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Sample records for remedial response washington

  1. Utah Division of Environmental Response and Remediation Underground...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Utah Division of Environmental Response and Remediation Underground Storage Tank Branch Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Utah...

  2. Environmental Response to Remedial Actions at the Weldon Spring Site--An Environmental Success Story

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, J. A.; Welton, T. D.

    2002-02-27

    Environmental remediation activities have been ongoing at the Weldon Spring Site for over a decade, beginning with small interim response actions and culminating in completion of surface cleanup as represented by closure of the 17 hectare (42-acre) on-site disposal cell. As remedial actions have incrementally been accomplished, the occurrence of site-related contaminants in on and off-site environmental media have effectively been reduced. The DOE-WSSRAP has demonstrated success through the effective reduction or elimination of site related water and airborne contaminants along multiple migration pathways. This paper briefly describes the remedial measures affected at Weldon Spring, and quantifies the environmental responses to those remedial measures.

  3. Remedial actions at the former Vitro Rare Metals plant site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-07-01

    The environmental impacts associated with remedial actions in connection with residual radioactive materials remaining at the inactive uranium processing site located in Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania are evaluated. The Canonsburg site is an 18.5-acre property that was formerly owned by the Vitro Rare Metals Company. The expanded Canonsburg site would be 30-acre property that would include the Canonsburg site (the former Vitro Rare Metals plant), seven adjacent private houses, and the former Georges Pottery property. During the period 1942 through 1957 the Vitro Manufacturing Company and its successor, the Vitro Corporation of America, processed onsite residues and ores, and government-owned ores, concentrates, and scraps to extract uranium and other rare metals. The Canonsburg site is now the Canon Industrial Park. In addition to storing the residual radioactive materials of this process at the Canonsburg site, about 12,000 tons of radioactively contaminated materials were transferred to a railroad landfill in Burrell Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. This Canonsburg FEIS evaluates five alternatives for removing the potential public health hazard associated with the radioactively contaminated materials. In addition to no action, these alternatives involve various combinations of stabilization of the radioactively contaminated materials in place or decontamination of the Canonsburg and Burrell sites by removing the radioactively contaminated materials to another location. In addition to the two sites mentioned, a third site located in Hanover Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania has been considered as a disposal site to which the radioactively contaminated materials presently located at either of the other two sites might be moved.

  4. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 10): Northwest Transformer, Whatcom County, Washington (First remedial action), September 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-15

    The Northwest Transformer site (NWT), a 1.6-acre former salvage yard, is approximately 2 miles south of Everson in Whatcom County, Washington. The site is in a rural area and is bordered by low-density residential areas to the north and east, and farmland to the south. The NWT site was used for transformer storage and salvage. Storage and salvage operations were conducted in an onsite barn where PCB-contaminated dielectric fluid was drained from the transformers before dismantling. Transformer casings and associated parts were incinerated onsite, and some of the recovered oil was burned to heat the barn. Spillage and leakage of PCB-laden oil on the ground appeared to have occurred frequently, and some oil apparently was dumped directly into a seepage pit onsite, contaminating soil and possibly ground water. This operable unit includes investigations of ground water and the onsite barn to determine whether either is sufficiently contaminated to merit a subsequent operable unit. The primary contaminant of concern affecting the soil is PCB. The selected remedial action for this are site included.

  5. Washington

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowingFuel EfficiencyWashington , DC 20585 April 15, 2013 Mr.

  6. Washington,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowingFuel EfficiencyWashington , DC 20585 April 15, 2013Local DC

  7. Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-KR-4 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). This work plan and the attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the CERCLA remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-KR-4 operable unit. The 100-K Area consists of the 100-KR-4 groundwater operable unit and three source operable units. The 100-KR-4 operable unit includes all contamination found in the aquifer soils and water beneath the 100-K Area. Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of contamination.

  8. Decontamination Technologies, Task 3, Urban Remediation and Response Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser,J.; Sullivan, T.

    2009-06-30

    In the aftermath of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD, also known as a dirty bomb) it will be necessary to remediate the site including building exteriors and interiors, equipment, pavement, vehicles, personal items etc. Remediation will remove or reduce radioactive contamination from the area using a combination of removing and disposing of many assets (including possible demolition of buildings), decontaminating and returning to service other assets, and fixing in place or leaving in place contamination that is deemed 'acceptable'. The later will require setting acceptable dose standards, which will require negotiation with all involved parties and a balance of risk and cost to benefit. To accomplish the first two, disposal or decontamination, a combination of technologies will be deployed that can be loosely classified as: Decontamination; Equipment removal and size reduction; and Demolition. This report will deal only with the decontamination technologies that will be used to return assets to service or to reduce waste disposal. It will not discuss demolition, size reduction or removal technologies or equipment (e.g., backhoe mounted rams, rock splitter, paving breakers and chipping hammers, etc.). As defined by the DOE (1994), decontamination is removal of radiological contamination from the surfaces of facilities and equipment. Expertise in this field comes primarily from the operation and decommissioning of DOE and commercial nuclear facilities as well as a small amount of ongoing research and development closely related to RDD decontamination. Information related to decontamination of fields, buildings, and public spaces resulting from the Goiania and Chernobyl incidents were also reviewed and provide some meaningful insight into decontamination at major urban areas. In order to proceed with decontamination, the item being processed needs to have an intrinsic value that exceeds the cost of the cleaning and justifies the exposure of any workers during the decontamination process(es). In the case of an entire building, the value may be obvious; it's costly to replace the structure. For a smaller item such as a vehicle or painting, the cost versus benefit of decontamination needs to be evaluated. This will be determined on a case by case basis and again is beyond the scope of this report, although some thoughts on decontamination of unique, personal and high value items are given. But, this is clearly an area that starting discussions and negotiations early on will greatly benefit both the economics and timeliness of the clean up. In addition, high value assets might benefit from pre-event protection such as protective coatings or HEPA filtered rooms to prevent contaminated outside air from entering the room (e.g., an art museum).

  9. Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-BC-2 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This work plan and attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-BC-2 operable unit in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The 100 Area is one of four areas at the Hanford Site that are on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) National Priorities List under CERCLA. The 100-BC-2 operable unit is one of two source operable units in the 100-B/C Area (Figure ES-1). Source operable units are those that contain facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of hazardous substance contamination. The 100-BC-2 source operable unit contains waste sites that were formerly in the 100-BC-2, 100-BC-3, and 100-BC-4 operable units. Because of their size and geographic location, the waste sites from these two operable units were added to 100-BC-2. This allows for a more efficient and effective investigation of the remaining 100-B/C Reactor area waste sites. The investigative approach to waste sites associated with the 100-BC-2 operable unit are listed in Table ES-1. The waste sites fall into three general categories: high priority liquid waste disposal sites, low priority liquid waste disposal sites, and solid waste burial grounds. Several sites have been identified as candidates for conducting an IRM. Two sites have been identified as warranting additional limited field sampling. The two sites are the 116-C-2A pluto crib, and the 116-C-2C sand filter.

  10. Washington v. DOE - Respondents' Response in Opposition to Petitioner's

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-Sessions | DepartmentResidential Savings|Washington , DCofof Energy

  11. Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Coumbia River, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.C. Hulstrom

    2010-11-10

    This report summarizes field sampling activities conducted in support of WCH’s Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River. This work was conducted form 2008 through 2010. The work included preliminary mapping and measurement of Hanford Site contaminants in sediment, pore water, and surface water located in areas where groundwater upwelling were found.

  12. Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.C. Hulstrom

    2010-08-11

    This report summarizes field sampling activities conducted in support of WCH’s Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River. This work was conducted form 2008 through 2010. The work included preliminary mapping and measurement of Hanford Site contaminants in sediment, pore water, and surface water located in areas where groundwater upwelling were found.

  13. Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan for the 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This work plan identifies the objectives, tasks, and schedule for conducting a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for the 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit in the southern portion of the 200 West Groundwater Aggregate Area of the Hanford Site. The 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit addresses contamination identified in the aquifer soils and groundwater within its boundary, as determined in the 200 West Groundwater Aggregate Area Management Study Report (AAMSR) (DOE/RL 1992b). The objectives of this work plan are to develop a program to investigate groundwater contaminants in the southern portion of the 200 West Groundwater Aggregate Area that were designated for Limited Field Investigations (LFIs) and to implement Interim Remedial Measures (IRMs) recommended in the 200 West Groundwater AAMSR. The purpose of an LFI is to evaluate high priority groundwater contaminants where existing data are insufficient to determine whether an IRM is warranted and collect sufficient data to justify and implement an IRM, if needed. A Qualitative Risk Assessment (QRA) will be performed as part of the LFI. The purpose of an IRM is to develop and implement activities, such as contaminant source removal and groundwater treatment, that will ameliorate some of the more severe potential risks of groundwater contaminants prior to the RI and baseline Risk Assessment (RA) to be conducted under the Final Remedy Selection (FRS) at a later date. This work plan addresses needs of a Treatability Study to support the design and implementation of an interim remedial action for the Uranium-{sup 99}{Tc}-Nitrate multi-contaminant IRM plume identified beneath U Plant.

  14. Historical Shoreline Evolution as a Response to Dam Placement on the Elwha River, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagid, Bethany Marie

    2015-01-01

    of the Elwha River, Washington- Biological and physicalthe Elwha River, Washington, U.S. , Fisheries Management &on the Elwha River, Washington, USA: River channel and

  15. DOE responses to Ecology review comments for ``Sampling and analysis plans for the 100-D Ponds voluntary remediation project``

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The Sampling and Analysis Plan describes the sampling and analytical activities which will be performed to support closure of the 100-D Ponds at the Hanford Reservation. This report contains responses by the US Department of Energy to Ecology review for ``Sampling and Analysis Plan for the 100-D Ponds Voluntary Remediation Project.``

  16. Guide to ground water remediation at CERCLA response action and RCRA corrective action sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    This Guide contains the regulatory and policy requirements governing remediation of ground water contaminated with hazardous waste [including radioactive mixed waste (RMW)], hazardous substances, or pollutants/contaminants that present (or may present) an imminent and substantial danger. It was prepared by the Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-413), to assist Environmental Program Managers (ERPMs) who often encounter contaminated ground water during the performance of either response actions under CERCLA or corrective actions under Subtitle C of RCRA. The Guide begins with coverage of the regulatory and technical issues that are encountered by ERPM`s after a CERCLA Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation (PA/SI) or the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) have been completed and releases into the environment have been confirmed. It is based on the assumption that ground water contamination is present at the site, operable unit, solid waste management unit, or facility. The Guide`s scope concludes with completion of the final RAs/corrective measures and a determination by the appropriate regulatory agencies that no further response action is necessary.

  17. Remedial investigation plan for Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Responses to regulator comments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    This document, ES/ER-6 D2, is a companion document to ORNL/RAP/Sub-87/99053/4 R1, Remedial Investigation Plan for ORNL Waste Area Grouping 1, dated August 1989. This document lists comments received from the Environmental Protection Agency, Region 4 (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) and responses to each of these comments. As requested by EPA, a revised Remedial Investigation (RI) Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 will not be submitted. The document is divided into two Sections and Appendix. Section I contains responses to comments issued on May 22, 1990, by EPA's Region 4 program office responsible for implementing the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Section 2 contains responses to comments issued on April 7, 1989, by EPA's program office responsible for implementing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); these comments include issues raised by the TDHE. The Appendix contains the attachments referenced in a number of the responses. 35 refs.

  18. Comment and response document for the final remedial action plan site design for stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Sites at Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document consists of comments and responses; the reviewers are the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Colorado Dept. of Public Health and Environment, and the remedial action contractor (RAC).

  19. Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Myers, R.

    2013-07-01

    Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the observational approach. The WCH project team is working closely with stakeholders and taking a number of steps to meet these challenges in a continuing effort to remediate chromium contaminated soil in an efficient and cost-effective manner. (authors)

  20. Updated Site Response Analyses for the Waste Treatment Plant, DOE Hanford, Site, Washington.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youngs, Robert R.

    2007-06-29

    This document describes the calculations performed to develop updated relative amplification functions for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facility at the DOE Hanford Site, Washington State. The original 2,000-year return period design spectra for the WTP were based on the results of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) performed for the DOE Hanford Site by Geomatrix (1996). Geomatrix (1996) performed the PSHA using empirical soil-site ground motion models based primarily on recordings from California. As part of that study, site response analyses were performed to evaluate ground motions at the Hanford sites and California deep soil sites. As described in Appendix A of Geomatrix (1996), characteristic site profiles and dynamic soil properties representative of conditions at various Hanford sites and California deep soil strong motion recording stations were defined. Relative site responses of the Hanford profiles and California profiles were then compared. Based on the results of those site response analyses, it was concluded that ground motions at the Hanford sites underlain by deep soil deposits are similar in character to those on California deep soil sites and it was judged appropriate to use empirical deep soil site attenuation relationships based primarily on California ground motion data to develop design spectra for the Hanford sites. In a subsequent analysis, Geomatrix (2003) updated the site response analyses of Geomatrix (1996, Appendix A) to incorporate randomization of the California and Hanford profiles. The results of that analysis also led to the conclusion that the response of the Hanford profiles was similar to the response of deep soil sites in California.

  1. Remedial actions at the former Vitro Rare Metals plant site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-07-01

    This report provides a summary of the conceptual design and other information necessary to understand the proposed remedial action at the expanded Canonsburg, Pennsylvania site. This design constitutes the current approach to stabilizing the radioactively contaminated materials in place in a manner that would fully protect the public health and environment. This summary is intended to provide sufficient detail for the reader to understand the proposed remedial action and the anticipated environmental impacts. The site conceptual design has been developed using available data. In some cases, elements of the design have not been developed fully and will be made final during the detailed design process.

  2. Responsiveness summary for the remedial investigation/feasibility study for management of the bulk wastes at the Weldon Spring quarry, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, J.M.; MacDonell, M.M.

    1990-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for conducting remedial actions at the Weldon Spring site in St. Charles County, Missouri, under its Surplus Facilities Management Program. The site consists of a quarry and a chemical plant area located about 6.4 km (4 mi) northeast of the quarry. The quarry is surrounded by the Weldon Spring Wildfire Area and is near an alluvial well field that constitutes a major source of potable water for St. Charles County; the nearest supply well is located about 0.8 km (0.5 mi) southeast of the quarry. From 1942 to 1969, the quarry was used for the disposal of various radioactively and chemically contaminated materials. Bulk wastes in the quarry consist of contaminated soils and sediments, rubble, metal debris, and equipment. As part of overall site remediation, DOE is proposing to conduct an interim remedial action at the quarry to manage the radioactively and chemically contaminated bulk wastes contained therein. Potential remedial action alternatives for managing the quarry bulk wastes have been evaluated consistent with US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance for conducting remedial actions under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. The contents of these documents were developed in consultation with EPA Region VII and the state of Missouri and reflect the focused scope defined for this interim remedial action. 9 refs.

  3. Remedial measures plan for a spill of solvent refined coal liquid at the SRC pilot plant, Ft. Lewis, Washington. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimshaw, T.W.; Little, W.M.

    1980-08-22

    On December 19, 1979, a spill of SRC liquid occurred during transfer of the liquid from a storage tank to sample drums. Approximately 2,300 gallons of fluid flowed into the floor of the tank farm and infiltrated into the porous and permeable gravels at the site. Because of concern for the possible impact of the SRC fluid on the quality of ground water, surface water, and water supply sources at and near the site, GMRC commissioned Radian to evaluate the problem and recommend specific measures to mitigate any known or anticipated impacts. This report presents the results of Radian's investigations. Although ground-water contamination apparently has occurred as a result of the December 19 spill, the contamination plume is localized to the vicinity of the SRC plant and Lake Sequalitchew. A contamination plume apparently is presently moving toward Lake Sequalitchew, but the two pump wells included in the Remedial Measures Plan will arrest this movement. These wells will be pumped until phenol concentrations in the groundwater fall to acceptable levels. The source of contamination at the spill is being cut off by excavation of the contaminated soil and sealing of the floor of the tank farm. No public water supplies are appreciably endangered by the December 19 spill. A long-term ground-water monitoring plan is being implemented to ensure early discovery of any unanticipated impacts of the spill. If further water quality problems are disclosed, additional remedial measures will be undertaken as necessary.

  4. US Department of Energy response to standards for remedial actions at inactive uranium processing sites: Proposed rule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-29

    The Title I groundwater standards for inactive uranium mill tailings sites, which were promulgated on January 5, 1983, by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, were remanded to the EPA on September 3, 1985, by the US Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals. The Court instructed the EPA to compile general groundwater standards for all Title I sites. On September 24, 1987, the EPA published proposed standards (52FR36000-36008) in response to the remand. This report includes an evaluation of the potential effects of the proposed EPA groundwater standards on the UMTRA Project, as well as a discussion of the DOE's position on the proposed standards. The report also contains and appendix which provides supporting information and cost analyses. In order to assess the impacts of the proposed EPA standards, this report summarizes the proposed EPA standards in Section 2.0. The next three sections assess the impacts of the three parts of the EPA standards: Subpart A considers disposal sites; Subpart B is concerned with restoration at processing sites; and Subpart C addresses supplemental standards. Section 6.0 integrates previous sections into a recommendations section. Section 7.0 contains the DOE response to questions posed by the EPA in the preamble to the proposed standards. 6 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON WASHINGTON STATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrajt, Graciela

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON WASHINGTON STATE EMPLOYEE TUITION EXEMPTION REQUEST I have read and accept OF WASHINGTON STATE EMPLOYEES TUITION EXEMPTION REQUEST INSTRUCTIONSELIGIBILITY Eligible State of Washington to be eligible: Non-University of Washington permanent classified or contract state employees employed half

  6. Site-Specific Seismic Site Response Model for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, Alan C.; Reidel, Steve P.

    2005-02-24

    This interim report documents the collection of site-specific geologic and geophysical data characterizing the Waste Treatment Plant site and the modeling of the site-specific structure response to earthquake ground motions.

  7. Responses to comments on the remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental impact statement for remedial action at the Chemical Plant area of the Weldon Spring site (November 1992)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site in St. Charles County, Missouri. The site consists of a chemical plant area and a noncontiguous limestone quarry; both areas are radioactively and chemically contaminated as a result of past processing and disposal activities. Explosives were produced by the US Army at the chemical plant in the 1940s, and uranium and thorium materials were processed by DOE`s predecessor agency in the 1950s and 1960s. During that time, various wastes were disposed of at both areas of the site. The DOE is conducting cleanup activities at the site under its Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. The integrated remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental impact statement (RI/FS-EIS) documents for the chemical plant area were issued to the public in November 1992 as the draft RI/FS-EIS. (The CERCLA RI/FS is considered final when issued to the public, whereas per the NEPA process, an EIS is initially issued as a draft and is finalized after substantive public comments have been addressed.) Four documents made up the draft RI/FS-EIS, which is hereafter referred to as the RI/FS-EIS: (1) the RI (DOE 1992d), which presents general information on the site environment and the nature and extent of contamination; (2) the baseline assessment (BA) (DOE 1992a), which evaluates human health and environmental effects that might occur if no cleanup actions were taken; (3) the FS (DOE 1992b), which develops and evaluates alternatives for site cleanup; and (4) the proposed plan (PP) (DOE 1992c), which summarizes key information from the RI, BA, and FS reports and identifies DOE`s preferred alternative for remedial action. This comment response document combined with those four documents constitutes the final RI/FS-EIS for the chemical plant area.

  8. WASHINGTON PUD ASSOCIATON COMMENTS ON THE NWPCC'S DRAFT RECOMMENDATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WASHINGTON PUD ASSOCIATON COMMENTS ON THE NWPCC'S DRAFT RECOMMENDATIONS REGARDING BPA'S FUTURE ROLE April 22, 2004 INTRODUCTION These comments are submitted by the Washington PUD Association in response binding dispute resolution mechanisms before anobjective third party. #12;Washington PUD Association

  9. Toxic remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matthews, Stephen M. (Alamed County, CA); Schonberg, Russell G. (Santa Clara County, CA); Fadness, David R. (Santa Clara County, CA)

    1994-01-01

    What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

  10. -California -Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with Hawaii-based U.S. fisheries, as well as the fleets of other Pacific Rim nations. As such, the managementPacific - California - Oregon - Washington #12;Regional Summary Pacific Region Management Context The Pacific Region includes California, Oregon, and Washington. Federal fisheries in this region are managed

  11. Selecting Mold Remediation Contractors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renchie, Don L.

    2005-10-05

    Texas has strict regulations that govern mold remediation companies. Before contracting for mold remediation work, consumers should know what the law requires of remediation companies and what such contracts should contain....

  12. Remedial action plan for the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. DOE responses to comments from U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-11-16

    This report contains responses by the US Department of Energy to comments from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment on the Naturita remedial action plan. This was done in an attempt to clarify information. The site is an inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado.

  13. Census Snapshot: Washington, DC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, Adam P.; Baumle, Amanda K; Badgett, M.V. Lee; Gates, Gary J

    2007-01-01

    INSTITUTE CENSUS SNAPSHOT | WASHINGTON, DC. | DECEMBER 2007WASHINGTON, D.C. Adam P. Romero, Public Policy Fellow AmandaINSTITUTE CENSUS SNAPSHOT | WASHINGTON, DC. | DECEMBER 2007

  14. University of Washington University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    University of Washington University of Washington President's Advisory Committee on Women PACW 2007 REPORT ON WOMEN AT UW Contact Us: pacw@u.washington.edu http://depts.washington.edu/pacw/reports/women2007 #12;University of Washington Introduction From President Emmert: One of the charges given

  15. University of Washington University of Washington -Bothell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    University of Washington University of Washington - Bothell University of Washington - Tacoma Diver- sity Outreach & Recruitment 425.352.3254 AKelley@uwb.edu UW Tacoma Equity & Diversity http://www.tacoma.washington.edu/diversity University of Washington Tacoma, 1900 Commerce St, Box 358430 Tacoma, WA 98402-3100 Dr. Sharon Parkter

  16. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON SEATTLE, WASHINGTON 98195

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON SEATTLE, WASHINGTON 98195 College of Engineering Department of Nuclear of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue Washington, D.C. 20585 Dear Dr. Hunter: The Magnetic Fusion Advisory

  17. Phase 1 remedial investigation report for 200-BP-1 operable unit. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, in Washington State is organized into numerically designated operational areas including the 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, and 1100 Areas. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in November 1989 included the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site on the National Priority List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Inclusion on the NPL initiated the remedial investigation (RD process for the 200-BP-1 operable unit. These efforts are being addressed through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1989) which was negotiated and approved by the DOE, the EPA, and the State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) in May 1989. This agreement, known as the Tri-Party Agreement, governs all CERCLA efforts at Hanford. In March of 1990, the Department of Energy, Richland Operations (DOE-RL) issued a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) work plan (DOE-RL 1990a) for the 200-BP-1 operable unit. The work plan initiated the first phase of site characterization activities associated with the 200-BP-1 operable unit. The purpose of the 200-BP-1 operable unit RI is to gather and develop the necessary information to adequately understand the risks to human health and the environment posed by the site and to support the development and analysis of remedial alternatives during the FS. The RI analysis will, in turn, be used by Tri-Party Agreement signatories to make a risk-management-based selection of remedies for the releases of hazardous substances that have occurred from the 200-BP-1 operable unit.

  18. Environmental remediation 1991: ``Cleaning up the environment for the 21st Century``. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, D.E.

    1991-12-31

    This report presents discussions given at a conference on environmental remediation, September 8--11, Pasco, Washington. Topics include: public confidence; education; in-situ remediation; Hanford tank operations; risk assessments; field experiences; standards; site characterization and monitoring; technology discussions; regulatory issues; compliance; and the UMTRA project. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  19. Tank waste remediation system retrieval and disposal mission readiness-to-proceed responses to internal independent assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaus, P.S.

    1998-01-06

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is planning to make critical decisions during fiscal year (FY) 1998 regarding privatization contracts for the treatment of Hanford tank waste. Specifically, DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL), will make decisions related to proceeding with Phase 1 Privatization. In support of these decisions, the management and integration (M+I) contractor must be able to meet the requirements to support the Phase 1 privatization contractors. As part of the assessment of the Tank Waste Retrieval (TWR) Readiness-To-Proceed (RTP), an independent review of their process and products was required by the RL letter of August 8, 1997. The Independent Review Team reviewed the adequacy of the planning that has been done by the M+I contractor to validate that, if the plans are carried out, there is reasonable assurance of success. Overall, the RTP Independent Review Team concluded that, if the planning by the M+I contractor team is carried out with adequate funding, there is reasonable assurance that the M+I contractor will be able to deliver waste to the privatization contractor for the duration of Phase 1. This conclusion was based on addressing the recommendations contained in the Independent Review Team`s Final Report and in the individual Criteria and Review Approach (CRA) forms completed during the assessment. The purpose of this report is to formally document the independent assessment and the RTP team responses to the Independent Review Team recommendations. It also provides closure logics for selected recommendations from a Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) internal assessment of the Technical Basis Review (TBR) packages. This report contains the RTP recommendation closure process (Section 2.0); the closure tables (Section 3.0) which provide traceability between each review team recommendation and its corresponding Project Hanford Management Contract closure logic; and two attachments that formally document the Independent Review Team Final Report and the Internal Assessment Final Report.

  20. WASHINGTON. DC.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , cMarch 20, 1995WASHINGTON.

  1. Census Snapshot: Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, Adam P.; Rosky, Clifford J; Badgett, M.V. Lee; Gates, Gary J

    2008-01-01

    WASHINGTON Adam P. Romero, Public Policy Fellow Clifford J.raising children in Washington. We compare same-sex “sex married couples in Washington. 1 APRIL 2008 In many

  2. Washington: Washington's Clean Energy Resources and Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-25

    This document highlights the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's investments and impacts in the state of Washington.

  3. Pinellas Remediation Agreement Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act Scope Summary Remediation of property adjacent to the...

  4. Washington University Financial Statements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Gregory

    Washington University Financial Statements June 30, 2011 and 2010 #12;Washington University Index: (314) 206-8514, www.pwc.com/us To the Board of Trustees of Washington University In our opinion fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Washington University (the "University

  5. Selecting Mold Remediation Contractors (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renchie, Don L.

    2007-10-08

    Texas has strict regulations that govern mold remediation companies. Before contracting for mold remediation work, consumers should know what the law requires of remediation companies and what such contracts should contain....

  6. 1www.grad.uw.edu Discover what's next. It's the Washington Way.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrajt, Graciela

    1www.grad.uw.edu Discover what's next. It's the Washington Way. 2011 | Diversity Report The University of Washington educates a diverse student body to become responsible global citizens and future of Washington Vision and Values The University of Washington's goal to educate a diverse student body to prepare

  7. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON FINANCE & FACILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON FINANCE & FACILITIES Capital Projects Office TITLE UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON FINANCE & FACILITIES Capital Projects Office UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON FINANCE & FACILITIES Capital, 2013 #12;UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON FINANCE & FACILITIES Capital Projects Office TITLE · 3.15-mile

  8. EIS-0189-S1: Tank Waste Remediation System, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For this Supplement Analysis, in each of the potential impact areas for Project W-314, the proposed action was evaluated and compared to the TWRS EIS evaluation of the preferred alternative (Section 5.0). Qualitative and/or quantitative comparisons are then provided in this Supplement Analysis to support a determination on the need for additional National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis. Based on this Supplement Analysis, the potential impacts for Project W -314 would be small in comparison to and are bounded by the impacts assessed for the TWRS EIS preferred alternative, and therefore no additional NEPA analysis is required.

  9. Biological assessment for the remedial action at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Dunn, C.P.

    1992-11-01

    The Weldon Spring site in St.Charles County, Missouri, became contaminated during the 1940s through the 1960s as a result of explosives production by the US Army and uranium and thorium processing by the predecessor agency of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency, and DOE is responsible for its cleanup. Contaminants are present in soil, surface water, and aquatic sediments. Alternatives identified for site remediation are no action (included as baseline for comparison), treatment and disposal of the wastes at the Weldon Spring site, and on-site treatment followed by off-site disposal at either a commercial facility near Clive, Utah, or at DOE`s Hanford site near Richland, Washington. In accordance with the requirements of the Endangered Species Act, this biological assessment has been prepared to evaluate the potential effects of proposed remedial action alternatives on federal listed (endangered or threatened) and candidate species at the respective sites. The assessment includes consideration of the environmental setting at each site; the federal listed and candidate species that could occur at each site; the construction, excavation, and treatment activities under each alternative; and the amount of land area affected at each site.

  10. Biological assessment for the remedial action at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Dunn, C.P.

    1992-11-01

    The Weldon Spring site in St.Charles County, Missouri, became contaminated during the 1940s through the 1960s as a result of explosives production by the US Army and uranium and thorium processing by the predecessor agency of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency, and DOE is responsible for its cleanup. Contaminants are present in soil, surface water, and aquatic sediments. Alternatives identified for site remediation are no action (included as baseline for comparison), treatment and disposal of the wastes at the Weldon Spring site, and on-site treatment followed by off-site disposal at either a commercial facility near Clive, Utah, or at DOE's Hanford site near Richland, Washington. In accordance with the requirements of the Endangered Species Act, this biological assessment has been prepared to evaluate the potential effects of proposed remedial action alternatives on federal listed (endangered or threatened) and candidate species at the respective sites. The assessment includes consideration of the environmental setting at each site; the federal listed and candidate species that could occur at each site; the construction, excavation, and treatment activities under each alternative; and the amount of land area affected at each site.

  11. ICDF Complex Remedial Action Work Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. M. Heileson

    2006-12-01

    This Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for operation of the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility Complex (ICDF). This facility includes (a) an engineered landfill that meets the substantial requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C, Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl landfill requirements; (b) centralized receiving, inspections, administration, storage/staging, and treatment facilities necessary for CERCLA investigation-derived, remedial, and removal waste at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prior to final disposition in the disposal facility or shipment off-Site; and (c) an evaporation pond that has been designated as a corrective action management unit. The ICDF Complex, including a buffer zone, will cover approximately 40 acres, with a landfill disposal capacity of approximately 510,000 yd3. The ICDF Complex is designed and authorized to accept INL CERCLA-generated wastes, and includes the necessary subsystems and support facilities to provide a complete waste management system. This Remedial Action Work Plan presents the operational approach and requirements for the various components that are part of the ICDF Complex. Summaries of the remedial action work elements are presented herein, with supporting information and documents provided as appendixes to this work plan that contain specific detail about the operation of the ICDF Complex. This document presents the planned operational process based upon an evaluation of the remedial action requirements set forth in the Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision.

  12. CLOSEOUT REPORT REMEDIAL ACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINAL CLOSEOUT REPORT REMEDIAL ACTION AREA OF CONCERN 6 BUILDING 650 RECLAMATION FACILITY SUMP York 11973 REGISTERED TO ISO 14001 #12;AOC 6 BUILDING 650 RECLAMATION FACILITY SUMP AND SUMP OUTFALL .................................................................................9 2.6.1 Final Radiological Status Survey Design

  13. Washington: Putting More Solar on More Rooftops in Washington...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Putting More Solar on More Rooftops in Washington State Washington: Putting More Solar on More Rooftops in Washington State November 8, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Mercer Island...

  14. Radioactive Tank Waste Remediation Focus Area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    In February 1991, DOE`s Office of Technology Development created the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID), to develop technologies for tank remediation. Tank remediation across the DOE Complex has been driven by Federal Facility Compliance Agreements with individual sites. In 1994, the DOE Office of Environmental Management created the High Level Waste Tank Remediation Focus Area (TFA; of which UST-ID is now a part) to better integrate and coordinate tank waste remediation technology development efforts. The mission of both organizations is the same: to focus the development, testing, and evaluation of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in USTs at DOE facilities. The ultimate goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. The TFA has focused on four DOE locations: the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho, the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina.

  15. Y-12 Plant remedial action Technology Logic Diagram: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part A, Remedial action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Remedial Action Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) problems at the Y-12 Plant to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to remedial action (RA) activities. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets. This report is Part A of Volume 3 and contains the Remedial Action section.

  16. Southeast Washington Subbasin Planning Ecoregion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southeast Washington Subbasin Planning Ecoregion Wildlife Assessment Paul R. Ashley and Stacey H. Stovall 2004 #12;SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN PLANNING ECOREGION WILDLIFE ASSESSMENT i Table of Contents

  17. George Washington Carver Recognition Day

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In commemoration of George Washington Carver’s life and work, Congress declared January 5 as George Washington Carver Recognition Day.

  18. AFFILIATIONS: Mass and Baars--Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Joslyn--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raftery, Adrian

    AFFILIATIONS: Mass and Baars--Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Joslyn-- Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Pyle, Tewson, Jones--Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; GneiTinG, raf

  19. One Earth Future Foundation and George Washington University's Institute for Corporate Responsibility invite you a panel discussion on business and the Responsibility to Protect (R2P). This event will bring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    One Earth Future Foundation and George Washington University's Institute for Corporate associate at One Earth Future Foundation · Jonas Claes, program officer, US Institute of Peace · Raymond Earth Future Foundation by phone, 303.533.1707 or by email, rspivak@oneearthfuture.org. Best regards

  20. K basins interim remedial action health and safety plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAY, P.T.

    1999-09-14

    The K Basins Interim Remedial Action Health and Safety Plan addresses the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as they apply to the CERCLA work that will take place at the K East and K West Basins. The provisions of this plan become effective on the date the US Environmental Protection Agency issues the Record of Decision for the K Basins Interim Remedial Action, currently planned in late August 1999.

  1. THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS BULLETIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS BULLETIN 2013­2014 #12;Mission Statement of The George Washington University The George Washington University, an independent academic institution. The George Washington University, centered in the national and international crossroads of Washington, D

  2. Effects of remediation amendments on vadose zone microorganisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Hannah M.; Tilton, Fred A.

    2012-08-10

    Surfactant-based foam delivery technology has been studied to remediate Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment. However, the surfactants and remediation amendments have an unknown effect on indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Microbial populations are important factors to consider in remediation efforts due to their potential to alter soil geochemistry. This project focuses on measuring microbial metabolic responses to remediation amendments in batch and column studies using Deep Vadose Zone Sediments. Initial studies of the microbes from Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment showed surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) and remediation amendment calcium polysulfide (CPS) had no affect on microbial growth using BiologTM Ecoplates. To move towards a more realistic field analog, soil columns were packed with Hanford 200 Area sediment. Once microbial growth in the column was verified by observing growth of the effluent solution on tryptic soy agar plates, remedial surfactants were injected into the columns, and the resulting metabolic diversity was measured. Results suggest surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) stimulates microbial growth. The soil columns were also visualized using X-ray microtomography to inspect soil packing and possibly probe for evidence of biofilms. Overall, BiologTM Ecoplates provide a rapid assay to predict effects of remediation amendments on Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone microorganisms.

  3. Energy Matters in Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Energy Matters in Washington State Energy Matters in Washington State www.energy.wsu.edu/library/ November 2009 #12;905 Plum Street SE, Building 3 P.O. Box 43169 Olympia, Washington 98504-3169 Energy University Extension Energy Program. 905 Plum Street SE, Building 3, P.O. Box 43169, Olympia, Washington

  4. CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERGMAN, T. B.; STEFANSKI, L. D.; SEELEY, P. N.; ZINSLI, L. C.; CUSACK, L. J.

    2012-09-19

    THE CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY WAS CONDUCTED TO DEVELOP AN OPTIMAL SEQUENCE OF REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTING THE CERCLA DECISION ON THE CENTRAL PLATEAU. THE STUDY DEFINES A SEQUENCE OF ACTIVITIES THAT RESULT IN AN EFFECTIVE USE OF RESOURCES FROM A STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVE WHEN CONSIDERING EQUIPMENT PROCUREMENT AND STAGING, WORKFORCE MOBILIZATION/DEMOBILIZATION, WORKFORCE LEVELING, WORKFORCE SKILL-MIX, AND OTHER REMEDIATION/DISPOSITION PROJECT EXECUTION PARAMETERS.

  5. My own, private Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galletly, Adam Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Recent affairs in Washington D.C. are beginning to lay the foundation for a new exploration of architecture. The division line between national and corporate identities, their spatial relationship to the public realm are ...

  6. Methodology to remediate a mixed waste site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, J.B.

    1994-08-01

    In response to the need for a comprehensive and consistent approach to the complex issue of mixed waste management, a generalized methodology for remediation of a mixed waste site has been developed. The methodology is based on requirements set forth in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and incorporates ``lessons learned`` from process design, remediation methodologies, and remediation projects. The methodology is applied to the treatment of 32,000 drums of mixed waste sludge at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. Process technology options are developed and evaluated, first with regard to meeting system requirements and then with regard to CERCLA performance criteria. The following process technology options are investigated: (1) no action, (2) separation of hazardous and radioactive species, (3) dewatering, (4) drying, and (5) solidification/stabilization. The first two options were eliminated from detailed consideration because they did not meet the system requirements. A quantitative evaluation clearly showed that, based on system constraints and project objectives, either dewatering or drying the mixed waste sludge was superior to the solidification/stabilization process option. The ultimate choice between the drying and the dewatering options will be made on the basis of a technical evaluation of the relative merits of proposals submitted by potential subcontractors.

  7. Integrated Systems-Based Approach to Monitoring Environmental Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunn, Amoret L.; Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2013-02-24

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for risk reduction and cleanup of its nuclear weapons complex. Remediation strategies for some of the existing contamination use techniques that mitigate risk, but leave contaminants in place. Monitoring to verify remedy performance and long-term mitigation of risk is a key element for implementing these strategies and can be a large portion of the total cost of remedy implementation. Especially in these situations, there is a need for innovative monitoring approaches that move away from the cost and labor intensive point-source monitoring. A systems-based approach to monitoring design focuses monitoring on controlling features and processes to enable effective interpretation of remedy performance.

  8. Integrated Systems-Based Approach to Monitoring Environmental Remediation - 13211

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Mike; Oostrom, Mart; Carroll, K.C.; Bunn, Amoret; Wellman, Dawn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, Washington (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, Washington (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for risk reduction and cleanup of its nuclear weapons complex. Remediation strategies for some of the existing contamination use techniques that mitigate risk, but leave contaminants in place. Monitoring to verify remedy performance and long-term mitigation of risk is a key element for implementing these strategies and can be a large portion of the total cost of remedy implementation. Especially in these situations, there is a need for innovative monitoring approaches that move away from the cost and labor intensive point-source monitoring. A systems-based approach to monitoring design focuses monitoring on controlling features and processes to enable effective interpretation of remedy performance. (authors)

  9. Radioactive tank waste remediation focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    EM`s Office of Science and Technology has established the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to manage and carry out an integrated national program of technology development for tank waste remediation. The TFA is responsible for the development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in the underground stabilize and close the tanks. The goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. Within the DOE complex, 335 underground storage tanks have been used to process and store radioactive and chemical mixed waste generated from weapon materials production and manufacturing. Collectively, thes tanks hold over 90 million gallons of high-level and low-level radioactive liquid waste in sludge, saltcake, and as supernate and vapor. Very little has been treated and/or disposed or in final form.

  10. Fermilab Today | University of Washington Profile

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington August 27, 2009 NAME: University of Washington HOME TOWN: Seattle, Washington MASCOT: Husky SCHOOL COLORS: Purple and gold PARTICLE PHYSICS COLLABORATIONS: DZero and...

  11. The 100-C-7 Remediation Project. An Overview of One of DOE's Largest Remediation Projects - 13260

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, Thomas C. [U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Strom, Dean [Washington Closure Hanford LLC, 2620 Fermi Avenue, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford LLC, 2620 Fermi Avenue, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Beulow, Laura [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 309 Bradley Boulevard, Suite 115, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 309 Bradley Boulevard, Suite 115, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (RL), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington Closure Hanford LLC (WCH) completed remediation of one of the largest waste sites in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The waste site, 100-C-7, covers approximately 15 football fields and was excavated to a depth of 85 feet (groundwater). The project team removed a total of 2.3 million tons of clean and contaminated soil, concrete debris, and scrap metal. 100-C-7 lies in Hanford's 100 B/C Area, home to historic B and C Reactors. The waste site was excavated in two parts as 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1. The pair of excavations appear like pit mines. Mining engineers were hired to design their tiered sides, with safety benches every 17 feet and service ramps which allowed equipment access to the bottom of the excavations. The overall cleanup project was conducted over a span of almost 10 years. A variety of site characterization, excavation, load-out and sampling methodologies were employed at various stages of remediation. Alternative technologies were screened and evaluated during the project. A new method for cost effectively treating soils was implemented - resulting in significant cost savings. Additional opportunities for minimizing waste streams and recycling were identified and effectively implemented by the project team. During the final phase of cleanup the project team applied lessons learned throughout the entire project to address the final, remaining source of chromium contamination. The C-7 cleanup now serves as a model for remediating extensive deep zone contamination sites at Hanford. (authors)

  12. Digging Begins at Hazardous Hanford Burial Ground- River Corridor Contractor Spent Two Years Preparing to Remediate 618-10

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, WASH. — After careful preparation and characterization, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has begun remediation of one of the most hazardous burial grounds tackled to date on the Hanford Site’s River Corridor.

  13. Washington: Washington's Clean Energy Resources and Economy (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-03-01

    This document highlights the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's investments and impacts in the state of Washington.

  14. GUIDE TO WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GUIDE TO WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES DEPARMENT OF SPECIAL COLLECTIONS of both Washington University and the St. Louis communities from 1853 to present day. Our collections. CONTACT INFORMATION: Our street address: Our mailing address: Washington University Archives Washington

  15. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON HONORARIA CHECKLIST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrajt, Graciela

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON HONORARIA CHECKLIST FOR INVITED GUEST SPEAKERS PROCUREMENT SERVICES Date Number 35 QUESTIONS? Contact the Tax Office, Phone: 206-616-3003 or Email: taxofc@u.washington.edu If the person IS NOT an invited guest speaker, please use form UoW 1632 available at http://www.washington

  16. Appendix Three UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Appendix Three UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF RISK AN CONSENT FOR TREATMENT FOR MINOR of Washington does not provide health and accident insurance for field trip participants and I agree-6450 (voice): (206) 543-6452 (TTY); or (206) 543-3885 (FAX); or access@u.washington.edu (email). · To purchase

  17. September 18, 2012 Seattle, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agenda September 18, 2012 Seattle, Washington Monday, September 17 6:00 pm Meet in hotel lobby:00 am Breakfast buffet/registration 60 8:00 am Welcome ­ Jeff Uhlmeyer, Washington DOT 15 8:15 am Final University 30 11:00 am LTPP SPS-2 Pavement Preservation Pooled Fund Opportunity ­ Jeff Uhlmeyer, Washington

  18. UNIVERSITY of WASHINGTON PRESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manchak, John

    UNIVERSITY of WASHINGTON PRESS Fall 2014 #12;CONTENTS NEW BOOKS1 CONTACT INFO49 SALES REPRESENTATIVES49 PUBLISHING PARTNERS Canadian Museum of Civilization48 Fowler Museum at UCLA36 Lost Horse Press39 Lynx House Press41 National Gallery of Australia38 Silkworm Books42 UBC Press43 UCLA Chicano Studies

  19. Washington State Electric Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Washington State Electric Vehicle Implementation Bryan Bazard Maintenance and Alternate Fuel Technology Manager #12;Executive Order 14-04 Requires the procurement of electric vehicles where and equipment with electricity or biofuel to the "extent practicable" by June 2015 1. The vehicle is due

  20. ICDF Complex Remedial Action Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. M. Heileson

    2007-09-26

    This Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Remedial Action Report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Section 6.2 of the INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan. The agency prefinal inspection of the ICDF Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF) was completed in June of 2005. Accordingly, this report has been developed to describe the construction activities completed at the ICDF along with a description of any modifications to the design originally approved for the facility. In addition, this report provides a summary of the major documents prepared for the design and construction of the ICDF, a discussion of relevant requirements and remedial action objectives, the total costs associated with the development and operation of the facility to date, and identification of necessary changes to the Agency-approved INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan and the ICDF Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan.

  1. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi{sup 2} (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives.

  2. Spokane, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) Jump to:Spill Prevention and ResponseSpokane, Washington:

  3. Remediation by inspiration : artist-driven models for environmental clean-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fain, Jessica (Jessica Elizabeth)

    2011-01-01

    While often seen as utilitarian and technical, environmental remediation efforts have significant cultural, social and physical impacts. Accordingly, they demand responses that utilize a multi-disciplinary approach to the ...

  4. Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Remedial investigation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuen, C. R.; Martino, L. E.; Biang, R. P.; Chang, Y. S.; Dolak, D.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R. A.; Patton, T. L.; Prasad, S.; Quinn, J.; Rosenblatt, D. H.; Vercellone, J.; Wang, Y. Y.

    2000-03-14

    This report presents the results of the remedial investigation (RI) conducted at J-Field in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), a U.S. Army installation located in Harford County, Maryland. Since 1917, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, and testing of chemical agents and munitions and the subsequent destruction of these materials at J-Field by open burning and open detonation. These activities have raised concerns about environmental contamination at J-Field. This RI was conducted by the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division, Directorate of Safety, Health and Environmental Division of APG, pursuant to requirements outlined under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA). The RI was accomplished according to the procedures developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988). The RI provides a comprehensive evaluation of the site conditions, nature of contaminants present, extent of contamination, potential release mechanisms and migration pathways, affected populations, and risks to human health and the environment. This information will be used as the basis for the design and implementation of remedial actions to be performed during the remedial action phase, which will follow the feasibility study (FS) for J-Field.

  5. Tablet PC Enhanced Curricula University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    Tablet PC Enhanced Curricula University of Washington Richard Anderson http://www.cs.washington Classroom Presenter is free for educational and non-commercial use. It is available from: www.cs.washington University of Washington anderson@cs.washington.edu 1. Instructor displays a slide with an exercise

  6. Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  7. Washington City Power- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington City adopted a net-metering program, including interconnection procedures, in January 2008.* Net metering is available to residential and commercial customers that generate electricity...

  8. Environmental Remediation program completes legacy mercury cleanup...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Stewardship Environmental Cleanup Feature Stories Legacy slope-side cleanup Environmental Remediation program completes legacy mercury cleanup near Smith's...

  9. Nanoethics Graduate Education Symposium University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olmstead, Marjorie

    Nanoethics Graduate Education Symposium University of Washington September 2009 Original for Workforce Development University of Washington Special Edition Monograph National Science Foundation Grant. Brainard Editor: Deborah R. Bassett Assistant Editor: Amanda L. Wysocki University of Washington

  10. Bruin Feminists for Equality Go to Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petersen, Miranda; Duran, Myra; Le, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    Feminists for Equality Go to Washington UCLA Students AttendEleanor Holmes Norton (D-Washington, DC). The timing of ours Leadership conference in Washington, DC, with the generous

  11. Review: Rare Plants of Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Ryder W.

    2013-01-01

    to the Rare Plants of Washington Pamela Camp and John G.John G. , eds. Field Guide to the Rare Plants of Washington.Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press, 2011. 408pp.

  12. Toxic Remediation System And Method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matthews, Stephen M. (Alameda County, CA); Schonberg, Russell G. (Santa Clara County, CA); Fadness, David R. (Santa Clara County, CA)

    1996-07-23

    What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

  13. GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION DESIGN USING SIMULATED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mays, Larry W.

    CHAPTER 8 GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION DESIGN USING SIMULATED ANNEALING Richard L. Skaggs Pacific? There has been an emergence in the use of combinatorial methods such as simulated annealing in groundwater for groundwater management applications. The algorithm incor- porates "directional search" and "memory

  14. Recent developments: Washington focus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-02-01

    Congress reconvened on January 23, but most of Washington`s January new involves the Administration. DOE sent two letters to USEC customers, awarded a contract for the independent financial review of the enrichment program, and released a plan for demonstrating AVLIS by 1992. A General Accounting Office (GAO) report investigating the impact of imports of Soviet EUP into the US was made public. Both Congress and the administration are reportedly considering a full-scope US-Soviet Agreement for Nuclear Cooperation. Finally, published reports indicate Congress may consider ending the customs user fee which levies a charge of 0.17% on the value of all imported goods. The fee is felt to violate the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and is not based on recovering actual Customs costs for processing a good. The fee brings the Treasury over $700 million per year, but the business community plans to lobby hard for its outright elimination or a change in authority to collect the fee based on actual costs.

  15. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington Update Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington Update Presentation-given at the Fall 2012...

  16. Washington Energy Facility Site Evalutation Council - Siting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington Energy Facility Site Evalutation Council - Siting and Review Process Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Washington Energy...

  17. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON DIPLOMA CERTIFICATION REQUEST FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhard, Marc O.

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON DIPLOMA CERTIFICATION REQUEST FORM GRADUATION AND ACADEMIC RECORDS OFFICE: _________________ Notes: Please return this form to: University of Washington, Graduation & Academic Records Box 355850

  18. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Washington Closure...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Washington Closure Hanford VPP Report - March 2009 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Washington Closure Hanford VPP Report - March 2009 March 2009 Evaluation to determine...

  19. Washington and Lee University STUDENT ORGANIZATION APPLICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, David

    Washington and Lee University STUDENT ORGANIZATION APPLICATION Organization Name mission statement of your organization. How will your organization be beneficial to Washington and Lee

  20. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington Update Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington Update Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting:...

  1. Washington Energy Facility Site Evalutation Council - Generalized...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington Energy Facility Site Evalutation Council - Generalized Siting Process Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Chart: Washington Energy...

  2. Harold Washington Social Security Administration (SSA) Center...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Harold Washington Social Security Administration (SSA) Center Water Conservation and Green Energy Harold Washington Social Security Administration (SSA) Center Water Conservation...

  3. Washington: Graphene Nanostructures for Lithium Batteries Recieves...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Washington: Graphene Nanostructures for Lithium Batteries Recieves 2012 R&D 100 Award Washington: Graphene Nanostructures for Lithium Batteries Recieves 2012 R&D 100 Award February...

  4. Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program - 12189

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Christopher; Kothari, Vijendra; Starr, Ken; Gillespie, Joey; Widdop, Michael; none,

    2012-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was established in 1974 to address residual radiological contamination at sites where work was performed for the Manhattan Engineer District and U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. Initially, FUSRAP activities began with a records search for sites that had the potential to contain residual radiological contamination; 46 sites were identified that were eligible for and required remediation. Remedial action began in 1979. In 1997, Congress assigned responsibility for the remediation of FUSRAP sites to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). DOE retains responsibility for determining if sites are eligible for FUSRAP remediation and for providing long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) of remediated FUSRAP sites. DOE LTS&M activities are designed to ensure that FUSRAP sites remain protective of human health and the environment and to preserve knowledge regarding FUSRAP sites. Additional elements include eligibility determinations, transition of remediated sites from USACE to DOE, LTS&M operations such as inspections and institutional controls management, stakeholder support, preservation of records, and real property and reuse. DOE maintains close coordination with USACE and regulators to ensure there is no loss of protectiveness when sites transition to DOE for LTS&M.

  5. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON University Center for Excellence in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities Center and Disability University of Washington Box 357920 Seattle, Washington 98195-7920 206-543-7701 http://depts.washington__________________________________________________________________________ 9 Race Data for Washington State ____________________________________________________ 9 Home

  6. A comparison of the RCRA Corrective Action and CERCLA Remedial Action Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traceski, Thomas T.

    1994-02-01

    This document provides a comprehensive side-by-side comparison of the RCRA corrective action and the CERCLA remedial action processes. On the even-numbered pages a discussion of the RCRA corrective action process is presented and on the odd-numbered pages a comparative discussion of the CERCLA remedial action process can be found. Because the two programs have a difference structure, there is not always a direct correlation between the two throughout the document. This document serves as an informative reference for Departmental and contractor personnel responsible for oversight or implementation of RCRA corrective action and CERCLA remedial action activities at DOE environmental restoration sites.

  7. Environmental Restoration Strategic Plan. Remediating the nuclear weapons complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    With the end of the cold war, the US has a reduced need for nuclear weapons production. In response, the Department of Energy has redirected resources from weapons production to weapons dismantlement and environmental remediation. To this end, in November 1989, the US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (renamed the Office of Environmental Management in 1994). It was created to bring under a central authority the management of radioactive and hazardous wastes at DOE sites and inactive or shut down facilities. The Environmental Restoration Program, a major component of DOE`s Environmental Management Program, is responsible for the remediation and management of contaminated environmental media (e.g., soil, groundwater, sediments) and the decommissioning of facilities and structures at 130 sites in over 30 states and territories.

  8. Innovative Vitrification for Soil Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hnat, James G.; Patten, John S.; Jetta, Norman W.

    1996-12-31

    Vortec has successfully completed Phases 1 and 2 of a technology demonstration program for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation.'' The principal objective of the program is to demonstrate the ability of a Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS) to remediate DOE contaminated soils and other waste forms containing TM RCRA hazardous materials, low levels of radionuclides and TSCA (PCB) containing wastes. The demonstration program will verify the ability of this vitrification process to produce a chemically stable glass final waste form which passes both TCLP and PCT quality control requirements, while meeting all federal and state emission control regulations. The demonstration system is designed to process 36 ton/day of as-received drummed or bulk wastes. The processing capacity equates to approximately 160 barrels/day of waste materials containing 30% moisture at an average weight of 450 lbs./barrel.

  9. EA-1096: Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects (Programmatic), Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement...

  10. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON DIPLOMA NAME REQUEST FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reh, Thomas A.

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON DIPLOMA NAME REQUEST FORM GRADUATION AND ACADEMIC RECORDS OFFICE http://www.washington.edu/students/reg/grad.html Email: ugradoff@u.washington.edu Phone: 206-543-1803 FAX: 206-685-3660 Current Students: Complete this form by the last day of the quarter you plan to graduate to: University of Washington Graduation

  11. Department of Civil Engineering University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhard, Marc O.

    #12;Department of Civil Engineering University of Washington Box 352700 Seattle, Washington 98195-2700 EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF FOREST ROADS ON STREAMFLOW IN HARD AND WARE CREEKS, WASHINGTON by LAURA C Washington catchments, Hard and Ware Creeks (drainage areas 2.3 and 2.8 square km, respectively). Road

  12. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON BOTHELL GENERAL FACULTY ORGANIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON BOTHELL GENERAL FACULTY ORGANIZATION BYLAWS UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON of Washington Bothell (UWB) establishes herewith, under Faculty Code, Section 23-45A, its organization and rules of procedures. ARTICLE I PURPOSE AND FUNCTION Section 1. The purpose of the University of Washington Bothell

  13. UW GEOTECHNICAL The University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhard, Marc O.

    UW GEOTECHNICAL PROGRAM The University of Washington Geotechnical Engineering Program is one Earthquake Engineering Research (PEER) Center, and the Washington State Department of Transportation. www.ce.washington activities and the cultural activities found in a cosmopolitan city. On the shores of Lake Washington

  14. Rev. 8/12 Registration | Washington border policy.doc Washington Border Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elzanowski, Marek

    Rev. 8/12 ­ Registration | Washington border policy.doc Washington Border Policy Guidelines and Application form The Washington Border Policy benefit allows Washington residents who live in 11 approved days prior to enrollment at PSU includes Washington driver's license (primary document), or may include

  15. Transformative Wave Technologies Kent, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Transformative Wave Technologies Kent, Washington www.transformativewave.com #12;#12;North America are shifted to off peak times #12;#12;Transformative Wave Technologies www.transformativewave.com #12

  16. Washington Gas- Commercial Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington Gas as a part of the Maryland EmPOWER program offers incentives to its commercial customer for making energy efficiency improvements. Rebates are available for qualifying water heaters,...

  17. Environmental Restoration and Performance-Based Remediation....

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Policy Flash Environmental Restoration and Performance-Based Remediation. . . More Documents & Publications Oversight of Performance-based Contracts CRAD, Performance-Based...

  18. X-701B Groundwater Remedy Portsmouth Ohio

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    toward remedial objectives at a similar cost. In this example, the alternative to a surface cap was blending solid oxidant into the subsurface beneath the former basin to...

  19. Summary - Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and surface water Hg remediation strategy for adequacy in reducing Hg levels in the fish and to indentify opportunities to achieve cost and technical improvements andor to...

  20. Recommendation 192: Comments on Remediation Effectiveness Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ORSSAB Recommendations and Comments on the Draft 2010 Remediation Effectiveness Report for the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation.

  1. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, N.P.; Webb, J.R.; Ferguson, S.D.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

    1990-09-01

    The 394 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eleventh in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (8) Technical Measurements Center, (9) Remedial Action Program, and (10) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies.

  2. Interstate Technology & Regulatory Council (ITRC) Remediation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    & Publications December 11-12, 2014 - Technical Exchange Meeting - Las Vegas, Nevada October 13, 2015 Webinar - EPA Radiation Risk Assessment Approach Attenuation Based Remedies...

  3. Nanocatalysts for Diesel Engine Emissions Remediation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanocatalysts for Diesel Engine Emissions Remediation Zeolite-Based Nanocatalysts Offer Enhanced Catalyst Performance and Durability Each year, the United States consumes a large...

  4. Tank waste remediation system (TWRS) mission analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rieck, R.H.

    1996-10-03

    The Tank Waste Remediation System Mission Analysis provides program level requirements and identifies system boundaries and interfaces. Measures of success appropriate to program level accomplishments are also identified.

  5. Washington -- SEP Summary of Reported Data | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary of Reported Data Washington -- SEP Summary of Reported Data Summary of data reported by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner Washington -- SEP. Washington -- SEP...

  6. Old Silver Readings: Mythology, Portraits, and Booker T. Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuckman, Hugh E

    2013-01-01

    R. (1988). Booker T. Washington in perspective: Essays ofBieze, M. (2008). Booker T. Washington and the art of self-2008). HOPE [Poster]. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institute.

  7. No New Gimmicks: Continued Budget Challenges in Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jenny L.; Benjamin, Francis

    2012-01-01

    summary.aspx? bill = 1997. Washington State Liquor Controlabout/ standard-hours. Washington State Senate Committeemade clear. Ultimately, Washington State is still battling a

  8. 2012 Washington State Budget: A Year of Political Earthquakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Francis; Chávez, Maria; Lovrich, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    accessed March 1, 2013). Washington State RedistrictingCommission (2012) “2011 Washington State Redistricting1, 2013). Association of Washington Business (2011) 2012

  9. Response

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Response SEAB Recommendations Related to the Evaluation of New Funding Constructs for Energy R&D in the Department of Energy Introduction Over the past seven years, the Department...

  10. Tank waste remediation system compensatory measure removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MILLIKEN, N.J.

    1999-05-18

    In support of Fiscal Year 1998 Performance Agreement TWR1.4.3, ''Replace Compensatory Measures,'' the Tank Waste Remediation System is documenting the completion of field modifications supporting the removal of the temporary exemptions from the approved Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs), HNF-SD-WM-TSR-006. These temporary exemptions or compensatory measures expire September 30, 1998.

  11. Groundwater Remediation Strategy Using Global Optimization Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    Groundwater Remediation Strategy Using Global Optimization Algorithms Shreedhar Maskey1 ; Andreja Jonoski2 ; and Dimitri P. Solomatine3 Abstract: The remediation of groundwater contamination by pumping as decision variables. Groundwater flow and particle-tracking models MODFLOW and MODPATH and a GO tool GLOBE

  12. Creating A More Inclusive Campus Rev. Dr. Jamie Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Jaswinder Pal

    Creating A More Inclusive Campus Community Rev. Dr. Jamie Washington President, The Washington Washington, M.Div., Ph.D. President, Washington Consulting Group Founder, Social Justice Training Institute

  13. U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE WASHINGTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Don

    U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE WASHINGTON : For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U­1800 Fax: (202) 512­2250 Mail: Stop SSOP, Washington, DC 20402­0001 90-136 PDF 2004 H.R. 3039

  14. 1400 WASHINGTON AVENUE ALBANY, NY 12222

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrova, Ivana

    1400 WASHINGTON AVENUE ALBANY, NY 12222 CAMPUS CENTER 116 (CC116) www.albany.edu/sasenate sasenate University of New York at Albany, Inc. Campus Center 116 1400 Washington Ave. Albany, NY 12222

  15. An Economic Engine for Washington State

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pnnl.gov An Economic Engine for Washington State When Washington State leaders share their visions for a vibrant future, certain priorities rise to the top: jobs, education, and an...

  16. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hart, J.G.

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project. During Phase 2, the basic nitrification process design was modified to meet the specific needs of the new waste streams available at Paducah. The system design developed for Paducah has significantly enhanced the processing capabilities of the Vortec vitrification process. The overall system design now includes the capability to shred entire drums and drum packs containing mud, concrete, plastics and PCB`s as well as bulk waste materials. This enhanced processing capability will substantially expand the total DOE waste remediation applications of the technology.

  17. QER Public Meeting in Washington, DC: Enhancing Energy Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Washington, DC: Enhancing Energy Infrastructure Resiliency and Addressing Vulnerabilities QER Public Meeting in Washington, DC: Enhancing Energy Infrastructure Resiliency and...

  18. Washington's 7th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    7th congressional district ARCH Venture Partners (Washington) Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center Washington Technology Center Registered Networking...

  19. GWU, RPI, VCU All Rights Reserved Washington State Ferry Risk Assessment Appendix I The Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    © GWU, RPI, VCU ­ All Rights Reserved Washington State Ferry Risk Assessment ­ Appendix I The Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment Appendix I: Historical Data Analysis Results JULY 1, 1999 Prepared for: Blue Ribbon Panel on Washington State Ferry Safety and Washington State Transportation Commission

  20. EIS-0456: Cushman Hydroelectric Project, Tacoma, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS is for the design and construction of certain components of the Cushman Hydroelectric Project in Mason County, Washington.

  1. Remediation of DOE hazardous waste sites: Planning and integration requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geffen, C.A.; Garrett, B.A.; Cowan, C.E.; Siegel, M.R.; Keller, J.F. )

    1989-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is faced with a immense challenge in effectively implementing a program to mitigate and manage the environmental impacts created by current operations and from past activities at its facilities. The current regulatory framework and public interest in the environmental arena have made operating DOE facilities in an environmentally responsible manner a compelling priority. This paper provides information on the results of a project funded by DOE to obtain a better understanding of the regulatory and institutional drivers in the hazardous waste market and the costs and timeframes required for remediation activities. Few realize that before remediating a hazardous waste site, a comprehensive planning process must be conducted to characterize the nature and extent of site contamination, calculate the risk to the public, and assess the effectiveness of various remediation technologies. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and others have found that it may take up to 7 years to complete the planning process at an average cost of $1.0 million per site. While cost information is not yet available for DOE sites, discussions with hazardous waste consulting firms indicate that average characterization and assessment costs will be 5 to 10 times this amount for DOE sites. The higher costs are expected because of the additional administrative requirements placed on DOE sites, the need to handle mixed wastes, the amount and extent of contamination at many of these sites, and the visibility of the sites. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Hanford site tank waste remediation system programmatic environmental review report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haass, C.C.

    1998-09-03

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) committed in the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Record of Decision (ROD) to perform future National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis at key points in the Program. Each review will address the potential impacts that new information may have on the environmental impacts presented in the TWRS EIS and support an assessment of whether DOE`s plans for remediating the tank waste are still pursuing the appropriate plan for remediation or whether adjustments to the program are needed. In response to this commitment, DOE prepared a Supplement Analysis (SA) to support the first of these reevaluations. Subsequent to the completion of the SA, the Phase IB negotiations process with private contractors resulted in several changes to the planned approach. These changes along with other new information regarding the TWRS Program have potential implications for Phase 1 and Phase 2 of tank waste retrieval and waste storage and/or disposal that may influence the environmental impacts of the Phased Implementation alternative. This report focuses on identifying those potential environmental impacts that may require NEPA analysis prior to authorization to begin facility construction and operations.

  3. Maritime Industry in Washington Washington's maritime industry is central to the economic and cultural history of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    Maritime Industry in Washington Washington's maritime industry is central the backbone of our economy, providing the transportation critical to Washington to destination is a well-choreographed and profitable venture. Washington's Ferry System

  4. Trade in Washington State Since 2001, the value of Washington exports has averaged more than $44 billion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    Trade in Washington State Since 2001, the value of Washington exports has averaged more than $44 billion annually, making Washington the most trade, Washington has the largest locally controlled public port system in the world

  5. U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE WASHINGTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE WASHINGTON : For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U­1800 Fax: (202) 512­2104 Mail: Stop IDCC, Washington, DC 20402­0001 52­894PDF 2010 THE NEXT GENERATION WU, Oregon BRIAN BAIRD, Washington BRAD MILLER, North Carolina DANIEL LIPINSKI, Illinois GABRIELLE

  6. Lucas Patzek Washington State University, Mount Vernon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    - 1 - Lucas Patzek Address: Washington State University, Mount Vernon Department of Crop and Soil), Aug. 2008 ­ Graduating Feb. 2012 Washington State University, Mount Vernon, WA. Major advisor: Dr factors on diverse small grain production systems of Washington State. B.S. in Molecular, Cellular

  7. Planning & Budgeting Brief opb.washington.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    Planning & Budgeting Brief opb.washington.edu Page 1 Date: November 10, 2014 Subject: Earnings Information for Washington Graduates As part of the final 2014 supplemental operating budget (ESSB 6002, Sec 129), the Washington legislature required that the Education Research & Data Center

  8. THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLAN #12;University Emergency Operations Plan. Sincerely, Steven Knapp President The George Washington University Page i July 2013 #12;University Emergency to make the George Washington University a safe and prepared community. Steven Lerman Provost

  9. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacCready, Parker

    #12;UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT Mark A. Emmert, President September 3, 2009 of Washington's (UW's) Climate Action Plan is a compilation of ideas and strategies from across our three this challenging economic time. Working across our University of Washington community to achieve climate neutrality

  10. University of Washington Learning Space Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    University of Washington Learning Space Assessment Report - June 2014 #12;#12;University of Washington Learning Space Assessment Report - June 2014 #12;#12;1.0 Executive Summary 1 2.0 Goals and Process.0 Recommendations 127 8.0 Acknowledgments 141 9.0 Appendix 143 Table of Contents #12;#12;University of Washington

  11. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON TRAVEL CARD APPLICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrajt, Graciela

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON TRAVEL CARD APPLICATION US 01745 UW CTS Box 351120 206-543-7171 CARD DATA the following conditions: · The card must be used only for University of Washington business related and travel expenses as described in card policies http://f2.washington.edu/fm

  12. WASHINGTON TECHNICAL WRRC Report No. ~6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    WASHINGTON TECHNICAL INSTITUTE WRRC Report No. ~6 SURVEY, ECOLOGY, AND SYSTEMATICS OF THE UPPER Resources Research Center Washington Technical Institute Washington, D. C. 20008 August 1975 #12;FOREWARN standards of 96% removal of U.O.D. (ultimate oxygen demand), 96% removal of . phosphate, and 85% removal

  13. Trajectories of Microbial Community Function in Response to Accelerate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Trajectories of Microbial Community Function in Response to Accelerated Remediation of Subsurface Metal Contaminants Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Trajectories of...

  14. Remedial Action Work Plan Amchitka Island Mud Pit Closures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV

    2001-04-05

    This remedial action work plan presents the project organization and construction procedures developed for the performance of the remedial actions at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE's) sites on Amchitka Island, Alaska. During the late1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (the predecessor agency to DOE) used Amchitka Island as a site for underground nuclear tests. A total of nine sites on the Island were considered for nuclear testing; however, tests were only conducted at three sites (i.e., Long Shot in 1965, Milrow in 1969, and Cannikin in 1971). In addition to these three sites, large diameter emplacement holes were drilled in two other locations (Sites D and F) and an exploratory hole was in a third location (Site E). It was estimated that approximately 195 acres were disturbed by drilling or preparation for drilling in conjunction with these activities. The disturbed areas include access roads, spoil-disposal areas, mud pits which have impacted the environment, and an underground storage tank at the hot mix plant which was used to support asphalt-paving operations on the island. The remedial action objective for Amchitka Island is to eliminate human and ecological exposure to contaminants by capping drilling mud pits, removing the tank contents, and closing the tank in place. The remedial actions will meet State of Alaska regulations, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge management goals, address stakeholder concerns, and address the cultural beliefs and practices of the native people. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office will conduct work on Amchitka Island under the authority of the Comprehensive Emergency Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Field activities are scheduled to take place May through September 2001. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent Closure Report.

  15. Response

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-A Wholesale PowerNatural GasBreakoutResponse SEAB Recommendations

  16. Responsibility

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-A Wholesale PowerNaturalEnergy Response

  17. Biofuels in Oregon and Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Biomass Programs Prepared by Pacific within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, particularly Mr. Zia Haq, for co- fundingPNNL-17351 Biofuels in Oregon and Washington A Business Case Analysis of Opportunities

  18. November, 2014 UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sniadecki, Nathan J.

    Health and Safety is the owner's representative. DESIGN CRITERIA General Fire Protection shallNovember, 2014 UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Environmental Health and Safety Design Guide Fire floor within a stair enclosure in multi-story buildings The design criteria for the fire sprinkler

  19. Adaptive management: a paradigm for remediation of public facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janecky, David R; Whicker, Jeffrey J; Doerr, Ted B

    2009-01-01

    Public facility restoration planning traditionally focused on response to natural disasters and hazardous materials accidental releases. These plans now need to integrate response to terrorist actions. Therefore, plans must address a wide range of potential vulnerabilities. Similar types of broad remediation planning are needed for restoration of waste and hazardous material handling areas and facilities. There are strong similarities in damage results and remediation activities between unintentional and terrorist actions; however, the uncertainties associated with terrorist actions result in a re-evaluation of approaches to planning. Restoration of public facilities following a release of a hazardous material is inherently far more complex than in confined industrial settings and has many unique technical, economic, social, and political challenges. Therefore, they arguably involve a superset of drivers, concerns and public agencies compared to other restoration efforts. This superset of conditions increases complexity of interactions, reduces our knowledge of the initial conditions, and even condenses the timeline for restoration response. Therefore, evaluations of alternative restoration management approaches developed for responding to terrorist actions provide useful knowledge for large, complex waste management projects. Whereas present planning documents have substantial linearity in their organization, the 'adaptive management' paradigm provides a constructive parallel operations paradigm for restoration of facilities that anticipates and plans for uncertainty, multiple/simUltaneous public agency actions, and stakeholder participation. Adaptive management grew out of the need to manage and restore natural resources in highly complex and changing environments with limited knowledge about causal relationships and responses to restoration actions. Similarities between natural resource management and restoration of a facility and surrounding area(s) after a disruptive event suggest numerous advantages over preset linearly-structured plans by incorporating the flexibility and overlap of processes inherent in effective facility restoration. We discuss three restoration case studies (e.g., the Hart Senate Office Building anthrax restoration, Rocky Flats actinide remediation, and hurricane destruction restoration), that implement aspects of adaptive management but not a formal approach. We propose that more formal adoption of adaptive management principles could be a basis for more flexible standards to improve site-specific remediation plans under conditions of high uncertainty.

  20. Electrolytic remediation of chromated copper arsenate wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Heather A. G. (Heather Ann Ganung)

    2006-01-01

    While chromated copper arsenate (CCA) has proven to be exceptionally effective in protecting wood from rot and infestation, its toxic nature has led to the problem of disposal of CCA-treated lumber and remediation of waters ...

  1. EIS-0096: Remedial Actions at the Former Vitro Rare Metals Plant Site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this statement to evaluate the environmental impacts associated with five potential sets of actions to address the potential public health hazards of residual radioactive materials remaining at the inactive uranium processing site in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania.

  2. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hnat, J.G. [Vortec Corp., Collegeville, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project.

  3. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hnat, J.G. [Vortec Corp., Collegeville, PA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase I consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project.

  4. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Ferguson, S.D.; Fielden, J.M.; Schumann, P.L.

    1989-09-01

    The 576 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the tenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title work, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords.

  5. Tank waste remediation system integrated technology plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, B.; Ignatov, A.; Johnson, S.; Mann, M.; Morasch, L.; Ortiz, S.; Novak, P. [eds.] [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-02-28

    The Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, is operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors. Starting in 1943, Hanford supported fabrication of reactor fuel elements, operation of production reactors, processing of irradiated fuel to separate and extract plutonium and uranium, and preparation of plutonium metal. Processes used to recover plutonium and uranium from irradiated fuel and to recover radionuclides from tank waste, plus miscellaneous sources resulted in the legacy of approximately 227,000 m{sup 3} (60 million gallons) of high-level radioactive waste, currently in storage. This waste is currently stored in 177 large underground storage tanks, 28 of which have two steel walls and are called double-shell tanks (DSTs) an 149 of which are called single-shell tanks (SSTs). Much of the high-heat-emitting nuclides (strontium-90 and cesium-137) has been extracted from the tank waste, converted to solid, and placed in capsules, most of which are stored onsite in water-filled basins. DOE established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program in 1991. The TWRS program mission is to store, treat, immobilize and dispose, or prepare for disposal, the Hanford tank waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. Technology will need to be developed or improved to meet the TWRS program mission. The Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) is the high-level consensus plan that documents all TWRS technology activities for the life of the program.

  6. Waste Management Plan for the Oak Ridge National Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    In accordance with the requirements of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Project Quality Assurance Plan, this Waste Management Plan establishes clear lines of responsibility and authority, documentation requirements, and operational guidance for the collection, identification, segregation, classification, packaging, certification, and storage/disposal of wastes. These subjects are discussed in the subsequent sections of this document.

  7. Results of Remediation and Verification Sampling for the 600-270 Horseshoe Landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. S. Thompson

    2005-12-14

    This report presents the results of the 2005 remedial action and verification soil sampling conducted at the 600-270 waste site after removal of soil containing residual concentrations of dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane and its breakdown products dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene and dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethane. The remediation was performed in response to post-closure surface soil sampling performed between 1998 and 2003 that indicated the presence of residual DDT contamination exceeding the Record of Decision for the 1100 Area National Priorities List site cleanup criteria of 1 mg/kg that was established for the original 1994 cleanup activities.

  8. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces, in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP intends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years. ISR IP is an applied research and development program broadly addressing known DOE environmental restoration needs. Analysis of a sample of 334 representative sites by the Office of Environmental Restoration has shown how many sites are amenable to in situ remediation: containment--243 sites; manipulation--244 sites; bioremediation--154 sites; and physical/chemical methods--236 sites. This needs assessment is focused on near-term restoration problems (FY93--FY99). Many other remediations will be required in the next century. The major focus of the ISR EP is on the long term development of permanent solutions to these problems. Current needs for interim actions to protect human health and the environment are also being addressed.

  9. Incorporating ecological risk assessment into remedial investigation/feasibility study work plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This guidance document (1) provides instructions on preparing the components of an ecological work plan to complement the overall site remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan and (2) directs the user on how to implement ecological tasks identified in the plan. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), and RI/FS work plan will have to be developed as part of the site-remediation scoping process. Specific guidance on the RI/FS process and the preparation of work plans has been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988a). This document provides guidance to US Department of Energy (DOE) staff and contractor personnel for incorporation of ecological information into environmental remediation planning and decision making at CERCLA sites.

  10. SUSTAINABLE REMEDIATION SOFTWARE TOOL EXERCISE AND EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, J.; Nichols, R.; Looney, B.

    2011-05-12

    The goal of this study was to examine two different software tools designed to account for the environmental impacts of remediation projects. Three case studies from the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC were used to exercise SiteWise (SW) and Sustainable Remediation Tool (SRT) by including both traditional and novel remediation techniques, contaminants, and contaminated media. This study combined retrospective analysis of implemented projects with prospective analysis of options that were not implemented. Input data were derived from engineering plans, project reports, and planning documents with a few factors supplied from calculations based on Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). Conclusions drawn from software output were generally consistent within a tool; both tools identified the same remediation options as the 'best' for a given site. Magnitudes of impacts varied between the two tools, and it was not always possible to identify the source of the disagreement. The tools differed in their quantitative approaches: SRT based impacts on specific contaminants, media, and site geometry and modeled contaminant removal. SW based impacts on processes and equipment instead of chemical modeling. While SW was able to handle greater variety in remediation scenarios, it did not include a measure of the effectiveness of the scenario.

  11. 1. Exit at Washington Ave. (Exit 17C) 2. Le at Washington Ave. S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    From I-35W Southbound 1. Exit at Washington Ave. (Exit 17C) 2. Le at Washington Ave. S. 3. Con nue Straight as Washington Ave S becomes Cedar Ave 5. Le on 3rd St S. 6. For 19th Ave Ramp, turn right 17C) 2. Stay in the middle lane and follow the signs for Washington Ave./U of M/West Bank. 3

  12. 1. Exit at Washington Ave. (Exit 17C) 2. Le at Washington Ave. S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    From I-35W Southbound 1. Exit at Washington Ave. (Exit 17C) 2. Le at Washington Ave. S. 3. Con nue Straight as Washington Ave S becomes Cedar Ave 5. Le on 3rd St S. 6. Con nue to 19th Ave S. Turn right. Con the signs for Washington Ave./U of M/West Bank. 3. Then move to the right lane and take the exit for U of M

  13. 1. Exit at Washington Ave. (Exit 17C) 2. Le at Washington Ave. S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    From I-35W Southbound 1. Exit at Washington Ave. (Exit 17C) 2. Le at Washington Ave. S. 3. Le at the 2nd signal to con nue on Washington Ave S. 4. Con nue through the signal at 19th Ave. On to 2nd St./U of M (Exit 17C) 2. Stay in the middle lane and follow the signs for Washington Ave./U of M/West Bank. 3

  14. ,"Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  15. ,"Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  16. Robert Wood, University of Washington many contributors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    Robert Wood, University of Washington many contributors VOCALS Education and Outreach Snider (Wyoming) · Dave Spencer (NCSU) · Cindy Twohy (OSU) · Rob Wood/Chris Bretherton/Rhea George

  17. Energy Northwest, Washington Bonneville Power Administration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    APRIL 9, 2015 1 1393164 | 300019859 Energy Northwest, Washington Bonneville Power Administration, Oregon; Wholesale Electric Credit Profile US329.455 mil columbia generating...

  18. Energy Northwest, Washington Bonneville Power Administration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SEPTEMBER 25, 2015 1 1455301 | 300019859 Energy Northwest, Washington Bonneville Power Administration, Oregon; Wholesale Electric Credit Profile US43.1 mil proj 1 elec rev rfdg...

  19. Bonneville Power Administration, Oregon Energy Northwest, Washington...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bonneville Power Administration, Oregon Energy Northwest, Washington; Wholesale Electric Primary Credit Analyst: David N Bodek, New York (1) 212-438-7969; david.bodek@standardandpo...

  20. USDA Rural Development Washington State Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture is hosting a Washington Rural Development Workshop. Speakers will cover local and regional broadband initiatives program and broadband success stories,...

  1. Spotlight on Seattle, Washington: Community Partnerships Work...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Revised July 2011 Version 2 Spotlight on Seattle, Washington: Community Partnerships Work to Extend Program Reach Getting Started 1 Seattle Moves the Needle With the Help of Its...

  2. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Washington Group International...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    October 23, 2003 Issued to Washington Group International related to Falsification of Records and Procurement Deficiencies at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project at the...

  3. ,"Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release...

  4. ,"Washington Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","930...

  5. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Washington River...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    February 13, 2014 Evaluation to determine whether Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Hanford is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition. Voluntary...

  6. ,"Washington Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","09...

  7. ,"Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release...

  8. Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - Dangerous Waste Treatment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - Dangerous Waste Treatment Storage Disposal Facility New Permit Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web...

  9. Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - Underground Injection...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - Underground Injection Control Registration webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site:...

  10. Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - NPDES Construction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - NPDES Construction Stormwater General Permit Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory...

  11. Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - NPDES Individual Permit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - NPDES Individual Permit Coverage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance -...

  12. SSL Demonstration: Parking Garage Lighting, Washington, DC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-06-01

    GATEWAY program report brief summarizing an SSL parking garage demonstration at the Dept. of Labor headquarters parking garage in Washington, DC.

  13. Clean Cities: Western Washington Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Studies where her studies focused on policies to stimulate the growth of renewable energy. 1904 Third Ave, Ste 105 Seattle, WA 98101 Western Washington Success Stories Watch...

  14. University of Washington Department of Aeronautics & Astronautics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    University of Washington Department of Aeronautics & Astronautics Undergraduate and Graduate Discrimination Act of 1975. COMPLETE AND RETURN THIS FORM TO William E. Boeing Department of Aeronautics

  15. Wood to Energy in Washington Page 1 of 5 Wood to Energy in Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    energy or when used as transportation fuels. Woody biomass is an attractive alternative energy sourceWood to Energy in Washington Page 1 of 5 Wood to Energy in Washington: Imperatives, Opportunities Washington State lacks a cohesive strategy to reduce green house gases and for renewable energy development

  16. 1999 GWU, RPI, VCU All Rights Reserved Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment Final Report The Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    © 1999 GWU, RPI, VCU ­ All Rights Reserved Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment Final Report The Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment Executive Summary JULY 1, 1999 Prepared for: Blue Ribbon Panel on Washington State Ferry Safety and Washington State Transportation Commission Olympia, Washington By

  17. Remediation of Soil at Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, R.; Boardman, C.; Robbins, R; Fox, Robert Vincent; Mincher, Bruce Jay

    2000-03-01

    As the major nuclear waste and decontamination and decommissioning projects progress, one of the remaining problems that faces the nuclear industry is that of site remediation. The range of contamination levels and contaminants is wide and varied and there is likely to be a significant volume of soil contaminated with transuranics and hazardous organic materials that could qualify as mixed TRU waste. There are many technologies that offer the potential for remediating this waste but few that tackle all or most of the contaminants and even fewer that have been deployed with confidence. This paper outlines the progress made in proving the ability of Supercritical Fluid Extraction as a method of remediating soil, classified as mixed (TRU) transuranic waste.

  18. Remediation of soil at nuclear sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Holmes; C. Boardman; R. Robbins; R. Fox; B. J. Mincher

    2000-02-28

    As the major nuclear waste and decontamination and decommissioning projects progress, one of the remaining problems that faces the nuclear industry is that of site remediation. The range of contamination levels and contaminants is wide and varied and there is likely to be a significant volume of soil contaminated with transuranics and hazardous organic materials that could qualify as mixed TRU waste. There are many technologies that offer the potential for remediating this waste but few that tackle all or most of the contaminants and even fewer that have been deployed with confidence. This paper outlines the progress made in proving the ability of Supercritical Fluid Extraction as a method of remediating soil, classified as mixed (TRU) transuranic waste

  19. Technology development activities supporting tank waste remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonner, W.F.; Beeman, G.H.

    1994-06-01

    This document summarizes work being conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development (EM-50) in support of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program. The specific work activities are organized by the following categories: safety, characterization, retrieval, barriers, pretreatment, low-level waste, and high-level waste. In most cases, the activities presented here were identified as supporting tank remediation by EM-50 integrated program or integrated demonstration lead staff and the selections were further refined by contractor staff. Data sheets were prepared from DOE-HQ guidance to the field issued in September 1993. Activities were included if a significant portion of the work described provides technology potentially needed by TWRS; consequently, not all parts of each description necessarily support tank remediation.

  20. Tank waste remediation system operational scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.E.

    1995-05-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) mission is to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford waste (current and future tank waste and the strontium and cesium capsules) in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner (DOE 1993). This operational scenario is a description of the facilities that are necessary to remediate the Hanford Site tank wastes. The TWRS Program is developing technologies, conducting engineering analyses, and preparing for design and construction of facilities necessary to remediate the Hanford Site tank wastes. An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is being prepared to evaluate proposed actions of the TWRS. This operational scenario is only one of many plausible scenarios that would result from the completion of TWRS technology development, engineering analyses, design and construction activities and the TWRS EIS. This operational scenario will be updated as the development of the TWRS proceeds and will be used as a benchmark by which to evaluate alternative scenarios.

  1. Sodium dichromate expedited response action assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) recommended that the US Department of Energy (DOE) perform an expedited response action (ERA) for the Sodium Dichromate Barrel Disposal Landfill. The ERA lead regulatory agency is Ecology and EPA is the support agency. The ERA was categorized as non-time-critical, which required preparation of an engineering evaluation and cost analysis (EE/CA). The EE/CA was included in the ERA proposal. The EE/CA is a rapid, focused evaluation of available technologies using specific screening factors to assess feasibility, appropriateness, and cost. The ERA goal is to reduce the potential for any contaminant migration from the landfill to the soil column, groundwater, and Columbia River. Since the Sodium Dichromate Barrel Disposal Landfill is the only waste site within the operable unit, the removal action may be the final remediation of the 100-IU-4 Operable Unit. This ERA process started in March 1992. The ERA proposal went through a parallel review process with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), DOE Richland Operations (RL), EPA, Ecology, and a 30-day public comment period. Ecology and EPA issued an Action Agreement Memorandum in March 1993 (Appendix A). The memorandum directed excavation of all anomalies and disposal of the collected materials at the Hanford Site Central Landfill. Primary field activities were completed by the end of April 1993. Final waste disposal of a minor quantity of hazardous waste was completed in July 1993.

  2. Remedial action planning for Trench 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Primrose, A.; Sproles, W.; Burmeister, M.; Wagner, R.; Law, J.; Greengard, T.

    1998-07-01

    The accelerated action to remove the depleted uranium chips and associated soils and wastes from Trench 1 at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) will begin in June 1998. To ensure that the remedial action is conducted safely, a rigorous and disciplined planning process was followed that incorporates the principles of Integrated Safety Management and Enhanced Work Planning. Critical to the success of the planning was early involvement of project staff (salaried and hourly) and associated technical support groups and disciplines. Feedback was and will continue to be solicited, and lessons learned incorporated to ensure the safe remediation of this site.

  3. Washington State 2010 Supplemental Budget Bottom Line: New Taxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jenny L; Lovrich, Nicholas P

    2011-01-01

    2010. “Scorecard for the 2010 Washington Legislature. ” TheNews/Budgetnews4-14-10.asp>. Washington Secretary of State’swww.sos.wa.gov/elections/>. Washington State Economic and

  4. The Top Two Primary: What Can California Learn from Washington?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donovan, Todd

    2012-01-01

    and C. Tol- bert. Washington, D.C. : Brookings InstitutionPolitics 40(4): 681–86. ———. 2011. “Washington Elections,”in Governing Washington, ed. C. Clayton and N. Lovrich.

  5. The Revolution Revised: A Guided Tour of Davis v. Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    for Petitoner, Davis v. Washington, No. 05-5524, Dec. 22,WL 3597706, p. 15. Davis v. Washington, No. 05-5224, Oralfor Respondent, Davis v. Washington, No. 05-5524, Feb. 2,

  6. Washington University in St. Louis Institutional Biological & Chemical Safety Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Kristen L.

    Washington University in St. Louis Institutional Biological & Chemical Safety Committee Written and are instructed to report to Student & Employee Health or Washington University's contracted occupational health will report to Student & Employee Health or Washington University's contracted occupational health provider

  7. Alcohol Outlets and Violent Crime in Washington D.C.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, F. Abron; LaVeist, Thomas A.; Webster, Daniel W.; Pan, William K.

    2010-01-01

    of Violence and Disorder. Washington, D.C. : The Urbanand Violent Crime in Washington D.C. F. Abron Franklin II,Involvement in Crime. Washington, D.C. : U.S. Department of

  8. The Short (?), Happy (?) Life of Crawford v. Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Originalism in Crawford v. Washington, 2005, 71 Brook.L.Rev.Professors, Crawford v. Washington, 541 U.S. 36 , 2004, No.Originalism in Crawford v. Washington, 2005, 71 Brook.L.Rev.

  9. Secretary Chu Tours the 2013 Washington Auto Show | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tours the 2013 Washington Auto Show Secretary Chu Tours the 2013 Washington Auto Show January 31, 2013 - 5:04pm Addthis 1 of 10 While at the Washington Auto Show, Energy Secretary...

  10. Aerospace & Energetics Research Program -University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shumlak, Uri

    - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group q The Boltzmann equation is seven dimensional. qAerospace & Energetics Research Program - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group Plasma Research Program - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group Abstract Many current plasma simulation

  11. DESCRIPTION OF MODELING ANALYSES IN SUPPORT OF THE 200-ZP-1 REMEDIAL DESIGN/REMEDIAL ACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VONGARGEN BH

    2009-11-03

    The Feasibility Study/or the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (DOE/RL-2007-28) and the Proposed Plan/or Remediation of the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (DOE/RL-2007-33) describe the use of groundwater pump-and-treat technology for the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) as part of an expanded groundwater remedy. During fiscal year 2008 (FY08), a groundwater flow and contaminant transport (flow and transport) model was developed to support remedy design decisions at the 200-ZP-1 OU. This model was developed because the size and influence of the proposed 200-ZP-1 groundwater pump-and-treat remedy will have a larger areal extent than the current interim remedy, and modeling is required to provide estimates of influent concentrations and contaminant mass removal rates to support the design of the aboveground treatment train. The 200 West Area Pre-Conceptual Design/or Final Extraction/Injection Well Network: Modeling Analyses (DOE/RL-2008-56) documents the development of the first version of the MODFLOW/MT3DMS model of the Hanford Site's Central Plateau, as well as the initial application of that model to simulate a potential well field for the 200-ZP-1 remedy (considering only the contaminants carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99). This document focuses on the use of the flow and transport model to identify suitable extraction and injection well locations as part of the 200 West Area 200-ZP-1 Pump-and-Treat Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan (DOEIRL-2008-78). Currently, the model has been developed to the extent necessary to provide approximate results and to lay a foundation for the design basis concentrations that are required in support of the remedial design/remediation action (RD/RA) work plan. The discussion in this document includes the following: (1) Assignment of flow and transport parameters for the model; (2) Definition of initial conditions for the transport model for each simulated contaminant of concern (COC) (i.e., carbon tetrachloride, technetium-99, iodine-129, nitrate [as NO{sub 3}], trichloroethene [TCE], total chromium, tritium), plus uranium; (3) Assumptions underlying the predictive simulations, including the phased implementation of the final full remedy; (4) Approximate number, locations, and rates of extraction and injection wells; and (5) Predicted amounts of contaminant mass extracted and influent concentrations at individual extraction wells for each COC and for uranium. This document is a companion report to pre-conceptual design document (DOE/RL-2008-56). Together these documents describe the sequential, progressive development of the modeling analyses and design basis for the 200-ZP-1 OU remedy.

  12. Washington

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs SearchAMERICA'S FUTURE. regulators02-03 AUDITWash ington, DC 20585

  13. Groundwater remediation at a former oil service site 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Liping

    2005-08-29

    As an intern with URS Corporation, I participated in several remediation and wastewater treatment projects during the year 2004. A groundwater remediation project was selected to present in this record of study for my Doctor of Engineering degree...

  14. Audit of Selected Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program Costs...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Selected Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program Costs, ER-B-97-04 Audit of Selected Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program Costs, ER-B-97-04 Audit of Selected Hazardous...

  15. Industrial & Systems Engineering University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    Industrial & Systems Engineering University of Washington Linda Ng Boyle, Ph.D. Associate Professor linda@u.washington.edu #12;Agenda · What is Industrial & Systems Engineering? · Where do Industrial Engineers get jobs? · What classes would you take in ISE? · Where do UW graduates with ISE degrees

  16. Export Control Laws and Washingtonand Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Export Control Laws and Washingtonand Washington University For Washington University Faculty Authors: Cindy White, Research Office Tina Tyson, Office of General Counsel May 2006 What are export of foreign policy and national security. *NOTE: Export control laws apply to all activities -- not just

  17. The Smart Approach to Intelligence:[FINAL Edition] John Deutch. The Washington Post. Washington, D.C.: Sep 9, 2002.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutch, John

    The Smart Approach to Intelligence:[FINAL Edition] John Deutch. The Washington Post. Washington, D.C.: Sep 9, 2002. pg. A.17 Full Text (1023 words) Copyright The Washington Post Company Sep 9, 2002 Defense

  18. Energy Secretary Chu, EPA Administrator Jackson, Washington State...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    decree with Washington or invoke judicial dispute resolution proceedings under its terms. Oregon and Washington will also enter into a separate Memorandum of Agreement that...

  19. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group 2011 Meeting: Washington...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2011 Meeting: Washington Update Federal Utility Partnership Working Group 2011 Meeting: Washington Update Presentation-given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working...

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Carnegie Institute of Washington...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Carnegie Institute of Washington Dept of Genetics - NY 0-07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Carnegie Institute of Washington (Dept. of Genetics) (NY.0-07 ) Eliminated from...

  1. Making the Grade: Washington School District Invest in Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Making the Grade: Washington School District Invest in Energy Efficiency Making the Grade: Washington School District Invest in Energy Efficiency September 10, 2015 - 11:55am...

  2. Type B Accident Investigation At Washington Closure Hanford,...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    part of a Washington Closure Hanford, LLC (WCH) team of craft personnel preparing a bridge crane for removal from the 336 Building. Type B Accident Investigation At Washington...

  3. State of Washington Clean Energy Opportunity: Technical Market...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Washington Clean Energy Opportunity: Technical Market Potential for CHP, August 2010 State of Washington Clean Energy Opportunity: Technical Market Potential for CHP, August...

  4. EIS-0492: Oregon LNG Export Project (Warrenton, OR) and Washington...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: Oregon LNG Export Project (Warrenton, OR) and Washington Expansion Project (between Sumas and Woodland, WA) EIS-0492: Oregon LNG Export Project (Warrenton, OR) and Washington...

  5. Seattle, Washington: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Seattle, Washington: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Seattle, Washington: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

  6. IH Report # 04-011 April 2004 Mold Remediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IH Report # 04-011 April 2004 STANFORD UNIVERSITY Mold Remediation This document is designed to help zone and building managers address general mold remediation issues in buildings on campus. For larger areas (greater than 10 sq. feet) of mold contamination, contact EH&S before beginning remediation

  7. Activated Peroxygens for Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    i Activated Peroxygens for Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater Ph.D. thesis Submitted May 2011 #12;ii Activated Peroxygens for Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater Ph.D. thesis peroxygens for remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater" along with 5 papers describing part

  8. LIST OF CONTRACTORS TO SUPPORT ANTHRAX REMEDIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Northwest Regional Technology Center for Homeland Security List of Contractors to Support Anthrax operated by BATTELLE for the UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 #12;1 ListLIST OF CONTRACTORS TO SUPPORT ANTHRAX REMEDIATION May 2010 Prepared for the Interagency Biological

  9. Probabilistic risk analysis of groundwater remediation strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolster, Diogo

    Probabilistic risk analysis of groundwater remediation strategies D. Bolster,1 M. Barahona,1 M uncertainty quantification and risk analysis. When these modeling components are ignored, the failure is emerging that risk analysis must be an integral part of decision making in subsurface hydrology, its

  10. groundwater nitrogen source identification and remediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    groundwater nitrogen source identification and remediation The Seymour Aquifer is a shallow aquifer, the Seymour Aquifer has the highest groundwater pollution potential of all the major aqui- fers in Texas drinking water standards. Potential sources of nitrate in groundwater include atmospheric deposi- tion

  11. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1, main text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    This document is the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek Operable Unit (CR/PC OU), an off-site OU associated with environmental restoration activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). As a result of past, present, and potential future releases of hazardous substances into the environment, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List in December 1989 (54 FR 48184). Sites on this list must be investigated for possible remedial action, as required by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 42 U.S.C. 9601, et seq.). This report documents the findings of the remedial investigation of this OU and the feasibility of potential remedial action alternatives. These studies are authorized by Sect. 117 of CERCLA and were conducted in accordance with the requirements of the National Contingency Plan (40 CFR Part 300). DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) have entered into a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), as authorized by Sect. 120 of CERCLA and Sects. 3008(h) and 6001 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (42 U.S.C. 6901, et seq.). The purpose of this agreement is to ensure a coordinated and effective response for all environmental restoration activities occurring at the ORR. In addition to other responsibilities, the FFA parties mutually define the OU boundaries, set remediation priorities, establish remedial investigation priorities and strategies, and identify and select remedial actions. A copy of this FFA is available from the DOE Information Resource Center in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

  12. Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. P. Wells

    2006-09-19

    The remedial design/remedial action for Operable Unit 6-05 (Waste Area Group 6) and Operable Unit 10-04 (Waste Area Group 10) - collectively called Operable Unit 10-04 has been divided into four phases. Phase I consists of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operable Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase III will remediate lead contamination at a gun range, and Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance. This Phase III remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility (STF)-02 Gun Range located at the Idaho National Laboratory. Remediation of the STF-02 Gun Range will include excavating contaminated soils; physically separating copper and lead for recycling; returning separated soils below the remediation goal to the site; stabilizing contaminated soils, as required, and disposing of the separated soils that exceed the remediation goal; encapsulating and disposing of creosote-contaminated railroad ties and power poles; removing and disposing of the wooden building and asphalt pads found at the STF-02 Gun Range; sampling and analyzing soil to determine the excavation requirements; and when the remediation goals have been met, backfilling and contouring excavated areas and revegetating the affected area.

  13. Washington State biomass data book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

    1991-07-01

    This is the first edition of the Washington State Biomass Databook. It assess sources and approximate costs of biomass fuels, presents a view of current users, identifies potential users in the public and private sectors, and lists prices of competing energy resources. The summary describes key from data from the categories listed above. Part 1, Biomass Supply, presents data increasing levels of detail on agricultural residues, biogas, municipal solid waste, and wood waste. Part 2, Current Industrial and Commercial Use, demonstrates how biomass is successfully being used in existing facilities as an alternative fuel source. Part 3, Potential Demand, describes potential energy-intensive public and private sector facilities. Part 4, Prices of Competing Energy Resources, shows current suppliers of electricity and natural gas and compares utility company rates. 49 refs., 43 figs., 72 tabs.

  14. Utah Division of Environmental Response and Remediation Underground Storage

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York:PowerNewPumaty Jump to:UAC R930-6Commerce JumpOpenTank

  15. mentor memo University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    . These are the opportunities and responsibilities that consume most of our time and energy, because we care about what's going, these responsibilities consume us on a daily basis. The only professional problem with this--and it's a big one

  16. WASTE PACKAGE REMEDIATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.D. Sudan

    2000-06-22

    The Waste Package Remediation System remediates waste packages (WPs) and disposal containers (DCs) in one of two ways: preparation of rejected DC closure welds for repair or opening of the DC/WP. DCs are brought to the Waste Package Remediation System for preparation of rejected closure welds if testing of the closure weld by the Disposal Container Handling System indicates an unacceptable, but repairable, welding flaw. DC preparation of rejected closure welds will require removal of the weld in such a way that the Disposal Container Handling System may resume and complete the closure welding process. DCs/WPs are brought to the Waste Package Remediation System for opening if the Disposal Container Handling System testing of the DC closure weld indicates an unrepairable welding flaw, or if a WP is recovered from the subsurface repository because suspected damage to the WP or failure of the WP has occurred. DC/WP opening will require cutting of the DC/WP such that a temporary seal may be installed and the waste inside the DC/WP removed by another system. The system operates in a Waste Package Remediation System hot cell located in the Waste Handling Building that has direct access to the Disposal Container Handling System. One DC/WP at a time can be handled in the hot cell. The DC/WP arrives on a transfer cart, is positioned within the cell for system operations, and exits the cell without being removed from the cart. The system includes a wide variety of remotely operated components including a manipulator with hoist and/or jib crane, viewing systems, machine tools for opening WPs, and equipment used to perform pressure and gas composition sampling. Remotely operated equipment is designed to facilitate DC/WP decontamination and hot cell equipment maintenance, and interchangeable components are provided where appropriate. The Waste Package Remediation System interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System for the receipt and transport of WPs and DCs. The Waste Handling Building System houses the system, and provides the facility, safety, and auxiliary systems required to support operations. The system receives power from the Waste Handling Building Electrical System. The system also interfaces with the various DC systems.

  17. 2010 Raj JainCSE574sWashington University in St. Louis Radio FrequencyRadio Frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Raj

    . Louis RFID ReadersRFID Readers Sends a pulse of radio energy and listens for tags response Readers may24-1 ©2010 Raj JainCSE574sWashington University in St. Louis Radio FrequencyRadio Frequency;24-3 ©2010 Raj JainCSE574sWashington University in St. Louis What is RFID?What is RFID? Radio Frequency

  18. Energy Matters in Washington State Page 1 Energy Matters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Energy Matters in Washington State ­ Page 1 Energy Matters in Washington State June 2008 Updated November 2009 Updated and Revised October 2013 Grand Coulee Dam #12;Energy Matters in Washington State ­ Page 2 Copyright © 2013 Washington State University Energy Program. 905 Plum Street SE, P.O. Box 43169

  19. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Seminar: Washington Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Seminar: Washington Update on May 22, 2013.

  20. State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 State of Washington Water mission of the State of Washington Water Research Center (SWWRC) has been to: i) facilitate, coordinate, conduct, and administer water-related research important to the State of Washington and the region, ii

  1. State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2008 State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2008 1 #12;Introduction The mission of the State of Washington-related research important to the State of Washington and the region, ii) Educate and train engineers, scientists

  2. State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 State of Washington Water, the overarching strategic mission of the State of Washington Water Research Center (SWWRC) has been to: i) facilitate, coordinate, conduct, and administer water-related research important to the State of Washington

  3. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON FACULTY COUNCIL ON TRI-CAMPUS POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON FACULTY COUNCIL ON TRI-CAMPUS POLICY The Faculty Council on Tri, Chancellor, University of Washington, Bothell; Vicky Carwein, Chancellor, University of Washington, Tacoma; and Weldon Ihrig, Executive Vice President, University of Washington. ABSENT: Ex officio members Fugate

  4. State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 State of Washington Water of Washington Water Research Center (SWWRC) is to facilitate, coordinate, conduct, and administer water throughout the State of Washington. Activities include presentations to watershed groups, participation

  5. State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 State of Washington Water strategic mission of the State of Washington Water Research Center (SWWRC) has been to: i) facilitate, coordinate, conduct, and administer water-related research important to the State of Washington

  6. State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 State of Washington Water, the overarching strategic mission of the State of Washington Water Research Center (SWWRC) has been to: i) facilitate, coordinate, conduct, and administer water-related research important to the State of Washington

  7. State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 State of Washington Water of the State of Washington Water Research Center (SWWRC) is to: i) facilitate, coordinate, conduct, and administer water-related research important to the State of Washington and the region, ii) educate and train

  8. "To the immortal name and memory of George Washington"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    "To the immortal name and memory of George Washington" The United States Army Corps of Engineers and the Construction of the Washington Monument Louis Torres #12;THE COVER Washington Monument and Surroundings, North and memory of George Washington" The United States Army Corps of Engineers and the Construction

  9. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS PROGRAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billey, Sara

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS PROGRAMS RETURN TO: IMA PROGRAMS OFFICE OR cwigton@u.washington.edu PERSONAL TRAINING PROGRAM SURVEY FORM 1. How did you find out about the IMA OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS PROGRAMS RETURN TO: IMA PROGRAMS OFFICE OR cwigton@u.washington

  10. www.pnnl.gov An Economic Engine for Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    www.pnnl.gov An Economic Engine for Washington State When Washington State leaders share, but significant benefit: economic impact. In Washington State, that impact shows up in funding and spending, jobs's 4,344 staff, 94 percent reside in Washington State, including Richland, Seattle, and Sequim

  11. XRETRIEVE (request, i.a.) (iris.washington.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laske, Gabi

    XRETRIEVE (request, i.a.) BDSN MEDNET IRIS DMC (iris.washington.edu) GEOSCOPE BREQ_FAST (request) email to BREQ_FAST@sob.iris.washington.edu interactive non-interactive customized pre-assembled customized pre-assembled www.iris.washington.edu (seismiquery/data sources) www.iris.washington.edu (FARM

  12. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON FACULTY COUNCIL ON TRI-CAMPUS RELATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    by Alex Bolton Council Support Analyst bolt@u.washington.edu Present: Faculty: Collins (Chair), Wood

  13. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON FACULTY COUNCIL ON ACADEMIC STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    Bolton Council Support Analyst bolt@u.washington.edu Present: Faculty: Schaufelberger (Chair), Holman

  14. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON FACULTY COUNCIL ON UNIVERISITY FACILITIES AND SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    Bolton Council Support Analyst bolt@u.washington.edu Present: Faculty: Rorabaugh (Chair), Gates, Little

  15. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON FACULTY COUNCIL ON INSTRUCTIONAL QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    by Alex Bolton Council Support Analyst bolt@u.washington.edu Present: Faculty: Wenderoth (Chair), Edgar

  16. Washington Success Story—A Performance Contracting Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides an overview case study of Washington's Performance Contracting Program. Author: Energy Services Coalition

  17. SRS Burial Ground Complex: Remediation in Progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, M.; Crapse, B.; Cowan, S.

    1998-01-21

    Closure of the various areas in the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) represents a major step in the reduction of risk at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and a significant investment of resources. The Burial Ground Complex occupies approximately 195 acres in the central section of the SRS. Approximately 160 acres of the BGC consists of hazardous and radioactive waste disposal sites that require remediation. Of these source acres, one-third have been remediated while two-thirds are undergoing interim or final action. These restoration activities have been carried out in a safe and cost effective manner while minimizing impact to operating facilities. Successful completion of these activities is in large part due to the teamwork demonstrated by the Department of Energy, contractor/subcontractor personnel, and the regulatory agencies. The experience and knowledge gained from the closure of these large disposal facilities can be used to expedite closure of similar facilities.

  18. What does it take to create a clean energy future for Washington? Solar, Wind, Hydro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    Flexible Solar Film Atomic Force Microscope Materials Science Molecule Polymers Nanostructured Solar Cells Solar, Wind, Hydro A Complete Energy System Home and Commercial Generation Demand Response 10-10 m 10 established the Clean Energy Institute to support science & engineering research that sustains Washington

  19. Thixotropic gel for vadose zone remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rhia, Brian D. (Augusta, GA)

    2011-03-01

    A thixotropic gel suitable for use in subsurface bioremediation is provided along with a process of using the gel. The thixotropic gel provides a non-migrating injectable substrate that can provide below ground barrier properties. In addition, the gel components provide for a favorable environment in which certain contaminants are preferentially sequestered in the gel and subsequently remediated by either indigenous or introduced microorganisms.

  20. Thixotropic gel for vadose zone remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riha, Brian D.

    2012-07-03

    A thixotropic gel suitable for use in subsurface bioremediation is provided along with a process of using the gel. The thixotropic gel provides a non-migrating injectable substrate that can provide below ground barrier properties. In addition, the gel components provide for a favorable environment in which certain contaminants are preferentially sequestered in the gel and subsequently remediated by either indigenous or introduced microorganisms.

  1. Portsmouth Remediation Scope | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyAprilEnergyPartnershipSite Background »PortsmouthRemediation

  2. Charging Up in King County, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    King County, Washington is spearheading a regional effort to develop a network of electric vehicle charging stations. It is also improving its vehicle fleet and made significant improvements to a...

  3. University of Washington ENTERPRISE RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    University of Washington ENTERPRISE RISK MANAGEMENT 2010 Annual Report #12;ERM 2010 Annual Report 2 December 2010 "Enterprise Risk Management" (ERM) - a process - to integrate risk into strategic UW Enterprise Risk Management Framework . . . . . . . . . 6 Illustration of ERM Components

  4. Physicists and Technologists in Washington | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physicists and Technologists in Washington April 4, 2012 Last week we were visited by Dr. Gerald Blazey, the assistant director for Physical Sciences of the Office of Science and...

  5. Charging Up in King County, Washington

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Constantine, Dow; Oliver, LeAnn; Inslee, Jay; Sahandy, Sheida; Posthuma, Ron; Morrison, David;

    2013-05-29

    King County, Washington is spearheading a regional effort to develop a network of electric vehicle charging stations. It is also improving its vehicle fleet and made significant improvements to a low-income senior housing development.

  6. ATTACHMENT 1 Washington State University Vancouver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATTACHMENT 1 Washington State University Vancouver Stormwater Management Program (SWMP) WSU PERMIT VANCOUVER STORMWATER MANAGEMENT PROGRAM TABLE OF CONTENTS S6.A Stormwater Management Program (SWMP Site Stormwater Runoff Control_______________________ 8 S6.D.5 Post-Construction Stormwater Management

  7. William A. Stein References Cited (858) 220-6876 wstein@math.washington.edu http://sage.math.washington.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, William

    William A. Stein References Cited (858) 220-6876 wstein@math.washington.edu http://sage.math.washington and Number Theory, http://modular.math.washington.edu/msri07/. [BMSW06] B. Bektemirov, B. Mazur, W. Stein), http://sage.math.washington.edu/papers/bmsw-rank/. [CDR+07] J. Cremona, H. Darmon, K. Ribet, R. Sharifi

  8. William A. Stein References Cited (858) 220-6876 wstein@math.washington.edu http://sage.math.washington.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, William

    William A. Stein References Cited (858) 220-6876 wstein@math.washington.edu http://sage.math.washington Theory, (Jan. 29­Feb. 2, 2007), http://modular.math.washington.edu/msri07/. [2] J. Cremona, H. Darmon, K://matplotlib.sourceforge.net/ (2005). [10] D. Joyner and W. Stein, Workshop: SAGE Days 1, UC San Diego (February 2006), http://sage.math.washington

  9. 1999 GWU, RPI, VCU All Rights Reserved Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment -Appendix III The Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    © 1999 GWU, RPI, VCU ­ All Rights Reserved Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment - Appendix III The Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment Appendix III: Detailed Discussion of Modeling Methodology and Assumptions. JULY 1, 1999 Prepared for: Blue Ribbon Panel on Washington State Ferry Safety and Washington

  10. Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Main Body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    US DOE /NV

    1999-09-01

    This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

  11. Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    USDOE /NV

    1999-09-01

    This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

  12. Biomass groups: 13 April 2012 H222c Ener&Env 1. Gillian kenagyg@u.washington.edu , kenagyg@u.washington.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomass groups: 13 April 2012 H222c Ener&Env 1. Gillian kenagyg@u.washington.edu , kenagyg@u.washington.edu Tarra ttheisen@u.washington.edu Emily halvoe@u.washington.edu Alex adadgar@u.washington.edu Maddy mjyoung@u.washington.edu 2. Leslie lhedwards2@gmail.com , leslie2@u.washington.edu Addy adairpc@u.washington

  13. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1993 Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1993, surface remedial action was complete at 10 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites. In 1993 the UMTRA Project office revised the UMTRA Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, as required by the US DOE. Because the UMTRA Project sites are in different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  14. MANAGING ENGINEERING ACTIVITIES FOR THE PLATEAU REMEDIATION CONTRACT - HANFORD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRONVALL CM

    2011-01-14

    In 2008, the primary Hanford clean-up contract transitioned to the CH2MHill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). Prior to transition, Engineering resources assigned to remediation/Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities were a part of a centralized engineering organization and matrixed to the performing projects. Following transition, these resources were reassigned directly to the performing project, with a loose matrix through a smaller Central Engineering (CE) organization. The smaller (10 FTE) central organization has retained responsibility for the overall technical quality of engineering for the CHPRC, but no longer performs staffing and personnel functions. As the organization has matured, there are lessons learned that can be shared with other organizations going through or contemplating performing a similar change. Benefits that have been seen from the CHPRC CE organization structure include the following: (1) Staff are closely aligned with the 'Project/facility' that they are assigned to support; (2) Engineering priorities are managed to be consistent with the 'Project/facility' priorities; (3) Individual Engineering managers are accountable for identifying staffing needs and the filling of staffing positions; (4) Budget priorities are managed within the local organization structure; (5) Rather than being considered a 'functional' organization, engineering is considered a part of a line, direct funded organization; (6) The central engineering organization is able to provide 'overview' activities and maintain independence from the engineering organizations in the field; and (7) The central engineering organization is able to maintain a stable of specialized experts that are able to provide independent reviews of field projects and day-to-day activities.

  15. Biological assessment of remedial action at the abandoned uranium mill tailings site near Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    Pursuant to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to conduct remedial action to clean up the residual radioactive materials (RRM) at the Naturita uranium processing site in Colorado. The Naturita site is in Montrose County, Colorado, and is approximately 2 miles (mi) (3 kilometer [km]) from the unincorporated town of Naturita. The proposed remedial action is to remove the RRM from the Naturita site to the Upper Burbank Quarry at the Uravan disposal site. To address the potential impacts of the remedial action on threatened and endangered species, the DOE prepared this biological assessment. Informal consultations with the U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) were initiated in 1986, and the FWS provided a list of the threatened and endangered species that may occur in the Naturita study area. This list was updated by two FWS letters in 1988 and by verbal communication in 1990. A biological assessment was included in the environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed remedial action that was prepared in 1990. This EA addressed the impacts of moving the Naturita RRM to the Dry Flats disposal site. In 1993, the design for the Dry Flats disposal alternative was changed. The FWS was again consulted in 1993 and provided a new list of threatened and endangered species that may occur in the Naturita study area. The Naturita EA and the biological assessment were revised in response to these changes. In 1994, remedial action was delayed because an alternate disposal site was being considered. The DOE decided to move the FIRM at the Naturita site to the Upper Burbank Quarry at the Uravan site. Due to this delay, the FWS was consulted in 1995 and a list of threatened and endangered species was provided. This biological assessment is a revision of the assessment attached to the Naturita EA and addresses moving the Naturita RRM to the Upper Burbank Quarry disposal site.

  16. S. M. PENNY Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battisti, David

    Reply S. M. PENNY Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington received 4 November 2010, in final form 2 March 2011) ABSTRACT Penny et al. recently showed and the amplitude compares well with the midwinter suppression. 1. Introduction Penny et al. (2010, hereafter PRB10

  17. An Exploration of the Perceptions and Utilizations of Networking Systems in Washington, D.C.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Robynne

    2013-01-01

    Personal Interview. Washington, D.C. , July 25, 2013.Personal Interview. Washington, D.C. , August 12, 2013.Personal Interview. Washington, D.C. , July 17, 2013. 12

  18. Seasonal and interannual oxygen variability on the Washington and Oregon continental shelves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    oxygen variability on the Washington and Oregon continentalin Juan de Fuca Canyon, Washington, Geophys. Res. Lett. ,oxygen ?uxes on the Washington shelf and slope: A comparison

  19. Washington State Department of Transportation Bridge Maintenance and Inspection Guidance for Protected Terrestrial Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carey, Marion

    2007-01-01

    7404, careym@WSDOT.wa.gov), Washington State Department ofspecies that utilize the Washington State Department ofspecies that utilize the Washington State Department of

  20. Vegetation stability and the habitat associations of the endemic taxa of the Olympic Peninsula, Washington, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavin, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Olympic Peninsula, Washington (USA). Ecological Monographs,gradients, Olympic Peninsula, Washington, USA. Holocene, 15,forests, Olympic Peninsula, Washington, USA. Holocene, 11,

  1. The Economic Impact of Extending Marriage to Same-Sex Couples in Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kastanis, Angeliki; Badgett, M.V. Lee; Herman, Jody L.

    2012-01-01

    tax burden for the State of Washington according to the Taxsurvey/. State of Washington Department of Commerce. (2011). Washington State Travel Impacts 1991-2010p. Retrieved

  2. The Impact of Washington's Budget of Allowing Same-Sex Couples to Marry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Badgett, M.V. Lee; Sears, Brad; Kukura, Elizabeth; Lau, Holning S.

    2006-01-01

    and Rubenstein, at 4. 93 Washington State Department ofFinancial Report, at 94 Washington State Department ofLongwoods International, “Washington State Visitor Profile:

  3. Washington – Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law and Documentation of Discrimination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Brad

    2009-01-01

    a 2007 complaint to the Washington State Human Rightsdriver employed by the Washington Department of Wash. StateExec. Order No. 93-07 (1993). WASHINGTON Williams Institute

  4. 2013 Washington State Budget-Recession and Basic Education as a Constitutional Paramount Duty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Francis; Chavez, Maria; Lovrich, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Commission. 2012. “2011 Washington State Redistricting Com-P. Lovrich. Pullman, WA: Washington State University Press.eds. 2011. Governing Washington: Political and Government in

  5. FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION BAYSIDE, NEW YORK VW. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and...

  6. Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) Located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, the Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research...

  7. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Collaboration to Enable a Carbon-Neutral Energy Economy Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation Hydrogen permeability and Integrity of hydrogen...

  8. Unique environmental remediation project on steep canyon successfully...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    recently completed a remediation project that involved removing contaminated rock and soil from the parking lot of a busy shopping center. July 29, 2015 A telescoping crane...

  9. CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company are

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HILL Plateau Remediation Company are safely removing contaminated equipment from the Plutonium Finishing Plant once used to produce plutonium during the Cold War at the Hanford...

  10. Three-Dimensional Groundwater Models of the 300 Area at the Hanford Site, Washington State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Mark D.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Thorne, Paul D.; Chen, Yousu

    2008-09-01

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed field-scale groundwater flow and transport simulations of the 300 Area to support the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit Phase III Feasibility Study. The 300 Area is located in the southeast portion of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington State. Historical operations involving uranium fuel fabrication and research activities at the 300 Area have contaminated engineered liquid-waste disposal facilities, the underlying vadose zone, and the uppermost aquifer with uranium. The main objectives of this research were to develop numerical groundwater flow and transport models to help refine the site conceptual model, and to assist assessment of proposed alternative remediation technologies focused on the 300 Area uranium plume.

  11. Case Study of Anomalies Encountered During Remediation of Mixed Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds in the 100 and 300 Areas of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haass, M.J.; Zacharias, P.E.; Zacharias, A.E.

    2007-07-01

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy's River Corridor Closure Project, Washington Closure Hanford has completed remediation of more than 10 mixed low-level waste burial grounds in the 100 and 300 Areas of the Hanford Site. The records of decision for the burial grounds required excavation, characterization, and transport of contaminated material to a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976-compliant hazardous waste landfill. This paper discusses a sample of the anomalous waste found during remediation and provides an overview of the waste excavation activities. The 100 Area burial grounds received plutonium production reactor waste and waste associated with various test programs. Examples of 100 Area anomalies include spent nuclear fuel, elemental mercury, reactor hardware, and the remains of animals used in testing the effects of radionuclides on living organisms. The 300 Area burial grounds received waste from research and development laboratories and fuel manufacturing operations. Of the seven 300 Area burial grounds remediated to date, the most challenging has been the 618-2 Burial Ground. It presented significant challenges because of the potential for airborne alpha contamination and the discovery of plutonium in an isotopically pure form. Anomalies encountered in the 618-2 Burial Ground included a combination safe that contained gram quantities of plutonium, miscellaneous containers of unknown liquids, and numerous types of shielded shipping casks. Information presented in this paper will be an aid to those involved in remediation activities throughout the U.S. Department of Energy complex and at other nuclear waste disposal sites. (authors)

  12. Vicinity Property Assessments at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Project Sites in the New York District - 13420

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewy, Ann; Hays, David

    2013-07-01

    The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) has addressed sites across the nation for almost 4 decades. Multiple stake holder pressures, multiple regulations, and process changes occur over such long time periods. These result in many challenges to the FUSRAP project teams. Initial FUSRAP work was not performed under Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Records of Decision (ROD). The ROD identifies the remedy decision and ultimately the criteria to be used to release a site. Early FUSRAP projects used DOE Orders or the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) standards. Under current RODs, regulations may differ, resulting in different cleanup criteria than that used in prior Vicinity Property (VP) remediation. The USACE, in preparation for closeout of Sites, conducts reviews to evaluate whether prior actions were sufficient to meet the cleanup criteria specified in the current ROD. On the basis of these reviews, USACE has conducted additional sampling, determined that prior actions were sufficient, or conducted additional remediation consistent with the selected remedy in the ROD. As the public pressures, regulations, and processes that the FUSRAP encounters continue to change, the program itself continues to evolve. Assessment of VPs at FUSRAP sites is a necessary step in the life cycle of our site management. (authors)

  13. Innovative mathematical modeling in environmental remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, Gour T. [Taiwan Typhoon and Flood Research Institute (Taiwan); National Central Univ. (Taiwan); Univ. of Central Florida (United States); Gwo, Jin Ping [Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Rockville, MD (United States); Siegel, Malcolm D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Li, Ming-Hsu [National Central Univ. (Taiwan); ; Fang, Yilin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhang, Fan [Inst. of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Luo, Wensui [Inst. of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Yabusaki, Steven B. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-05-01

    There are two different ways to model reactive transport: ad hoc and innovative reaction-based approaches. The former, such as the Kd simplification of adsorption, has been widely employed by practitioners, while the latter has been mainly used in scientific communities for elucidating mechanisms of biogeochemical transport processes. It is believed that innovative mechanistic-based models could serve as protocols for environmental remediation as well. This paper reviews the development of a mechanistically coupled fluid flow, thermal transport, hydrologic transport, and reactive biogeochemical model and example-applications to environmental remediation problems. Theoretical bases are sufficiently described. Four example problems previously carried out are used to demonstrate how numerical experimentation can be used to evaluate the feasibility of different remediation approaches. The first one involved the application of a 56-species uranium tailing problem to the Melton Branch Subwatershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the parallel version of the model. Simulations were made to demonstrate the potential mobilization of uranium and other chelating agents in the proposed waste disposal site. The second problem simulated laboratory-scale system to investigate the role of natural attenuation in potential off-site migration of uranium from uranium mill tailings after restoration. It showed inadequacy of using a single Kd even for a homogeneous medium. The third example simulated laboratory experiments involving extremely high concentrations of uranium, technetium, aluminum, nitrate, and toxic metals (e.g.,Ni, Cr, Co).The fourth example modeled microbially-mediated immobilization of uranium in an unconfined aquifer using acetate amendment in a field-scale experiment. The purposes of these modeling studies were to simulate various mechanisms of mobilization and immobilization of radioactive wastes and to illustrate how to apply reactive transport models for environmental remediation.The second problem simulated laboratory-scale system to investigate the role of natural attenuation in potential off-site migration of uranium from uranium mill tailings after restoration. It showed inadequacy of using a single Kd even for a homogeneous medium.

  14. Remediation and management of degraded lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, M.H.; Wong, J.W.C.; Baker, A.J.M. [eds.

    1999-11-01

    This book presents the program of the first International Conference on the Remediation and Management of Degraded lands. The book has three sections: mine management and rehabilitation, the management of derelict lands, and soil contamination and reclamation. The 34 chapters present a proactive, solution based approach to the rehabilitation of natural resources. Topics of discussions include the following: the multidisciplinary approach practiced by the Australian Center for Minesite Rehabilitation Research; the relationship between biofuel harvesting and Hong Kong`s continuing upland degradation; and experiments with the effectiveness of EDTA/HCI to remove contaminants from soil.

  15. Tank Waste Remediation System optimized processing strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slaathaug, E.J.; Boldt, A.L.; Boomer, K.D.; Galbraith, J.D.; Leach, C.E.; Waldo, T.L.

    1996-03-01

    This report provides an alternative strategy evolved from the current Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) programmatic baseline for accomplishing the treatment and disposal of the Hanford Site tank wastes. This optimized processing strategy performs the major elements of the TWRS Program, but modifies the deployment of selected treatment technologies to reduce the program cost. The present program for development of waste retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification technologies continues, but the optimized processing strategy reuses a single facility to accomplish the separations/low-activity waste (LAW) vitrification and the high-level waste (HLW) vitrification processes sequentially, thereby eliminating the need for a separate HLW vitrification facility.

  16. Proposed plan for remedial action at the quarry residuals operable unit of the Weldon Spring Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This proposed plan addresses the management of contamination present in various components of the quarry residuals operable unit (QROU) of the Weldon Spring site, which is located in St. Charles County, Missouri. The QROU consists of (1) residual waste at the quarry proper; (2) the Femme Osage Slough, Little Femme Osage Creek, and Femme Osage Creek; and (3) quarry groundwater located primarily north of the slough. Potential impacts to the St. Charles County well field downgradient of the quarry area are also being addressed as part of the evaluations for this operable unit. Remedial activities for the QROU will be conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. As part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process required for the QROU under CERCLA, three major evaluation documents have been prepared to support cleanup decisions for this operable unit.

  17. Sodium Dichromate Barrel Landfill expedited response action proposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) recommended that the US Department of Energy (DOE) prepare an expedited response action (ERA) for the Sodium Dichromate Barrel Landfill. The Sodium Dichromate Barrel Disposal Site was used in 1945 for disposal of crushed barrels. The site location is the sole waste site within the 100-IU-4 Operable Unit. The Waste Information Data System (WIDS 1992) assumes that the crushed barrels contained 1% residual sodium dichromate at burial time and that only buried crushed barrels are at the site. Burial depth is shallow since visual inspection finds numerous barrel debris on the surface. A non-time-critical ERA proposal includes preparation of an engineering evaluation and cost analysis (EE/CA) section. The EE/CA is a rapid, focused evaluation of available technologies using specific screening factors to assess feasibility, appropriateness, and cost. The ERA goal is to reduce the potential for any contaminant migration from the landfill to the soil column, groundwater, and Columbia River. Since the landfill is the only waste site within the operable unit, the ERA will present a final remediation of the 100-IU-4 operable unit.

  18. New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan For Test Area North Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, L. O.

    2007-06-12

    This remedial action work plan identifies the approach and requirements for implementing the medial zone remedial action for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the management approach for the construction and operation of the New Pump and Treat Facility (NPTF). As identified in the remediatial design/remedial action scope of work, a separate remedial design/remedial action work plan will be prepared for each remedial component of the Operable Unit 1-07B remedial action.

  19. Installation of an innovative remedial technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hines, B. [CDM Federal Programs Corp., Kevil, KY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The major goal of the Lasagna{trademark} project was to design, construct, install, and operate an in situ remediation system in low-permeability soil. A new technology--the Lasagna process--uses electro-osmosis to move contaminated groundwater through treatment zones. The treatment zones are installed in contaminated soils, thereby forming an integrated in situ remedial process. Electro-osmosis, well known for its effectiveness and extremely low power consumption, uses a direct current to cause Groundwater to travel through low-permeability soil. When a bench-scale version of the technology was 98 percent effective in removing contamination, an actual field test was the next step. The site chosen for this first field effort was the DOE-owned Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant located in Paducah, Kentucky. The target contaminant for this project was trichloroethylene (TCE) because it is found at many sites across the country and is present at approximately 60 percent of DOE`s sites.

  20. University of Washington | Office of Global Affairs Faculty-led Program Grant Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukuda, Munehiro

    University of Washington | Office of Global Affairs Page 1 Faculty-led Program Grant Application Systems _____ College: University of Washington Bothell_____________ Email: mfukuda@u.washington_________________________________________________________ Email: stiber@u.washington.edu________________ Phone Number: 425-352-5280________________________ Campus

  1. Chapter 2. Assessment and Remediation of Residential Lead Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 2. Assessment and Remediation of Residential Lead Exposure Prepared by Thomas D. Matte, MD of Residential Lead Exposure Table 2.1. Summary of Recommendations for Assessment and Remediation of Residential Lead Exposure Make prompt and effective environmental management for children with EBLLs the highest

  2. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1994 environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1994, surface remedial action was complete at 14 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites: Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; Durango, Colorado; Grand Junction, Colorado; Green River Utah, Lakeview, Oregon; Lowman, Idaho; Mexican Hat, Utah; Riverton, Wyoming; Salt Lake City, Utah; Falls City, Texas; Shiprock, New Mexico; Spook, Wyoming, Tuba City, Arizona; and Monument Valley, Arizona. Surface remedial action was ongoing at 5 sites: Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico; Naturita, Colorado; Gunnison, Colorado; and Rifle, Colorado (2 sites). Remedial action has not begun at the 5 remaining UMTRA Project sites that are in the planning stage. Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota; Maybell, Colorado; and Slick Rock, Colorado (2 sites). The ground water compliance phase of the UMTRA Project started in 1991. Because the UMTRA Project sites are.` different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  3. Optimal Groundwater Remediation Network Design using Selective Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Optimal Groundwater Remediation Network Design using Selective Membranes Eugenio Bringasa with the optimal synthesis of groundwater remediation networks for the valorization of anionic pollutants by means possible design alternatives are proposed. The aim of this work is to obtain a minimum cost groundwater

  4. DOE Cites Washington TRU Solutions for Nuclear Safety Violations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Violations December 22, 2005 - 4:53pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The Department of Energy (DOE) today notified Washington TRU Solutions (WTS) that it will fine the company...

  5. Potential Federal On-Site Solar Aggregation in Washington, D...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential Federal On-Site Solar Aggregation in Washington, D.C., and Maryland Potential Federal On-Site Solar Aggregation in Washington, D.C., and Maryland Presentation describes...

  6. Washington Notice of Construction Application under New Source...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington Notice of Construction Application under New Source Review (Form ECY 070-410) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Washington Notice...

  7. DOE Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    at Hanford Site May 29, 2008 - 12:51pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), LLC has...

  8. University of Washington Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    University of Washington Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics University of Washington Correspondence Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Box 352400 INTERDEPARTMENTAL September 19, 2008 TO: Students Requesting Access to Departmental Computing Facilities FROM: Adam P. Bruckner, Chair Aeronautics

  9. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 10): Old Navy Dump Manchester Laboratory (USEPA/NOAA), Manchester, WA, September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Old Navy Dump/Manchester Annex Superfund Site (Site) in Manchester, Washington. The selected remedy is the only response action planned for the Site.

  10. Creating Clarity for the Process of Managing Residents through Remediation, Probation and Termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Remediation, Probation and Termination Murano T, Lypson M,remediation, probation and termination (RPT), as well as theobservation period. 4. Termination: when a resident is

  11. GROUNDWATER RADIOIODINE: PREVALENCE, BIOGEOCHEMISTRY, AND POTENTIAL REMEDIAL APPROACHES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denham, M.; Kaplan, D.; Yeager, C.

    2009-09-23

    Iodine-129 ({sup 129}I) has not received as much attention in basic and applied research as other contaminants associated with DOE plumes. These other contaminants, such as uranium, plutonium, strontium, and technetium are more widespread and exist at more DOE facilities. Yet, at the Hanford Site and the Savannah River Site {sup 129}I occurs in groundwater at concentrations significantly above the primary drinking water standard and there is no accepted method for treating it, other than pump-and-treat systems. With the potential arrival of a 'Nuclear Renaissance', new nuclear power facilities will be creating additional {sup 129}I waste at a rate of 1 Ci/gigawatts energy produced. If all 22 proposed nuclear power facilities in the U.S. get approved, they will produce more {sup 129}I waste in seven years than presently exists at the two facilities containing the largest {sup 129}I inventories, ({approx}146 Ci {sup 129}I at the Hanford Site and the Savannah River Site). Hence, there is an important need to fully understand {sup 129}I behavior in the environment to clean up existing plumes and to support the expected future expansion of nuclear power production. {sup 129}I is among the key risk drivers at all DOE nuclear disposal facilities where {sup 129}I is buried, because of its long half-life (16 million years), high toxicity (90% of the body's iodine accumulates in the thyroid), high inventory, and perceived high mobility in the subsurface environment. Another important reason that {sup 129}I is a key risk driver is that there is the uncertainty regarding its biogeochemical fate and transport in the environment. We typically can define {sup 129}I mass balance and flux at sites, but can not accurately predict its response to changes in the environment. This uncertainty is in part responsible for the low drinking water standard, 1 pCi/L {sup 129}I, and the low permissible inventory limits (Ci) at the Savannah River Site, Hanford Site, and the former Yucca Mountain disposal facilities. The objectives of this report are to: (1) compile the background information necessary to understand behavior of {sup 129}I in the environment, (2) discuss sustainable remediation approaches to {sup 129}I contaminated groundwater, and (3) identify areas of research that will facilitate remediation of {sup 129}I contaminated areas on DOE sites. Lines of scientific inquiry that would significantly advance the goals of basic and applied research programs for accelerating {sup 129}I environmental remediation and reducing uncertainty associated with disposal of {sup 129}I waste are: (1) Evaluation of amendments or other treatment systems that can sequester subsurface groundwater {sup 129}I. (2) Develop analytical techniques for measurement of total {sup 129}I that eliminate the necessity of collecting and shipping large samples of groundwater. (3) Develop and evaluate ways to manipulate areas with organic-rich soil, such as wetlands, to maximize {sup 129}I sorption, minimizing releases during anoxic conditions. (4) Develop analytical techniques that can identify the various {sup 129}I species in the subsurface aqueous and solid phases at ambient concentrations and under ambient conditions. (5) Identify the mechanisms and factors controlling iodine-natural organic matter interactions at appropriate environmental concentrations. (6) Understand the biological processes that transform iodine species throughout different compartments of subsurface waste sites and the role that these processes have on {sup 129}I flux.

  12. The George Washington University's Institute for Biomedical Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larsen, Mike

    The George Washington University's Institute for Biomedical Sciences MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION Date Street, NW Ross Hall, Room 561 Washington, DC 20037 Phone: (202) 994-2179 Fax: (202) 994-0967 Website: http://smhs.gwu.edu/ibs/ #12;The George Washington University's Institute for Biomedical Sciences 4

  13. State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction The mission of the State of Washington Water Research Center (SWWRC) is to: i) facilitate, coordinate, conduct, and administer water-related research important to the State of Washington and the region, ii) educate and train

  14. State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction The mission of the State of Washington Water Research Center (SWWRC) is to: i) facilitate, coordinate, conduct, and administer water-related research important to the State of Washington and the region, ii) educate and train

  15. University of Washington Academic Human Resources, Office of the Provost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrajt, Graciela

    University of Washington Academic Human Resources, Office of the Provost 240 Gerberding Hall, Box 351270, Seattle, WA 98195 206.543.5630 acadpers@u.washington.edu Biography Date Name in full (do not use: Name of Institution Location Date Degree Conferred Degree Type Are you a State of Washington Department

  16. University of Washington's Eleventh Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reh, Thomas A.

    University of Washington's Eleventh Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium Celebrating or send an email to urp@u.washington.edu. URP maintains a listing of currently available research projects and other resources for students and faculty at: http://www.washington.edu/research/urp/. Janice De

  17. State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction The mission of the State of Washington Water Research Center (SWWRC) is to facilitate, coordinate, conduct, and administer water related research important to the State of Washington and the region; educate and train

  18. UCR 09/2014 Washington Academic Internship Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UCR 09/2014 Washington Academic Internship Program Overview of Application Requirements Submit and experience do you possess that you will use to market yourself to internship sites in Washington, DC? o What help you realize those goals? o Why Washington, DC? What can you get out of an internship in DC

  19. State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction The mission of the State of Washington Water Research Center (SWWRC) is to: i) facilitate, coordinate, conduct, and administer water-related research important to the State of Washington and the region, ii) educate and train

  20. Washington State DOT Report: State Report Questions on MEPDG Implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington State DOT Report: State Report Questions on MEPDG Implementation 1. Summarize your state to the MEPDG. · We are not confident that the models in MEPDG portray the type of cracking we see in Washington Washington on Interstate 5) but not modeled in the MEPDG. However, longitudinal cracking alone rarely

  1. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON NON-MATRICULATED (NM) APPLICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhard, Marc O.

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON NON-MATRICULATED (NM) APPLICATION OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR (206) 543 order payable to the University of Washington in U.S. Funds. Return application and fee to: UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, REGISTRAR'S OFFICE 225 Schmitz Hall, Box 355850 Seattle, WA 98195-5850 SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER

  2. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhard, Marc O.

    #12;Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Washington Box 352700 Seattle, Washington 98195-2700 PREDICTABILITY OF RUNOFF IN THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN By Edwin P. Maurer Water and support provided by his advisor, Professor Dennis P. Lettenmaier at the University of Washington

  3. University of Washington Bothell Food and Beverage Internal Approval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrajt, Graciela

    University of Washington Bothell Food and Beverage Internal Approval PLEASE OBTAIN PRIOR APPROVAL FROM BUDGET AND PLANNING "Food approval code definitions are described at http://www.washington.washington.edu/fm/food-approval (this section is mandatory, if not filled out properly it could delay

  4. Rev. 11/21/2011 University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacCready, Parker

    Rev. 11/21/2011 University of Washington Retirement Status Form* Section 1: To be completed Identification No.______________ Have you ever retired from one of the following Washington State Retirement' Retirement System (LEOFF) Plan 1¨Plan 2¨ Washington State Patrol Retirement System (WSPRS) Plan 1¨Plan 2

  5. Washington and Lee University Library Special Collections Collection Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, David

    Washington and Lee University Library Special Collections Collection Policy This policy revises categories of books: 1. Books from the libraries of earlier incarnations of Washington and Lee University. 2. Books that include Washington and Lee University in their subject content. 3. Books about Robert E. Lee

  6. Tutorial, GECCO'05, Washington D.C. Fitness Approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Shengxiang

    1 Tutorial, GECCO'05, Washington D.C. Fitness Approximation in Evolutionary Computation Yaochu Jin Honda Research Institute Europe Khaled Rasheed University of Georgia Tutorial, GECCO'05, Washington D expensive fitness evaluations Tutorial, GECCO'05, Washington D.C. Fitness Approximation Methods · Problem

  7. State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction The mission of the State of Washington Water Research Center (SWWRC) is to: i) facilitate, coordinate, conduct, and administer water-related research important to the State of Washington and the region, ii) educate and train

  8. State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction The mission of the State of Washington Water Research Center (SWWRC) is to: i) facilitate, coordinate, and administer water-related research important to the State of Washington and the region; ii) educate and train engineers, scientists

  9. 1979-1980 Geothermal Resource Assessment Program in Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korosec, M.A.; Schuster, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for seven papers. Also included are a bibliography of geothermal resource information for the State of Washington, well temperature information and locations in the State of Washington, and a map of the geology of the White Pass-Tumac Mountain Area, Washington. (MHR)

  10. SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Suntana Utilization of Aboveground Forest Biomass for Sustainable Energy Development Lauren S. UrgensonSCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON WELCOME Tom Hinckley, Interim Director and Professor SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES ALUMNI ASSOCIATION Ara Erickson (`04) Green Cities Director, Cascade

  11. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON PERSONAL DATA FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrajt, Graciela

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON PERSONAL DATA FORM Name of Employee (Last, First, M.I.) Student Number (If to print this information in the directory? Yes No (County) UoW 1354 (8/01) Contact's Day Phone Contact (e.g. Dr. of Education, Dr. of Science) Employee's Signature Date *The University has requested your

  12. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON PERSONAL DATA FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlizerman, Eli

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON PERSONAL DATA FORM DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY Name of Employee (Last, First, M Is it okay to print this information in the directory? Yes No (County) UoW 1354 (10/00) Contact's Day Phone (e.g. Dr. of Education, Dr. of Science) Employee's Signature Date *The University has requested your

  13. Industrial & Systems Engineering University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    Industrial & Systems Engineering University of Washington Linda Ng Boyle, Ph.D. Professor and Chair linda@uw.edu #12;Agenda · What is Industrial & Systems Engineering? · Where do Industrial Engineers get area #12;Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISE) · Design things to be ­ Better quality ­ Higher

  14. WWU Sustainability Academy Western Washington University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

    WWU Sustainability Academy Western Washington University Dear colleagues, We cordially extend to you this invitation to join the WWU Sustainability Academy! Following several years of discussion, a group of faculty has started the (tentatively named) "WWU Sustainability Academy." Our goal is to build

  15. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON FIRE DRILL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrajt, Graciela

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON FIRE DRILL REPORT ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY Building Name Facility or Building Administrator/Coordinator Date of Drill Device Activated (location) Time Initiated Time Completed Verify that all procedures for preparing and conducting fire drills have been completed. Do not activate

  16. FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Washington, DC 20554

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bove Jr., V. Michael

    FCC 96­207 Before the FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Washington, DC 20554 In the Matter of a mechanism for a bit stream layer transmission standard (into which, e.g., MPEG­2 could fit) 3) The FCC: number of hours per day of digital television transmission, minimal Quality of Service specifications

  17. RPPL, University of Washington Glow Discharge Cleaning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    of Glow RPPL, University of Washington Bulk metal of vacuum chamber wall Oxide impurity layer water and hydrocarbon impurity layer Schematic of Typical Vacuum Chamber Wall and Impurity Layers + Ion from glow particles - can lead to runaway erosion and contamination · Glow used on TEXTOR, JET, DIII-D, TFTR, ASDEX

  18. Washington University Department of Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Douglas C.

    Washington University Department of Computer Science CS422: Operating Systems Programming Project_SOCK_Connector (void); // Default constructor. int connect (Muxed_SOCK_Stream *&new_stream, const INET_Addr &remote_sap); // Actively connect and produce a if things go well. // The sap> is the address that we

  19. University of Washington Math 336 Term Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow, James A.

    across a wired or wireless network to a router, modem, server, cell tower, or perhaps some other device at the University of Washington, for example, packets of data first travel from my wireless card to my router that in turn forwards the information to another router, modem, etc. and so forth until it reaches its

  20. Remediation of Centre Pier, Port Hope, Ontario: Historical, Logistical, Regulatory and Technical Challenges - 13118

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson Jones, Andrea; Case, Glenn; Lawrence, Dave

    2013-07-01

    Centre Pier is a 3.9 ha property owned by the Commissioners of the Port Hope Harbour in the Municipality of Port Hope, Ontario, Canada. It is centrally located on the Port Hope waterfront and is bounded on the west by the Port Hope Harbour, on the east by the Ganaraska River, on the south by Lake Ontario, and on the north by a railway corridor. The property is currently leased by the Commissioners of the Port Hope Harbour to the Cameco Corporation which owns the four onsite building that are used as warehouse space for their uranium conversion facility located on the western side of the Harbour. Remediation of this site forms part of the Port Hope Project being undertaken by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) and Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) as part of the Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI). Soil impacts include radiological, metals and petroleum hydrocarbons resulting from long term historical industrial use. Radiological impacts in soil extend across most of the site primarily within the upper metre of fill. Metals-contaminated soil is present across the entire site in the underlying fill material. The metals-contaminated fill extends to a maximum depth of 2.0 m below grade at the north end of the site which is underlain by peat. However, the metals-contaminated soil could extend to the top of the bedrock on the remainder of the site. Based on the elevation of the bedrock in the adjacent river and Harbour Basin, the metals-contaminated soil may extend to a depth of 5.6 m or 6.5 m below existing grade. Petroleum-contaminated soil is present on the southeast side of the site, where a storage tank farm was previously located. Challenges include: - The complex history of the site both relating to site use and Pier construction. Pier development began in the 1800's and was undertaken by many different entities. Modifications and repairs were made over the years resulting in several different types of Pier walls and fill that must be considered during remediation. A wide variety of industrial activity on the Pier including extensive foundry operations as well as the industrial nature of the fill used to construct the Pier has resulted in extensive contamination distribution. The Pier structure will require reinforcement to permit both the remediation of the Pier and the adjacent Harbour and remediation techniques will need to be well suited to minimize disruption of wall structures as well as being able to deal with fill ranging from ash to boulders. - Multiple stakeholders are responsible for building demolition, remediation of radiological impacts, remediation of industrial impacts and the use of the site as a staging area for Harbour sediment remediation. The successful remediation of the Centre Pier will require careful negotiation and planning for the various remediation activities noted above. - The depth of contamination on the Pier would result in the complete removal of the Pier if all contamination were to be excavated. Therefore, a Risk Assessment will be conducted to determine the appropriate means for in situ risk management for materials to be left in place below a proposed depth of 1.5 m below current grade. With the concurrence of the property owners and Provincial regulators, the Risk Assessment will be undertaken in accordance with the Provincial requirements that will ensure adequate protection of the environment and future users of the site. - The end use of the Pier has yet to be confirmed by the Municipality. (authors)

  1. Independent Technical Review of the X-740 Groundwater Remedy, Portsmouth, Ohio: Technical Evaluation and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B.; Rhia, B.; Jackson, D.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

    2010-04-30

    Two major remedial campaigns have been applied to a plume of trichloroethene (TCE) contaminated groundwater near the former X-740 facility at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon Ohio. The two selected technologies, phytoremediation using a stand of hybrid poplar trees from 1999-2007 and in situ chemical oxidation using modified Fenton's Reagent from 2008-2009, have proven ineffective in achieving remedial action objectives (RAOs). The 'poor' performance of these technologies is a direct result of site specific conditions and the local contaminant hydrogeology. Key among these challenges is the highly heterogeneous subsurface geology with a thin contaminated aquifer zone (the Gallia) - the behavior of the contamination in the Gallia is currently dominated by slow release of TCE from the clay of the overlying Minford formation, from the sandstone of the underlying Berea formation, and from clayey layers within the Gallia itself. In response to the remediation challenges for the X-740 plume, the Portsmouth team (including the US Department of Energy (DOE), the site contractor (CDM), and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA)) is evaluating the feasibility of remediation at this site and identifying specific alternatives that are well matched to site conditions and that would maximize the potential for achieving RAOs. To support this evaluation, the DOE Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation (EM-32) assembled a team of experts to serve as a resource and provide input and recommendations to Portsmouth. Despite the challenging site conditions and the failure of the previous two remediation campaigns to adequately move the site toward RAOs, the review team was unanimous in the conclusion that an effective combination of cost effective technologies can be identified. Further, the team expressed optimism that RAOs can be achieved if realistic timeframes are accepted by all parties. The initial efforts of the review team focused on reviewing the site history and data and organizing the information into a conceptual model and findings to assist in evaluating the potential of alternative remediation technologies. Examples of the key conceptual findings of the EM-32 review team were: (1) The Gallia represents the most practical target for deployment of in situ remediation treatment reagents - injection/extraction focused in this zone would provide maximum lateral impacts with minimal potential risk of failure or adverse collateral impacts. (2) The slow release of TCE from clay and sandstone into the Gallia represent a long term source of TCE that can re-contaminate the Gallia in the future - technologies that effectively treat the permeable portions of the Gallia, but do not leave residual treatment capacity in the system are unlikely to achieve long term remedial action objectives. CDM, the site contractor, provided important and useful information documenting the status and preliminary results of the on-site technology alternative evaluation. In the CDM evaluation, potential technologies were either retained (or screened out) in two preliminary evaluation phases and a detailed evaluation was performed on the five alternatives that were retained into the final 'detailed analysis' phase. The five alternatives that were included in the detailed analysis were: (1) hydraulic fracturing with EHC (a solid bioremediation amendment), (2) enhanced anaerobic bioremediation, (3) in situ chemical oxidation, (4) electrical resistance heating, and (5) reactive barriers. In several cases, two or three variants were separately evaluated. The review team found the CDM effort to be generally credible and reasonable. Thus, the review team focused on providing additional considerations and inputs to Portsmouth and on amending and refining the alternatives in ways that might improve performance and/or reduce costs. The Department of Energy Portsmouth Paducah Project Office requested assistance from Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM-32) to provide an independent technical panel to review previous and o

  2. DWPF SMECT PVV SAMPLE CHARACTERIZATION AND REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.; Crawford, C.

    2013-06-18

    On April 2, 2013, a solid sample of material collected from the Defense Waste Processing Facility’s Process Vessel Vent (PVV) jumper for the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) was received at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). DWPF has experienced pressure spikes within the SMECT and other process vessels which have resulted in processing delays while a vacuum was re-established. Work on this sample was requested in a Technical Assistance Request (TAR). This document reports the results of chemical and physical property measurements made on the sample, as well as insights into the possible impact to the material using DWPF’s proposed remediation methods. DWPF was interested in what the facility could expect when the material was exposed to either 8M nitric acid or 90% formic acid, the two materials they have the ability to flush through the PVV line in addition to process water once the line is capped off during a facility outage.

  3. EIS-0205: Joint NEPA/SEPA Final Environmental Impact Statement Washington Windplant No. 1, Goldendale, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration prepared this statement in order to fulfill its National Environmental Policy Act obligations ahead of signing an agreement with the utilities that would purchase the Windplant’s power from KENETECH. KENETECH Windpower, Inc., proposes to construct and operate Washington Windplant No. 1 in the Columbia Hills area, southeast of Goldendale, in Klickitat County, Washington.

  4. 1999 GWU, RPI, VCU All Rights Reserved Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment -Appendix II The Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    © 1999 GWU, RPI, VCU ­ All Rights Reserved Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment - Appendix II The Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment Appendix II: Collision, Allision, Grounding and Fire/Explosion Results using the WSF Simulation JULY 1, 1999 Prepared for: Blue Ribbon Panel on Washington State Ferry

  5. Model Fit to Experimental Data for Foam-Assisted Deep Vadose Zone Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roostapour, A.; Lee, G.; Zhong, Lirong; Kam, Seung I.

    2014-01-15

    Foam has been regarded as a promising means of remeidal amendment delivery to overcome subsurface heterogeneity in subsurface remediation processes. This study investigates how a foam model, developed by Method of Characteristics and fractional flow analysis in the companion paper of Roostapour and Kam (2012), can be applied to make a fit to a set of existing laboratory flow experiments (Zhong et al., 2009) in an application relevant to deep vadose zone remediation. This study reveals a few important insights regarding foam-assisted deep vadose zone remediation: (i) the mathematical framework established for foam modeling can fit typical flow experiments matching wave velocities, saturation history , and pressure responses; (ii) the set of input parameters may not be unique for the fit, and therefore conducting experiments to measure basic model parameters related to relative permeability, initial and residual saturations, surfactant adsorption and so on should not be overlooked; and (iii) gas compressibility plays an important role for data analysis, thus should be handled carefully in laboratory flow experiments. Foam kinetics, causing foam texture to reach its steady-state value slowly, may impose additional complications.

  6. Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process, elements and techniques guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This manual provides detailed guidance on Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies (RI/FSs) conducted pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The purpose of the RI/FS, to assess the risk posed by a hazardous waste site and to determine the best way to reduce that risk, and its structure (site characterization, risk assessment, screening and detailed analysis of alternatives, etc.) is defined in the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) and further explained in the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies Under CERCLA (Interim Final) 540/G-89/004, OSWER Directive 9355.3-01, October 1988. Though issued in 1988, the EPA guidance remains an excellent source of information on the conduct and structure of an RI/FS. This document makes use of supplemental RI/FS-related guidance that EPA has developed since its initial document was issued in 1988, incorporates practical lessons learned in more than 12 years of experience in CERCLA hazardous site remediation, and drawing on those lessons, introduces the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER), developed by DOE as a way to proceed quickly and efficiently through the RI/FS process at DOE facilities. Thus as its title implies, this guidance is intended to describe in detail the process and component elements of an RI/FS, as well as techniques to manage the RI/FS effectively.

  7. Ecological risk assessment guidance for preparation of remedial investigation/feasibility study work plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pentecost, E.D.; Vinikour, W.S.

    1993-08-01

    This guidance document (1) provides instructions on preparing the components of an ecological work plan to complement the overall site remedial assessment investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan and (2) directs the user on how to implement ecological tasks identified in the plan. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfired Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), an RI/FS work plan win have to be developed as part of the site-remediation scoping the process. Specific guidance on the RI/FS process and the preparation of work plans has been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988a). This document provides guidance to US Department of Energy (DOE) staff and contractor personnel for incorporation of ecological information into environmental remediation planning and decision making at CERCLA sites. An overview analysis of early ecological risk assessment methods (i.e., in the 1980s) at Superfund sites was conducted by the EPA (1989a). That review provided a perspective of attention given to ecological issues in some of the first RI/FS studies. By itself, that reference is of somewhat limited value; it does, however, establish a basis for comparison of past practices in ecological risk with current, more refined methods.

  8. Remedial investigation/feasibility study report for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR) Operable Unit (OU). The LWBR is located in Roane, Rhea, and Meigs counties, Tennessee, and consists of Watts Bar Reservoir downstream of the Clinch river. This area has received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). As required by this law, the ORR and all off-site areas that have received contaminants, including LWBR, must be investigated to determine the risk to human health and the environment resulting from these releases, the need for any remedial action to reduce these risks, and the remedial actions that are most feasible for implementation in this OU. Contaminants from the ORR are primarily transported to the LWBR via the Clinch River. There is little data regarding the quantities of most contaminants potentially released from the ORR to the Clinch River, particularly for the early years of ORR operations. Estimates of the quantities released during this period are available for most radionuclides and some inorganic contaminants, indicating that releases 30 to 50 years ago were much higher than today. Since the early 1970s, the release of potential contaminants has been monitored for compliance with environmental law and reported in the annual environmental monitoring reports for the ORR.

  9. An Overview of Public Domain Tools for Measuring the Sustainability of Environmental Remediation - 12060

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claypool, John E.; Rogers, Scott [AECOM, Denver, Colorado, 80202 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The application of sustainability principles to the investigation and remediation of contaminated sites is an area of rapid development within the environmental profession, with new business practices, tools, and performance standards for identifying, evaluating, and managing the 'collateral' impacts of cleanup projects to the environment, economy and society coming from many organizations. Guidelines, frameworks, and standards of practice for 'green and sustainable remediation' (GSR) have been released and are under development by the Sustainable Remediation Forum (SURF), the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), the Interstate Technology Roundtable Commission (ITRC) and other organizations in the U.S. and internationally. In response to Executive Orders from the President, Federal government agencies have developed policies, procedures and guidelines for evaluating and reporting the sustainability of their environmental restoration projects. Private sector companies in the petroleum, utility, manufacturing, defense, and other sectors are developing their own corporate GSR programs to improve day-to-day management of contaminated sites and to support external reporting as part of their corporate social responsibility (CSR) efforts. The explosion of mandates, policy, procedures and guidance raises the question of how to determine whether a remediation technology or cleanup approach is green and/or sustainable. The environmental profession has responded to this question by designing, developing and deploying a wide array of tools, calculators, and databases that enable regulatory agencies, site managers and environmental professionals to calculate the collateral impacts of their remediation projects in the environmental, social, and economic domains. Many of these tools are proprietary ones developed by environmental engineering/consulting firms for use in their consulting engagements and/or tailored specifically to meet the needs of their clients. When it comes to the public domain, Federal government agencies are spearheading the development of software tools to measure and report emissions of air pollutants (e.g., carbon dioxide, other greenhouse gases, criteria air pollutants); consumption of energy, water and natural resources; accident and safety risks; project costs and other economic metrics. Most of the tools developed for the Government are available to environmental practitioners without charge, so they are growing in usage and popularity. The key features and metrics calculated by the available public-domain tools for measuring the sustainability of environmental remediation projects share some commonalities but there are differences amongst the tools. The SiteWise{sup TM} sustainability tool developed for the Navy and US Army will be compared with the Sustainable Remediation Tool (SRT{sup TM}) developed for the US Air Force (USAF). In addition, the USAF's Clean Solar and Wind Energy in Environmental Programs (CleanSWEEP), a soon-to-be-released tool for evaluating the economic feasibility of utilizing renewal energy for powering remediation systems will be described in the paper. (authors)

  10. Federal government information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-31

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the Federal Government. It contains a summary of the organization and responsibilities of agencies within the executive branch of the Federal government which may be relevant to FUSRAP activities; a brief summary of relevant Federal statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the US Congress, identification of the officers, relevant committees and committee chairmen; a description of the Federal legislative process; a summary of legislation enacted and considered in the recently-adjourned 96th Congress; a description of the Federal budgetary process; a summary of the Carter Administration's comprehensive radioactive waste management program; and excerpts from the text of relevant federal statutes and regulations.

  11. Proposed plan for remedial action for the Groundwater Operable Unit at the Chemical Plant Area of the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-08-10

    This Proposed Plan addresses the remediation of groundwater contamination at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring site in Weldon Spring, Missouri. The site is located approximately 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis in St. Charles County . Remedial activities at the site will be conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with the U.S. Department of the Army (DA), conducted a joint remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) to allow for a comprehensive evaluation of groundwater conditions at the Weldon Spring chemical plant area and the Weldon Spring ordnance works area, which is an Army site adjacent to the chemical plant area. Consistent with DOE policy, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) values have been incorporated into the CERCLA process. That is, the analysis conducted and presented in the RVFS reports included an evaluation of environmental impacts that is comparable to that performed under NEPA. This Proposed Plan summarizes information about chemical plant area groundwater that is presented in the following documents: (1) The Remedial Investigation (RI), which presents information on the nature and extent of contamination; (2) The Baseline Risk Assessment (BRA), which evaluates impacts to human health and the environment that could occur if no cleanup action of the groundwater were taken (DOE and DA 1997a); and (3) The Feasibility Study (FS) and the Supplemental FS, which develop and evaluate remedial action alternatives for groundwater remediation.

  12. Data Quality Assessment Report for the Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.C. Hulstrom

    2010-09-21

    This report summarizes the results of the data quality assessment that was performed on the analytical data generated in connection with the 2008/2009 surface water, sediment, and soil data collection; groundwater upwelling investigation sample collection; and fish tissue sample collection.

  13. Board on Physics and AstronomyBoard on Physics and Astronomy 2101 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20418

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -academies.org/bpa August 31, 1999 Dr. Martha Krebs Director Office of Science Department of Energy Washington, DC 20550 Dear Dr. Krebs: National Research Council Chair Dr. Bruce Alberts, in response to your letter and inertial confinement, but the program structures are quite different. The committee does not directly

  14. Proceedings,Windpower `95, AWEA, Washington DC, March 27-30, 1995. ALL WIND FARM UNCERTAINTY IS NOT THE SAME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proceedings,Windpower `95, AWEA, Washington DC, March 27-30, 1995. ALL WIND FARM UNCERTAINTY Wind Energy Technology Department Albuquerque, NM 87185-0708 USA ABSTRACT There is uncertainty in the performance of wind energy installations due to unknowns in the local wind environment, machine response

  15. EIS-0402: Remediation of Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is preparing an EIS for cleanup of Area IV, including the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), as well as the Northern Buffer Zone of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) in eastern Ventura County, California, approximately 29 miles north of downtown Los Angeles. (DOE’s operations bordered the Northern Buffer Zone. DOE is responsible for soil cleanup in Area IV and the Northern Buffer Zone.) In the EIS, DOE will evaluate reasonable alternatives for disposition of radiological facilities and support buildings, remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater, and disposal of all resulting waste at permitted facilities.

  16. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Savannah River Remediation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the evaluation of Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR), at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina during the period of November 4-13, 2014, and provides the Associate Under...

  17. Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    College intern Spencer Isom recently began her second summer with Savannah River Remediation (SRR), and her fourth year at Savannah River Site (SRS), where she continues a 31-year family legacy on site.

  18. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services related to a Radioactive Material Release during Trench Remediation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, (EA-97-04) On June 6, 1997, the U.S. Department of...

  19. Environmental Remediation Strategic Planning of Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Yasuo

    2011-12-01

    Environmntal Remediation Assessment and other respons decision making on Environmental monitoring, experiments and assessment. Preliminary assessment to grasp the overall picture and determine critical locations, phenomena, people, etc. Using simple methods and models.

  20. In Situ Iron Oxide Emplacement for Groundwater Arsenic Remediation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abia, Thomas Sunday

    2012-02-14

    Iron oxide-bearing minerals have long been recognized as an effective reactive media for arsenic-contaminated groundwater remediation. This research aimed to develop a technique that could facilitate in situ oxidative precipitation of Fe3+ in a soil...

  1. Low-temperature geothermal resources of Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuster, J.E. [Washington State Dept. of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA (United States). Div. of Geology and Earth Resources] [Washington State Dept. of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA (United States). Div. of Geology and Earth Resources; Bloomquist, R.G. [Washington State Energy Office, Olympia, WA (United States)] [Washington State Energy Office, Olympia, WA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    This report presents information on the location, physical characteristics, and water chemistry of low-temperature geothermal resources in Washington. The database includes 941 thermal (>20C or 68F) wells, 34 thermal springs, lakes, and fumaroles, and 238 chemical analyses. Most thermal springs occur in the Cascade Range, and many are associated with stratovolcanoes. In contrast, 97 percent of thermal wells are located in the Columbia Basin of southeastern Washington. Some 83.5 percent are located in Adams, Benton, Franklin, Grant, Walla Walla, and Yakima Counties. Yakima County, with 259 thermal wells, has the most. Thermal wells do not seem to owe their origin to local sources of heat, such as cooling magma in the Earth`s upper crust, but to moderate to deep circulation of ground water in extensive aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt Group and interflow sedimentary deposits, under the influence of a moderately elevated (41C/km) average geothermal gradient.

  2. The Best Work of Your Life Washington University Career Fair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Systems Construction Management Urban Planning Site Development GIS, Mapping and Surveying Wetlands Interchange Airport Runway 11-29 Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge Environmental Remediation #12;

  3. FOAM: NOVEL DELIVERY TECHNOLOGY FOR REMEDIATION OF VADOSE ZONE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansik, Danielle P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Zhong, Lirong; Wu, Yuxin; Foote, Martin; Zhang, Z. F.; Hubbard, Susan

    2011-07-05

    Deep vadose zone environments can be a primary source and pathway for contaminant migration to groundwater. These environments present unique characterization and remediation challenges that necessitate scrutiny and research. The thickness, depth, and intricacies of the deep vadose zone, combined with a lack of understanding of the key subsurface processes (e.g., biogeochemical and hydrologic) affecting contaminant migration, make it difficult to create validated conceptual and predictive models of subsurface flow dynamics and contaminant behavior across multiple scales. These factors also make it difficult to design and deploy sustainable remedial approaches and monitor long-term contaminant behavior after remedial actions. Functionally, the methods for addressing contamination must remove and/or reduce transport of contaminants. This problem is particularly challenging in the arid western United States where the vadose zone is hundreds of feet thick, rendering transitional excavation methods exceedingly costly and ineffective. Delivery of remedial amendments is one of the most challenging and critical aspects for all remedy-based approaches. The conventional approach for delivery is through injection of aqueous remedial solutions. However, heterogeneous deep vadose zone environments present hydrologic and geochemical challenges which limit the effectiveness. Because the flow of solution infiltration is dominantly controlled by gravity and suction, injected liquid preferentially percolates through highly permeable pathways, by-passing low-permeability zones which frequently contain the majority of contamination. Moreover, the wetting front can readily mobilize and enhance contaminant transport to the underlying aquifer prior to stabilization. Development of innovative, in-situ technologies may be the only way to meet remedial action objectives and long-term stewardship goals. Surfactants can be used to lower the liquid surface tension and create stabile foams, which readily penetrate low permeability zones. Although surfactant foams have been utilized for subsurface mobilization efforts in the oil and gas industry, so far, the concept of using foams as a delivery mechanism for transporting remedial amendments into deep vadose zone environments to stabilize metal and long-lived radionuclide contaminants has not been explored. Foam flow can be directed by pressure gradients, rather than being dominated by gravity; and, foam delivery mechanisms limit the volume of water (< 5% vol.) required for remedy delivery and emplacement, thus mitigating contaminant mobilization. We will present the results of a numerical modeling and integrated laboratory- / intermediate-scale investigation to simulate, develop, demonstrate, and monitor (i.e. advanced geophysical techniques and advanced predictive biomarkers) foam-based delivery of remedial amendments to remediate metals and radionuclides in vadose zone environments.

  4. Good Energies (Washington DC) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County, Georgia: Energy ResourcesIllinois:Good Energies (Washington

  5. Energy Incentive Programs, Washington | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeCommunication3-EDepartment ofArizona EnergyHampshire EnergyOregonTexasWashington

  6. Newcastle, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI Ventures LtdNeville,InformationNewcastle, Washington: Energy Resources

  7. Least-Cost Groundwater Remediation Design Using Uncertain Hydrogeological Information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinder, George F.

    1999-06-01

    The research conducted by at the Research Center for Groundwater Remediation Design at the University of Vermont funded by the Department of Energy continues to focus on the implementation of a new method of including uncertainty into the optimal design of groundwater remediation systems. The uncertain parameter is the hydraulic conductivity of an aquifer. The optimization method utilized for this project is called robust optimization. The uncertainty of the hydraulic conductivity is described by a probability density function, PDF.

  8. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 10): Northwest Transformer-Mission Pole, Whatcom County, WA. (First remedial action), (Amendment), September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-30

    The 1.6-acre Northwest Transformer - Mission Pole site, is former transformer storage and salvage facility, is 2 miles south of Everson in Whatcom County, Washington. The site is bordered by low-density residential areas to the north and east, and farmland to the south. Storage and salvage operations were conducted in an onsite barn where PCB-contaminated dielectric fluid was drained from the transformers prior to dismantling. A 1989 Record of Decision (ROD) addressed remediation through excavation, consolidation, and onsite treatment using in-situ vitrification. The ROD amends the 1989 ROD and provides a change in the remedy for soil due to excessive cost. The primary contaminant of concern affecting the soil is PCB, an organic. The selected amended remedial action for the ROD includes incincerating approximately 70 cubic yards of soil contaminated with PCBs at levels greater than or equal to 50 mg/kg at a TSCA-approved facility and landfilling approximately 1,500 cubic yards of soil contaminated with PCBs at levels greater than or equal to 1 mg/kg and less than 50 mg/kg offsite at a TSCA-approved facility.

  9. Programmatic Environmental Report for remedial actions at UMTRA (Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action) Project vicinity properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    This Environmental Report (ER) examines the environmental consequences of implementing a remedial action that would remove radioactive uranium mill tailings and associated contaminated materials from 394 vicinity properties near 14 inactive uranium processing sites included in the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project pursuant to Public Law 95--604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. Vicinity properties are those properties in the vicinity of the UMTRA Project inactive mill sites, either public or private, that are believed to be contaminated by residual radioactive material originating from one of the 14 inactive uranium processing sites, and which have been designated under Section 102(a)(1) of UMTRCA. The principal hazard associated with the contaminated properties results from the production of radon, a radioactive decay product of the radium contained in the tailings. Radon, a radioactive gas, can diffuse through the contaminated material and be released into the atmosphere where it and its radioactive decay products may be inhaled by humans. A second radiation exposure pathway results from the emission of gamma radiation from uranium decay products contained in the tailings. Gamma radiation emitted from contaminated material delivers an external exposure to the whole body. If the concentration of radon and its decay products is high enough and the exposure time long enough, or if the exposure to direct gamma radiation is long enough, cancers (i.e., excess health effects) may develop in persons living and working at the vicinity properties. 3 refs., 7 tabs.

  10. DOE Selects CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electricLaboratory | Department of Energy WASHINGTON - The

  11. SBA Increases Size Standards for Waste Remediation Services ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    You may also mail comments to Khem R. Sharma, Chief, Office of Size Standards, 409 3rd St., SW, Mail Code 6530, Washington, DC 20416. As part of an ongoing review of all size...

  12. OLENDER REPORTING, INC. 1100 Connecticut Avenue NW, #810, Washington, DC 20036

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 OLENDER REPORTING, INC. 1100 Connecticut Avenue NW, #810, Washington, DC 20036 Washington: 202 Avenue17 Washington, D.C.18 19 20 21 22 #12;2 OLENDER REPORTING, INC. 1100 Connecticut Avenue NW, #810 #12;3 OLENDER REPORTING, INC. 1100 Connecticut Avenue NW, #810, Washington, DC 20036 Washington: 202

  13. Expanded public notice: Washington State notice of intent for corrective action management unit, Hanford Environmental Restoration Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This document is to serve notice of the intent to operate an Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), adjacent to the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington, as a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU), in accordance with 40 Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) 264.552. The ERDF CAMU will serve as a management unit for the majority of waste (primarily soil) excavated during remediation of waste management sites on the Hanford Facility. Only waste that originates from the Hanford Facility can be accepted in this ERDF CAMU. The waste is expected to consist of dangerous waste, radioactive waste, and mixed waste. Mixed waste contains radioactive and dangerous components. The primary features of the ERDF could include the following: one or more trenches, rail and tractor/trailer container handling capability, railroads, an inventory control system, a decontamination building, and operational offices.

  14. Evaluation of surface water treatment and discharge options for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goyette, M.L.; MacDonell, M.M.

    1992-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), under its Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program, is responsible for conducting response actions at the Weldon Spring site in St. Charles County, Missouri. The site consists of two noncontiguous areas: (1) the chemical plant area, which includes four raffinate pits and two small ponds, and (2) a 3.6-ha (9-acre) quarry located about 6.4 km (4 mi) southwest of the chemical plant area. Both of these areas became chemically and radioactively contaminated as a result of processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through 1960s. The Weldon Spring site, located about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis, is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Nitroaromatic explosives were processed by the Army at the chemical plant area during the 1940s, and radioactive materials were processed by DOE`s predecessor agency (the Atomic Energy Commission) during the 1950s and 1960s. Overall remediation of the Weldon Spring site is being addressed through the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, and it consists of several components. One component is the management of radioactively and chemically contaminated surface water impoundments at the chemical plant area -- i.e., the four raffinate pits, Frog Pond, and Ash Pond which was addressed under a separate action and documented in an engineering evaluation/cost analysis report. This report discusses the evaluation of surface water treatment at the Weldon Spring site.

  15. Evaluation of surface water treatment and discharge options for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goyette, M.L.; MacDonell, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), under its Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program, is responsible for conducting response actions at the Weldon Spring site in St. Charles County, Missouri. The site consists of two noncontiguous areas: (1) the chemical plant area, which includes four raffinate pits and two small ponds, and (2) a 3.6-ha (9-acre) quarry located about 6.4 km (4 mi) southwest of the chemical plant area. Both of these areas became chemically and radioactively contaminated as a result of processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through 1960s. The Weldon Spring site, located about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis, is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Nitroaromatic explosives were processed by the Army at the chemical plant area during the 1940s, and radioactive materials were processed by DOE's predecessor agency (the Atomic Energy Commission) during the 1950s and 1960s. Overall remediation of the Weldon Spring site is being addressed through the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, and it consists of several components. One component is the management of radioactively and chemically contaminated surface water impoundments at the chemical plant area -- i.e., the four raffinate pits, Frog Pond, and Ash Pond which was addressed under a separate action and documented in an engineering evaluation/cost analysis report. This report discusses the evaluation of surface water treatment at the Weldon Spring site.

  16. Unique Regulatory Approach for Licensing the Port Hope Remediation Project in Canada - 13315

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostova, M.; Howard, D.; Elder, P.

    2013-07-01

    The Port Hope remediation project is a part of a larger initiative of the Canadian Federal Government the Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI) which is based upon a community proposal. The Government of Canada, through Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) is investing $1.28 billion over 10 years to clean up historic low-level radioactive waste in the Port Hope Area and to provide long-term safe management of the low-level radioactive wastes in the Port Hope Area. These wastes arose from the activities of a former Federal Crown Corporation (Eldorado Nuclear) and its private sector predecessors. In Canada, historic waste are defined as low-level radioactive waste that was managed in a manner no longer considered acceptable, but for which the original producer cannot reasonably be held responsible or no longer exists and for which the Federal Government has accepted responsibility. In Canada, under the current regulatory framework, the environmental remediation is not considered as a distinct phase of the nuclear cycle. The regulatory approach for dealing with existing sites contaminated with radioactive residues is defined on the basis of risk and application of existing regulations. A unique regulatory approach was taken by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) to address the various licensing issues and to set out the requirements for licensing of the Port Hope Project within the current regulatory framework. (authors)

  17. Institute Recognizes Washington Closure Hanford as International Award Finalist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – The Project Management Institute (PMI) honored Hanford Site contractor Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) as a finalist for the international Project of the Year Award.

  18. DOE Exercises 5 Year Option on Washington TRU Solutions Contract...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    it has decided to exercise the five year option in the Washington TRU Solutions LLC ("WTS") contract to continue managing and operating the Department's Waste Isolation Pilot...

  19. SLIDESHOW: Secretary Moniz Tours 2014 Washington Auto Show

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A slideshow featuring highlights from Secretary Moniz's tour of the 2014 Washington Auto Show is currently posted on the Energy Department's blog.

  20. ,"Washington Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

  1. ,"Washington Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9...

  2. Developing microbe-plant interactions for applications in plant-growth promotion and disease control, production of useful compounds, remediation, and carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard, S.

    2009-01-01

    Remediation, and Carbon Sequestration References Anderson,Remediation, and Carbon Sequestration rhizosphere byRemediation, and Carbon Sequestration Figure 1. Examples of

  3. New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan for Test Area North (TAN) Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. O. Nelson

    2003-09-01

    This operations and maintenance plan supports the New Pump and Treat Facility (NPTF) remedial action work plan and identifies the approach and requirements for the operations and maintenance activities specific to the final medical zone treatment remedy. The NPTF provides the treatment system necessary to remediate the medical zone portion of the OU 1-07B contaminated groundwater plume. Design and construction of the New Pump and Treat Facility is addressed in the NPTF remedial action work plan. The scope of this operation and maintenance plan includes facility operations and maintenance, remedy five-year reviews, and the final operations and maintenance report for the NPTF.

  4. Workshop on Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) Markets and Challenges Renaissance Washington Hotel, Washington, DC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 9:00 The RECs Market and Policy Context Moderator, Lori BirdWorkshop on Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) Markets and Challenges Renaissance Washington Hotel and Continental Breakfast 8:30 Opening Remarks Steven Chalk, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Renewable Energy ­ U

  5. Vancouver, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, NewArkansas: Energy Resources Jump to:Wert County,Washington:

  6. Washington Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin,VillageWarren Park, Indiana:OpenIowa:NewTexas:Washington

  7. Medina, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy Resources Jump to:Electric Coop,Smw import foaf JumpTexas:Washington:

  8. Issaquah, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8,Open EnergyIssaquah, Washington: Energy Resources Jump

  9. PacifiCorp (Washington) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program | OpenWisconsin:NewOverPPS EnviroPoweredPower (Washington))

  10. STATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV6STAT 12293GG STATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT

  11. STATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV6STAT 12293GG STATE OF WASHINGTON

  12. STATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV6STAT 12293GG STATE OF WASHINGTON"

  13. Washington/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw, Poland: EnergyPage Edit History Washington/Wind

  14. Ahtanum, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolar EnergyAerodynallIndustrias do ValeAhtanum, Washington:

  15. Algona, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolarOpen5 -TelephoneInformation AlgerAlgodyneWashington:

  16. Burien, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine: EnergyEnergyOhio: EnergyNorthInformation WashingtonActBurien,

  17. Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company)Idaho)Vossloh Kiepe JumpWarana GroupWashington: Energy

  18. 2013 Washington Auto Show | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3 Racetracks2 DOEEnergy Los Alamos3 National3Washington

  19. Phosphate-Mediated Remediation of Metals and Radionuclides

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Martinez, Robert J.; Beazley, Melanie J.; Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide industrialization activities create vast amounts of organic and inorganic waste streams that frequently result in significant soil and groundwater contamination. Metals and radionuclides are of particular concern due to their mobility and long-term persistence in aquatic and terrestrial environments. As the global population increases, the demand for safe, contaminant-free soil and groundwater will increase as will the need for effective and inexpensive remediation strategies. Remediation strategies that include physical and chemical methods (i.e., abiotic) or biological activities have been shown to impede the migration of radionuclide and metal contaminants within soil and groundwater. However, abiotic remediation methods aremore »often too costly owing to the quantities and volumes of soils and/or groundwater requiring treatment. The in situ sequestration of metals and radionuclides mediated by biological activities associated with microbial phosphorus metabolism is a promising and less costly addition to our existing remediation methods. This review highlights the current strategies for abiotic and microbial phosphate-mediated techniques for uranium and metal remediation. « less

  20. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Fielden, J.M.; Johnson, C.A.

    1982-09-01

    This bibliography contains 693 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. Foreign, as well as domestic, literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, and Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Chapter sections for chapters 1 and 2 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Land Decontamination and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; and General Studies. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for (1) author; (2) corporate affiliation; (3) title; (4) publication description; (5) geographic location; and (6) keywords. An appendix of 202 bibliographic references without abstracts or indexes has been included in this bibliography. This appendix represents literature identified but not abstracted due to time constraints.

  1. University of Washington Bothell: Autumn 2015 Recommendation Form for the University of Washington Bothell First Year Entry RN-to-BSN program.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrajt, Graciela

    University of Washington Bothell: Autumn 2015 Recommendation Form for the University of Washington enrolled at the University of Washington has access to his or her education records. We intend to comply. Suggested word count is 200. #12;University of Washington Bothell: Autumn 2015 Recommendation Form

  2. College of Arts and Sciences Box 353765 University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195-3765 phone: (206) 543-5340 www.artsci.washington.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrajt, Graciela

    College of Arts and Sciences · Box 353765 · University of Washington · Seattle, WA 98195-3765 phone: (206) 543-5340 · www.artsci.washington.edu The University of Washington College of Arts and Sciences class is from Washington state Academic and research faculty (FTE, 2012 average) A&S faculty have

  3. The GeorGe WashinGTon UniversiTy | WashinGTon DC The Elliott School's M.A. program in International Affairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larsen, Mike

    The GeorGe WashinGTon UniversiTy | WashinGTon DC Overview The Elliott School's M.A. program affairs. Students can take advantage of numerous internship opportunities in the Washington, DC, area to pursue daytime internships in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area. Master of arts in international

  4. ErikaCheck,Washington Scientists at a military medical facility in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ErikaCheck,Washington Scientists at a military medical facility in Washington DC have lashed out on the campus of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center and at several smaller facilities in the Washington area

  5. Page 1 of 2 Industry Sponsored Projects at University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    Page 1 of 2 Industry Sponsored Projects at University of Washington The University of Washington (UW) frequently conducts research projects sponsored. 1 For more information see http://www.washington

  6. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON FINANCE & FACILITIES Faculty Council on University Facilities and Services Presentation October 30, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON FINANCE & FACILITIES Faculty Council on University Facilities and Services Presentation October 30, 2014 Capital Projects Office TITLE #12;UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON FINANCE & FACILITIES Office TITLE #12;UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON FINANCE & FACILITIES Faculty Council on University Facilities

  7. Greenhouse gas mitigation options for Washington State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, N.

    1996-04-01

    President Clinton, in 1993, established a goal for the United States to return emissions of greenhouse gases to 1990 levels by the year 2000. One effort established to help meet this goal was a three part Environmental Protection Agency state grant program. Washington State completed part one of this program with the release of the 1990 greenhouse gas emissions inventory and 2010 projected inventory. This document completes part two by detailing alternative greenhouse gas mitigation options. In part three of the program EPA, working in partnership with the States, may help fund innovative greenhouse gas reduction strategies. The greenhouse gas control options analyzed in this report have a wide range of greenhouse gas reductions, costs, and implementation requirements. In order to select and implement a prudent mix of control strategies, policy makers need to have some notion of the potential change in climate, the consequences of that change and the uncertainties contained therein. By understanding the risks of climate change, policy makers can better balance the use of scarce public resources for concerns that are immediate and present against those that affect future generations. Therefore, prior to analyzing alternative greenhouse gas control measures, this report briefly describes the phenomenon and uncertainties of global climate change, and then projects the likely consequences for Washington state.

  8. Linde FUSRAP Site Remediation: Engineering Challenges and Solutions of Remedial Activities on an Active Industrial Facility - 13506

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beres, Christopher M.; Fort, E. Joseph; Boyle, James D.

    2013-07-01

    The Linde FUSRAP Site (Linde) is located in Tonawanda, New York at a major research and development facility for Praxair, Inc. (Praxair). Successful remediation activities at Linde combines meeting cleanup objectives of radiological contamination while minimizing impacts to Praxair business operations. The unique use of Praxair's property coupled with an array of active and abandoned utilities poses many engineering and operational challenges; each of which has been overcome during the remedial action at Linde. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District (USACE) and CABRERA SERVICES, INC. (CABRERA) have successfully faced engineering challenges such as relocation of an aboveground structure, structural protection of an active water line, and installation of active mechanical, electrical, and communication utilities to perform remediation. As remediation nears completion, continued success of engineering challenges is critical as remaining activities exist in the vicinity of infrastructure essential to business operations; an electrical substation and duct bank providing power throughout the Praxair facility. Emphasis on engineering and operations through final remediation and into site restoration will allow for the safe and successful completion of the project. (authors)

  9. Peter M. Vallone AAFS Washington, D.C.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter M. Vallone AAFS Washington, D.C. February 23, 2008 http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech available for the purpose. Our publications and presentations are made available at: http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech/strbase/NISTpub.htm #12;Peter M. Vallone AAFS Washington, D.C. February 23, 2008 http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech

  10. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety Design Guide Site of specifications for projects in areas with site contamination. Overview Many locations on University of Washington industrial activities such as fuel storage or dispensing or hazardous material spills prior to University

  11. POLYGENETIC TOPOGRAPHY OF THE CASCADE RANGE, WASHINGTON STATE, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    POLYGENETIC TOPOGRAPHY OF THE CASCADE RANGE, WASHINGTON STATE, USA SARA GRAN MITCHELL Range of Washington State by analyzing the topography, geology, and exhumation patterns across the range-relief topography, 2) post-Miocene surface uplift of the range superimposed on pre-existing high-relief topography

  12. TRI-CITIES, WASHINGTON INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY INDEX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;TRI-CITIES, WASHINGTON INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY INDEX 2001 October 3, 2001 Economic and Technology Index 2001 2 Dear Reader: The known story of the Washington state technology industry has centered of growth such as traffic congestion and high cost of living o Has two factors impeding its technology

  13. Planning & Budgeting Brief http://opb.washington.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    Planning & Budgeting Brief http://opb.washington.edu Page 1 Date: August 30, 2012 Subject: Tuition Savings Plan Structures in Global Challenge States Washington State's Guaranteed Education Tuition program funds. GET remains one of the few, and perhaps only, state-guaranteed tuition savings plans

  14. Machine Design Analysis University of Washington, Seattle Winter Quarter 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sniadecki, Nathan J.

    ://courses.washington.edu/nsniadec/ME356/W15 Description: Analysis, design, and selection of mechanical and electromechanical subsystems of Materials Laboratory Textbook: Budynas, R. G. & Nisbett, J.K., 2014, Shigley's Mechanical Engineering Design-tolerance for cheating. Please refer to UW's Student Conduct Code. http://www.washington.edu/students/handbook

  15. Aerospace & Energetics Research Program -University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shumlak, Uri

    of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group q The Boltzmann equation is seven dimensional. q As a consequence plasmaAerospace & Energetics Research Program - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group Plasma Plasma Dynamics Group Abstract Many current plasma simulation codes are based on the magnetohydrodynamic

  16. Duct Remediation Program: Material characterization and removal/handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckman, T.d.; Davis, M.M.; Karas, T.M.

    1992-11-01

    Remediation efforts were successfully performed at Rocky Flats to locate, characterize, and remove plutonium holdup from process exhaust ducts. Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) techniques were used to determine holdup locations and quantities. Visual characterization using video probes helped determine the physical properties of the material, which were used for remediation planning. Assorted equipment types, such as vacuum systems, scoops, brushes, and a rotating removal system, were developed to remove specific material types. Personnel safety and material handling requirements were addressed throughout the project.

  17. Recommendation 170: Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for East Tennessee Technology Park

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ORSSAB Recommendation to DOE on a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for East Tennessee Technology Park.

  18. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project- March 2007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation to determine whether Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP recognition.

  19. Environmental Remediation Activities in Japan Following the Fukushima Dai-ichi Reactor Incident - 12603

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lively, J.W.; Kelley, J.L.; Marcial, M.R. [AMEC Environment and Infrastructure (United States); Yashio, Shoko; Kuriu, Nobou; Kamijo, Hiroaki; Jotatsu, Kato [Obayashi Corporation (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    In March 2011, the Fukushima Dai-ichi reactor power plant was crippled by the Great Pacific earthquake and subsequent tsunami. Much of the focus in the news was on the reactor site itself as the utility company (TEPCO), the Japanese government, and experts from around the world worked to bring the damaged plants into a safe shutdown condition and stem the release of radioactivity to the environment. Most of the radioactivity released was carried out to sea with the prevailing winds. Still, as weather patterns changed and winds shifted, a significant plume of radioactive materials released from the plant deposited in the environment surrounding the plant, contaminating large land areas of the Fukushima Prefecture. The magnitude of the radiological impact to the surrounding environmental is so large that the Japanese government has had to reevaluate the meaning of 'acceptably clean'. In many respects, 'acceptably clean' cannot be a one-size-fits-all standard. The economics costs of such an approach would make impossible what is already an enormous and costly environmental response and remediation task. Thus, the Japanese government has embarked upon an approach that is both situation-specific and reasonably achievable. For example, the determination of acceptably clean for a nursery school or kindergarten play yard may be different from that for a parking lot. The acceptably clean level of residual radioactivity in the surface soil of a rice paddy is different from that in a forested area. The recognized exposure situation (scenario) thus plays a large role in the decision process. While sometimes complicated to grasp or implement, such an approach does prioritize national resources to address environment remediation based upon immediate and significant risks. In addition, the Japanese government is testing means and methods, including advanced or promising technologies, that could be proven to be effective in reducing the amount of radioactivity in the environment beyond a fixed, concentration based limit. Essentially, the definition of acceptably clean includes the concept of reasonably achievable, given the available technology, means and methods, and the cost to implement such. The Japanese government recently issued three technology demonstration contracts expressly designed to test and evaluate the available technologies, means, and methods, which, if implemented, might produce the greatest risk reduction from environmental contamination for the best value. One of the Japanese contract holders, Obayashi JV, has teamed with AMEC to demonstrate the applicability and capabilities of the Orion ScanPlot{sup SM} and ScanSort{sup SM} technologies in radiologically impacted towns both inside and immediately outside the 20 km restricted zone. This presentation provides some unique images and informative insight into the environmental radioactive impacts in and around the exclusion zone. It will provide a look at one element of the Japanese government?s efforts to achieve the greatest risk reduction that is reasonably achievable. The Orion ScanPlot{sup SM} and ScanSort{sup SM} are being used with success on the Japan Town Demonstration Project to assess pre-remedial action contamination levels, document the post-remedial action contamination levels and to precisely measure and segregate excavated soils based on their radioactive content and the prescribed segregation limits (DCS). Initial results suggest that these technologies could provide capabilities to the remedial action efforts that would result in considerable improvements in field data certainty and compliance with remedial objectives while reducing overall costs. (authors)

  20. Safe interim storage of Hanford tank wastes, draft environmental impact statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This Draft EIS is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Washington State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). DOE and Ecology have identified the need to resolve near-term tank safety issues associated with Watchlist tanks as identified pursuant to Public Law (P.L.) 101-510, Section 3137, ``Safety Measures for Waste Tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation,`` of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1991, while continuing to provide safe storage for other Hanford wastes. This would be an interim action pending other actions that could be taken to convert waste to a more stable form based on decisions resulting from the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) EIS. The purpose for this action is to resolve safety issues concerning the generation of unacceptable levels of hydrogen in two Watchlist tanks, 101-SY and 103-SY. Retrieving waste in dilute form from Tanks 101-SY and 103-SY, hydrogen-generating Watchlist double shell tanks (DSTs) in the 200 West Area, and storage in new tanks is the preferred alternative for resolution of the hydrogen safety issues.

  1. US hydropower resource assessment for Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the United States. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Washington.

  2. Savannah River Remediation, College Create Job Opportunities for Graduates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – Savannah River Remediation (SRR), the liquid waste contractor for the EM program at the Savannah River Site (SRS), requires workers with unique skills to protect employees from radiation as the company works safely toward completing its mission.

  3. Biogeochemical Considerations Related To The Remediation Of I-129 Plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D. I.; Yeager, C.; Denham, M. E.; Zhang, S.; Xu, C.; Schwehr, K. A.; Li, H. P.; Brinkmeyer, R.; Santschi, P. H.

    2012-09-24

    The objectives of this report were to: provide a current state of the science of radioiodine biogeochemistry relevant to its fate and transport at the Hanford Site; conduct a review of Hanford Site data dealing with groundwater {sup 129}I; and identify critical knowledge gaps necessary for successful selection, implementation, and technical defensibility in support of remediation decisions.

  4. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project surface project management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This Project Management Plan describes the planning, systems, and organization that shall be used to manage the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA). US DOE is authorized to stabilize and control surface tailings and ground water contamination at 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials.

  5. Managing Complex Environmental Remediation amidst Aggressive Facility Revitalization Milestones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richter Pack, S. [PMP Science Applications International Corporation, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Unlike the final closure projects at Rocky Flats and Fernald, many of the Department of Energy's future CERCLA and RCRA closure challenges will take place at active facilities, such as the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) central campus. ORNL has aggressive growth plans for a Research Technology Park and cleanup must address and integrate D and D, soil and groundwater remediation, and on-going and future business plans for the Park. Different planning and tracking tools are needed to support closures at active facilities. To support some large Airport redevelopment efforts, we created tools that allowed the Airline lease-holder to perform environmental remediation on the same schedule as building D and D and new building construction, which in turn allowed them to migrate real estate from unusable to usable within an aggressive schedule. In summary: The FIM and OpenGate{sup TM} spatial analysis system were two primary tools developed to support simultaneous environmental remediation, D and D, and construction efforts at an operating facility. These tools helped redevelopers to deal with environmental remediation on the same schedule as building D and D and construction, thereby meeting their goals of opening gates, restarting their revenue streams, at the same time complying with all environmental regulations. (authors)

  6. Discrimination algorithms for the remediation of unexploded ordnance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    Discrimination algorithms for the remediation of unexploded ordnance by Laurens Sander Beran B of discriminating between buried unexploded ordnance (UXO) and non-hazardous metallic clutter. Magnetic data ac by a conductor. Model parameters estimated with inversion can be input into a discrimination algorithm whose out

  7. Description of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    The background and the results to date of the Department of Energy program to identify and evaluate the radiological conditions at sites formerly utilized by the Corps of Engineers' Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) are summarized. The sites of concern were federally, privately, and institutionally owned and were used primarily for research, processing, and storage of uranium and thorium ores, concentrates, or residues. Some sites were subsequently released for other purposes without radiological restriction. Surveys have been conducted since 1974 to document radiological conditions at such sites. Based on radiological surveys, sites are identified in this document that require, or are projected to require, remedial action to remove potential restrictions on the use of the property due to the presence of residual low-level radioactive contamination. Specific recommendations for each site will result from more detailed environmental and engineering surveys to be conducted at those sites and, if necessary, an environmental impact assessment or environmental impact statement will be prepared. Section 3.0 describes the current standards and guidelines now being used to conduct remedial actions. Current authority of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to proceed with remedial actions and the new authority required are summarized. A plan to implement the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) in accordance with the new authority is presented, including the objectives, scope, general approach, and a summary schedule. Key issues affecting schedule and cost are discussed.

  8. National conference on environmental remediation science and technology: Abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This conference was held September 8--10, 1998 in Greensboro, North Carolina. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on methods and site characterization technologies for environmental monitoring and remedial action planning of hazardous materials. This report contains the abstracts of sixty-one papers presented at the conference.

  9. In-Situ Thermal Remediation of Contaminated Soil1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lapin, Sergey

    Chapter 1 In-Situ Thermal Remediation of Contaminated Soil1 Written by Huaxiong Huang,2 Serguei Lapin and Rex Westbrook 1.1 Background Recently, a method for removing contaminants from soil (several as follows. Over a period of several weeks, electrical energy is introduced to the contaminated soil using

  10. Remediation of arsenic-contaminated soils and groundwaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peters, Robert W. (Naperville, IL); Frank, James R. (Glen Ellyn, IL); Feng, Xiandong (West Richland, WA)

    1998-01-01

    An in situ method for extraction of arsenic contaminants from a soil medium and remediation of the medium including contacting the medium with an extractant solution, directing the solution within and through the medium, and collecting the solution and contaminants. The method can also be used for arsenate and/or arsenite removal.

  11. Remediation of arsenic-contaminated soils and groundwaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peters, R.W.; Frank, J.R.; Feng, X.

    1998-06-23

    An in situ method is described for extraction of arsenic contaminants from a soil medium and remediation of the medium including contacting the medium with an extractant solution, directing the solution within and through the medium, and collecting the solution and contaminants. The method can also be used for arsenate and/or arsenite removal. 8 figs.

  12. In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to a system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil. In particular the present invention relates to stabilizing toxic metals in groundwater and soil. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

  13. Recovery Act Begins Box Remediation Operations at F Canyon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – The F Canyon box remediation program, an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project at Savannah River Site (SRS), has come online to process legacy transuranic (TRU) waste for off-site shipment and permanent disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a geological repository in New Mexico.

  14. Deep Borehole Disposal Remediation Costs for Off-Normal Outcomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, John T.; Cochran, John R.; Hardin, Ernest

    2015-08-17

    This memo describes rough-order-of-magnitude (ROM) cost estimates for a set of off-normal (accident) scenarios, as defined for two waste package emplacement method options for deep borehole disposal: drill-string and wireline. It summarizes the different scenarios and the assumptions made for each, with respect to fishing, decontamination, remediation, etc.

  15. In-Situ Radiological Surveys to Address Nuclear Criticality Safety Requirements During Remediation Activities at the Shallow Land Disposal Area, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania - 12268

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, Phillip; Mihalo, Mark; Eberlin, John; Lambert, Mike; Matthews, Brian

    2012-07-01

    Cabrera Services Inc. (CABRERA) is the remedial contractor for the Shallow Land Disposal Area (SLDA) Site in Armstrong County Pennsylvania, a United States (US) Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District (USACE) contract. The remediation is being completed under the USACE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) which was established to identify, investigate, and clean up or control sites previously used by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its predecessor, the Manhattan Engineer District (MED). As part of the management of the FUSRAP, the USACE is overseeing investigation and remediation of radiological contamination at the SLDA Site in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), 42 US Code (USC), Section 9601 et. seq, as amended and, the National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP), Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Section 300.430(f) (2). The objective of this project is to clean up radioactive waste at SLDA. The radioactive waste contains special nuclear material (SNM), primarily U-235, in 10 burial trenches, Cabrera duties include processing, packaging and transporting the waste to an offsite disposal facility in accordance with the selected remedial alternative as defined in the Final Record of Decision (USACE, 2007). Of particular importance during the remediation is the need to address nuclear criticality safety (NCS) controls for the safe exhumation and management of waste containing fissile materials. The partnership between Cabrera Services, Inc. and Measutronics Corporation led to the development of a valuable survey tool and operating procedure that are essential components of the SLDA Criticality Safety and Material Control and Accountability programs. Using proven existing technologies in the design and manufacture of the Mobile Survey Cart, the continued deployment of the Cart will allow for an efficient and reliable methodology to allow for the safe exhumation of the Special Nuclear Material in existing SLDA trenches. (authors)

  16. Addendum to the East Tennessee Technology Park Site-Wide Residual Contamination Remedial Investigation Work Plan Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAIC

    2011-04-01

    The East Tennessee Technology Park Site-Wide Residual Contamination Remedial Investigation Work Plan (DOE 2004) describes the planned fieldwork to support the remedial investigation (RI) for residual contamination at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) not addressed in previous Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) decisions. This Addendum describes activities that will be conducted to gather additional information in Zone 1 of the ETTP for groundwater, surface water, and sediments. This Addendum has been developed from agreements reached in meetings held on June 23, 2010, August 25, 2010, October 13, 2010, November 13, 2010, December 1, 2010, and January 13, 2011, with representatives of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). Based on historical to recent groundwater data for ETTP and the previously completed Sitewide Remedial Investigation for the ETTP (DOE 2007a), the following six areas of concern have been identified that exhibit groundwater contamination downgradient of these areas above state of Tennessee and EPA drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs): (1) K-720 Fly Ash Pile, (2) K-770 Scrap Yard, (3) Duct Island, (4) K-1085 Firehouse Burn/J.A. Jones Maintenance Area, (5) Contractor's Spoil Area (CSA), and (6) Former K-1070-A Burial Ground. The paper presents a brief summary of the history of the areas, the general conceptual models for the observed groundwater contamination, and the data gaps identified.

  17. Use of Facility Contractor Employees for Services to DOE in the Washington, D.C., Area

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-04-15

    To clarify and modify policies and procedures for management of Department of Energy (DOE) facility contractor employees located in the Washington, D.C., area. A facility contractor employee is any employee of either a contractor responsible for managing a Department-owned facility, such as a National Laboratory, or a subcontractor of such a contractor. Facility contractor means any contractor performing under a Management and Operating (M&O), Management and Integration (M&I), or Environmental Restoration Management Contractor (ERMC) contract awarded by a DOE contracting officer. Canceled by DOE O 350.2.

  18. Apparatus and method for extraction of chemicals from aquifer remediation effluent water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMurtrey, Ryan D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moor, Kenneth S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Shook, G. Michael (Idaho Falls, ID); Moses, John M. (Dedham, MA); Barker, Donna L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for extraction of chemicals from an aquifer remediation aqueous effluent are provided. The extraction method utilizes a critical fluid for separation and recovery of chemicals employed in remediating aquifers contaminated with hazardous organic substances, and is particularly suited for separation and recovery of organic contaminants and process chemicals used in surfactant-based remediation technologies. The extraction method separates and recovers high-value chemicals from the remediation effluent and minimizes the volume of generated hazardous waste. The recovered chemicals can be recycled to the remediation process or stored for later use.

  19. Method and system for extraction of chemicals from aquifer remediation effluent water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMurtrey, Ryan D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moor, Kenneth S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Shook, G. Michael (Idaho Falls, ID); Barker, Donna L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2003-01-01

    A method and system for extraction of chemicals from an groundwater remediation aqueous effluent are provided. The extraction method utilizes a critical fluid for separation and recovery of chemicals employed in remediating groundwater contaminated with hazardous organic substances, and is particularly suited for separation and recovery of organic contaminants and process chemicals used in surfactant-based remediation technologies. The extraction method separates and recovers high-value chemicals from the remediation effluent and minimizes the volume of generated hazardous waste. The recovered chemicals can be recycled to the remediation process or stored for later use.

  20. http://www.washington.edu/admin/pb/home/ Date: June 16, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    http://www.washington.edu/admin/pb/home/ Page 1 Date: June 16, 2011 Subject: Latest Washington million Based on New Revenue Projections On Thursday, June 16, the Washington State Economic and Revenue in Washington, non-residential construction remains embroiled in the worst downturn in over 30 years, overall

  1. IT'S BEEN 25 YEARS Twenty-five years ago, the Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrajt, Graciela

    IT'S BEEN 25 YEARS Twenty-five years ago, the Washington State Legislature authorized two new UW to us by the state of Washington: to provide access to a University of Washington education@uwb.edu THE UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON BOTHELL opens the door to an internationally and nationally-ranked university

  2. CHDD Outlook News from the Center on Human Development and Disability at the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Washington CHDD IDDRC UCEDD Understanding the Connection Between Intellectual Disability and Juvenile Justice), is collaborating with the Washington State Developmental Disabilities Council and Disability Rights Washington of Washington Trust Fund, a nonprofit organization that promotes the rights of people with IDD, Brown

  3. SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN PLANNING ECOREGION WILDLIFE ASSESSMENT 208 Appendix A: Assessment Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN PLANNING ECOREGION WILDLIFE ASSESSMENT 208 Appendix A: Assessment Tools #12;SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON SUBBASIN PLANNING ECOREGION WILDLIFE ASSESSMENT A-1 Interactive and Washington during the Wildlife-Habitat Types in Oregon and Washington project. IBIS data is currently being

  4. Verification of EPA's ''Preliminary Remediation Goals for radionuclides'' (PRG) electronic calculator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, Tim; Stagich, Brooke

    2015-08-28

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requested an external, independent verification study of their updated “Preliminary Remediation Goals for Radionuclides” (PRG) electronic calculator. The calculator provides PRGs for radionuclides that are used as a screening tool at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) sites. These risk-based PRGs establish concentration limits under specific exposure scenarios. The purpose of this verification study is to determine that the calculator has no inherit numerical problems with obtaining solutions as well as to ensure that the equations are programmed correctly. There are 167 equations used in the calculator. To verify the calculator, all equations for each of seven receptor types (resident, construction worker, outdoor and indoor worker, recreator, farmer, and composite worker) were hand calculated using the default parameters. The same four radionuclides (Am-241, Co-60, H-3, and Pu-238) were used for each calculation for consistency throughout.

  5. Fiscal year 1996 annual report to stakeholders, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This is the Fiscal Year (FY) 1996 annual report on the status of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. In 1978, Congress directed the DOE to assess and clean up contamination at 24 designated former uranium processing sites. The DOE is also responsible for cleaning up properties in the vicinity of the sites where wind and water erosion deposited tailings or people removed them from the site for use in construction of landscaping. Cleanup is being undertaken in cooperation with state governments and Indian tribes within whose boundaries the sites are located. It is being conducted in two phases: the surface project and the ground water project. This report addresses specifics about the surface phase of the UMTRA Project.

  6. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project fiscal year 1997 annual report to stakeholders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The fiscal year (FY) 1997 annual report is the 19th report on the status of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. In 1978, Congress directed the DOE to assess and clean up contamination at 24 designated former uranium processing sites. The DOE is also responsible for cleaning up properties in the vicinity of the sites where wind and water erosion deposited tailings or people removed them from the site for use in construction or landscaping. Cleanup has been undertaken in cooperation with state governments and Indian tribes within whose boundaries the sites are located. It is being conducted in two phases: the surface project and the groundwater project. This report addresses specifics about the UMTRA surface project.

  7. Tank waste remediation system program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, R.W.

    1998-01-09

    This TWRS Program plan presents the planning requirements and schedules and management strategies and policies for accomplishing the TWRS Project mission. It defines the systems and practices used to establish consistency for business practices, engineering, physical configuration and facility documentation, and to maintain this consistency throughout the program life cycle, particularly as changes are made. Specifically, this plan defines the following: Mission needs and requirements (what must be done and when must it be done); Technical objectives/approach (how well must it be done); Organizational structure and philosophy (roles, responsibilities, and interfaces); and Operational methods (objectives and how work is to be conducted in both management and technical areas). The plan focuses on the TWRS Retrieval and Disposal Mission and supports the DOE mid-1998 Readiness to Proceed with Privatized Waste Treatment evaluation for establishing contracts with private contractors for the treatment (immobilization) of Hanford tank high-level radioactive waste.

  8. Fiscal Year 2006 Washington Closure Hanford Science & Technology Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.J. Kroegler, M. Truex, D.J. McBride

    2006-01-19

    This Washington Closure Hanford science and technology (S&T) plan documents the activities associated with providing S&T support to the River Corridor Closure Project for fiscal year 2006.

  9. Washington: Sustainability Training for Realtors in High Demand...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sustainability Training for Realtors in High Demand Washington: Sustainability Training for Realtors in High Demand March 6, 2014 - 5:50pm Addthis Demand has been high for a free...

  10. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety Design Guide Mercury used in many laboratory areas on campus. All laboratory areas and former laboratory areas should. Cleanup by a hazardous materials contractor is required before demolition or construction can begin

  11. Independent Activity Report, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC- October 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Industrial Hygiene Surveillance of the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Industrial Hygiene Program Strategy and Implementation of the Hanford Concerns Council Recommendations [HIAR-ORP-2011-10-26

  12. Secretary Chu Speaks at the 2010 Washington Auto Show

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    at the 2010 Washington Auto Show, Secretary Chu lays out a roadmap for how the U.S. can lead the world in making the clean vehicles we need. He also announced that the Department of Energy had...

  13. FCTCP 6-5-08 UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    -2017 University of Washington Tacoma." She explained that Tacoma was in the process of creating a strategic plan has been in conversation with the President for the last year and a half about organizing UW Tacoma

  14. Final Report: Feasibility Study of Biomass in Snohomish County, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daryl Williams; Ray Clark

    2005-01-31

    This report and its attachments summarizes the results of a unique tribal-farmer cooperative study to evaluate the feasibility of building one or more regional anaerobic digestion systems in Snohomish County, Washington.

  15. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON FACULTY COUNCIL ON WOMEN IN ACADEMIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    Silberstein adjourned the meeting at 1:21 p.m. ********************* Minutes by Alex Bolton Council Support Analyst bolt@u.washington.edu Present: Faculty: Silberstein (Chair), Iarocci, Mescher, Olmstead President

  16. Washington Sea Grant Kate Litle, Citizen Science Specialist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrington, Emily

    Washington Sea Grant Kate Litle, Citizen Science Specialist Michelle Wainstein, Senior Program Stewardship Program Director Citizen Science Advisory Panel Citizen Science Harnessing to State University (WSU) Extension to develop recommendations for advancing citizen science to meet Action

  17. Washington State Department of Ecology: Replacement Wells Requiring...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington State Department of Ecology: Replacement Wells Requiring a Water Right Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther:...

  18. Washington Post, Sept. 15, 2005 Communication Challenges After the Hurricane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peha, Jon M.

    Washington Post, Sept. 15, 2005 Communication Challenges After the Hurricane Jon M. Peha Many survivors of Hurricane Katrina who tried to call for rescue or medical assistance found that their cell

  19. Math/Stat 370: Engineering Statistics, Washington State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haijun

    8 10 x u = 5, v = 15 f(x) u = 5, v = 5 f1 ­ , ,u v f (x) Haijun Li Math/Stat 370: Engineering f1 ­ , , f, ,u v u v f (x) Haijun Li Math/Stat 370: Engineering Statistics, Washington State f1-,n1-1,n2-1. Haijun Li Math/Stat 370: Engineering Statistics, Washington State University Week 11

  20. Five-Year Review of CERCLA Response Actions at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. L. Jolley

    2007-02-01

    This report summarizes the documentation submitted in support of the five-year review or remedial actions implemented under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Sitewide at the Idaho National Laboratory. The report also summarizes documentation and inspections conducted at the no-further-action sites. This review covered actions conducted at 9 of the 10 waste area groups at the Idaho National Laboratory, i.e. Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10. Waste Area Group 8 was not subject to this review, because it does not fall under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office. The review included past site inspections and monitoring data collected in support of the remedial actions. The remedial actions have been completed at Waste Area Groups 2, 4, 5, 6, and 9. Remedial action reports have been completed for Waste Area Groups 2 and 4, and remedial action reports are expected to be completed during 2005 for Waste Area Groups 1, 5, and 9. Remediation is ongoing at Waste Area Groups 3, 7, and 10. Remedial investigations are yet to be completed for Operable Units 3-14, 7-13/14, and 10-08. The review showed that the remedies have been constructed in accordance with the requirements of the Records of Decision and are functioning as designed. Immediate threats have been addressed, and the remedies continue to be protective. Potential short-term threats are being addressed though institutional controls. Soil cover and cap remedies are being maintained properly and inspected in accordance with the appropriate requirements. Soil removal actions and equipment or system removals have successfully achieved remedial action objectives identified in the Records of Decision. The next Sitewide five-year review is scheduled for completion by 2011.

  1. Decontamination formulation with additive for enhanced mold remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker, Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM); Irvine, Kevin (Huntsville, AL); Berger, Paul (Rome, NY); Comstock, Robert (Bel Air, MD)

    2010-02-16

    Decontamination formulations with an additive for enhancing mold remediation. The formulations include a solubilizing agent (e.g., a cationic surfactant), a reactive compound (e.g., hydrogen peroxide), a carbonate or bicarbonate salt, a water-soluble bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate), a mold remediation enhancer containing Fe or Mn, and water. The concentration of Fe.sup.2+ or Mn.sup.2+ ions in the aqueous mixture is in the range of about 0.0001% to about 0.001%. The enhanced formulations can be delivered, for example, as a foam, spray, liquid, fog, mist, or aerosol for neutralization of chemical compounds, and for killing certain biological compounds or agents and mold spores, on contaminated surfaces and materials.

  2. In-situ groundwater remediation by selective colloid mobilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seaman, John C. (New Ellenton, SC); Bertch, Paul M. (Aiken, SC)

    1998-01-01

    An in-situ groundwater remediation pump and treat technique effective for reclamation of aquifers that have been contaminated with a mixed, metal-containing waste, which promotes selective mobilization of metal oxide colloids with a cationic surfactant, preferably a quaternary alkylammonium surfactant, without significantly reducing formation permeability that often accompanies large-scale colloid dispersion, thus increasing the efficiency of the remediation effort by enhancing the capture of strongly sorbing contaminants associated with the oxide phases. The resulting suspension can be separated from the bulk solution with controlled pH adjustments to destabilize the oxide colloids, and a clear supernatant which results that can be recycled through the injection well without further waste treatment.

  3. In-situ groundwater remediation by selective colloid mobilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seaman, J.C.; Bertch, P.M.

    1998-12-08

    An in-situ groundwater remediation pump and treat technique is described which is effective for reclamation of aquifers that have been contaminated with a mixed, metal-containing waste, and which promotes selective mobilization of metal oxide colloids with a cationic surfactant, preferably a quaternary alkylammonium surfactant, without significantly reducing formation permeability that often accompanies large-scale colloid dispersion, thus increasing the efficiency of the remediation effort by enhancing the capture of strongly sorbing contaminants associated with the oxide phases. The resulting suspension can be separated from the bulk solution with controlled pH adjustments to destabilize the oxide colloids, and a clear supernatant which results that can be recycled through the injection well without further waste treatment. 3 figs.

  4. In situ RF/microwave remediation of soil experiment overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regan, A.H.; Palomares, M.E.; Polston, C.; Rees, D.E.; Roybal, W.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ross, T.J. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Contaminant plumes are significant waste problems that require remediation in both the government and private sectors. The authors are developing an in situ process that uses RF/microwave stimulation to remove pollutants from contaminated soils. This process is more efficient than existing technologies, creates less secondary pollution, and is applicable to situations that are not amenable to treatment by existing technologies. Currently, the most commonly used process is soil vapor extraction. However, even when it is successful, this technology is energy inefficient. The authors objective is to combine RF/microwave energy application with soil vapor extraction to help mobilize and efficiently remove the soil contaminants, specifically demonstrating the viability of RF/microwave induced, in situ, soil remediation of light and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPL, DNAPL) contaminants.

  5. Decommissioning of the remediation systems at Waverly, Nebraska, in 2011-2012.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2012-06-29

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility in Waverly, Nebraska, from 1952 to 1974. During this time, the grain fumigant '80/20' (carbon tetrachloride/carbon disulfide) was used to preserve stored grain. In 1982, sampling by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) found carbon tetrachloride contamination in the town's groundwater. After an investigation of the contaminant distribution, the site was placed on the National Priority List (NPL) in 1986, and the CCC/USDA accepted responsibility for the contamination. An Interagency Compliance Agreement between the EPA and the CCC/USDA was finalized in May 1988 (EPA 1990). The EPA (Woodward-Clyde Consultants, contractor) started immediate cleanup efforts in 1987 with the installation of an air stripper, a soil vapor extraction system, a groundwater extraction well, and groundwater and soil gas monitoring wells (Woodward-Clyde 1986, 1988a,b). After the EPA issued its Record of Decision (ROD; EPA 1990), the CCC/USDA (Argonne National Laboratory, contractor) took over operation of the treatment systems. The CCC/USDA conducted a site investigation (Argonne 1991, 1992a,b), during which a carbon tetrachloride plume in groundwater was discovered northeast of the former facility. This plume was not being captured by the existing groundwater extraction system. The remediation system was modified in 1994 (Argonne 1993) with the installation of a second groundwater extraction well to contain the contamination further. Subsequently, a detailed evaluation of the system resulted in a recommendation to pump only the second well to conserve water in the aquifer (Argonne 1995). Sampling and analysis after implementation of this recommendation showed continued decreases in the extent and concentrations of the contamination with only one well pumping (Argonne 1999). The CCC/USDA issued quarterly monitoring reports from 1988 to 2009. Complete documentation of the CCC/USDA characterization and remediation efforts, including the quarterly monitoring reports, is on the compact disc inside the back cover of this report. The EPA reported on the progress of the remediation systems in a series of five-year reviews (EPA 1993, 1999, 2004, 2009). These reports and other EPA documentation are also on the compact disc inside the back cover of this report, along with the Woodward-Clyde (1986, 1988a,b) documentation cited. Starting in 2006, the analytical results for groundwater (the only medium still being monitored) showed no carbon tetrachloride concentrations above the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5.0 g/L. Because the cleanup goals specified in the ROD (EPA 1990) had been met, the EPA removed the site from the NPL in November 2006 (Appendix A). In 2008 the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for the remediation system was deactivated, and a year later the EPA released its fourth and final five-year report (EPA 2009), indicating that no further action was required for the site and that the site was ready for unlimited use. In 2011-2012, the CCC/USDA decommissioned the remediation systems at Waverly. This report documents the decommission process and closure of the site.

  6. Testing and development strategy for the tank waste remediation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddick, G.W.

    1994-12-01

    This document provides a strategy for performing radioactive (hot) and nonradioactive testing to support processing tank waste. It evaluates the need for hot pilot plant(s) to support pretreatment and other processing functions and presents a strategy for performing hot test work. A strategy also is provided for nonradioactive process and equipment testing. The testing strategy supports design, construction, startup, and operation of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) facilities.

  7. Testing and development strategy for the tank waste remediation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddick, G.W.

    1995-05-10

    This document provides a strategy for performing radioactive (hot) and nonradioactive testing to support processing tank waste. It evaluates the need for hot pilot plant(s) to support pretreatment and other processing functions and presents a strategy for performing hot test work. A strategy also is provided for nonradioactive process and equipment testing. The testing strategy supports design, construction, startup, and operation of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) facilities.

  8. Level 1 remedial investigation work plan, 300 Area Process Ponds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    This report discusses the objectives of the site characterization for the 300 Area Process Ponds which are to identify and quantify contamination at the ponds and to estimate their potential impact on human health and the environment. The results of the site characterization will be used to identify any future actions related to contamination at the site and to identify any additional data requirements needed to support selection of a remedial action. 9 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: FY 1994 program summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Technology Development (EM-50) as an element of the Office of Environmental Management (EM) in November 1989. In an effort to focus resources and address priority needs, EM-50 introduced the concept of integrated programs (IPs) and integrated demonstrations (IDs). The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) focuses research and development on the in-place treatment of contaminated environmental media, such as soil and groundwater, and the containment of contaminants to prevent the contaminants from spreading through the environment. Using in situ remediation technologies to clean up DOE sites minimizes adverse health effects on workers and the public by reducing contact exposure. The technologies also reduce cleanup costs by orders of magnitude. This report summarizes project work conducted in FY 1994 under the ISR IP in three major areas: treatment (bioremediation), treatment (physical/chemical), and containment technologies. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized waste are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive waste, volatile and nonvolatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials.

  10. Long term performance of different radon remedial methods in Sweden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clavensjoe, B

    2002-01-01

    The object of this project was to investigate the long time effectiveness of different radon remedial methods. The ten years project started 1991. From start the investigation comprised of 105 dwellings (91 single-family houses and 14 flats in multi-family buildings). In all of the dwellings remedial measures were carried out in the eighties. Before and immediately after the reduction the local measured the radon concentrations. New measurements of the radon concentrations have been made every third year; in 1991, 1994, 1997 and in 2000. Twelve different radon remedial methods and method combinations were used. The radon sources were building materials as well as sub-soils. In all of the dwellings the radon concentrations were measured by nuclear track films during 3 months (January-March) measurements and in half of them the air change rates by passive tracer gas methods. The results of the 2000 and the 1991 (within brackets) studies showed that the radon concentration was up to 200 Bq/m sup 3 in 54 (54) sin...

  11. A WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY POSTDOCTORAL POSITION FOR EXPERIMENTS WITH ULTRACOLD The Department of Physics and Astronomy, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA, invites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    A WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY POSTDOCTORAL POSITION FOR EXPERIMENTS WITH ULTRACOLD ATOMS The Department of Physics and Astronomy, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA, invites applications and the salary will be commensurate with experience and qualifications. ATOMIC PHYSICS GROUP AT WASHINGTON STATE

  12. University of Washington, Seattle White paper for international collaboration on QUEST in Japan White Paper for University of Washington Collaboration with the QUEST-ST in Japan to develop long-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Washington, Seattle ­ White paper for international collaboration on QUEST in Japan 1/2 White Paper for University of Washington Collaboration with the QUEST-ST in Japan to develop long- pulse. Jarboe, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 E-mails: raman@aa.washington.edu and Jarboe@aa.washington

  13. EIS-0189: Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS), Richland, WA (Programmatic)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This environmental impact statement evaluates the Department of Energy (DOE)'s, in cooperation with the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), decisions on how to properly manage and dispose of Hanford Site tank waste and encapsulated cesium and strontium to reduce existing and potential future risk to the public, Site workers, and the environment. The waste includes radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste currently stored in 177 underground storage tanks, approximately 60 other smaller active and inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks (MUSTs), and additional Site waste likely to be added to the tank waste, which is part of the tank farm system. In addition, DOE proposes to manage and dispose of approximately 1,930 cesium and strontium capsules that are by-products of tank waste. The tank waste and capsules are located in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington.

  14. Nano Catalysts for Diesel Engine Emission Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Yang, Xiaofan; Debusk, Melanie Moses; Mullins, David R; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Wu, Zili

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this project was to develop durable zeolite nanocatalysts with broader operating temperature windows to treat diesel engine emissions to enable diesel engine based equipment and vehicles to meet future regulatory requirements. A second objective was to improve hydrothermal durability of zeolite catalysts to at least 675 C. The results presented in this report show that we have successfully achieved both objectives. Since it is accepted that the first step in NO{sub x} conversion under SCR (selective catalytic reduction) conditions involves NO oxidation to NO{sub 2}, we reasoned that catalyst modification that can enhance NO oxidation at low-temperatures should facilitate NO{sub x} reduction at low temperatures. Considering that Cu-ZSM-5 is a more efficient catalyst than Fe-ZSM-5 at low-temperature, we chose to modify Cu-ZSM-5. It is important to point out that the poor low-temperature efficiency of Fe-ZSM-5 has been shown to be due to selective absorption of NH{sub 3} at low-temperatures rather than poor NO oxidation activity. In view of this, we also reasoned that an increased electron density on copper in Cu-ZSM-5 would inhibit any bonding with NH{sub 3} at low-temperatures. In addition to modified Cu-ZSM-5, we synthesized a series of new heterobimetallic zeolites, by incorporating a secondary metal cation M (Sc{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 3+}, In{sup 3+}, and La{sup 3+}) in Cu exchanged ZSM-5, zeolite-beta, and SSZ-13 zeolites under carefully controlled experimental conditions. Characterization by diffuse-reflectance ultra-violet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) does not permit conclusive structural determination but supports the proposal that M{sup 3+} has been incorporated in the vicinity of Cu(II). The protocols for degreening catalysts, testing under various operating conditions, and accelerated aging conditions were provided by our collaborators at John Deere Power Systems. Among various zeolites reported here, CuFe-SSZ-13 offers the best NO{sub x} conversion activity in 150-650 C range and is hydrothermally stable when tested under accelerated aging conditions. It is important to note that Cu-SSZ-13 is now a commercial catalyst for NO{sub x} treatment on diesel passenger vehicles. Thus, our catalyst performs better than the commercial catalyst under fast SCR conditions. We initially focused on fast SCR tests to enable us to screen catalysts rapidly. Only the catalysts that exhibit high NO{sub x} conversion at low temperatures are selected for screening under varying NO{sub 2}:NO{sub x} ratio. The detailed tests of CuFe-SSZ-13 show that CuFe-SSZ-13 is more effective than commercial Cu-SSZ-13 even at NO{sub 2}:NO{sub x} ratio of 0.1. The mechanistic studies, employing stop-flow diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy (DRIFTS), suggest that high concentration of NO{sup +}, generated by heterobimetallic zeolites, is probably responsible for their superior low temperature NO{sub x} activity. The results described in this report clearly show that we have successfully completed the first step in a new emission treatment catalyst which is synthesis and laboratory testing employing simulated exhaust. The next step in the catalyst development is engine testing. Efforts are in progress to obtain follow-on funding to carry out scale-up and engine testing to facilitate commercialization of this technology.

  15. Waste Area Grouping 2 Remedial Investigation Phase 1 Seep Task data report: Contaminant source area assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hicks, D.S.

    1996-03-01

    This report presents the findings of the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2, Phase 1 Remedial Investigation (RI) Seep Task efforts during 1993 and 1994 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The results presented here follow results form the first year of sampling, 1992, which are contained in the Phase 1 RI report for WAG 2 (DOE 1995a). The WAG 2 Seep Task efforts focused on contaminants in seeps, tributaries, and main streams within the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed. This report is designed primarily as a reference for contaminants and a resource for guiding remedial decisions. Additional in-depth assessments of the Seep Task data may provide clearer understandings of contaminant transport from the different source areas in the WOC watershed. WAG 2 consists of WOC and its tributaries downstream of the ORNL main plant area, White Oak Lake, the White Oak Creek Embayment of the Clinch River, and the associated flood plains and subsurface environment. The WOC watershed encompasses ORNL and associated WAGs. WAG 2 acts as an integrator for contaminant releases from the contaminated sites at ORNL and as the conduit transporting contaminants to the Clinch River. The main objectives of the Seep Task were to identify and characterize seeps, tributaries and source areas that are responsible for the contaminant releases to the main streams in WAG 2 and to quantify their input to the total contaminant release from the watershed at White Oak Dam (WOD). Efforts focused on {sup 90}Sr, {sup 3}H, and {sup 137}Cs because these contaminants pose the greatest potential human health risk from water ingestion at WOD. Bimonthly sampling was conducted throughout the WOC watershed beginning in March 1993 and ending in August 1994. Samples were also collected for metals, anions, alkalinity, organics, and other radionuclides.

  16. Remediation of Deep Vadose Zone Radionuclide and Metal Contamination: Status and Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresel, P. Evan; Truex, Michael J.; Cantrell, Keri

    2008-12-30

    This report documents the results of a PNNL literature review to report on the state of maturity of deep vadose zone remediation technologies for metal contaminants including some radionuclides. Its recommendations feed into decisionmakers need for scientific information and cost-effective in situ remediation technlogies needed under DOE's Environmental Management initiative Enhanced Remediation Methods: Scientific & Technical Basis for In Stu Treatment Systems for Metals and Radionuclides.

  17. A STUDY OF ROCK-WATER-NUCLEAR WASTE INTERACTIONS IN THE PASCO BASIN, WASHINGTON -- Part: Distribution and Composition of Secondary and Primary Mineral Phases in Basalts of the Pasco Basin, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, L.V.

    2010-01-01

    IN THE PASCO BASIN, WASHINGTON PART I DISTRIBUTION ANDOF THE PASCO BASIN, WASHINGTON L. V. Benson and L. S. TeagueBasin of southeastern Washington. In particular, we have

  18. Savannah River Remediation Donates $10,000 to South Carolina State Nuclear Engineering Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    *Editor's note: This article is cross-posted from Savannah River Remediation's website, where it was posted on September 28, 2012.

  19. EIS-0195: Remedial Actions at Operable Unit 4, Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to conduct remedial action at Operable Unit 4 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project.

  20. Versatile microbial surface-display for environmental remediation and biofuels production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawkes, Daniel S

    2008-01-01

    engineering microbes for biofuels production. Science 315,xenobiotics remediation and biofuels production. TargetP. putida JS444 E. coli Biofuels Production Cellobiose

  1. Hardboiled Performance and Affective Intimacy: Remediations of Racism in the Cenk Batu Tatorte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breger, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Intimacy: Remediations of Racism in the Cenk Batu Tatorteremediation with respect to racism in contemporary Germany.and mainstreaming, of anti-Muslim racism. 5 In this social

  2. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CHPlateau Remediation Contract Hanford Site- March 2011

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Evaluation to determine whether Plateau Remediation Contract Hanford Site is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

  3. Frances Marcus Lewis, RN, MN, PhD, FAAN Professor, Department of Family & Child Nursing, University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brent, Roger

    of Washington Frances Marcus Lewis, RN, MN, PhD, FAAN is a Professor in the Department of Family& Child Nursing at the University of Washington, sits as the University of Washington Medical Center Professor of Nursing Leadership

  4. Remedial investigation work plan for Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (Rust Spoil Area, SY-200 Yard, Spoil Area 1) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The enactment of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in 1976 and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to RCRA in 1984 created management requirements for hazardous waste facilities. The facilities within the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) were in the process of meeting the RCRA requirements when ORR was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) National Priorities List (NPL) on November 21, 1989. Under RCRA, the actions typically follow the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA)/RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI)/Corrective Measures Study (CMS)/Corrective Measures implementation process. Under CERCLA the actions follow the PA/SI/Remedial Investigation (RI)/Feasibility Study (FS)/Remedial Design/Remedial Action process. The development of this document will incorporate requirements under both RCRA and CERCLA into an RI work plan for the characterization of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Operable Unit (OU) 2.

  5. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project environmental protection implementation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP is updated annually. This version covers the time period of 9 November 1994, through 8 November 1995. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies.

  6. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. 1995 Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 23 1. 1, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, the DOE prepares an annual report to document the activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring program. This monitoring must comply with appropriate laws, regulations, and standards, and it must identify apparent and meaningful trends in monitoring results. The results of all monitoring activities must be communicated to the public. The UMTRA Project has prepared annual environmental reports to the public since 1989.

  7. Activities of HPS standards committee in environmental remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.; Chen, S.Y.

    1994-12-31

    The Health Physics Society (HPS) develops American National Standards in the area of radiation protection using methods approved by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Two of its sections, Environmental Health Physics and Contamination Limits, have ongoing standards development which are important to some environmental remediation efforts. This paper describes the role of the HPS standards process and indicates particular standards under development which will be of interest to the reader. In addition, the authors solicit readers to participate in the voluntary standards process by either joining active working groups (WG) or suggesting appropriate and relevant topics which should be placed into the standards process.

  8. 100-D/H Remedial Investigation/ Feasibility Study /Proposed Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-InspiredAtmosphericdevicesPPO Retirees withEnergy Special4 Mickey Remedial

  9. SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    , and Carbon, and Fuel Consumption in Shrub-dominated Ecosystems Royce Anderson Microarthropod Distribution: an Assessment of Regional Streamflow Response to Climate Change Jessica Farmer Variations in Types of Major Funding Partnerships in College and University Gardens Justina Harris Urbanization and Picea sitchensis

  10. Eme res rgency Procedu University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    immediately to your left as you enter. The drawer is labeled. The office Administrator is responsible office. There is also a fire extinguisher on top of the supply cabinet. Suspicious packages If a suspicious package arrives at the office: · Notify building security; · Place the package in a plastic bag

  11. Climate Action Plan Washington State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    construction and operation, including geothermal heating and cooling, natural day lighting, natural habitat of electric power and energy systems. Researchers in the College of Engineering and Architecture are working environment that fosters the conservation of natural resources, supports and enhances social responsibility

  12. Feasibility study for remedial action for the groundwater operable units at the chemical plant area and the ordnance works area, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-07-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Army (DA) are conducting an evaluation to identify the appropriate response action to address groundwater contamination at the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant (WSCP) and the Weldon Spring Ordnance Works (WSOW), respectively. The two areas are located in St. Charles County, about 48 km (30 rni) west of St. Louis. The groundwater operable unit (GWOU) at the WSCP is one of four operable units being evaluated by DOE as part of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). The groundwater operable unit at the WSOW is being evaluated by the DA as Operable Unit 2 (OU2); soil and pipeline contamination are being managed under Operable Unit 1 (OU1). Remedial activities at the WSCP and the WSOW are being conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Consistent with DOE policy, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) values have been incorporated into the CERCLA process. A remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan summarizing initial site conditions and providing site hydrogeological and exposure models was published in August of 1995 (DOE 1995). The remedial investigation (RI) and baseline risk assessment (BRA) have also recently been completed. The RI (DOE and DA 1998b) discusses in detail the nature, extent, fate, and transport of groundwater and spring water contamination. The BRA (DOE and DA 1998a) is a combined baseline assessment of potential human health and ecological impacts and provides the estimated potential health risks and ecological impacts associated with groundwater and springwater contamination if no remedial action were taken. This feasibility study (FS) has been prepared to evaluate potential options for addressing groundwater contamination at the WSCP and the WSOW. A brief description of the history and environmental setting of the sites is presented in Section 1.1, key information relative to the nature and extent of contamination is presented in Section 1.2, and the results of the BRA are summarized in Section 1.3. The objective of this FS is discussed in Section 1.4, and preliminary remediation goals are identified in Section 1.5. The organization of the remaining chapters of this FS is outlined in Section 1.6.

  13. PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [University of Washington-Tacoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [University of Washington-Tacoma] On ISSN: 0737-0024 print / 1532-7051 online DOI: 10.1080/07370020802016399 DownloadedBy:[UniversityofWashington-Tacoma

  14. Energy Secretary Moniz's Remarks at CSIS in Washington D.C. on...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Moniz's Remarks at CSIS in Washington D.C. on Energy Security 40 Years after the Embargo - As Delivered Energy Secretary Moniz's Remarks at CSIS in Washington D.C. on Energy...

  15. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3, Appendix B, Technical findings and conclusions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    This Remedial Investigation Report on Waste Area Grouping, (NVAG) 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was prepared in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for reporting, the results of a site chacterization for public review. This work was performed under Work Breakdown Structure 1.4.12.6.1.05.40.02 (Activity Data Sheet 3305, ``WAG 5``). Publication of this document meets a Federal Facility Agreement milestone of March 31, 1995. This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of investigations performed at WAG 5. It includes information on risk assessments that have evaluated long-term impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in this document forms the basis for decisions regarding, the need for subsequent remediation work at WAG 5.

  16. Scheduling the Remediation of Port Hope: Logistical and Regulatory Challenges of a Multiple Site Urban Remediation Project - 13119

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson Jones, Andrea; Lee, Angela; Palmeter, Tim

    2013-07-01

    The Port Hope Project is part of the larger CAN$1.28 billion Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI), a community-based program for the development and implementation of a safe, local, long-term management solution for historic Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) in the Municipalities of Port Hope and Clarington, Ontario, Canada. Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) is the Project Proponent, Public Works and Government Services (PWGSC) is managing the procurement of services and the MMM Group Limited - Conestoga Rovers and Associates Joint Venture (MMM-CRA Joint Venture) is providing detailed design and construction oversight and administration services for the Project. The Port Hope Project includes the construction of a long-term waste management facility (LTWMF) in the Municipality of Port Hope and the remediation of 18 (eighteen) large-scale LLRW, numerous small-scale sites still being identified and industrial sites within the Municipality. The total volume to be remediated is over one million cubic metres and will come from sites that include temporary storage sites, ravines, beaches, parks, private commercial and residential properties and vacant industrial sites all within the urban area of Port Hope. Challenges that will need to be overcome during this 10 year project include: - Requirements stipulated by the Environmental Assessment (EA) that affect Project logistics and schedule. - Coordination of site remediation with the construction schedule at the LTWMF. - Physical constraints on transport routes and at sites affecting production rates. - Despite being an urban undertaking, seasonal constrains for birds and fish (i.e., nesting and spawning seasons). - Municipal considerations. - Site-specific constraints. - Site interdependencies exist requiring consideration in the schedule. Several sites require the use of an adjacent site for staging. (authors)

  17. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1. Main text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    This is the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Crack (CR/PC) Operable Unit (OU). The CR/PC OU is located in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee and consists of the Clinch River and several of its embayments in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. These waters have received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. A remedial investigation has been conducted to determine the current nature and extent of any contamination and to assess the resulting risk to human health and the environment. The feasibility study evaluates remedial action alternatives to identify any that are feasible for implementation and that would effectively reduce risk. Historical studies had indicated that current problems would likely include {sup 137}Cs in sediment of the Clinch River, mercury in sediment and fish of Poplar Creek and PCBs and pesticides in fish from throughout the OU. Peak releases of mercury and {sup 137}Cs occurred over 35 years ago, and current releases are low. Past releases of PCBs from the ORR are poorly quantified, and current releases are difficult to quantify because levels are so low. The site characterization focused on contaminants in surface water, sediment, and biota. Contaminants in surface water were all found to be below Ambient Water Quality Criteria. Other findings included the following: elevated metals including cesium 137 and mercury in McCoy Branch sediments; PCBs and chlordane elevated in several fish species, presenting the only major human health risk, significant ecological risks in Poplar Creek but not in the Clinch River.

  18. Emission Testing of Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) Natural Gas and Diesel Transit Buses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melendez, M.; Taylor, J.; Wayne, W. S.; Smith, D.; Zuboy, J.

    2005-12-01

    An evaluation of emissions of natural gas and diesel buses operated by the Washington Metro Area Transit Authority.

  19. Potential Federal On-Site Solar Aggregation in Washington, D.C., and Maryland

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation describes potential Federal on-site solar aggregation opportunities in Washington, D.C., and Maryland.

  20. Demonstration of LED Retrofit Lamps at the Smithsonian Art Museum, Washington, DC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N. J.; Rosenfeld, S. M.

    2012-06-01

    GATEWAY program report on a demonstration of LED retrofit lamps at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC.