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1

Preliminary remediation goals for use at the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office  

SciTech Connect

This report presents Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs) for use in human health risk assessment efforts under the United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office Environmental Restoration (ER) Division. Chemical-specific PRGs are concentration goals for individual chemicals for specific medium and land use combinations. The PRGs are referred to as risk-based because they have been calculated using risk assessment procedures. Risk-based calculations set concentration limits using both carcinogenic or noncarcinogenic toxicity values under specific exposure pathways. The PRG is a concentration that is derived from a specified excess cancer risk level or hazard quotient. This report provides the ER Division with standardized PRGs which are integral to the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study process. By managing the assumptions and systems used in PRG derivation, the Environmental Restoration Risk Assessment Program will be able to control the level of quality assurance associated with these risk-based guideline values.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Preliminary remediation goals for use at the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This technical memorandum presents Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs) for use in human health risk assessment efforts under the United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office Environmental Restoration (ER) Division. This document provides the ER Division with standardized PRGs which are integral to the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study process. They are used during project scooping (Data Quality Objectives development), in screening level risk assessments to support early action or No Further Investigation decisions, and in the baselines risk assessment where they are employed in the selection of chemicals of potential concern. The primary objective of this document is to standardize these values and eliminate any duplication of effort by providing PRGs to all contractors involved in risk activities. In addition, by managing the assumptions and systems used in PRG derivation, the ER Risk Assessment Program will be able to control the level of quality assurance associated with these risk-based guideline values.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Remediation  

SciTech Connect

The three most frequently used remediation technologies are discussed: (1) NAPL removal, (2) Pump-and-Treat, (3) Soil Vapor Extraction.

Oostrom, Mart; Falta, Ron W.; Mayer, Alex S.; Javandel, I.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

4

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B, B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals) Interim United States Office of Research and EPA/540/R-92/003 Environmental Protection Development December 1991 Agency Washington, DC 20460 EPA/540/R-92/003 Publication 9285.7-01 B December 1991 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Printed on Recycled Paper N O T I C E The policies set out in this document are intended solely as guidance; they are not final U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) actions. These policies are not intended, nor can they be relied upon, to create any rights enforceable by any party in litigation with the United States. EPA officials may

5

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs) for Radionuclides User's Guide Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs) for Radionuclides User's Guide Note The RAIS presents this updated PRG calculator in response to the following: incorporating chemical-specific parameters from the lastest EPI release, addition of air as a media, and conversion to a new database structure. The previous RAIS PRG calculator presented PRGs for radionuclides and chemcials together. Recent development of chemical and radionuclide exposure equations has necessitated that the RAIS separate the chemicals and the radionuclides. To calculate PRGs for chemicals, use the RAIS Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs) for Chemicals calculator. Currently the agricultural equations for the RAIS chemical and radionuclide PRG calculators are identical. The EPA's Preliminary Remediation Goals for

6

Developing health-based pre-planning clearance goals for airport remediation following chemical terrorist attack: Introduction and key assessment considerations  

SciTech Connect

In the event of a chemical terrorist attack on a transportation hub, post-event remediation and restoration activities necessary to attain unrestricted facility re-use and re-entry could require hours to multiple days. While restoration timeframes are dependent on numerous variables, a primary controlling factor is the level of pre-planning and decision-making completed prior to chemical terrorist release. What follows is the first of a two-part analysis identifying key considerations, critical information, and decision criteria to facilitate post-attack and post-decontamination consequence management activities. A conceptual site model and human health-based exposure guidelines are developed and reported as an aid to site-specific pre-planning in the current absence of U.S. state or Federal values designated as compound-specific remediation or re-entry concentrations, and to safely expedite facility recovery to full operational status. Chemicals of concern include chemical warfare nerve and vesicant agents and the toxic industrial compounds phosgene, hydrogen cyanide, and cyanogen chloride. This work has been performed as a national case study conducted in partnership with the Los Angeles International Airport and The Bradley International Terminal. All recommended guidelines have been selected for consistency with airport scenario release parameters of a one-time, short-duration, finite airborne release from a single source followed by compound-specific decontamination.

Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Raber, Ellen [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Dolislager, Frederick [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine; Hall, Dr. Linda [ENVIRON International Corporation; Love, Dr. Adam [Johnson Wright, Inc.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Developing health-based pre-planning clearance goals for airport remediation following a chemical terrorist attack: Decision criteria for multipathway exposure routes  

SciTech Connect

In the event of a chemical terrorist attack on a transportation hub, post-event remediation and restoration activities necessary to attain unrestricted facility re-use and re-entry could require hours to multiple days. While timeframes are dependent on numerous variables, a primary controlling factor is the level of pre-planning and decision-making completed prior to chemical release. What follows is the second of a two-part analysis identifying key considerations, critical information and decision criteria to facilitate post-attack and post-decontamination consequence management activities. Decision criteria analysis presented here provides first-time, open-literature documentation of multi-pathway, health-based remediation exposure guidelines for selected toxic industrial compounds, chemical warfare agents, and agent degradation products for pre-planning application in anticipation of a chemical terrorist attack. Guideline values are provided for inhalation and direct ocular vapor exposure routes as well as percutaneous vapor, surface contact, and ingestion. Target populations include various employees as well as transit passengers. This work has been performed as a national case study conducted in partnership with the Los Angeles International Airport and The Bradley International Terminal. All recommended guidelines have been selected for consistency with airport scenario release parameters of a one-time, short-duration, finite airborne release from a single source followed by compound-specific decontamination.

Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Dolislager, Frederick [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hall, Dr. Linda [ENVIRON International Corporation; Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine; Raber, Ellen [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Love, Dr. Adam [Johnson Wright, Inc.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Sustainability Goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goals Sustainability Goals We support and encourage energy conservation and environmental sustainability. Energy Conservation Efficient Water Use & Management High Performance...

9

CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

A systematic approach to closure planning is being implemented at the Hanford Site's Central Plateau to help achieve the goal of closure by the year 2035. The overall objective of Central Plateau remediation is to protect human health and the environment from the significant quantity of contaminated material that resulted from decades of plutonium production in support of the nation's defense. This goal will be achieved either by removing contaminants or placing the residual contaminated materials in a secure configuration that minimizes further migration to the groundwater and reduces the potential for inadvertent intrusion into contaminated sites. The approach to Central Plateau cleanup used three key concepts--closure zones, closure elements, and closure process steps--to create an organized picture of actions required to complete remediation. These actions were merged with logic ties, constraints, and required resources to produce an integrated time-phased schedule and cost profile for Central Plateau closure. Programmatic risks associated with implementation of Central Plateau closure were identified and analyzed. Actions to mitigate the most significant risks are underway while high priority remediation projects continue to make progress.

ROMINE, L.D.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III  

SciTech Connect

The remedial design/remedial action for Operable Unit 6-05 (Waste Area Group 6) and Operable Unit 10-04 (Waste Area Group 10) - collectively called Operable Unit 10-04 has been divided into four phases. Phase I consists of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operable Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase III will remediate lead contamination at a gun range, and Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance. This Phase III remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility (STF)-02 Gun Range located at the Idaho National Laboratory. Remediation of the STF-02 Gun Range will include excavating contaminated soils; physically separating copper and lead for recycling; returning separated soils below the remediation goal to the site; stabilizing contaminated soils, as required, and disposing of the separated soils that exceed the remediation goal; encapsulating and disposing of creosote-contaminated railroad ties and power poles; removing and disposing of the wooden building and asphalt pads found at the STF-02 Gun Range; sampling and analyzing soil to determine the excavation requirements; and when the remediation goals have been met, backfilling and contouring excavated areas and revegetating the affected area.

R. P. Wells

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

11

Remediation Experiences in Finland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter discusses remediation practices for addressing gasoline-impacted soil and ground water at several hundred Neste Marketing Limited (Neste ... in Finland. The first systematic investigation and remediation

Martti R. Suominen; Nancy E. Milkey P.G.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Pinellas Remediation Agreement Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pinellas Pinellas Agreement Name Remediation Agreement for the Four and One-Half Acre Site in Largo, Pinellas County, Florida State Florida Agreement Type Remediation Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA/ Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended/ Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act Scope Summary Remediation of property adjacent to the former Pinellas Plant Parties DOE; Florida Department of Environmental Protection Date 3/12/2001 SCOPE * Remediate the groundwater under a parcel of property adjacent to DOE's former Pinellas Plant to levels consistent with industrial use. * Complete remedial actions at the site in accordance with a Remedial Action Plan prepared by DOE and approved by FDEP. * Submit quarterly reports of interim remedial actions at the Site.

13

Gamma Ray Imaging for Environmental Remediation  

SciTech Connect

This program is the development of germanium strip detectors for environmental remediation. It is a collaboration between the Naval Research Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. The goal is to develop detectors that are simultaneously capable of excellent spectroscopy and imaging of gamma radiation.

B.F. Philips; R.A. Kroeger: J.D. Kurfess: W.N. Johnson; E.A. Wulf; E. I. Novikova

2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

14

A Hydraulic Capture Application for Optimal Remediation Design K. R. Fowlera  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. INTRODUCTION Hydraulic capture methods for remediation attempt to control the direction of ground- water1 A Hydraulic Capture Application for Optimal Remediation Design K. R. Fowlera , C. T. Kelley b , C Carolina Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7400, USA The goal of a hydraulic capture model for remediation purposes

15

Overview of Green and Sustainable Remediation for Soil and Groundwater Remediation - 12545  

SciTech Connect

Making remediation efforts more 'sustainable' or 'green' is a topic of great interest in the remediation community. It has been spurred on by Executive Orders from the White House, as well as Department of Energy (DOE) sustainability plans. In private industry, it is motivated by corporate sustainability goals and corporate social responsibility. It has spawned new organizations, areas of discussion, tools and practices, and guidance documents around sustainable remediation or green remediation. Green remediation can be thought of as a subset of sustainable remediation and is mostly focused on reducing the environmental footprint of cleanup efforts. Sustainable remediation includes both social and economic considerations, in addition to environmental. Application of both green and sustainable remediation (GSR) may involve two primary activities. The first is to develop technologies and alternatives that are greener or more sustainable. This can also include making existing remediation approaches greener or more sustainable. The second is to include GSR criteria in the evaluation of remediation alternatives and strategies. In other words, to include these GSR criteria in the evaluation of alternatives in a feasibility study. In some cases, regulatory frameworks allow the flexibility to include GSR criteria into the evaluation process (e.g., state cleanup programs). In other cases, regulations allow less flexibility to include the evaluation of GSR criteria (e.g., Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)). New regulatory guidance and tools will be required to include these criteria in typical feasibility studies. GSR provides a number of challenges for remediation professionals performing soil and groundwater remediation projects. Probably the most significant is just trying to stay on top of the ever changing landscape of products, tools, and guidance documents coming out of various groups, the US EPA, and states. However, this process also provides new opportunities to think differently and look at the bigger picture of the overall benefit we are providing with our remediation projects. The opportunities from the move towards GSR are very real. They will help us make remedial actions truly more beneficial to the environment and to society. They will also allow (or force) remediation practitioners to think outside of the usual realm of approaches to find newer and more beneficial technologies. (authors)

Simpkin, Thomas J. [CH2M HILL, Denver, Colorado (United States); Favara, Paul [CH2M HILL, Gainesville, Florida (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Groundwater Remediation and Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of the author’s vantage point, this chapter is necessarily based on experience in ground-water remediation in the United States. Much of that...

Peter Shanahan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

A Framework for Sustainable Remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

However, after more than 30 years of experience with remediation projects, it is now clear that remedial actions are frequently energy intensive, may produce their own pollutant emissions, and may disturb and cause controversy in neighboring communities. ... Regulators, industry, and communities recognize that sustainability principles must be integrated into remediation activities, and various sustainable remediation guidance documents have been developed. ...

Karin S. Holland

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

18

Attenuation Based Remedies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The mission of the Attenuation Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative is to seek holistic solutions to DOE’s groundwater contamination problems that consider not only...

19

Y-12 Plant remedial action Technology Logic Diagram: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part A, Remedial action  

SciTech Connect

The Y-12 Plant Remedial Action Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) problems at the Y-12 Plant to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to remedial action (RA) activities. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets. This report is Part A of Volume 3 and contains the Remedial Action section.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

TRANSFORMATIONAL GOALS FOR THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSFORMATIONAL GOALS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY PROGRESS REPORT FALL 2014 #12;CONTENTS EXECUTIVE Transformational Goals progress report Fall 2014 #12;Transformational Goals Progress Report | FALL 20142 In 2010 Island Build a community at URI that values and embraces equity and diversity #12;Transformational Goals

Rhode Island, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation goals prgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Sustainable Soil Remediation:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...wastes and creating new markets for the end products...study of the treatment of diesel-contaminated soil indicated...size and location of markets relative to waste production...remediation scenario for a diesel-contaminated site using...catabolic activity in diesel contaminated soil following...

David L. Jones; John R. Healey

22

Sustainable Soil Remediation:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...recognised since the birth of agriculture, the landspreading of industrial...full life cycle assessment (LCA). For example, blending high-nutrient-content...cradle-to-grave) of an LCA can also lead to misleading...remediation option is best. In LCA, impacts are classified as...

David L. Jones; John R. Healey

23

Remedial Action Performed  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

General Motors Site in General Motors Site in Adrian, Michigan Department of Energy OiZce of Assistant Manager for Environmental Management Oak Ridge Operations January 2001 69 Printed on recycledhcydable paper. CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE GENERAL MOTORS SITE ADRIAN, MICHIGAN JANUARY 200 1 Prepared for United States Army Corps of Engineers Under Contract No. DACW45-98-D-0028 BY Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 CONTENTS FIGURES .............................................................................................................................................. TABLES ...............................................................................................................................................

24

TRANSFORMATIONAL GOALS FOR THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSFORMATIONAL GOALS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY The presidenT's 21sT cenTury fund for excellence #12;TRANSFORMATIONAL GOALS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY 1 THE UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND The University of Rhode Island and transform our approaches to teaching, research, and service so that we can prepare students for a rapidly

Rhode Island, University of

25

CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY  

SciTech Connect

THE CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY WAS CONDUCTED TO DEVELOP AN OPTIMAL SEQUENCE OF REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTING THE CERCLA DECISION ON THE CENTRAL PLATEAU. THE STUDY DEFINES A SEQUENCE OF ACTIVITIES THAT RESULT IN AN EFFECTIVE USE OF RESOURCES FROM A STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVE WHEN CONSIDERING EQUIPMENT PROCUREMENT AND STAGING, WORKFORCE MOBILIZATION/DEMOBILIZATION, WORKFORCE LEVELING, WORKFORCE SKILL-MIX, AND OTHER REMEDIATION/DISPOSITION PROJECT EXECUTION PARAMETERS.

BERGMAN TB; STEFANSKI LD; SEELEY PN; ZINSLI LC; CUSACK LJ

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

26

Goals and Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Sustainability Performance Office (SPO) is committed to meeting the goals of Executive Order (E.O.) 13514, E.O. 13423, and related statutory requirements through the Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan (SSPP).

27

Remedial Action Performed  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Baker and Williams Baker and Williams Warehouses Site in New York, New York, 7997 - 7993 Department of Energy Former Sites Restoration Division Oak Ridge Operations Office November 7 995 CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE BAKER AND WILLIAMS WAREHOUSES SITE IN NEW YORK, NEW YORK, 1991-1993 NOVEMBER 1995 Prepared for United States Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office Under Contract No. DE-AC05-910R21949 BY Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 __ CONTENTS .- ~_- _- ..- ^_ FIGURES . ...,.,.....,,........,,.,_.....,.,.,.__,....,,,,, v TABLES ,.,__...,,....,..._._..,,,,_._...,.,.,,.,,,..._,,,, vi ACRONYMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..v~

28

Remedial Action Performed  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' at the C. H. Schnoor Site, Springdale, Pennsylvania, in 1 994 Department of Energy Former Sites Restoration Division Oak Ridge Operations Office November 1996 CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE C. H. SCHNOOR SITE SPRINGDALE, PENNSYLVANIA, IN 1994 NOVEMBER 1996 prep&ed for United States Department of ~nergy Oak Ridge Operations Off= r Under Contract No. DE-AC05-910R21949 Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. '14501 CONTENTS FIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v ACRONYMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi UNITS OF MEASURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii

29

Remedial Action Performed  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Alba Craft Laboratory and Alba Craft Laboratory and Vicinity Properties Site in Oxford, Ohio C Department of Energy Former Sites Restoration Division Oak Ridge Operations Office January 1997 $$@T Op% 3 @!B . i~d!l Ab Printed on recycled/recyclable paper. CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE FORMER ALBA CRAFT LABORATORY AND VICINITY PROPERTIES SITE IN OXFORD, OHIO JANUARY 1997 Prepared for United States Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office Under Contract No. DE-AC0591 OR2 1949 Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 CONTENTS Page FIGURES .............................................................................................................................................. v TABLES.. .............................................................................................................................................. vi

30

Remedial Action Performed  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Aliquippa Forge Site Aliquippa Forge Site in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania Department of Energy Former Sites Restoration Division Oak Ridge Operations Office November 1996 CERTIFICATION DOCKE.~ FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE ALIQUIPPA FORGE SITE IN ALIQUIPPA, PENNSYLVANIA NOVEMBER 1996 Prepared for . UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Oak Ridge Operations Office Under Contract No. DE-AC05-9 1 OR2 1949 Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 CONTENTS Page FIGURES v . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TABLES vii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ACRONYMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii UNITSOFMEASURE ix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . INTRODUCTION xi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

31

Advanced Remediation Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the cleanup of nation's nuclear weapons program legacy wastes, along with waste associated with nuclear energy programs and research. The EM cleanup efforts continue to progress, however the cleanup continues to be technologically complex, heavily regulated, long-term; and the effort also has a high life cycle cost estimate (LCCE) effort. Over the past few years, the EM program has undergone several changes to accelerate its cleanup efforts with varying degrees of success. This article will provide some insight into the Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) projects that may enhance cleanup efforts and reduce life cycle costs. (authors)

Krahn, St.; Miller, C.E. [The United States Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Washington, D.C. (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Saxton soil remediation project  

SciTech Connect

The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Facility (SNEF) consists of a 23-MW(thermal) pressurized light water thermal reactor located in south central Pennsylvania. The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Corporation (SNEC), a wholly owned subsidiary of the General Public Utilities (GPU) Corporation, is the licensee for the SNEF. Maintenance and decommissioning activities at the site are conducted by GPU Nuclear, also a GPU subsidiary and operator of the Three Mile Island and Oyster Creek nuclear facilities. The remediation and radioactive waste management of contaminated soils is described.

Holmes, R.D. [GPU Nuclear Corporation, Middletown, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

Surfactants and subsurface remediation  

SciTech Connect

Because of the limitations of pump-and-treat technology, attention is now focused on the feasibility of surfactant use to increase its efficiency. Surfactants have been studied for use in soil washing and enhanced oil recovery. Although similarities exist between the applications, there are significant differences in the objectives of the technologies and the limitations placed on surfactant use. In this article we review environmental studies concerned with the fate and transport of surface-active compounds in the subsurface environment and discuss key issues related to their successful use for in situ aquifer remediation, particularly with respect to nonaqueous-phase liquids.

West, C.C.; Harwell, J.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

FOAM: NOVEL DELIVERY TECHNOLOGY FOR REMEDIATION OF VADOSE ZONE ENVIRONMENTS  

SciTech Connect

Deep vadose zone environments can be a primary source and pathway for contaminant migration to groundwater. These environments present unique characterization and remediation challenges that necessitate scrutiny and research. The thickness, depth, and intricacies of the deep vadose zone, combined with a lack of understanding of the key subsurface processes (e.g., biogeochemical and hydrologic) affecting contaminant migration, make it difficult to create validated conceptual and predictive models of subsurface flow dynamics and contaminant behavior across multiple scales. These factors also make it difficult to design and deploy sustainable remedial approaches and monitor long-term contaminant behavior after remedial actions. Functionally, the methods for addressing contamination must remove and/or reduce transport of contaminants. This problem is particularly challenging in the arid western United States where the vadose zone is hundreds of feet thick, rendering transitional excavation methods exceedingly costly and ineffective. Delivery of remedial amendments is one of the most challenging and critical aspects for all remedy-based approaches. The conventional approach for delivery is through injection of aqueous remedial solutions. However, heterogeneous deep vadose zone environments present hydrologic and geochemical challenges which limit the effectiveness. Because the flow of solution infiltration is dominantly controlled by gravity and suction, injected liquid preferentially percolates through highly permeable pathways, by-passing low-permeability zones which frequently contain the majority of contamination. Moreover, the wetting front can readily mobilize and enhance contaminant transport to the underlying aquifer prior to stabilization. Development of innovative, in-situ technologies may be the only way to meet remedial action objectives and long-term stewardship goals. Surfactants can be used to lower the liquid surface tension and create stabile foams, which readily penetrate low permeability zones. Although surfactant foams have been utilized for subsurface mobilization efforts in the oil and gas industry, so far, the concept of using foams as a delivery mechanism for transporting remedial amendments into deep vadose zone environments to stabilize metal and long-lived radionuclide contaminants has not been explored. Foam flow can be directed by pressure gradients, rather than being dominated by gravity; and, foam delivery mechanisms limit the volume of water (< 5% vol.) required for remedy delivery and emplacement, thus mitigating contaminant mobilization. We will present the results of a numerical modeling and integrated laboratory- / intermediate-scale investigation to simulate, develop, demonstrate, and monitor (i.e. advanced geophysical techniques and advanced predictive biomarkers) foam-based delivery of remedial amendments to remediate metals and radionuclides in vadose zone environments.

Jansik, Danielle P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Zhong, Lirong; Wu, Yuxin; Foote, Martin; Zhang, Z. F.; Hubbard, Susan

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

35

BUILDING 96 RECOMMENDATION FOR SOURCE AREA REMEDIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the 1999 Operable Unit (OU) III Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study(RI/FS) and was designated as AreaOU III BUILDING 96 RECOMMENDATION FOR SOURCE AREA REMEDIATION FINAL Prepared by: Brookhaven REMEDIATION Executive Summary

36

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediation - July 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July 2010 July 2010 Savannah River Operations Office Integrated Safety Management System Phase II...

37

Page 1 of 8 I. Introduction: Why perform RSEs? There are several reasons to be excited about the Remediation System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

checklist and the various subsurface performance evaluation checklists (e.g., ground water extraction, air about the Remediation System Evaluation (RSE) initiative. This is a small effort, in cost and time of the protectiveness and performance of the remedy; D. Verifying that there are clear goals and realistic closure

US Army Corps of Engineers

38

Remedial design work plan for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Remedial Design Work Plan (RDWP) for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) Operable Unit (OU) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This remedial action fits into the overall Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) cleanup strategy by addressing contaminated floodplain soil. The objective of this remedial action is to minimize the risk to human health and the environment from contaminated soil in the Lower EFPC floodplain pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (1992). In accordance with the FFA, a remedial investigation (RI) (DOE 1994a) and a feasibility study (DOE 1994b) were conducted to assess contamination of the Lower EFPC and propose remediation alternatives. The remedial investigation determined that the principal contaminant is mercury, which originated from releases during Y-12 Plant operations, primarily between 1953 and 1963. The recommended alternative by the feasibility study was to excavate and dispose of floodplain soils contaminated with mercury above the remedial goal option. Following the remedial investigation/feasibility study, and also in accordance with the FFA, a proposed plan was prepared to more fully describe the proposed remedy.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Radioactive Tank Waste Remediation Focus Area. Technology summary  

SciTech Connect

In February 1991, DOE`s Office of Technology Development created the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID), to develop technologies for tank remediation. Tank remediation across the DOE Complex has been driven by Federal Facility Compliance Agreements with individual sites. In 1994, the DOE Office of Environmental Management created the High Level Waste Tank Remediation Focus Area (TFA; of which UST-ID is now a part) to better integrate and coordinate tank waste remediation technology development efforts. The mission of both organizations is the same: to focus the development, testing, and evaluation of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in USTs at DOE facilities. The ultimate goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. The TFA has focused on four DOE locations: the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho, the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA UMore Park Remedial Investigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA UMore Park Remedial Investigation Frequently Asked Questions What is a remedial investigation? A remedial investigation is a technical assessment that characterizes the soil. A remedial investigation includes the analysis of soil and water samples as well as evaluating existing data

Netoff, Theoden

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation goals prgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ICDF Complex Remedial Action Report  

SciTech Connect

This Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Remedial Action Report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Section 6.2 of the INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan. The agency prefinal inspection of the ICDF Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF) was completed in June of 2005. Accordingly, this report has been developed to describe the construction activities completed at the ICDF along with a description of any modifications to the design originally approved for the facility. In addition, this report provides a summary of the major documents prepared for the design and construction of the ICDF, a discussion of relevant requirements and remedial action objectives, the total costs associated with the development and operation of the facility to date, and identification of necessary changes to the Agency-approved INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan and the ICDF Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan.

W. M. Heileson

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

42

Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System Remedial Action Report  

SciTech Connect

This Remedial Action Report summarizes activities undertaken to remediate the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The site addressed in this report was defined in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision and subsequent implementing documents. This report concludes that remediation requirements and cleanup goals established for the site have been accomplished and is hereafter considered a No Further Action site.

Lee Davison

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

43

Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System Remedial Action Request  

SciTech Connect

This Remedial Action Report summarizes activities undertaken to remediate the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The site addressed in this report was defined in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision and subsequent implementing documents. This report concludes that remediation requirements and cleanup goals established for the site have been accomplished and is hereafter considered a No Further Action site.

L. Davison

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

44

Remediation of old environmental liabilities in the Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (NRI) is a leading institution in all areas of nuclear R and D in the Czech Republic. The NRI's activity encompasses nuclear physics, chemistry, nuclear power, experiments at research nuclear reactors and many other topics. The NRI operates two research nuclear reactors, many facilities as a hot cell facility, research laboratories, technology for radioactive waste (RAW) management, radionuclide irradiators, an electron accelerator, etc. After 50 years of activities in the nuclear field, there are some environmental liabilities that shall be remedied in the NRI. There are three areas of remediation: (1) decommissioning of old obsolete facilities (e.g. decay tanks, RAW treatment technology, special sewage system), (2) treatment of RAW from operation and dismantling of nuclear facilities, and (3) elimination of spent fuel from research nuclear reactors operated by the NRI. The goal is to remedy the environmental liabilities and eliminate the potential negative impact on the environment. Based on this postulate, optimal remedial actions have been selected and recommended for the environmental remediation. Remediation of the environmental liabilities started in 2003 and will be finished in 2012. Some liabilities have already been successfully remedied. The most significant items of environmental liabilities are described in the paper together with information about the history, the current state, the progress, and the future activities in the field of remediation of environmental liabilities in the NRI. (authors)

Podlaha, J. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Strategic Safety Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fatalities Fatalities Radiological exposures > 2 rem Radiological releases above regulatory limits Chemical/hazardous material releases above regulatory limits Infrastructure Losses > $5 million Total 2 4 1 3 1 1 (Vehicle) 1 3 1 0 0 1 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 (Yr to Date) Total 1 1 0 1 1* 0 Total 1 0 0 0 0 0 Total 2 3 2 0 2 0 Total 0 0 0 0 1 0 Safety Performance for 2 nd Quarter 2012 Strategic Safety Goals: Events DOE Strives to Avoid 1 * In 2012, to date, there has been a single fatality involving a motor vehicle accident outside the boundary of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) when a dump trailer and a General Services Administration (GSA) pickup driven by a WIPP employee collided. * Two occurrences have been added to the 2011 calendar year total for chemical and hazardous material releases above regulatory

46

SAFARI 2000 Goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Objectives Research Objectives The goal of SAFARI 2000 is to understand the key linkages between the physical, chemical and biological processes, including human activities, that comprise the southern African biogeophysical system. More specifically, SAFARI 2000 aims to: characterize, quantify and understand the processes driving biogenic, pyrogenic and anthropogenic emissions in southern Africa; combine atmospheric transport and chemistry models with ground-based, airborne, and satellite-based observations to validate and extend our understanding of the transport and transformations of these emissions; identify where, when and how the emissions are deposited, and determine their impacts, and, lay the foundation for monitoring longer-term climatic, hydrological, and ecosystem consequences of these biogeochemical and physical processes.

47

EM Rolls Ahead of DOE Goals to Trim Vehicle Fleet Inventory | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rolls Ahead of DOE Goals to Trim Vehicle Fleet Inventory Rolls Ahead of DOE Goals to Trim Vehicle Fleet Inventory EM Rolls Ahead of DOE Goals to Trim Vehicle Fleet Inventory March 12, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers use this mobile survey vehicle in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act work at the Hanford site to survey remediated areas for radiological contamination. Workers use this mobile survey vehicle in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act work at the Hanford site to survey remediated areas for radiological contamination. WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM exceeded a DOE goal to reduce its vehicle fleet inventory, advancing the Department's broader initiative to cut greenhouse gas emissions and decrease petroleum consumption across the complex. With a 45 percent cut to its fleet in fiscal year 2012, EM beat the Department's goal of a 35 percent drop by fiscal year 2013 a year early.

48

Surfactants for ground water remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ground water contamination is a most intractable form of pollution. Spilled solvent or fuel liquids are trapped below the water table by colloidal forces. Surfactants may be used to dramatically improve contaminated aquifer remediation rates. Principal remediation mechanisms include micellar solubilization and mobilization of the trapped liquids by lowering of the oil/water interfacial tension. Surfactant selection is a key to the successful design of a remediation effort, and involves consideration of factors including Krafft Point, surfactant adsorption onto the aquifer solids, and the phase behavior of the oil/water/surfactant system. Successful field demonstrations have occurred in recent months and the technology is moving rapidly toward commercialization. Critical research issues remain including acceptable clean-up levels, surfactant/contaminant in situ biodegradation rates, and surfactant decontamination and reuse.

Jeffrey H. Harwell; David A. Sabatini; R.C. Knox

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Managing Complex Environmental Remediation amidst Aggressive Facility Revitalization Milestones  

SciTech Connect

Unlike the final closure projects at Rocky Flats and Fernald, many of the Department of Energy's future CERCLA and RCRA closure challenges will take place at active facilities, such as the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) central campus. ORNL has aggressive growth plans for a Research Technology Park and cleanup must address and integrate D and D, soil and groundwater remediation, and on-going and future business plans for the Park. Different planning and tracking tools are needed to support closures at active facilities. To support some large Airport redevelopment efforts, we created tools that allowed the Airline lease-holder to perform environmental remediation on the same schedule as building D and D and new building construction, which in turn allowed them to migrate real estate from unusable to usable within an aggressive schedule. In summary: The FIM and OpenGate{sup TM} spatial analysis system were two primary tools developed to support simultaneous environmental remediation, D and D, and construction efforts at an operating facility. These tools helped redevelopers to deal with environmental remediation on the same schedule as building D and D and construction, thereby meeting their goals of opening gates, restarting their revenue streams, at the same time complying with all environmental regulations. (authors)

Richter Pack, S. [PMP Science Applications International Corporation, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Streamline simulation of Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLS) are a recognized source of groundwater contamination. Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation (SEAR) shows promise in increasing the efficiency and effectiveness over traditional "pump and treat" NAPL remediation...

Tunison, Douglas Irvin

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Use of Risk Analysis on Remedial Alternatives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quantitative risk assessment (RA) is a tool used in determining a remedial alternative’s effectiveness of reducing public health ... to occur at a site. Under the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) ...

Teresa A. Schuller; Denice H. Wardrop…

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Assessment of Remedial Actions for Contaminated Sites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the investigation in the field of remedial actions on contaminated land, an appropriate concept ... site, an evaluation of the existing alternative remedial techniques is necessary. The comparative evaluat...

Th. Neteler; H. L. Jessberger

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Toxic Remediation System And Method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

Matthews, Stephen M. (Alameda County, CA); Schonberg, Russell G. (Santa Clara County, CA); Fadness, David R. (Santa Clara County, CA)

1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

54

Strategic Safety Goals | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategic Safety Goals Strategic Safety Goals July 19, 2012 Strategic Safety Goals, Safety Performance for 2nd Quarter 2012 - Events DOE Strives to Avoid Strategic Safety Goals...

55

Residential radon remediation: performance over 17 years  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......covering about 1000 m2. Water drains into the basin...sub-slab ventilation remediation system installed, i...sub-slab ventilation remediation (Bq mSE). Measured...concentration with height above ground level. For example...had a sub-slab radon remediation system installed that......

Naomi H. Harley; Passaporn Chittaporn; Anthony Marsicano

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Bargaining over Remedies in Merger Bruce Lyons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the internationally standard 2-phase investigation structure and remedy negotiations of the form practiced by the EC jurisdictions, remedies can be agreed in either phase of investigation. In particular, both the EU and US merger regulations allow remedies to be agreed in either phase of the investigation. Either de jure (as in the EU

Feigon, Brooke

57

Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint The Hanford Site is looking greener these days after American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers revegetated 166 acres across 12 waste sites, planting over 1,100 pounds of seeds and about 280,000 pounds of mulch. The largest of the sites, known as the BC Control Area, is an approximately 13-square-mile area associated with a waste disposal system used during Hanford operations. Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint More Documents & Publications 2011 ARRA Newsletters Workers at Hanford Site Achieve Recovery Act Legacy Cleanup Goals Ahead of

58

NONAQUEOUS-PHASE LIQUID CHARACTERIZATION AND POST-REMEDIATION VERIFICATION SAMPLING  

SciTech Connect

Light and dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) were identified in the surficial aquifer at the Northeast Site of the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center located in Largo, Florida. The composition and the horizontal and vertical extent of NAPLs were determined using historical site information, analysis of ground water and soil boring data, and analysis of free product recovered from wells. Trichloroethene, dichloroethene, methylene chloride, toluene, and oils were identified as NAPLs. Calculations were conducted to determine NAPL remediation goals for both soil and ground water. Following completion of in situ thermal remediation activities at a 9,900-cubic-meter NAPL contamination area, a sampling program was implemented to verify the success of the remediation. The program consisted of using hot media sampling techniques to collect soil and ground water samples at randomly chosen locations in three sampling events during a 6- month period. Verification data indicate that the remediation was successful.

Tabor, Charles [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Juhlin, Randall [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Darr, Paul [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Caballero, Julian [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Daniel, Joseph [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Ingle, David [S.M. Stoller Corporation; none,

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification (January 1986) Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification (January 1986) More Documents & Publications Supplement No. 1 to the FUSRAP Summary Protocol - Designation/Elimination Protocol Pre-MARSSIM Surveys in a MARSSIM World: Demonstrating How Pre-MARSSIM Radiological Data Demonstrate Protectiveness at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Sites U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at

60

Soil & Groundwater Remediation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Soil & Groundwater Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil remediation effort in the world. The inventory at the DOE sites includes 6.5 trillion liters of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to about four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of soil and debris contaminated with radionuclides, metals, and organics. The Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation is working with DOE site managers around the country regarding specific technical issues. At the large sites such as Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge, the Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation has conducted research and demonstration projects to test new technologies and remediation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation goals prgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

UCSD Stroke Fellowship Goals and Objectives GOALS AND OBJECTIVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UCSD Stroke Fellowship Goals and Objectives GOALS AND OBJECTIVES During the one-year training of clinical situation related to stroke. The overall objective for our Vascular Neurology fellowship training and prevention. 2. Management of critically-ill cerebrovascular patients, such as those with ischemic stroke

62

Site Remediation in a Virtual Environment Information and Computing Sciences Division  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of scientific judgement and intuition. In environmental remediation, the goal is to clean up contaminants either to mobilize and extract hydrocarbon contaminants from a volume of saturated soil/rock. Several wells are drilled in the vicinity of the contaminant, water and/or chemicals are injected into some of the wells

63

Goals:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CUG 2009 Proceedings 1 of 8 CUG 2009 Proceedings 1 of 8 User and Performance Impacts from Franklin Upgrades Yun (Helen) He National Energy Research Supercomputing Center Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 ABSTRACT: The NERSC flagship computer Cray XT4 system "Franklin" has gone through three major upgrades: quad core upgrade, CLE 2.1 upgrade, and IO upgrade, during the past year. In this paper, we will discuss the various aspects of the user impacts such as user access, user environment, and user issues etc from these upgrades. The performance impacts on the kernel benchmarks and selected application benchmarks will also be presented. KEYWORDS: Cray XT4, Franklin, NERSC, Quad Core, CLE 2.1, Application Performance, IO Performance, User Impacts.

64

Facility Utilization and Risk Analysis for Remediation of Legacy Transuranic Waste at the Savannah River Site - 13572  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) completed the Accelerated TRU Project for remediating legacy waste at the Savannah River Site with significant cost and schedule efficiencies due to early identification of resources and utilization of risk matrices. Initial project planning included identification of existing facilities that could be modified to meet the technical requirements needed for repackaging and remediating the waste. The project schedule was then optimized by utilization of risk matrices that identified alternate strategies and parallel processing paths which drove the overall success of the project. Early completion of the Accelerated TRU Project allowed SRNS to pursue stretch goals associated with remediating very difficult TRU waste such as concrete casks from the hot cells in the Savannah River National Laboratory. Project planning for stretch goals also utilized existing facilities and the risk matrices. The Accelerated TRU project and stretch goals were funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). (authors)

Gilles, Michael L.; Gilmour, John C. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

X-701B Groundwater Remedy Portsmouth Ohio  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

X-701B Groundwater Remediation X-701B Groundwater Remediation ETR Report Date: December 2008 ETR-20 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the X-701B Groundwater Remedy, Portsmouth, Ohio Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) has responsibility for remediation of the X-701B ground water plume with the key contaminant of trichloroethene (TCE). The remedy has been divided into four phases: Phase I- Initial Source Area Treatment, Phase II-Expanded Source Area Treatment, Phase III-Evaluation and Reporting, and Phase IV- Downgradient Remediation and Confirmation of Source Area Treatment. Phase II treatment has injected

66

DOE Selects CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation Contract at its Hanford Site DOE Selects CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation Contract at its Hanford Site June 19, 2008 - 1:29pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company has been selected as the plateau remediation contractor for DOE's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The contract is a cost-plus award-fee contract valued at approximately $4.5 billion over ten years (a five-year base period with the option to extend it for another five years). CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company is a limited liability company formed by CH2M Hill Constructors, Inc. The team also includes AREVA Federal

67

Campus Sustainability Goals Energy & Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Campus Sustainability Goals Energy & Climate By 2014, reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 and water consumption and wastewater production; incorporate sustainable design principles into capital levels. Food & Dining By 2020, increase sustainable food purchases by campus foodservice providers

Jacobs, Lucia

68

Remedial Action Work Plan Amchitka Island Mud Pit Closures  

SciTech Connect

This remedial action work plan presents the project organization and construction procedures developed for the performance of the remedial actions at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE's) sites on Amchitka Island, Alaska. During the late1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (the predecessor agency to DOE) used Amchitka Island as a site for underground nuclear tests. A total of nine sites on the Island were considered for nuclear testing; however, tests were only conducted at three sites (i.e., Long Shot in 1965, Milrow in 1969, and Cannikin in 1971). In addition to these three sites, large diameter emplacement holes were drilled in two other locations (Sites D and F) and an exploratory hole was in a third location (Site E). It was estimated that approximately 195 acres were disturbed by drilling or preparation for drilling in conjunction with these activities. The disturbed areas include access roads, spoil-disposal areas, mud pits which have impacted the environment, and an underground storage tank at the hot mix plant which was used to support asphalt-paving operations on the island. The remedial action objective for Amchitka Island is to eliminate human and ecological exposure to contaminants by capping drilling mud pits, removing the tank contents, and closing the tank in place. The remedial actions will meet State of Alaska regulations, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge management goals, address stakeholder concerns, and address the cultural beliefs and practices of the native people. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office will conduct work on Amchitka Island under the authority of the Comprehensive Emergency Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Field activities are scheduled to take place May through September 2001. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent Closure Report.

DOE/NV

2001-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

69

Summary - Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and surface water Hg remediation strategy for adequacy in reducing Hg levels in the fish and to indentify opportunities to achieve cost and technical improvements andor to...

70

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Expanded Staff Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River Remediation Delivering the Mission Dave Olson President and Project Manager January 27, 2012 SRS Executive Management Community Discussion 2 * Liquid Waste Funding...

71

Recommendation 192: Comments on Remediation Effectiveness Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ORSSAB Recommendations and Comments on the Draft 2010 Remediation Effectiveness Report for the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation.

72

Remedy Evaluation Framework for Inorganic, Non-Volatile Contaminants in the Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect

Contaminants in the vadose zone may act as a potential long-term source of groundwater contamination and need to be considered in remedy evaluations. In many cases, remediation decisions for the vadose zone will need to be made all or in part based on projected impacts to groundwater. Because there are significant natural attenuation processes inherent in vadose zone contaminant transport, remediation in the vadose zone to protect groundwater is functionally a combination of natural attenuation and use of other remediation techniques, as needed, to mitigate contaminant flux to groundwater. Attenuation processes include both hydrobiogeochemical processes that serve to retain contaminants within porous media and physical processes that mitigate the rate of water flux. In particular, the physical processes controlling fluid flow in the vadose zone are quite different and generally have a more significant attenuation impact on contaminant transport relative to those within the groundwater system. A remedy evaluation framework is presented herein that uses an adaptation of the established EPA Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) evaluation approach and a conceptual model based approach focused on identifying and quantifying features and processes that control contaminant flux through the vadose zone. A key concept for this framework is to recognize that MNA will comprise some portion of all remedies in the vadose zone. Thus, structuring evaluation of vadose zone waste sites to use an MNA-based approach provides information necessary to either select MNA as the remedy, if appropriate, or to quantify how much additional attenuation would need to be induced by a remedial action (e.g., technologies considered in a feasibility study) to augment the natural attenuation processes and meet groundwater protection goals.

Truex, Michael J.; Carroll, Kenneth C.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Advanced Remedial Methods for Metals and Radionuclides in Vadose Zone Environments  

SciTech Connect

Functionally, the methods for addressing contamination must remove and/or reduce transport or toxicity of contaminants. This problem is particularly challenging in arid environments where the vadose zone can be up to hundreds of feet thick, rendering transitional excavation methods exceedingly costly and ineffective. Delivery of remedial amendments is one of the most challenging and critical aspects for all remedy-based approaches. The conventional approach for delivery is through injection of aqueous remedial solutions. However, heterogeneous vadose zone environments present hydrologic and geochemical challenges that limit the effectiveness. Because the flow of solution infiltration is dominantly controlled by gravity and suction, injected liquid preferentially percolates through highly permeable pathways, by-passing low-permeability zones which frequently contain the majority of the contamination. Moreover, the wetting front can readily mobilize and enhance contaminant transport to underlying aquifers prior to stabilization. Development of innovative, in-situ technologies may be the only way to meet remedial action objectives and long-term stewardship goals. Shear-thinning fluids (i.e., surfactants) can be used to lower the liquid surface tension and create stabile foams, which readily penetrate low permeability zones. Although surfactant foams have been utilized for subsurface mobilization efforts in the oil and gas industry, so far, the concept of using foams as a delivery mechanism for transporting reactive remedial amendments into deep vadose zone environments to stabilize metal and long-lived radionuclide contaminants has not been explored. Foam flow can be directed by pressure gradients, rather than being dominated by gravity; and, foam delivery mechanisms limit the volume of water (< 20% vol.) required for remedy delivery and emplacement, thus mitigating contaminant mobilization. We will present the results of a numerical modeling and integrated laboratory-/ intermediate-scale investigation to simulate, develop, demonstrate, and monitor (i.e. advanced geophysical techniques and advanced predictive biomarkers) foam-based delivery of remedial amendments to remediate metals and radionuclides in vadose zone environments.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Hubbard, Susan; Miracle, Ann L.; Zhong, Lirong; Foote, Martin; Wu, Yuxin; Jansik, Danielle P.

2010-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

74

Determine Institutional Change Sustainability Goals | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Determine Institutional Change Sustainability Goals Determine Institutional Change Sustainability Goals Institutional Change Continuous Improvement Cycle The first step in the...

75

Consideration of Reliability in System Design for Ground Water Remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A remedial action design system is described that may be used to evaluate candidate remediation systems and select the preferred alternative under conditions of uncertainty. The remedial action design method i...

W. Woldt; I. Bogardi; L. Duckstein

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Groundwater Remediation Strategy Using Global Optimization Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. DOI: 10.1061/ ASCE 0733-9496 2002 128:6 431 CE Database keywords: Ground water; Remedial action; Algorithms; Ground-water management. Introduction The contamination of groundwater is a widespread problemGroundwater Remediation Strategy Using Global Optimization Algorithms Shreedhar Maskey1 ; Andreja

Neumaier, Arnold

77

Remediation of the Maxey Flats Site  

SciTech Connect

This report describes issues associated with remedial action of Maxey Flats, a low-level radioactive waste disposal site from 1963-1977, located in Fleming County, Kentucky. Present remedial action alternatives being considered are discussed along with emergency plans, ground water monitoring plans, and budgets.

Not Available

1990-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

78

Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Idaho Department of Environmental Quality and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have released a planning document that specifies how DOE will continue to remediate a landfill containing hazardous and transuranic waste at DOE's Idaho Site located in eastern Idaho. The Phase 1 Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Unit 7-13/14 document was issued after the September 2008 Record of Decision (ROD) and implements the retrieval of targeted waste at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The SDA began receiving waste in 1952 and contains radioactive and chemical waste in approximately 35 acres of disposal pits, trenches and soil vaults.

79

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research...

80

Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation Full Document...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation goals prgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Groundwater remediation technologies for trichloroethylene and technetium-99.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??M. Eng. The Technical Advisory Group (TAG) of the Innovative Treatment Remediation Demonstration Program (ITRD) made technology recommendations after reviewing thirty in situ remediation technologies… (more)

Uhl, John Nicholas, 1960-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Surfactant-enhanced electrokinetic remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Concern over soil and groundwater contamination has created a demand for new and efficient remediation technologies. Surfactant-enhanced electrokinetic remediation is an innovative technique which has… (more)

Thomas, Steven P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Optimized remedial groundwater extraction using linear programming  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater extraction systems are typically installed to remediate contaminant plumes or prevent further spread of contamination. These systems are expensive to install and maintain. A traditional approach to designing such a wellfield uses a series of trial-and-error simulations to test the effects of various well locations and pump rates. However, the optimal locations and pump rates of extraction wells are difficult to determine when objectives related to the site hydrogeology and potential pumping scheme are considered. This paper describes a case study of an application of linear programming theory to determine optimal well placement and pump rates. The objectives of the pumping scheme were to contain contaminant migration and reduce contaminant concentrations while minimizing the total amount of water pumped and treated. Past site activities at the area under study included disposal of contaminants in pits. Several groundwater plumes have been identified, and others may be present. The area of concern is bordered on three sides by a wetland, which receives a portion of its input budget as groundwater discharge from the pits. Optimization of the containment pumping scheme was intended to meet three goals: (1) prevent discharge of contaminated groundwater to the wetland, (2) minimize the total water pumped and treated (cost benefit), and (3) avoid dewatering of the wetland (cost and ecological benefits). Possible well locations were placed at known source areas. To constrain the problem, the optimization program was instructed to prevent any flow toward the wetland along a user-specified border. In this manner, the optimization routine selects well locations and pump rates so that a groundwater divide is produced along this boundary.

Quinn, J.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

Operable Unit 3-14, Tank Farm Soil and INTEC Groundwater Remedial Design/Remedial Action Scope of Work  

SciTech Connect

This Remedial Design/Remedial Action (RD/RA) Scope of Work pertains to OU 3-14 Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center and the Idaho National Laboratory and identifies the remediation strategy, project scope, schedule, and budget that implement the tank farm soil and groundwater remediation, in accordance with the May 2007 Record of Decision. Specifically, this RD/RA Scope of Work identifies and defines the remedial action approach and the plan for preparing the remedial design documents.

D. E. Shanklin

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

85

Determine Institutional Change Sustainability Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The first step in the institutional change process is defining your Federal agency's sustainability goals. That is, decide what outcomes are desired (or required) over what period of time. Behavioral, organizational, and institutional changes typically are means to achieve desired energy, resource, or greenhouse gas emission outcomes. They are not ends in and of themselves.

86

Innovative vitrification for soil remediation  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project. During Phase 2, the basic nitrification process design was modified to meet the specific needs of the new waste streams available at Paducah. The system design developed for Paducah has significantly enhanced the processing capabilities of the Vortec vitrification process. The overall system design now includes the capability to shred entire drums and drum packs containing mud, concrete, plastics and PCB`s as well as bulk waste materials. This enhanced processing capability will substantially expand the total DOE waste remediation applications of the technology.

Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hart, J.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale in SITU Thermal NAPL Remediation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) successfully completed a field-scale remediation to remove non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from the subsurface at the Northeast Site on the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research (STAR) Center, Largo, Florida. The Young-Rainey STAR Center is a former DOE facility that was previously known as the Pinellas Plant and the Pinellas STAR Center. The remediation project encompassed an area of 10,000 ft2 and depths extending to 35 ft below ground surface. Prior to the remediation, DOE evaluated technologies that had the potential to remove NAPLs from the subsurface at the site. Because of site conditions (clay lenses and an underlying clay layer that were thought to be contaminated), steam injection and electrical heating were considered to be the only technologies that had the potential to remove these NAPLs. In July 2001, DOE’s contractor awarded a subcontract for removal of NAPLs from a portion of the Northeast Site. The technologies used for remediation were a combination of steam-enhanced extraction and Electro-Thermal Dynamic Stripping Process, an electrical resistive heating technology. Construction of the remediation system was completed in September 2002. Remedial operations began immediately after construction, and active heating ended in February 2003. After operations were completed, confirmatory sampling was conducted during a 6-month period to verify the level of cleanup achieved. Additional confirmatory sampling was conducted 18 months after operations ended. Analytical results of the confirmatory sampling showed that NAPL concentrations were reduced significantly below the required cleanup goals and, in most cases, below the regulatory maximum contaminant levels. Lessons learned relative to the design, construction, operation, confirmatory sampling approach, and subcontracting could benefit managers of similar remediation projects.

Butherus, Michael [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Ingle, David S. [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Juhlin, Randall [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Daniel, Joseph [S.M. Stoller Corporation; none,

2004-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

88

EM-54 Technology Development In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Technology Development (EM-50) as an element of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) in November 1989. EM manages remediation of all DOE sites as well as wastes from current operations. The goal of the EM program is to minimize risks to human health, safety and the environment, and to bring all DOE sites into compliance with Federal, state, and local regulations by 2019. EM-50 is charged with developing new technologies that are safer, more effective and less expensive than current methods. The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (the subject of this report) is part of EM-541, the Environmental Restoration Research and Development Division of EM-54. The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: Significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces; in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP tends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young-Rainey Star Center  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) successfully completed a fieldscale remediation to remove non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from the subsurface at a site on the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research (STAR) Center, Largo, Florida. The STAR Center is a former DOE facility. The remediation project covered an area of 930 m2 (10,000 ft2) and depths extending to 10.5 m (35 ft) below ground surface. In July 2001, DOE’s contractor awarded a subcontract to SteamTech Environmental Services for removal of NAPLs from a portion of the Northeast Site. The technologies used for remediation were steam-enhanced extraction and Electro-Thermal Dynamic Stripping Process, an electrical resistive heating technology. McMillan-McGee Corporation implemented the process. Construction of the remediation system was completed in September 2002. Operations began immediately after construction, and active heating ended in February 2003. After operations were completed, confirmatory sampling was conducted over a 6-month period to verify the level of cleanup achieved. Results of the sampling showed that NAPL concentrations were reduced significantly below the required cleanup goals and, in most cases, below the regulatory maximum contaminant levels. Lessons learned relative to the design, construction, operation, confirmatory sampling approach, and subcontracting could benefit managers of similar remediation projects

Gavaskar, A.R. [ed.; Chen, A.S.C. [ed.; none,

2004-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

90

Clean Cities: Clean Cities Goals and Accomplishments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Cities Goals and Accomplishments Clean Cities Goals and Accomplishments to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Clean Cities Goals and Accomplishments on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Clean Cities Goals and Accomplishments on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Clean Cities Goals and Accomplishments on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Clean Cities Goals and Accomplishments on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Clean Cities Goals and Accomplishments on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Clean Cities Goals and Accomplishments on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Clean Cities 20th Anniversary Partnerships Hall of Fame Contacts Clean Cities Goals and Accomplishments Clean Cities' primary goal is to cut petroleum use in the United States by 2.5 billion gallons per year by 2020. To achieve this goal, Clean Cities

91

Applied Field Research Initiative Attenuation Based Remedies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PA00133 - March 2011 PA00133 - March 2011 Applied Field Research Initiative Attenuation Based Remedies in the Subsurface Located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, the Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) was established to develop the tools, approaches and technologies that will be required to address the technical challenges associated characteriza- tion, remediation and long-term monitoring of recalcitrant compounds in the subsurface at Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) sites. The ABRS AFRI site provides a unique setting for researchers in both applied and basic science fields. A wealth of subsurface data is available to support research activities and remedial decision making.

92

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The mission of the Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative is to control the flux of contaminants in soil and water environments for the purpose of...

93

Engineered Polymeric Nanoparticles for Soil Remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

compds. in soil-water systems in which surfactants play a role in contaminant remediation or facilitated transport. ... (9)?Abdul, A. S.; Ang, C. C. Ground Water 1994, 32, 727. ...

Warapong Tungittiplakorn; Leonard W. Lion; Claude Cohen; Ju-Young Kim

2004-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

94

SITE MAINTENANCE PLAN CSMRI SITE REMEDIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...............................................................................................................5 5.2 Ground and Surface Water MonitoringSITE MAINTENANCE PLAN CSMRI SITE REMEDIATION June 29, 2004 Prepared by: Colorado School of Mines .................................................................................................4 5.0 SITE AIR AND WATER MONITORING

95

Avoiding Destructive Remediation at DOE Sites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Pollutants, Radioactive 0 Water Pollutants, Radioactive...States Government Agencies Water Pollutants, Radioactive...management government agencies ground water policy pollutants pollution...pumping radioactive waste remediation risk assessment soils...

F. W. Whicker; T. G. Hinton; M. M. MacDonell; J. E. Pinder III; L. J. Habegger

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

96

In situ Groundwater Remediation Using Treatment Walls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development of treatment wall technology for the clean up of contaminated ground-water resources has expanded in the past few...ex situ and other in situ ground-water remediation approaches is reduced operation a...

Radisav D. Vidic; Frederick G. Pohland

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Electrolytic remediation of chromated copper arsenate wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While chromated copper arsenate (CCA) has proven to be exceptionally effective in protecting wood from rot and infestation, its toxic nature has led to the problem of disposal of CCA-treated lumber and remediation of waters ...

Stern, Heather A. G. (Heather Ann Ganung)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PLAN CSMRI SITE REMEDIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Littleton, CO 80127 #12;CSMRI Site Remediation Quality Assurance Project Plan March 30, 2004 SAMPLING Environmental Consultants, Inc. Approved By: Date: Sally Cuffin Project Quality Assurance Manager New Horizons...................................................................................................................................3 2.5 Decision Rules

99

LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals Lab demolition projects under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act have...

100

Sandia National Laboratories: Pollution Prevention: Goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System Pollution Prevention Sustainable Acquisition Electronics Stewardship Recycling Reuse Outreach Awards News About Goals for Sandia These are goals in which Pollution...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation goals prgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for defining the remedial design requirements, preparing the design documentation, and defining the remedial actions for Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the design developed to support the remediation and disposal activities selected in the Final Operable Unit 3-13, Record of Decision.

D. E. Shanklin

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation research  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently evaluating hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation technologies in existence and under development to determine applicability to remediation needs of the DOE facilities under the Albuquerque Operations Office and to determine areas of research need. To assist LANL is this effort, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) conducted an assessment of technologies and monitoring methods that have been demonstrated or are under development. The focus of this assessment is to: (1) identify existing technologies for hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation of old waste sites; (2) identify technologies under development and the status of the technology; (3) assess new technologies that need development to provide adequate hazardous waste treatment and remedial action technologies for DOD and DOE sites; and (4) identify hazardous waste and remediation problems for environmental research and development. There are currently numerous research and development activities underway nationwide relating to environmental contaminants and the remediation of waste sites. To perform this effort, SAIC evaluated current technologies and monitoring methods development programs in EPA, DOD, and DOE, as these are the primary agencies through which developmental methods are being demonstrated. This report presents this evaluation and provides recommendations as to pertinent research needs or activities to address waste site contamination problems. The review and assessment have been conducted at a programmatic level; site-specific and contaminant-specific evaluations are being performed by LANL staff as a separate, related activity.

Not Available

1989-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

103

In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Technology summary  

SciTech Connect

The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces, in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP intends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years. ISR IP is an applied research and development program broadly addressing known DOE environmental restoration needs. Analysis of a sample of 334 representative sites by the Office of Environmental Restoration has shown how many sites are amenable to in situ remediation: containment--243 sites; manipulation--244 sites; bioremediation--154 sites; and physical/chemical methods--236 sites. This needs assessment is focused on near-term restoration problems (FY93--FY99). Many other remediations will be required in the next century. The major focus of the ISR EP is on the long term development of permanent solutions to these problems. Current needs for interim actions to protect human health and the environment are also being addressed.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Multiscale modeling of surfactant phase behavior in the remediation of DNAPL contamination.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The brine barrier remediation technique (BBRT) has been proposed as a novel Brine barrier remediation techniques (BBRT) that use surfactants have been proposed for remediating… (more)

Fan, Xiangyu.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Remediation of water contamination using catalytic technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remediation of contaminated ground and underground water is becoming a critical issue in Europe and worldwide. We discuss here the role of catalysis in water remediation, with reference to two specific examples of catalytic water remediation technologies: (i) the elimination of nitrate and pesticides from water contaminated as a result of agricultural practices and (ii) the conversion of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in contaminated underground water. Of particular interest is a technology based on catalytic membranes for remediation of water contaminated by nitrate, which offers various advantages with respect to conventional technologies. Using a Pd-Cu-based catalytic membrane, a reaction temperature below 15 °C, a mixed 4:1 CO2:H2 feed and controlling bulk solution pH by \\{HCl\\} addition, it is possible to obtain a nitrate conversion higher than 80% even with ammonium ion formation below 0.5 ppm, i.e. the maximum concentration allowed to meet the requirements for drinking water quality. In MTBE conversion in contaminated underground water, acid zeolites with suitable pore structures (channel structure and pore openings) such as H-ZSM-5 and H-BEA can be used as catalytic permeable reactive barriers for in situ remediation. These zeolites not only act as adsorbents for both MTBE and its reaction products, but also effectively catalyze the hydrolysis of MTBE to t-butyl alcohol (TBA) and methanol (MeOH) which then can be rapidly biodegraded by indigenous microorganisms.

Gabriele Centi; Siglinda Perathoner

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

ICDF Complex Remedial Action Work Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for operation of the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility Complex (ICDF). This facility includes (a) an engineered landfill that meets the substantial requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C, Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl landfill requirements; (b) centralized receiving, inspections, administration, storage/staging, and treatment facilities necessary for CERCLA investigation-derived, remedial, and removal waste at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prior to final disposition in the disposal facility or shipment off-Site; and (c) an evaporation pond that has been designated as a corrective action management unit. The ICDF Complex, including a buffer zone, will cover approximately 40 acres, with a landfill disposal capacity of approximately 510,000 yd3. The ICDF Complex is designed and authorized to accept INL CERCLA-generated wastes, and includes the necessary subsystems and support facilities to provide a complete waste management system. This Remedial Action Work Plan presents the operational approach and requirements for the various components that are part of the ICDF Complex. Summaries of the remedial action work elements are presented herein, with supporting information and documents provided as appendixes to this work plan that contain specific detail about the operation of the ICDF Complex. This document presents the planned operational process based upon an evaluation of the remedial action requirements set forth in the Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision.

W. M. Heileson

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Widget:GoalMeter | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GoalMeter GoalMeter Jump to: navigation, search This widget produces an image showing progress against some numeric goal. Parameters Parameter Type Required? Example Description goal Integer Y 100 Total goal value http_link String Y groups.google.com/group/openei URL to which the meter will hyperlink. Note that the leading "http://" must be omitted. title String Y Google Group Members The goal's title. value Integer Y 25 Current value of progress against the goal. height Integer N (default=100) 150 Height of the meter image (in pixels). width Integer N (default=200) 300 Width of the meter image (in pixels). Example Output Google Group Members (goal: 100) Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Widget:GoalMeter&oldid=271157"

108

Renewable Energy Goal | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Goal Renewable Energy Goal Renewable Energy Goal < Back Eligibility Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Energy Sources Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider Oklahoma Corporation Commission In May 2010, Oklahoma established a renewable energy goal for electric utilities operating in the state. The goal calls for 15% of the total installed generation capacity in Oklahoma to be derived from renewable sources by 2015. There are no interim targets, and the goal does not extend past 2015. Eligible renewable energy resources include wind, solar, hydropower, hydrogen, geothermal, biomass, and other renewable energy

109

How to accelerate the Fernald remediation  

SciTech Connect

The Fernald Environmental Management Project is unique among Department of Energy (DOE) sites by virtue of successful efforts by the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) and DOE-Fernald Area Office (FN) in securing a stak-eholder-assisted final site closure vision and all Record of Decisions (ROD) or Interim RODs required to set the stage for final remediation. DOE and FERMCO have agreed in principle on a Ten Year Plan which accelerates all activities to remediate the site in approximately half the target schedule. This paper presents the path that led to the current Ten Year Plan, the key elements of the plan and the implementation strategies.

Yates, M.K. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States). Fernald Environmental Management Project; Reising, J. [USDOE Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

110

Limiting factors in ground water remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If one is charged with restoring a contaminated aquifer today, the procedure of pumping contaminated water to the surface for treatment and discharge is most often the state-of-practice technology. The perceived success of pump-and-treat technology can be misleading if the hydrology and contaminant characteristics at the site are not adequately understood. A failure to understand the processes controlling contaminant transport can result in extremely long pumping periods and, consequently, costly and inefficient remediation. Effects of tailing, sorption, and residual immiscible fluids on time required for pump-and-treat remediation of ground water are discussed.

Clinton W. Hall; Jeffrey A. Johnson

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Remediation technology needs and applied R D initiatives  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) recently consolidated its environmental restoration and waste management activities. Within that new organization, DOE has committed to support Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing and, Evaluation (RDDT E) activities with the following objectives: rapidly advance beyond currently available technologies; provide solutions to key technical issues that will improve effectiveness, efficiency, and safety; and enhance DOE's ability to meet its 30-year compliance and cleanup goals. Four general categories have been identified where R D (and DT E) efforts need to be focused. These include: waste minimization technologies, site characterization and assessment methods, waste treatment technologies, and remediation technologies with emphasis on in-situ methods. The DOE has already supported a number of R D activities in these areas and plans to continue that support in the future. For technology development, the DOE is committed to forming cooperative partnerships and eliciting broad participation from qualified organizations who can contribute to RDDT E activities. The new technologies resulting from these R D initiatives will enhance DOE's ability to meet its 30-year cleanup goal, reduce environmental risk, and provide significant cost savings over existing technologies. Even modest investments in these emerging technologies now can be expected to generate a high rate of return. 3 refs., 2 tabs.

Lien, S.C.T.; Levine, R.S. (USDOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Washington, DC (United States). Research and Development Div.); Beskid, N.J.; Devgun, J.S.; Erickson, M.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Webster, S.L. (USDOE Chicago Operations Office, Argonne, IL (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

City of Phoenix- Renewable Energy Goal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 2008, the Phoenix City Council approved a renewable energy goal for the city. The city aims for 15% of the electricity used by the city to come from renewable energy sources by 2025. This goal...

113

Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds. May 2004, Monterey, California. Charles Tabor, Randall Juhlin, Paul Darr, Julian Caballero, Joseph Daniel, David Ingle Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling More Documents & Publications Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site Restoration at Young - Rainey STAR Center Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young - Rainey STAR Center

114

Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds. May 2004, Monterey, California. Charles Tabor, Randall Juhlin, Paul Darr, Julian Caballero, Joseph Daniel, David Ingle Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling More Documents & Publications Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young - Rainey STAR Center Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site Restoration at Young - Rainey STAR Center

115

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Full Document and...

116

Hydrocarbon pollution control and remediation of groundwater: a brief review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...oil-contaminated sediments. There are two main remediation techniques: soil washing and bio- remediation. With soil washing, contaminated soil is leached with water containing a surfactant to assist in hydrocarbon removal. In situ washing is undertaken...

L. Clark

117

Remedial Costs for MTBE in Soil and Ground Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The contamination of MTBE in ground water has introduced concerns about the increased cost of remediating MTBE/BTEX releases compared to remediating sites with BTEX only contamination. In an attempt to evaluat...

Barbara H. Wilson; John T. Wilson Ph.D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Draft Final Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study and Proposed Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Draft Final Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study and Proposed Plan Colorado School of Mines, Colorado 80021 #12;The S.M. Stoller Corporation Flood Plain Remedial Investigation / Feasibility Study ..................................................................................................... 1-8 1.6 Previous Investigations

119

Acoustically enhanced remediation, Phase 2: Technology scaling  

SciTech Connect

Weiss Associates is conducting the following three phase program investigating the in-situ application of acoustically enhanced remediation (AER) of contaminated unconsolidated soil and ground water under both saturated and unsaturated conditions: Phase I-- laboratory scale parametric investigation; Phase II--technology Scaling; and Phase III--large scale field tests. AER addresses the need for NAPL (either lighter or denser than water: LNAPL or DNAPL, respectively) in high and low permeability sediments, and the remediation of other types of subsurface contaminants (e.g., metals, radionuclides) in low permeability soils. This program has been placed in the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) DNAPL product. Phase I indicated that AER could be used to effectively remediate NAPL in high permeability soil, and that removal of NAPL from low permeability soil could be increased since the water flux through these soils was significantly increased. Phase II, Technology Scaling, the subject of this paper, focused on (1) evaluating the characteristics of an AER field deployment system, (2) developing DNAPL flow and transport performance data under acoustic excitation, (3) predicting the effect of acoustic remediation in three-dimensional unconsolidated hydrogeologic conditions, (4) conducting an engineering analysis of acoustical sources, and (5) identifying candidate field site(s) for large-scale field testing of the technology.

Iovenitti, J.L.; Hill, D.G. [Weiss Associates, Emeryville, CA (United States); Rynne, T.M.; Spadaro, J.F.; Hutchinson, W. [Scientific Applications and Research Associates, Inc., Huntington Beach, CA (United States); Illangasakere, T. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

groundwater nitrogen source identification and remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

producer profits. This will, in turn, benefit water bodies in the area that receive stream baseflow fromgroundwater nitrogen source identification and remediation The Seymour Aquifer is a shallow aquifer water withdraws are used for irrigation while the cities of Vernon, Burk- burnett and Electra and many

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation goals prgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Energy Reduction Goals | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduction Goals Reduction Goals Energy Reduction Goals < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Other Program Info State Vermont Program Type Energy Efficiency Resource Standard Provider Vermont Energy Investment Corporation In June 1999, Vermont enacted legislation authorizing the Vermont Public Service Board (PSB) to establish a volumetric charge on all electric customers' bills to support energy efficiency programs and goals.* The subsequent year the PSB established Efficiency Vermont, a statewide "energy efficiency utility," and a funding mechanism to support it. Efficiency Vermont is currently administered by Vermont Energy Investment Corporation (VEIC), an independent, non-profit corporation. Efficiency Vermont periodically establishes certain goals that constitute

122

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ETR-13 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, TN Why DOE-EM Did This Review From 1953 to 1983, ~240,000 pounds of mercury (Hg) were released to the East Fork Popular Creek during the operation of the Y-12 Plant. In 1963, direct systematic releases of mercury stopped; however, mercury continues to be released into the creek from various sources of contamination in the Y-12 complex. Remediation completed up to 1992 resulted in an overall reduction of Hg loading from 150 g/day in 1983 to 15 g/day in 1992, with a current goal of 5g/day or less. The objective was to

123

Ecological effects of contaminants and remedial actions in Bear Creek  

SciTech Connect

Ecological studies of the Bear Creek watershed, which drains the area surrounding several Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities, were initiated in May 1984 and are continuing at present. These studies consisted of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek, and they were followed by a presently ongoing monitoring phase that involves reduced sampling intensities. The characterization phase utilized two approaches: (1) instream sampling of benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek to identify spatial and temporal patterns in distribution and abundance and (2) laboratory bioassays on water samples from Bear Creek and selected tributaries to identify potential sources of toxicity to biota. The monitoring phase of the ecological program relates to the long-term goals of identifying and prioritizing contaminant sources and assessing the effectiveness of remedial actions. It continues activities of the characterization phase at less frequent intervals. The Bear Greek Valley is a watershed that drains the area surrounding several closed Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities. Past waste disposal practices in Bear Creek Valley resulted in contamination of Bear Creek and consequent ecological damage. Extensive remedial actions have been proposed at waste sites, and some of the have been implemented or are now underway. The proposed study plan consists of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek in the first year followed by a reduction in sampling intensity during the monitoring phase of the plan. The results of sampling conducted from May 1984 through early 1989 are presented in this report.

Southworth, G.R.; Loar, J.M.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Stewart, A.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Burris, J.A. [C. E. Environmental, Inc., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Scientific Opportunity to Reduce Risk in Groundwater and Soil Remediation  

SciTech Connect

In this report, we start by examining previous efforts at linking science and DOE EM research with cleanup activities. Many of these efforts were initiated by creating science and technology roadmaps. A recurring feature of successfully implementing these roadmaps into EM applied research efforts and successful cleanup is the focus on integration. Such integration takes many forms, ranging from combining information generated by various scientific disciplines, to providing technical expertise to facilitate successful application of novel technology, to bringing the resources and creativity of many to address the common goal of moving EM cleanup forward. Successful projects identify and focus research efforts on addressing the problems and challenges that are causing “failure” in actual cleanup activities. In this way, basic and applied science resources are used strategically to address the particular unknowns that are barriers to cleanup. The brief descriptions of the Office of Science basic (Environmental Remediation Science Program [ERSP]) and EM’s applied (Groundwater and Soil Remediation Program) research programs in subsurface science provide context to the five “crosscutting” themes that have been developed in this strategic planning effort. To address these challenges and opportunities, a tiered systematic approach is proposed that leverages basic science investments with new applied research investments from the DOE Office of Engineering and Technology within the framework of the identified basic science and applied research crosscutting themes. These themes are evident in the initial portfolio of initiatives in the EM groundwater and soil cleanup multi-year program plan. As stated in a companion document for tank waste processing (Bredt et al. 2008), in addition to achieving its mission, DOE EM is experiencing a fundamental shift in philosophy from driving to closure to enabling the long-term needs of DOE and the nation.

Pierce, Eric M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Looney, Brian B.; Zachara, John M.; Liang, Liyuan; Lesmes, D.; Chamberlain, G. M.; Skubal, Karen L.; Adams, V.; Denham, Miles E.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2009-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

125

FY 2010 Performance Goals Artificial Retina Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 Performance Goals 10 Performance Goals 2010 Annual Goal: Advance blind patient sight: Initiate preclinical studies of 200+ electrode implantable device. Complete specification for 1000+ pixel device. Performance Goal/Annual Target Quarter Quarter Goal Quarterly Results: Yes or No? 1st Quarter Design verification of subsystems for preclinical 200+ system. Goal Met. The design verification of the subsystems for the preclinical 200+ system has been completed. The thin film electrode array and the demultiplexer which were updated based on the A - 60 clinical trials have been fabricated and successfully tested. 2nd Quarter Assembly of preclinical 200+ systems. Goal Met. The assembly of the components including the thin film electrode array and the electronics package for a Preclinical 200+ system has been completed. Initial functional testing has verified that wireless power and telemetry was transmitted and received from the Preclinical 200+ system.

126

FY 2009 Performance Goals Artificial Retina Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FY 2009 Performance Goals FY 2009 Performance Goals 2009 Annual Goal: Advance blind patient sight. FY09: Complete in vitro/benchtop development of implantable 200+ electrode prototype. 2009 Annual Goal Met: The bench-top development of an implantable 200+ electrode prototype has been completed. All the components of the 200+ electrode prototype have been integrated and characterized. Performance Goal/Annual Target Quarter Quarter Goal Quarterly Results: Yes or No? 1st Quarter Build electronics module for implantable active A-200+ system Goal Met. The electronics module for an implantable active A-200+ system was assembled and tested. It is a key component required to fabricate the active A-200+ prototype system. 2nd Quarter Complete fabrication of active A - 200+ Prototype system

127

Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266  

SciTech Connect

Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the observational approach. The WCH project team is working closely with stakeholders and taking a number of steps to meet these challenges in a continuing effort to remediate chromium contaminated soil in an efficient and cost-effective manner. (authors)

Scott Myers, R. [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

WASTE PACKAGE REMEDIATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Package Remediation System remediates waste packages (WPs) and disposal containers (DCs) in one of two ways: preparation of rejected DC closure welds for repair or opening of the DC/WP. DCs are brought to the Waste Package Remediation System for preparation of rejected closure welds if testing of the closure weld by the Disposal Container Handling System indicates an unacceptable, but repairable, welding flaw. DC preparation of rejected closure welds will require removal of the weld in such a way that the Disposal Container Handling System may resume and complete the closure welding process. DCs/WPs are brought to the Waste Package Remediation System for opening if the Disposal Container Handling System testing of the DC closure weld indicates an unrepairable welding flaw, or if a WP is recovered from the subsurface repository because suspected damage to the WP or failure of the WP has occurred. DC/WP opening will require cutting of the DC/WP such that a temporary seal may be installed and the waste inside the DC/WP removed by another system. The system operates in a Waste Package Remediation System hot cell located in the Waste Handling Building that has direct access to the Disposal Container Handling System. One DC/WP at a time can be handled in the hot cell. The DC/WP arrives on a transfer cart, is positioned within the cell for system operations, and exits the cell without being removed from the cart. The system includes a wide variety of remotely operated components including a manipulator with hoist and/or jib crane, viewing systems, machine tools for opening WPs, and equipment used to perform pressure and gas composition sampling. Remotely operated equipment is designed to facilitate DC/WP decontamination and hot cell equipment maintenance, and interchangeable components are provided where appropriate. The Waste Package Remediation System interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System for the receipt and transport of WPs and DCs. The Waste Handling Building System houses the system, and provides the facility, safety, and auxiliary systems required to support operations. The system receives power from the Waste Handling Building Electrical System. The system also interfaces with the various DC systems.

N.D. Sudan

2000-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

129

Recommendations for Remedial Action at Everest, Kansas.  

SciTech Connect

On September 7, 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) presented a Scoping Memo (Argonne 2005) for preliminary consideration by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). This document suggested possible remedial options for the carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Everest, Kansas. The suggested approaches were discussed by representatives of the KDHE, the CCC/USDA, and Argonne at the KDHE office in Topeka on September 8-9, 2005, along with other technical and logistic issues related to the Everest site. In response to these discussions, the KDHE recommended (KDHE 2005) evaluation of several remedial processes, either alone or in combination, as part of a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for Everest. The primary remedial processes suggested by the KDHE included the following: (1) Hydraulic control by groundwater extraction with aboveground treatment; (2) Air sparging-soil vapor extraction (SVE) in large-diameter boreholes; and (3) Phytoremediation. As a further outcome of the 2005 meeting and as a precursor to the proposed CAS, the CCC/USDA completed the following supplemental investigations at Everest to address several specific technical concerns discussed with the KDHE: (1) Construction of interpretive cross sections at strategic locations selected by the KDHE along the main plume migration pathway, to depict the hydrogeologic characteristics affecting groundwater flow and contaminant movement (Argonne 2006a); (2) A field investigation in early 2006 (Argonne 2006c), as follows: (a) Installation and testing of a production well and associated observation points, at locations approved by the KDHE, to determine the response of the Everest aquifer to groundwater extraction near the Nigh property; (b) Groundwater sampling for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the installation of additional permanent monitoring points at locations selected by the KDHE, to further constrain the existing contaminant plume; and (c) Resampling of all existing permanent monitoring points for VOCs and biodegradation parameter analyses, at the request of the KDHE. On the basis of these studies (Argonne 2006a,c) and the CCC/USDA's past investigations at Everest (Argonne 2006b), the CCC/USDA concluded that groundwater extraction is not an effective remedial option for this site, and the KDHE concurred (KDHE 2006). As outlined in the next section, the CCC/USDA also believes that air sparging does not represent a viable remedial alternative. The CCC/USDA therefore proposes to collect the technical data required to evaluate the potential viability of a phytoremediation approach for this site and, if appropriate, to support the development of a remedial design.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocky Mountain Remediation Rocky Mountain Remediation Services - EA-97-04 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services - EA-97-04 June 6, 1997 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Rocky Mountain Remediation Services related to a Radioactive Material Release during Trench Remediation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, (EA-97-04) This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of noncompliances associated with the dispersal of radioactive material during the remediation of trenches. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services - EA-97-04 More Documents & Publications Preliminary Notice of Violation, Kaiser-Hill Company - EA-97-03 Consent Order, Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC - EA 98-03 Preliminary Notice of Violation , Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

131

DEMO Project Goals | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

DEMO Project Goals | National Nuclear Security Administration DEMO Project Goals | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog DEMO Project Goals Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Human Resources > Pay-banding > DEMO Project Goals DEMO Project Goals The goals of this demonstration project are to Improve hiring by allowing NNSA to compete more effectively for high

132

P-3 Program goals for CLASIC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Colorado at Boulder Center for Environmental Technology P-3 Program Goals for CLASIC The Department of Energy's Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC)...

133

Identifying Needs and Goals | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Meet a minimum annual solar energy production target. Maximize the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction. Goals could adjust or change as the project develops, but they always...

134

Weatherization Assistance Program Goals and Metrics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) regularly reviews the work of state and grant recipients for effectiveness and for meeting program goals.

135

Alternative Endpoints and Approaches for the Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater at Complex Sites - 13426  

SciTech Connect

The goal of United States (U.S.) Department of Energy's (DOE)'s environmental remediation programs is to restore groundwater to beneficial use, similar to many other Federal and state environmental cleanup programs. Based on past experience, groundwater remediation to pre-contamination conditions (i.e., drinking water standards or non-detectable concentrations) can be successfully achieved at many sites. At a subset of the most complex sites, however, complete restoration is not likely achievable within the next 50 to 100 years using today's technology. This presentation describes several approaches used at complex sites in the face of these technical challenges. Many complex sites adopted a long-term management approach, whereby contamination was contained within a specified area using active or passive remediation techniques. Consistent with the requirements of their respective environmental cleanup programs, several complex sites selected land use restrictions and used risk management approaches to accordingly adopt alternative cleanup goals (alternative endpoints). Several sites used long-term management designations and approaches in conjunction with the alternative endpoints. Examples include various state designations for groundwater management zones, technical impracticability (TI) waivers or greater risk waivers at Superfund sites, and the use of Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) or other passive long-term management approaches over long time frames. This presentation will focus on findings, statistics, and case studies from a recently-completed report for the Department of Defense's Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) (Project ER-0832) on alternative endpoints and approaches for groundwater remediation at complex sites under a variety of Federal and state cleanup programs. The primary objective of the project was to provide environmental managers and regulators with tools, metrics, and information needed to evaluate alternative endpoints for groundwater remediation at complex sites. A statistical analysis of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites receiving TI waivers will be presented as well as case studies of other types of alternative endpoints and alternative remedial strategies that illustrate the variety of approaches used at complex sites and the technical analyses used to predict and document cost, time frame, and potential remedial effectiveness. This presentation is intended to inform DOE program managers, state regulators, practitioners and other stakeholders who are evaluating technical cleanup challenges within their own programs, and establishing programmatic approaches to evaluating and implementing long-term management approaches. Case studies provide examples of long-term management designations and strategies to manage and remediate groundwater at complex sites. At least 13 states consider some designation for groundwater containment in their corrective action policies, such as groundwater management zones, containment zones, and groundwater classification exemption areas. Long-term management designations are not a way to 'do nothing' or walk away from a site. Instead, soil and groundwater within the zone is managed to be protective of human health and the environment. Understanding when and how to adopt a long-term management approach can lead to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across DOE and at numerous other industrial and military sites across the U.S. This presentation provides context for assessing the use and appropriate role of alternative endpoints and supporting long-term management designations in final remedies. (authors)

Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elisabeth L. [ARCADIS, U.S., 2000 Powell St., 7th Floor, Emeryville, California 94608 (United States)] [ARCADIS, U.S., 2000 Powell St., 7th Floor, Emeryville, California 94608 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Rethinking remediation technologies for desertified landscapes  

SciTech Connect

Shrub-dominated communities have replaced native grasslands throughout much of the arid Southwest during the past 120 years. Most currently available remediation technologies are uneconomical due to large inputs of energy, fertilizers, herbicides and labor, or are ecologically ineffective due to harsh environments and the highly competitive nature of these native shrubs. Our analysis of these historical remediation technologies together with new information on ecosystem processes has led us to pursue an ecologically-based approach in which more limited inputs are targeted to promote natural processes of regeneration. Advantages to this approach include lower costs, reduced reliance on agronomic practices, and maintenance of natural landscape features. Disadvantages include longer time required for desired changes to occur, and a need for increased understanding of arid land processes.

Herrick, J.E.; Havstad, K.M. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Coffin, D.P. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The role of innovative remediation technologies  

SciTech Connect

There are currently over 1200 sites on the US Superfund's National Priorities List (NPL) of hazardous waste sites, and there are over 30, 000 sites listed by the Comprehensive Environmental Responsibility, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS). The traditional approach to remediating sites in the US has been to remove the material and place it in a secure landfill, or in the case of groundwater, pump and treat the effluent. These technologies have proven to be very expensive and don't really fix the problem. The waste is just moved from one place to another. In recent years, however, alternative and innovative technologies have been increasingly used in the US to replace the traditional approaches. This paper will focus on just such innovative remediation technologies in the US, looking at the regulatory drivers, the emerging technologies, some of the problems in deploying technologies, and a case study.

Doesburg, J.M.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The role of innovative remediation technologies  

SciTech Connect

There are currently over 1200 sites on the US Superfund`s National Priorities List (NPL) of hazardous waste sites, and there are over 30, 000 sites listed by the Comprehensive Environmental Responsibility, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS). The traditional approach to remediating sites in the US has been to remove the material and place it in a secure landfill, or in the case of groundwater, pump and treat the effluent. These technologies have proven to be very expensive and don`t really fix the problem. The waste is just moved from one place to another. In recent years, however, alternative and innovative technologies have been increasingly used in the US to replace the traditional approaches. This paper will focus on just such innovative remediation technologies in the US, looking at the regulatory drivers, the emerging technologies, some of the problems in deploying technologies, and a case study.

Doesburg, J.M.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

2010sr31_box-remediation.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thursday, November 18, 2010 Thursday, November 18, 2010 james-r.giusti@srs.gov Paivi Nettamo, SRNS, (803) 292-2484 paivi.nettamo@srs.gov SRS Recovery Act TRU Waste Project Ahead of Schedule with Box Remediation Program Aiken, SC - The U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) started off the last 12 months of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act with an enormous success in its legacy transuranic (TRU) waste program. The H-Canyon

140

Remediation and Recycling of Linde FUSRAP Materials  

SciTech Connect

During World War II, the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) utilized facilities in the Buffalo, New York area to extract natural uranium from uranium-bearing ores. The Linde property is one of several properties within the Tonawanda, New York Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) site, which includes Linde, Ashland 1, Ashland 2, and Seaway. Union Carbide Corporation's Linde Division was placed under contract with the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) from 1942 to 1946 to extract uranium from seven different ore sources: four African pitchblende ores and three domestic ores. Over the years, erosion and weathering have spread contamination from the residuals handled and disposed of at Linde to adjacent soils. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) negotiated a Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) governing remediation of the Linde property. In Fiscal Year (FY) 1998, Congress transferred cleanup management responsibility for the sites in the FUSRAP program, including the Linde Site, from the DOE to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), with the charge to commence cleanup promptly. All actions by the USACE at the Linde Site are being conducted subject to the administrative, procedural, and regulatory provisions of the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the existing FFA. USACE issued a Proposed Plan for the Linde Property in 1999 and a Final Record of Decision (ROD) in 2000. USACE worked with the local community near the Tonawanda site, and after considering public comment, selected the remedy calling for removing soils that exceed the site-specific cleanup standard, and transporting the contaminated material to off-site locations. The selected remedy is protective of human health and the environment, complies with Federal and State requirements, and meets commitments to the community.

Coutts, P. W.; Franz, J. P.; Rehmann, M. R.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation goals prgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Thixotropic gel for vadose zone remediation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thixotropic gel suitable for use in subsurface bioremediation is provided along with a process of using the gel. The thixotropic gel provides a non-migrating injectable substrate that can provide below ground barrier properties. In addition, the gel components provide for a favorable environment in which certain contaminants are preferentially sequestered in the gel and subsequently remediated by either indigenous or introduced microorganisms.

Rhia, Brian D. (Augusta, GA)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Innovative mathematical modeling in environmental remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are two different ways to model reactive transport: ad hoc and innovative reaction-based approaches. The former, such as the Kd simplification of adsorption, has been widely employed by practitioners, while the latter has been mainly used in scientific communities for elucidating mechanisms of biogeochemical transport processes. It is believed that innovative mechanistic-based models could serve as protocols for environmental remediation as well. This paper reviews the development of a mechanistically coupled fluid flow, thermal transport, hydrologic transport, and reactive biogeochemical model and example-applications to environmental remediation problems. Theoretical bases are sufficiently described. Four example problems previously carried out are used to demonstrate how numerical experimentation can be used to evaluate the feasibility of different remediation approaches. The first one involved the application of a 56-species uranium tailing problem to the Melton Branch Subwatershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the parallel version of the model. Simulations were made to demonstrate the potential mobilization of uranium and other chelating agents in the proposed waste disposal site. The second problem simulated laboratory-scale system to investigate the role of natural attenuation in potential off-site migration of uranium from uranium mill tailings after restoration. It showed inadequacy of using a single Kd even for a homogeneous medium. The third example simulated laboratory experiments involving extremely high concentrations of uranium, technetium, aluminum, nitrate, and toxic metals (e.g., Ni, Cr, Co). The fourth example modeled microbially-mediated immobilization of uranium in an unconfined aquifer using acetate amendment in a field-scale experiment. The purposes of these modeling studies were to simulate various mechanisms of mobilization and immobilization of radioactive wastes and to illustrate how to apply reactive transport models for environmental remediation.

Gour-Tsyh Yeh; Jin-Ping Gwo; Malcolm D. Siegel; Ming-Hsu Li; Yilin Fang; Fan Zhang; Wensui Luo; Steve B. Yabusaki

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Remedial design through effective electronic associations  

SciTech Connect

Black and Veatch Special Projects Corp. (BVSPC) used an environmental data management system (EDMS) to consolidate x-ray fluorescence (XRF), global positioning system (GPS), and laboratory analytical data into a unique and flexible electronic database. Cost savings were acknowledged in all phases of the remedial design due to the development and use of the EDMS and its distinct associations with various electronic software packages. The EDMS allowed effective and efficient completion of the remedial design investigation of the Oronogo-Duenweg Mining Belt Site. The Site is a 125-year old mining community in Jasper County, Missouri. Approximately 6,500 residences are now located within the 60 square-mile Superfund Site where lead and zinc were mined. Smelting and mining activities were conducted in several areas throughout the community. These operations left approximately 9 million tons of mine wastes at the Site upon completion of the mining activities. The purpose of the remedial design investigation was to quantify and identify the residential yards that were adversely affected by these activities.

Deis, J.L.; Wankum, R.D.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Goal-Driven business process derivation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solutions to the problem of deriving business processes from goals are critical in addressing a variety of challenges facing the services and business process management community, and in particular, the challenge of quickly generating large numbers ... Keywords: business process, capabilities, goals, tasks

Aditya K. Ghose; Nanjangud C. Narendra; Karthikeyan Ponnalagu; Anurag Panda; Atul Gohad

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 2  

SciTech Connect

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

USDOE NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 4  

SciTech Connect

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

USDOE /NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 5  

SciTech Connect

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

USDOE /NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Energy Efficiency Goals | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Goals Energy Efficiency Goals Energy Efficiency Goals < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Other Program Info State Florida Program Type Energy Efficiency Resource Standard Provider Florida Public Service Commission In 1980, Florida enacted the Florida Energy Efficiency and Conservation Act (FEECA), creating Florida Statutes Section 366.80-366.85 and Section 403.519. Section 366.82(6) requires the Florida Public Service Commission to review the conservation goals of each utility subject to FEECA at least every five years. Most recently, goals were established on December 30, 2009 with the passage of Order No. PSC-09-0855-FOF-EG. Utilities whose annual sales amount to less than 2,000 GWh as of July 1, 1993 are not

149

Energy Efficiency Goals | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Goals Energy Efficiency Goals Energy Efficiency Goals < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Utility Savings Category Other Program Info State Missouri Program Type Energy Efficiency Resource Standard Provider Missouri Public Service Commission In 2009, Missouri enacted the Missouri Energy Efficiency Investment Act, creating energy efficiency sales and peak reduction goals to be met through investment in demand side management. The goals outlined below were created by the Public Service Commission (PSC) in 2010, with benchmarks beginning in 2012. Year Annual Sales Reductions Annual Peak Reductions Cumulative Sales Reductions Cumulative Peak Reductions 2012 0.3% 1.0% 0.3% 1.0% 2013 0.5% 1.0% 0.8% 2.0% 2014 0.7% 1.0% 1.5% 3.0% 2015 0.9% 1.0% 2.4% 4.0%

150

Water Efficiency Goal Guidance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Efficiency Goal Guidance Water Efficiency Goal Guidance Water Efficiency Goal Guidance Water Efficiency Definitions A clear understanding of water efficiency definitions is very helpful in complying with the water-reduction goals of E.O. 13514. See section 3.0 of Federal Agency Implementation of Water Efficiency and Management Provisions of Executive Order 13514 for key definitions. The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) issued water efficiency goal guidance in Federal Agency Implementation of Water Efficiency and Management Provisions of Executive Order 13514. This comprehensive document establishes guidelines for Federal agencies in meeting the water-related requirements of Executive Order (E.O.) 13514 and includes information about baseline development, reporting requirements, and strategies for

151

Current goal for this year is:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17, 2009 17, 2009 MEMORANDUM FOR DAVID W. GEISER ACTING DIRECTOR OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT g h it. D~gitally signed by Tracy FROM: TRACY RIBEIRO 7' Ribeiro ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (EMS) COORDINATOR SUBJECT: APPROVAL OF FY 2010 EMS GOALS AND INITIATIVES In accordance with the requirements of the DOE-LM Environmental Management Svslem I)c.scriplion, the EMS goals and initiatives for FY 2010 are enclosed for your formal approval. The EMS Core Team developed these goals after reviewing the project environmental aspects. The FY 201 0 goals were presented to S.M. Stoller and DOE-LM management during the annual EMS Management Review on July 23,2009 and finalized on August 26,2009. The EMS goals and initiatives align with DOE Order 450.1 A, Environmental Protection Program;

152

Cancer risks from soil emissions of volatile organic compounds at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The emission isolation flux chamber (EIFC) methodology was applied to Superfund investigations at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 to determine if on-site workers were exposed to VOCs volatilizing from the subsurface and what, if any, health risks could be attributed to the inhalation of the VOCs volatilizing from the subsurface. During July and August of 1996, twenty, eighteen, and twenty six VOC soil vapor flux samples were collected in the Building 830, 832, and 854 areas, respectively using EIFCS. The VOC concentrations in the vapor samples were used to calculate soil flux rates which were used as input into an air dispersion model to calculate ambient air exposure-point concentrations. The exposure-point concentrations were compared to EPA Region IX Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs). Buildings 830 and 832 exposure-point concentrations were less then the PRGs therefore no cancer risks were calculated. The cancer risks for Building 854 ranged from 1.6 x 10{sup -7} to 2.1 x 10{sup -6}. The resultant inhalation cancer risks were all within the acceptable range, implying that on-site workers were not exposed to VOC vapors volatilizing from the subsurface soil that could have significant cancer risks. Therefore remediation in these areas would not be necessary.

Dibley, V. R., LLNL

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (March 2012)

154

TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF SOIL REMEDIATION ALTERNATIVES AT THE BUILDING 812 OPERABLE UNIT, LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE 300  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Livermore Site Office requested a technical review of remedial alternatives proposed for the Building 812 Operable Unit, Site 300 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The team visited the site and reviewed the alternatives proposed for soil remediation in the draft RI/FS and made the following observations and recommendations. Based on the current information available for the site, the team did not identify a single technology that would be cost effective and/or ecologically sound to remediate DU contamination at Building 812 to current remedial goals. Soil washing is not a viable alternative and should not be considered at the site unless final remediation levels can be negotiated to significantly higher levels. This recommendation is based on the results of soil washing treatability studies at Fernald and Ashtabula that suggest that the technology would only be effective to address final remediation levels higher than 50 pCi/g. The technical review team identified four areas of technical uncertainty that should be resolved before the final selection of a preferred remedial strategy is made. Areas of significant technical uncertainty that should be addressed include: (1) Better delineation of the spatial distribution of surface contamination and the vertical distribution of subsurface contamination in the area of the firing table and associated alluvial deposits; (2) Chemical and physical characterization of residual depleted uranium (DU) at the site; (3) Determination of actual contaminant concentrations in air particulates to support risk modeling; and (4) More realistic estimation of cost for remedial alternatives, including soil washing, that were derived primarily from vendor estimates. Instead of conducting the planned soil washing treatability study, the team recommends that the site consider a new phased approach that combines additional characterization approaches and technologies to address the technical uncertainty in the remedial decision making. The site should redo the risk calculations as the future use scenario has changed for the site. As a result, the existing model is based on very conservative assumptions that result in calculation of unreasonably low cleanup goals. Specifically, the review team proposes that LLNL consider: (1) Revising the industrial worker scenario to a reasonable maximum exposure (RME) for a site worker that performs a weekly walk down of the area for two hours for 25 years (or an alternative RME if the exposure scenario changes); (2) Revising the ESSI of 2 mg U per kg soil for the deer mouse to account for less than 0.05 of the total ingested uranium being adsorbed by the gut; (3) Revising bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) for vegetation and invertebrates that are based on 100 mg of soluble uranium per kg of soil, as the uranium concentration in the slope soil does not average 100 mg/kg and it is not all in a soluble form; and (4) Measuring actual contaminant concentrations in air particulates at the site and using the actual values to support risk calculations. The team recommends that the site continue a phased approach during remediation. The activities should focus on elimination of the principal threats to groundwater by excavating (1) source material from the firing table and alluvial deposits, and (2) soil hotspots from the surrounding slopes with concentrations of U-235 and U-238 that pose unacceptable risk. This phased approach allows the remediation path to be driven by the results of each phase. This reduces the possibility of costly 'surprises', such as failure of soil treatment, and reduces the impact of remediation on endangered habitat. Treatment of the excavated material with physical separation equipment may result in a decreased volume of soil for disposal if the DU is concentrated in the fine-grained fraction, which can then be disposed of in an offsite facility at a considerable cost savings. Based on existing data and a decision to implement the recommended phased approach, the cost of characterization, excavation and physical

Eddy-Dilek, C.; Miles, D.; Abitz, R.

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

155

Savannah River Site Achieves Transuranic Waste Disposition Goal...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

liquid waste contractor, Savannah River Remediation (SRR): Closed two more underground tanks containing radioactive waste, helping reduce a significant environmental risk to South...

156

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Located on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the RoMIC-AFRI was established to protect water resources by addressing the challenge of preventing contamination. The initiative at Oak Ridge is a collaborative effort that leverages DOE investments in basic science and applied research and the work of site contractors to address the complex challenges in the remediation of legacy waste at the Oak Ridge Reservation. The mission of the Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants

157

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity July 9, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Maddie M. Blair Public Affairs Intern, Savannah River Remediation Why does she keep coming back? "There are so many fascinating processes, people, and work

158

Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - January 2011 Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - January 2011 January 2011 Review of the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Unreviewed Safety Question Procedure [ARPT-RL-2011-003] The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security, during a site visit from January 10-14, 2011, presented the results of a technical review of the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (PRC) Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) Procedure. Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - January 2011 More Documents & Publications CX-009415: Categorical Exclusion Determination Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - January 2011

159

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity July 9, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Maddie M. Blair Public Affairs Intern, Savannah River Remediation Why does she keep coming back? "There are so many fascinating processes, people, and work

160

Gas: A Neglected Phase in Remediation of Metals and Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

The gas phase is generally ignored in remediation of metals and radionuclides because it is assumed that there is no efficient way to exploit it. In the literal sense, all remediations involve the gas phase because this phase is linked to the liquid and solid phases by vapor pressure and thermodynamic relationships. Remediation methods that specifically use the gas phase as a central feature have primarily targeted volatile organic contaminants, not metals and radionuclides. Unlike many organic contaminants, the vapor pressure and Henry's Law constants of metals and radionuclides are not generally conducive to direct air stripping of dissolved contaminants. Nevertheless, the gas phase can play an important role in remediation of inorganic contaminants and provide opportunities for efficient, cost effective remediation. The objective here is to explore ways in which manipulation of the gas phase can be used to facilitate remediation of metals and radionuclides.

Denham, Miles E.; Looney, Brian B

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation goals prgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Gene mapping of bovine phosphoribosylglycinamide synthetase (PRGS) and phosphoribosylaminoimidazole synthetase (PAIS) in hybrid somatic cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by various strategies of selective breeding [5, 6, 7] . Breeders select desirable traits based on the phenotypic expression of productivity and health, propagate the desired trait with purebreeds, and crossbreed for heterosis. Further improvement... (RI) strains have also been developed which carzy unique combinations of alleles [9, 10]. Linkage is determined by making a comparison of the strain distribution pattern (SDP) for traits of the original parents. Traits with identical oz similar...

McAvin, James Charles

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

162

Part 2: Quality Assurance Project Plan Remedial Investigation, UMore East  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Part 2: Quality Assurance Project Plan Remedial Investigation, UMore East Dakota County, Minnesota\\23191092 UMore 1948 Parcel Remedial Inv\\WorkFiles\\SAP\\Part 2-QAPP Umore East v2.1\\QAPP rev. 2.1.doc A2 Table\\19\\23191092 UMore 1948 Parcel Remedial Inv\\WorkFiles\\SAP\\Part 2-QAPP Umore East v2.1\\QAPP rev. 2

Netoff, Theoden

163

Integrated phytobial remediation for sustainable management of arsenic in soil and water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Arsenic (As), cited as the most hazardous substance by the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry (ATSDR, 2005), is an ubiquitous metalloid which when ingested for prolonged periods cause extensive health effects leading to ultimate untimely death. Plants and microbes can help mitigate soil and groundwater As problem since they have evolved elaborate detoxification machineries against this toxic metalloid as a result of their coexistence with this since the origin of life on earth. Utilization of the phytoremediation and bioremediation potential of the plants and microbes, respectively, is now regarded as two innovative tools that encompass biology, geology, biotechnology and allied sciences with cutting edge applications for sustainable mitigation of As epidemic. Discovery of As hyperaccumulating plants that uptake and concentrate large amounts of this toxic metalloid in their shoots or roots offered new hope to As phytoremediation, solar power based nature's own green remediation. This review focuses on how phytoremediation and bioremediation can be merged together to form an integrated phytobial remediation which could synergistically achieve the goal of large scale removal of As from soil, sediment and groundwater and overcome the drawbacks of the either processes alone. The review also points to the feasibility of the introduction of transgenic plants and microbes that bring new hope for more efficient treatment of As. The review identifies one critical research gap on the importance of remediation of As contaminated groundwater not only for drinking purpose but also for irrigation purpose and stresses that more research should be conducted on the use of constructed wetland, one of the most suitable areas of application of phytobial remediation. Finally the review has narrowed down on different phytoinvestigation and phytodisposal methods, which constitute the most essential and the most difficult part of pilot scale and field scale applications of phytoremediation programs.

Madhumita Roy; Ashok K. Giri; Sourav Dutta; Pritam Mukherjee

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Utah Division of Environmental Response and Remediation Underground...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Division of Environmental Response and Remediation Underground Storage Tank Branch Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Utah...

165

Remediation of environmental contaminants by novel organoclay adsorbents.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Naturally occuring layer silicate clay minerals could be value-added by modifying the surface properties in order to enhance their efficacy in the remediation of environmental… (more)

Sarkar, Binoy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

SBA Increases Size Standards for Waste Remediation Services ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Remediation Services & InformationAdmin Support December 12, 2012 - 10:22am Addthis John Hale III John Hale III Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization...

167

EPA - National Remedy Review Board webpage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Review Board webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA - National Remedy Review Board webpage Abstract This webpage provides...

168

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation P. Sofronis, I. M. Robertson, D. D. Johnson University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group...

169

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOE has determined that the contamination is not attirbutable to the AEC-sponsored operations. Therefore, DOE does not have legal authority to conduct remedial actions at...

170

100-D/H Remedial Investigation/ Feasibility Study /Proposed...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Remedial Investigation Feasibility Study Proposed Plan Nina Menard Washington State Department of Ecology 100-DH RIFSPP * Received Draft RIFSPP on December 14, 2012 *...

171

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Barriers: Hydrogen embrittlement of pipelines and remediation (mixing with water vapor?) hpwgwembrittlementsteelssofronis.pdf More Documents & Publications Webinar: I2CNER: An...

172

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOW CHEMICAL COMPANY WALNUT CREEK, CALIFORNIA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site...

173

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH LABORATORY) WINCHESTER, MASSACHUSE'ITS Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and...

174

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

PITTSBURGH PLANT FOREST HILLS PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and...

175

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION BAYSIDE, NEW YORK VW. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and...

176

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY NEW YORK, NEW YORK Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning...

177

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

OF ARIZONA (U.S. BUREAU OF MINES) TUCSON, ARIZONA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and...

178

Waterjet injection of powdered activated carbon for sediment remediation .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??"In situ sediment remediation through waterjet-activated carbon amendment delivery is an innovative means to mitigate the dangers posed by hydrophobic organic compounds. Ease of use… (more)

Redell, Chris J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

setting for researchers in both applied and basic science fields. A wealth of subsurface data is available to support research activities and remedial decision making. Led by the...

180

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC CORPORATION BUILDING 7 BLOOMFIELD, NEW JERSEY SW 30 1985 Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation goals prgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

MANAGEMENT ALERT Remediation of Selected Transuranic Waste Drums...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

MANAGEMENT ALERT Remediation of Selected Transuranic Waste Drums at Los Alamos National Laboratory - Potential Impact on the Shutdown of the Department's Waste Isolation Plant DOE...

182

Mission and Goals | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mission and Goals Mission and Goals Mission and Goals October 10, 2013 - 11:56am Addthis Mission Develop and demonstrate new, energy-efficient processing and materials technologies at a scale adequate to prove their value to manufacturers and spur investment. Develop broadly applicable manufacturing processes that reduce energy intensity and improve production. Develop and demonstrate pervasive materials technologies, enabling improved products that use less energy throughout their lifecycles. Conduct technical assistance activities that promote use of advanced technologies and better energy management to capture U.S. competitive advantage. Goal Reduce by 50% in 10 years the life-cycle energy consumption of manufactured goods by targeting the production and use of advanced manufacturing

183

Clean Cities: Clean Cities Goals and Accomplishments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goals and Accomplishments Goals and Accomplishments Clean Cities' primary goal is to cut petroleum use in the United States by 2.5 billion gallons per year by 2020. To achieve this goal, Clean Cities employs three strategies: Replace petroleum with alternative and renewable fuels Reduce petroleum consumption through smarter driving practices and fuel economy improvements Eliminate petroleum use through idle reduction and other fuel-saving technologies and practices. Clean Cities coalitions and stakeholders have saved more than 5 billion gallons of petroleum since the program's inception in 1993. Clean Cities efforts have helped deploy thousands of alternative fuel vehicles and the fueling stations needed to serve them, aided in the elimination of millions of hours of vehicle idling, and helped accelerate the entry of electric-drive vehicles into the marketplace.

184

Energy Efficiency Goal | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Energy Efficiency Goal Energy Efficiency Goal < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info State Texas Program Type Energy Efficiency Resource Standard Texas is credited with being the first state to establish an Energy Efficiency Resource Standard in the United States.* Originally, the goal called for investor owned utilities (IOUs) to meet 10% of its annual growth in electricity demand through energy efficiency. The legislature updated those standards in 2008 ([http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/tlodocs/80R/billtext/html/HB03693F.htm HB3693]) and the Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUCT) finalized the goals and provided additional guidance on how to achieve them. SB1125

185

Clean Energy Portfolio Goal | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portfolio Goal Portfolio Goal Clean Energy Portfolio Goal < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Retail Supplier Utility Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Water Heating Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission In May 2011, Indiana enacted SB 251, creating the Clean Energy Portfolio Standard (CPS). The program sets a voluntary goal of 10% clean energy by 2025, based on the amount of electricity supplied by the utility in 2010. The Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission (IURC) adopted emergency rules (RM #11-05) for the CPS in December 2011. Final rules were adopted in June

186

Institutionalized attitudes, intentions, and goal perceptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management and executive personnel of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department were sampled using a non-experimental, mail survey design. The variances accounted for by organizational-management goal congruence on organizational commitment, general job...

Alexander, Steven Eric

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

187

Sustainability Plan Part I: Strategy and Goals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainability Plan Part I: Strategy and Goals Prepared By: Oregon State University Sustainability University (OSU) Sustainable Facilities Committee (SFC) was established in November, 2004 by the OSU infrastructure and operations toward sustainability. Additionally, the group serves as a discussion forum

Escher, Christine

188

Innovative mathematical modeling in environmental remediation  

SciTech Connect

There are two different ways to model reactive transport: ad hoc and innovative reaction-based approaches. The former, such as the Kd simplification of adsorption, has been widely employed by practitioners, while the latter has been mainly used in scientific communities for elucidating mechanisms of biogeochemical transport processes. It is believed that innovative mechanistic-based models could serve as protocols for environmental remediation as well. This paper reviews the development of a mechanistically coupled fluid flow, thermal transport, hydrologic transport, and reactive biogeochemical model and example-applications to environmental remediation problems. Theoretical bases are sufficiently described. Four example problems previously carried out are used to demonstrate how numerical experimentation can be used to evaluate the feasibility of different remediation approaches. The first one involved the application of a 56-species uranium tailing problem to the Melton Branch Subwatershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the parallel version of the model. Simulations were made to demonstrate the potential mobilization of uranium and other chelating agents in the proposed waste disposal site. The second problem simulated laboratory-scale system to investigate the role of natural attenuation in potential off-site migration of uranium from uranium mill tailings after restoration. It showed inadequacy of using a single Kd even for a homogeneous medium. The third example simulated laboratory experiments involving extremely high concentrations of uranium, technetium, aluminum, nitrate, and toxic metals (e.g.,Ni, Cr, Co).The fourth example modeled microbially-mediated immobilization of uranium in an unconfined aquifer using acetate amendment in a field-scale experiment. The purposes of these modeling studies were to simulate various mechanisms of mobilization and immobilization of radioactive wastes and to illustrate how to apply reactive transport models for environmental remediation.The second problem simulated laboratory-scale system to investigate the role of natural attenuation in potential off-site migration of uranium from uranium mill tailings after restoration. It showed inadequacy of using a single Kd even for a homogeneous medium.

Yeh, Gour T. [Taiwan Typhoon and Flood Research Institute (Taiwan); National Central Univ. (Taiwan); Univ. of Central Florida (United States); Gwo, Jin Ping (Jack) [Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Rockville, MD (United States); Siegel, Malcolm D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Li, Ming-Hsu [National Central Univ. (Taiwan); ; Fang, Yilin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhang, Fan [Inst. of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Luo, Wensui [Inst. of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Yabusaki, Steven B. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

2013-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

189

New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan for Test Area North (TAN) Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B  

SciTech Connect

This remedial action work plan identifies the approach and requirements for implementing the medical zone remedial action for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This plan details management approach for the construction and operation of the New Pump and Treat Facility. As identified in the remedial design/remedial action scope of work, a separate remedial design/remedial action work plan will be prepared for each remedial component of the Operable Unit 1-07B remedial action. This work plan was originally prepared as an early implementation of the final Phase C remediation. At that time, The Phase C implementation strategy was to use this document as the overall Phase C Work Plan and was to be revised to include the remedial actions for the other remedial zones (hotspot and distal zones). After the completion of Record of Decision Amendment: Technical Support Facility Injection Well (TSF-05) and Surrounding Groundwater Contamination (TSF-23) and Miscellaneous No Action Sites, Final Remedial Action, it was determined that each remedial zone would have it own stand-alone remedial action work plan. Revision 1 of this document converts this document to a stand-alone remedial action plan specific to the implementation of the New Pump and Treat Facility used for plume remediation within the medical zone of the OU 1-07B contaminated plume.

D. Vandel

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Access to Courts and Preemption of State Remedies in Collective Action Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

application of preemption doctrine to state judicial remedies. This article applies a “collective action” framework for preemption analysis to the issue of remedial preemption. Our analysis suggests that while remedial preemption may be justified in some...

Glicksman, Robert L.; Levy, Richard E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

RCRA Information Brief, June 1996: Conditional remedies under RCRA correction action  

SciTech Connect

This document describes conditional remedies under RCRA corrective action. The definition of conditional remedies, criteria that must be met, applications to DOE facilities, applicable clean-up standards, and implementation of conditional remedies are discussed in the document.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Characterization of complex mineral assemblages: Implications for contaminant transport and environmental remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...W P ( 1996 ) Ground Water 34 : 778 – 783...environmental remediation. | Surface...and biological remediation strategies...environmental effects ground water humic acids humic...pollutants pollution remediation risk assessment...

Paul M. Bertsch; John C. Seaman

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2011_1012_Hansen_100-K_Remediation.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

K Area Remediation Summary of Draft Su a y o a t Remedial InvestigationFeasibility Study and Proposed Plan Study and Proposed Plan October 2011 Purpose * The 100-K Remedial...

194

New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan For Test Area North Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B  

SciTech Connect

This remedial action work plan identifies the approach and requirements for implementing the medial zone remedial action for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the management approach for the construction and operation of the New Pump and Treat Facility (NPTF). As identified in the remediatial design/remedial action scope of work, a separate remedial design/remedial action work plan will be prepared for each remedial component of the Operable Unit 1-07B remedial action.

Nelson, L. O.

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

195

The mysteries of goal decomposition Scott Munro1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mysteries of goal decomposition Scott Munro1 Sotirios Liaskos2 Jorge Aranda3 1 Department languages such as i*. High-level goals of stakeholders are recursively decomposed into lower level ones, goal modeling, i-star 1 Introduction Goal decomposition is central in goal modeling. High-level goals

Liaskos, Sotirios

196

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation P. Sofronis, I. M. Robertson, D% · Contractor share: 25% · Barriers ­ Hydrogen embrittlement of pipelines and remediation (mixing with water;Objectives · To come up with a mechanistic understanding of hydrogen embrittlement in pipeline steels

197

Integration of biotechnology in remediation and pollution prevention activities  

SciTech Connect

The North American Free Trade Agreement/North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation provides a mechanism for an international collaboration between the US, Canada, and Mexico to jointly develop, modify, or refine technologies that remediate or protect the environment. These countries have a vested interest in this type of collaboration because contaminants do not respect the boundaries of a manufacturing site, region, city, state, or country. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) consists of a diverse group of individuals who address a variety of environmental issues. ESD is involved in basic and applied research on the fate, transport, and remediation of contaminants; environmental assessment; environmental engineering; and demonstrations of advanced remediation technologies. The remediation and protection of the environment includes water, air, and soils for organic, inorganic, and radioactive contaminants. In addition to remediating contaminated sites, research also focuses on life-cycle analyses of industrial processes and the production of green technologies. The author focuses this discussion on subsurface remediation and pollution prevention; however, the research activities encompass water, soil and air and many of the technologies are applicable to all environments. The discussion focuses on the integration of biotechnology with remediation activities and subsequently linking these biological processes to other remediation technologies.

Strong-Gunderson, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Remediation of the Maxey Flats Site. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes issues associated with remedial action of Maxey Flats, a low-level radioactive waste disposal site from 1963-1977, located in Fleming County, Kentucky. Present remedial action alternatives being considered are discussed along with emergency plans, ground water monitoring plans, and budgets.

Not Available

1990-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

199

An I-P-O model of team goal, leader goal orientation, team cohesiveness, and team effectiveness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on a proposed input-process-output model of team goal, leader goal orientation, team cohesion, and team effectiveness, this study examined the influences of the leader trait goal orientation on the relationships between team goals and team...

Yu, Chien-Feng

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

200

LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals Lab demolition projects under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act have recovered more than 136 tons of recyclable metal since work began last year. March 8, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation goals prgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal Los Alamos shipped 1,074 cubic meters of transuranic (TRU) and mixed low-level waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and other approved waste disposal facilities. July 8, 2013 A shipment carrying Los Alamos transuranic waste heads down NM 502, bound for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico. A shipment carrying Los Alamos transuranic waste heads down NM 502, bound for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico. Contact Fred deSousa Communications Office (505) 665-3430 Email "We've made significant progress removing waste stored above ground at Area G, and we made this progress while maintaining an excellent safety record," said Jeff Mousseau, associate director of Environmental Programs

202

Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal Los Alamos shipped 1,074 cubic meters of transuranic (TRU) and mixed low-level waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and other approved waste disposal facilities. July 8, 2013 A shipment carrying Los Alamos transuranic waste heads down NM 502, bound for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico. A shipment carrying Los Alamos transuranic waste heads down NM 502, bound for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico. Contact Fred deSousa Communications Office (505) 665-3430 Email "We've made significant progress removing waste stored above ground at Area G, and we made this progress while maintaining an excellent safety record," said Jeff Mousseau, associate director of Environmental Programs

203

EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at 331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal for the Rock Springs In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Test Site remediation that would be performed at the Rock Springs site in Sweetwater County, Wyoming. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 31, 2000 EA-1331: Finding of No Significant Impact Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site July 31, 2000 EA-1331: Final Environmental Assessment

204

EIS-0198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project 198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project EIS-0198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project SUMMARY This EIS assesses the potential programmatic impacts of conducting the Ground Water Project, provides a method for determining the site-specific ground water compliance strategies, and provides data and information that can be used to prepare site-specific environmental impacts analyses more efficiently. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 28, 1997 EIS-0198: Record of Decision Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project (April 1997) December 1, 1996 EIS-0198: Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project

205

Implementation of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementation of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Implementation of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program: Coordination Between the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Implementation of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program: Coordination Between the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Implementation of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program: Coordination Between the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Waste Management Conference 2010) Implementation of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program: Coordination Between the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Waste Management Conference 2010) More Documents & Publications Recent Developments in DOE FUSRAP

206

Summary - X-701B Groundwater Remedy, Portsmouth, Ohio  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

X-701B Groundwater Remediation ETR Report Date: December 2008 ETR-20 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the X-701B Groundwater Remedy, Portsmouth, Ohio Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) has responsibility for remediation of the X-701B ground water plume with the key contaminant of trichloroethene (TCE). The remedy has been divided into four phases: Phase I- Initial Source Area Treatment, Phase II-Expanded Source Area Treatment, Phase III-Evaluation and Reporting, and Phase IV- Downgradient Remediation and Confirmation of Source Area Treatment. Phase II treatment has injected catalyzed hydrogen peroxide without meeting the

207

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July 2010 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediation - July 2010 Remediation - July 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July 2010 July 2010 Savannah River Operations Office Integrated Safety Management System Phase II Verification Review of Savannah River Remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), participated in the DOE Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), Office of Safety and Quality Assurance (OSQA), Technical Support Division (TSD) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), Phase II Verification of Savannah River Remediation (SRR). The purpose of the DOE-SR Phase II ISMS Verification was to verify that the SRR ISMS Description that was submitted to and approved by the DOE-SR Manager is being effectively implemented at the Savannah

208

DOE Awards Contract for Environmental Remediation Services at California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Remediation Services at Environmental Remediation Services at California Santa Susana Field Laboratory DOE Awards Contract for Environmental Remediation Services at California Santa Susana Field Laboratory September 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor bill.taylor@srs.gov 803-952-8564 Cincinnati - The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a task order (contract) to CDM, A Joint Venture, of Fairfax, Virginia, to provide environmental remediation services for the Energy Technology Engineering Center at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Canoga Park, California. The cost-plus incentive fee task order has a 36-month performance period and a value of $11.3 million. CDM will continue to assist DOE in chemical sampling, the preparation of a chemical data gap analysis and preparing a soils remediation action

209

DEMONSTRATION OF ELECTROCHEMICAL REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES-INDUCED COMPLEXATION  

SciTech Connect

The Project Team is submitting this Topical Report on the results of its bench-scale demonstration of ElectroChemical Remediation Technologies (ECRTs) and in particular the Induced Complexation (ECRTs-IC) process for remediation of mercury contaminated soils at DOE Complex sites. ECRTs is an innovative, in-situ, geophysically based soil remediation technology with over 50 successful commercial site applications involving remediation of over two million metric tons of contaminated soils. ECRTs-IC has been successfully used to remediate 220 cu m of mercury-contaminated sediments in the Union Canal, Scotland. In that operation, ECRTs-IC reduced sediment total mercury levels from an average of 243 mg/kg to 6 mg/kg in 26 days of operation. The clean up objective was to achieve an average total mercury level in the sediment of 20 mg/kg.

Barry L. Burks

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Promoting decision making through a Sustainable Remediation Assessment Matrix (SRAM)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the steps taken in a decision making process through a Sustainable Remediation Assessment Matrix (SRAM). The development of the SRAM deals with Complex, Large-scale Interconnected, Open, and Socio-technical System (CLIOS). For both large and small contaminated areas, considers potential impacts on neighbouring areas, the contribution to air emissions from the materials of the proposed project and the energy to be consumed. Along this line, the research focused on setting up a model under a systems perspective. A systemigram, from remedial investigation to project closeout, has been developed. For each stage of the remediation project, the process to identify stakeholders has been outlined. Moreover, and as an illustrative example, environmental, social, and economic aspects of remedial operations have been addressed on a specific case using the US Air Force Sustainable Remediation Tool (SRT).

Aspasia Kalomoiri; Washington Braida

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Transmission line route selection by goal programming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A two-stage solution for transmission line route selection is presented. The generalized double-sweep method has been used to select the K least costly routes. The selected routes are subjected to social and environmental constraints (SEC). The SEC problem is formulated as a zero-one goal-programming model and solved by the implicit enumeration method. The two-stage solution algorithm has been applied to two problems. The results indicate the suitability of the method for route selection provided that acceptable SEC criteria can be found. The results also indicate the viability of the goal-programming technique for choosing power network interconnection concepts.

I.M. Elamin; S.O. Duffuaa; H.A. Yassein

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Renewables Portfolio Goal | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Renewables Portfolio Goal Renewables Portfolio Goal < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Water Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Solar Home Weatherization Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Utah Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider Office of Energy Development Utah enacted ''The Energy Resource and Carbon Emission Reduction Initiative'' ([http://le.utah.gov/~2008/bills/sbillenr/sb0202.pdf S.B. 202]) in March 2008. While this law contains some provisions similar to those found in renewable portfolio standards (RPSs) adopted by other

213

E-Print Network 3.0 - active chemical remediation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

.405 Discovery or notification. 300.410 Removal site evaluation. 300.415 Removal action. 300.420 Remedial site... evaluation. 300.425 Establishing remedial...

214

Verification of Active and Passive Ground-Water Contamination Remediation Efforts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The verification of ground-water contamination remediation efforts requires thorough documentation of subsurface conditions ... comprehensive approach to the design and operation of remediation efforts with an em...

M. J. Barcelona

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

An investigation of school factors related to enrollment in remedial writing at postsecondary institutions in Montana.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Remedial postsecondary coursework, while ubiquitous, is a high cost means for students to become prepared to complete the rigors of postsecondary education. Remedial coursework… (more)

Shipman, Dustin Harry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

An investigation of school factors related to enrollment in remedial writing at postsecondary institutions in Montana.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Remedial postsecondary coursework, while ubiquitous, is a high cost means for students to become prepared to complete the rigors of postsecondary education. Remedial coursework represents… (more)

Shipman, Dustin Harry.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

120 Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 32, no. 1/ Winter 2012/pages 120130 NGWA.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

120 Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 32, no. 1/ Winter 2012/pages 120­130 NGWA.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation © 2011, National Ground Water Association. Published 2011. This article known as emerging contaminants (ECs) to surrounding groundwater and surface water. ECs consist

218

DWPF SMECT PVV SAMPLE CHARACTERIZATION AND REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

On April 2, 2013, a solid sample of material collected from the Defense Waste Processing Facility’s Process Vessel Vent (PVV) jumper for the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) was received at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). DWPF has experienced pressure spikes within the SMECT and other process vessels which have resulted in processing delays while a vacuum was re-established. Work on this sample was requested in a Technical Assistance Request (TAR). This document reports the results of chemical and physical property measurements made on the sample, as well as insights into the possible impact to the material using DWPF’s proposed remediation methods. DWPF was interested in what the facility could expect when the material was exposed to either 8M nitric acid or 90% formic acid, the two materials they have the ability to flush through the PVV line in addition to process water once the line is capped off during a facility outage.

Bannochie, C.; Crawford, C.

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

219

Tank waste remediation system engineering plan  

SciTech Connect

This Engineering Plan describes the engineering process and controls that will be in place to support the Technical Baseline definition and manage its evolution and implementation to the field operations. This plan provides the vision for the engineering required to support the retrieval and disposal mission through Phase 1 and 2, which includes integrated data management of the Technical Baseline. Further, this plan describes the approach for moving from the ``as is`` condition of engineering practice, systems, and facilities to the desired ``to be`` configuration. To make this transition, Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Engineering will become a center of excellence for TWRS which,will perform engineering in the most effective manner to meet the mission. TWRS engineering will process deviations from sitewide systems if necessary to meet the mission most effectively.

Rifaey, S.H.

1998-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

220

Environmental remediation and waste management information systems  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to document a few of the many environmental information systems that currently exist worldwide. The paper is not meant to be a comprehensive list; merely a discussion of a few of the more technical environmental database systems that are available. Regulatory databases such as US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) RODS (Records of Decision System) database [EPA, 1993] and cost databases such as EPA`s CORA (Cost of Remedial Action) database [EPA, 1993] are not included in this paper. Section 2 describes several US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) information systems and databases. Section 3 discusses several US EPA information systems on waste sites and technologies. Section 4 summarizes a few of the European Community environmental information systems, networks, and clearinghouses. And finally, Section 5 provides a brief overview of Geographical Information Systems. Section 6 contains the references, and the Appendices contain supporting information.

Harrington, M.W.; Harlan, C.P.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation goals prgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

R&D priorities in the field of sustainable remediation and purification of agro-industrial and municipal wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article was presented as a position paper during the Environmental Biotechnology and Microbiology Conference in Bologna, Italy in April 2012. It indicates major and emerging environmental biotechnology research and development (R&D) priorities for EU members in the field of sustainable remediation and purification of agro-industrial and municipal wastewater. The identified priorities are: anaerobic/aerobic microbial treatment, combination of photochemical and biological treatment, phytoremediation and algae-based remediation, as well as innovative technologies currently investigated, such as enzyme-based treatment, bioelectrochemical treatment and recovery of nutrients and reuse of cleaned water. State of the art, research needs and prospective development in these domains are crucially discussed. As a result, goals of the future development of bioremediation and purification processes are defined and the way to achieve them is proposed.

Korneliusz Miksch; Grzegorz Cema; Philippe F.-X. Corvini; Ewa Felis; Adam Sochacki; Joanna Surmacz-Górska; Jaros?aw Wiszniowski; Sebastian ?abczynski

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Saving Money When Eating Out SESSION GOALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saving Money When Eating Out SESSION GOALS: Participants will understand the impact that eating out has on their personal food budget. In addition, participants will learn ways that they can save money. Apply techniques that will enable participants to save money when eating out. #12;2 Saving Money When

223

Towards quantifying the completeness of BDI goals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Often, such as in the presence of conflicts, an agent must choose between multiple intentions. The level of completeness of the intentions can be a factor in this deliberation. We sketch a pragmatic but principled mechanism for quantifying the level ... Keywords: goal reasoning, partial completeness, resource summaries

John Thangarajah, James Harland, David N. Morley, Neil Yorke-Smith

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

FUSION POWER PLANTS GOALS AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHALLENGES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FUSION POWER PLANTS ­ GOALS AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHALLENGES Farrokh Najmabadi Dept. of Electrical & Computer Eng. and Fusion Energy Research Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0417 619-534-7869 (619-534-7716, Fax) ABSTRACT Fusion is one of a few future power sources with the poten

Najmabadi, Farrokh

225

Second Decade Planning Setting System Wide Goals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

School Enrollment Should be done HS by going rate with rollups to colleges and to total. Build in the HS an Efficient, Sustainable Organization · For each category, a small number of goals will be set that will o of students earning degrees through the University Centers to A. Creating an efficient, sustainable

Olsen, Stephen L.

226

Fast Food with Slow Cookers SESSION GOALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fast Food with Slow Cookers SESSION GOALS: Participants will learn how to use a slow cooker to help cooker. SESSION OBJECTIVES: By participating in today's session, participants will be able to: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of key food safety principles when using a slow cooker. 2. Prepare more

227

Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Remedial investigation results  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the remedial investigation (RI) conducted at J-Field in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), a U.S. Army installation located in Harford County, Maryland. Since 1917, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, and testing of chemical agents and munitions and the subsequent destruction of these materials at J-Field by open burning and open detonation. These activities have raised concerns about environmental contamination at J-Field. This RI was conducted by the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division, Directorate of Safety, Health and Environmental Division of APG, pursuant to requirements outlined under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA). The RI was accomplished according to the procedures developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988). The RI provides a comprehensive evaluation of the site conditions, nature of contaminants present, extent of contamination, potential release mechanisms and migration pathways, affected populations, and risks to human health and the environment. This information will be used as the basis for the design and implementation of remedial actions to be performed during the remedial action phase, which will follow the feasibility study (FS) for J-Field.

Yuen, C. R.; Martino, L. E.; Biang, R. P.; Chang, Y. S.; Dolak, D.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R. A.; Patton, T. L.; Prasad, S.; Quinn, J.; Rosenblatt, D. H.; Vercellone, J.; Wang, Y. Y.

2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

228

GOAL OF THE STATE WETLANDS STRATEGY It shall be the goal of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHAPTER 2 GOAL OF THE STATE WETLANDS STRATEGY It shall be the goal of the State of Tennessee to provide the maximum practicable wetlands benefits to Tennessee and her citizens by conserving, enhancing, and restoring the acreage, quality, and biological diversity of Tennessee wetlands. The management of wetlands

Gray, Matthew

229

Effects of remediation amendments on vadose zone microorganisms  

SciTech Connect

Surfactant-based foam delivery technology has been studied to remediate Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment. However, the surfactants and remediation amendments have an unknown effect on indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Microbial populations are important factors to consider in remediation efforts due to their potential to alter soil geochemistry. This project focuses on measuring microbial metabolic responses to remediation amendments in batch and column studies using Deep Vadose Zone Sediments. Initial studies of the microbes from Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment showed surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) and remediation amendment calcium polysulfide (CPS) had no affect on microbial growth using BiologTM Ecoplates. To move towards a more realistic field analog, soil columns were packed with Hanford 200 Area sediment. Once microbial growth in the column was verified by observing growth of the effluent solution on tryptic soy agar plates, remedial surfactants were injected into the columns, and the resulting metabolic diversity was measured. Results suggest surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) stimulates microbial growth. The soil columns were also visualized using X-ray microtomography to inspect soil packing and possibly probe for evidence of biofilms. Overall, BiologTM Ecoplates provide a rapid assay to predict effects of remediation amendments on Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone microorganisms.

Miller, Hannah M.; Tilton, Fred A.

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

230

Remedial Action Assessment System (RAAS): Evaluation of selected feasibility studies of CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act) hazardous waste sites  

SciTech Connect

Congress and the public have mandated much closer scrutiny of the management of chemically hazardous and radioactive mixed wastes. Legislative language, regulatory intent, and prudent technical judgment, call for using scientifically based studies to assess current conditions and to evaluate and select costeffective strategies for mitigating unacceptable situations. The NCP requires that a Remedial Investigation (RI) and a Feasibility Study (FS) be conducted at each site targeted for remedial response action. The goal of the RI is to obtain the site data needed so that the potential impacts on public health or welfare or on the environment can be evaluated and so that the remedial alternatives can be identified and selected. The goal of the FS is to identify and evaluate alternative remedial actions (including a no-action alternative) in terms of their cost, effectiveness, and engineering feasibility. The NCP also requires the analysis of impacts on public health and welfare and on the environment; this analysis is the endangerment assessment (EA). In summary, the RI, EA, and FS processes require assessment of the contamination at a site, of the potential impacts in public health or the environment from that contamination, and of alternative RAs that could address potential impacts to the environment. 35 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Whelan, G. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Hartz, K.E.; Hilliard, N.D. (Beck (R.W.) and Associates, Seattle, WA (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

FORMERLY REMEDIAL UTILIZED SITES ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

(' (' . . FORMERLY REMEDIAL UTILIZED SITES ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT ELIMINATION REPORT FORMER VITRO LABORATORIES FORMER VITRO LABORATORIES VITRO CORPORATION VITRO CORPORATION WEST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY WEST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY SEP 30 1985 SEP 30 1985 Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Waste Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Deconxnissioning Projects . CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES iii Page 7 3 4 - _- mI _---. ELSMINATION REPORT FORMER VITRO LABORATORIES, VITRO CORPORATION, WEST ORAN6E, NEW JERSEY INTRODUCTION . The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site

232

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM . ELIMINATION REPORT FOR AL-TECH SPECIALTY STEEL CORPORATION (THE FORMER ALLEGHENY-LUDLUM STEEL CORPORATION) _ WATERYLIET, NEW YORK, AND DUNKIRK, NEW YORK SEP 301985 Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects ----- ----_l_.._- .._. _- CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES iii .- --- .- Page . 1 4 ELIMINATION REPORT AL-TECH SPECIALTY STEEL CORPORATION (THE FORMER ALLEGHENY-LUDLUM STEEL CORPORATION) WATERYLIET, NEW YORK, AND DUNKIRK, NEW YORK 1 INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office

233

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I I c. ,..I -. i FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT FOR BRIDGEPORT BRASS COMPANY HAVENS LABORATORY (REACTIVE METALS, INC.) KOSSUTH AND PULASKI STREETS BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUT i Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decomnissioning Projects CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES Page 1 . 2 ii .-_. _.--_- "~ ELIMINATION REPORT FORMER BRIDGEPORT BRASS COMPANY HAVENS LABORATORY (REACTIVE METALS, INC. 1 KOSSUTH AND PULASKI STREETS BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUT INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and kaste Technology, Division of Facility and Site

234

Sulfate Reduction in Groundwater: Characterization and Applications for Remediation  

SciTech Connect

Sulfate is ubiquitous in groundwater, with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Sulfate reduction reactions play a significant role in mediating redox conditions and biogeochemical processes for subsurface systems. They also serve as the basis for innovative in-situ methods for groundwater remediation. An overview of sulfate reduction in subsurface environments is provided, with a specific focus on implications for groundwater remediation. A case study presenting the results of a pilot-scale ethanol injection test illustrates the advantages and difficulties associated with the use of electron-donor amendments for sulfate remediation.

Miao, Z.; Brusseau, M. L.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Carreon-Diazconti, C.; Johnson, B.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Iowa Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act (Iowa) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Iowa Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act Iowa Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act (Iowa) Iowa Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources

236

FTCP FY 2011 Operational Plan - Goal 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Accelerate and Expand Implementation of eTQP Champions: Allen Tate, SSO and Robert Hastings, RL Goal was not achieved due to change in software platform. The goal to automate portions of the TQP is identified in the FTCP FY2011 Ops Plan as a separate issue. Objective 1: Acceleration of eTQP Baseline Champion: Allen Tate Accomplishments The team developed an implementation schedule but the rest of the objective was not accomplished due to HC-1 decision to change the eTQP software platform to PLATEAU versus Vision. Subsequent energy of the team was spent on trying to find alternative approaches to fund and use Vision. The fiscal year ended with no solutions. Objective 2: Accelerate Implementation of eTQP Champion: Rob Hastings Accomplishments

237

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY Energy Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NAVY NAVY Energy Goals 31 May 2013 CAPT Kerry Gilpin, USN Director, 1GW Task Force Marines checking door-to-door in New Orleans, September 2005 SECNAV Energy Goals Increase Alternative Energy Sources Ashore Sail the "Great Green Fleet" Reduce Non-tactical Petroleum Use Energy Efficient Acquisitions Increase Alternative Energy Department-wide It's about the Mission Gunnery Control Console, USS ANZIO (CG 68) What's the next mission? SH-60F helicopter from USS RONALD REAGAN (CVN 76) surveys tsunami damage, 21 March 2011 1GW of renewable energy: enough to power 250,000 homes or a city the size of Orlando, FL http://www.secnav.navy.mil/eie/ Pages/Energy.aspx Naval Station Sasebo, Japan

238

WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

SRI International is conducting experiments to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology or hot water extraction (HWE) technology for remediating petroleum-contaminated soils. Most current remediation practices either fail to remove the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in petroleum-contaminated sites, are too costly, or require the use of organic solvents at the expense of additional contamination and with the added cost of recycling solvents. Hydrothermal extraction offers the promise of efficiently extracting PAHs and other kinds of organics from contaminated soils at moderate temperatures and pressures, using only water and inorganic salts such as carbonate. SRI has conducted experiments to measure the solubility and rate of solubilization of selected PAHs (fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, 9,10-dimethylanthracene) in water using SRI's hydrothermal optical cell with the addition of varying amounts of sodium carbonate to evaluate the efficiency of the technology for removing PAHs from the soil. SRI data shows a very rapid increase in solubility of PAHs with increase in temperature in the range 25-275 C. SRI also measured the rate of solubilization, which is a key factor in determining the reactor parameters. SRI results for fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, and 9,10-dimethylanthracene show a linear relationship between rate of solubilization and equilibrium solubility. Also, we have found the rate of solubilization of pyrene at 275 C to be 6.5 ppm/s, indicating that the equilibrium solubilization will be reached in less than 3 min at 275 C; equilibrium solubility of pyrene at 275 C is 1000 ppm. Also, pyrene and fluoranthene appear to have higher solubilities in the presence of sodium carbonate. In addition to this study, SRI studied the rate of removal of selected PAHs from spiked samples under varying conditions (temperature, pore sizes, and pH). We have found a higher removal of PAHs in the presence of sodium carbonate in both sand and bentonite systems. Also, sodium carbonate greatly reduces the possible reactor corrosion under hydrothermal conditions. Our results show that a water-to-sand ratio of at least 3:1 is required to efficiently remove PAH from soil under static conditions.

Indira S. Jayaweera; Montserrat Marti-Perez; Jordi Diaz-Ferrero; Angel Sanjurjo

2001-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

239

In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Evaluation and assessment of containment technology  

SciTech Connect

Containment technology refers to a broad range of methods that are used to contain waste or contaminated groundwater and to keep uncontaminated water from entering a waste site. The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Technology Development has instituted the In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISRIP) to advance the state-of-the-art of innovative technologies that contain or treat, in situ, contaminated media such as soil and groundwater, to the point of demonstration and to broaden the applicability of these technologies to the widely varying site remediation requirements throughout the DOE complex. The information provided here is an overview of the state-of-the-art of containment technology and includes a discussion of ongoing development projects; identifies the technical gaps; discusses the priorities for resolution of the technical gaps; and identifies the site parameters affecting the application of a specific containment method. The containment technology described in this document cover surface caps; vertical barriers such as slurry walls, grout curtains, sheet pilings, frozen soil barriers, and vitrified barriers; horizontal barriers; sorbent barriers; and gravel layers/curtains. Within DOE, containment technology could be used to prevent water infiltration into buried waste; to provide for long-term containment of pits, trenches, and buried waste sites; for the interim containment of leaking underground storage tanks and piping; for the removal of contaminants from groundwater to prevent contamination from migrating off-site; and as an interim measure to prevent the further migration of contamination during the application of an in situ treatment technology such as soil flushing. The ultimate goal is the implementation of containment technology at DOE sites as a cost-effective, efficient, and safe choice for environmental remediation and restoration activities.

Gerber, M.A.; Fayer, M.J.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE RADIATION SURVEY AND SITE INVESTIGATION PROCESS, THE CERCLA REMEDIAL OR REMOVAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment Site Inspection Remedial Investigation Feasibility Study Remedial Design/ Remedial Action PassAPPENDIX F THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE RADIATION SURVEY AND SITE INVESTIGATION PROCESS, THE CERCLA REMEDIAL OR REMOVAL PROCESS, AND THE RCRA CORRECTIVE ACTION PROCESS This appendix presents a discussion

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation goals prgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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241

Managing Legacy Records for Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Managing Legacy Records for Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Sites (Waste Management Conference 2008)

242

REMEDIATION OF HIGH WATER CONTENT GEOMATERIALS: A REVIEW OF GEOTEXTILE FILTER PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costly remediation alternatives is capping of surface impoundments such as lagoons, ponds or old quarries

Aydilek, Ahmet

243

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT FOR OCCIDENTAL CHEMICAL CORPORATION ( FORMER HOOKER ELECTROCHEMICAL COMPANY ) NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK SEP 30 1985 Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects ELIMINATION REPORT FOR OCCIDENTAL CHEMICAL CORPORATION (FORMER HOOKER ELECTROCHEMICAL COMPANY) L NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK- INTRODUCTION The Department ' of Energy (DDE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or the predecessor agencies, offices, and divisions), has reviewed the past activities of the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (MED/AEC) at

244

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company The Office of Hea1th, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement and Oversight has evaluated the facts and circumstances of a series of radiological work deficiencies at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and the 105 K-East Reactor Facility (105KE Reactor) by CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). The radiological work deficiencies at PFP are documented in the April 29, 2011, Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) Surveillance Report S-11-SED-CHP~C-PFP-002, Planning and Execution of Radiological Work. S-11-SED-CHPRC-PFP-002 documented four examples where inadequate hazard analysis resulted in airborne radioactivity that exceeded the limits of the controlling radiological work permit.

245

Integrated Systems-Based Approach to Monitoring Environmental Remediation  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for risk reduction and cleanup of its nuclear weapons complex. Remediation strategies for some of the existing contamination use techniques that mitigate risk, but leave contaminants in place. Monitoring to verify remedy performance and long-term mitigation of risk is a key element for implementing these strategies and can be a large portion of the total cost of remedy implementation. Especially in these situations, there is a need for innovative monitoring approaches that move away from the cost and labor intensive point-source monitoring. A systems-based approach to monitoring design focuses monitoring on controlling features and processes to enable effective interpretation of remedy performance.

Bunn, Amoret L.; Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

246

Integrated Systems-Based Approach to Monitoring Environmental Remediation - 13211  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for risk reduction and cleanup of its nuclear weapons complex. Remediation strategies for some of the existing contamination use techniques that mitigate risk, but leave contaminants in place. Monitoring to verify remedy performance and long-term mitigation of risk is a key element for implementing these strategies and can be a large portion of the total cost of remedy implementation. Especially in these situations, there is a need for innovative monitoring approaches that move away from the cost and labor intensive point-source monitoring. A systems-based approach to monitoring design focuses monitoring on controlling features and processes to enable effective interpretation of remedy performance. (authors)

Truex, Mike; Oostrom, Mart; Carroll, K.C.; Bunn, Amoret; Wellman, Dawn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, Washington (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, Washington (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Oak Ridge Associated Universities OF Preparedfor REMEDIAL ACTIONS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-7 8,-7 C 7 I 2o.1-1o 1 ORAU 891-29 Prepared by VERIFICATION Oak Ridge Associated Universities OF Preparedfor REMEDIAL ACTIONS ecommissioning ALBANY RESEARCH CENTER...

248

Groundwater remediation at a former oil service site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not only because I spent more time on it than any other project, but also because it represents the broadness and depth of a typical URS remediation project. In this report, findings from previous environmental investigations were summarized and used...

Han, Liping

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

249

DRAFT HAB Advice: Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HAB Advice: Remedial InvestigationFeasibility Study and Proposed Plan for the 100-FR-1, 100-FR-2, 100-FR-3, 100-IU-2 and 100-IU-6 Operable Units; DOERL Authors; Shelley Cimon,...

250

Summary - Building C-400 Thermal Treatment Remedial Design Report...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation, Paducah Kentucky Why DOE-EM Did This Review...

251

300 Area Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study and Proposed...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S. Hudson Page 1 of 2 300 Area Remedial InvestigationFeasibility Study and Proposed Plan Deconstruct Advice Points (paragraph number ) 4-1 The Board believes the Tri-Party...

252

Applications of triazine chemistry: education, remediation, and drug delivery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and its effect on the environment and society. The modification of chitosan for herbicide remediation has been accomplished using triazine chemistry, as well. Treatment of chitosan iteratively with cyanuric chloride followed by piperazine produces...

Hatfield, Susan Elizabeth

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Transfer and commercialisation of contaminated groundwater remediation technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High costs and poor performance of conventional groundwater remediation technologies have brought a call for the deployment of innovative technologies capable of attaining regulatory standards while satisfying time and budget constraints. To develop an innovative technology in the laboratory and ultimately transition it to full-scale commercialisation, presents challenges at various levels. Scientific and engineering problems and regulatory and legal issues exist that must be dealt with when moving a technology from the laboratory to the field. Importantly, cost and performance data must be presented in a manner that convinces stakeholders that the technology can accomplish remediation more economically, safely and efficiently than conventional technologies. The challenges of transferring and commercialising innovative groundwater remediation technologies and strategies that may be used to help overcome these challenges are discussed. Case studies of groundwater remediation technology transfer are presented.

Mark N. Goltz; Kenneth J. Williamson

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Uranium mining legacies remediation and renaissance development: an international overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The uranium mining industry has a record of environmental management that has been very variable over the past 50 years. Although there have been examples of good remediation in some countries, sadly there are...

Peter Waggitt

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services related to a Radioactive Material Release during Trench Remediation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, (EA-97-04) On June 6, 1997, the U.S. Department...

256

SBA Increases Size Standards for Waste Remediation Services &  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SBA Increases Size Standards for Waste Remediation Services & SBA Increases Size Standards for Waste Remediation Services & Information/Admin Support SBA Increases Size Standards for Waste Remediation Services & Information/Admin Support December 12, 2012 - 10:22am Addthis John Hale III John Hale III Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization Earlier this week, the U.S. Small Business Administration announced that they have revised size definitions for small businesses in Administrative and Support & Waste Management and Remediation Services categories, saying these revisions "reflect changes in marketplace conditions." The new standards are published in the Federal Register. Increases to size standards will enable some growing small businesses in these sectors to retain their small business status; will give federal

257

The 100-C-7 Remediation Project. An Overview of One of DOE's Largest Remediation Projects - 13260  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (RL), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington Closure Hanford LLC (WCH) completed remediation of one of the largest waste sites in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The waste site, 100-C-7, covers approximately 15 football fields and was excavated to a depth of 85 feet (groundwater). The project team removed a total of 2.3 million tons of clean and contaminated soil, concrete debris, and scrap metal. 100-C-7 lies in Hanford's 100 B/C Area, home to historic B and C Reactors. The waste site was excavated in two parts as 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1. The pair of excavations appear like pit mines. Mining engineers were hired to design their tiered sides, with safety benches every 17 feet and service ramps which allowed equipment access to the bottom of the excavations. The overall cleanup project was conducted over a span of almost 10 years. A variety of site characterization, excavation, load-out and sampling methodologies were employed at various stages of remediation. Alternative technologies were screened and evaluated during the project. A new method for cost effectively treating soils was implemented - resulting in significant cost savings. Additional opportunities for minimizing waste streams and recycling were identified and effectively implemented by the project team. During the final phase of cleanup the project team applied lessons learned throughout the entire project to address the final, remaining source of chromium contamination. The C-7 cleanup now serves as a model for remediating extensive deep zone contamination sites at Hanford. (authors)

Post, Thomas C. [U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Strom, Dean [Washington Closure Hanford LLC, 2620 Fermi Avenue, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford LLC, 2620 Fermi Avenue, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Beulow, Laura [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 309 Bradley Boulevard, Suite 115, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 309 Bradley Boulevard, Suite 115, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Remediation of Uranium Impacted Sediments in a Watercourse - 12486  

SciTech Connect

In 2009, remediation was initiated for a non-operational fuel cycle facility previously used for government contract work. Between 2009 and the spring of 2011, remediation efforts were focused on demolition of contaminated buildings and removal of contaminated soil. In the late spring of 2011, the last phase of remediation commenced involving the removal of contaminated sediments from portions of a 1,200 meter long gaining stream. Planning and preparation for remediation of the stream began in 2009 with submittal of permit applications to undertake construction activities in a wetland area. The permitting process was lengthy and involved securing permits from multiple agencies. However, early and frequent communication with stakeholders played an integral role in efficiently obtaining the permit approvals. Frequent communication with stakeholders throughout the planning and remediation process also proved to be a key factor in timely completion of the project. The remediation of the stream involved the use of temporary bladder berms to divert surface water flow, water diversion piping, a sediment vacuum removal system, excavation of sediments using small front-end loaders, sediment dewatering, and waste packaging, transportation and disposal. Many safeguards were employed to protect several species of concern in the work area, water management during project activities, challenges encountered during the project, methods of Final Status Survey, and stream restoration. The planning and permitting effort for the Site Brook remediation began in May 2009 and permits were approved and in place by February 2011. The remediation and restoration of the Site Brook began in April 2011 and was completed in November 2011. The remediation of the Site Brook involved the use of temporary bladder berms to divert surface water flow, water diversion piping, a sediment vacuum removal system, excavation of sediments using small front-end loaders, sediment dewatering, and waste packaging, transportation, disposal, FSS, and restoration. Early and frequent communications with stakeholders proved to be a key factor in timely completion of the project. Challenges encountered during the remediation effort were overcome by proper planning and having preparedness procedures in place prior to executing the work. With the remediation and restoration successfully completed, the only remaining task is to monitor/maintain the restoration for 10 years. (authors)

Shephard, E.; Walter, N.; Downey, H.; Collopy, P. [AMEC E and I, Inc., 511 Congress Street, Suite 200, Portland, ME 04101 (United States); Conant, J. [ABB, Inc., 5 Waterside Crossing, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report - Volume I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

494-VOL I/REV 1 494-VOL I/REV 1 U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office E nv i r onm ent al R es t or at i on D i v i s i on N ev ada E nv i r onm ent al R es t or at i on Pr oj ect S al m on S i t e R em edi al Inv es t i gat i on R epor t Vol u m e I R ev i s i on N o. : 1 S ept em ber 1999 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. This page intentionally left blank DOE/NV--494-VOL I/REV 1 SALMON SITE REMEDIAL INVESTIGATION REPORT DOE Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada Revision No.: 1 September 1999 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Available to the public from - U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 (703) 487-4650 Available electronically at http://www.doe.gov/bridge. Available to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors in paper from -

260

WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

SRI International conducted experiments in a two-year, two-phase process to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology, also known as hot water extraction (HWE) technology, to separate petroleum-related contaminants and other hazardous pollutants from soil and sediments. In this process, water with added electrolytes (inexpensive and environmentally friendly) is used as the extracting solvent under subcritical conditions (150-300 C). The use of electrolytes allows us to operate reactors under mild conditions and to obtain high separation efficiencies that were hitherto impossible. Unlike common organic solvents, water under subcritical conditions dissolves both organics and inorganics, thus allowing opportunities for separation of both organic and inorganic material from soil. In developing this technology, our systematic approach was to (1) establish fundamental solubility data, (2) conduct treatability studies with industrial soils, and (3) perform a bench-scale demonstration using a highly contaminated soil. The bench-scale demonstration of the process has shown great promise. The next step of the development process is the successful pilot demonstration of this technology. Once pilot tested, this technology can be implemented quite easily, since most of the basic components are readily available from mature technologies (e.g., steam stripping, soil washing, thermal desorption). The implementation of this technology will revolutionize the conventional use of water in soil remediation technologies and will provide a stand-alone technology for removal of both volatile and heavy components from contaminated soil.

Indira S. Jayaweera; Montserrat Marti-Perez; Jordi Diaz-Ferrero; Angel Sanjurjo

2001-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation goals prgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Remedial Action and Waste Disposal Conduct of OperationsMatrix  

SciTech Connect

This Conduct of Operations (CONOPS) matrix incorporates the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) CONOPS matrix (BHI-00746, Rev. 0). The ERDF CONOPS matrix has been expanded to cover all aspects of the RAWD project. All remedial action and waste disposal (RAWD) operations, including waste remediation, transportation, and disposal at the ERDF consist of construction-type activities as opposed to nuclear power plant-like operations. In keeping with this distinction, the graded approach has been applied to the developmentof this matrix.

M. A. Casbon.

1999-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

262

Commencement Bay Nearshore/Tideflats Remedial Investigation. summary report  

SciTech Connect

The report summarizes work complete under the U.S. EPA/WDOE Cooperative Agreement for the Commencement Bay Nearshore/Tideflats Remedial Investigation of the Waterways/Shoreline area. The Commencement Bay Superfund Investigation includes various integrated program management and technical components. These include assessments of chemical contamination, biological effects, toxicity, and public health concerns; identification of sources; and identification of potential remedial actions and technologies.

Not Available

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

A New Approach to Wastewater Remediation Based on Bifunctional Electrodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A New Approach to Wastewater Remediation Based on Bifunctional Electrodes ... To illustrate this innovative technique, TiO2/Ti/Ta2O5?IrO2 bifunctional electrodes were prepared using a facile thermal decomposition technique and employed in this study. ... The establishment and enforcement of limits for the discharge and/or disposal of toxic and hazardous materials has required the development of new technologies to effectively remediate a variety of gaseous and liquid effluents, solid waste and sludge. ...

Robert Matthew Asmussen; Min Tian; Aicheng Chen

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

264

Goal Practice & Experience : Status Quo and Future for Industrial...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Goal Practice & Experience : Status Quo and Future for Industrial Scale Biomass Energy Development in China Goal Practice & Experience : Status Quo and Future for Industrial Scale...

265

Hydrogen Program Goal-Setting Methodologies Report to Congress...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Program Goal-Setting Methodologies Report to Congress Hydrogen Program Goal-Setting Methodologies Report to Congress This Report to Congress, published in August 2006,...

266

Los Angeles County's Green Idea House Achieves Efficient Goals...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Los Angeles County's Green Idea House Achieves Efficient Goals Los Angeles County's Green Idea House Achieves Efficient Goals Photo of an energy-efficient home with modern...

267

State Energy Program Goals, Metrics, and History | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

State Energy Program Goals, Metrics, and History State Energy Program Goals, Metrics, and History The mission of the State Energy Program (SEP) is to provide leadership to maximize...

268

Federal Progress Toward Energy/Sustainability Goals | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Progress Toward EnergySustainability Goals Federal Progress Toward EnergySustainability Goals Presentation covers Federal facility efficiency investment and progress toward...

269

A New Framework for Adaptive Sampling and Analysis During Long-Term Monitoring and Remedial Action Management  

SciTech Connect

DOE and other Federal agencies are making a significant investment in the development of field analytical techniques, nonintrusive technologies, and sensor technologies that will have a profound impact on the way environmental monitoring is conducted. Monitoring and performance evaluation networks will likely be base on suites of in situ sensors, with physical sampling playing a much more limited role. Designing and using these types of networks effectively will require development of a new paradigm for sampling and analysis of remedial actions, which is the overall goal of this project.

Minsker, Barbara; Albert Valocchi; Barbara Bailey

2008-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

270

ACTIVE CAPPING TECHNOLOGY - NEW APPROACHES FOR IN SITU REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluated pilot-scale active caps composed of apatite, organoclay, biopolymers, and sand for the remediation of metal-contaminated sediments. The active caps were constructed in Steel Creek, at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. Monitoring was conducted for 12 months. Effectiveness of the caps was based on an evaluation of contaminant bioavailability, resistance to erosion, and impacts on benthic organisms. Active caps lowered metal bioavailability in the sediment during the one-year test period. Biopolymers reduced sediment suspension during cap construction, increased the pool of carbon, and lowered the release of metals. This field validation showed that active caps can effectively treat contaminants by changing their speciation, and that caps can be constructed to include more than one type of amendment to achieve multiple goals.

Knox, A.; Paller, M.; Roberts, J.

2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

271

GAO report recommends review of goals, objectives  

SciTech Connect

This article highlights a recent GAO study titled Nuclear Waste: Yucca Mountain Project Behind Schedule and Facing Major Scientific Uncertainties. The study was undertaken at the request of the former chairman of the Subcommittee on Nuclear Regulation, the predecessor of the current Subcommittee on Clean Air and Nuclear Regulation of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works. The report concludes that the level of funding DOE is requesting is not adequate to complete the goals of the project within the established timeline, and questions whether the changes being recommended by DOE to streamline the project will save money at the cost of safety. The GAO report recommends that the Secretary of Energy {open_quotes}...review the program`s goals and objectives in the context of the program`s priority for funding.{close_quotes} It also recommends that Congress not consider any funding changes until the Secretary`s report is in and an independent review by the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board is also available.

NONE

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Phyto remediation groundwater trends at the DOE portsmouth gaseous  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the progress of a phyto-remediation action being performed at the Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) X-740 Waste Oil Handling Facility to remediate contaminated groundwater under a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure action. This action was effected by an Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA) decision to use phyto-remediation as the preferred remedy for the X-740 groundwater contamination. This remedy was recognized as a cost-effective, low-maintenance, and promising method to remediate groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily trichloroethylene (TCE). During 1999, prior to the tree installation at the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area, water level measurements in the area were collected from 10 monitoring wells completed in the Gallia Formation. The Gallia is the uppermost water-bearing zone and contains most of the groundwater contamination at PORTS. During the tree installation which took place during the summer of 1999, four new Gallia monitoring wells were installed at the X-740 Area in addition to the 10 Gallia wells which had been installed in the same area during the early 1990's. Manual water level measurements were collected quarterly from these 14 Gallia monitoring wells between 1998 and 2001. These manual water level measurements were collected to monitor the combined impact of the trees on the groundwater prior to root development. Beginning in 2001, water level measurements were collected monthly during the growing season (April-September) and quarterly during the dormant season (October-March). A total of eight water level measurements were collected annually to monitor the phyto-remediation system's effect on the groundwater in the X- 740 Area. The primary function of the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area is to hydraulically prevent further spreading of the TCE plume. This process utilizes deep-rooted plants, such as poplar trees, to extract large quantities of water from the saturated zone. The focus of any phyto-remediation system is to develop a cone of depression under the entire plantation area. This cone of depression can halt migration of the contaminant plume and can create a hydraulic barrier, thereby maintaining plume capture. While a cone of depression is not yet evident at the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area, water level measurements in 2004 and 2005 differed from measurements taken in previous years, indicating that the now mature trees are influencing groundwater flow direction and gradient at the site. Water level measurements taken from 2003 through 2005 indicate a trend whereby groundwater elevations steadily decreased in the X-740 Phyto-remediation System. During this time, an average groundwater table drop of 0.30 feet was observed. Although the time for the phyto-remediation system to mature had been estimated at two to three years, these monitoring data indicate a period of four to five years for the trees to reach maturity. Although, these trends are not apparent from analysis of the potentiometric surface contours, it does appear that the head gradient across the site is higher during the spring and lower during the fall. It is not clear, however, whether this trend was initiated by the installation of the phyto-remediation system. This paper will present the groundwater data collected to date to illustrate the effects of the trees on the groundwater table. (authors)

Lewis, A.C.; Baird, D.R. [CDM, Piketon, OH (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Write SMART goals: Having goals for what to do with your money will help you make the everyday choices that come your way. When making goals try using the SMART method. SMART goals are  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Write SMART goals: Having goals for what to do with your money will help you make the everyday exactly do you want to achieve? Measurable ­ How much money will this goal take? Adaptable ­ Is this goal you when saving money for a rainy day/emergency fund or for special purchases, services you want

274

Vehicle Technologies Program: Goals, Strategies, and Top Accomplishments (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet describes the Vehicle Technologies Program and its goals, strategies and top accomplishments.

Not Available

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Remediation of contaminated soils and sediments using Daramend bioremediation  

SciTech Connect

Soils and sediments containing polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy oils, chlorinated phenols, pesticides, herbicides and phthalates, either individually or in combination, have been difficult to remediate in the past. Not only the species of contaminant, but contaminant concentrations were roadblocks to successful use of bioremediation. Daramend{sup Tm} remediation has removed many of these obstacles through extensive research. Bench-scale, pilot-scale and full-scale demonstrations have been conducted at a variety of industrial sites. At a manufactured gas site, 295 days of Daramend remediation reduced concentrations of chrysene and fluoranthene from 38.9 mg/kg to 5.9 mg/kg and 84.6 mg/kg to 7.8 mg/kg respectively. Elsewhere, the total PAH concentration in a silty soil was reduced from 1,442 mg/kg to 36 mg/kg. Concentrations of even the most refractory PAHs (e.g. pyrene, benzo(a)pyrene) were reduced to below the established clean-up guidelines. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel fuel) have also been reduced from 8,700 mg/kg to 34 mg/kg after 182 days of treatment. Similarly, in a clay soil contaminated by crude oil processing, the concentrations of high molecular weight aliphatic hydrocarbons were rapidly reduced (138 days) to below the remediation criteria. Demonstrations with wood treatment site soils have proven Daramend remediation effective in enhancing the target compound degradation rates. Soils containing 2170 mg PCP/kg were shown to contain only 11 mg PCP/kg after 280 days of Darmend remediation. The issue of toxicity of soil containing increased amounts of pentachlorophenols was solved. Performance data collected during these projects indicate that Daramend remediation provides a cost effective method for clean-up of soils and sediments containing a variety of organic compounds.

Burwell, S.W.; Bucens, P.G.; Seech, A.G.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Chapter 28 - Nanotechnology for Contaminated Subsurface Remediation: Possibilities and Challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Groundwater represents a significant source of potable and industrial process water throughout the world. With population growth the availability of this precise resource is becoming increasingly scarce. Historically, the subsurface was thought to act as a natural filter of wastes injected into the ground. The potential for these wastes to persist in the subsurface for decades, potentially contaminating drinking water sources was ignored. Not only do toxic compounds have significant detrimental impacts on the environment and human health, there are also economic and social costs associated with contaminated groundwater. Due to increased demands on groundwater resources and historical contamination there is a need to remediate contaminated groundwater to meet current and future demands. At many hazardous sites, however, current remediation technologies routinely defy attempts at satisfactory restoration. As a result new, innovative remediation technologies are required. Nanomaterials are receiving widespread interest in a variety of fields due to their unique, beneficial chemical, physical, and mechanical properties. They have recently been proposed to address a number of environmental problems including the remediation of the contaminated subsurface. A wide variety of nanoparticles, such as metallic (e.g., zero valent iron or bimetallic nanoparticles) and carbon based nanoparticles (e.g., C60 nanoparticles) have been investigated to assess their potential for contaminated site remediation. Studies suggest that nanoparticles have the ability to convert or sequester a wide variety of subsurface contaminants (e.g., chlorinated solvents and heavy metals). In addition they are more reactive than similar, larger sized, reactive materials. The majority of these studies have, however, been conducted at the batch scale. Considerable work is necessary prior to the application of nanotechnology for contaminated site remediation. One problem, for example, is the delivery of reactive nanometals to the contaminated source zone where they will react. This chapter will summarize the use of nanoparticles for contaminated site remediation and highlight some of the challenges that remain unresolved.

Denis M. O’Carroll

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

A Global Cloud Resolving Model Goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Resolving Model Cloud Resolving Model Goals Uniform global horizontal grid spacing of 4 km or better ("cloud permitting") 100 or more layers up to at least the stratopause Parameterizations of microphysics, turbulence (including small clouds), and radiation Execution speed of at least several simulated days per wall-clock day on immediately available systems Annual cycle simulation by end of 2011. Motivations Parameterizations are still problematic. There are no spectral gaps. The equations themselves change at high resolution. GCRMs will be used for NWP within 10 years. GCRMs will be used for climate time-slices shortly thereafter. It's going to take some time to learn how to do GCRMs well. Scaling Science Length, Spatial extent, #Atoms, Weak scaling Time scale

278

Evaluation of previous remedial construction along the Duquesne Bluff  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Boulevard of the Allies is a major four lane roadway in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania that is constructed atop a near vertical, 35 meter high rock slope known locally as the Duquesne Bluff. Stratigraphic relief observed on the bluff consists of alternating sequences of flat lying sedimentary deposits of sandstone, siltstone, shale, carbonaceous shale, claystone and limestone. Expsoure of alternating sequences of durable and less durable rock has resulted in differential weathering and the formation of precarious overhanging conditions. In the interest of motorist safety and roadway improvement, a major remedial program was undertaken by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) in the mid 1980s. Primary remedial activities included rock trimming, rock bolting, the construction of dental concrete buttressing for overhanging rock support and shotcrete slope facing to arrest continued weathering of less durable claystone and carbonaceous shale exposures. As part of a current roadway improvement project, PennDOT and their consultant, Gannett Fleming, Inc., are evaluating the performance of previous remedial construction and are developing preliminary alternatives for future remediation. This paper will discuss the slope geology, overall favorable performance of the previous remedial construction and unfavorable slope conditions that may have resulted from large scale trimming operations.

J.W. Kovacs; W.R. Adams Jr.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Remediation plan for fluorescent light fixtures containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the remedial action to achieve compliance with 29 CFR 1910 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements of fluorescent light fixtures containing PCBs at K-25 site. This remedial action is called the Remediation Plan for Fluorescent Light Fixtures Containing PCBs at the K-25 Site (The Plan). The Plan specifically discusses (1) conditions of non-compliance, (2) alternative solutions, (3) recommended solution, (4) remediation plan costs, (5) corrective action, (6) disposal of PCB waste, (7) training, and (8) plan conclusions. The results from inspections by Energy Systems personnel in 2 buildings at K-25 site and statistical extension of this data to 91 selected buildings at the K-25 site indicates that there are approximately 28,000 fluorescent light fixtures containing 47,036 ballasts. Approximately 38,531 contain PCBs and 2,799 of the 38,531 ballasts are leaking PCBs. Review of reportable occurrences at K-25 for the 12 month period of September 1990 through August 1991 shows that Energy Systems personnel reported 69 ballasts leaking PCBs. Each leaking ballast is in non-compliance with 29 CFR 1910 - Table Z-1-A. The age of the K-25 facilities indicate a continued and potential increase in ballasts leaking PCBs. This report considers 4 alternative solutions for dealing with the ballasts leaking PCBs. The advantages and disadvantages of each alternative solution are discussed and ranked using cost of remediation, reduction of health risks, and compliance with OSHA as criteria.

NONE

1992-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

C:\DOCS\NEW-VER.FRM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Verification Report Verification Report This form, or a similar form, is used to maintain quality assurance over the Statistical Analysis System (SAS ) or comparable program used to calculate excess cancer risks or hazard quotients for the ® Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations (DOE-ORO) Environmental Management (EM) Program. Specifically, this form verifies the use of correct exposure equations, exposure parameters, and toxicity values (or ecotoxicological benchmarks) and verifies the correct calculation of exposures, excess cancer risks, and hazard quotients for all human health or ecological risk assessments that involve risk calculations or the development of Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs). In addition, this form presents issues identified during the verification and their resolutions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation goals prgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Sales Volume Goals  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Sales Renewable Fuel Sales Volume Goals to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Sales Volume Goals on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Sales Volume Goals on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Sales Volume Goals on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Sales Volume Goals on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Sales Volume Goals on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Sales Volume Goals on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Sales Volume Goals The Wisconsin Legislature sets goals for minimum annual renewable fuel

282

SunShot Initiative: Mission, Vision, and Goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mission, Vision, and Goals to Mission, Vision, and Goals to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Mission, Vision, and Goals on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Mission, Vision, and Goals on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Mission, Vision, and Goals on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Mission, Vision, and Goals on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Mission, Vision, and Goals on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Mission, Vision, and Goals on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Systems Integration Balance of Systems Mission, Vision, and Goals Photo of a male silhouetted against a solar array. Researcher Josh Stein of Sandia National Laboratories studies how clouds impact large-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) power plants. Photo from Randy

283

2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Linking Strategic Goals to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Linking Strategic Goals 2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Linking Strategic Goals to Annual Performance Goals 2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Linking Strategic Goals to Annual Performance Goals Section 10 of the U.S. Department of Energy's Strategic Plan discusses Linking Strategic Goals to Annual Performance Goals through Program Assessment. DOE uses a variety of methods and tools to assess its programs. Internally, programs are required to report quarterly on their progress in meeting annual performance metrics. The data is then consolidated for senior management review. 2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Linking Strategic Goals to Annual Performance Goals More Documents & Publications 2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan U.S Department of Energy Strategic Plan

284

Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Goal Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goal Guidance to someone by E-mail Goal Guidance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Goal Guidance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Goal Guidance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Goal Guidance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Goal Guidance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Goal Guidance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Goal Guidance on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Water Efficiency Basics Federal Requirements Water Efficiency Goal Guidance Baseline & Annual Water Use Guidance Best Management Practices

285

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Acquisition Goals  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Acquisition Goals to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Acquisition Goals on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Acquisition Goals on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Acquisition Goals on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Acquisition Goals on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Acquisition Goals on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Acquisition Goals on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Acquisition Goals To help achieve the statewide goal of reducing petroleum use by 20% by July

286

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

itI.2 -2 itI.2 -2 FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT FOR THE FORMER BRUSH BERYLLIUM COMPANY CLEVELAND, OHIO Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects __I__,_-. - ---.. ____- .- CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES Pa e -5 2 2 2 4 4 4 ii ELIMINATION REPORT THE FORMER BRUSH BERYLLIUM COMPANY CLEVELAND, OHIO INTRODUCTION The Oepartment of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decorrnnissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices and divisionsa has reviewed the past activities of the Manhattan Engineer

287

Geoengineering: Plan B Remedy for Global Warming Andrew A. Lacis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geoengineering: Plan B Remedy for Global Warming Geoengineering: Plan B Remedy for Global Warming Andrew A. Lacis NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Accelerated melting of Greenland ice is a clear indication that consequences of global warming are real and impending. The underlying causes of global warming are well enough understood, but the necessary reduction of greenhouse gases to prevent irreversible climate change is unlikely to happen before the point of no return is reached. To reverse the impending sea level rise, geoengineering counter- measures may be required to counter the current global energy imbalance due to global warming. Of the many proposed remedies, deploying aerosols within the stratosphere offers realistic prospects. Sulfur injections in the lower stratosphere would have the cooling effect of naturally occurring volcanic aerosols. Soot at

288

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

fi.q 2, fi.q 2, I: * FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT FOR WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT EAST PITTSBURGH PLANT FOREST HILLS PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND CONTENTS Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES Page 1 4 iii ELIMINATION REPORT WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT EAST PITTSBURGH PLANT FOREST HILLS PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decormnissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices and

289

Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

82-TAC 82-TAC U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report September 2003 N0065200 GJO- 2003- 482- TAC GJO- PIN 13.12.10 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report Young - Rainey STAR Center September 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13- 02GJ79491 Document Number N0065200 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report September 2003 Page iii

290

The mission of the Remediation of Mercury and Industrial  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative is to control the flux of contaminants in soil and water environments for the purpose of protecting surface water, groundwater, and ecological receptors. For more information, contact: Eric Pierce Oak Ridge National Laboratory 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS 6038 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 pierceem@ornl.gov (865) 574-9968 Kurt Gerdes DOE-EM Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation kurt.gerdes@em.doe.gov (301) 903-7289 Sediment Biota Groundwater Flow Fluctuating Water Table Hg in building structures and rubble Waterborne mercury (mercury being transported via water being released from the facilities to the creeks) Hg currently present in the creek and sediments along the base of the creek

291

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-p,l-I -p,l-I . . FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT FOR MOBIL MINING AND MINERALS COMPANY (THE FORMER MATHIESON CHEMICAL COMPANY) PASADENA, TEXAS D Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES Page 1 2 2 2 3 3 4 ii --. ELIMINATION REPORT MOBIL MINING AND MINERALS COMPANY (THE FORMER MATHIESON CHEMICAL COMPANY) PASADENA, TEXAS INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor offices and divisions),

292

Review on electrical discharge plasma technology for wastewater remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As wastewater remediation becomes a global concern, the development of innovative advanced oxidation processes for wastewater treatment is still a major challenge. With regard to its fast removal rate and environmental compatibility, plasma technology is considered as a promising remediation technology for water remediation. The principles of electrical plasma with liquids for pollutant removal and the reactors of various electrical discharge types are outlined in this review. To improve energy efficiency, combination of plasma technology with catalysts has attracted significant attention. The present review is concerned about present understanding of the mechanisms involved in these combined processes. Further on, detailed discussions are given of the effects of various factors on the performance of pulsed electrical plasma technology in water treatment processes. Finally, special attention is paid to the future challenges of plasma technology utilized for industrial wastewater treatment.

Bo Jiang; Jingtang Zheng; Shi Qiu; Mingbo Wu; Qinhui Zhang; Zifeng Yan; Qingzhong Xue

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Validated analytical data summary report for White Oak Creek Watershed remedial investigation supplemental sampling, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

CDM Federal Programs Corporation (CDM Federal) was tasked by the Environmental Restoration Program of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Inc. (Energy Systems), to collect supplemental surface soil data for the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed. The WOC watershed RI/FS is being conducted to define a remediation approach for complying with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The data generated from these supplemental sampling activities will be incorporated into the RUFS to aid decision makers and stakeholders with the selection of remedial alternatives and establish remediation goals for the WOC watershed. A series of Data Quality Objective (DQO) meetings were held in February 1996 to determine data needs for the WOC watershed RI/FS. The meetings were attended by representatives from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and contractors to DOE. During the DQO meetings, it was determined that the human health risk associated with exposure to radionuclides was high enough to establish a baseline for action; however, it was also determined that the impacts associated with other analytes (mainly metals) were insufficient for determining the baseline ecological risk. Based on this premise, it was determined that additional sampling would be required at four of the Waste Area Groupings (WAGs) included in the WOC watershed to fulfill this data gap.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

White Oak Creek Watershed: Melton Valley Area Remedial Investigation Report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 1 Main Text  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Remedial Investigation (RI) report is to present an analysis of the Melton Valley portion of the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, which will enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to pursue a series of cost-effective remedial actions resulting in site cleanup and stabilization. In this RI existing levels of contamination and radiological exposure are compared to levels acceptable for future industrial and potential recreational use levels at the site. This comparison provides a perspective for the magnitude of remedial actions required to achieve a site condition compatible with relaxed access restrictions over existing conditions. Ecological risk will be assessed to evaluate measures required for ecological receptor protection. For each subbasin, this report will provide site-specific analyses of the physical setting including identification of contaminant source areas, description of contaminant transport pathways, identification of release mechanisms, analysis of contaminant source interactions with groundwater, identification of secondary contaminated media associated with the source and seepage pathways, assessment of potential human health and ecological risks from exposure to contaminants, ranking of each source area within the subwatershed, and outline the conditions that remedial technologies must address to stop present and future contaminant releases, prevent the spread of contamination and achieve the goal of limiting environmental contamination to be consistent with a potential recreational use of the site.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Linde FUSRAP Site Remediation: Engineering Challenges and Solutions of Remedial Activities on an Active Industrial Facility - 13506  

SciTech Connect

The Linde FUSRAP Site (Linde) is located in Tonawanda, New York at a major research and development facility for Praxair, Inc. (Praxair). Successful remediation activities at Linde combines meeting cleanup objectives of radiological contamination while minimizing impacts to Praxair business operations. The unique use of Praxair's property coupled with an array of active and abandoned utilities poses many engineering and operational challenges; each of which has been overcome during the remedial action at Linde. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District (USACE) and CABRERA SERVICES, INC. (CABRERA) have successfully faced engineering challenges such as relocation of an aboveground structure, structural protection of an active water line, and installation of active mechanical, electrical, and communication utilities to perform remediation. As remediation nears completion, continued success of engineering challenges is critical as remaining activities exist in the vicinity of infrastructure essential to business operations; an electrical substation and duct bank providing power throughout the Praxair facility. Emphasis on engineering and operations through final remediation and into site restoration will allow for the safe and successful completion of the project. (authors)

Beres, Christopher M.; Fort, E. Joseph [Cabrera Services, Inc., 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06118 (United States)] [Cabrera Services, Inc., 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06118 (United States); Boyle, James D. [United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)] [United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,: /A (,) i_ - z ,: /A (,) i_ - z FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT FOR FORMERLY UTILIZED PORTIONS OF THE WATERTOWN ARSENAL WATERTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decotwnissioning Projects CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS Findings and Recommendation 6 REFERENCES iii Page 1 1 1 3 4 7 "..*.w..,, -. ._ ..- ". --. AUTHORITY REVIEW WATERTOWN ARSENAL WATERTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS INTRODUCTION The purpose of this review is to present information pertaining to work performed under the sponsorship of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the facts and circum-

297

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SENECA ARMY DEPOT SENECA ARMY DEPOT ROMULUS, NEW YORK Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and kaste Technology. Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects INTRODUCTION t3ACKGROUND CONTENTS . -Page Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES 1 4 ii .___ -_-_..--. ._.".. ELIMINATION REPORT SENECA ARMY DEPOT ROMULUS, NEW YORK . INTRODUCTION The Department pf Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices, and divisions) has reviewed the past activities of the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) at Seneca Army Depot, Romulus, hew York. Based on the

298

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

\ \ ,.-c , 2 2 a. . FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM . ELIMINATION REPORT FOR THE FORMER GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION 39TH STREET WAREHOUSE 1716 PERSHING ROAD CHICAGO, ILLINOIS SEP301985 Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects __--... -_ -._.-_- _"_-. .___.. -... .._ ..-. .-. ..--- . , ' , CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES iii 4 __-.I ._-----.- --- ELIMINATION REPORT FOR THE FORMER GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION 39TH STREET WAREHOUSE 1716 PERSHING ROAD CHICAGO, ILLINOIS INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office

299

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

CF INDUSTRIES, INC. CF INDUSTRIES, INC. ( THE FORMER INTERNATIONAL MI NERALS AND CHEMICAL CORPORATION) BARTON, FLORIDA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy. Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects - - .._. ..--.. . . I."__ . - INTRODUCTION CONTENTS Page BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological. History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES Summary of Findings ii 7 8 --..I--- - ..-___-_--.___-"-- -- ' . ELIMINATION REPORT CF INDUSTRIES, INC. (THE FORMER INTERNATIONAL MINERALS AND CHEMICAL CORPORATION) BARTOW, FLORIDA INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices, and

300

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ROHM & HAAS COMPANY ROHM & HAAS COMPANY PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLYANIA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects CONTENTS Page INTRODUCTIOk BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES 2 2 2 2 3 3 iii ELIMINATION REPORT ROHM & HAAS COMPANY PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANXA INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor offices and divisions) has reviewed the past activities of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) at the Rohm & Haas Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Based on a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation goals prgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

BETHLEHEM STEEL CORPORATION BETHLEHEM STEEL CORPORATION LACKAWANNA, NEW YORK Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects P bl@ C.' , 1 & cr INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND CONTENTS Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES Page 1 5 iii ELIMINATION REPORT BETHLEHEM STEEL CORPORATION LACKAWANNA, NEW YORK INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices and divisions), has reviewed the past activities of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) at the Bethlehem Steel Corporation, Lackawanna, New

302

Designation of Sites for Remedial Action - Metal Hydrides, Beverly,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

T: T: Designation of Sites for Remedial Action - Metal Hydrides, Beverly, MA; Bridgeport Brass, Adrian, MI and Seymour, Chicago, IL CT; National Guard Armory, 0: Joe LaGrone, Manager Oak Ridge Operations Office Based on the attached radiological survey data (Attachments 1 through 3) and an appropriate authority review, the following properties are being authorized for remedial action. It should be noted that the attached survey data are for designation purposes only and that Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) should conduct appropriate comprehensive characterization studies to determine the extent'and magnitude of contamination on properties. Site Location Priority Former Bridgeport Brass Co. (General Motors) Adrian, MI Low Former Bridgeport Brass Co.

303

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA (U.S. BUREAU OF MINES) TUCSON, ARIZONA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects -- --- .- _- --__ CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES ii - ,. -- Page 1 4 4 ..I___ - ~-___- ELIMINATION REPORT UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA (U.S. BUREAU OF MINES) TUCSON, ARIZONA INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor offices and divisions) has reviewed the past activities of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC)

304

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS BUILDINGS NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS BUILDINGS VAN NESS STREET WASHINGTON, D.C. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects - __-~---- -._.. .._ .-. .- INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status CONTENTS ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES ii Paqe 1 4 INiRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices, and divisions) has reviewed the past activities conducted for the Atomic Energy Commission and the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) (DOE predecessors) at

305

Tank waste remediation system systems engineering management plan  

SciTech Connect

This Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) describes the Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) implementation of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Systems Engineering (SE) policy provided in Tank Waste Remediation System Systems Engineering Management Policy, DOE/RL letter, 95-RTI-107, Oct. 31, 1995. This SEMP defines the products, process, organization, and procedures used by the TWRS Program to accomplish SE objectives. This TWRS SEMP is applicable to all aspects of the TWRS Program and will be used as the basis for tailoring SE to apply necessary concepts and principles to develop and mature the processes and physical systems necessary to achieve the desired end states of the program.

Peck, L.G.

1996-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

306

Duct Remediation Program: Material characterization and removal/handling  

SciTech Connect

Remediation efforts were successfully performed at Rocky Flats to locate, characterize, and remove plutonium holdup from process exhaust ducts. Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) techniques were used to determine holdup locations and quantities. Visual characterization using video probes helped determine the physical properties of the material, which were used for remediation planning. Assorted equipment types, such as vacuum systems, scoops, brushes, and a rotating removal system, were developed to remove specific material types. Personnel safety and material handling requirements were addressed throughout the project.

Beckman, T.d.; Davis, M.M.; Karas, T.M.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 1: Set Goals and Objectives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1: Set 1: Set Goals and Objectives to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 1: Set Goals and Objectives on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 1: Set Goals and Objectives on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 1: Set Goals and Objectives on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 1: Set Goals and Objectives on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 1: Set Goals and Objectives on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 1: Set Goals and Objectives on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Set Goals & Objectives Create an Evaluation Plan Conduct Audience Research Identify Target Audiences & Behavior Changes

308

Hydrogen Goal-Setting Methodologies Report to Congress  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

DOE's Hydrogen Goal-Setting Methodologies Report to Congress summarizes the processes used to set Hydrogen Program goals and milestones. Published in August 2006, it fulfills the requirement under se

309

REVIEW REPORT: BUILDING C-400 THERMAL TREATMENT 90 PERCENT REMEDIAL DESIGN REPORT AND SITE INVESTIGATION, PGDP, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY  

SciTech Connect

On 9 April 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters, Office of Soil and Groundwater Remediation (EM-22) initiated an Independent Technical Review (ITR) of the 90% Remedial Design Report (RDR) and Site Investigation (RDSI) for thermal treatment of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the soil and groundwater in the vicinity of Building C-400 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The general ITR goals were to assess the technical adequacy of the 90% RDSI and provide recommendations sufficient for DOE to determine if modifications are warranted pertaining to the design, schedule, or cost of implementing the proposed design. The ultimate goal of the effort was to assist the DOE Paducah/Portsmouth Project Office (PPPO) and their contractor team in ''removing'' the TCE source zone located near the C-400 Building. This report provides the ITR findings and recommendations and supporting evaluations as needed to facilitate use of the recommendations. The ITR team supports the remedial action objective (RAO) at C-400 to reduce the TCE source area via subsurface Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH). Further, the ITR team commends PPPO, their contractor team, regulators, and stakeholders for the significant efforts taken in preparing the 90% RDR. To maximize TCE removal at the target source area, several themes emerge from the review which the ITR team believes should be considered and addressed before implementing the thermal treatment. These themes include the need for: (1) Accurate and site-specific models as the basis to verify the ERH design for full-scale implementation for this challenging hydrogeologic setting; (2) Flexible project implementation and operation to allow the project team to respond to observations and data collected during construction and operation; (3) Defensible performance metrics and monitoring, appropriate for ERH, to ensure sufficient and efficient clean-up; and (4) Comprehensive (creative and diverse) contingencies to address the potential for system underperformance, and other unforeseen conditions These themes weave through the ITR report and the various analyses and recommendations. The ITR team recognizes that a number of technologies are available for treatment of TCE sources. Further, the team supports the regulatory process through which the selected remedy is being implemented, and concurs that ERH is a potentially viable remedial technology to meet the RAOs adjacent to C-400. Nonetheless, the ITR team concluded that additional efforts are needed to provide an adequate basis for the planned ERH design, particularly in the highly permeable Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA), where sustaining target temperatures present a challenge. The ERH design modeling in the 90% RDR does not fully substantiate that heating in the deep RGA, at the interface with the McNairy formation, will meet the design goals; specifically the target temperatures. Full-scale implementation of ERH to meet the RAOs is a challenge in the complex hydrogeologic setting at PGDP. Where possible, risks to the project identified in this ITR report as ''issues'' and ''recommendations'' should be mitigated as part of the final design process to increase the likelihood of remedial success. The ITR efforts were organized into five lines of inquiry (LOIs): (1) Site investigation and target zone delineation; (2) Performance objectives; (3) Project and design topics; (4) Health and safety; and (5) Cross cutting and independent cost evaluation. Within each of these LOIs, the ITR team identified a series of unresolved issues--topics that have remaining uncertainties or potential project risks. These issues were analyzed and one or more recommendations were developed for each. In the end, the ITR team identified 27 issues and provided 50 recommendations. The issues and recommendations are briefly summarized below, developed in Section 5, and consolidated into a single list in Section 6. The ITR team concluded that there are substantive unresolved issues and system design uncertainties, resulting in technical and financial risks to DOE.

Looney, B; Jed Costanza, J; Eva Davis, E; Joe Rossabi, J; Lloyd (Bo) Stewart, L; Hans Stroo, H

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes radiological conditions at sites remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and transferred to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for...

311

Integrated Remediation Process for a High Salinity Industrial Soil Sample Contaminated with Heavy Oil and Metals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A highly saline industrial soil sample contaminated with heavy oils and several heavy metals, was tested for remediation using NRC’s Solvent Extraction Soil Remediation (SESR) process. The sample was provided ...

Abdul Majid; Bryan D. Sparks

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal-based folk remedies Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2009 Determinants of the success of remedy offers W: www.uea.ac.ukccp T... : +44 (0)1603 593715 A: UEA, Norwich, NR4 7TJ Determinants of the success of remedy offers:...

313

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services- EA-97-04  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Rocky Mountain Remediation Services related to a Radioactive Material Release during Trench Remediation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, (EA-97-04)

314

In Situ Vitrification an Innovative Melting Technology for the Remediation of Contaminated Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The remediation of contaminated sites is an increasingly serious problem in industrialised countries. There is a growing need for efficient techniques for remedial actions, especially for on-site treatment of ...

Dipl.-Ing. Hans Joachim Hampel; V. F. Fitzpatrick

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site Restoration at Young - Rainey STAR Center Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site Restoration at Young - Rainey STAR Center Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds. May 2004, Monterey, California. Gorm Heron, Steven Carroll, Hank Sowers, Bruce McGee, Randall Juhlin, Joe Daniel, David S. Ingle Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site Restoration at Young - Rainey STAR Center More Documents & Publications Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young - Rainey STAR Center Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification

316

Goals in a Formal Theory of Commonsense Psychology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Goals in a Formal Theory of Commonsense Psychology Jerry R. HOBBS and Andrew GORDON University of commonsense psychology, or how peole think they think, we have developed a formal theory of goals. In it we, intactness, and importance. Keywords. Goals, commonsense psychology, commonsense reasoning, intention

Hobbs, Jerry R.

317

Formal modelling of organisational goals based on performance indicators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Every organisation exists or is created for the achievement of one or more goals. To ensure continued success, the organisation should monitor its performance with respect to the formulated goals. In practice the performance of an organisation is often ... Keywords: Enterprise architectures, Formal modelling, Formal verification, Goals, Mathematical logic, Organisation modelling, Performance evaluation, Performance indicators

Viara Popova; Alexei Sharpanskykh

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Recommendation 170: Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for East Tennessee Technology Park  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ORSSAB Recommendation to DOE on a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for East Tennessee Technology Park.

319

Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (March 2012)

320

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project- March 2007  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Evaluation to determine whether Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP recognition.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation goals prgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Assessing and Implementing LTS&M Requirements for Remediation Sites Under the FUSRAP Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Assessing and Implementing LTS&M Requirements for Remediation Sites Under the FUSRAP Program (Waste Management Conference 2007)

322

Decommissioning of the remediation systems at Waverly, Nebraska, in 2011-2012.  

SciTech Connect

The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility in Waverly, Nebraska, from 1952 to 1974. During this time, the grain fumigant '80/20' (carbon tetrachloride/carbon disulfide) was used to preserve stored grain. In 1982, sampling by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) found carbon tetrachloride contamination in the town's groundwater. After an investigation of the contaminant distribution, the site was placed on the National Priority List (NPL) in 1986, and the CCC/USDA accepted responsibility for the contamination. An Interagency Compliance Agreement between the EPA and the CCC/USDA was finalized in May 1988 (EPA 1990). The EPA (Woodward-Clyde Consultants, contractor) started immediate cleanup efforts in 1987 with the installation of an air stripper, a soil vapor extraction system, a groundwater extraction well, and groundwater and soil gas monitoring wells (Woodward-Clyde 1986, 1988a,b). After the EPA issued its Record of Decision (ROD; EPA 1990), the CCC/USDA (Argonne National Laboratory, contractor) took over operation of the treatment systems. The CCC/USDA conducted a site investigation (Argonne 1991, 1992a,b), during which a carbon tetrachloride plume in groundwater was discovered northeast of the former facility. This plume was not being captured by the existing groundwater extraction system. The remediation system was modified in 1994 (Argonne 1993) with the installation of a second groundwater extraction well to contain the contamination further. Subsequently, a detailed evaluation of the system resulted in a recommendation to pump only the second well to conserve water in the aquifer (Argonne 1995). Sampling and analysis after implementation of this recommendation showed continued decreases in the extent and concentrations of the contamination with only one well pumping (Argonne 1999). The CCC/USDA issued quarterly monitoring reports from 1988 to 2009. Complete documentation of the CCC/USDA characterization and remediation efforts, including the quarterly monitoring reports, is on the compact disc inside the back cover of this report. The EPA reported on the progress of the remediation systems in a series of five-year reviews (EPA 1993, 1999, 2004, 2009). These reports and other EPA documentation are also on the compact disc inside the back cover of this report, along with the Woodward-Clyde (1986, 1988a,b) documentation cited. Starting in 2006, the analytical results for groundwater (the only medium still being monitored) showed no carbon tetrachloride concentrations above the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5.0 g/L. Because the cleanup goals specified in the ROD (EPA 1990) had been met, the EPA removed the site from the NPL in November 2006 (Appendix A). In 2008 the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for the remediation system was deactivated, and a year later the EPA released its fourth and final five-year report (EPA 2009), indicating that no further action was required for the site and that the site was ready for unlimited use. In 2011-2012, the CCC/USDA decommissioned the remediation systems at Waverly. This report documents the decommission process and closure of the site.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

323

Description of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program  

SciTech Connect

The background and the results to date of the Department of Energy program to identify and evaluate the radiological conditions at sites formerly utilized by the Corps of Engineers' Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) are summarized. The sites of concern were federally, privately, and institutionally owned and were used primarily for research, processing, and storage of uranium and thorium ores, concentrates, or residues. Some sites were subsequently released for other purposes without radiological restriction. Surveys have been conducted since 1974 to document radiological conditions at such sites. Based on radiological surveys, sites are identified in this document that require, or are projected to require, remedial action to remove potential restrictions on the use of the property due to the presence of residual low-level radioactive contamination. Specific recommendations for each site will result from more detailed environmental and engineering surveys to be conducted at those sites and, if necessary, an environmental impact assessment or environmental impact statement will be prepared. Section 3.0 describes the current standards and guidelines now being used to conduct remedial actions. Current authority of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to proceed with remedial actions and the new authority required are summarized. A plan to implement the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) in accordance with the new authority is presented, including the objectives, scope, general approach, and a summary schedule. Key issues affecting schedule and cost are discussed.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

A large scale environmental assessment: The Clinch River Remedial Investigation  

SciTech Connect

The USEPA identified the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in east Tennessee as a Superfund National Priorities List site in 1989. Facilities at the ORR have released a variety of radiological, organic, and inorganic contaminants to the local aquatic environment as a result of nuclear weapons production, uranium enrichment, and energy research and development activities from the mid 1940s to the present. The Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) was initiated to meet the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements to determine the nature and extent of hazardous releases to the aquatic environment. Phase 1 of the CRRI consisted of sampling and analysis of selected sites representing differing levels of contamination to determine the range of contaminant concentrations present in off-site water, sediment, and fish. Sampling activities in support of Phase 2 of the remedial investigation were designed to assist in defining the nature and extent of the contaminants of concern in sediment, water and biota, and to provide information for assessing the potential risks to human health and the environment associated with those contaminants. A concurrent study evaluated potential remedial alternatives and identified effective and acceptable corrective measures. An overview of the CRRI, including a history of the facilities and their contaminant releases, and the regulatory context in which the remedial investigation occurred is presented.

LeHew, R.; Harris, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

Adapting Advances in Remediation Science to Long-Term Surveillance  

SciTech Connect

Several facets of groundwater remediation stand to gain from the advances made during recent years in disciplines that contribute to remediation science. Engineered remedies designed to aggressively remove subsurface contamination should benefit from this progress, and more passive cleanup methods and the long-term monitoring of such passive approaches may benefit equally well if not more. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) has adopted a strategic plan that is designed to take advantage of technological improvements in the monitoring and assessment of both active and passive groundwater remedies. Flexible adaptation of new technologies, as they become available, to long-term surveillance at LM sites is expected to reduce site stewardship costs while ensuring the future protection of human health and the environment. Some of the technologies are expected to come from government initiatives that focus on the needs of subsurface monitoring. Additional progress in monitoring science will likely result from continual improvements in our understanding of contaminant fate-and-transport processes in the groundwater and the vadose zone.

Peterson, Dave [S.M. Stoller Corporation

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Remediation alternatives for low-level herbicide contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect

In early 1995, an evaluation of alternatives for remediation of a shallow groundwater plume containing low-levels of an organic herbicide was conducted at BASF Corporation, a petrochemical facility located in Ascension Parish, Louisiana. The contaminated site is located on an undeveloped portion of property within 1/4 mile of the east bank of the Mississippi River near the community of Geismar. Environmental assessment data indicated that about two acres of the thirty acre site had been contaminated from past waste management practices with the herbicide bentazon. Shallow soils and groundwater between 5 to 15 feet in depth were affected. Maximum concentrations of bentazon in groundwater were less than seven parts per million. To identify potentially feasible remediation alternatives, the environmental assessment data, available research, and cost effectiveness were reviewed. After consideration of a preliminary list of alternatives, only two potentially feasible alternatives could be identified. Groundwater pumping, the most commonly used remediation alternative, followed by carbon adsorption treatment was identified as was a new innovative alternative known as vegetative transpiration. This alternative relies on the natural transpiration processes of vegetation to bioremediate organic contaminants. Advantages identified during screening suggest that the transpiration method could be the best remediation alternative to address both economic and environmental factors. An experiment to test critical factors of the vegetatived transpiration alternative with bentazon was recommended before a final decision on feasibility can be made.

Conger, R.M. [BASF Corp., Geismar, LA (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

FY-95 technology catalog. Technology development for buried waste remediation  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program, which is now part of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area (LSFA), supports applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a multitude of advanced technologies dealing with underground radioactive and hazardous waste remediation. These innovative technologies are being developed as part of integrated comprehensive remediation systems for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste sites throughout the DOE complex. These efforts are identified and coordinated in support of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) and Waste Management (EM-30) needs and objectives. Sponsored by the DOE Office of Technology Development (EM-50), BWID and LSFA work with universities and private industry to develop technologies that are being transferred to the private sector for use nationally and internationally. This report contains the details of the purpose, logic, and methodology used to develop and demonstrate DOE buried waste remediation technologies. It also provides a catalog of technologies and capabilities with development status for potential users. Past FY-92 through FY-94 technology testing, field trials, and demonstrations are summarized. Continuing and new FY-95 technology demonstrations also are described.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil. In particular the present invention relates to stabilizing toxic metals in groundwater and soil. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Corey, J.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

In-Situ Thermal Remediation of Contaminated Soil1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

differentials at the electrodes. Water is also pumped into the soil via the injection well and out of the groundChapter 1 In-Situ Thermal Remediation of Contaminated Soil1 Written by Huaxiong Huang,2 Serguei meters under the ground) has been proposed by McMillan-McGee Corp. The process can be described

Lapin, Sergey

330

Remediation of arsenic-contaminated soils and groundwaters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in situ method is described for extraction of arsenic contaminants from a soil medium and remediation of the medium including contacting the medium with an extractant solution, directing the solution within and through the medium, and collecting the solution and contaminants. The method can also be used for arsenate and/or arsenite removal. 8 figs.

Peters, R.W.; Frank, J.R.; Feng, X.

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

331

Application of groundwater modeling in remedial action development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development and implementation of a remedial program usually is a costly process. Available scientific and engineering data should be used to optimize the investigation program which will lead to the development of a cost-effective remedial action. As part of the scope of the Remedial Investigation (RI), the data needs and significance of the key parameters as related to the final remedial design should be assessed and determined to obtain necessary data in a timely and cost-effective manner. Properly verified groundwater computer models are powerful tools for both identifying data gaps which must be filled before an appropriate design can be prepared and for assessing the significance of site features on the problem and solution. These models can be used effectively during both the RI and Feasibility Study (FS) phases. In the RI phase, the models can be used for optimization of field and laboratory testing programs and in data analysis to assess adequateness of the field investigation and provide basic data for

Sirous H. Djafari; David E. Troxell

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Savannah River Remediation, College Create Job Opportunities for Graduates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

AIKEN, S.C. – Savannah River Remediation (SRR), the liquid waste contractor for the EM program at the Savannah River Site (SRS), requires workers with unique skills to protect employees from radiation as the company works safely toward completing its mission.

333

Remedial action work plan for the Colonie site. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Colonie site is a DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) site located in the Town of Colonie, New York, and consisting of an interim storage site and several vicinity properties. The Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS) is the former National Lead (NL) Industries plant located at 1130 Central Avenue. There are 11 vicinity properties that received remedial action in 1984: 7 located south of the site on Yardboro and Palmer Avenues just across the Colonie-Albany town limits in Albany, and 4 located northwest of the site along Central Avenue in Colonie. Of these properties, nine are residences and two are commercial properties. This document describes the engineering design, construction, and associated plans for remedial action on the vicinity properties and the interim storage site. These plans include both radiological and chemical work. Radiological work includes: excavating the above-guideline radioactive wastes on the vicinity properties; designing required facilities for the interim storage site; preparing the interim storage site to receive these contaminated materials; transporting the contaminated materials to the interim waste storage stockpile; and preparing necessary schedules for accomplishing the remedial actions. Chemical work involves: developing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure plans; neutralizing chemical hazards associated with plating solutions; inventorying on-site chemicals; and disposal of chemicals and/or residues. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

In situ Remediation Technologies Associated with Sanitation Improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by poor levels of sanitation and inadequate water and wastewater management. Pressure from urban areas12 In situ Remediation Technologies Associated with Sanitation Improvement: An Opportunity, the implementation of sanitation infrastructure is also necessary. With the increase of the negative environmental

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

335

Remediation of Petroleum-Contaminated Groundwater Using High Carbon Content Fly Ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Remediation of Petroleum-Contaminated Groundwater Using High Carbon Content Fly Ash M. Melih for retardation of petroleum contaminants in barrier applications. Sorbed amounts measured in batch scale tests on remediation efficiency. INTRODUCTION Remediation of groundwater contaminated with petroleum-based products has

Aydilek, Ahmet

336

CSMRI Site Remediation Quality Assurance Project Plan March 30, 2004 TABLE OF CONTENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..........................................................................................................................................5 9.0 Ground- and Surface-Water MonitoringCSMRI Site Remediation Quality Assurance Project Plan March 30, 2004 TASK PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 .............................................................................................5 FIGURES #12;CSMRI Site Remediation Task Plan March 31, 2004 TASK PLAN CSMRI SITE REMEDIATION 1

337

Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks  

SciTech Connect

This final hazard categorization (FHC) document examines the hazards, identifies appropriate controls to manage the hazards, and documents the commitments for the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks Remediation Project. The remediation activities analyzed in this FHC are based on recommended treatment and disposal alternatives described in the Engineering Evaluation for the Remediation to the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks (BHI 2005e).

T. M. Blakley; W. D. Schofield

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

338

Minnesota Pollution Control Agency Public Meeting -5/19/2011 Remedial Investigation of UMore Park East  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minnesota Pollution Control Agency Public Meeting - 5/19/2011 Remedial Investigation of UMore Park MINNESOTA POLLUTION CONTROL AGENCY University of Minnesota Remedial Investigation of UMore Park East Dakota Public Meeting - 5/19/2011 Remedial Investigation of UMore Park East (763) 591-0535 or (800) 591

Netoff, Theoden

339

Relationship Between Solute Permeability and Osmotic Remediability in a Galactose-Negative Strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...workers defined an osmotic remedial mutant as one in which the...inorganic, are effective osmotic remedial agents. The results reported here are a continuation of an investigation into the genetic and physiological...galactose-negative, osmotic remedial mutant. In S. cerevisiae...

John Bassel; Howard C. Douglas

1970-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Community Involvement Plan: Remedial Investigation of UMore Park East, Dakota County, Minnesota  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i Community Involvement Plan: Remedial Investigation of UMore Park East, Dakota County, Minnesota Appendix A Fact Sheet on Planned Remedial Investigation of UMore Park East UMP012331 #12;1 1.0 Overview participation in the planned Remedial Investigation (RI) of the eastern portion of the University of Minnesota

Netoff, Theoden

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation goals prgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

Osmotic Remedial Response in a Galactose-negative Mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...proposed that an osmotic remedial allele produces an...The object of this investigation was to examine the...particular osmotic remedial mutant in some detail...possibility that the osmotic remedial response affects trans...is currently under investigation. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This...

John Bassel; H. C. Douglas

1968-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

The prevalence of folate-remedial MTHFR enzyme variants in humans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The hypothesis that folate-remedial alleles of MTHFR are those...response that is currently under investigation. In this way the activity...function and would be nutrient remedial. The contribution from common...The prevalence of folate-remedial MTHFR enzyme variants in humans...

Nicholas J. Marini; Jennifer Gin; Janet Ziegle; Kathryn Hunkapiller Keho; David Ginzinger; Dennis A. Gilbert; Jasper Rine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Nevada National Security Site Environmental Remediation Progress Toward Closure of Contaminated Sites  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office assess the environmental impacts that resulted from atmospheric and underground nuclear tests conducted from 1951 to 1992 on the Nevada National Security Site and Nevada Test and Training Range (which includes the Tonopah Test Range). The goal is to protect public health and the environment through investigations and corrective actions. The Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO), established in 1996 between the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), DOE, and the U.S. Department of Defense, serves as the cleanup agreement for the Environmental Restoration activities and provides the framework for identifying, prioritizing, investigating, remediating, and monitoring contaminated sites. This agreement satisfies the corrective action requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. To ensure efficiency in managing these corrective actions, the sites are grouped according to location, physical and geological characteristics, and/or contaminants. These groups, called corrective action units, are prioritized based on potential risk to workers and the public, available technology, future land use, agency and stakeholder concerns, and other criteria. Environmental Restoration activities include: Industrial Sites, Soils, and Underground Test Area. Nearly 15 years have passed since the FFACO was established, and during this time, more than 3,000 sites have been identified as requiring investigation or corrective actions. To date, approximately 1,945 sites have been investigated and closed through no further action, clean closure, or closure in place. Another 985 sites are currently being investigated or are in the remediation phase, leaving approximately 80 contaminated sites yet to be addressed.

Patrick Matthews (N-I) and Robert Boehlecke (NSO)

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

344

INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE C-400 INTERIM REMEDIAL PROJECT PHASE I RESULTS, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY  

SciTech Connect

The groundwater and soil in the vicinity of the C-400 Building at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), is contaminated with substantial quantities of industrial solvents, primarily trichoroethene (TCE). This solvent 'source' is recognized as a significant challenge and an important remediation target in the overall environmental cleanup strategy for PGDP. Thus, the cleanup of the C-400 TCE Source is a principal focus for the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors, and for PGDP regulators and stakeholders. Using a formal investigation, feasibility study and decision process, Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH) was selected for the treatment of the soil and groundwater in the vicinity of C-400. ERH was selected as an interim action to remove 'a significant portion of the contaminant mass of TCE at the C-400 Cleaning Building area through treatment' with the longer term goal of reducing 'the period the TCE concentration in groundwater remains above its Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL).' ERH is a thermal treatment that enhances the removal of TCE and related solvents from soil and groundwater. The heterogeneous conditions at PGDP, particularly the high permeability regional gravel aquifer (RGA), are challenging to ERH. Thus, a phased approach is being followed to implement this relatively expensive and complex remediation technology. Conceptually, the phased approach encourages safety and efficiency by providing a 'lessons learned' process and allowing appropriate adjustments to be identified and implemented prior to follow-on phase(s) of treatment. More specifically, early deployment targeted portions of the challenging RGA treatment zone with relatively little contamination reducing the risk of adverse collateral impacts from underperformance in terms of heating and capture. Because of the importance and scope of the C-400 TCE source remediation activities, DOE chartered an Independent Technical Review (ITR) in 2007 to assess the C-400 ERH plans prior to deployment and a second ITR to evaluate Phase I performance in September 2010. In this report, these ITR efforts are referenced as the '2007 ITR' and the 'current ITR', respectively. The 2007 ITR document (Looney et al., 2007) provided a detailed technical evaluation that remains relevant and this report builds on that analysis. The primary objective of the current ITR is to provide an expedited assessment of the available Phase I data to assist the PGDP team as they develop the lessons learned from Phase I and prepare plans for Phase II.

Looney, B.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart,L.; Richards, W.

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

345

Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase IV  

SciTech Connect

This Phase IV Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of areas with the potential for UXO at the Idaho National Laboratory. These areas include portions of the Naval Proving Ground, the Arco High-Altitude Bombing Range, and the Twin Buttes Bombing Range. Five areas within the Naval Proving Ground that are known to contain UXO include the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area, the Mass Detonation Area, the Experimental Field Station, The Rail Car Explosion Area, and the Land Mine Fuze Burn Area. The Phase IV remedial action will be concentrated in these five areas. For other areas, such as the Arco High-Altitude Bombing Range and the Twin Buttes Bombing Range, ordnance has largely consisted of sand-filled practice bombs that do not pose an explosion risk. Ordnance encountered in these areas will be addressed under the Phase I Operations and Maintenance Plan that allows for the recovery and disposal of ordnance that poses an imminent risk to human health or the environment.

R. P. Wells

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

346

Savannah River Remediation Donates $10,000 to South Carolina State Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Remediation Donates $10,000 to South Carolina State Savannah River Remediation Donates $10,000 to South Carolina State Nuclear Engineering Program Savannah River Remediation Donates $10,000 to South Carolina State Nuclear Engineering Program September 28, 2012 - 9:27am Addthis Savannah River Remediation presents a $10,000 to South Carolina State University to support its Nuclear Engineering Program. In the photo, from left: Kayla Miller, Savannah River Remediation Procurement Department and South Carolina State University 2010 graduate; Dr. John Corbitt, Acting Chairman of the South Carolina State University Board of Trustees; Dr. Cynthia Warrick, Interim South Carolina State University President; and Dave Olson, Savannah River Remediation President and Project Manager. Savannah River Remediation presents a $10,000 to South Carolina State

347

The U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial The U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program: Ensuring Protectiveness and Preserving Knowledge The U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program: Ensuring Protectiveness and Preserving Knowledge The U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program: Ensuring Protectiveness and Preserving Knowledge (Waste Management Conference 2010) The U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program: Ensuring Protectiveness and Preserving Knowledge More Documents & Publications Implementation of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program: Coordination Between the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP

348

Energy Efficiency Resource Goal (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Resource Goal (Virginia) Energy Efficiency Resource Goal (Virginia) Energy Efficiency Resource Goal (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Program Info State Virginia Program Type Energy Efficiency Resource Standard In March 2007, the Virginia legislature passed SB 1416 thereby amending Virginia's earlier electric industry restructuring law, including a energy efficiency goal of 10% electricity savings by 2022 relative to 2006 base sales. With SB 1416, the State Corporation Commission (SCC) was directed to conduct a series of proceedings to consider whether the 10% goal could be met cost-effectively, determine the mix of programs that should be implemented and their cost, and develop a plan for development and implementation of these programs. The SCC completed a report verifying the energy efficiency goal of 10% by

349

Voluntary Renewable Energy Portfolio Goal | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Voluntary Renewable Energy Portfolio Goal Voluntary Renewable Energy Portfolio Goal Voluntary Renewable Energy Portfolio Goal < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider Virginia State Corporation Commission As part of legislation to re-regulate the state's electricity industry, Virginia enacted a voluntary renewable energy portfolio goal in 2007. Legislation passed in 2009 (HB 1994) expanded the goal, encouraging investor-owned utilities to procure a percentage of the power sold in Virginia from eligible renewable energy sources. Legislation passed in 2012 (SB 413) allows investor-owned utilities to meet up to 20% of a renewable energy goal through certificated research and development activity expenses

350

Sustainably Priced Energy Enterprise Development (SPEED) Goals | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sustainably Priced Energy Enterprise Development (SPEED) Goals Sustainably Priced Energy Enterprise Development (SPEED) Goals Sustainably Priced Energy Enterprise Development (SPEED) Goals < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Heating & Cooling Water Heating Wind Program Info State Vermont Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider Vermont Public Service Board Vermont's Sustainably Priced Energy Enterprise Development (SPEED) Program was created by legislation in 2005 to promote renewable energy development. The SPEED program itself is not a renewable portfolio goal or standard. However, if the Vermont Public Service Board (PSB) determines that the

351

Hanford Site Workers Meet Challenging Performance Goal at Plutonium...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford site's Plutonium Finishing Plant are surpassing goals for removing hazardous tanks once used in the plutonium production process. EM's Richland Operations Office and...

352

Hydrogen Program Goal-Setting Methodologies Report to Congress  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Report to Congress, published in August 2006, focuses on the methodologies used by the DOE Hydrogen Program for goal-setting.

353

Y-12 Successfully Meets and Exceeds Defense Programs Goals During...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

News Releases Y-12 Successfully Meets and Exceeds Defense Programs ... Y-12 Successfully Meets and Exceeds Defense Programs Goals During FY 2010 applicationmsword icon NR-11-10...

354

Step 1: Set Goals and Objectives | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Objectives Step 1: Set Goals and Objectives Many program administrators start "marketing" as soon as they can, without having done the necessary homework to shape their...

355

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF No REMEDIAL ACTION AT THE INACTIVE URANIFEROUS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 206 7 206 REV. 0 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF No REMEDIAL ACTION AT THE INACTIVE URANIFEROUS LIGNITE ASHING SITES AT BELFIELD AND BOWMAN. NORTH DAKOTA United States Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project June 1997 INTENDED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE This report has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available in paper copy and microfiche Number of pages in this report: 5 8 DOE and DOE contractors can obtain copies of this report from: Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (61 5) 576-8401 This report is publicly available from: National Technical Information Service Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royai Road Springfield, VA 22161 (703) 487-4650 DOE/EA-1206 REV. 0 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

356

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIkNATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELIkNATION REPORT ELIkNATION REPORT .FOR WESTINGHOUSE .ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT EAST PITTSBURGH PLANT FOREST HILLS PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Deconrmissioning Projects l CONTENTS INTRODUCTICIN BACKGROUND. Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES Page 1 2 2 2' 4 4 iii ELIMINATION~REPORT WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER,DEVELOPMENT,PLANT: EAST PITTSBURGH PLANT: 'FOREST HILLS ,PITTS.BURGH, PENNSYLVANIA INTRODUCTION The Department of,Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of 'Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices and

357

In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation within a Highly Contaminated Aquifer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation within a Highly Contaminated Aquifer Matthew Ginder-Vogel1, Wei-Min Wu1, Jack Carley2, Phillip Jardine2, Scott Fendorf1 and Craig Criddle1 1Stanford University, Stanford, CA 2Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN Microbial Respiration Figure 1. Uranium(VI) reduction is driven by microbial respiration resulting in the precipitation of uraninite. Uranium contamination of ground and surface waters has been detected at numerous sites throughout the world, including agricultural evaporation ponds (1), U.S. Department of Energy nuclear weapons manufacturing areas, and mine tailings sites (2). In oxygen-containing groundwater, uranium is generally found in the hexavalent oxidation state (3,4), which is a relatively soluble chemical form. As U(VI) is transported through

358

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM - ELIMINATION REPORT FOR  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

- - ELIMINATION REPORT FOR . UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA MACKAY SCHOOL OF MINES RENO, NEVADA s,d k I",, ici ;3J(, i Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES 1 , Page . 1 2 2 2' 3 3 iii The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor offices and divisions) has reviewed the past activities conducted under contract to the Atomic Energy Conrmission (AEC) at the University of Nevada, Mackay

359

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

FORMER ALLIED CHEMICAL CORPORATION, CHEMICALS COMPANY FORMER ALLIED CHEMICAL CORPORATION, CHEMICALS COMPANY (NOW GENERAL CHEMICAL CORPORATION) NORTH CLAYMONT, DELAWARE Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioni.ng Projects " .___ . ..-. --.- ------ ". CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES Page 1 1 1 2 2 2 4 ii INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices, and divisions) has reviewed the past activities of the Manhattan Engineer -- District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) at the Allied Chemical

360

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AMOCO CHEMICAL COMPANY AMOCO CHEMICAL COMPANY (THE FORMER TEXAS CITY CHEMICALS, INC.) TEXAS CITY, TEXAS Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS Summary of Findings REFERENCES ii --.. ---_ .l.- _-__II__-_. -. Page 1 7 7 ' c . ELIMINATION REPORT AMOCO CHEMICAL COMPANY (THE FORMER TEXAS CITY CHEMICALS, INC.) TEXAS CITY, TEXAS INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor offices and divisions), has reviewed the past activities conducted on behalf of the Atomic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation goals prgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Embrittlement Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation P. Sofronis, I. M. Robertson, D. D. Johnson University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop Augusta, GA, August 30, 2005 Funding and Duration * Timeline - Project start date: 7/20/05 - Project end date: 7/19/09 - Percent complete: 0.1% * Budget: Total project funding: 300k/yr * DOE share: 75% * Contractor share: 25% * Barriers - Hydrogen embrittlement of pipelines and remediation (mixing with water vapor?) - Assessment of hydrogen compatibility of the existing natural gas pipeline system for transporting hydrogen - Suitable steels, and/or coatings, or other materials to provide safe and reliable hydrogen transport and reduced capital cost 2 Team and Collaborators 3 * Industrial Partners: SECAT

362

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION BAYSIDE, NEW YORK VW. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects ..- .-- ---- CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES ii Page 1 L 2 2 3 3 5 5 - --__( -_..... _ .._ ELIMINATION REPORT THE FORMER SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION BAYSIDE, NEW YORK L -rc c INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices, and divisions) has reviewed the past activities of the Atomic Energy

363

NE-24 Unlverslty of Chicayo Remedial Action Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

(YJ 4 tlsj .?I2 (YJ 4 tlsj .?I2 416 17 1983 NE-24 Unlverslty of Chicayo Remedial Action Plan 22&d 7 IA +-- E. I.. Keller, Director Technical Services Division Oak Ridge Operations Ufflce In response to your memorandum dated July 29, 1983, the Field Task Proposal/Agreement (FTP/A) received frw Aryonne National Laboratory (ANL) appears to be satisfactory, and this office concurs in the use of ANL to provide the decontamination effort as noted in the FTP/A. The final decontaminatton report should Include the data needed for certiff- cation of the cleanup and any contamination left In place, e.g., sewer lines should be so documented in the permanent records of the University as well as the certification documents and reports. The remedial action to be conducted appears to be clearly InsIgnifIcant from an environmental

364

Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit Ill Interim Remedial Action  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Site Operable Unit Ill Interim Remedial Action Mark Perfxmed Under DOE Contrici No. DE-AC13-96CJ873.35 for th3 U.S. De[:ar!menf of Energy app~oveJioi'ptiL#ic re1ease;dCinWlionis Unlimilra' This page intentionally left blank Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit I11 Interim Remedial Action Annual Status Report August 1999 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office Project Number MSG-035-0011-00-000 Document Number Q0017700 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC99-03 This page intentionally blank Document Number Q0017700 Acronyms Contents Page ACRONYMS .............................................................................................................................. V

365

Final Report Northeast Site Area B NAPL Remediation Project  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Northeast Site Area B Northeast Site Area B NAPL Remediation Project at the Young - Rainey STAR Center Largo, Pinellas County, Florida April 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1457 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1457-2007 Final Report Northeast Site Area B NAPL Remediation Project at the Young - Rainey STAR Center Largo, Pinellas County, Florida April 2007 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado

366

Oak Ridge Operations Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

IC77GLg /'-Oi. SEP 20 1982 IC77GLg /'-Oi. SEP 20 1982 10-05-04B-001 Deportment of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Contract No. DE-AC05-810R20722 PRELIMINARY ENGINEERING EVALUATION OF REMEDIAL ACTION ALTERNATIVES BAYO CANYON SITE, LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO SEPTEMBER 1982 Bechtel Job 14501 Bechtel National, Inc. Nuclear Fuel Operations LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Department of Energy, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product or process disclosed, or represents that its use

367

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

REPORT, REPORT, FOR AL-TECH SPECIALTY STEEL CORPORATION (THE FORMER ALLEGHENY-LUDLUM STEEL CORPORATION) WATERVLIET, NEW YORK, AND DUNKIRK, NEW YORK Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste.Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES * 1 2 2 2 3 4 4 . . . 111 ELIMINATION REPORT AL-TECH SPECIALTY STEEL CORPORATION (THE FORMER ALLEGHENY-LUDLUM STEEL CORPORATION) WATERVLIET. NEW YORK, AND DUNKIRK, NEW YORK INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices, and

368

Remedial Alternative Selection for the F Area Tank Farm,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notice of Availability: Notice of Availability: Explanation of Significant Difference for Incorporating Tanks 18 and 19 into Revision 1 Interim Record Of Decision Remedial Alternative Selection for the F Area Tank Farm, Waste Tanks 17 and 20 at the Savannah River Site The Explanation of Significant Difference for Incorporating Tanks 18 and 19 into Revision 1 Interim Record of Decision Remedial Alternative Selection for the F Area Tank Farm, (hereafter referred to as the Tank 18 and 19 ESD) is being issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the lead agency for the Savannah River Site (SRS), with concurrence by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Region 4 (EPA), and South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The Tank 18 and 19 ESD modifies

369

In-situ groundwater remediation by selective colloid mobilization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in-situ groundwater remediation pump and treat technique effective for reclamation of aquifers that have been contaminated with a mixed, metal-containing waste, which promotes selective mobilization of metal oxide colloids with a cationic surfactant, preferably a quaternary alkylammonium surfactant, without significantly reducing formation permeability that often accompanies large-scale colloid dispersion, thus increasing the efficiency of the remediation effort by enhancing the capture of strongly sorbing contaminants associated with the oxide phases. The resulting suspension can be separated from the bulk solution with controlled pH adjustments to destabilize the oxide colloids, and a clear supernatant which results that can be recycled through the injection well without further waste treatment.

Seaman, John C. (New Ellenton, SC); Bertch, Paul M. (Aiken, SC)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

In situ RF/microwave remediation of soil experiment overview  

SciTech Connect

Contaminant plumes are significant waste problems that require remediation in both the government and private sectors. The authors are developing an in situ process that uses RF/microwave stimulation to remove pollutants from contaminated soils. This process is more efficient than existing technologies, creates less secondary pollution, and is applicable to situations that are not amenable to treatment by existing technologies. Currently, the most commonly used process is soil vapor extraction. However, even when it is successful, this technology is energy inefficient. The authors objective is to combine RF/microwave energy application with soil vapor extraction to help mobilize and efficiently remove the soil contaminants, specifically demonstrating the viability of RF/microwave induced, in situ, soil remediation of light and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPL, DNAPL) contaminants.

Regan, A.H.; Palomares, M.E.; Polston, C.; Rees, D.E.; Roybal, W.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ross, T.J. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Clean option: An alternative strategy for Hanford Tank Waste Remediation  

SciTech Connect

Plans for remediation of the Hanford underground storage tanks are currently undergoing reevaluation. As part of this process, many options are being considered for the Tank Waste Remediation System (MRS). The clean option'' described here proposes an aggressive waste processing strategy to achieve the three ma or objectives: Greatly reduce the volume of high-level waste (HLW) to lessen demands on geologic repository space; decrease by several orders of magnitude the amount of radioactivity and toxicity now in the waste tanks that will be left permanently onsite as low-level solid waste (LLW); and accomplish the first two objectives without significantly increasing the total amount of waste for disposal. The study discussed here focuses on process chemistry, as it provides the foundation for achieving the clean option objectives. Because demonstrated separation steps have been identified and connected in a way that meets these objectives, the study concludes that the process chemistry rests on a firm technical basis.

Straalsund, J.L.; Swanson, J.L.; Baker, E.G.; Jones, E.O.; Kuhn, W.L. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Holmes, J.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

A method for desalination and water remediation by hydrodynamic cavitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water is becoming an increasingly valuable commodity with population growth demanding more and more amounts of this limited resource. Increased efforts are directed toward recycling and remediation as well as desalination of the large quantities of seawater available. Dr. Bertwin Langenecker was a pioneer in utilizing hydrodynamic cavitation in a variety of applications that would remove dissolved solids from water and other liquids. His combination of intense cavitation using a rotor-stator combination as well as simultaneously adding an adsorbent demonstrated impressive results in desalination and waste water remediation. In this presentation a description will be given of Dr. Langenecker’s technology as well as a sampling of some of his most impressive results. Speculations as to why this approach works as well as it does will be presented.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

A method for desalination and water remediation by hydrodynamic cavitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water is becoming an increasingly valuable commodity with population growth demanding more and more amounts of this limited resource. Increased efforts are directed toward recycling and remediation as well as desalination of the large quantities of seawater available. Dr. Bertwin Langenecker was a pioneer in utilizing hydrodynamic cavitation in a variety of applications that would remove dissolved solids from water and other liquids. His combination of intense cavitation using a rotor-stator combination as well as simultaneously adding an adsorbent demonstrated impressive results in desalination and waste water remediation. In this presentation a description will be given of Dr. Langenecker's technology as well as a sampling of some of his most impressive results. Speculations as to why this approach works as well as it does will be presented.

Lawrence A. Crum; Michael Skinner; Scott Zeilinger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Decontamination formulation with additive for enhanced mold remediation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Decontamination formulations with an additive for enhancing mold remediation. The formulations include a solubilizing agent (e.g., a cationic surfactant), a reactive compound (e.g., hydrogen peroxide), a carbonate or bicarbonate salt, a water-soluble bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate), a mold remediation enhancer containing Fe or Mn, and water. The concentration of Fe.sup.2+ or Mn.sup.2+ ions in the aqueous mixture is in the range of about 0.0001% to about 0.001%. The enhanced formulations can be delivered, for example, as a foam, spray, liquid, fog, mist, or aerosol for neutralization of chemical compounds, and for killing certain biological compounds or agents and mold spores, on contaminated surfaces and materials.

Tucker, Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM); Irvine, Kevin (Huntsville, AL); Berger, Paul (Rome, NY); Comstock, Robert (Bel Air, MD)

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

375

In-situ groundwater remediation by selective colloid mobilization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in-situ groundwater remediation pump and treat technique is described which is effective for reclamation of aquifers that have been contaminated with a mixed, metal-containing waste, and which promotes selective mobilization of metal oxide colloids with a cationic surfactant, preferably a quaternary alkylammonium surfactant, without significantly reducing formation permeability that often accompanies large-scale colloid dispersion, thus increasing the efficiency of the remediation effort by enhancing the capture of strongly sorbing contaminants associated with the oxide phases. The resulting suspension can be separated from the bulk solution with controlled pH adjustments to destabilize the oxide colloids, and a clear supernatant which results that can be recycled through the injection well without further waste treatment. 3 figs.

Seaman, J.C.; Bertch, P.M.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

376

FORMERLY REMEDIAL UTILIZED SITES ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

REMEDIAL UTILIZED SITES ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT FOR FORMER CARPENTER STEEL COMPANY; 101 WEST BERN STREET; READING, PENNSYLVANIA December 1991 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration Elimination Report Former Carpenter Steel Company CONTENTS INTRODUCTION ........................... 1 BACKGROUND ............................ 1 Site Function ......................... Site Description. ....................... : Radiological History and Status ................ 2 ELIMINATION ANALYSIS ....................... 3 REFERENCES ............................ 4 Elimination Report Former Carpenter Steel Company INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration, has reviewed the past activities of the Manhattan Engineer District (MEO) and

377

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

< < .. ,:. FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT FOR JESSOP STEEL COMPANY; 500 GREEN STREET: WASHINGTON, PENNSYLVANIA December 1991 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration Elimination Report Jessop Steel Company CONTENTS INTRODUCTION ...................... .'. .... 1 BACKGROUND ............................. 1 Site Function Site Description : : : : : : : .................................... : Radiological History and Status ................. 2 ELIMINATION ANALYSIS ........................ 3 REFERENCES .............................. 4 Elimination Report Jessop Steel Company 1 INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE)., Office of Environmental Restoration, has reviewed the past activities of the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and

378

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT SONABOND ULTRASONICS FORMERLY AEROPROJECTS, INC. 200-T E. ROSEDALE AVENUE WEST CHESTER,~PENNSYLVANIA December 1991 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Environmental Restoration Office of Eastern Area Programs . . . CONTENTS INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BACKGROUND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . REFERENCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . m . . 1 . . 1 . . 2 . . 2 I . . ELIMINATIO N REPO R T SONABOND ULTRASONICS FORMERLY AEROPROJECTS, INC. 200-T E. ROSEDALE AVENUE W EST CHESTER, PENNSYLVANIA

379

Mercury contaminated sediment sites—An evaluation of remedial options  

SciTech Connect

Mercury (Hg) is a naturally-occurring element that is ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. Though efforts have been made in recent years to decrease Hg emissions, historically-emitted Hg can be retained in the sediments of aquatic bodies where they may be slowly converted to methylmercury (MeHg). Consequently, Hg in historically-contaminated sediments can result in high levels of significant exposure for aquatic species, wildlife and human populations consuming fish. Even if source control of contaminated wastewater is achievable, it may take a very long time, perhaps decades, for Hg-contaminated aquatic systems to reach relatively safe Hg levels in both water and surface sediment naturally. It may take even longer if Hg is present at higher concentration levels in deep sediment. Hg contaminated sediment results from previous releases or ongoing contributions from sources that are difficult to identify. Due to human activities or physical, chemical, or biological processes (e.g. hydrodynamic flows, bioturbation, molecular diffusion, and chemical transformation), the buried Hg can be remobilized into the overlying water. Hg speciation in the water column and sediments critically affect the reactivity (i.e. conversion of inorganic Hg(II) to MeHg), transport, and its exposure to living organisms. Also, geochemical conditions affect the activity of methylating bacteria and its availability for methylation. This review paper discusses remedial considerations (e.g. key chemical factors in fate and transport of Hg, source characterization and control, environmental management procedures, remediation options, modeling tools) and includes practical case studies for cleaning up Hg-contaminated sediment sites. -- Highlights: ? Managing mercury-contaminated sediment sites are challenging to remediate. ? Remediation technologies are making a difference in managing these sites. ? Partitioning plays a dominant role in the distribution of mercury species. ? Mathematical models can be used to help us understand the chemistry and processes.

Randall, Paul M., E-mail: randall.paul@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Chattopadhyay, Sandip, E-mail: Sandip.Chattopadhyay@tetratech.com [Tetra Tech, Inc., 250 West Court Street, Suite 200W, Cincinnati, OH 45202 (United States)] [Tetra Tech, Inc., 250 West Court Street, Suite 200W, Cincinnati, OH 45202 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Integrating GIS and GPS in environmental remediation oversight  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents findings on Ohio EPA Office of Federal Facilities Oversight`s (OFFO) use of GIS and GPS for environmental remediation oversight at the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Fernald Site. The Fernald site is a former uranium metal production facility within DOE`s nuclear weapons complex. Significant uranium contamination of soil and groundwater is being remediated under state and federal regulations. OFFO uses GIS/GPS to enhance environmental monitoring and remediation oversight. These technologies are utilized within OFFO`s environmental monitoring program for sample location and parameter selection, data interpretation and presentation. GPS is used to integrate sample data into OFFO`s GIS and for permanently linking precise and accurate geographic data to samples and waste units. It is important to identify contamination geographically as all visual references (e.g., buildings, infrastructure) will be removed during remediation. Availability of the GIS allows OFFO to perform independent analysis and review of DOE contractor generated data, models, maps, and designs. This ability helps alleviate concerns associated with {open_quotes}black box{close_quotes} models and data interpretation. OFFO`s independent analysis has increased regulatory confidence and the efficiency of design reviews. GIS/GPS technology allows OFFO to record and present complex data in a visual format aiding in stakeholder education and awareness. Presented are OFFO`s achievements within the aforementioned activities and some reasons learned in implementing the GIS/GPS program. OFFO`s two years of GIS/GPS development have resulted in numerous lessons learned and ideas for increasing effectiveness through the use of GIS/GPS.

Kaletsky, K.; Earle, J.R.; Schneider, T.A. [Ohio EPA, Dayton, OH (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation goals prgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

FORMERLY UTILIZED elTEB REMEDIAL ACTION PROORAM [FUSRAP] AND  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

bE8IQM CRITERIA FOR bE8IQM CRITERIA FOR r FORMERLY UTILIZED elTEB REMEDIAL ACTION PROORAM [FUSRAP] AND r 8URPLUS FACIL~TIES MANAOEMENT PROQRAM [SFMPI FEBRUARY 1886 i r s o i - o o - ~ c - o l - 1 ~ R e v . 1 DESIGN CRITERIA FOR FORMERLY UTILIZED Sf TES REMEDIAL' ACTION PROGAM ( PUSRAPL AND . . -- SURPLUS F A C I L I T I E S UANAGEMENT PROGRAM ( SFMP ( I S S U E D FOR CLIENT APPROVAL) SF proved by: 2-24-86 D a t e T e c h n i c a l Services D i v i s i o n A p p r o v e d by: 2-24-86 D a t e C o n s t r u c t i o n a n d E n g i n e e r i n g Oak R i d g e O p e r a t i o n s O f f ice 14SOl-00-PC-01 Rev. 1 PREFACE T O DESIGN CRITERIA These design criteria have been written in a generic form that sunmarizes criteria applicabl'e for remedial action and long-tern ranasenent activities associated with t h e radioactive wastes at the FOSRAP *and SFflP sites. Site-specific information i

382

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WINCHESTER ENGINEERING AND ANALYTICAL CENTER WINCHESTER ENGINEERING AND ANALYTICAL CENTER (NORTHEASTERN RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH LABORATORY) WINCHESTER, MASSACHUSE'ITS Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects . . I . I C O N T E N T S IN T R O D U C T IO N B A C K G R O U N D S i te F u n c ti o n S i te D e s c ri p ti o n R a d i o l o g i c a l H i s to ry a n d S ta tu s E L IM IN A T IO N A N A L Y S IS R E F E R E N C E S - P a g e 1 2 2 2 3 5 5 i i i -..- - ELIMINATION REPORT WINCHESTER ENGINEERING AND ANALYTICAL CENTER (NORTHEASTERN RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH LABORATORY) WINCHESTER, MASSACHUSETTS INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action, Division of Remedial Action Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices and divisions,)

383

Remediation of a uranium-contamination in ground water  

SciTech Connect

The former production site of NUKEM where nuclear fuel-elements were developed and handled from 1958 to 1988 was situated in the centre of an industrial park for various activities of the chemical and metallurgical industry. The size of the industrially used part is about 300.000 m{sup 2}. Regulatory routine controls showed elevated CHC (Chlorinated Hydro-Carbons) values of the ground water at the beginning of the 1990's in an area which represented about 80.000 m{sup 2} down-gradient of locations where CHC compounds were stored and handled. Further investigations until 1998 proved that former activities on the NUKEM site, like the UF{sub 6} conversion process, were of certain relevance. The fact that several measured values were above the threshold values made the remediation of the ground water mandatory. This was addressed in the permission given by the Ministry for Nuclear Installations and Environment of Hesse according to chap. 7 of the German atomic law in October 2000. Ground water samples taken in an area of about 5.000 m{sup 2} showed elevated values of total Uranium activity up to between 50 and 75 Bq/l in 2002. Furthermore in an area of another 20.000 m{sup 2} the samples were above threshold value. In this paper results of the remediation are presented. The actual alpha-activities of the ground waters of the remediation wells show values of 3 to 9 Bq/l which are dominated by 80 to 90 % U-234 activity. The mass-share of total Uranium for this nuclide amounts to 0,05% on average. The authority responsible for conventional water utilisation defined target values for remediation: 20 {mu}g/l for dissolved Uranium and 10 {mu}g/l for CHC. Both values have not yet been reached for an area of about 10.000 m{sup 2}. The remediation process by extracting water from four remediation wells has proved its efficiency by reduction of the starting concentrations by a factor of 3 to 6. Further pumping will be necessary especially in that area of the site where the contaminations were found later during soil remediation activities. Only two wells have been in operation since July 2002 when the remediation technique was installed and an apparatus for direct gamma-spectroscopic measurement of the accumulated activities on the adsorbers was qualified. Two further remediation wells have been in operation since August 2006, when the installed remediation technique was about to be doubled from a throughput of 5 m{sup 3}/h to 10 m{sup 3}/h. About 20.000 m{sup 3} of ground water have been extracted since from these two wells and the decrease of their Uranium concentrations behaves similar to that of the two other wells being extracted since the beginning of remediation. Both, total Uranium-concentrations and the weight-share of the nuclides U-234, U-235 and U-238 are measured by ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry) besides measurements of Uranium-Alpha-Activities in addition to the measurement of CHC components of which PCE (Per-chlor-Ethene) is dominant in the contaminated area. CHC compounds are measured by GC (Gas Chromatography). Down-gradient naturally attenuated products are detected in various compositions. Overall 183.000 m{sup 3} of ground water have been extracted. Using a pump and treat method 11 kg Uranium have been collected on an ion-exchange material based on cellulose, containing almost 100 MBq U-235 activity, and almost 15 kg of CHC, essentially PCE, were collected on GAC (Granules of Activated Carbon). Less than 3% of the extracted Uranium have passed the adsorber-system of the remediation plant and were adsorbed by the sewage sludge of the industrial site's waste water treatment. The monthly monitoring of 19 monitoring wells shows that an efficient artificial barrier was built up by the water extraction. The Uranium contamination of two ground water plumes has drastically been reduced by the used technique dependent on the amounts of extracted water. The concentration of the CHC contamination has changed depending on the location of temporal pumping. Thereby maximum availability of this contaminan

Woerner, Joerg; Margraf, Sonja; Hackel, Walter [RD Hanau GmbH (Germany)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Environmental restoration and remediation technical data management plan  

SciTech Connect

The tasks performed in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) work plan for each Hanford Site operable unit must meet the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) and the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement, Ecology et. al 1992). An extensive amount of data will be generated in the evaluation and remediation of hazardous waste sites at the Site. The data must be of sufficient quality, as they will be used to evaluate the need, select the method(s), and support the full remediation of the waste sites as stipulated in the Tri-Party Agreement. In particular, a data management plan (DMP) is to be included in an RI/FS work plan for managing the technical data obtained during the characterization of an operable unit, as well as other data related to the study of the operable unit. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) sites are involved in the operable unit. Thus, the data management activities for the operable unit should be applied consistently to RCRA sites in the operable unit as well. This DMP provides common direction for managing-the environmental technical data of all defined operable units at the Hanford Site during the RI/FS activities. Details specific to an operable unit will be included in the actual work plan of that operable unit.

Key, K.T.; Fox, R.D.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Appendix B (Part 2)  

SciTech Connect

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

USDOE /NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

An Approach for Optimal Goal Position Assignment in Vehicle Formations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper one methodology to solve the goal position assignment (GPA) problem is developed, this is, to assign the corresponding goal position (desired position) for a group of vehicles, knowing the initial positions and the established formation ... Keywords: Assignment, Optimization, Quad-rotor, Vehicle formations

Luis García-Delgado; R. Gómez-Fuentes; A. García-Juárez; A. L. Leal-Cruz; D. Berman-Mendoza; A. Vera-Marquina; A. G. Rojas-Hernández

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Developing and Executing Goal-Based, Adjustably Autonomous Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing and Executing Goal-Based, Adjustably Autonomous Procedures David Kortenkamp, R. Peter@jsc.nasa.gov This paper describes an approach to representing, authoring and executing procedures during human spaceflight missions. The approach allows for the explicit incorporation of goals into procedures. The approach also

Kortenkamp, David

388

Domain-Independent Heuristics for Goal Formulation Mark Wilson1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to make changes where obviously necessary. Most autonomous agents are frustrating in the same way; even. For example, if a UAV capable of autonomous goal formulation burns fuel at unexpectedly high rates (because it is flying into the wind), it would formulate a goal to refuel. In contrast, a replanning system might

Gupta, Kalyan Moy

389

Agile Development & Business Goals: The Six Week Solution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Agile Development and Business Goals describes a unique, state-of-the-art methodology that aligns the critical but often "silo-ed" software development process with core company goals. Eschewing long-winded "agile philosophy" in favor of a formally ...

Bill Holtsnider; Tom Wheeler; George Stragand; Joseph Gee

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals" was held May 30-31 in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL. The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals" was held May 30-31 in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL. The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals" was held May 30-31 in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL.

391

Energy Goals and Standards for Federal Government | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Goals and Standards for Federal Government Energy Goals and Standards for Federal Government Energy Goals and Standards for Federal Government < Back Eligibility Fed. Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Energy Sources Buying & Making Electricity Solar Water Heating Program Info Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider U.S. Department of Energy The federal Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005) established several goals and standards to reduce energy use in existing and new federal buildings. Executive Order 13423, signed in January 2007, expanded on those goals and standards and was later reaffirmed by congress with the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007). EISA 2007 extended an

392

Determine Institutional Change Sustainability Goals | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determine Institutional Change Sustainability Goals Determine Institutional Change Sustainability Goals Determine Institutional Change Sustainability Goals October 8, 2013 - 11:17am Addthis Institutional Change Continuous Improvement Cycle The first step in the institutional change process is defining your Federal agency's sustainability goals. That is, decide what outcomes are desired (or required) over what period of time. Behavioral, organizational, and institutional changes typically are means to achieve desired energy, resource, or greenhouse gas emission outcomes. They are not ends in and of themselves. Agencies may derive goals from multiple sources, such as: Formal executive orders (E.O.s) or other requirements. For example, E.O. 13514 and associated agency strategic sustainability performance plans

393

Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals" was held May 30-31 in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL. The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals" was held May 30-31 in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL. The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals" was held May 30-31 in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL.

394

DOE-EMSP Final Report: Characterization of Changes in Colloid and DNAPL Affecting Surface Chemistry and Remediation  

SciTech Connect

The waste disposal to the M-area basin and A-14 outfall at the Savannah River Department of Energy facility in Aiken SC (USA) included a wide variety of inorganic aqueous flows and organic solvents in the form of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL). The DNAPL has migrated through the subsurface resulting in widespread groundwater contamination. The goal of this research was to identify and quantify processes that could have affected the migration and remediation of the DNAPL in the subsurface. It was hypothesized that the variety of waste disposed at this site could have altered the mineral, microbial and DNAPL properties at this site relative to other DNAPL sites. The DNAPL was determined to have a very low interfacial tension and is suspected to be distributed in fine grained media, thereby reducing the effectiveness of soil vapor extraction remediation efforts. Although the DNAPL is primarily comprised of tetrachloroethene and trichloroethane, it also contains organic acids and several heavy metals. Experimental results suggest that iron from the aqueous and DNAPL phases undergoes precipitation and dechlorination reactions at the DNAPL-water interface, contributing to the low interfacial tension and acidity of the DNAPL. Biological activity in the contaminated region can also contribute to the low interfacial tension. PCE degrading bacteria produce biosurfactants and adhere to the DNAPL-water interface when stressed by high tetrachloroethene or low dissolved oxygen concentrations. The presence of iron can reduce the interfacial tension by nearly an order of magnitude, while the PCE degraders reduced the interfacial tension by nearly 50%. Abiotic changes in the mineral characteristics were not found to be substantially different between contaminated and background samples. The research completed here begins to shed some insight into the complexities of DNAPL fate and migration at sites where co-disposal of many different waste products occurred. Quantifying the low interfacial tension of the SRS DNAPL helps to formulate a new conceptual picture of the subsurface DNAPL migration and provides an explanation of the limited effectiveness of remediation efforts. Alternative designs for remediation that are more effective for sites with DNAPL in fine grained media are required.

Susan E. Powers; Stefan J. Grimberg; Miles Denham

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

395

EIS-0355: Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

355: Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and 355: Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah EIS-0355: Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah Summary The Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah, Environmental Impact Statement and associated supplements and amendments provides information on the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) proposal to (1) remediate approximately 11.9 million tons of contaminated materials located on the Moab site and approximately 39,700 tons located on nearby vicinity properties and (2) develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for the Moab site using the framework of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water

396

DOE/OR/20722-88 Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

88 88 . Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Contract No. DE-AC05-810R20722 POST-REMEDIAL ACTION REPORT FOR THE WAYNE SITE - 1985 AND 1987 Wayne, New Jersey March 1989 Bechtel National, Inc. DOE/OR/20722-88 POST-REMEDIAL ACTION REPORT FOR THE WAYNE SITE - 1985 AND 1987 WAYNE, NEW JERSEY MARCH 1989 Prepared for UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OAK RIDGE OPERATIONS OFFICE Under Contract No. DE-AC05-810R20722 BY R. M. Howard Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 TABLE OF CONTENTS Paqe 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 Introduction 1.1 Background 1.2 History Remedial Action Guidelines 5 Remedial Action 3.1 Cleanup/Decontamination Activities 3.2 Contamination Control During the Cleanup 8 8 11 Post-Remedial-Action Sampling 13

397

Feasibility study for remedial action for the groundwater operable units at the chemical plant area and the ordnance works area, Weldon Spring, Missouri  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Army (DA) are conducting an evaluation to identify the appropriate response action to address groundwater contamination at the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant (WSCP) and the Weldon Spring Ordnance Works (WSOW), respectively. The two areas are located in St. Charles County, about 48 km (30 rni) west of St. Louis. The groundwater operable unit (GWOU) at the WSCP is one of four operable units being evaluated by DOE as part of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). The groundwater operable unit at the WSOW is being evaluated by the DA as Operable Unit 2 (OU2); soil and pipeline contamination are being managed under Operable Unit 1 (OU1). Remedial activities at the WSCP and the WSOW are being conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Consistent with DOE policy, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) values have been incorporated into the CERCLA process. A remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan summarizing initial site conditions and providing site hydrogeological and exposure models was published in August of 1995 (DOE 1995). The remedial investigation (RI) and baseline risk assessment (BRA) have also recently been completed. The RI (DOE and DA 1998b) discusses in detail the nature, extent, fate, and transport of groundwater and spring water contamination. The BRA (DOE and DA 1998a) is a combined baseline assessment of potential human health and ecological impacts and provides the estimated potential health risks and ecological impacts associated with groundwater and springwater contamination if no remedial action were taken. This feasibility study (FS) has been prepared to evaluate potential options for addressing groundwater contamination at the WSCP and the WSOW. A brief description of the history and environmental setting of the sites is presented in Section 1.1, key information relative to the nature and extent of contamination is presented in Section 1.2, and the results of the BRA are summarized in Section 1.3. The objective of this FS is discussed in Section 1.4, and preliminary remediation goals are identified in Section 1.5. The organization of the remaining chapters of this FS is outlined in Section 1.6.

NONE

1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Remediation of Methyl Iodide in Aqueous Solution and Soils Amended with Thiourea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remediation of Methyl Iodide in Aqueous Solution and Soils Amended with Thiourea ... Therefore, spraying thiourea on the soil surface to form a “reactive surface barrier” may be an effective and innovative strategy for controlling fumigant emissions to the atmosphere and for improving environmental protection. ... Currently, new and innovative remediation technologies including bioremediation, phytoremediation, and chemical remediation have been proposed for use in cleaning polluted soil and groundwater. ...

Wei Zheng; Sharon K. Papiernik; Mingxin Guo; Scott R. Yates

2004-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

399

State Energy Policy Goal and Development (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

State Energy Policy Goal and Development (Montana) State Energy Policy Goal and Development (Montana) State Energy Policy Goal and Development (Montana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Montana Legislature, Legislative Services Division

400

Remedial System Performance Improvement for the 200-ZP-1_PW-1 Operable Units at Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Operations Review Report: Feasibility Study Strategies and Remedial System Performance Improvement for the 200- ZP-1/PW-1 Operable Units at Hanford Prepared for Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation Office of Environmental Management February 9, 2007 i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, Headquarters' Office of Environmental Management, the Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation (EM-22), performed a Remediation System Evaluation (RSE) of the 200-ZP-1/PW-1 groundwater pump and treat (P&T) system, as well as the vadose zone Soil Vapor Extraction (SVE) system at the Hanford

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation goals prgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

DOE/OFVZ1949402 Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOE/OFVZ1949402 DOE/OFVZ1949402 Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Contract No. DE-ACO5-9%OR21949 Post-Remedial Action Report for the Former Baker Brothers Site Toledd, Ohio . February 1997 . . DOWORRl949-402 POST-REMEDIAL ACTION REPORT FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION ATTHE FORMER BAKER BROTHERS SITE TOLEDO. OHIO FEBRUARY 1997 . United States Department of Energy I OakRidgeOpcrationsOfficc Under Contract No. DE-AC059 I OR2 1949 BY Bcchtcl National, Inc. . . : ; '.' OakRldnc.Tc~~~.- ~--~-' -------m . . Be&cl Job No. 14501 CQNTENTS FIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..~~................................................................................ iv TABLES . . . . . . . ..i.................................................................................................................................

402

E-Print Network 3.0 - area remediation case Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Short Courses Module F: Remediation... for professionals working in or intending to enter the field of contaminated site assessment, ... Source: Baird, Mark - Climate and...

403

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerated remedial strategy Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Short Courses Module F: Remediation... for professionals working in or intending to enter the field of contaminated site assessment, ... Source: Baird, Mark - Climate and...

404

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced remediation technologies Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in humid gas streams Ann C. Gentilea)and Mark J. Kushnerb) Summary: remediation in humid gas streams is an efficient technology for disposal of volatile organic compounds......

405

The effects of viscosity and subsurface heterogeneity on a brine barrier approach to DNAPL remediation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) are a long-term source of groundwater contamination. Difficulties of current remediation methods have led to the study of a novel… (more)

Murphy, Lauren L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Record of Decision/Remedial Alternative Selection for the Motor Shops Seepage Basin (716-A)  

SciTech Connect

This decision document presents the selected remedial alternative for the Motor Shops Seepage Basin located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina

Palmer, E.

1999-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

407

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CHPlateau Remediation Contract Hanford Site- March 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Evaluation to determine whether Plateau Remediation Contract Hanford Site is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

408

Rules and Regulations for the Investigation and Remediation of Hazardous Material Releases (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations establish procedures for the investigation and remediation of contamination resulting from the unpermitted release of hazardous materials. The regulations aim to protect water...

409

Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young- Rainey STAR Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds.May 2004, Monterey, California.Randall Juhlin, Michael Butherus, Joseph Daniel, David S....

410

INVESTIGATION OF REMEDIAL EDUCATION COURSE SCORES AS A PREDICTOR OF FRESHMAN-LEVEL COURSE PERFORMANCES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study sought to determine the relationship between the performance in remedial courses (English and math) and college-level course performances among students in a large… (more)

Ulmer, Larry

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Lovato learning: a guide for interactive, differential instruction in a high school remedial math class.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The implementation of different instructional strategies and their affects on student attitudes toward learning will be investigated in two Northern Humboldt High School remedial math… (more)

Lovato, Susan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Drought remedial measures through resistivity investigations in a typical crystalline region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Systematic geoelectrical investigations were carried out in a typical drought ... of Andhra Pradesh, India, for evolving drought remedial strategies. Depth to basement maps, geoelectrical...

B. H. Briz-Kishore

413

Innovative Soil and Groundwater Remediation; Applications and Demonstrations: The Site Program Experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program of the ... United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) evaluates innovative hazardous waste remediation technologies. The program works with t...

S. Rock; J. Martin

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

EIS-0195: Remedial Actions at Operable Unit 4, Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to conduct remedial action at Operable Unit 4 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project.

415

Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program -12184  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) methods and protocols allow evaluation of remediation and final site conditions to determine if remediated sites remain protective. Two case studies are presented that involve the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) and associated vicinity properties (VPs), which are being remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are a part of the former Lake Ontario Ordnance Works (LOOW). In response to stakeholders concerns about whether certain remediated NFSS VPs were putting them at risk, DOE met with stakeholders and agreed to evaluate protectiveness. Documentation in the DOE records collection adequately described assessed and final radiological conditions at the completed VPs. All FUSRAP wastes at the completed sites were cleaned up to meet DOE guidelines for unrestricted use. DOE compiled the results of the investigation in a report that was released for public comment. In conducting the review of site conditions, DOE found that stakeholders were also concerned about waste from the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) that was handled at LOOW. DOE agreed to determine if SPRU waste remained at that needed to be remediated. DOE reviewed records of waste characterization, historical handling locations and methods, and assessment and remediation data. DOE concluded that the SPRU waste was remediated on the LOOW to levels that pose no unacceptable risk and allow unrestricted use and unlimited exposure. This work confirms the following points as tenets of an effective long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) program: ? Stakeholder interaction must be open and transparent, and DOE must respond promptly to stakeholder concerns. ? DOE, as the long-term custodian, must collect and preserve site records in order to demonstrate that remediated sites pose no unacceptable risk. ? DOE must continue to maintain constructive relationships with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and state and federal regulators.

Clayton, Christopher [U.S Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC; Kothari, Vijendra [U.S Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, West Virginia; Starr, Ken [U.S Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Westminster, Colorado; Widdop, Michael; Gillespie, Joey [SM Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado

2012-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

416

FORMERLY USED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM DESIGNATION SUMMARY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

USED SITES USED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM DESIGNATION SUMMARY FOR ALBA CRAFT LABORATORY OXFORD, OHIO October 1, 1992 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION Designation Summary Alba Craft Laboratory. Oxford CONTENTS INTRODUCTION .......... . . ..................... 1 BACKGROUND Site Function ......................... Site Description ..................... 1 Owner History ................. .. 2 Radiological History and Status............ 2 Authority Review .................... .. 3 DESIGNATION DETERMINATION ........ ....... 3 REFERENCES . ............ .... . 3 Designation Summary Alba Craft Laboratory, Oxford INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration, has reviewed the past activities of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) at the

417

Enhancement of in situ microbial remediation of aquifers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods are provided for remediating subsurface areas contaminated by toxic organic compounds. An innocuous oil, such as vegetable oil, mineral oil, or other immiscible organic liquid, is introduced into the contaminated area and permitted to move therethrough. The oil concentrates or strips the organic contaminants, such that the concentration of the contaminants is reduced and such contaminants are available to be either pumped out of the subsurface area or metabolized by microorganisms. Microorganisms may be introduced into the contaminated area to effect bioremediation of the contamination. The methods may be adapted to deliver microorganisms, enzymes, nutrients and electron donors to subsurface zones contaminated by nitrate in order to stimulate or enhance denitrification.

Fredrickson, James K. (Kennewick, WA); Brockman, Fred J. (Kennewick, WA); Streile, Gary P. (both or Richland, WA); Cary, John W. (both or Richland, WA); McBride, John F. (Carrboro, NC)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Surfactant-enhanced remediation of organic contaminated soil and water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surfactant based remediation technologies for organic contaminated soil and water (groundwater or surface water) is of increasing importance recently. Surfactants are used to dramatically expedite the process, which in turn, may reduce the treatment time of a site compared to use of water alone. In fact, among the various available remediation technologies for organic contaminated sites, surfactant based process is one of the most innovative technologies. To enhance the application of surfactant based technologies for remediation of organic contaminated sites, it is very important to have a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in this process. This paper will provide an overview of the recent developments in the area of surfactant enhanced soil and groundwater remediation processes, focusing on (i) surfactant adsorption on soil, (ii) micellar solubilization of organic hydrocarbons, (iii) supersolubilization, (iv) density modified displacement, (v) degradation of organic hydrocarbon in presence surfactants, (vi) partitioning of surfactants onto soil and liquid organic phase, (vii) partitioning of contaminants onto soil, and (viii) removal of organics from soil in presence of surfactants. Surfactant adsorption on soil and/or sediment is an important step in this process as it results in surfactant loss reduced the availability of the surfactants for solubilization. At the same time, adsorbed surfactants will retained in the soil matrix, and may create other environmental problem. The biosurfactants are become promising in this application due to their environmentally friendly nature, nontoxic, low adsorption on to soil, and good solubilization efficiency. Effects of different parameters like the effect of electrolyte, pH, soil mineral and organic content, soil composition etc. on surfactant adsorption are discussed here. Micellar solubilization is also an important step for removal of organic contaminants from the soil matrix, especially for low aqueous solubility organic contaminants. Influences of different parameters such as single and mixed surfactant system, hydrophilic and hydrophobic chain length, HLB value, temperature, electrolyte, surfactant type that are very important in micellar solubilization are reviewed here. Microemulsion systems show higher capacity of organic hydrocarbons solubilization than the normal micellar system. In the case of biodegradation of organic hydrocarbons, the rate is very slow due to low water solubility and dissolution rate but the presence of surfactants may increase the bioavailability of hydrophobic compounds by solubilization and hence increases the degradation rate. In some cases the presence of it also reduces the rate. In addition to fundamental studies, some laboratory and field studies on removal of organics from contaminated soil are also reviewed to show the applicability of this technology.

Santanu Paria

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Adaptive management: a paradigm for remediation of public facilities  

SciTech Connect

Public facility restoration planning traditionally focused on response to natural disasters and hazardous materials accidental releases. These plans now need to integrate response to terrorist actions. Therefore, plans must address a wide range of potential vulnerabilities. Similar types of broad remediation planning are needed for restoration of waste and hazardous material handling areas and facilities. There are strong similarities in damage results and remediation activities between unintentional and terrorist actions; however, the uncertainties associated with terrorist actions result in a re-evaluation of approaches to planning. Restoration of public facilities following a release of a hazardous material is inherently far more complex than in confined industrial settings and has many unique technical, economic, social, and political challenges. Therefore, they arguably involve a superset of drivers, concerns and public agencies compared to other restoration efforts. This superset of conditions increases complexity of interactions, reduces our knowledge of the initial conditions, and even condenses the timeline for restoration response. Therefore, evaluations of alternative restoration management approaches developed for responding to terrorist actions provide useful knowledge for large, complex waste management projects. Whereas present planning documents have substantial linearity in their organization, the 'adaptive management' paradigm provides a constructive parallel operations paradigm for restoration of facilities that anticipates and plans for uncertainty, multiple/simUltaneous public agency actions, and stakeholder participation. Adaptive management grew out of the need to manage and restore natural resources in highly complex and changing environments with limited knowledge about causal relationships and responses to restoration actions. Similarities between natural resource management and restoration of a facility and surrounding area(s) after a disruptive event suggest numerous advantages over preset linearly-structured plans by incorporating the flexibility and overlap of processes inherent in effective facility restoration. We discuss three restoration case studies (e.g., the Hart Senate Office Building anthrax restoration, Rocky Flats actinide remediation, and hurricane destruction restoration), that implement aspects of adaptive management but not a formal approach. We propose that more formal adoption of adaptive management principles could be a basis for more flexible standards to improve site-specific remediation plans under conditions of high uncertainty.

Janecky, David R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Doerr, Ted B [NON LANL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Raman spectroscopy of selected arsenates—implications for soil remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The contamination of soils with heavy metals such as As, Cr and Cu is of great importance; the remediation of such soils even more so. Arsenic compounds are prevalent in soils either through leaching of mine tailings, the use of Cu/Cr/As as a wood preservative or through the use of arsenic in cattle dips. The arsenic compounds in soils and leachates can be highly reactive and mobile, resulting in the formation of metal arsenate compounds. Of these compounds, one such set of minerals that can be formed is the vivianite arsenate minerals. Raman spectroscopy has been used to characterise the vivianite arsenates and to identify arsenic contaminants in a soil.

Ray L. Frost; Theo Kloprogge; Matthew L. Weier; Wayde N. Martens; Z. Ding; Howell G.H. Edwards

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation goals prgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Federal Facility Efficiency Investment and Progress toward Sustainability Goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 | Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Chris Tremper, Program Analyst chris.tremper@ee.doe.gov 202-586-7632 Federal Facility Efficiency Investment and Progress toward Sustainability Goals July 31, 2013 Overall Facility Goal Progress, FY 2012 Goal/Requirement for FY 2012 FY 2012 Federal Performance E.O. 13423/EISA: Reduce energy intensity (Btu/GSF) by 21% compared to 2003; 30% reduction required in FY 2015. Government decreased energy intensity by 20.6% in FY 2012 relative to FY 2003 17 of 24 Scorecard agencies achieved the goal. EPACT 2005/E.O. 13423: Use renewable electric energy equivalent to at least 5% of total electricity use; at least half of which must come from sources developed after January 1,

422

Federal Facility Efficiency Investment and Progress toward Sustainability Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 | Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Chris Tremper, Program Analyst chris.tremper@ee.doe.gov 202-586-7632 Federal Facility Efficiency Investment and Progress toward Sustainability Goals July 31, 2013 Overall Facility Goal Progress, FY 2012 Goal/Requirement for FY 2012 FY 2012 Federal Performance E.O. 13423/EISA: Reduce energy intensity (Btu/GSF) by 21% compared to 2003; 30% reduction required in FY 2015. Government decreased energy intensity by 20.6% in FY 2012 relative to FY 2003 17 of 24 Scorecard agencies achieved the goal. EPACT 2005/E.O. 13423: Use renewable electric energy equivalent to at least 5% of total electricity use; at least half of which must come from sources developed after January 1,

423

Collaborating Towards a Common Goal to Advance America's Solar Industry |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Collaborating Towards a Common Goal to Advance America's Solar Collaborating Towards a Common Goal to Advance America's Solar Industry Collaborating Towards a Common Goal to Advance America's Solar Industry June 21, 2012 - 6:07pm Addthis Attendees gather to discuss, collaborate at the SunShot Grand Challenge Summit in Denver, Colorado. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder/NREL. Attendees gather to discuss, collaborate at the SunShot Grand Challenge Summit in Denver, Colorado. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder/NREL. Justin Vandenbroeck Intern, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Change takes more than desire -- it takes collaboration, communication, and a common goal. This idea was perhaps best exemplified at the SunShot Grand Challenge Summit in Denver. As a former participant in the Solar Decathlon and a current Energy Department intern, I attended the Summit to

424

EM Exceeds Sustainability Goal by Reducing Carbon Footprint | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Exceeds Sustainability Goal by Reducing Carbon Footprint EM Exceeds Sustainability Goal by Reducing Carbon Footprint EM Exceeds Sustainability Goal by Reducing Carbon Footprint April 8, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Spanning 34 acres, the Savannah River Site Biomass Cogeneration Facility is the culmination of 30 months and more than 600,000 hours of labor. Spanning 34 acres, the Savannah River Site Biomass Cogeneration Facility is the culmination of 30 months and more than 600,000 hours of labor. Sources of greenhouse gas emissions. Sources of greenhouse gas emissions. Spanning 34 acres, the Savannah River Site Biomass Cogeneration Facility is the culmination of 30 months and more than 600,000 hours of labor. Sources of greenhouse gas emissions. WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM has surpassed another DOE sustainability goal, this

425

Hydrogen Program Goal-Setting Methodologies Report to Congress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Hydrogen Program Goal-Setting Methodologies Report to Congress (ESECS EE-4015) Hydrogen Program Goal-Setting Methodologies (This page intentionally left blank) 8/7/2006 - 2 - Hydrogen Program Goal-Setting Methodologies Introduction This report addresses section 1819 of Public Law 109-58, also referred to as the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Section 1819 states: "Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to Congress a report evaluating methodologies to ensure the widest participation practicable in setting goals and milestones under the hydrogen program of the Department, including international participants." In response to section 1819, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) delivers this report

426

Collaborating Towards a Common Goal to Advance America's Solar Industry |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Collaborating Towards a Common Goal to Advance America's Solar Collaborating Towards a Common Goal to Advance America's Solar Industry Collaborating Towards a Common Goal to Advance America's Solar Industry June 21, 2012 - 6:07pm Addthis Attendees gather to discuss, collaborate at the SunShot Grand Challenge Summit in Denver, Colorado. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder/NREL. Attendees gather to discuss, collaborate at the SunShot Grand Challenge Summit in Denver, Colorado. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder/NREL. Justin Vandenbroeck Intern, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Change takes more than desire -- it takes collaboration, communication, and a common goal. This idea was perhaps best exemplified at the SunShot Grand Challenge Summit in Denver. As a former participant in the Solar Decathlon and a current Energy Department intern, I attended the Summit to

427

Telework Participation Goal (FY 2014) | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

38%. CHCO Memo - FY 14 Participation Goal Responsible Contacts Bruce Murray HR Policy Advisor E-mail bruce.murray@hq.doe.gov Phone 202-586-3372 More Documents & Publications Desk...

428

Roadmap and Goals of Agricultural Science and Technology in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the next 50 years, the overall goal for agricultural science and technology in China is to ensure the sustainable development of resources, environment and socio-economy, and on this basis to provide feasib...

Qiguo Zhao; Jikun Huang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleRenewablesPortfolioStandardsandGoals&oldid542706" Categories: Stubs EZFeed...

430

LM to Meet Energy Metering Goals Through Enhanced Data Collection...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

usage and metering. The first goal states that LM should reduce energy use intensity (EUI) by 30 percent by fiscal year (FY) 2020, as compared to the FY 2003 baseline. The...

431

Cascading Goals and Objectives to Ensure Accountability and Action  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bristol-Myers Squibb Worldwide Beauty Care Group has adopted a methodology that is reaping benefits throughout the company. The underlying principle in cascading goals and objectives is that every employee is accountable for achieving any corporate...

Tarifi, M.; Bingham, P. R.

432

Goal, Practice & Experience : Status Quo and Future for Industrial...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Biomass Energy Research Center of the Investment Association of China National Bio Energy Group 2014.7.29-30 Washington Content 1.Background and goal 2.Exploration and...

433

A goal directed simulation method using fuzzy cognitive mapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was constructed using the C++ programming language and the EXSYS expert system shell. All simulation models were constructed and analyzed using ARENA simulation software. Additional analyses were conducted using Excel spreadsheets. A goal directed system...

Deines, Erich Vernon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

434

Quadrennial Energy Review: Scope, Goals, Vision, Approach, Outreach  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This slideshow explains the scope and goals of the first year of the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER). The first year of the QER focuses on energy transmission, storage, and distribution (TS&D).

435

Energy Department Helps Advance Island Clean Energy Goals (Fact...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Department Helps Advance Island Clean Energy Goals U.S. Virgin Islands Signs Solar Deal Worth 65 Million Like many islands around the world, the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) is...

436

EM Exceeds Sustainability Goal by Reducing Carbon Footprint | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exceeds Sustainability Goal by Reducing Carbon Footprint Exceeds Sustainability Goal by Reducing Carbon Footprint EM Exceeds Sustainability Goal by Reducing Carbon Footprint April 8, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Spanning 34 acres, the Savannah River Site Biomass Cogeneration Facility is the culmination of 30 months and more than 600,000 hours of labor. Spanning 34 acres, the Savannah River Site Biomass Cogeneration Facility is the culmination of 30 months and more than 600,000 hours of labor. Sources of greenhouse gas emissions. Sources of greenhouse gas emissions. Spanning 34 acres, the Savannah River Site Biomass Cogeneration Facility is the culmination of 30 months and more than 600,000 hours of labor. Sources of greenhouse gas emissions. WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM has surpassed another DOE sustainability goal, this

437

Scheduling the Remediation of Port Hope: Logistical and Regulatory Challenges of a Multiple Site Urban Remediation Project - 13119  

SciTech Connect

The Port Hope Project is part of the larger CAN$1.28 billion Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI), a community-based program for the development and implementation of a safe, local, long-term management solution for historic Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) in the Municipalities of Port Hope and Clarington, Ontario, Canada. Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) is the Project Proponent, Public Works and Government Services (PWGSC) is managing the procurement of services and the MMM Group Limited - Conestoga Rovers and Associates Joint Venture (MMM-CRA Joint Venture) is providing detailed design and construction oversight and administration services for the Project. The Port Hope Project includes the construction of a long-term waste management facility (LTWMF) in the Municipality of Port Hope and the remediation of 18 (eighteen) large-scale LLRW, numerous small-scale sites still being identified and industrial sites within the Municipality. The total volume to be remediated is over one million cubic metres and will come from sites that include temporary storage sites, ravines, beaches, parks, private commercial and residential properties and vacant industrial sites all within the urban area of Port Hope. Challenges that will need to be overcome during this 10 year project include: - Requirements stipulated by the Environmental Assessment (EA) that affect Project logistics and schedule. - Coordination of site remediation with the construction schedule at the LTWMF. - Physical constraints on transport routes and at sites affecting production rates. - Despite being an urban undertaking, seasonal constrains for birds and fish (i.e., nesting and spawning seasons). - Municipal considerations. - Site-specific constraints. - Site interdependencies exist requiring consideration in the schedule. Several sites require the use of an adjacent site for staging. (authors)

Ferguson Jones, Andrea; Lee, Angela [MMM Group Limited, 100 Commerce Valley Drive West, Thornhill, Ontario, L3T 0A1 (Canada)] [MMM Group Limited, 100 Commerce Valley Drive West, Thornhill, Ontario, L3T 0A1 (Canada); Palmeter, Tim [Public Works and Government Services Canada, 4900 Yonge Street, Toronto, Ontario, M2N 6A6 (Canada)] [Public Works and Government Services Canada, 4900 Yonge Street, Toronto, Ontario, M2N 6A6 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Review of the Vortec soil remediation demonstration program  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of the METC/Vortec program is to develop and demonstrate the effectiveness of the Vortec CMS in remediating soils contaminated with hazardous materials and/or low levels of radionuclides. To convincingly demonstrate the CMS`s capability, a Demonstration Plant will be constructed and operated at a DOE site that has a need for the remediation of contamination soil. The following objectives will be met during the program: (1) establish the glass chemistry requirements to achieve vitrification of contaminated soils found at the selected DOE site; (2) complete the design of a fully integrated soil vitrification demonstration plant with a capacity to process 25 TPD of soil; (3) establish the cost of a fully integrated soil demonstration plant with a capacity to process 25 TPD of soil; (4) construct and operate a fully integrated demonstration plant; (5) analyze all influent and effluent streams to establish the partitioning of contaminants and to demonstrate compliance with all applicable health, safety, and environmental requirements; (6) demonstrate that the CMS technology has the capability to produce a vitrified product that will immobilize the hazardous and radionuclide materials consistent with the needs of the specific DOE waste repositories.

Patten, J.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

Technique for rapid establishment of American lotus in remediation efforts  

SciTech Connect

A technique for increasing the establishment rate of American lotus (Nelumbo lutea) and simplifying planting was developed as part of a pond remediation project. Lotus propagation techniques typically require scarification of the seed, germination in heated water, and planting in nursery containers. Then mature (~ 1 yr) nursery-grown stock is transferred to planting site or scarified seed are broadcast applied. Mature plants should grow more quickly, but can be sensitive to handling, require more time to plant, and cost more. Scarified seeds are easier to plant and inexpensive, but have a lag time in growth, can fail to germinate, and can be difficult to site precisely. We developed an intermediate technique using small burlap bags that makes planting easier, provides greater germination success, and avoids lag time in growth. Data on survival and growth from experiments using mature stock, scarified seeds, and bag lotus demonstrate that bag lotus grow rapidly in a variety of conditions, have a high survival rate, can be processed and planted easily and quickly, and are very suitable for a variety of remediation projects

Ryon, Michael G [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Goins, Kenneth N [ORNL; Jett, Robert T [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL; Morris, Gail Wright [ORNL; Riazzi, Adam [Lincoln County HS, Hamlin WV; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Risk assessment in the DOE Assurance Program for Remedial Action  

SciTech Connect

This document provides information obtained during the performance of risk assessment tasks in support of the Assurance Program for Remedial Action (APRA) sponsored by the Office of Operational Safety of the Department of Energy. We have presented a method for the estimation of projected health effects at properties in the vicinity of uranium mill tailing piles due to transported tailings or emissions from the piles. Because radon and radon daughter exposure is identified as the principal factor contributing to health effects at such properties, the basis for estimating lung cancer risk as a result of such exposure is discussed in detail. Modeling of health risk due to a secondary pathway, ingestion of contaminated, home-grown food products, is also discussed since it is a potentially important additional source of exposure in certain geographic locations. Risk assessment methods used in various mill tailings reports are reviewed. The protocols for radiological surveys conducted in DOE-sponsored remedial action programs are critically reviewed with respect to their relevance to the needs of health risk estimation. The relevance of risk assessment to the APRA program is discussed briefly.

Marks, S.; Cross, F.T.; Denham, D.H.; Kennedy, W.E.; Stenner, R.D.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation goals prgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Missouri State information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program  

SciTech Connect

This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Missouri. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; a description of the organization and structure of local governments affected by remedial action at the St. Louis area sites; a summary of relevant local ordinances and regulations; an identification of relevant public interest groups; a list of radio stations, television stations, and newspapers that provide public information to the St. Louis area or to Jefferson City; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

none,

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

In-Situ Arsenic Remediation in Carson Valley, Douglas County, West-Central Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In-Situ Arsenic Remediation in Carson Valley, Douglas County, West-Central Nevada Scientific in Carson Valley, Douglas County, West-Central Nevada By Angela P. Paul, Douglas K. Maurer, Kenneth G.G., and Welch, A.H., 2010, In-situ arsenic remediation in Carson Valley, Douglas County, west-central Nevada: U

443

Consequences of propene and propane on plasma remediation of NOx Rajesh Doraia)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. INTRODUCTION Plasma remediation of exhaust from internal combustion engines, and diesel engines in particular of achieving high E/N electric field/ gas number density are promising in this regard.11 Actual diesel exhaust discharge DBD reactors are being investigated for plasma remediation of NOx from the exhaust of internal

Kushner, Mark

444

Microstreamer dynamics during plasma remediation of NO using atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microstreamer dynamics during plasma remediation of NO using atmospheric pressure dielectric- ate toxins from atmospheric pressure gas streams. Plasma remediation is one technique which has been methods for the removal of oxides of nitrogen NxOy from atmospheric gas streams and among those techniques

Kushner, Mark

445

Geophysical Monitoring of Foam used to Deliver Remediation1 Treatments within the Vadose Zone2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for transport of pollutants from the ground surface37 to ground water. Contaminants in the vadose zone1 Geophysical Monitoring of Foam used to Deliver Remediation1 Treatments within the Vadose Zone2 3 amendments into the vadose zone for in situ11 remediation; it is an approach being considered for in situ

Hubbard, Susan

446

Supplemental Groundwater Remediation Technologies to Protect the Columbia River at the Hanford Site, Washington - An Update  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an update on supplemental groundwater remediation technologies to protect the Columbia River at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Major groundwater contaminants at the Hanford Site are described, along with the technologies and remedial activities that will address these environmental challenges.

Thompson, K. M.; Rowley, R. B.; Petersen, Scott W.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

447

PCB Concentration in Fish in a River System after Remediation of Contaminated Sediment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An 1991 investigation of PCB concentrations in water and fish along a river was repeated in 1996 after the completion of a remediation of PCB-containing sediment in a lake within the river system. ... The results indicated, that changes in background exposure must be taken into account when evaluating the success of remedial actions measures carried out over several years. ...

Gudrun Bremle; Per Larsson

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

448

VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH WATERSHED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH their environmental impact, innovative practices must be developed that replace ecosystem services lost during systems for urban ecosystem remediation. The stormwater retention performance of a thin-layer green roof

Rosemond, Amy Daum

449

A Regional Perspective on Contaminated Site Remediation—Fate of Materials and Pollutants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Regional Perspective on Contaminated Site Remediation—Fate of Materials and Pollutants ... Other innovative treatment technologies such as bioremediation showed a decreasing trend, although they could be very effective treatment alternatives for PHCs (6). ... Anderson, W. C. Innovative Site Remediation Technology. ...

1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions. Volume 6. A selected bibliography  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography of 683 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the sixth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's remedial action program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Facilities Contaminated with Natural Radioactivity; (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) Technical Measurements Center; and (9) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 5, and 7 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate affiliation or by publication description.

Owen, P.T.; Michelson, D.C.; Knox, N.P.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Scientists decipher genome of bacterium that remediates uranium contamination, generates electricity Public release date: 11-Dec-2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a microbe's capability to generate electricity and to help clean up radioactive contamination, scientistsScientists decipher genome of bacterium that remediates uranium contamination, generates that remediates uranium contamination, generates electricity Analysis of Geobacter sulfurreducens genes reveals

Lovley, Derek

452

NEAC Recommended Goals for Nuclear Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEAC Recommended Goals for Nuclear Energy NEAC Recommended Goals for Nuclear Energy NEAC Recommended Goals for Nuclear Energy Nuclear energy currently provides approxi- mately 20 percent of the electricity for the U.S. The primary alternative for power generation is fossil fuels. Though still controversial, evidence continues to mount about the negative health and environmental effects of carbon emissions. Nuclear power is the most significant technology available for meeting anticipated energy needs while reducing emissions to the environment. Nuclear energy is an essential component to a secure and prosperous future for the U.S. and the world. The reliance on fossil fuels for the growing energy usage of an expanding world population will bring about enormous global environmental problems. Nuclear energy is the single largest tool

453

DOE Simulator Training to Brazil's Petrobas Advances Goal of Deploying  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Simulator Training to Brazil's Petrobas Advances Goal of DOE Simulator Training to Brazil's Petrobas Advances Goal of Deploying Clean Coal Technology at Home and Abroad DOE Simulator Training to Brazil's Petrobas Advances Goal of Deploying Clean Coal Technology at Home and Abroad September 25, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A recently-completed comprehensive Department of Energy (DOE) training initiative using an innovative high-fidelity combined-cycle dynamic simulator has provided employees of a Brazilian multi-national company the opportunity to learn to operate and control the near-zero-emission power plants critical to a cleaner energy future. The 8-day course for power plant operators from Petrobras used a simulator from the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)-sponsored AVESTAR™ (Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research) Center.

454

EIA - AEO2010 - State renewable energy requirements and goals: Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

State renewable energy requirements and goals: Update through 2009 State renewable energy requirements and goals: Update through 2009 Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 State renewable energy requirements and goals: Update through 2009 To the extent possible, AEO2010 incorporates the impacts of State laws requiring the addition of renewable generation or capacity by utilities doing business in the States. Currently, 30 States and the District of Columbia have enforceable RPS or similar laws (Table 2). Under such standards, each State determines its own levels of generation, eligible technologies, and noncompliance penalties. AEO2010 includes the impacts of all laws in effect as of September 2009 (with the exception of Hawaii, because NEMS provides electricity market projections for the continental United States only).

455

Kansas City Weatherization Efforts Exceed Goals | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Weatherization Efforts Exceed Goals Weatherization Efforts Exceed Goals Kansas City Weatherization Efforts Exceed Goals July 23, 2010 - 11:43am Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Kansas City's rainy summer is good news for lawns but not so good news for homes in need of weatherization, since wet conditions slow down work. But Bob Jackson isn't worried. "We've had a significantly wet season... but we're two and half months ahead," says the manager of the city's Property Preservation Division, which oversees weatherization efforts for Kansas City and some satellite towns. Even so, Jackson far exceeded the target number of income-eligible homes to weatherize, as set forth by the Missouri's Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and the U.S. Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance

456

Kansas City Weatherization Efforts Exceed Goals | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kansas City Weatherization Efforts Exceed Goals Kansas City Weatherization Efforts Exceed Goals Kansas City Weatherization Efforts Exceed Goals July 23, 2010 - 11:43am Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Kansas City's rainy summer is good news for lawns but not so good news for homes in need of weatherization, since wet conditions slow down work. But Bob Jackson isn't worried. "We've had a significantly wet season... but we're two and half months ahead," says the manager of the city's Property Preservation Division, which oversees weatherization efforts for Kansas City and some satellite towns. Even so, Jackson far exceeded the target number of income-eligible homes to weatherize, as set forth by the Missouri's Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and the U.S. Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance

457

NNSA Production Office tops Feds Feed Families campaign goal | National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Office tops Feds Feed Families campaign goal | National Production Office tops Feds Feed Families campaign goal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA Production Office tops Feds Feed Families ... NNSA Production Office tops Feds Feed Families campaign goal Posted By Office of Public Affairs Employees of the NNSA Production Office (NPO) have donated 17,348 pounds of

458

Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry November 27, 2013 - 1:35pm Addthis Energy Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman speaks at the Clemson University Wind Turbine Drivetrain Testing Facility dedication in South Carolina. | Photo courtesy of Clemson University Energy Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman speaks at the Clemson University Wind Turbine Drivetrain Testing Facility dedication in South Carolina. | Photo courtesy of Clemson University The Clemson University Wind Turbine Drivetrain Testing Facility in North Charleston, South Carolina will test large, commercial scale turbines. | Photo courtesy of Clemson University The Clemson University Wind Turbine Drivetrain Testing Facility in North

459

FTCP FY09 Operational Plan GOAL 3 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY09 OPSPLAN FY09 OPSPLAN GOAL 3 Summary Carol Sohn Mike Mikolanis 2 FTCP FY09 OPSPLAN GOAL 3 Summary * Objective 1: Define and describe the key steps an individual should take following initial TQP qualification to achieve status as a DOE-recognized expert (Dave Chaney, Lead) √ Attributes, responsibilities and qualification methods for current DOE/NNSA experts document completed √ Methods of potential designation/institutionalization of "recognized expert" document completed √ Evaluation of external industry groups relative to recognized experts completed √ Definition of DOE/NNSA recognized expert completed √ Approach to institutionalize DOE/NNSA recognized experts white paper completed 3 FTCP FY09 OPSPLAN GOAL 3 Summary * Objective 2: Define and clarify the term "continuous

460

Savannah River Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for FY13 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Savannah River Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings ... Savannah River Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for FY13 Posted By Office of Public Affairs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation goals prgs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Savannah River Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for FY13 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Savannah River Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings ... Savannah River Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for FY13 Posted By Office of Public Affairs

462

Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry November 27, 2013 - 1:35pm Addthis Energy Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman speaks at the Clemson University Wind Turbine Drivetrain Testing Facility dedication in South Carolina. | Photo courtesy of Clemson University Energy Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman speaks at the Clemson University Wind Turbine Drivetrain Testing Facility dedication in South Carolina. | Photo courtesy of Clemson University The Clemson University Wind Turbine Drivetrain Testing Facility in North Charleston, South Carolina will test large, commercial scale turbines. | Photo courtesy of Clemson University The Clemson University Wind Turbine Drivetrain Testing Facility in North

463

Savannah River Site Achieves Transuranic Waste Disposition Goal in 2013 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Achieves Transuranic Waste Disposition Goal in Savannah River Site Achieves Transuranic Waste Disposition Goal in 2013 Savannah River Site Achieves Transuranic Waste Disposition Goal in 2013 December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers gather behind a “Safety and Security begins with Me” banner at the Savannah River Site. Workers gather behind a "Safety and Security begins with Me" banner at the Savannah River Site. Workers sort through transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site. Workers sort through transuranic waste at the Savannah River Site. SRR employees Glenn Kelly and Fred Merriweather pour the final amount of grout into Tank 6. SRR employees Glenn Kelly and Fred Merriweather pour the final amount of grout into Tank 6. Workers gather behind a "Safety and Security begins with Me" banner at the Savannah River Site.

464

Energy Efficiency Goals and Requirements for Public Entities | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Goals and Requirements for Public Entities Energy Efficiency Goals and Requirements for Public Entities Energy Efficiency Goals and Requirements for Public Entities < Back Eligibility Institutional Local Government Schools State Government Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Texas Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider State Energy Conservation Office In 2001, Texas Senate Bill 5 ([http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/tlodocs/77R/billtext/html/SB00005F.htm S.B. 5]), was enacted to help the state comply with federal Clean Air Act standards. S.B. 5 amended the state's Health and Safety Code to require that each political subdivision in 38 (later amended to 41) Texas counties: * Implement all energy efficiency measures that meet the standards

465

Global Leaders Meet To Collaborate on Energy Efficiency Goals | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leaders Meet To Collaborate on Energy Efficiency Goals Leaders Meet To Collaborate on Energy Efficiency Goals Global Leaders Meet To Collaborate on Energy Efficiency Goals May 11, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - Assistant Secretary Cathy Zoi of the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy joined leaders from 15 countries and the European Commission today at the first Policy Committee meeting of the International Partnership for Energy Efficiency Cooperation (IPEEC) to promote global collaboration on energy-saving programs and policies. U.S. participation in this partnership, launched at the Group of 8 (G8) Energy Ministers Meeting in Rome in May 2009, continues the Obama Administration's efforts to forge partnerships among governments to address climate change, reduce reliance on fossil fuels, and grow the global clean

466

Energy Innovation Hubs: Achieving Our Energy Goals with Science |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovation Hubs: Achieving Our Energy Goals with Science Innovation Hubs: Achieving Our Energy Goals with Science Energy Innovation Hubs: Achieving Our Energy Goals with Science March 2, 2012 - 6:44pm Addthis Secretary Chu stops at Oak Ridge National Lab in February 2012 for a quick, nuclear-themed visit that included a tour of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) and a stop at the new Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF). | Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge National Lab Secretary Chu stops at Oak Ridge National Lab in February 2012 for a quick, nuclear-themed visit that included a tour of the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) and a stop at the new Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF). | Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge National Lab Michael Hess Michael Hess

467

Department of Energy Achieves Goal of 200 Energy Savings Assessments |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Achieves Goal of 200 Energy Savings Achieves Goal of 200 Energy Savings Assessments Department of Energy Achieves Goal of 200 Energy Savings Assessments March 2, 2007 - 10:28am Addthis Over 50 Trillion Btus of Natural Gas Savings Found AUSTIN, TX - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Andy Karsner today announced the completion of Energy Savings Assessments (ESAs) at 200 of the largest industrial facilities in the nation, identifying opportunities to save over 50 trillion Btus of natural gas - roughly equivalent to the natural gas used in 700,000 American homes. In 2007, DOE will conduct 250 additional Energy Savings Assessments and offer cost-sharing options with industry, utilities and other partners. Assistant Secretary Karsner made the

468

Long Island Power Authority - Renewable Electricity Goal | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Electricity Goal Renewable Electricity Goal Long Island Power Authority - Renewable Electricity Goal < Back Eligibility Municipal Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider Long Island Power Authority As a municipal utility, the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) is not obligated to comply with the [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=N... New York Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS)]. The LIPA Board of Trustees has nevertheless decided to make their own renewable energy commitment mirroring the requirements for New York's investor owned utilities. The initiative is outlined in LIPA's 2004-2013 Energy Plan, approved in June

469

San Antonio City Public Service (CPS Energy) - Renewables Portfolio Goal |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

San Antonio City Public Service (CPS Energy) - Renewables Portfolio San Antonio City Public Service (CPS Energy) - Renewables Portfolio Goal San Antonio City Public Service (CPS Energy) - Renewables Portfolio Goal < Back Eligibility Municipal Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard In 2003 San Antonio's municipal electric utility, City Public Service (CPS Energy) established a goal of meeting 15% of its electrical peak demand with renewable energy by 2020 under its Strategic Energy Plan. In June 2008 the utility announced plans to increase the overall renewables target to 20% by 2020 with at least 100 megawatts (MW) from non-wind renewable energy sources. As of November 2012, the utility had 11% of their peak electric

470

Fermilab | Take Five for Goal Zero | Useful Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Take Five for Goal Zero: At Work and at Home Take Five for Goal Zero: At Work and at Home Martha Michels Martha Michels What does Take Five for Goal Zero mean to me? To me, it is a reminder to stop and think about myself, others and the environment before I act. I hope the Take 5 campaign has helped keep your awareness up as it has mine. Whether it is using the proper tool, donning appropriate personal protective equipment, buying the greener option, or minimizing waste, you have the choice to make a positive impact here at Fermilab. Take Five to make that choice. Click on the categories below for helpful links that will help you improve ESH&Q and promote best practices. ESH&Q is everyone's responsibility! If you'd like to suggest a link to add to this page, please contact us. Take 5 Winter Challenge 2013

471

The Use of Ecological Restoration Principles To Achieve Remedy Protection at the Fernald Preserve and Weldon Spring Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Use of Ecological Restoration Principles To Achieve Remedy Protection at the Fernald Preserve and Weldon Spring Sites

472

Independent Oversight Review, Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance- April 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance Conduct of Operations

473

Fuel economy goals for future powertrain and engine options  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Efficiency goals represent one of the key factors governing powertrain choice. These goals are specified for three novel developments in automotive technology which would enable them to compete on this single basis with the conventional four-speed manual or automatic transmission (with torque converter lock-up) coupled with a fixed displacement spark-ignition engine. The fuel consumption figures of continuously variable ratio and infinitely variable ratio automobile transmissions are presented using a simulation model of a vehicle in both urban (EPA cycle) and constant-speed operation. A powertrain utilising a variable displacement engine is also simulated.

D.B. Gilmore

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Value tradeoffs for the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program  

SciTech Connect

The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program at the Hanford Site of the Department of Energy has adopted a logical approach to making decisions that uses decision analysis to structure and analyze decision alternatives and public values to evaluate them. This report is the third in a series to support this effort. The first identified a set of objectives (called {open_quotes}ends objectives{close_quotes}) that characterize the ultimate goals and desires of Hanford decision makers and stakeholders. The second report developed operational measures for these ends objectives (called {open_quotes}ends measures{close_quotes}) and it also developed a set of performance objectives and associated performance measures that are more directly related to how well decision alternatives in the TWRS program perform to achieve the ends objectives. The present report describes the development of quantitative value tradeoffs for both the ends measures and the performance measures. First, five national value experts were interviewed to obtain value tradeoffs for units of the ends measures identified in Keeney and von Winterfeldt (1996). The results of this assessment are shown in Table S1. Second, the implied value tradeoffs for the units of the performance measures were calculated from the value tradeoffs for units of the ends measures provided by the national experts. When calculating the value tradeoffs for the units of the performance measures, very simple quantitative relationships between ends and performance measures were assumed. The results of this calculation are shown in Table S2. The results of this report shown in Tables S1 and S2 should be considered preliminary and largely illustrative of the principles for developing value tradeoffs. The report lists several important caveats and recommendations for how future work can improve on the assessment of value tradeoffs.

Keeney, R.L.; Winterfeldt, D. von [Decision Insights, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

CONTENTS CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES ii Pa e -5 1 : 2 2 4 ELIMINATION REPORT THE FORMER VIRGINIA-CAROLINA CHEMICAL CORPORATION RICHMOND, VIRGINIA INTROUUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices and divisions, has reviewed the past activities of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) at the former Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation, Richmond, Virginia. On the basis of historical information, DOE has determined that any radioactive material potentially remaining from these activities would be insignificant in terms of both its quantity and the hazard it would

476

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

. . CONTENTS INTROOUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History,and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES 9 1 1 2 2 2 4 ii ELIMINATION REPORT THE FORMER VIRGINIA-CAROLINA CHEMICAL CORPORATION RICHMOND. VIRGINIA INTROLJUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of ,Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Deconunissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices and divisions, has reviewed the past activities of the Atomic Energy Carmission (AEC) at the former Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation, Richmond, Virginia. On the basis of historical information, DOE has determined that any radioactive material potentially remaining from these activities would oe insignificant in terms of both its quantity and the hazard it would

477

UC-70A Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

F. a% F. a% .~~~~~~":~,~~~~,~. .-+smiii"-l ," ^.-. _ _I ,a ,' ~, *p2 - QRkl~ oR,o~ DOE/OR/20722- 29 UC-70A Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Contract No. DE-ACO5-81OR20722 CI c F c F F c CI c c F P RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE ALBANY RESEARCH CENTER Albany, O regon Bechtel National, inc. Advanced Technology Division L- ..^___ ~. _ .._.. -.~~_-- ._ ._.. .._ .^.". January 1985 Technical information Center Office of Scientific and Technical Information