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Sample records for religious grantmaking civic

  1. Religious Worship Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Religious Worship Characteristics by Activity... Religious Worship Religious worship buildings are those in which people gather for religious activities. Basic Characteristics ...

  2. AVTA: 2013 Honda Civic HEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    VTO's National Laboratories have tested and collected both dynamometer and fleet data for the Honda Civic HEV (a hybrid electric vehicle).

  3. Religious Worship | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Building Types 1 References EIA CBECS Building Types U.S. Energy Information Administration (Oct 2008) Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleReligiousWorshi...

  4. 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas Home > Groups > Utility Rate Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 19 April, 2013 - 13:44 Apps challenge hackathon The folks at Rally...

  5. National Day of Civic Hacking | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Day of Civic Hacking Home > Blogs > Graham7781's blog Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 14 April, 2014 - 09:48 code community data Event...

  6. AVTA: 2012 CNG Honda Civic Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2012 Compressed Natural Gas Honda Civic GX. Baseline and other data collected at Idaho National Laboratory is in the attached documents. Baseline data collected at Argonne National Laboratory is available in summary and CSV form on the Argonne Downloadable Dynometer Database site (http://www.anl.gov/energy-systems/group/downloadable-dynamometer-databas...). Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing.

  7. American Indian Religious Freedom Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    American Indian Religious Freedom Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: American Indian Religious Freedom ActLegal...

  8. Development and Testing of an UltraBattery-Equipped Honda Civic Hybrid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sally Sun; Tyler Gray; Pattie Hovorka; Jeffrey Wishart; Donald Karner; James Francfort

    2012-08-01

    The UltraBattery Retrofit Project DP1.8 and Carbon Enriched Project C3, performed by ECOtality North America (ECOtality) and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Advanced Lead Acid Battery Consortium (ALABC), are established to demonstrate the suitability of advanced lead battery technology in hybrid electrical vehicles (HEVs). A profile, termed the “Simulated Honda Civic HEV Profile” (SHCHEVP) has been developed in Project DP1.8 in order to provide reproducible laboratory evaluations of different battery types under real-world HEV conditions. The cycle is based on the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycles and simulates operation of a battery pack in a Honda Civic HEV. One pass through the SHCHEVP takes 2,140 seconds and simulates 17.7 miles of driving. A complete nickel metal hydride (NiMH) battery pack was removed from a Honda Civic HEV and operated under SHCHEVP to validate the profile. The voltage behavior and energy balance of the battery during this operation was virtually the same as that displayed by the battery when in the Honda Civic operating on the dynamometer under the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycles, thus confirming the efficacy of the simulated profile. An important objective of the project has been to benchmark the performance of the UltraBatteries manufactured by both Furukawa Battery Co., Ltd., Japan (Furakawa) and East Penn Manufacturing Co., Inc. (East Penn). Accordingly, UltraBattery packs from both Furakawa and East Penn have been characterized under a range of conditions. Resistance measurements and capacity tests at various rates show that both battery types are very similar in performance. Both technologies, as well as a standard lead-acid module (included for baseline data), were evaluated under a simple HEV screening test. Both Furakawa and East Penn UltraBattery packs operated for over 32,000 HEV cycles, with minimal loss in performance; whereas the standard lead-acid unit experienced significant degradation after only 6,273 cycles. The high-carbon, ALABC battery manufactured in Project C3 also was tested under the advanced HEV schedule. Its performance was significantly better than the standard lead-acid unit, but was still inferior compared with the UltraBattery. The batteries supplied by Exide as part of the C3 Project performed well under the HEV screening test, especially at high temperatures. The results suggest that higher operating temperatures may improve the performance of lead-acid-based technologies operated under HEV conditions—it is recommended that life studies be conducted on these technologies under such conditions.

  9. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: American Indian Religious Freedom Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-11-01

    This Reference Book contains a copy of the American Indian Religious Freedom Act and guidance for DOE compliance with the statute. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically.

  10. 2010 Honda Civic Hybrid UltraBattery Conversion 5577 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Honda Civic HEV UltraBattery Conversion (VIN JHMFA3F24AS005577). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the AVTA for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the DOE.

  11. AVTA: 2010 Honda Civic HEV with Experimental Ultra Lead Acid Battery Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2010 Civic hybrid electric vehicle with an advanced experimental ultra-lead acid battery, an experimental vehicle not for sale. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  12. Religious and Philosophical Justifications for War: A Synthesis of Selected Literature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martzen, E

    2000-08-15

    The Critical Issues Forum (CIF) is a cooperative education program supported in part by the Department of Energy's Defense Programs. The Science and Technology Education Program (STEP) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory manages one component of this program. CIF engages high school students and teachers regarding issues of the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, arms control, and international security. These issues are viewed in light of their scientific, economic, socio-cultural, and political/geopolitical influences and implications. This year CIF's focus is on chemical and biological weapons (CBW). CBW is becoming more of a threat today than ever before. Many countries are developing these weapons. CBW also presents certain ethical dilemmas for many individuals, especially if those individuals feel it is their religious duty to use or avoid the use of such weapons. Religion has become an important determining factor in international security because many cultures, and even governments make decisions based on religious traditions. This paper is an attempt to look at these religions and philosophical traditions with an emphasis on views of ''just war''. The ultimate purpose of this paper is to promote awareness about religion's influence on international security issues. This paper was written by Cadet Ernst ''Mitch'' Martzen, AFROTC. He is an intern with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Science and Technology Education Program, under the guidance of Dr. Stephen C. Sesko, the director of LLNL's CIF program. Every major religion and ethical system has developed a societal concept of ''just war''. Today, the world's largest religions include Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism. Each faith lays claim to a heritage rich with thousands of years of history, and the power of great minds to support its ethical and moral beliefs. These religions have each developed separate and distinct beliefs regarding warfare. Whether those beliefs were developed through formal theological discourse, or through the dialogue in scriptures, they are valid and necessary today because they affect contemporary political action. Even today, many religious societies base their willingness to fight on the just war ethic that they hold.

  13. Evolution of Religious Beliefs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Humans may be distinguished from all other animals in having beliefs about the causal interaction of physical objects. Causal beliefs are a developmental primitive in human children; animals, by contrast, have very few causal beliefs. The origin of human causal beliefs comes from the evolutionary advantage it gave in relation to complex tool making and use. Causal beliefs gave rise religion and mystical thinking as our ancestors wanted to know the causes of events that affected their lives.

  14. City of Eagan …Civic Ice Arena Renovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Provide a reliable central ice making and heating system that meets the performance requirements of the owner. Reduce operation and maintenance costs.

  15. Development and Testing of an UltraBattery-Equipped Honda Civic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Karner

    2012-04-01

    The UltraBattery retrofit project DP1.8 and Carbon Enriched project C3, performed by ECOtality North America (ECOtality) and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Advanced Lead Acid Battery Consortium (ALABC), are to demonstrate the suitability of advanced lead battery technology in Hybrid Electrical Vehicles (HEVs).

  16. Retrofit Audits and Cost Estimates: A Look at Quality and Consistency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenberg, L.; Shapiro, C.; Fleischer, W.

    2012-10-01

    Retrofit NYC Block by Block is an outreach program targeting owners of one- to four-family homes, the most common building type in New York City, with more than 600,000 structures citywide. Administered by the Pratt Center for Community Development and implemented by four nonprofit, community based organizations, Block by Block connects residents, businesses, and religious and civic organizations in predominantly low- and moderate-income neighborhoods with one or more of a half-dozen public and private financial incentive programs that facilitate energy-efficiency retrofits. This research project sought to evaluate the approach, effectiveness, and the energy use reductions accomplished by the Retrofit NYC: Block by Block program.

  17. Retrofit Audits and Cost Estimates. A Look at Quality and Consistency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenberg, L.; Shapiro, C.; Fleischer, W.

    2012-10-01

    Retrofit NYC Block by Block is an outreach program targeting owners of one- to four-family homes, the most common building type in New York City, with more than 600,000 structures citywide. Administered by the Pratt Center for Community Development and implemented by four nonprofit, community-based organizations, Block by Block connects residents, businesses, and religious and civic organizations in predominantly low-and moderate-income neighborhoods with one or more of a half-dozen public and private financial incentive programs that facilitate energy-efficiency retrofits. This research project sought to evaluate the approach, effectiveness, and the energy use reductions accomplished by the Retrofit NYC: Block by Block program.

  18. Discussions

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    22 Apr 2013 20:55:02 +0000 Rmckeel 657 at http:en.openei.orgcommunity 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas http:en.openei.orgcommunitydiscussion2013-civic-hacking-day-ideas...

  19. OpenEI Community - Apps

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    community 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas http:en.openei.orgcommunitydiscussion2013-civic-hacking-day-ideas

    The folks at Rally<...

  20. OpenEI Community - OpenEI

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Day of Civic Hacking http:en.openei.orgcommunityblognational-day-civic-hacking

  1. Graham7781's blog

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2 en National Day of Civic Hacking http:en.openei.orgcommunityblognational-day-civic-hacking

  2. OpenEI Community - community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Civic Hacking http:en.openei.orgcommunityblognational-day-civic-hacking

    <...

  3. National Building Museum 2010 Honor Award

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dr. Kristina M. Johnson

    2010-09-01

    This video was presented at the National Building Museum's 2010 Honor Award: A Salute to Civic Innovators.

  4. Related Links | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oak Ridge Heritage and Preservation Association Oak Ridge Art Center Oak Ridge Civic Music Association Oak Ridge Playhouse Univerity of Tennessee Arboretum Secret City Excursion...

  5. Better Buildings Residential Network Data & Evaluation Peer Exchange...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cadmus Group Chicago, IL Civic Works (Baltimore, MD) Clean Energy Durham CORE DC Sustainable Energy Utility Eagle County, CO Efficiency Vermont Energize New York Greater ...

  6. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emergency Response & Procedures Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Video Re-Building Greensburg Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped...

  7. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Video Re-Building Greensburg Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped rebuild Greensburg, Kansas...

  8. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Video Re-Building Greensburg Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped rebuild Greensburg, Kansas into...

  9. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 13 results. Video Re-Building Greensburg Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped rebuild Greensburg, Kansas...

  10. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 25 results. Video Re-Building Greensburg Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped rebuild Greensburg,...

  11. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Security + Safety Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Video Re-Building Greensburg Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped...

  12. Energy Data Jam | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Recent content 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential Datapalooza Announcements Top Innovation Ideas from the New York Energy Data...

  13. Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program AVTA: 2010 Honda Civic ...

  14. LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Oct. 31, 2013-Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Deaf, 1060 Cerrillos Road, Santa Fe * Nov. 15, Taos Convention Center, 120 Civic Plaza Drive, Taos. Sponsored by the Fellows of Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Frontiers...

  15. Energy Data Jam | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    post into this group. Recent content 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential Datapalooza Announcements Top Innovation Ideas from the...

  16. Energy Datapalooza Community | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    post into this group. Recent content 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential Discussion Page Datapalooza Announcements Group members...

  17. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Video Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Video Re-Building Greensburg Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped rebuild Greensburg, Kansas...

  18. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 7 of 7 results. Video Re-Building Greensburg Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped rebuild Greensburg, Kansas...

  19. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 9 of 9 results. Video Re-Building Greensburg Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped rebuild Greensburg, Kansas...

  20. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    + Safety Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Video Re-Building Greensburg Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped rebuild Greensburg,...

  1. Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Equipment Program Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program AVTA: 2010 Honda Civic HEV with Experimental Ultra Lead Acid Battery Testing Results

  2. Cold-Start and Warm-Up Driveability Performance of Hybrid Electric Vehicles Using Oxygenated Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, M.; Jorgensen, S.; Evans, B.; Wright, K.

    2003-11-01

    Provides analysis and results of the driveability performance testing from four hybrid electric vehicles--Honda Civic, Toyota Prius, and two Honda Insights--that used oxygenated fuels.

  3. Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy-Water Nexus and What It Can Do For Your Residential Program (301) January 21, 2016 ... Kansas City Civic Works Columbia Water & Light Duke Carbon Offsets Initiative ...

  4. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Sources Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Video Re-Building Greensburg Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped rebuild...

  5. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Sources Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 25 results. Video Re-Building Greensburg Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped rebuild...

  6. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Sources Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Video Re-Building Greensburg Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped rebuild...

  7. U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    hall and civic plaza solar panels; 7) Fire Station 50 energy improvements; 8) traffic signal enhancements; 9) healthy home pilot; 10) HVAC control system upgrade; 11) GPS on...

  8. Energy Data Jam | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential Datapalooza...

  9. Top Innovation Ideas from the New York Energy Data Jam | OpenEI...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Latest blog post comments No comments have been made yet Recent content 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential Datapalooza...

  10. New York City Data Jam | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jul 8 2012 New York City Data Jam Location: New York City Recent content 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential Datapalooza...

  11. Stanford Precourt Institute for Energy Joins U.S. Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    basic science and technology to policy and business. The institute also cultivates alliances with industry, governments, civic organizations, and other research institutions to...

  12. Energy Literacy - Jamaica 10-16-14.indd

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Energy issues often require an understanding of civics, history, economics, sociology, ... Ideally, scientists acknowledge such confl ict and work toward fi nding evidence that will ...

  13. Making a positive impact for California

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Martin, on behalf of Sandia National Laboratories, donated 100,000 to support California education, arts, civic groups and other causes annually. * Employees support local...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia/California Economic Impact...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Martin, on behalf of Sandia National Laboratories, donates 100,000 to support California education, arts, civic groups and other causes annually. Our employees log more than...

  15. Mitigation of Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts with Renewables...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts with Renewables and Energy Storage Mitigation of Vehicle Fast ... AVTA: 2010 Honda Civic HEV with Experimental Ultra Lead Acid Battery Testing Results

  16. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Greensburg Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped rebuild Greensburg, Kansas into an energy efficient city, with solar panels and wind turbines, after a devastating tornado in...

  17. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Re-Building Greensburg Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped rebuild Greensburg, Kansas into an energy efficient city, with solar panels and wind turbines, after a...

  18. DOE appoints three new members to advisory board

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    founded to support collaborative public policy decision making. Her interest in the CAB stems from her commitment to civic and stakeholder involvement in public decisions and...

  19. Description of CBECS Building Types

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    or public safety. jail, reformatory, or penitentiary courthouse or probation office fire or police station Top Religious Worship Buildings in which people gather for religious...

  20. Expanding Solar Access to Nonprofits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Solar Foundation is leading a team that developed the CivicPACE program through an award from the SunShot Initiative. CivicPACE addresses the underwriting and access challenges of solar financing for tax-exempt organizations, such as churches, nonprofit affordable housing, community clinics, and education institutions.

  1. Frontiers in Science lectures focus on radiography and its contributio...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 3, El Alcalde Room, Coronado Hall, Taos Convention Center, 120 Civic Plaza Drive, Taos. All the talks begin at 7 p.m. and are free of charge. The Frontiers in...

  2. Matter, antimatter and surviving the big bang is topic of Lab...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the Deaf, 1060 Cerrillos Road, Santa Fe Nov. 15, Taos Convention Center, 120 Civic Plaza Drive, Taos. Sponsored by the Fellows of Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Frontiers...

  3. TOC.indd

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... The introduction of the new City Hall and civic green, the proposed Las Flores Shopping ... Climate which allows for use of alternative energy - Capitalizing on solar power and other ...

  4. Re-Building Greensburg

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Greensburg, KS - A town that was devastated by a tornado in 2007, yet came back to be one of the Nation's most energy-efficient, sustainable communities. Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped...

  5. Biographies: Ambassadors for the Minorities in Energy Initiatve...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    inductees into the U.S. News & World Report STEM Solutions Leadership Hall of Fame. Marie C. Johns has been a leader in business, civic and government service for more than 30...

  6. "The Ambassadors are key leaders in industry, government, academia...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    inductees into the U.S. News & World Report STEM Solutions Leadership Hall of Fame. Marie C. Johns has been a leader in business, civic and government service for more than 30...

  7. Energy Data Initiative (EDI) | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Data Now Available on OpenEI 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas For those looking to advance o... more Group members (12) Managers:...

  8. community | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 14 April, 2014 - 09:48 National Day of Civic Hacking code community data Event hacking international national OpenEI The National Day of...

  9. Energy Datapalooza Community | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Discussion hackathon 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas Rmckeel 1 22 May 2013 - 08:23 Groups Menu You must login in order to post...

  10. Energy Datapalooza Community | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential Discussion Page...

  11. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Discussion hackathon 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas Rmckeel 1 22 May 2013 - 08:23 Groups Menu You must login in order to post...

  12. challenge | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 19 April, 2013 - 13:44 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas Apps challenge hackathon The folks at Rally are considering options to help...

  13. Image upload with broken thumbnail image | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New page curation tool Posted: 7 May 2013 - 08:16 by Rmckeel Rmckeel 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas Posted: 19 Apr 2013 - 13:44 by Rmckeel 1 comment(s) 1 of 5 Groups...

  14. All | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Apps Built with Open Data Graham7781 16 Jan 2014 - 15:14 Discussion Apps 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas Rmckeel 1 22 May 2013 - 08:23 Group Apps Green Button Applications Dbrodt 1...

  15. Developer | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Discussion challenge 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas Rmckeel 1 22 May 2013 - 08:23 Groups Menu You must login in order to post...

  16. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Apps Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Discussion Apps 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas Rmckeel 1 22 May 2013 - 08:23 Groups Menu You must login in order to post...

  17. Event | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 14 April, 2014 - 09:48 National Day of Civic Hacking code community data Event hacking international national OpenEI The National Day of...

  18. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Apps Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Discussion Apps 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas Rmckeel 1 22 May 2013 - 08:23 Groups Menu You must login in order to post...

  19. hacking | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hacking Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 14 April, 2014 - 09:48 National Day of Civic Hacking code community data Event hacking...

  20. Apps | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 19 April, 2013 - 13:44 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas Apps challenge hackathon The folks at Rally are considering options to help...

  1. hackathon | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 19 April, 2013 - 13:44 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas Apps challenge hackathon The folks at Rally are considering options to help...

  2. OpenEI | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 14 April, 2014 - 09:48 National Day of Civic Hacking code community data Event hacking international national OpenEI The National Day of...

  3. How do I add open data requirements into my government contract...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Data Now Available on OpenEI 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas For those looking to advance o... more Group members (12) Managers:...

  4. Energy Data Initiative (EDI) - Q & A | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Data Now Available on OpenEI 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas For those looking to advance o... more Group members (12) Managers:...

  5. code | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 14 April, 2014 - 09:48 National Day of Civic Hacking code community data Event hacking international national OpenEI The National Day of...

  6. The Administration's "North Stars" for Energy | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Data Now Available on OpenEI 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas For those looking to advance o... more Group members (12) Managers:...

  7. Recent content in Energy Data Initiative (EDI) | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    For those looking to advance o... Ianjkalin 26 Mar 2013 - 18:28 Answer 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas Rmckeel 19 Apr 2013 - 13:44 Discussion Commercial and Residential Hourly...

  8. Energy Data Initiative (EDI) | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Discussion hackathon 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas Rmckeel 1 22 May 2013 - 08:23 Groups Menu You must login in order to post...

  9. OpenEI Community Central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Discussion challenge 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas Rmckeel 1 22 May 2013 - 08:23 Groups Menu You must login in order to post...

  10. Energy Datapalooza Community | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Apps Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Discussion Apps 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas Rmckeel 1 22 May 2013 - 08:23 Groups Menu You must login in order to post...

  11. Developer | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Apps Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Discussion Apps 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas Rmckeel 1 22 May 2013 - 08:23 Groups Menu You must login in order to post...

  12. national | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 14 April, 2014 - 09:48 National Day of Civic Hacking code community data Event hacking international national OpenEI The National Day of...

  13. international | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 14 April, 2014 - 09:48 National Day of Civic Hacking code community data Event hacking international national OpenEI The National Day of...

  14. Recent content in Energy Data Jam | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of renewable energy potential Graham7781 11 Feb 2013 - 15:18 Blog entry 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas Rmckeel 19 Apr 2013 - 13:44 Discussion Groups Menu You must login in order...

  15. Discussions | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thanks Ryan Group: Utility Rate Tags: Utility Rates 5 comment(s) Rmckeel 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas Posted: 19 Apr 2013 - 13:44 by Rmckeel The folks at Rally are considering...

  16. Energy Data Initiative (EDI) | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Apps Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Discussion Apps 2013 Civic Hacking Day Ideas Rmckeel 1 22 May 2013 - 08:23 Groups Menu You must login in order to post...

  17. Graham7781's blog | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 14 April, 2014 - 09:48 National Day of Civic Hacking code community data Event hacking international national OpenEI The National Day of...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA- Hybrid Electric Vehicles Performance and Testing Data

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) uses standard procedures and test specifications to test and collect data from vehicles on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. This page provides data on the hybrid electric versions of the Volkswagen Jetta, Ford C-Max, Chevrolet Malibu, Honda Civic, Hyundai Sonata, Honda CRZ, Honda Civic with Advanced Experimental Ultra Lead Acid Battery, Mercedes Benz, Toyota Prius Gen III, Ford Fusion, Honda Insight and Honda CR-Z.

  19. Model Year 2006: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Model Year 2006: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Fuel Type EPAct Compliant? Model Vehicle Type Emission Class Powertrain Fuel Capacity Range American Honda Motor Corporation 888-CCHONDA www.honda.com CNG Dedicated EPAct Yes Civic GX Compact Sedan SULEV Tier 2 Bin II 1.7L, 4-cylinder 8 GGE 200 mi HEV (NiMH) EPAct No Accord Hybrid Sedan ULEV 3.0L V6 144 volt NiMH + 17.1 Gal Gasoline TBD HEV (NiMH) EPAct No Civic Hybrid Sedan CA ULEV 1.3L, 4-cylinder 144 volt NiMH + 13.2 Gal

  20. CJ M H

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The time-binding ability of human beings arises from their usage of "language, number, ... magico-religious representation and narrative representation, as well as seal iconography. ...

  1. Improving Code Compliance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Sent an article containing project elements to the Journal of the American Planning Association ... 27% All buildings >10k ft 2 except Education, Public Assembly, Religious Worship, ...

  2. DISCLAIMER

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... AEC U.S. Atomic Energy Commission AIP Agreement in Principle AIRFA American Indian Religious Freedom Act ANOVA Analysis of Variance APCD Air Pollution Control Division ARLSORD Air ...

  3. Energy Principles into High School Physics Dr. Ann Reimers, Albert...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - The sociological, psychological, religious factors that underlie people's beliefs when faced with scientific data NGSS HS-PS4-4 "Evaluate the validity and reliability ...

  4. Instructions for the Supporting Statement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... additional justification for any questions of a sensitive nature, such as sexual behavior and attitudes, religious beliefs, and other matters that are commonly considered private. ...

  5. Clean Cities: Clean Fuels Ohio coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    where he was charged with administering programs for AmeriCorps members. Andrew holds dual Bachelor's degrees in History and Comparative Religious Studies from Wright State...

  6. Energy Keepers, Inc.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    General Overview March 25, 2015 Energy Keepers, Inc. 5132015 2 Lower Flathead River Before Kerr Dam Kerr Dam is located on a significant sight from cultural, religious, and ...

  7. DOE Order 144.1: Department of Energy American Indian Tribal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    impact American Indian and Alaska Native traditional, cultural, and religious values and practices; natural resources; treaty and other federally recognized and reserved rights. ...

  8. Consultation with Native Hawaiian Organizations in the Section...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    must consult with any Native Hawaiian organization that attaches religious and cultural significance to historic properties that may be affected by the agency's undertakings. ...

  9. Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review Process...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Indian tribe that attaches religious and cultural significance to historic properties that ... 106 and for Tribal Historic Preservation Officers and tribal cultural resource managers. ...

  10. Description of CBECS Building Types

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Buildings used for the preservation of law and order or public safety. police station fire station jail, reformatory, or penitentiary courthouse or probation office Top Religious...

  11. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--CBECS Building Types

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Order and Safety jail, reformatory, or penitentiary courthouse or probation office fire or police station Religious Worship Includes buildings such as chapels, churches,...

  12. RAPID/Roadmap/11-WA-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sites and artifacts, and traditional areas or items of religious, ceremonial and social uses to affected tribes. Washington defines an "Archaeological resource" as any...

  13. A Look at Principal Building Activities in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sales Lodging Religious Worship Public Assembly Public Order and Safety Warehouse and Storage Vacant Other Summary Comparison Table (All Activities) More information on the:...

  14. Property:Buildings/ModelBuildingType | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Religious Worship Service Warehouse and Storage Other Vacant Pages using the property "BuildingsModelBuildingType" Showing 12 pages using this property. G General Merchandise...

  15. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    '05''Retail complex' '06''Religious campus or complex' '07''Hospital or other health care complex' '08''Lodging or resort complex' '09''Post office complex' '10''Other...

  16. Workforce Diversity Action Plans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    not tolerate any manifestations of discrimination, including those based on race, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, sexual orientation, religious or political beliefs, and...

  17. Working with Us | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Us Working with Us True to its mission, the office serves to actively facilitate relationships between the Department and Members of Congress, Governors, State/local officials and their staffs, tribal governments, public interest groups representing consumers/citizens organizations, business/industries, civic groups, educational organizations and institutions, and all other energy-oriented stakeholder organizations. Congressional Affairs Congressional Testimony Congressional Resources

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA- Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) uses standard procedures and test specifications to test and collect data from vehicles on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. Data on the 2012 Honda Civic CNG is available in downloadable form.

  19. US ITER - Why Fusion?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Educational Resources Fusion Educational Resources DOE Office of Science Fusion Energy Programs Education Links FuseNet: The European Fusion Education Network General Atomics Fusion Education PPPL Science Education Program PPPL FusEdWeb Educational Outreach: US ITER staff members are available for presentations on fusion energy and the ITER project to technical, civic, community, and student groups. To make arrangements for a speaker, please contact Mark Uhran, Communications Manager,

  20. US ITER | Media Corner

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Newsletter Newsletter December 2015 July 2015 November 2014 February 2014 July 2013 January 2013 May 2012 December 2011 July 2011 March 2011 September 2010 Subscribe to the US ITER Newsletter Need an Expert? Media are welcome to contact Mark Uhran for assistance in reaching an appropriate US ITER expert. US ITER staff members are also available for presentations on fusion energy and the ITER project to technical, civic, community, and student groups. To make arrangements for a speaker, please

  1. Hybrid Electric Vehicles | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 Honda Accord Hybrid 2013 Chevrolet Malibu Eco 2013 Ford Cmax Hybrid 2013 Honda CIvic Hybrid 2013 Volkswagen Jetta Hybrid 2011 Hyundai Sonata 2010 Ford Fusion Hybrid 2010 Honda CR-Z 2010 Honda Insight 2010 Mercedes S400h BlueHybrid 2010 Toyota Prius Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Electric Vehicles Conventional Vehicles Conventional Start-Stop Vehicles Alternative Fuel Vehicles Facilities Publications News About Us For ES Employees Staff Directory About Us For ES Employees Staff Directory

  2. cityOakRidgeWeb

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 miles 1 12 HIGH SCHOOL Oak Ridge Playhouse Methodist Medical Center CIVIC CENTER Art Ctr. Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) Hampton Inn DoubleTree Hotel Days Inn MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND ENERGY Y-12 NATIONAL SECURITY COMPLEX Oak Ridge Mall Jameson Inn Numbered and unnumbered tra c lights Staybridge Suites Comfort Inn Commerce Park Jack Case Center New Hope Center Y-12 Visitor Center Children 's Museum OFFICE OF SCIENTIFIC & TECHNICAL INFORMATION Oak Ridge Marina Centennial Golf Course

  3. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Speaker Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Speakers Bureau Request U.S. DOE/NNSA - Nevada Field Office Speakers Bureau Request Form Are you interested in having a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration representative talk to you about Environmental Management, Nevada National Security Site History, and numerous other DOE/NNSA Nevada Field Office programs and activities? Speakers are available to talk to civic organizations, clubs, schools, churches, and other groups within Southern Nevada. Speakers Bureau

  4. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Speaker Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Speakers Bureau Request U.S. DOE/NNSA - Nevada Field Office Speakers Bureau Request Form Are you interested in having a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration representative talk to you about Environmental Management, Nevada National Security Site History, and numerous other DOE/NNSA Nevada Field Office programs and activities? Speakers are available to talk to civic organizations, clubs, schools, churches, and other groups within Southern Nevada. Speakers Bureau

  5. PROJECT PROFILE: The Solar Foundation (Solar Market Pathways) | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy The Solar Foundation (Solar Market Pathways) PROJECT PROFILE: The Solar Foundation (Solar Market Pathways) Title: Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy for Tax- Exempt and Public Entities (CivicPACE) TSF logo.png Funding Opportunity: Solar Market Pathways SunShot Subprogram: Soft Costs Location: Washington, DC Amount Awarded: $900,034 Awardee Cost Share: $315,260 The Solar Foundation, in partnership with Urban Ingenuity and Clean Energy Solutions, Inc., is working with state

  6. Novel Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperatures Geothermal Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    | Department of Energy Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperatures Geothermal Resources presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. PDF icon novel_energy_conversion_equipment_low_peer2013.pdf More Documents & Publications Novel Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperature Geothermal Resources City of Eagan …Civic Ice Arena Renovation Canby Cascaded Geothermal Project Phase 1 Feasibility

  7. Re-Building Greensburg | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Re-Building Greensburg Re-Building Greensburg Addthis Description Greensburg, Kansas - A town that was devastated by a tornado in 2007, yet came back to be one of the Nation's most energy-efficient, sustainable communities. Civic leaders and entrepreneurs rallied residents behind the idea of "greening" Greensburg, inspiring the construction of energy-efficient buildings, some of which generate their own renewable power with solar panels and wind turbines. Greensburg has demonstrated

  8. Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon arravt002_es_flicker_2012_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program AVTA: 2010 Honda Civic HEV with Experimental Ultra Lead Acid Battery Testing Results

  9. Societal health and urban sustainability indicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrich, C.H.; Tonn, B.E.

    1996-08-27

    Without the social will, no city can successfully Undertake the planning and programs necessary for meaningful progress toward sustainability. Social will derives from wellsprings of vital societal health. This paper presents an approach to helping cities in APEC member economies initiate a program for developing indicators of sustainability. Representative indicators of social capital and other aspects of civic engagement, as proxies for societal health, are presented.

  10. Speakers Bureau | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Speakers Bureau Argonne's experts volunteer their time and talents to share their knowledge on a variety of science, engineering, energy and environmental topics that enlighten, educate and inform the public. Argonne's speakers bureau is a regional resource available free of charge to the community for educational, civic, business and other professional purposes. Speakers are selected based on your needs and interests. Please call 630-252-5580 or send an email to speakers@anl.gov for more

  11. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Nevada National Security Site Tours

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nevada National Security Site Tours NNSA/NFO Language Options U.S. DOE/NNSA - Nevada Field Office Photograph of Nevada National Security Site Tour The Nevada Field Office provides free general interest tours of the Nevada National Security Site on a monthly basis. Groups, civic or technical organizations, and private clubs may request specially-arranged tours (minimum of 25 people) by calling 702-295-0944. Below you will find information on tour logistics, points of interest on the tour,

  12. Develop NREL Center for Low Temperature Research/Project Data Collection |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Project objective: Low-Temperature Geothermal (LTGT) represents a huge; underutilized resource of renewable energy in the United States.; This project will accelerate the commercial application of these resources. PDF icon low_williams_nrel_center.pdf More Documents & Publications Novel Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperature Geothermal Resources Analysis of Low-Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources City of Eagan …Civic Ice Arena Renovat

  13. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Q Q Retail Complex ... 151 134 Q Q N Q Q Religious Campus or Complex ... 195 170 Q Q Q N Q Health Care Complex ... 39 27 11 Q Q Q...

  14. EO 13007: Indian Sacred Sites (1996)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Executive Order 13007 Indian Sacred Sites (1996). Designed to protect and preserve Indian religious practices, this EO directs each federal agency that manages federal lands to “(1) accommodate...

  15. Executive Order 13007 Indian Sacred Sites (1996)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Executive Order 13007 Indian Sacred Sites (1996). Designed to protect and preserve Indian religious practices, this EO directs each federal agency that manages federal lands to “(1) accommodate...

  16. ANNUAL FEDERAL EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY STATISTICAL REPORT...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... P. RELIGIOUS ACCOMODATION 0 0 0 0 0 Q. RETIREMENT 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 4 2 2 R. SEX-STEROTYPI... ISSUES OF ALLEGED DISCRIMINATION BASES OF ALLEGED DISCRIMINATION SEX PREGNANCY ...

  17. O N A G B M C H D L E I F J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Salmon, the king of the fish, are one of the great natural resources of the Pacific Northwest. For Northwest Indian tribes, they hold special religious meaning. For all of us in...

  18. SR0704

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 13, 2007 Media Contact: Julie Petersen (803) 952-7697 julie.petersen@srs.gov Savannah River Site Employees Honored with President’s Volunteer Service Award AIKEN, S.C., – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has honored several Savannah River Site (SRS) employees with the President’s Volunteer Service Award (PVSA) for their notable volunteerism and civic participation. “It is an honor to be part of a work family whose members give so selflessly to help make a positive difference in

  19. Making the "Best Place to Live" Even Better

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For 2010, the appropriately named Eden Prairie, Minnesota was honored as the No. 1 Best Place to Live in the United States by Money Magazine. The highly-coveted civic title reflects many aspects of the family-friendly suburb of 62,000 located 16 miles from downtown Minneapolis, including the advantages of being the home to major employers like Fortune 500 trucking company C.H. Robinson and hearing-aid maker Starkey Labs. The city also hass many natural amenities like 17 lakes and parks with 125 miles of running, hiking, and biking trails.

  20. Re-Building Greensburg

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hewitt, Steven; Wallach, Daniel; Peterson, Stephanie;

    2013-05-29

    Greensburg, KS - A town that was devastated by a tornado in 2007, yet came back to be one of the Nation's most energy-efficient, sustainable communities. Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped rally residents behind the idea of "greening" Greensburg, inspiring the construction of numerous energy-efficient buildings, some of which generate their own renewable power with solar panels and wind turbines. Many of the town's government buildings use cutting edge energy-saving technologies, saving the local taxpayers' money. Greensburg has demonstrated to the world that any city can reach its energy efficiency and renewable energy goals today using widely available technologies.

  1. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Speakers Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Speakers Bureau NNSA/NFO Language Options U.S. DOE/NNSA - Nevada Field Office Speakers Bureau Photograph of the Speakers Bureau The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office provides a Speakers Bureau as a public service to the community, civic, and school groups to learn about Nevada National Security Site programs and activities. The Nevada National Security Site, with its unique 50 plus-year history unlike any place in the United States, is of

  2. Religion as a Natural Phenomenon

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dennett, Daniel [Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States

    2009-09-01

    Religion is a costly human activity that has evolved over the millennia. Why does it exist and how does it foster such powerful allegiances? To undertake a serious scientific study of religious practices and attitudes we must set aside a traditional exemption from scrutiny which religions have enjoyed. Religious adherents may not welcome this attention, but we should press ahead with it, since if we don't come to understand religion as a natural phenomenon, our attempts to deal with the problems that loom in the twenty-first century will likely be counterproductive.

  3. Consultation with Native Hawaiian Organizations in the Section 106 Review Process: A Handbook (2011)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires that, in carrying out the requirements of Section 106, "Protection of Historic Properties," each federal agency must consult with any Native Hawaiian organization that attaches religious and cultural significance to historic properties that may be affected by the agency's undertakings.

  4. Consultation with Native Hawaiian Organizations in the Section 106 Review Process: A Handbook (ACHP, 2011)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires that, in carrying out the requirements of Section 106, "Protection of Historic Properties," each federal agency must consult with any Native Hawaiian organization that attaches religious and cultural significance to historic properties that may be affected by the agency's undertakings.

  5. Alternate Funding Sources for the International Atomic Energy Agency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toomey, Christopher; Wyse, Evan T.; Kurzrok, Andrew J.; Swarthout, Jordan M.

    2012-09-04

    Since 1957, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has worked to ensure the safe and responsible promotion of nuclear technology throughout the world. The IAEA operates at the intersection of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty’s (NPT) fourth and third articles, which guarantee Parties to the Treaty the right to peaceful uses of nuclear technology, provided those activities are placed under safeguards verified by the IAEA. However, while the IAEA has enjoyed substantial success and prestige in the international community, there is a concern that its resources are being stretched to a point where it may no longer be possible to execute its multifaceted mission in its entirety. As noted by the Director General (DG) in 2008, demographics suggest that every aspect of the IAEA’s operations will be in higher demand due to increasing reliance on non-carbon-based energy and the concomitant nonproliferation, safety, and security risks that growth entails. In addition to these nuclear energy concerns, the demand for technical developmental assistance in the fields of food security, resource conservation, and human health is also predicted to increase as the rest of the world develops. Even with a 100% value-for-money rating by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and being described as an “extraordinary bargain” by the United Nations Secretary-General’s High-level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change, real budget growth at the Agency has been limited to zero-real growth for a better part of the last two decades. Although the 2012 regular budget (RB) received a small increase for most programs, the 2013 RB has been set at zero-real growth. As a result, the IAEA has had to defer infrastructure investments, which has hindered its ability to provide the public goods its Members seek, decreased global security and development opportunities, and functionally transformed the IAEA into a charity, dependent on extrabudgetary (EB) contributions to sustain its mission and capabilities. To resolve these resource constraints, we recommend the creation of an endowment, funded entirely through private contributions. Our initial estimates for the endowment are that a €2B principal. This level of capitalization could provide significant support to all aspects of the IAEA’s mission, including Capital Investment and Innovation; Technical Cooperation; as well as incentivizing the policy and technology entrepreneurship that will be necessary for the future health of the nonproliferation regime. Given this potential, our future efforts will focus on a more rigorous assessment of the financial requirements, while simultaneously creating the beginnings of a functional organization. These include: organizational structure, metrics for grant-making and performance evaluation, and outreach and fundraising strategies. At the end of this process, there should be sufficient information and engagement to begin to operationalize the endowment through external funding sources.

  6. Near term hybrid passenger vehicle development program. Phase I. Appendices A and B. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    In this report vehicle use patterns or missions are defined and studied. The three most promising missions were found to be: all-purpose city driving which has the maximum potential market penetration; commuting which requires mainly a two-passenger car; and family and civic business driving which have minimal range requirements. The mission selection process was based principally on an analysis of the travel patterns found in the Nationwide Transportation Survey and on the Los Angeles and Washington, DC origin-destination studies data presented by General Research Corporation in Volume II of this report. Travel patterns in turn were converted to fuel requirements for 1985 conventional and hybrid cars. By this means the potential fuel savings for each mission were estimated, and preliminary design requirements for hybrid vehicles were derived.

  7. Development of Integrated Motor Assist Hybrid System: Development of the 'Insight', a Personal Hybrid Coupe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaoru Aoki; Shigetaka Kuroda; Shigemasa Kajiwara; Hiromitsu Sato; Yoshio Yamamoto

    2000-06-19

    This paper presents the technical approach used to design and develop the powerplant for the Honda Insight, a new motor assist hybrid vehicle with an overall development objective of just half the fuel consumption of the current Civic over a wide range of driving conditions. Fuel consumption of 35km/L (Japanese 10-15 mode), and 3.4L/100km (98/69/EC) was realized. To achieve this, a new Integrated Motor Assist (IMA) hybrid power plant system was developed, incorporating many new technologies for packaging and integrating the motor assist system and for improving engine thermal efficiency. This was developed in combination with a new lightweight aluminum body with low aerodynamic resistance. Environmental performance goals also included the simultaneous achievement of low emissions (half the Japanese year 2000 standards, and half the EU2000 standards), high efficiency, and recyclability. Full consideration was also given to key consumer attributes, including crash safety performance, handling, and driving performance.

  8. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamatey, A.

    2009-09-15

    The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2008 (SRNS-STI-2009-00190) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, 'Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,' and DOE Order 5400.5, 'Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment.' The annual SRS Environmental Report has been produced for more than 50 years. Several hundred copies are distributed each year to government officials, universities, public libraries, environmental and civic groups, news media, and interested individuals. The report's purpose is to: (1) present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; (2) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; and (3) highlight significant programs and efforts.

  9. Site Programs & Cooperative Agreements: Hanford | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Hanford Site Programs & Cooperative Agreements: Hanford Hanford The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR), Nez Perce Tribe, and Yakama Nation are important stakeholders with Treaty rights and interests at the Hanford Site. DOE environmental cleanup activities have the potential to impact natural and cultural resources and to interfere with American Indian religious practices. Through cooperative agreements, tribal staff and consultants of the Yakama, Nez Perce, and

  10. Summary of Prinicpal Building Activities in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    12.3 98.5 Office 97.2 18.9 35.7 Warehouse 38.3 6.4 22.4 Public Assembly 113.7 12.7 51.9 Education 79.3 8.4 41.1 Food Service 245.5 36.0 153.5 Religious Worship 37.4 3.4 28.0...

  11. Executive Order 13007 Indian Sacred Sites (1996)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6771 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 104 / Wednesday, May 29, 1996 / Presidential Documents Executive Order 13007 of May 24, 1996 Indian Sacred Sites By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, in furtherance of Federal treaties, and in order to protect and preserve Indian religious practices, it is hereby ordered: Section 1. Accommodation of Sacred Sites. (a) In managing Federal lands, each executive branch agency with statutory or

  12. GAINING CONSENSUS: THE STORY OF ''OAK RIDGE TENNESSEE - A CITIZEN'S GUIDE TO THE ENVIRONMENT''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, Robert; Freeman, Jenny; Gawarecki, Susan L; Hardy, Parker; Kopp, Steve; Mulvenon, Norman A; Pardue, William; Sarno, Doug

    2003-02-27

    In 2001, a diverse group of citizens ranging from conservationists to industrial developers joined forces to produce a factual description of Oak Ridge's environment and the issues associated with contamination on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reservation. This consensus effort was a result of common values not generally seen in this spectrum of philosophies, and of shared concerns about rising property taxes, declining city services, fleeing retail establishments, and diminishing real estate values. These problems are attributed to waning local DOE budgets coupled with Oak Ridge's national reputation of being contaminated and unsafe. This undeserved reputation harms the city's ability to attract new industry to replace declining federal employment and to induce families to live in the community. Representatives from a spectrum of conservation, environmental, economic development, local government, and civic organizations were invited to meet regarding how to best explain the complex environmental story of Oak Ridge and the DOE reservation. This large group decided to publish a straightforward explanation of the environmental quality of the city and its relationship to the DOE reservation in easy-to-understand language. The result was Oak Ridge, Tennessee--A Citizen's Guide to the Environment, a 28-page glossy booklet, distributed through the Chamber of Commerce and other organizations. The Oak Ridger ensured wide distribution in the community by publishing it as an insert in the daily paper. The material is also available on several web sites. A trifold brochure summarizing and promoting the larger document was also produced for wider distribution. The integrity of the Citizen's Guide was ensured by having a six-member editorial team manage writing and review of the document. There was no direct involvement by the DOE and its contractor. Knowledgeable citizen writers from throughout the community contributed technical and descriptive text. A professional technical editor melded the disparate styles into a cohesive publication. Volunteers from about 100 organizations reviewed the draft for accuracy of content and readability. Participating organizations, upon review of the final draft, then decided whether their names would be listed in the document as contributors and supporters. While the writing and editing was primarily accomplished by conservation and civic organizations, funding to print the final publications came largely from economic development interests and their supporters. The positive reception from the public upon release of Oak Ridge, Tennessee--A Citizen's Guide to the Environment stands as testament to the ability of diverse interest groups to come to consensus and communicate the environmental value of their community.

  13. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    0 2003 Commercial Primary Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type Consumption Percent of Total | Consumption Percent of Total Building Type (thousand Btu/SF) Consumption | Building Type (thousand Btu/SF) Consumption Health Care 345.9 8% | Education 159.0 11% Inpatient 438.8 6% | Service 151.6 4% Outpatient 205.9 2% | Food Service 522.4 6% Food Sales 535.5 5% | Religious Worship 77.0 2% Lodging 193.1 7% | Public Order and Safety 221.1 2% Office 211.7 19% | Warehouse and Storage

  14. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Principal Commercial Building Types, as of 2003 (Percent of Total Floorspace) (1) Office 17% 17% 19% Mercantile 16% 14% 18% Retail 6% 9% 5% Enclosed & Strip Malls 10% 4% 13% Education 14% 8% 11% Warehouse and Storage 14% 12% 7% Lodging 7% 3% 7% Service 6% 13% 4% Public Assembly 5% 6% 5% Religious Worship 5% 8% 2% Health Care 4% 3% 8% Inpatient 3% 0% 6% Outpatient 2% 2% 2% Food Sales 2% 5% 5% Food Service 2% 6% 6% Public Order and Safety 2% 1% 2% Other 2% 2% 4% Vacant 4% 4% 1% Total 100%

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3.2.2 Principal Commercial Building Types, as of 2003 (Percent of Total Floorspace) (1) Total Floorspace Total Buildings Primary Energy Consumption Office 17% 17% 19% Mercantile 16% 14% 18% Retail 6% 9% 5% Enclosed & Strip Malls 10% 4% 13% Education 14% 8% 11% Warehouse and Storage 14% 12% 7% Lodging 7% 3% 7% Service 6% 13% 4% Public Assembly 5% 6% 5% Religious Worship 5% 8% 2% Health Care 4% 3% 8% Inpatient 3% 0% 6% Outpatient 2% 2% 2% Food Sales 2% 5% 5% Food Service 2% 6% 6% Public Order

  16. 1.TIF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 OF 11 DOCUMENT #: DOE/EIS-0113 TITLE: Final EIS Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes MULTNOMAH MONTHLYMEETING Religious Smaetyaf Friend., fpuakeral No rt h lesions Yeedy Meeting `ISl25.E Stark Straef, Portland, OR gnI5 Clerk J ... t nations. Treasurer Michael Well. Mr. R. A. Holton U.S.Departmentof Energy Richland Opemdom Office P.O. Box 550 Rieldxna,WA 99752 Dear Mr. Holton, No 2.3.2.8 and in. RE c il - CCE RL AUG 11966 p15^ - ^nmiDfrsioro July M, 1986 Moodily

  17. 1.TIF

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    0 OF 11 DOCUMENT #: DOE/EIS-0113 TITLE: Final EIS Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes MULTNOMAH MONTHLYMEETING Religious Smaetyaf Friend., fpuakeral No rt h lesions Yeedy Meeting `ISl25.E Stark Straef, Portland, OR gnI5 Clerk J ... t nations. Treasurer Michael Well. Mr. R. A. Holton U.S.Departmentof Energy Richland Opemdom Office P.O. Box 550 Rieldxna,WA 99752 Dear Mr. Holton, No 2.3.2.8 and in. RE c il - CCE RL AUG 11966 p15^ - ^nmiDfrsioro July M, 1986 Moodily

  18. Employee Spotlight: Gene Ortega

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gene Ortega May 4, 2016 The eyes have it Gene Ortega paints portraits rich in color and symbolism. "My style is chaotic with a bit of refinement," says Gene, a systems engineer in Facility System Engineering. "It can be almost photo-realistic, but you can see the brushstrokes and the texture in it, and the chaos and the anger." Gene's vivid paintings explore religious iconography and Day of the Dead motifs in portraits, often drawing on the imagery of saints, the Virgin Mary,

  19. Buildings*","Principal Building Activity"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Selected Principal Activity: Part 2, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Principal Building Activity" ,,"Office","Public Assembly","Public Order and Safety","Religious Worship","Service","Warehouse and Storage" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,824,277,71,370,622,597 "Building Floorspace" "(Square

  20. Buildings*","Principal Building Activity"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Selected Principal Activity: Part 2, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Principal Building Activity" ,,"Office","Public Assembly","Public Order and Safety","Religious Worship","Service","Warehouse and Storage" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,12208,3939,1090,3754,4050,10078 "Building Floorspace"

  1. Measuring the accomplishments of public participation programs: Overview of a methodological study performed for DOE`s Office of Environmental Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweitzer, M.; Carnes, S.A.; Peelle, E.B.; Wolfe, A.K.

    1997-06-01

    Recently, staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory performed a study for the Office of Intergovernmental and Public Accountability within the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), examining how to measure the success of public participation programs. While the study began with a thorough literature review, the primary emphasis of this research effort was on getting key stakeholders to help identify attributes of successful public participation in EM activities and to suggest how those attributes might be measured. Interviews were conducted at nine DOE sites that provided substantial variety in terms of geographic location, types of environmental management activities undertaken, the current life-cycle stage of those EM efforts, and the public participation mechanisms utilized. Approximately 12 to 15 oral interviews were conducted at each site, and each respondent also was asked to complete a written survey. Those interviewed included: non-regulatory state and local government officials; project managers and public participation staff for DOE and its management and operations contractors; non-government groups concerned with environmental protection, public safety, and health issues; federal and state environmental regulators; business organizations; civic groups; and other interested parties. While this study examined only those public participation programs sponsored by DOE, the resulting findings also have applicability to the public involvement efforts sponsored by many other public and private sector organizations.

  2. Annual review of cultural resource investigations by the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program. Fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, M.J.; Brooks, R.D.; Sassaman, K.E.; Crass, D.C.

    1995-10-01

    The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) continued through FY95 with the United States Department of Energy to fulfill a threefold mission of cultural resource management, research, and public education at the Savannah River Site. Over 2,300 acres of land on the SRS came under cultural resources review in FY95. This activity entailed 30 field surveys, resulting in the recording of 86 new sites. Twenty-two existing sites within survey tract boundaries were revisited to update site file records. Research conducted by SRARP was reported in 11 papers and monographs published during FY95. SRARP staff also presented research results in 18 papers at professional meetings. Field research included several testing programs, excavations, and remote sensing at area sites, as well as data collection abroad. Seven grants were acquired by SRARP staff to support off-site research. In the area of heritage education, the SRARP expanded its activities in FY95 with a full schedule of classroom education, public outreach, and on-site tours. Volunteer excavations at the Tinker Creek site were continued with the Augusta Archaeological Society and other avocational groups, and other off-site excavations provided a variety of opportunities for field experience. Some 80 presentations, displays and tours were provided for schools, historical societies, civic groups, and environmental and historical awareness day celebrations. Additionally, SRARP staff taught four anthropology courses at area colleges.

  3. Reactivation of landslides by surface subsidence from longwall mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iannacchione, A.T.; Ackman, T.E.

    1984-12-01

    Subsidence research by the US Bureau of Mines has identified and documented the occurrence of landslides over a longwall mining area in the Dunkard basin. Mining by longwall methods has been observed or produce a gradual surface subsidence profile of up to 60% of the thickness of the mined coal bed. The gradual subsidence of panels averaging 600 x 5000 ft (180 x 1525 m) can cause reactivation of older landslide deposits by decreasing the support to the landslide toe area. Examination of surficial features over a longwall mining area comprised of nine panels has led to the identification of several reactivated landslides. The two largest landslides occurred above a thin sandstone member with several associated springs. The largest landslides ranged from 100 to 300 ft (30 to 90 m) in length and from 100 to 200 ft (30 to 60 m) in width. Maximum scarp-slope displacements were approximately 7 ft (2 m). Less significant mass wasting was also observed over the longwall panels. Identification of landslides was accomplished through examination of premining aerial photographs and geologic field investigation. Characterization of reactivated zones was achieved through evaluation of current aerial 2-ft (0.6-m) surface contour map and field surveys. Recognition of problem areas will make civic and mining personnel aware of the landslide potential so that damage in such areas can be minimized.

  4. Hybrid Electric Vehicle Fleet and Baseline Performance Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Francfort; D. Karner

    2006-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts baseline performance and fleet testing of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). To date, the AVTA has completed baseline performance testing on seven HEV models and accumulated 1.4 million fleet testing miles on 26 HEVs. The HEV models tested or in testing include: Toyota Gen I and Gen II Prius, and Highlander; Honda Insight, Civic and Accord; Chevrolet Silverado; Ford Escape; and Lexus RX 400h. The baseline performance testing includes dynamometer and closed track testing to document the HEVs fuel economy (SAE J1634) and performance in a controlled environment. During fleet testing, two of each HEV model are driven to 160,000 miles per vehicle within 36 months, during which maintenance and repair events, and fuel use is recorded and used to compile life-cycle costs. At the conclusion of the 160,000 miles of fleet testing, the SAE J1634 tests are rerun and each HEV battery pack is tested. These AVTA testing activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory, Electric Transportation Applications, and Exponent Failure Analysis Associates. This paper discusses the testing methods and results.

  5. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Cultural environment and aesthetic resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trettin, L.D.; Petrich, C.H.; Saulsbury, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on the cultural environment and aesthetic resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The cultural environment in the Geothermal Resource Zone (GRZ) and associated study area consists of Native Hawaiian cultural and religious practices and both Native Hawaiian and non-Native Hawaiian cultural resources. This report consists of three sections: (1) a description of Native Hawaiian cultural and religious rights, practices, and values; (2) a description of historic, prehistoric, and traditional Native Hawaiian sites; and (3) a description of other (non-native) sites that could be affected by development in the study area. Within each section, the level of descriptive detail varies according to the information currently available. The description of the cultural environment is most specific in its coverage of the Geothermal Resource Subzones in the Puna District of the island of Hawaii and the study area of South Maui. Ethnographic and archaeological reports by Cultural Advocacy Network Developing Options and International Archaeological Research Institute, Inc., respectively, supplement the descriptions of these two areas with new information collected specifically for this study. Less detailed descriptions of additional study areas on Oahu, Maui, Molokai, and the island of Hawaii are based on existing archaeological surveys.

  6. Restoration in the Anacostia river watershed: An ecosystem management case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, L.R.

    1995-12-01

    This paper discusses various aspects of an ecosystem approach to watershed restoration as illustrated by the Anacostia River Watershed Restoration initiative. This information was derived from a case study conducted as part of the Interagency Ecosystem Management Initiative (IEMI), an outgrowth of a recommendation in the National Performance Review. The purpose of this study was to identify components of the ecosystem approach used in the Anacostia initiative that may be useful to other ecosystem restoration and management initiatives in the future. Water quality and ecological conditions within the Anacostia River watershed have become degraded due to urban and suburban development and other activities in the watershed over the last two centuries. An intergovernmental partnership has been formed to cooperatively assess the specific problems in the basin and to direct and implement restoration efforts. The Anacostia initiative includes a number of cooperative efforts that cross political boundaries, and involves numerous states, local agencies, civic groups, and private individuals in addition to the Federal players. In contrast with some of the other case studies in the IEMI, the Anacostia restoration effort is primarily driven by state and local governments. There has, however, been Federal involvement in the restoration and use of Federal grants. In addition, the establishment of a forum for setting goals, priorities and resolving differences was viewed as essential. Closer relationships between planning and regulatory functions can help advance the restoration goals. Public participation, including education, outreach and involvement, is essential to viable ecosystem initiatives. Comprehensive planning and modeling must be balanced with continuous visible results in order to sustain administrative and public support for the initiative.

  7. Existing climate data sources and Their Use in Heat IslandResearch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Pon, Brian; Smith, Craig Kenton; Stamper-Kurn, Dan Moses

    1998-10-01

    Existing climate data sources can be used in two general types of analysis for the detection of urban heat islands. Historical analyses use long-term data records-preferentially from several locations in and around an urban area-to trace the gradual influence of urban development on its climate. Primary sources of such data include the cooperative network, first-order National Weather Service stations, and military weather stations. Analyses of short-term data use information from a dense urban weather station network to discern the location, extent, and magnitude of urban heat islands. Such analyses may use the aforementioned national networks or regional networks such as agricultural, air quality monitoring, or utility networks. We demonstrate the use of existing data sources with a historical analysis of temperature trends in Los Angeles, California, and an analysis of short-term data of the urban temperature profile for Phoenix, Arizona. The Los Angeles climate was examined with eleven long-term data records from the cooperative network. Statistically significant trends of rising temperature were detected at Los Angeles Civic Center and other stations over some parts of the year, although timing of the increase varied from station to station. Observed increases in temperatures maybe due to long-term climate changes, microclimate influences, or local-scale heat islands. The analysis of short-term data was made for Phoenix using the PRISMS station network. Mean diurnal temperature profiles for a month were examined and compared with those for adjacent rural areas. Data fi-om stations in the center of Phoenix showed clear and significant nighttime and daytime temperature differences of 1- 2K (3 - 4"F). These temperature increases maybe attributable to a local-scale heat island.

  8. FY 2014 Continuation of Solicitation for the Office of Science Financial Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saundry, Peter

    2014-04-01

    On January 28-30, 2014, the National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE) hosted its 14th National Confrerence and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment: Building Climate Solutions. The conference was held at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City near the Washington, DC National Airport. The conference engaged over 1,100 key individuals from a variety of fields, including natural and social sciences, humanities and engineering and government and policy, as well as business and civil society. They developed actionable partnerships, strategies and tactics that advanced solutions minimizing the impacts of anthropogenic climate change. The conference was organized around the two major areas where climate actions are necessary: [1] The Built Environment; and, [2] Agriculture and Natural Resources. This “multi-sector approach” of the conference enables participants to work across traditional boundaries of discipline, science, policy and application by engaging a diverse team of scientists, public- and private-sector program managers, and policy-makers. The confernce was two and a half days long. During this time, over 200 speakers presented in 8 keynote addresses, 7 plenary roundtable discussions, 30 symposia and 23 workshops. The goal of the workshops was to generate additional action through development of improved strategies, tools, and partnerships. During the workshops, participants developed actionable outcomes, committed to further collaboration and implementation, and outlined follow-up activities for post-conference. A list of recommendations from the workshop follows this summary. NCSE’s annual conference has become a signature event for the organization, recognized for its notable presenters, innovative programming, and outcome-oriented approach. Each year, over 1,100 participants attend the event, representing federal agencies, higher education institutions, state and local governments, non-governmental and civic organizations, businesses, and international entities.

  9. Arid sites stakeholder participation in evaluating innovative technologies: VOC-Arid Site Integrated Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, T.S.; McCabe, G.H.; Brockbank, B.R.

    1995-05-01

    Developing and deploying innovative environmental cleanup technologies is an important goal for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which faces challenging remediation problems at contaminated sites throughout the United States. Achieving meaningful, constructive stakeholder involvement in cleanup programs, with the aim of ultimate acceptance of remediation decisions, is critical to meeting those challenges. DOE`s Office of Technology Development sponsors research and demonstration of new technologies, including, in the past, the Volatile Organic Compounds Arid Site Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID), hosted at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The purpose of the VOC-Arid ID has been to develop and demonstrate new technologies for remediating carbon tetrachloride and other VOC contamination in soils and ground water. In October 1994 the VOC-Arid ID became a part of the Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation Focus Area (Plume Focus Area). The VOC Arid ID`s purpose of involving stakeholders in evaluating innovative technologies will now be carried on in the Plume Focus Area in cooperation with Site Technology Coordination Groups and Site Specific Advisory Boards. DOE`s goal is to demonstrate promising technologies once and deploy those that are successful across the DOE complex. Achieving that goal requires that the technologies be acceptable to the groups and individuals with a stake in DOE facility cleanup. Such stakeholders include groups and individuals with an interest in cleanup, including regulatory agencies, Native American tribes, environmental and civic interest groups, public officials, environmental technology users, and private citizens. This report documents the results of the stakeholder involvement program, which is an integral part of the VOC-Arid ID.

  10. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    9 2003 Commercial Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type and Vintage (1) | Building Type Pre-1959 1960-1989 1990-2003 | Building Type Pre-1959 1960-1989 1990-2003 Health Care 178.1 216.0 135.7 | Education 77.7 88.3 80.6 Inpatient 230.3 255.3 253.8 | Service 62.4 86.0 74.8 Outpatient 91.6 110.4 84.4 | Food Service 145.2 290.1 361.2 Food Sales 205.8 197.6 198.3 | Religious Worship 46.6 39.9 43.3 Lodging 88.2 111.5 88.1 | Public Order & Safety N.A. 101.3 110.6

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    9 2003 Energy Expenditures per Square Foot of Commercial Floorspace and per Building, by Building Type ($2010) ($2010) Food Service 4.88 27.2 Mercantile 2.23 38.1 Food Sales 4.68 26.0 Education 1.43 36.6 Health Care 2.76 68.0 Service 1.39 9.1 Public Order and Safety 2.07 32.0 Warehouse and Storage 0.80 13.5 Office 2.01 29.8 Religious Worship 0.76 7.8 Public Assembly 1.73 24.6 Vacant 0.34 4.8 Lodging 1.72 61.5 Other 2.99 65.5 Note(s): Source(s): Mall buildings are no longer included in most CBECs

  12. Hanford cultural resources management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatters, J.C.

    1989-06-01

    As a federal agency, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been directed by Congress and the President to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historical, and cultural resources on lands it administers, to manage these in a spirit of stewardship for future generations, and to protect and preserve the rights of Native Americans to religious freedom. The purpose of this document is to describe how the DOE-Richland Operations (DOE-RL) will meet those responsibilities on the Hanford Site, pursuant to guidelines for Agency Responsibilities under the Historic Preservation Act (FR 53:31, February 17, 1988). This document is intended for multiple uses. Among other things, the text is designed as a manual for cultural resource managers to follow and as an explanation of the process of cultural resource regulatory compliance for the DOE-RL and Site contractors. 10 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

  13. Anomalous behavior of the Pd/D system. Final report, June 1989-August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szpak, S.J.; Mosier-Boss, P.A.

    1995-09-01

    In a news conference on 23 March 1989, Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons announced that nuclear events could be initiated by the electrochemical compression of deuterium into a palladium lattice. When researchers around the world tried to reproduce the effects described by Pons and Fleischmann in their laboratories, the results were mixed. The nature of the announcement and the Irreproducibility of the effect divided the scientific community into believers and skeptics, indicating religious fervor rather than scientific reasoning. Shortly after the Fleischmann-Pons announcement, a program at NRaD investigated anomalous effects in the Pd/D system. The NRaD program investigated the Pd/D system using standard electrochemical techniques to determine conditions for achieving high Pd/D loadings. Metallurgical aspects of the Pd/D system and the effect of additives were also examined. Tritium content in the gas/liquid phases and radiation emissions were monitored during electrolysis. This report summarizes the investigation results.

  14. Native Americans and state and local governments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusco, E.R.

    1991-10-01

    Native Americans` concerns arising from the possibility of establishment of a nuclear repository for high level wastes at Yucca Mountain fall principally into two main categories. First, the strongest objection to the repository comes from traditional Western Shoshones. Their objections are based on a claim that the Western Shoshones still own Yucca Mountain and also on the assertion that putting high level nuclear wastes into the ground is a violation of their religious views regarding nature. Second, there are several reservations around the Yucca Mountain site that might be affected in various ways by building of the repository. There is a question about how many such reservations there are, which can only be decided when more information is available. This report discusses two questions: the bearing of the continued vigorous assertion by traditionalist Western Shoshones of their land claim; and the extent to which Nevada state and local governments are able to understand and represent Indian viewpoints about Yucca Mountain.

  15. The ASC Sequoia Programming Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seager, M

    2008-08-06

    In the late 1980's and early 1990's, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was deeply engrossed in determining the next generation programming model for the Integrated Design Codes (IDC) beyond vectorization for the Cray 1s series of computers. The vector model, developed in mid 1970's first for the CDC 7600 and later extended from stack based vector operation to memory to memory operations for the Cray 1s, lasted approximately 20 years (See Slide 5). The Cray vector era was deemed an extremely long lived era as it allowed vector codes to be developed over time (the Cray 1s were faster in scalar mode than the CDC 7600) with vector unit utilization increasing incrementally over time. The other attributes of the Cray vector era at LLNL were that we developed, supported and maintained the Operating System (LTSS and later NLTSS), communications protocols (LINCS), Compilers (Civic Fortran77 and Model), operating system tools (e.g., batch system, job control scripting, loaders, debuggers, editors, graphics utilities, you name it) and math and highly machine optimized libraries (e.g., SLATEC, and STACKLIB). Although LTSS was adopted by Cray for early system generations, they later developed COS and UNICOS operating systems and environment on their own. In the late 1970s and early 1980s two trends appeared that made the Cray vector programming model (described above including both the hardware and system software aspects) seem potentially dated and slated for major revision. These trends were the appearance of low cost CMOS microprocessors and their attendant, departmental and mini-computers and later workstations and personal computers. With the wide spread adoption of Unix in the early 1980s, it appeared that LLNL (and the other DOE Labs) would be left out of the mainstream of computing without a rapid transition to these 'Killer Micros' and modern OS and tools environments. The other interesting advance in the period is that systems were being developed with multiple 'cores' in them and called Symmetric Multi-Processor or Shared Memory Processor (SMP) systems. The parallel revolution had begun. The Laboratory started a small 'parallel processing project' in 1983 to study the new technology and its application to scientific computing with four people: Tim Axelrod, Pete Eltgroth, Paul Dubois and Mark Seager. Two years later, Eugene Brooks joined the team. This team focused on Unix and 'killer micro' SMPs. Indeed, Eugene Brooks was credited with coming up with the 'Killer Micro' term. After several generations of SMP platforms (e.g., Sequent Balance 8000 with 8 33MHz MC32032s, Allian FX8 with 8 MC68020 and FPGA based Vector Units and finally the BB&N Butterfly with 128 cores), it became apparent to us that the killer micro revolution would indeed take over Crays and that we definitely needed a new programming and systems model. The model developed by Mark Seager and Dale Nielsen focused on both the system aspects (Slide 3) and the code development aspects (Slide 4). Although now succinctly captured in two attached slides, at the time there was tremendous ferment in the research community as to what parallel programming model would emerge, dominate and survive. In addition, we wanted a model that would provide portability between platforms of a single generation but also longevity over multiple--and hopefully--many generations. Only after we developed the 'Livermore Model' and worked it out in considerable detail did it become obvious that what we came up with was the right approach. In a nutshell, the applications programming model of the Livermore Model posited that SMP parallelism would ultimately not scale indefinitely and one would have to bite the bullet and implement MPI parallelism within the Integrated Design Code (IDC). We also had a major emphasis on doing everything in a completely standards based, portable methodology with POSIX/Unix as the target environment. We decided against specialized libraries like STACKLIB for performance, but kept as many general purpose, portable math libraries as were needed by the codes. Third, we assumed that the SMPs in clusters would evolve in time to become more powerful, feature rich and, in particular, offer more cores. Thus, we focused on OpenMP, and POSIX PThreads for programming SMP parallelism. These code porting efforts were lead by Dale Nielsen, A-Division code group leader, and Randy Christensen, B-Division code group leader. Most of the porting effort revolved removing 'Crayisms' in the codes: artifacts of LTSS/NLTSS, Civic compiler extensions beyond Fortran77, IO libraries and dealing with new code control languages (we switched to Perl and later to Python). Adding MPI to the codes was initially problematic and error prone because the programmers used MPI directly and sprinkled the calls throughout the code.

  16. A look at commercial buildings in 1995: Characteristics, energy consumption, and energy expenditures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The commercial sector consists of business establishments and other organizations that provide services. The sector includes service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as a wide range of facilities that would not be considered commercial in a traditional economic sense, such as public schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Nearly all energy use in the commercial sector takes place in, or is associated with, the buildings that house these commercial activities. Analysis of the structures, activities, and equipment associated with different types of buildings is the clearest way to evaluate commercial sector energy use. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national-level sample survey of commercial buildings and their energy suppliers conducted quadrennially (previously triennially) by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The target population for the 1995 CBECS consisted of all commercial buildings in the US with more than 1,000 square feet of floorspace. Decision makers, businesses, and other organizations that are concerned with the use of energy--building owners and managers, regulators, legislative bodies and executive agencies at all levels of government, utilities and other energy suppliers--are confronted with a buildings sector that is complex. Data on major characteristics (e.g., type of building, size, year constructed, location) collected from the buildings, along with the amount and types of energy the buildings consume, help answer fundamental questions about the use of energy in commercial buildings.

  17. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Cultural Resources.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This study attempts to identify and analyze the impacts of the System Operating Strategy (SOS) alternatives on cultural resources. The impacts include effects on Native American traditional cultural values, properties and practices. They also include effects on archeological or historic properties meeting the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places. In addition to responding to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), this analysis addresses the requirements of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), the Archeological Resources Protection Act (ARPA), the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), the Native American Religious Freedom Act (NARFA), and other relevant legislation. To meet their legally mandated cultural resources requirements, the SOR agencies will develop agreements and Implementation Plans with the appropriate State Historic Preservation Officers (SHPOs), Tribes, and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) detailing the measures necessary to best manage the resource. The planning and implementation activities will be staged over a number of years in consultation with affected Tribes.

  18. An information and dialogue conference on the human genome project (HGP) for the minority communities in the state of Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-06-01

    Zeta Phi Beta Sorority National Educational Foundation, in cooperation with Xavier University of New Orleans, and the New Orleans District Office of the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, held the Information and Dialogue Conference on the Human Genome Project for the Minority Communities in the State of Louisiana on April 16-17, 1999. The Conference was held on the campus of Xavier University in New Orleans. Community leaders, government officials, minority professional and social organizations leaders, religious leaders, persons from the educational and academic community, and students were invited. Conference objectives included bringing HGP information and a focus in the minority community on the project, in clear and understandable terms, to spread the work in the minority community about the project; to explore the likely positive implications with respect to health care and related matters; to explore possible negative results and strategies to meet them; to discuss the social, legal, and ethical implications; and to facilitate minority input into the HGP as it develops.

  19. Section 175 report: Secretary of Energy report to the Congress pursuant to Section 175 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-12-01

    This report contributes to, but does not supplant, ongoing studies being conducted by DOE to ensure that potentially significant adverse effects that may result from the repository program are minimized to the maximum extent practicable. As indicated in the Environmental Assessment for the Yucca Mountain site (US DOE, 1986) DOE does not believe significant adverse effects will result from site characterization activities. Nevertheless, DOE is conducting a variety of studies to determine if this conclusion is valid. These studies include, but are not limited to, monitoring of air and water quality and other environmental factors; monitoring the number of immigrating repository program workers and their residential locations; identifying cultural resources in the Yucca Mountain area and traditional culture and religious values of American Indian people associated with those resources; evaluating possible rail access routes to the Yucca Mountain site; and evaluating possible highway routes. These studies have been implemented after consultation with affected parties in Nevada. As part of the determination of suitability, and Environmental Impact Statement will be written and will include an analysis of potential impacts associated with constructing, operating, closing, and decommissioning a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. 59 refs., 33 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamatey, A.; Fanning, R.

    2010-08-19

    The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2009 (SRNS-STI-2010-00175) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1A,'Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,' and DOE Order 5400.5, 'Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment.' The annual SRS Environmental Report has been produced for more than 50 years. Several hundred copies are distributed each year to government officials, universities, public libraries, environmental and civic groups, news media, and interested individuals. The report's purpose is to: (1) present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; (2) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; and (3) highlight significant programs and efforts. SRS maintained its record of environmental excellence in 2009, as its operations continued to result in minimal impact to the offsite public and the surrounding environment. The site's radioactive and chemical discharges to air and water were well below regulatory standards for environmental and public health protection; its air and water quality met applicable requirements; and the potential radiation dose from its discharges was less than the national dose standards. The largest radiation dose that an offsite, hypothetical, maximally exposed individual could have received from SRS operations during 2009 was estimated to be 0.12 millirem (mrem). (An mrem is a standard unit of measure for radiation exposure.) The 2009 SRS dose is just 0.12 percent of the DOE all-pathway dose standard of 100 mrem per year, and far less than the natural average dose of about 300 mrem per year (according to Report No. 160 of the National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements) to people in the United States. This 2009 all-pathway dose of 0.12 mrem was the same as the 2008 dose. Environmental monitoring is conducted extensively within a 2,000-square-mile network extending 25 miles from SRS, with some monitoring performed as far as 100 miles from the site. The area includes neighboring cities, towns, and counties in Georgia and South Carolina. Thousands of samples of air, rainwater, surface water, drinking water, groundwater, food products, wildlife, soil, sediment, and vegetation are collected by SRS and state authorities and analyzed for the presence of radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants. Compliance with environmental regulations and with DOE orders related to environmental protection provides assurance that onsite processes do not impact the public or the environment adversely. Such compliance is documented in this report. SRS had a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) compliance rate of 99.92 percent in 2009, with only four of the 4,989 sample analyses performed exceeding permit limits. The NPDES program protects streams, reservoirs, and other wetlands by limiting the release of nonradiological pollution into surface waters. Discharge limits are set for each facility to ensure that SRS operations do not negatively impact aquatic life or degrade water quality.

  1. Representation of genomics research among Latin American laymen and bioethics: a inquiry into the migration of knowledge and its impact on underdeveloped communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernando Lolas; Carolina Valdebenito; Eduardo Rodrguez; Irene Schiattino; Adelio Misseroni

    2007-07-09

    The effects of genetic knowledge beyond the scientific community depend on processes of social construction of risks and benefits, or perils and possibilities, which are different in different communities. In a globalized world, new developments affect societies not capable of technically replicating them and unaware of the very nature of the scientific process. Moral and legal consequences, however, diffuse rapidly and involve groups and persons with scant or no knowledge about the way scientific concepts are developed or perfected. Leading genomics researchers view their field as developing after a sharp break with that worldwide social movement of the 20s and 30s known as eugenics and its most radical expression in the Nazi efforts to destroy life not worth living. Manipulation, prejudice and mistrust, however, pervade non-expert accounts of current research. Researchers claim that the new knowledge will have a positive impact on medicine and serve as a foundation for informed social policy. Both types of applications depend on informed communities of non-scientists (physicians, policymakers), whose members may well differ on what constitutes burden and what is benefit, depending upon professional socialization and cultural bias. ELSI projects associated with genomic research are notable for the lack of minorities involved and for the absence of comparative analysis of data reception in different world communities. It may be contended also that the critical potential of philosophical or ethical analyses is reduced by their being situated within the scientific process itself and carried out by members of the expert community, thus reducing independence of judgment. The majority of those involved in such studies, by tradition, experience, and formative influences, share the same worldview about the nature of moral dilemmas or the feasibility of intended applications. The global effects of new knowledge when combined with other cultural or religious traditions are thus unknown. These effects are interesting on two accounts. First, even if underdeveloped countries cannot replicate the technical aspects of research, their influence on social practices is not kept within geographical or language barriers. The way they are handled in developed countries may become part of resistances to ethical imperialism. Second, these advances have economic consequences. Their full understanding and the creation of a scientific literacy essential for sound ethical analysis demand the creation of receptive capacity in developing countries. The morality of genomics research and its applications can be analyzed from two main vantage points. Some traditions stress the ethics of convictions (in Max Webers terms, Gesinnungsethik) while others rely on the ethics of responsibility (Verantwortungsethik). In different forms, the latter deals with the consequences of social action, scientific research in this case, and may or may not be related to utilitarian considerations. It may be hypothesized that convictions, mostly of a religious nature, dominate the argumentative preferences in Latin countries and continental European traditions which rely on virtues while responsibility is associated with a discourse based on rights prevalent in countries following the Anglo-Saxon pattern of thought. This finds expression in different legal systems (common law versus codes) and in the language used for deliberation and moral reasoning. Although results of US-based ELSI research may not be transferable to other cultural and economic contexts, they impact other societies and serve as models. Rarely do they apply completely in other settings. In a globalized world, both appropriate understanding of the scientific enterprise and its ethical or economic sustainability demand empirical analysis of the patterns of thought, main beliefs, and reactions toward the new knowledge and its applications. Anecdotal accounts show that expectations may be misleading and inadequate knowledge prevents appropriate appraisal of burdens and benefits in different societies.

  2. The role of opacity and transparency in achieving strategic stability in South Asia.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajain, Arpit; Ashraf, Tariq Mahmud

    2005-08-01

    According to international relations theory, deterrence can be used as a tool to achieve stability between potentially hostile nations. India and Pakistan's long history of periodic crises raises the question of how they can achieve deterrence stability. 'Transparency' describes the flow of information between parties and plays a key role in establishing a deterrence relationship. This paper studies the balance needed between opacity and transparency in nuclear topics for the maintenance of deterrence stability between India and Pakistan. States with nuclear weapons are postulated to implement transparency in four categories: potential, capability, intent, and resolve. The study applies these categories to the nuclear components of the ongoing India-Pakistan Composite Dialogue Working Group for Peace and Security including CBMs. To focus our efforts, we defined four scenarios to characterize representative strategic/military/political conditions. The scenarios are combinations of these two sets of opposite poles: competition - cooperation; extremism - moderation (to be understood primarily in a religious/nationalistic sense). We describe each scenario in terms of select focal areas (nuclear doctrine, nuclear command and control, nuclear stockpile, nuclear delivery/defensive systems, and conventional force posture). The scenarios help frame the realm of possibilities, and have been described in terms of expected conditions for the focal areas. We then use the conditions in each scenario to prescribe a range of information-sharing actions that the two countries could take to increase stability. We also highlight the information that should not be shared. These actions can be political (e.g., declarations), procedural (e.g., advance notice of certain military activities), or technologically based (e.g., seismic monitoring of the nuclear test moratorium).

  3. Transnational Islamic activism and radicalization : patterns, trends, and prognosticators.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colbaugh, Richard; Engi, Dennis; LaViolette, Randall A.; Spomer, Judith E.

    2010-06-01

    The research described in this report developed the theoretical and conceptual framework for understanding, recognizing, and anticipating the origins, dynamic mechanisms, perceptions, and social structures of Islamic social reform movements in the Muslim homeland and in diaspora communities. This research has revealed valuable insights into the dynamic mechanisms associated with reform movements and, as such, offers the potential to provide indications and warnings of impending violence. This study produced the following significant findings: (1) A framework for understanding Islamic radicalization in the context of Social Movement Theory was developed and implemented. This framework provides a causal structure for the interrelationships among the myriad features of a social movement. (2) The degree to which movement-related activity shows early diffusion across multiple social contexts is a powerful distinguisher of successful and unsuccessful social movements. Indeed, this measurable appears to have significantly more predictive power than volume of such activity and also more power than various system intrinsics. (3) Significant social movements can occur only if both the intra-context 'infectivity' of the movement exceeds a certain threshold and the inter-context interactions associated with the movement occur with a frequency that is larger than another threshold. Note that this is reminiscent of, and significantly extends, well-known results for epidemic thresholds in disease propagation models. (4) More in-depth content analysis of blogs through the lens of Argumentation Theory has the potential to reveal new insights into radicalization in the context of Social Movement Theory. This connection has the potential to be of value from two important perspectives - first, this connection has the potential to provide more in depth insights into the forces underlying the emergence of radical behavior and second, this connection may provide insights into how to use the blogosphere to influence the emergent dialog to effectively impact the resulting actions taken by the potential radicals. The authors of this report recognize that Islamic communities are not the only source of radicalism; indeed many other groups, religious and otherwise, have used and continue to use, radicalism to achieve their ends. Further, the authors also recognize that not all Muslims use, or condone the use of, radical behavior. Indeed, only a very small segment of the Muslim communities throughout the world use and/or support such behavior. Nevertheless, the focus of this research is, indeed, on understanding, recognizing, and anticipating the origins, dynamic mechanisms, perceptions, and social structures of Islamic radicalism.

  4. Scoping Meeting Summary, Wailuku, Maui, March 9, 1992, 2 PM Session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinby-Hunt, Mary S.

    1992-06-06

    The meeting began with presentations by the facilitator, Mr. Spiegel, and Dr. Lewis, the program director from DOE. The facilitator introduced those on the podium. He then described the general structure of the meeting and its purpose: to hear the issues and concerns of those present regarding the proposed Hawaiian Geothermal Project. He described his role in ensuring the impartiality and fairness of the meeting. Dr. Lewis further defined the scope of the project, introduced members of the EIS team, briefly described the EIS process, and answered several process questions, noting that cable feasibility would be examined and that Native Hawaiian concerns would be addressed. Ms. Borgstrom stated that the ISIS Implementation Plan will be continuously refined and that impacts of reasonably foreseeable future activities would be examined. During the meeting, more than 90% of the commenters requested that the EIS identify and assess the relative merits and impacts of energy alternatives to the proposed action. Nearly 80% requested that the EIS investigate conservation and renewable forms of energy, such as wind, solar, and biomass. They suggested that integrated resource planning should be used, noting that the State is initiating such a process. More than 30% of the commenters asked that the EIS examine geothermal alternatives to the action including developing geothermal resources on Maui and using geothermal power on Hawai'i only on that island. One commenter proposed an alternative cable route that proceeds from Hawai'i to Lana'i and from Lana'i to Oahu with spur lines to Moloka'i and Maui as needed. Nearly 70% of the commenters made general statements concerning potential short- and long-term environmental costs and impacts of the HGP (particularly on pristine environments). Others were concerned about environmental costs to Maui, particularly the impacts of a land-based cable route on the south side of Maui and on Hawaiian homestead lands. More than half the commenters were concerned about the potential impacts of the HGP to cultural resources. They stated that the BIS should respect and address Native Hawaiian religious and cultural concerns noting that the lands from Ulupalakua to Kaupo are Native Hawaiian homelands replete with archeological sites and endangered plants used for rituals. Many (>30%) were concerned about impacts of the HGP on the life styles of the general population, in particular, on life styles of Native Hawaiians. Another 30% mentioned aesthetic impacts of HGP on pristine environments.

  5. Disaster: would your community bounce back?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sims, Benjamin H

    2011-01-12

    What makes some communities or organizations able to quickly bounce back from a disaster, while others take a long time to recover? This question has become very important for emergency planners in federal, state, and local government - particularly since the 9/11 attacks and Hurricane Katrina, which nearly destroyed New Orleans five years ago. These events have made people aware that we can't always prevent disasters, but might be able to improve the ability of communities and regions to respond to and bounce back from major disruptions. Social scientists have found that most communities are, in fact, quite resilient to most disasters. People tend to work together, overcome divisions, identify problems, and develop improvised solutions. This often leads to a greater sense of community and a sense of personal accomplishment. Long-term recovery can be harder, but rebuilding can create jobs and stimulate economies. Communities may even end up better than they were before. But there are some disturbing exceptions to this trend, including Hurricane Katrina. The hurricane killed many people, the federal and local emergency response was not effective, people who could not evacuate were housed in the Superdome and Convention Center in terrible conditions, crime was prevalent, and local government did not appear to have control over the situation. A significant portion of the population was eventually evacuated to other cities. Even five years later, many people have not returned, and large parts of the city have not been rebuilt. Clearly, New Orleans lacked sufficient resilience to overcome a disaster of the magnitude of Katrina. There are four factors that social scientists are beginning to agree are important for community resilience: (1) A strong, diverse economy - Stable jobs, good incomes, diversity of industries, personal savings; (2) Robust social networks - Community members know each other, help each other, and have connections outside the community; (3) Competent organizations - Government, health care, community service, and religious organizations are competent and trustworthy, and have resources to handle community needs; and (4) High-quality infrastructure - Road, power, and water systems (etc.) are in good condition and are designed to provide service even if some connections are destroyed. To explore how these factors make communities resilient, I will tell two stories of disasters. The first is the Buffalo Creek flood, which wiped out a coal mining community in West Virginia in 1972. This is a classic example of community that was not resilient in the aftermath of a disaster. The second example is the Vietnamese immigrant community in the Versailles neighborhood of New Orleans. In spite of being relatively poor and culturally isolated, this community was one of the first to fully rebound following Hurricane Katrina.

  6. DE-EE0000319 Final Technical Report [National Open-ocean Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skemp, Susan

    2013-12-29

    Under the authorization provided by Section 634 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (P.L. 110-140), in 2009 FAU was awarded U.S. Congressionally Directed Program (CDP) funding through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to investigate and develop technologies to harness the energy of the Florida Current as a source of clean, renewable, base-load power for Florida and the U.S. A second CDP award in 2010 provided additional funding in order to enhance and extend FAU’s activities. These two CDPs in 2009 and 2010 were combined into a single DOE grant, DE-EE0000319, and are the subject of this report. Subsequently, in July 2010 funding was made available under a separate contract, DE-EE0004200. Under that funding, DOE’s Wind and Water Power Program designated FAU’s state of Florida marine renewable energy (MRE) center as the Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center (SNMREC). This report discusses SNMREC activities funded by the DE-EE0000319 grant, but will make reference, as appropriate, to activities that require further investigation under the follow-on grant. The concept of extracting energy from the motions of the oceans has a long history. However, implementation on large scales of the technologies to effect renewable energy recovery from waves, tides, and open-ocean currents is relatively recent. DOE’s establishment of SNMREC recognizes a significant potential for ocean current energy recovery associated with the (relatively) high-speed Florida Current, the reach of the Gulf Stream System flowing through the Straits of Florida, between the Florida Peninsula and the Bahamas Archipelago. The proximity of the very large electrical load center of southeast Florida’s metropolitan area to the resource itself makes this potential all the more attractive. As attractive as this potential energy source is, it is not without its challenges. Although the technology is conceptually simple, its design and implementation in a commercially-viable fashion presents a variety of challenges. Beyond the technology itself (and, especially, the effects on the technology of the harsh oceanic environment), it is important to consider the possible environmental impacts of commercial-scale implementation of oceanic energy extraction. Further, because such implementation represents a completely new undertaking, the human resources required do not exist, so education and training programs are critical to eventual success. This project, establishing a national open-ocean energy laboratory, was designed to address each of these three challenges in a flexible framework allowing for adaptive management as the project proceeded. In particular:  the technology challenge, including resource assessment, evolved during the project to recognize and address the need for a national testing facility in the ocean for small-scale prototype MRE systems developed by industry;  the environmental challenge became formalized and expanded during the permitting process for such a testing facility; and  the human resources/societal challenges, both in terms of the need for education and training and in terms of public acceptance of MRE, stimulated a robust outreach program far beyond that originally envisioned at SNMREC. While all of these activities at SNMREC are ongoing, a number of significant milestones (in addition to the contributions listed in the appendices) were achieved under the auspices of this award. These include:  Planning and site selection for the first-phase test facility, offshore of Dania Beach, FL, including some equipment for the facility, submission of an Interim Policy Lease Application to the U.S. Department of Interior’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), and completion of an Environmental Assessment by BOEM and a positive Consistency Determination by the State of Florida;  Measurements using acoustic profilers of the current structure and variability in the vicinity of the site under a variety of weather conditions, seasons and time durations;  Design and implementation of instrumentation for the first phase of the offshore testing facility, the wet- and top-side data acquisition systems, and shore-based analysis systems;  Implementation of a laboratory-scale dynamometer system to test generators of up to 25 kW capacity using real-world (simulated) forcing;  Completion of 24 months of (airborne) marine vertebrate surveys and associated analysis of sea turtle offshore activity, marine mammal vocalization research, and ocean current turbine hydrodynamic noise characterization;  Development of a secondary-school (nominally grade 10) curriculum about hydrokinetic MRE, “Energy from the Oceans: The New Renewable”, and training of over 200 high-school teachers in its use and in how to educate their colleagues in application of the material in the classroom;  Presentations to over 50 interested civic groups in the region on various aspects of MRE in SE Florida  A series of public lectures to over 600 residents of south Florida to provide broader education on MRE.  Development of an interactive kiosk for installation in local science museums. These, and other accomplishments detailed in this report contribute to a comprehensive ongoing program at the SNMREC to support the affordable, responsible, and achievable commercialization of MRE. Many of the tasks of this award are continued or will be verified with follow-on funding DE-EE0004200, and its goal: the installation of the world’s first offshore ocean current turbine testing and validation capability.

  7. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, Sheryl

    2003-01-01

    The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

  8. Scoping Meeting Summary, Kaunakakai, Moloka'i, March 12, 1992, 2 PM Session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinby-Hunt, Mary S.

    1992-06-01

    The meeting began with presentations by the facilitator, Mr. Spiegel, and Dr. Lewis, the program manager from DOE. The facilitator introduced those on the podium. He then described the general structure of the meeting and its purpose: to hear the issues and concerns of those present regarding the proposed Hawaiian Geothermal Project. He described his role as assuring the impartiality and fairness of the meeting. Dr. Lewis of DOE further defined the scope of the project, introduced members of the EIS team, and briefly described.the EIS process. The overwhelming concerns of the meeting were Native Hawaiian issues. The presenters [more than 70%, most of whom addressed no other issue] want the EIS to respect Native Hawaiian religion, race, rights, language, and culture, noting that they believe that geothermal development is a desecration of Pele [{approx}60% of all presenters]. They expressed concern that their ancestors and burials should not be desecrated. The EIS should address Native Hawaiian concerns that the HGP would negatively impact Native Hawaiian fisheries, subsistence lifestyles, and religious practices. Virtually all the speakers expressed frustration with government. Most (> 70%) of the speakers voiced concern and frustration regarding lack of consideration for Native Hawaiians by government and lack of trust in government. One commenter requested that the EIS should consider the international implications of the U.S allowing their rainforests to be cleared, when the U.S. government asks other nations to preserve theirs. Nearly 30% of the commenters want the EIS to address the concern that people on Moloka'i will bear major environmental consequences of the HGP, but not gain from it. The commenters question whether it is right for Moloka'i to pay for benefits to Oahu, particularly using an unproven technology. After questioning the reliability and feasibility of the marine cable:, nearly 30% of the presenters were concerned about the impacts of the submarine cable. In specific, they suggested that the EIS investigate the impacts the cable would have on fisheries and marine life due to electromagnetic fields, dredging, and oil-release. The EIS should study the impacts of the HGP on the humpback whale and other marine species, particularly their birthing grounds, noting whales' hypersensitivity to emf and sound. One commenter suggested that the EIS examine the economics of the cable, including the need to build specialized ships to lay it, harbour(s), and the cable itself. One commenter was concerned about the future uses of the cable suggesting that the EIS should address the impacts that would result if the cable connecting Moloka'i to Oahu is used to transmit power from large coal or other types of power generation facilities constructed on Moloka'i. Commenters questioned the reliability of geothermal development in a region that is both seismically and volcanically active. One suggested that the EIS examine the merits of projects that conserve energy. With respect to land use, commenters asked that the EIS examine the propriety of using Native Hawaiian homelands and ceded lands for the HGP, questioning specifically the land exchange in Puna [Campbell Estate for Wao Kele o Puna]. The commenters want the EIS to address the issue of air, water and sail quality preservation. More than 20% of the commenters asked that the EIS examine concerns about the environmental consequences of the HGP to the rainforest, including possible species extinction. In particular, the EIS should address the impacts of roads associated with the HGP in the rainforest, including the resulting importation of exotic species (for example banana poko), which successfully compete against native species; and the effects of noise and fumes which negatively impact plants, birds, animals, and insects.

  9. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, Sheryl

    2004-01-01

    The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided