Sample records for reliability assessment area

  1. Reliability Assessment Incorporating Operational Considerations and Economic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PSERC Reliability Assessment Incorporating Operational Considerations and Economic Aspects Engineering Research Center Reliability Assessment Incorporating Operational Considerations and Economic and Economic Aspects for Large Interconnected Grids." We express our appreciation for the support provided

  2. Composite System based Multi-Area Reliability Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagarajan, Ramya

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    of such systems. Multi - area reliability evaluation is typically done by considering equivalent tie lines between different areas in an integrated power system. It gives approximate results for the reliability indices of a power system as it models each...

  3. Functional Area Assessments Project Charter Workstream Name Functional Area Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    with Huron on detailed project plan. Subject Experts Subject Expert Role Functional leadership Administrative1 of 2 Functional Area Assessments ­ Project Charter Workstream Name Functional Area Assessments - Internal Budgeting - Human Resources These diagnostics will be performed using interviews, surveys, data

  4. Towards Reliable SubDivision of Geological Areas: Interval Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Towards Reliable Sub­Division of Geological Areas: Interval Approach David D. Coblentz 1;2 , Vladik Difficult to Produce a Reliable Subdivision The subdivision of a geological zone into segments is often the area, and often, we do not have a statistically sufficient amount of thoroughly analyzed geological

  5. Towards Reliable SubDivision of Geological Areas: Interval Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Towards Reliable Sub­Division of Geological Areas: Interval Approach David D. Coblentz 1;2 , Vladik difficult to produce a reliable subdivision. The subdivision of a geological zone into segments is often, and often, we do not have a statistically sufficient amount of thoroughly analyzed geological samples

  6. Improved load models for multi-area reliability calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pathak, Sanjesh

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IMPROVED LOAD MODELS FOR MULTI-AREA RELIABILITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by SANJESH PATHAK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1992 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering IMPROVED LOAD MODELS FOR MULTI-AREA RELIABILITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by SAN JESH PATHAK Approved as to style and content by: Chanan Singh (Chair of Committee) Prasad Enjeti (Member) Ces . Mal, e...

  7. Assessing Reliability in Energy Supply Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    total of 15 metrics. Pathway reliability General objectives Adequacy Security Functional zones Primary energy supply

  8. Assessing reliability in energy supply systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Daniel

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    total of 15 metrics. Pathway reliability General objectives Adequacy Security Functional zones Primary energy supply

  9. Composite System based Multi-Area Reliability Evaluation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagarajan, Ramya

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    and no - load loss sharing policy among the areas. The proposed method is applied to standard IEEE 24 bus Reliability Test System (RTS) and the traditional equivalent tie-line method is applied to the multi-area configuration of the same test system. The results...

  10. Assessing the reliability of linear dynamic transformer thermal modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessing the reliability of linear dynamic transformer thermal modelling X. Mao, D.J. Tylavsky and G.A. McCulla Abstract: Improving the utilisation of transformers requires that the hot-spot and top. An alternative method for assessing transformer model reliability is provided. 1 Introduction The maximally

  11. EIS-0160: Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration prepared this statement to assess the environmental and socioeconomic implications of potential solutions to address a power system problem in the Puget Sound area of Washington State.

  12. A reliability assessment methodology for distribution systems with distributed generation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duttagupta, Suchismita Sujaya

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability assessment is of primary importance in designing and planning distribution systems that operate in an economic manner with minimal interruption of customer loads. With the advances in renewable energy sources, ...

  13. Trends in the Statistical Assessment of Reliability William Q. Meeker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    traces some of the history of the development of statistical methods for reliability assessment and makes of manufactured products that we have seen over the past 30 years (e.g., in automobiles manufactured in the United

  14. A reliability assessment methodology for distribution systems with distributed generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duttagupta, Suchismita Sujaya

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability assessment is of primary importance in designing and planning distribution systems that operate in an economic manner with minimal interruption of customer loads. With the advances in renewable energy sources, Distributed Generation (DG...

  15. Multi-hazard Reliability Assessment of Offshore Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mardfekri Rastehkenari, Maryam 1981-

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A probabilistic framework is developed to assess the structural reliability of offshore wind turbines. Probabilistic models are developed to predict the deformation, shear force and bending moment demands on the support structure of wind turbines...

  16. Multi-hazard Reliability Assessment of Offshore Wind Turbines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mardfekri Rastehkenari, Maryam 1981-

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A probabilistic framework is developed to assess the structural reliability of offshore wind turbines. Probabilistic models are developed to predict the deformation, shear force and bending moment demands on the support structure of wind turbines...

  17. Reliability Assessment Commitment Process (RAC) A. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    to enable the Midwest ISO to commit additional supply if needed to meet the system load forecast and reserve such responsibilities to each of the Balancing Area Operators, for the following reasons: The need to commit additional by the Midwest ISO on a system-wide basis throughout the Midwest ISO Region, rather than on a Balancing Area

  18. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Draft Environmental Impact State.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound's power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

  19. Puget Sound area electric reliability plan. Draft environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power & Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound`s power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

  20. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, and during certain conditions, there is more demand for power in the Puget Sound area than the transmission system and existing generation can reliably supply. This high demand, called peak demand occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both.

  1. Reliability worth assessment in a developing country - residential survey results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billinton, R.; Pandey, M.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a residential customer survey conducted in service areas of the Nepal Integrated Electric Power System (NPS). The objective was to determine the power interruption costs incurred by the residential customers of a developing country, and extend the customer survey approach to reliability worth evaluation in a developing environment. Interruption cost estimates were obtained using in-person interviews with 944 sample customers. The results indicate the implications of service reliability to residential customers of Nepal, and show that reliability worth evaluation in a developing country is both possible and practical.

  2. Reliability assessment of autonomous power systems incorporating HVDC interconnection links

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dialynas, E.N.; Koskolos, N.C. [National Technical Univ., Athens (Greece). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering] [National Technical Univ., Athens (Greece). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Agoris, D. [Public Power Corp., Athens (Greece)] [Public Power Corp., Athens (Greece)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to present an improved computational method for the overall reliability assessment of autonomous power systems that may or may not contain HVdc interconnection links. This is a hybrid method based on a Monte-Carlo simulation sequential approach which incorporates an analytical approach for the reliability modeling of the HVdc transmission links. The developed models and techniques have been implemented into a computer program that can be used to simulate the operational practices and characteristics of the overall system under study efficiently and realistically. A set of reliability indices are calculated for each load-point of interest and the entire system while a set of additional indices is calculated for quantifying the reliability performance of the interconnection links under the specified operating requirements. The analysis of a practical system is also included for a number of studies representing its various operating and design characteristics.

  3. Reliability-based condition assessment of steel containment and liners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellingwood, B.; Bhattacharya, B.; Zheng, R. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steel containments and liners in nuclear power plants may be exposed to aggressive environments that may cause their strength and stiffness to decrease during the plant service life. Among the factors recognized as having the potential to cause structural deterioration are uniform, pitting or crevice corrosion; fatigue, including crack initiation and propagation to fracture; elevated temperature; and irradiation. The evaluation of steel containments and liners for continued service must provide assurance that they are able to withstand future extreme loads during the service period with a level of reliability that is sufficient for public safety. Rational methodologies to provide such assurances can be developed using modern structural reliability analysis principles that take uncertainties in loading, strength, and degradation resulting from environmental factors into account. The research described in this report is in support of the Steel Containments and Liners Program being conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The research demonstrates the feasibility of using reliability analysis as a tool for performing condition assessments and service life predictions of steel containments and liners. Mathematical models that describe time-dependent changes in steel due to aggressive environmental factors are identified, and statistical data supporting the use of these models in time-dependent reliability analysis are summarized. The analysis of steel containment fragility is described, and simple illustrations of the impact on reliability of structural degradation are provided. The role of nondestructive evaluation in time-dependent reliability analysis, both in terms of defect detection and sizing, is examined. A Markov model provides a tool for accounting for time-dependent changes in damage condition of a structural component or system. 151 refs.

  4. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, B.G.; Richards, R.E.; Reece, W.J.; Gertman, D.I.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Reference Guide contains instructions on how to install and use Version 3.5 of the NRC-sponsored Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR). The NUCLARR data management system is contained in compressed files on the floppy diskettes that accompany this Reference Guide. NUCLARR is comprised of hardware component failure data (HCFD) and human error probability (HEP) data, both of which are available via a user-friendly, menu driven retrieval system. The data may be saved to a file in a format compatible with IRRAS 3.0 and commercially available statistical packages, or used to formulate log-plots and reports of data retrieval and aggregation findings.

  5. An overview of reliability assessment and control for design of civil engineering structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, R.V. Jr. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Structural Dynamics and Vibration Control Dept.; Grigoriadis, K.M. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Bergman, L.A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Skelton, R.E. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Applied Mechanics and Engineering Sciences Dept.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Random variations, whether they occur in the input signal or the system parameters, are phenomena that occur in nearly all engineering systems of interest. As a result, nondeterministic modeling techniques must somehow account for these variations to ensure validity of the solution. As might be expected, this is a difficult proposition and the focus of many current research efforts. Controlling seismically excited structures is one pertinent application of nondeterministic analysis and is the subject of the work presented herein. This overview paper is organized into two sections. First, techniques to assess system reliability, in a context familiar to civil engineers, are discussed. Second, and as a consequence of the first, active control methods that ensure good performance in this random environment are presented. It is the hope of the authors that these discussions will ignite further interest in the area of reliability assessment and design of controlled civil engineering structures.

  6. A Unified Framework for Reliability Assessment of Wind Energy Conversion Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    1 A Unified Framework for Reliability Assessment of Wind Energy Conversion Systems Sebastian S a framework for assessing wind energy conversion systems (WECS) reliability in the face of external based on wind energy are: the impact of wind speed variability on system reliability [1]; WECS' reaction

  7. Assessment of microelectronics packaging for high temperature, high reliability applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uribe, F.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details characterization and development activities in electronic packaging for high temperature applications. This project was conducted through a Department of Energy sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between Sandia National Laboratories and General Motors. Even though the target application of this collaborative effort is an automotive electronic throttle control system which would be located in the engine compartment, results of this work are directly applicable to Sandia`s national security mission. The component count associated with the throttle control dictates the use of high density packaging not offered by conventional surface mount. An enabling packaging technology was selected and thermal models defined which characterized the thermal and mechanical response of the throttle control module. These models were used to optimize thick film multichip module design, characterize the thermal signatures of the electronic components inside the module, and to determine the temperature field and resulting thermal stresses under conditions that may be encountered during the operational life of the throttle control module. Because the need to use unpackaged devices limits the level of testing that can be performed either at the wafer level or as individual dice, an approach to assure a high level of reliability of the unpackaged components was formulated. Component assembly and interconnect technologies were also evaluated and characterized for high temperature applications. Electrical, mechanical and chemical characterizations of enabling die and component attach technologies were performed. Additionally, studies were conducted to assess the performance and reliability of gold and aluminum wire bonding to thick film conductor inks. Kinetic models were developed and validated to estimate wire bond reliability.

  8. Design, Fabrication, and Reliability Assessment of Embedded Resistors and Capacitors on Multilayered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaminathan, Madhavan

    circuit, over 80 percent of the electronic components are passives such as resistors, inductors for discrete components and assembly of same, enhance electrical performance and reliability, and potentiallyDesign, Fabrication, and Reliability Assessment of Embedded Resistors and Capacitors

  9. Reliability Assessment of Fault-Tolerant Dc-Dc Converters for Photovoltaic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    Reliability Assessment of Fault-Tolerant Dc-Dc Converters for Photovoltaic Applications Sairaj V in photovoltaic energy processing applications is presented. The proposed approach acknowledges the influence through several case studies. Index Terms-- Markov reliability modeling, photovoltaic systems, power

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: assess PV system reliability issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system reliability issues Solar Regional Test Center in Vermont Achieves Milestone Installation On September 23, 2014, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Facilities, National...

  11. Structural Reliability: Assessing the Condition and Reliability of Casing in Compacting Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chantose, Prasongsit

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . Effective stress may exceed rock compressive strength, inducing compaction. Wells in compacting reservoirs risk high failure and deformation rates. This project introduces the concept of structural reliability to quantify casing failure risks in compacting...

  12. Ashland Area Support Substation Project : Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides wholesale electric service to the City of Ashland (the City) by transferring power over Pacific Power & Light Company`s (PP&L) 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines and through PP&L`s Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. The City distributes power over a 12.5-kV system which is heavily loaded during winter peak periods and which has reached the limit of its ability to serve peak loads in a reliable manner. Peak loads under normal winter conditions have exceeded the ratings of the transformers at both the Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. In 1989, the City modified its distribution system at the request of PP&L to allow transfer of three megawatts (MW`s) of electric power from the overloaded Ashland Substation to the Oak Knoll Substation. In cooperation with PP&L, BPA installed a temporary 6-8 megavolt-amp (MVA) 115-12.5-kV transformer for this purpose. This additional transformer, however, is only a temporary remedy. BPA needs to provide additional, reliable long-term service to the Ashland area through additional transformation in order to keep similar power failures from occurring during upcoming winters in the Ashland area. The temporary installation of another 20-MVA mobile transformer at the Ashland Substation and additional load curtailment are currently being studied to provide for sustained electrical service by the peak winter period 1992. Two overall electrical plans-of-service are described and evaluated in this report. One of them is proposed for action. Within that proposed plan-of-service are location options for the substation. Note that descriptions of actions that may be taken by the City of Ashland are based on information provided by them.

  13. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Appendix E, Transmission Reinforcement Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this appendix to the draft environmental impact statement (EIS) report is to provide an update of the latest study work done on transmission system options for the Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Also included in the attachments to the EIS are 2 reports analyzing the voltage stability of the Puget Sound transmission system and a review by Power Technologies, Inc. of the BPA voltage stability analysis and reactive options. Five transmission line options and several reactive options are presently being considered as possible solutions to the PSAFRP by the Transmission Team. The first two line options would be built on new rights-of way adjacent (as much as possible) to existing corridors. The reactive options would optimize the existing transmission system capability by adding new stations for series capacitors and/or switchgear. The other three line options are rebuilds or upgrades of existing cross mountain transmission lines. These options are listed below and include a preliminary assessment of the additional transmission system reinforcement required to integrate the new facilities into the existing transmission system. Plans were designed to provide at least 500 MVAR reactive margin.

  14. Reliability assessment of electrical power systems using genetic algorithms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samaan, Nader Amin Aziz

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ........................................................24 D. Calculating Reliability Indices........................................................25 IV. Case Studies.........................................................................................27 A. Case I: IEEE RTS-79... ......................................................................27 B. Case II: IEEE RTS-96.....................................................................33 V. Analysis of the Method........................................................................35 A. Effect of GA Parameters...

  15. RELIABILITY OF WIND POWER FROM DISPERSED SITES: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ON METHODOLOGY: FROM WIND POWER FREQUENCY TO LOSS-OF-LOADJ.P. , "Some Aspects of Wind Power Statistics, " J. of Appl.S£CTION Reliability of Wind Power From Dispersed Sites: A Pr

  16. Area C borrow Site Habitat Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A habitat quality assessment was performed within selected portions of the proposed Area C Borrow Source. The previously identified Bitterbrush / Indian ricegrass stabilized dune element occurrence was determined to be better described as a sagebrush /needle-and-thread grass element occurrence of fair to good quality. A new habitat polygon is suggested adjacent to this element occurrence, which would also be sagebrush/needle-and-thread grass, but of poor quality. The proposed site of initial borrow site development was found to be a very low quality community dominated by cheatgrass.

  17. Interval Methods in Remote Sensing: Reliable SubDivision of Geological Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Interval Methods in Remote Sensing: Reliable Sub­Division of Geological Areas David D. Coblentz, G. The subdivision of a geological zone into segments is often a controversial issue, with different evidence of the geological subdivision is the fact that the existing subdivision is often based on the chemical and physical

  18. Fracture mechanics models developed for piping reliability assessment in light water reactors: piping reliability project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, D.O.; Lim, E.Y.; Dedhia, D.D.; Woo, H.H.; Chou, C.K.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The efforts concentrated on modifications of the stratified Monte Carlo code called PRAISE (Piping Reliability Analysis Including Seismic Events) to make it more widely applicable to probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis of nuclear reactor piping. Pipe failures are considered to occur as the result of crack-like defects introduced during fabrication, that escape detection during inspections. The code modifications allow the following factors in addition to those considered in earlier work to be treated: other materials, failure criteria and subcritical crack growth characteristic; welding residual and vibratory stresses; and longitudinal welds (the original version considered only circumferential welds). The fracture mechanics background for the code modifications is included, and details of the modifications themselves provided. Additionally, an updated version of the PRAISE user's manual is included. The revised code, known as PRAISE-B was then applied to a variety of piping problems, including various size lines subject to stress corrosion cracking and vibratory stresses. Analyses including residual stresses and longitudinal welds were also performed.

  19. Defect localization, characterization and reliability assessment in emerging photovoltaic devices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Benjamin Bing-Yeh; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Haase, Gad S.; Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Cole, Edward Isaac,; Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microsystems-enabled photovoltaics (MEPV) can potentially meet increasing demands for light-weight, portable, photovoltaic solutions with high power density and efficiency. The study in this report examines failure analysis techniques to perform defect localization and evaluate MEPV modules. CMOS failure analysis techniques, including electroluminescence, light-induced voltage alteration, thermally-induced voltage alteration, optical beam induced current, and Seabeck effect imaging were successfully adapted to characterize MEPV modules. The relative advantages of each approach are reported. In addition, the effects of exposure to reverse bias and light stress are explored. MEPV was found to have good resistance to both kinds of stressors. The results form a basis for further development of failure analysis techniques for MEPVs of different materials systems or multijunction MEPVs. The incorporation of additional stress factors could be used to develop a reliability model to generate lifetime predictions for MEPVs as well as uncover opportunities for future design improvements.

  20. ASSESSMENT OF LIVESTOCK WINTERING AREAS IN BRIDGE CREEK BASIN, 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;ASSESSMENT OF LIVESTOCK WINTERING AREAS IN BRIDGE CREEK BASIN, 1996 DOE FRAP 1996-03 Prepared-96.............................................. 22 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Bridge Creek basin livestock wintering area back assessment, 1996 quality in the Bridge Creek basin are assessed. These sites had been inspected in the winter and spring

  1. E-Area Performance Assessment Interim Measures Assessment FY2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stallings, M

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    After major changes to the limits for various disposal units of the E-Area Low Level Waste Facility (ELLWF) last year, no major changes have been made during FY2005. A Special Analysis was completed which removes the air pathway {sup 14}C limit from the Intermediate Level Vault (ILV). This analysis will allow the disposal of reactor moderator deionizers which previously had no pathway to disposal. Several studies have also been completed providing groundwater transport input for future special analyses. During the past year, since Slit Trenches No.1 and No.2 were nearing volumetric capacity, they were operationally closed under a preliminary closure analysis. This analysis was performed using as-disposed conditions and data and showed that concrete rubble from the demolition of 232-F was acceptable for disposal in the STs even though the latest special analysis for the STs had reduced the tritium limits so that the inventory in the rubble exceeded limits. A number of special studies are planned during the next years; perhaps the largest of these will be revision of the Performance Assessment (PA) for the ELLWF. The revision will be accomplished by incorporating special analyses performed since the last PA revision as well as revising analyses to include new data. Projected impacts on disposal limits of more recent studies have been estimated. No interim measures will be applied during this year. However, it is being recommended that tritium disposals to the Components-in-Grout (CIG) Trenches be suspended until a limited Special Analysis (SA) currently in progress is completed. This SA will give recommendations for optimum placement of tritiated D-Area tower waste. Further recommendations for tritiated waste placement in the CIG Trenches will be given in the upcoming PA revision.

  2. Reliability worth assessment in a developing country - commercial and industrial survey results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandey, M.; Billinton, R.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of an investigation conducted to determine the costs of electric service interruptions in the commercial and industrial sectors of a developing country. The investigation used in-person interviews of 800 businesses and 300 industries in Nepal. The results indicate the customer implications of service reliability, and show that electric service reliability worth can be assessed in a developing country.

  3. Reliability of Quantitative Ultrasonic Assessment of Normal-Tissue Toxicity in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, Emi J.; Chen Hao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Torres, Mylin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Andic, Fundagul [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Liu Haoyang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Chen Zhengjia [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Statistics, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Sun, Xiaoyan [Department of Statistics, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Liu Tian, E-mail: tliu34@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We have recently reported that ultrasound imaging, together with ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC), can provide quantitative assessment of radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicity. This study's purpose is to evaluate the reliability of our quantitative ultrasound technology in assessing acute and late normal-tissue toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy. Method and Materials: Our ultrasound technique analyzes radiofrequency echo signals and provides quantitative measures of dermal, hypodermal, and glandular tissue toxicities. To facilitate easy clinical implementation, we further refined this technique by developing a semiautomatic ultrasound-based toxicity assessment tool (UBTAT). Seventy-two ultrasound studies of 26 patients (720 images) were analyzed. Images of 8 patients were evaluated for acute toxicity (<6 months postradiotherapy) and those of 18 patients were evaluated for late toxicity ({>=}6 months postradiotherapy). All patients were treated according to a standard radiotherapy protocol. To assess intraobserver reliability, one observer analyzed 720 images in UBTAT and then repeated the analysis 3 months later. To assess interobserver reliability, three observers (two radiation oncologists and one ultrasound expert) each analyzed 720 images in UBTAT. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate intra- and interobserver reliability. Ultrasound assessment and clinical evaluation were also compared. Results: Intraobserver ICC was 0.89 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.96 for glandular tissue toxicity. Interobserver ICC was 0.78 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.94 for glandular tissue toxicity. Statistical analysis found significant changes in dermal (p < 0.0001), hypodermal (p = 0.0027), and glandular tissue (p < 0.0001) assessments in the acute toxicity group. Ultrasound measurements correlated with clinical Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scores of patients in the late toxicity group. Patients with RTOG Grade 1 or 2 had greater ultrasound-assessed toxicity percentage changes than patients with RTOG Grade 0. Conclusion: Early and late radiation-induced effects on normal tissue can be reliably assessed using quantitative ultrasound.

  4. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Appendix B : Local Generation Evaluation : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The information and data contained in this Appendix was extracted from numerous sources. The principle sources used for technical data were Bonneville Power Administration's 1990 Resource Program along with its technical appendix, and Chapter 8 of the Draft 1991 Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan. All cost data is reported 1988 dollars unless otherwise noted. This information was supplemented by other data developed by Puget Sound utilities who participated on the Local Generation Team. Identifying generating resources available to the Puget Sound area involved a five step process: (1) listing all possible resources that might contribute power to the Puget Sound area, (2) characterizing the technology/resource status, cost and operating characteristics of these resources, (3) identifying exclusion criteria based on the needs of the overall Puget Sound Electric Reliability Plan study, (4) applying these criteria to the list of resources, and (5) summarizing of the costs and characteristics of the final list of resources. 15 refs., 20 tabs.

  5. Multi Anode Photomultiplier Tube Reliability Assessment for the JEM-EUSO Space Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Prieto-Alfonso; L. del Peral; M. Casolino; K. Tsuno; T. Ebisuzaki; M. D. Rodríguez Frías; JEM-EUSO Collaboration

    2015-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability assessment in concerned with the analysis of devices and systems whose individual components are prone to fail. This reliability analysis documents the process and results of reliability determination of the JEM-EUSO photomultiplier tube component using the methods 217 Plus. Quantum efficiency degradation and radiation hardness assurance. In conclussion, the levels of damage suffered by the PMTs which comprise the focal surface of JEM-EUSO Space Telescope, are acceptable. The results show as well the greatest contribution to the failure is due to radiation SET. The guaranteed performance of this equipment is a 99.45 per cent, an accepted value of reliability thus fulfilling the objectives and technological challenges of JEM-EUSO.

  6. Multi Anode Photomultiplier Tube Reliability Assessment for the JEM-EUSO Space Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prieto-Alfonso, H; Casolino, M; Tsuno, K; Ebisuzaki, T; Frías, M D Rodríguez

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability assessment in concerned with the analysis of devices and systems whose individual components are prone to fail. This reliability analysis documents the process and results of reliability determination of the JEM-EUSO photomultiplier tube component using the methods 217 Plus. Quantum efficiency degradation and radiation hardness assurance. In conclussion, the levels of damage suffered by the PMTs which comprise the focal surface of JEM-EUSO Space Telescope, are acceptable. The results show as well the greatest contribution to the failure is due to radiation SET. The guaranteed performance of this equipment is a 99.45 per cent, an accepted value of reliability thus fulfilling the objectives and technological challenges of JEM-EUSO.

  7. Protocol assessment of a field reliability experiment at the NDI Validation Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashbaugh, M. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Spencer, F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An initial task pursued by the Aging Aircraft NDI Validation Center (AANC) at the request of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was to plan and to implement a specific field experiment. The purpose was to assess the reliability of detecting a crack originating within fastener holes in thin aluminum structure using high-frequency eddy current inspection methods. To accomplish this the authors developed a consistent and systematic methodology to assess reliability of nondestructive inspections through field experiments (Spencer et al., 1993). In this article they briefly discuss major elements necessary for field experimentation. The authors also relate how they tested these elements for the Eddy Current Inspection Reliability Experiment (ECIRE) through a dress rehearsal in the Validation Center.

  8. Can biomass time series be reliably assessed from CPUE time series data Francis Lalo1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    1 Can biomass time series be reliably assessed from CPUE time series data only? Francis Laloë1 to abundance. This means (i) that catchability is constant and (ii) that all the biomass is catchable. If so, relative variations in CPUE indicate the same relative variations in biomass. Myers and Worm consider

  9. Optimized Sampling Frequencies for Weld Reliability Assessments of Long Pipeline Segments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    p. If this probability exceeds a certain regulated (small) threshold p 0 , the pipeline must. To be on the safe side, regulations require that a pipeline be repaired when it is possible that p â?? p 0 , iOptimized Sampling Frequencies for Weld Reliability Assessments of Long Pipeline Segments Cesar J

  10. Optimized Sampling Frequencies for Weld Reliability Assessments of Long Pipeline Segments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    p. If this probability exceeds a certain regulated (small) threshold p0, the pipeline must. To be on the safe side, regulations require that a pipeline be repaired when it is possible that p p0, i.e., when pOptimized Sampling Frequencies for Weld Reliability Assessments of Long Pipeline Segments Cesar J

  11. A Framework for Reliability and Performance Assessment of Wind Energy Conversion Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    penetration of wind-based generation. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, achieving 20% of wind power hinder the widespread penetration of wind-based power generation [2]. These are i) the impact of wind1 A Framework for Reliability and Performance Assessment of Wind Energy Conversion Systems

  12. Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Undrill, John; Mackin, Peter; Daschmans, Ron; Williams, Ben; Haney, Brian; Hunt, Randall; Ellis, Jeff; Illian, Howard; Martinez, Carlos; O'Malley, Mark; Coughlin, Katie; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi

    2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An interconnected electric power system is a complex system that must be operated within a safe frequency range in order to reliably maintain the instantaneous balance between generation and load. This is accomplished by ensuring that adequate resources are available to respond to expected and unexpected imbalances and restoring frequency to its scheduled value in order to ensure uninterrupted electric service to customers. Electrical systems must be flexible enough to reliably operate under a variety of"change" scenarios. System planners and operators must understand how other parts of the system change in response to the initial change, and need tools to manage such changes to ensure reliable operation within the scheduled frequency range. This report presents a systematic approach to identifying metrics that are useful for operating and planning a reliable system with increased amounts of variable renewable generation which builds on existing industry practices for frequency control after unexpected loss of a large amount of generation. The report introduces a set of metrics or tools for measuring the adequacy of frequency response within an interconnection. Based on the concept of the frequency nadir, these metrics take advantage of new information gathering and processing capabilities that system operators are developing for wide-area situational awareness. Primary frequency response is the leading metric that will be used by this report to assess the adequacy of primary frequency control reserves necessary to ensure reliable operation. It measures what is needed to arrest frequency decline (i.e., to establish frequency nadir) at a frequency higher than the highest set point for under-frequency load shedding within an interconnection. These metrics can be used to guide the reliable operation of an interconnection under changing circumstances.

  13. Abstract --A systematic framework for reliability assessment and fault-tolerant design of multiphase dc-dc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    reliability. Index Terms--Markov reliability modeling, maximum power point tracking, photovoltaics, switch1 Abstract -- A systematic framework for reliability assessment and fault-tolerant design of multiphase dc-dc converters deployed in photovoltaic applications is presented. System-level steady

  14. Imprecise Reliability Assessment and Decision-Making when the Type of the Probability Distribution of the Random Variables is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolaidis, Efstratios

    the upper and lower bounds of the reliability of a system involving such variables. A method for modeling, is formulated and solved in order to estimate the minimum and maximum values of a system's reliability1 Imprecise Reliability Assessment and Decision-Making when the Type of the Probability

  15. On Assessing the Accuracy of Offshore Wind Turbine Reliability-Based Design Loads from the Environmental Contour Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Lance

    On Assessing the Accuracy of Offshore Wind Turbine Reliability-Based Design Loads from to derive design loads for an active stall-regulated offshore wind turbine. Two different Danish offshore contour method; wind turbine; offshore; reliability. INTRODUCTION Inverse reliability techniques

  16. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Scoping Summary Report - Part B Preliminary Technical Analysis Appendix A.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes in general terms the nature of the voltage instability problem facing the Puget Sound area. The following two chapters cover the technical aspects of the problem. It deals with load growth, the root cause of the problem. Also addressed is the capacity of the current power system and the criteria for future system planning. It also explains the technical results of transmission system modeling which confirm the system's vulnerability to voltage instability, the principal symptom of the problem. The results of the scoping process in each of the four measure categories are presented. Included are lists of all options identified, a discussion of the screening criteria, and descriptions of the measures that survived the screening process and are proposed for further evaluation in Phase 2. We discuss the evaluation methodology which will be used to refine the analyses. The next steps in the planning process are outlined. It also describes the short term operational agreements that will assure continued reliable service until a long term solution is in place. 8 figs., 22 tabs.

  17. Methodology for reliability based condition assessment. Application to concrete structures in nuclear plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mori, Y.; Ellingwood, B. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (US). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structures in nuclear power plants may be exposed to aggressive environmental effects that cause their strength to decrease over an extended period of service. A major concern in evaluating the continued service for such structures is to ensure that in their current condition they are able to withstand future extreme load events during the intended service life with a level of reliability sufficient for public safety. This report describes a methodology to facilitate quantitative assessments of current and future structural reliability and performance of structures in nuclear power plants. This methodology takes into account the nature of past and future loads, and randomness in strength and in degradation resulting from environmental factors. An adaptive Monte Carlo simulation procedure is used to evaluate time-dependent system reliability. The time-dependent reliability is sensitive to the time-varying load characteristics and to the choice of initial strength and strength degradation models but not to correlation in component strengths within a system. Inspection/maintenance strategies are identified that minimize the expected future costs of keeping the failure probability of a structure at or below an established target failure probability during its anticipated service period.

  18. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR). Version 3.5, Quick Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, B.G.; Richards, R.E.; Reece, W.J.; Gertman, D.I.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Reference Guide contains instructions on how to install and use Version 3.5 of the NRC-sponsored Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR). The NUCLARR data management system is contained in compressed files on the floppy diskettes that accompany this Reference Guide. NUCLARR is comprised of hardware component failure data (HCFD) and human error probability (HEP) data, both of which are available via a user-friendly, menu driven retrieval system. The data may be saved to a file in a format compatible with IRRAS 3.0 and commercially available statistical packages, or used to formulate log-plots and reports of data retrieval and aggregation findings.

  19. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Appendix E: Transmission Reinforcement Analysis : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Five transmission line options and several reactive (voltage support) options are presently being considered as possible solutions to the PSAERP by the Transmission Team. The first two line options would be built on new rights-of way adjacent (as much as possible) to existing corridors. The reactive options would optimize the existing transmission system capability by adding new stations for series capacitors and/or switchgear. The other three line options are rebuilds or upgrades of existing cross mountain transmission lines. These options are listed below and include a preliminary assessment of the additional transmission system reinforcement required to integrate the new facilities into the existing transmission system. These options were derived from earlier study work that was summarized in Puget Sound Reinforcement Transmission Options'' and New Cross Mountain Transmission Line Alternative: The Crosstie'', which are attached. The initial Transmission Options study report recognized the value to system performance of adding an entirely new circuit rather than rebuilding an existing one. However, siting realities require that rebuild options be considered. Typically, the most attractive rebuild options would be the lowest capacity (lowest voltage) circuits. But because of corridor location, length and terminal proximity, the rebuild options listed below appear to be the most promising. Schematic diagrams and QV Curves of each option are also attached. It should be noted that Snoqualmie and Echo Lake refer to the same station east of Puget Sound and Naneum and Kittitas refer to the same station in the Ellensburg area. 100 figs., 20 tabs.

  20. Development of Autonomous Magnetometer Rotorcraft For Wide Area Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark D. McKay; Matthew O. Anderson

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large areas across the United States and internationally are potentially contaminated with unexploded ordinance (UXO), with some ranges encompassing tens to hundreds of thousands of acres. Technologies are needed which will allow for cost effective wide area scanning with (1) near 100% coverage and (2) near 100% detection of subsurface ordnance or features indicative of subsurface ordnance. The current approach to wide area assessment is a multi-level one, in which medium - altitude fixed wing optical imaging is used for an initial site assessment. This assessment is followed with low altitude manned helicopter based magnetometry. Subsequent to this wide area assessment targeted surface investigations are performed using either towed geophysical sensor arrays or man portable sensors. In order to be an effective tool for small UXO detection, the sensing altitude for magnetic site investigations needs to be on the order of 1 to 3 meters. These altitude requirements mean that manned helicopter surveys will generally only be feasible in large, open and relatively flat terrains. While such surveys are effective in mapping large areas relatively fast there are substantial mobilization/demobilization, staffing and equipment costs associated with these surveys, resulting in costs of approximately $100-$150/acre. In addition, due to the low altitude there are substantial risks to pilots and equipment. Surface towed arrays provide highresolution maps but have other limitations, e.g. in their ability to navigate rough terrain effectively. Thus there is a need for other systems, which can be used for effective data collection. An Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) magnetometer platform is an obvious alternative. The motivation behind such a system is that it reduces risk to operators, is lower in initial and Operational and Maintenance (O&M) costs (and can thus potentially be applied to smaller sites) and has the potential of being more effective in terms of detection and possibly characterization (through the use of dynamic acquisition, i.e. survey mission in-flight reprioritization).

  1. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL 21,NO 3, AUGUST 2006 Reliability and Cost trade-off in Multi-Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL 21,NO 3, AUGUST 2006 Reliability and Cost trade-area power systems. The objective is to obtain a suitable trade off between system reliability and cost-off in Multi-Area Power System Generation Expansion Using Dynamic Programming and Global Decomposition Panida

  2. A Methodology to Assess the Reliability of Hydrogen-based Transportation Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2. Define reliability in hydrogen energy systems 3.metrics to value reliability in hydrogen energy systems 4.Specify hydrogen energy systems to evaluate 5. Develop

  3. Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors: Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vierow, Karen; Aldemir, Tunc

    2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The project entitled, “Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors”, was conducted as a DOE NERI project collaboration between Texas A&M University and The Ohio State University between March 2006 and June 2009. The overall goal of the proposed project was to develop practical approaches and tools by which dynamic reliability and risk assessment techniques can be used to augment the uncertainty quantification process in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods and PRA applications for Generation IV reactors. This report is the Final Scientific/Technical Report summarizing the project.

  4. A Markov Model for Assessing the Reliability of a Digital Feedwater Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu,T.L.; Yue, M.; Martinez-Guridi, G.; Lehner, J.

    2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A Markov approach has been selected to represent and quantify the reliability model of a digital feedwater control system (DFWCS). The system state, i.e., whether a system fails or not, is determined by the status of the components that can be characterized by component failure modes. Starting from the system state that has no component failure, possible transitions out of it are all failure modes of all components in the system. Each additional component failure mode will formulate a different system state that may or may not be a system failure state. The Markov transition diagram is developed by strictly following the sequences of component failures (i.e., failure sequences) because the different orders of the same set of failures may affect the system in completely different ways. The formulation and quantification of the Markov model, together with the proposed FMEA (Failure Modes and Effects Analysis) approach, and the development of the supporting automated FMEA tool are considered the three major elements of a generic conceptual framework under which the reliability of digital systems can be assessed.

  5. Environmental assessment for the salvage/demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This environmental assessment has been prepared to assess potential environmental impacts associated with the US Department of Energy`s proposed action: the salvage/demolition of the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants and steam distribution piping. Impact information will be used by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Manager, to determine if the proposed action is a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. If the proposed action is determined to be major and significant, an environmental impact statement will be prepared. If the proposed action is determined not to be major and significant, a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) will be issued and the action can proceed. The proposed action involves the salvage and demolition of the 200 West Area, 200 East Are, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping, equipment, and ancillary facilities. Activities include the salvaging and recycling of all materials, wastes, and equipment where feasible, with waste minimization efforts utilized.

  6. Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM Maryland Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Draxl, C.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of the delineation proposed by the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) for the Maryland (MD) WEA and two alternative delineations. The objectives of the NREL evaluation were to assess MEA's proposed delineation of the MD WEA, perform independent analysis, and recommend how the MD WEA should be delineated.

  7. A limited assessment of the ASEP human reliability analysis procedure using simulator examination results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gore, B.R.; Dukelow, J.S. Jr.; Mitts, T.M.; Nicholson, W.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a limited assessment of the conservatism of the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP) human reliability analysis (HRA) procedure described in NUREG/CR-4772. In particular, the, ASEP post-accident, post-diagnosis, nominal HRA procedure is assessed within the context of an individual`s performance of critical tasks on the simulator portion of requalification examinations administered to nuclear power plant operators. An assessment of the degree to which operator perforn:Lance during simulator examinations is an accurate reflection of operator performance during actual accident conditions was outside the scope of work for this project; therefore, no direct inference can be made from this report about such performance. The data for this study are derived from simulator examination reports from the NRC requalification examination cycle. A total of 4071 critical tasks were identified, of which 45 had been failed. The ASEP procedure was used to estimate human error probability (HEP) values for critical tasks, and the HEP results were compared with the failure rates observed in the examinations. The ASEP procedure was applied by PNL operator license examiners who supplemented the limited information in the examination reports with expert judgment based upon their extensive simulator examination experience. ASEP analyses were performed for a sample of 162 critical tasks selected randomly from the 4071, and the results were used to characterize the entire population. ASEP analyses were also performed for all of the 45 failed critical tasks. Two tests were performed to assess the bias of the ASEP HEPs compared with the data from the requalification examinations. The first compared the average of the ASEP HEP values with the fraction of the population actually failed and it found a statistically significant factor of two bias on the average.

  8. A new mathematical approach to multi-area power system reliability evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pathak, Rajesh

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to three areas and arbitrary configurations. Among the analytical methods for looped interconnections, the most promising are those introduced by Pang and Wood, [7, 8], Clancy, Gross and Wu, [9], Oliveira, Cunha and Pereira, [10], and Lee, [11...]. These methods are based on schemes for classifying the interconnected system state space into regions of failure and success states, and can be used for systems containing any number of areas and arbitrary configurations. Pang and Wood, [7, 8], proposed...

  9. Modeling and Quantification of Team Performance in Human Reliability Analysis for Probabilistic Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey C. JOe; Ronald L. Boring

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and Human Reliability Assessment (HRA) are important technical contributors to the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC) risk-informed and performance based approach to regulating U.S. commercial nuclear activities. Furthermore, all currently operating commercial NPPs in the U.S. are required by federal regulation to be staffed with crews of operators. Yet, aspects of team performance are underspecified in most HRA methods that are widely used in the nuclear industry. There are a variety of "emergent" team cognition and teamwork errors (e.g., communication errors) that are 1) distinct from individual human errors, and 2) important to understand from a PRA perspective. The lack of robust models or quantification of team performance is an issue that affects the accuracy and validity of HRA methods and models, leading to significant uncertainty in estimating HEPs. This paper describes research that has the objective to model and quantify team dynamics and teamwork within NPP control room crews for risk informed applications, thereby improving the technical basis of HRA, which improves the risk-informed approach the NRC uses to regulate the U.S. commercial nuclear industry.

  10. Development of autonomous magnetometer rotorcraft for wide area assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roelof Versteeg; Matt Anderson; Les Beard; Eric Corban; Darryl Curley; Jeff Gamey; Ross Johnson; Dwight Junkin; Mark McKay; Jared Salzmann; Mikhail Tchernychev; Suraj Unnikrishnan; Scott Vinson

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large areas across the United States are potentially contaminated with UXO, with some ranges encompassing tens to hundreds of thousands of acres. Technologies are needed which will allow for cost effective wide area scanning with 1) near 100 % coverage and 2) near 100 % detection of subsurface ordnance or features indicative of subsurface ordnance. The current approach to wide area assessment is a multi-level one, in which medium - altitude fixed wing optical imaging is used for an initial site assessment. This assessment is followed with low altitude manned helicopter based magnetometry. Subsequent to this wide area assessment targeted surface investigations are performed using either towed geophysical sensor arrays or man portable sensors. In order to be an effective tool for small UXO detection, the sensing altitude for magnetic site investigations needs to be on the order of 1 – 3 meters. These altitude requirements mean that manned helicopter surveys will generally only be feasible in large, open and relatively flat terrains. While such surveys are effective in mapping large areas relatively fast there are substantial mobilization/demobilization, staffing and equipment costs associated with these surveys (resulting in costs of approximately $100-$150/acre). In addition, due to the low altitude there are substantial risks to pilots and equipment. Surface towed arrays provide high resolution maps but have other limitations, e.g. in their ability to navigate rough terrain effectively. There is thus a need for other systems which can be used for effective data collection. An UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) magnetometer platform is an obvious alternative. The motivation behind such a system is that it reduces risk to operators, is lower in initial and Operational and Maintenance (O&M) costs (and can thus potentially be applied to smaller sites) and has the potential of being more effective in terms of detection and possibly characterization (through the use of dynamic acquisition, i.e. survey mission inflight reprioritization). We describe and report on a one year effort with as primary goal to provide a recommendation to SERDP for a path forward in the implementation of one or more autonomous unmanned magnetometer rotorcraft platforms. This recommendation (which is provided in chapter 6) is based on the following three elements a) An assessment on the applicability of autonomous rotorcraft magnetometer systems to the current DoD site inventory, and an initial assessment of which type(s) of autonomous unmanned magnetometer rotorcraft platforms (in terms of performance characteristics such as payload, altitude, obstacle avoidance, production rate and flight time) would be most relevant to this inventory (chapter 3); b) An evaluation of the feasibility of assembling such platforms from commercial components (unmanned rotorcraft, control systems and sensors – both magnetometer sensors and supporting sensors). This evaluation included several highly successful field tests (chapter 4 and 5); c) A recommendation of the path forward, which includes a detailed outline of the efforts required in the design, assembly and testing of different modular platforms (chapter 6)

  11. Geologic Assessment of Piedmont and Playa Flood Hazards in the Ivanpah Valley Area, Clark County, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    1 Geologic Assessment of Piedmont and Playa Flood Hazards in the Ivanpah Valley Area, Clark County..................................................................................................................................... 4 Piedmont Geomorphology and Related Flood Hazards..................... 6 The Field Area

  12. An overview of the evolution of human reliability analysis in the context of probabilistic risk assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bley, Dennis C. (Buttonwood Consulting Inc., Oakton, VA); Lois, Erasmia (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC); Kolaczkowski, Alan M. (Science Applications International Corporation, Eugene, OR); Forester, John Alan; Wreathall, John (John Wreathall and Co., Dublin, OH); Cooper, Susan E. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the Reactor Safety Study in the early 1970's, human reliability analysis (HRA) has been evolving towards a better ability to account for the factors and conditions that can lead humans to take unsafe actions and thereby provide better estimates of the likelihood of human error for probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs). The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of recent reviews of operational events and advances in the behavioral sciences that have impacted the evolution of HRA methods and contributed to improvements. The paper discusses the importance of human errors in complex human-technical systems, examines why humans contribute to accidents and unsafe conditions, and discusses how lessons learned over the years have changed the perspective and approach for modeling human behavior in PRAs of complicated domains such as nuclear power plants. It is argued that it has become increasingly more important to understand and model the more cognitive aspects of human performance and to address the broader range of factors that have been shown to influence human performance in complex domains. The paper concludes by addressing the current ability of HRA to adequately predict human failure events and their likelihood.

  13. \\\\mi\\home\\gillow\\LaTeX\\Comp\\Safety\\Risk-Assessments\\Roof\\Sedum Roof Area Roof Access Risk Assessments 3th March 2014.docx `Sedum' Roof Area(s)/Roof Access Risk Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    \\\\mi\\home\\gillow\\LaTeX\\Comp\\Safety\\Risk-Assessments\\Roof\\Sedum Roof Area Roof Access Risk Assessments 3th March 2014.docx `Sedum' Roof Area(s)/Roof Access Risk Assessments DEPARTMENT: Andrew Wiles March 2015 Brief description of area and location Roof tops, walkways, and Fire Route. Sedum' Roof Area

  14. Tanks Focus Area (TFA) Site Needs Assessment FY 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RW Allen

    1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the process used by the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to analyze and develop responses to technology needs submitted by five major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites with radioactive tank waste problems, and the initial results of the analysis. The sites are the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Savannah River Site (SRS), and West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). This is the fifth edition of the TFA site needs assessment. As with previous editions, this edition serves to provide the basis for accurately defining the TFA program for the upcoming fiscal year (FY), and adds definition to the program for up to 4 additional outyears. Therefore, this version distinctly defines the FY 2000 progrti and adds further definition to the FY 2001- FY 2004 program. Each year, the TFA reviews and amends its program in response to site users' science and technology needs.

  15. Draft environmental assessment -- Test Area North pool stabilization project update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to update the ``Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project`` EA (DOE/EA-1050) and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) issued May 6, 1996. This update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of a drying process for the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear reactor core debris canisters now stored underwater in a facility on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A drying process was analyzed in the predecision versions of the EA released in 1995 but that particular process was determined to be ineffective and dropped form the Ea/FONSI issued May 6, 1996. The origin and nature of the TMI core debris and the proposed drying process are described and analyzed in detail in this EA. As did the 1996 EA, this update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of removing various radioactive materials from underwater storage, dewatering these materials, constructing a new interim dry storage facility, and transporting and placing the materials into the new facility. Also, as did the 1996 EA, this EA analyzes the removal, treatment and disposal of water from the pool, and placement of the facility into a safe, standby condition. The entire action would take place within the boundaries of the INEEL. The materials are currently stored underwater in the Test Area North (TAN) building 607 pool, the new interim dry storage facility would be constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) which is about 25 miles south of TAN.

  16. New Reliability Assessment Method for Solder Joints in BGA Package by Considering the Interaction between Design Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satoshi Kondo; Qiang Yu; T. Shibutani; M. Shiratori

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    As the integration and the miniaturization of electronics devices, design space become narrower and interactions between design factors affect their reliability. This paper presents a methodology of quantifying the interaction of each design factor in electronics devices. Thermal fatigue reliability of BGA assembly was assessed with the consideration of the interaction between design factors. Sensitivity analysis shows the influence of each design factor to inelastic strain range of a solder joint characterizing the thermal fatigue life if no interaction occurs. However, there is the interaction in BGA assembly since inelastic strain range depends on not only a mismatch in CTE but also a warpage of components. Clustering can help engineers to clarify the relation between design factors. The variation in the influence was taken to quantify the interaction of each design factor. Based on the interaction, simple evaluating approach of inelastic strain range for the BGA assembly was also developed. BGA package was simplified into a homogeneous component and equivalent CTE wascalculated from the warpage of BGA and PCB. The estimated equation was derived by using the response surface method as a function of design factors. Based upon these analytical results, design engineers can rate each factor's effect on reliability and assess the reliability of their basic design plan at the concept design stage.

  17. A Reliability and Validity Study of the Protective Factors Survey to Assess Protective Factors in Families

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Counts, Jacqueline Marie

    2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    and caregivers. Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted with a sample of 1,078 participants, who completed a parent education program in Nevada. Results provide psychometric data that support a valid and reliable four-factor solution, consisting of family...

  18. Estimation of the reliability of space nuclear power systems by probabilistic risk assessment techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutner, Sophie Isabelle

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A successful space mission depends on the reliable operation of the spacecraft's electrical power system. For payloads requiring high power levels, various designs of space nuclear power systems (SNPS) are available. Designers have conducted limited...

  19. Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Test Area North (TAN) Pool is located within the fenced TAN facility boundaries on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The TAN pool stores 344 canisters of core debris from the March, 1979, Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 reactor accident; fuel assemblies from Loss-of-Fluid Tests (LOFT); and Government-owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies. The LOFT and government owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies are hereafter referred to collectively as {open_quotes}commercial fuels{close_quotes} except where distinction between the two is important to the analysis. DOE proposes to remove the canisters of TMI core debris and commercial fuels from the TAN Pool and transfer them to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim dry storage until an alternate storage location other than at the INEL, or a permanent federal spent nuclear fuel (SNF) repository is available. The TAN Pool would be drained and placed in an industrially and radiologically safe condition for refurbishment or eventual decommissioning. This environmental assessment (EA) identifies and evaluates environmental impacts associated with (1) constructing an Interim Storage System (ISS) at ICPP; (2) removing the TMI and commercial fuels from the pool and transporting them to ICPP for placement in an ISS, and (3) draining and stabilizing the TAN Pool. Miscellaneous hardware would be removed and decontaminated or disposed of in the INEL Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). This EA also describes the environmental consequences of the no action alternative.

  20. Tracking the Reliability of the U.S. Electric Power System: An Assessment of Publicly Available Information Reported to State Public Utility Commissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCommare, Kristina H.; Eto, Joseph H.

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Large blackouts, such as the August 14-15, 2003 blackout in the northeasternUnited States and Canada, focus attention on the importance of reliable electric service. As public and private efforts are undertaken to improve reliability and prevent power interruptions, it is appropriate to assess their effectiveness. Measures of reliability, such as the frequency and duration of power interruptions, have been reported by electric utilities to state public utility commissions for many years. This study examines current state and utility practices for collecting and reporting electricity reliability information and discusses challenges that arise in assessing reliability because of differences among these practices. The study is based primarily on reliability information for 2006 reported by 123 utilities to 37 state public utility commissions.

  1. Lifetime Reliability Assessment with Aging Information from Low-Level Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanov, Georgi

    . As a conse- quence, Dynamic Reliability Management (DRM) becomes an essential approach to assure IC sensors are designed to replicate the NBTI stress of a device in the critical paths (CPs) or potential critical paths (PCPs), such that the aging status (i.e., delay shift) of CPs and PCPs can be estimated from

  2. INTEGRATING THE DESIGN AND RELIABILITY ASSESSMENT OF A HYBRID PV-THERMAL MICROCONCENTRATOR SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , concentrator receivers and modules are composed of many different materials that encapsulate, electrically interconnect, and heat-sink the solar cells. Many of these materials come from the power electronics industry. Although they are reliable in their original field of application, they might fail when included in a solar

  3. An Assessment Of The External Radiological Impact In Areas Of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    zones. The results include: (a) the exposure dose rates assessed by a car-borne scintillation spectrometry system; (b) laboratory measurements of the activity...

  4. DOEEA-1178 Assessment 300 Area Steam Plant Replacement, Hanford...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    From the draft NEPA Environmental Assessment (EA), I understand that the Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to install individual heating Units for individual buildings in the...

  5. Assessment of the Geothermal Potential Within the BPA Marketing Area.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lund, John W.; Allen, Eliot D.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential of geothermal energy is estimated that can be used for direct heat applications and electrical power generation within the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) marketing area. The BPA marketing area includes three principal states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho and portions of California, Montana, Wyoming, Nevada, and Utah bordering on these three states. This area covers approximately 384,000 square miles and has an estimated population of 6,760,000. The total electrical geothermal potential within this marketing area is 4077 MW/sub e/ from hydrothermal resources and 16,000 MW/sub e/ from igneous systems, whereas the total thermal (wellhead) potential is 16.15 x 10/sup 15/ Btu/y. Approximately 200 geothermal resource sites were initially identified within the BPA marketing area. This number was then reduced to about 100 sites thought to be the most promising for development by the year 2000. These 100 sites, due to load area overlap, were grouped into 53 composite sites; 21-3/4 within BPA preference customer areas and 31-1/4 within nonpreference customer areas. The geothermal resource potential was then estimated for high-temperature (> 302/sup 0/F = 150/sup 0/C), intermediate-temperature (194 to 302/sup 0/F = 90 to 150/sup 0/C), and low-temperature (< 194/sup 0/F = 90/sup 0/C) resources.

  6. Natural Circulation in Water Cooled Nuclear Power Plants Phenomena, models, and methodology for system reliability assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jose Reyes

    2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years it has been recognized that the application of passive safety systems (i.e., those whose operation takes advantage of natural forces such as convection and gravity), can contribute to simplification and potentially to improved economics of new nuclear power plant designs. In 1991 the IAEA Conference on ''The Safety of Nuclear Power: Strategy for the Future'' noted that for new plants the use of passive safety features is a desirable method of achieving simplification and increasing the reliability of the performance of essential safety functions, and should be used wherever appropriate''.

  7. Assessment of industrial minerals and rocks in the controlled area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castor, S.B. [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Reno, NV (United States); Lock, D.E. [Mackay School of Mines, Reno, NV (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, is a potential site for a permanent repository for high-level nuclear waste in Miocene ash flow tuff. The Yucca Mountain controlled area occupies approximately 98 km{sup 2} that includes the potential repository site. The Yucca Mountain controlled area is located within the southwestern Nevada volcanic field, a large area of Miocene volcanism that includes at least four major calderas or cauldrons. It is sited on a remnant of a Neogene volcanic plateau that was centered around the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The Yucca Mountain region contains many occurrences of valuable or potentially valuable industrial minerals, including deposits with past or current production of construction aggregate, borate minerals, clay, building stone, fluorspar, silicate, and zeolites. The existence of these deposits in the region and the occurrence of certain mineral materials at Yucca Mountain, indicate that the controlled area may have potential for industrial mineral and rock deposits. Consideration of the industrial mineral potential within the Yucca Mountain controlled area is mainly based on petrographic and lithologic studies of samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain. Clay minerals, zeolites, fluorite, and barite, as minerals that are produced economically in Nevada, have been identified in samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain.

  8. Geothermal resource assessment of Canon City, Colorado Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacharakis, Ted G.; Pearl, Richard Howard

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1979 a program was initiated to fully define the geothermal conditions of an area east of Canon City, bounded by the mountains on the north and west, the Arkansas River on the south and Colorado Highway 115 on the east. Within this area are a number of thermal springs and wells in two distinct groups. The eastern group consists of 5 thermal artesian wells located within one mile of Colorado Highway 115 from Penrose on the north to the Arkansas river on the south. The western group, located in and adjacent to Canon City, consists of one thermal spring on the south bank of the Arkansas River on the west side of Canon City, a thermal well in the northeast corner of Canon City, another well along the banks of Four Mile Creek east of Canon City and a well north of Canon City on Four Mile Creek. All the thermal waters in the Canon City Embayment, of which the study area is part of, are found in the study area. The thermal waters unlike the cold ground waters of the Canon City Embayment, are a calcium-bicarbonate type and range in temperature from 79 F (26 C) to a high of 108 F (42 C). The total combined surface discharge o fall the thermal water in the study area is in excess of 532 acre feet (A.F.) per year.

  9. Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM New Jersey Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Draxl, C.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's development and evaluation of the delineations for the New Jersey (NJ) WEA. The overarching objective of this study is to develop a logical process by which the New Jersey WEA can be subdivided into non-overlapping leasing areas for BOEM's use in developing an auction process in a renewable energy lease sale. NREL identified a selection of leasing areas and proposed delineation boundaries within the established NJ WEA. The primary output of the interagency agreement is this report, which documents the methodology, including key variables and assumptions, by which the leasing areas were identified and delineated.

  10. Evaluation of intrusion sensors and video assessment in areas of restricted passage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoover, C.E.; Ringler, C.E.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses an evaluation of intrusion sensors and video assessment in areas of restricted passage. The discussion focuses on applications of sensors and video assessment in suspended ceilings and air ducts. It also includes current and proposed requirements for intrusion detection and assessment. Detection and nuisance alarm characteristics of selected sensors as well as assessment capabilities of low-cost board cameras were included in the evaluation.

  11. Tanks Focus Area Site Needs Assessment FY 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Robert W.

    2000-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the Tanks Focus Area (TFA's) process of collecting, analyzing, and responding to high-level radioactive tank waste science and technology needs developed from across the DOE complex in FY 2000. The document also summarizes each science and technology need, and provides an initial prioritization of TFA's projected work scope for FY 2001 and FY 2002.

  12. Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM Massachusetts Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Parker, Z.; Fields, M.; Scott, G.; Elliott, D.; Draxl, C.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's development of three delineated leasing area options for the Massachusetts (MA) WEA and the technical evaluation of these leasing areas. The overarching objective of this study is to develop a logical process by which the MA WEA can be subdivided into non-overlapping leasing areas for BOEM's use in developing an auction process in a renewable energy lease sale. NREL worked with BOEM to identify an appropriate number of leasing areas and proposed three delineation alternatives within the MA WEA based on the boundaries announced in May 2012. A primary output of the interagency agreement is this report, which documents the methodology, including key variables and assumptions, by which the leasing areas were identified and delineated.

  13. Assessment of crack opening area for leak rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharples, J.K.; Bouchard, P.J.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines the background to recommended crack opening area solutions given in a proposed revision to leak before break guidance for the R6 procedure. Comparisons with experimental and analytical results are given for some selected cases of circumferential cracks in cylinders. It is shown that elastic models can provide satisfactory estimations of crack opening displacement (and area) but they become increasingly conservative for values of L{sub r} greater than approximately 0.4. The Dugdale small scale yielding model gives conservative estimates of crack opening displacement with increasing enhancement for L{sub r} values greater than 0.4. Further validation of the elastic-plastic reference stress method for up to L{sub r} values of about 1.0 is presented by experimental and analytical comparisons. Although a more detailed method, its application gives a best estimate of crack opening displacement which may be substantially greater than small scale plasticity models. It is also shown that the local boundary conditions in pipework need to be carefully considered when evaluating crack opening area for through-wall bending stresses resulting from welding residual stresses or geometry discontinuities.

  14. Tanks Focus Area site needs assessment FY 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RW Allen

    2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the process used by the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to analyze and develop responses to technology needs submitted by five major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites with radioactive tank waste problems, and the initial results of the analysis. The sites are the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Savannah River Site (SRS), and West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). During the past year, the TFA established a link with DOE's Fernald site to exchange, on a continuing basis, mutually beneficial technical information and assistance.

  15. Tanks focus area site needs assessment FY 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tanks Focus Area`s (TFA`s) mission is to manage an integrated technology development program that results in the application of technology to safely and efficiently accomplish tank waste remediation across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The TFA uses a systematic process for developing its annual program that draws from the tanks technology development needs expressed by four DOE tank waste sites - Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The process is iterative and involves six steps: (1) Site needs identification and documentation, (2) Site communication of priority needs, (3) Technical response development, (4) Review technical responses, (5) Develop program planning documents, and (6) Review planning documents. This document describes the outcomes of the first two steps: site needs identification and documentation, and site communication of priority needs. It also describes the initial phases of the third and fourth steps: technical response development and review technical responses. Each site`s Site Technology Coordination Group (STCG) was responsible for developing and delivering priority tank waste needs. This was accomplished using a standardized needs template developed by the National STCG. The standard template helped improve the needs submission process this year. The TFA received the site needs during December 1996 and January 1997.

  16. Tanks Focus Area FY 1996 Site Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tanks Focus Area`s (TFA`s) mission is to manage an integrated technology development program that results in the application of technology to safely and efficiently accomplish tank waste remediation across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The TFA uses a systematic process for developing its annual program that draws from the tanks technology development needs expressed by four DOE tank waste sites--Hanford, Idaho, Oak Ridge, and Savannah River Sites. The process is iterative and involves four steps: (1) identify and validate tank technology needs at these four sites, (2) define a technical program that responds to these needs, (3) select specific tasks and schedules that accomplish program objectives, and (4) develop integrated teams to carry out selected tasks. This document describes the first of these four steps: identification of sites` tank technology needs. This step concentrates solely on needs identification, collection, and validation. Funding requirements and specific scope of responsive technical activities are not considered until later steps in program definition. This year, the collection and validation of site needs were accomplished through written input from the Site Technology Coordination Groups (STCGs). The TFA recognizes the importance of a continuing solid partnership with the sites through the STCG and DOE as well as contractor users and, therefore, ensured site participation and close coordination throughout the process.

  17. Assessing the Reliability and Quality of Online Uterine Fibroid Embolization Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaicker, Jatin; Wu Ke; Athreya, Sriharsha, E-mail: sathreya@stjoes.ca [Michael G. Degroote School of Medicine, Department of Medical Imaging (Canada)] [Michael G. Degroote School of Medicine, Department of Medical Imaging (Canada)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was designed to examine the best internet resources about uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) pertinent to medical trainees, radiologists, gynecologists, family physicians, and patients. The terms 'uterine fibroid embolization,' 'uterine fibroid embolization,' and 'uterine artery embolization' were entered into Google, Yahoo, and Bing search engines; the top 20 hits were assessed. The hits were categorized as organizational or nonorganizational. Additionally, 23 radiological and obstetrical organizations were assessed. The DISCERN instrument and Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) benchmarks (authorship, attribution, currency, disclosure) were used to assess the information critically. The scope, strength, weaknesses, and unique features were highlighted for the top five organizational and nonorganizational websites. A total of 203 websites were reviewed; 23 were removed in accordance with the exclusion criteria and 146 were duplicate websites, for a total of 34 unique sites. It was found that 35 % (12/34 websites) were organizational (family medicine, radiology, obstetrics/gynecology) and 65 % (22/34 websites) were nonorganizational (teaching or patient resources). The overall mean DISCERN score was 49.6 (10.7). Two-tailed, unpaired t test demonstrated no statistically significant difference between organizational and nonorganizational websites (p = 0.101). JAMA benchmarks revealed 44 % (15/34 websites) with authorship, 71 % (24/34 websites) with attribution, 68 % (23/34 websites) with disclosure, and 47 % (16/34 websites) with currency. The overall quality of websites for UFE is moderate, with important but not serious shortcomings. The best websites provided relevant information about the procedure, benefits/risks, and were interactive. DISCERN scores were compromised by sites failing to provide resources for shared decision-making, additional support, and discussing consequence of no treatment. JAMA benchmarks revealed lack of authorship and currency.

  18. Assessment groundwater monitoring plan for single shell tank waste management area B-BX-BY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caggiano, J.A.

    1996-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Single Shell Tank Waste Management Area B-BX-BY has been placed into groundwater quality assessment monitoring under interim-status regulations. This document presents background and an assessment groundwater monitoring plan to evaluate any impacts of risks/spills from these Single Shell Tanks in WMA B-BX-BY on groundwater quality.

  19. Assessing the impacts of military vehicle traffic on natural areas. Introduction to the special

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehmi, Jeffrey S.

    Assessing the impacts of military vehicle traffic on natural areas. Introduction to the special issue and review of the relevant military vehicle impact literature Alan B. Anderson a,*, Antonio J, and the International Society for Terrain-Vehicle Systems cosponsored a symposium titled ``Assessing the Impacts

  20. Tanks Focus Area site needs assessment FY 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the process used by the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to analyze and develop responses to technology needs submitted by four major US Department of Energy (DOE) sites with radioactive tank waste problems, and the initial results of the analysis. The sites are the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and Savannah River Site (SRS). This document describes the TFA`s process of collecting site needs, analyzing them, and creating technical responses to the sites. It also summarizes the information contained within the TFA needs database, portraying information provided by four major DOE sites with tank waste problems. The overall TFA program objective is to deliver a tank technology program that reduces the current cost, and the operational and safety risks of tank remediation. The TFA`s continues to enjoy close, cooperative relationships with each site. During the past year, the TFA has fostered exchanges of technical information between sites. These exchanges have proven to be healthy for all concerned. The TFA recognizes that site technology needs often change, and the TFA must be prepared not only to amend its program in response, but to help the sites arrive at the best technical approach to solve revised site needs.

  1. Assessment of Rooftop Area in Austin Energy's Service Territory Suitable for PV Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of the Solar America Cities program, Austin Energy proposed to perform an assessment of the rooftop area available for PV development within its service area. Austin Energy contracted with Clean Energy Associates (CEA) to perform the analysis. This report summarizes the project objectives, data sources and methodological approach employed, and results.

  2. Assessment of multispectral glacier mapping methods and derivation of glacier area changes, 19782002, in the central

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kääb, Andreas

    Assessment of multispectral glacier mapping methods and derivation of glacier area changes, 1978 56, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand ABSTRACT. We have measured the glacier area changes in the central Southern Alps, New Zealand, between 1978 and 2002 and have compiled the 2002 glacier outlines using

  3. Geothermal resource assessment of the Yucca Mountain Area, Nye County, Nevada. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.; Trexler, D. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Harry Reid Center for Environmental Studies, Division of Earth Sciences; Shevenell, L., Garside, L. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Mackay School of Mines, Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the geothermal resources within a fifty-mile radius of the Yucca Mountain Project area was conducted to determine the potential for commercial development. The assessment includes collection, evaluation, and quantification of existing geological, geochemical, hydrological, and geophysical data within the Yucca Mountain area as they pertain to geothermal phenomena. Selected geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data were reduced to a set of common-scale digital maps using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for systematic analysis and evaluation. Available data from the Yucca Mountain area were compared to similar data from developed and undeveloped geothermal areas in other parts of the Great Basin to assess the resource potential for future geothermal development at Yucca Mountain. This information will be used in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project to determine the potential suitability of the site as a permanent underground repository for high-level nuclear waste.

  4. Baseline risk assessment for groundwater operable units at the Chemical Plant Area and the Ordnance Works Area, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of the Army (DA) are evaluating conditions in groundwater and springs at the DOE chemical plant area and the DA ordnance works area near Weldon Spring, Missouri. The two areas are located in St. Charles County, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The 88-ha (217-acre) chemical plant area is chemically and radioactively contaminated as a result of uranium-processing activities conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission in the 1950s and 1960s and explosives-production activities conducted by the U.S. Army (Army) in the 1940s. The 6,974-ha (17,232-acre) ordnance works area is primarily chemically contaminated as a result of trinitrotoluene (TNT) and dinitrotoluene (DNT) manufacturing activities during World War II. This baseline risk assessment (BRA) is being conducted as part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RUFS) required under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980, as amended. The purpose of the BRA is to evaluate potential human health and ecological impacts from contamination associated with the groundwater operable units (GWOUs) of the chemical plant area and ordnance works area. An RI/FS work plan issued jointly in 1995 by the DOE and DA (DOE 1995) analyzed existing conditions at the GWOUs. The work plan included a conceptual hydrogeological model based on data available when the report was prepared; this model indicated that the aquifer of concern is common to both areas. Hence, to optimize further data collection and interpretation efforts, the DOE and DA have decided to conduct a joint RI/BRA. Characterization data obtained from the chemical plant area wells indicate that uranium is present at levels slightly higher than background, with a few concentrations exceeding the proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 20 {micro}g/L (EPA 1996c). Concentrations of other radionuclides (e.g., radium and thorium) were measured at back-ground levels and were eliminated from further consideration. Chemical contaminants identified in wells at the chemical plant area and ordnance works area include nitroaromatic compounds, metals, and inorganic anions. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,2-dichloroethylene (1,2 -DCE) have been detected recently in a few wells near the raffinate pits at the chemical plant.

  5. Optical fiber reliability models M. John Matthewson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    3 Optical fiber reliability models M. John Matthewson Fiber Optic Materials Research Program Systems containing optical fiber have design lives on the order of decades so that models for assessing and promising areas for future work are proposed. 1. INTRODUCTION Mechanical failure of optical fiber must

  6. Integrated assessment of quality of supply in future electricity networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernando Gil, Ignacio

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Although power system reliability analysis is a mature research area, there is a renewed interest in updating available network models and formulating improved reliability assessment procedures. The main driver of this ...

  7. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VIII - Risk Assessment Documentation Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume VIII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the risk assessment documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  8. Summary of Tiger Team Assessment and Technical Safety Appraisal recurring concerns in the Maintenance Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tiger Team Assessments and Technical Safety Appraisals (TSA) were reviewed and evaluated for concerns in the Maintenance Area (MA). Two hundred and thirty one (231) maintenance concerns were identified by the Tiger Team Assessments and TSA reports. These recurring concerns appear below. A summary of the Noteworthy Practices that were identified and a compilation of the maintenance concerns for each performance objective that were not considered as recurring are also included. Where the Tiger Team Assessment and TSA identified the operating contractor or facility by name, the concern has been modified to remove the name while retaining the intent of the comment.

  9. PPE Certification of Hazard Assessment Dept: Area: Job Classification/Task

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    PPE 7 Appendix A PPE Certification of Hazard Assessment Dept: Area: Job Classification/Task: HAZARDS (Circle Hazards) Describe Specific Hazards Identify Type of PPE Required for the Hazards Eye Hazard Impact Penetration Dust Chemical Radiation Heat Bioaerosols Projectiles Head Hazard Burn Electric

  10. Soil trampling in an Antarctic Specially Protected Area: tools to assess levels of human impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justel Eusebio, Ana

    Soil trampling in an Antarctic Specially Protected Area: tools to assess levels of human impact P of current advice relating to travel on foot over Antarctic vegetation-free soils. These are based to alter both physical and biological characteristics of Byers Peninsula soils, although at the lowest

  11. Baseline Risk Assessment for the F-Area Burning/Rubble Pits and Rubble Pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an overview of the Savannah River Site (SRS) and a description of the F-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (BRPs) and Rubble Pit (RP) unit. It also describes the objectives and scope of the baseline risk assessment (BRA).

  12. Performance assessment for continuing and future operations at solid waste storage area 6. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix provides the radionuclide inventory data used for the Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 Performance Assessment (PA). The uncertainties in the radionuclide inventory data are also provided, along with the descriptions of the methods used to estimate the uncertainties.

  13. Empirical Bayes Estimation of Reliability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pensky, Marianna

    types of equipment relies on statistical inference about char- acteristics of reliabilityEmpirical Bayes Estimation of Reliability Introduction Assessment of the reliability of various such as reliability function, mean lifetime of the devices, or failure rate. Gen- eral techniques of statistical

  14. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area A-AX at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narbutovskih, Susan M.; Chou, Charissa J.

    2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes a groundwater assessment plan for the single-shell tank systems in Waste Management Area A-AX at the Hanford Site.

  15. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR): Data manual. Part 2: Human error probability (HEP) data; Volume 5, Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reece, W.J.; Gilbert, B.G.; Richards, R.E. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This data manual contains a hard copy of the information in the Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) Version 3.5 database, which is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUCLARR was designed as a tool for risk analysis. Many of the nuclear reactors in the US and several outside the US are represented in the NUCLARR database. NUCLARR includes both human error probability estimates for workers at the plants and hardware failure data for nuclear reactor equipment. Aggregations of these data yield valuable reliability estimates for probabilistic risk assessments and human reliability analyses. The data manual is organized to permit manual searches of the information if the computerized version is not available. Originally, the manual was published in three parts. In this revision the introductory material located in the original Part 1 has been incorporated into the text of Parts 2 and 3. The user can now find introductory material either in the original Part 1, or in Parts 2 and 3 as revised. Part 2 contains the human error probability data, and Part 3, the hardware component reliability data.

  16. Coal assessment and coal quality characterization of the Colorado Plateau area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Affolter, R.H.; Brownfield, M.E.; Biewick, L.H.; Kirschbaum, M.A. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Colorado Plateau Coal Assessment project is to provide an overview of the geologic setting, distribution, resources, and quality of Cretaceous coal in the Colorado Plateau and southernmost Green River Basin. Resources will be estimated by applying restrictions such as coal thickness and depth and will be categorized by land ownership. In some areas these studies will also delineate areas where coal mining may be restricted because of land use, industrial, social, or environmental factors. Emphasis will be placed on areas where the coal is owned or managed by the Federal Government. This assessment, which is part of the US Geological Survey`s National Coal Assessment Program, is different from previous coal assessments in that the major emphasis will be placed on coals that can provide energy for the next few decades. The data is also being collected and stored in digital format that can be updated when new pertinent information becomes available. This study is being completed in cooperation with the US Bureau of Land Management, the US Forest Service, Arizona Geological Survey, Colorado Geological Survey, New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, and the Utah Geological Survey.

  17. Groundwater impact assessment report for the 216-S-26 Crib, 200 West Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, J.W.; Evelo, S.D.; Alexander, D.J.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the impact of wastewater discharged to the 216-S-26 Crib on groundwater quality. The 216-S-26 Crib, located in the southern 200 West Area, has been in use since 1984 to dispose of liquid effluents from the 222-S Laboratory Complex. The 222-S Laboratory Complex effluent stream includes wastewater from four sources: the 222-S Laboratory, the 219-S Waste Storage Facility, the 222-SA Chemical Standards Laboratory, and the 291-S Exhaust Fan Control House and Stack. Based on assessment of groundwater chemistry and flow data, contaminant transport predictions, and groundwater chemistry data, the 216-S-26 Crib has minimal influence on groundwater contamination in the southern 200 West Area.

  18. Performance assessment for continuing and future operations at solid waste storage area 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revised performance assessment (PA) for the continued disposal operations at Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) has been prepared to demonstrate compliance with the performance objectives for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal contained in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. This revised PA considers disposal operations conducted from September 26, 1988, through the projects lifetime of the disposal facility.

  19. Area 2: Inexpensive Monitoring and Uncertainty Assessment of CO2 Plume Migration using Injection Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In-depth understanding of the long-term fate of CO2 in the subsurface requires study and analysis of the reservoir formation, the overlaying caprock formation, and adjacent faults. Because there is significant uncertainty in predicting the location and extent of geologic heterogeneity that can impact the future migration of CO2 in the subsurface, there is a need to develop algorithms that can reliably quantify this uncertainty in plume migration. This project is focused on the development of a model selection algorithm that refines an initial suite of subsurface models representing the prior uncertainty to create a posterior set of subsurface models that reflect injection performance consistent with that observed. Such posterior models can be used to represent uncertainty in the future migration of the CO2 plume. Because only injection data is required, the method provides a very inexpensive method to map the migration of the plume and the associated uncertainty in migration paths. The model selection method developed as part of this project mainly consists of assessing the connectivity/dynamic characteristics of a large prior ensemble of models, grouping the models on the basis of their expected dynamic response, selecting the subgroup of models that most closely yield dynamic response closest to the observed dynamic data, and finally quantifying the uncertainty in plume migration using the selected subset of models. The main accomplishment of the project is the development of a software module within the SGEMS earth modeling software package that implements the model selection methodology. This software module was subsequently applied to analyze CO2 plume migration in two field projects – the In Salah CO2 Injection project in Algeria and CO2 injection into the Utsira formation in Norway. These applications of the software revealed that the proxies developed in this project for quickly assessing the dynamic characteristics of the reservoir were highly efficient and yielded accurate grouping of reservoir models. The plume migration paths probabilistically assessed by the method were confirmed by field observations and auxiliary data. The report also documents the application of the software to answer practical questions such as the optimum location of monitoring wells to reliably assess the migration of CO2 plume, the effect of CO2-rock interactions on plume migration and the ability to detect the plume under those conditions and the effect of a slow, unresolved leak on the predictions of plume migration.

  20. What Can Meta-Analyses Tell Us About the Reliability of Life Cycle Assessment for Decision Support?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandao, M.; Heath, G.; Cooper, J.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The body of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature is vast and has grown over the last decade at a dauntingly rapid rate. Many LCAs have been published on the same or very similar technologies or products, in some cases leading to hundreds of publications. One result is the impression among decision makers that LCAs are inconclusive, owing to perceived and real variability in published estimates of life cycle impacts. Despite the extensive available literature and policy need formore conclusive assessments, only modest attempts have been made to synthesize previous research. A significant challenge to doing so are differences in characteristics of the considered technologies and inconsistencies in methodological choices (e.g., system boundaries, coproduct allocation, and impact assessment methods) among the studies that hamper easy comparisons and related decision support. An emerging trend is meta-analysis of a set of results from LCAs, which has the potential to clarify the impacts of a particular technology, process, product, or material and produce more robust and policy-relevant results. Meta-analysis in this context is defined here as an analysis of a set of published LCA results to estimate a single or multiple impacts for a single technology or a technology category, either in a statistical sense (e.g., following the practice in the biomedical sciences) or by quantitative adjustment of the underlying studies to make them more methodologically consistent. One example of the latter approach was published in Science by Farrell and colleagues (2006) clarifying the net energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of ethanol, in which adjustments included the addition of coproduct credit, the addition and subtraction of processes within the system boundary, and a reconciliation of differences in the definition of net energy metrics. Such adjustments therefore provide an even playing field on which all studies can be considered and at the same time specify the conditions of the playing field itself. Understanding the conditions under which a meta-analysis was conducted is important for proper interpretation of both the magnitude and variability in results. This special supplemental issue of the Journal of Industrial Ecology includes 12 high-quality metaanalyses and critical reviews of LCAs that advance understanding of the life cycle environmental impacts of different technologies, processes, products, and materials. Also published are three contributions on methodology and related discussions of the role of meta-analysis in LCA. The goal of this special supplemental issue is to contribute to the state of the science in LCA beyond the core practice of producing independent studies on specific products or technologies by highlighting the ability of meta-analysis of LCAs to advance understanding in areas of extensive existing literature. The inspiration for the issue came from a series of meta-analyses of life cycle GHG emissions from electricity generation technologies based on research from the LCA Harmonization Project of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, which also provided financial support for this special supplemental issue. (See the editorial from this special supplemental issue [Lifset 2012], which introduces this supplemental issue and discusses the origins, funding, peer review, and other aspects.) The first article on reporting considerations for meta-analyses/critical reviews for LCA is from Heath and Mann (2012), who describe the methods used and experience gained in NREL's LCA Harmonization Project, which produced six of the studies in this special supplemental issue. Their harmonization approach adapts key features of systematic review to identify and screen published LCAs followed by a meta-analytical procedure to adjust published estimates to ones based on a consistent set of methods and assumptions to allow interstudy comparisons and conclusions to be made. In a second study on methods, Zumsteg and colleagues (2012) propose a checklist for a sta

  1. Stress-Rupture, Overstressing and a Proposed New Methodology to Assess the Durability and Reliability of Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lara-Curzio, E.

    1999-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A new testing strategy is proposed to assess the durability and reliability of non- oxide continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites for high temperature structural applications. The strategy is based on determining the reliability (probability of failure) of these materials when subjected to random loading schedules consisting of load and temperature spikes that are superimposed on otherwise constant stress and temperature histories. The frequency and magnitude of the load and temperature spikes would be representative of the number and characteristics of the transients that are associated with a particular industrial application and that are expected to occur over the life of the component. The effect of overstressing on the stress- ruptttre behavior of a CG-NicalonTM fiber-reinforced SiC composite was investigated and results arc presented from tests conducted in ambient air at 950"C.

  2. ,"Table 2. Noncoincident Peak Load, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice Sold to Electric Powere.. Net Energy

  3. Geothermal-resource assessment of the Steamboat-Routt Hot Springs area, Colorado. Resources Series 22

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearl, R.H.; Zacharakis, T.G.; Ringrose, C.D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the Steamboat Springs region in northwest Colorado was initiated and carried out in 1980 and 1981. The goal of this program was to delineate the geological features controlling the occurrence of the thermal waters (temperatures in excess of 68/sup 0/F (20/sup 0/C)) in this area at Steamboat Springs and 8 miles (12.8 km) north at Routt Hot Springs. Thermal waters from Heart Spring, the only developed thermal water source in the study area, are used in the municipal swimming pool in Steamboat Springs. The assessment program was a fully integrated program consisting of: dipole-dipole, Audio-magnetotelluric, telluric, self potential and gravity geophysical surveys, soil mercury and soil helium geochemical surveys; shallow temperature measurements; and prepartion of geological maps. The investigation showed that all the thermal springs appear to be fault controlled. Based on the chemical composition of the thermal waters it appears that Heart Spring in Steamboat Springs is hydrologically related to the Routt Hot Springs. This relationship was further confirmed when it was reported that thermal waters were encountered during the construction of the new high school in Strawberry Park on the north side of Steamboat Springs. In addition, residents stated that Strawberry Park appears to be warmer than the surrounding country side. Geological mapping has determined that a major fault extends from the Routt Hot Springs area into Strawberry Park.

  4. 100 Area and 300 Area Component of the River Corridor Baseline Risk Assessment Spring 2006 Data Compilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Queen; S. G. Weiss

    2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to describe the sampling approaches, modifications made to the 100 Area and 300 Area component of the RCBRA Sampling and Analysis Plan, summarize validation efforts, and provide sample identification numbers.

  5. Performance assessment for continuing and future operations at Solid Waste Storage Area 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This radiological performance assessment for the continued disposal operations at Solid Waste Storage Area 6 (SWSA 6) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) has been prepared to demonstrate compliance with the requirements of the US DOE. The analysis of SWSA 6 required the use of assumptions to supplement the available site data when the available data were incomplete for the purpose of analysis. Results indicate that SWSA 6 does not presently meet the performance objectives of DOE Order 5820.2A. Changes in operations and continued work on the performance assessment are expected to demonstrate compliance with the performance objectives for continuing operations at the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF). All other disposal operations in SWSA 6 are to be discontinued as of January 1, 1994. The disposal units at which disposal operations are discontinued will be subject to CERCLA remediation, which will result in acceptable protection of the public health and safety.

  6. Water for Texas: Applicant Capacity Assessment Tool for the Economically Distressed Areas Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Jason; Dascaliuc, Svetlana; Grossman, Nick; Hunt, Michael; Kenesson, Laura; Madden, Tara; McWilliams, Austin; Scott, Whitney; Stubbs, Megan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    distressed areas This project was a partnership between the George Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University and the Texas Water Development Board II Executive Summary Since 1989, the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB... and over budget. To help address this problem, TWDB asked a team of graduate students at the George Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University to develop an evaluation tool to assess the capacity of applicants to complete...

  7. Assessing environmental risk of the retired filter bed area, Battelle West Jefferson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, S.F.; Thompson, M.D.; Glennon, M.A. [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Initial investigations conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy, Chicago Operations Office, and by Argonne National Laboratory used seismic refraction profiling, electrical resistivity depth sounding, conductivity profiling, magnetic gradiometry, and ground-penetrating radar to study environmental geophysics in the area of the Battelle West Jefferson site`s radiologically contaminated retired filter beds. The investigators used a combination of nonintrusive technologies and innovative drilling techniques to assess environmental risk at the filter beds and to improve understanding of the geology of the Big Darby Creek floodplain. The geophysical investigation, which showed that the preferred groundwater pathway is associated with a laterally extensive deposit of silty sand to sand that is less than 12 ft deep in the floodplain area, also guided the location of cone penetrometer test sites and piezometer installation. Cone penetrometer testing was useful for comparing continuous logging data with surface geophysical data in establishing correlations among unconsolidated materials.

  8. Soil Landscape Assessment atSoil Landscape Assessment at D I l d L A C d KD I l d L A C d KDog Island Lease Area, Cedar KeyDog Island Lease Area, Cedar Key

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Soil Landscape Assessment atSoil Landscape Assessment at D I l d L A C d KD I l d L A C d KDog Island Lease Area, Cedar KeyDog Island Lease Area, Cedar Key #12;Soil SampleSoil Sample LocationsLocationsLocationsLocations #12;Soil ElevationSoil Elevation (Bathymetry)(Bathymetry)(Bathymetry)(Bathymetry) 1.5 ft NAD881.5 ft

  9. Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.113

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shott, G. J.

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary results for Version 4.113 of the Nevada National Security Site Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site performance assessment model are summarized. Version 4.113 includes the Fiscal Year 2011 inventory estimate.

  10. E AREA LOW LEVEL WASTE FACILITY DOE 435.1 PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilhite, E

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Performance Assessment for the Savannah River Site E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility was prepared to meet requirements of Chapter IV of the Department of Energy Order 435.1-1. The Order specifies that a Performance Assessment should provide reasonable assurance that a low-level waste disposal facility will comply with the performance objectives of the Order. The Order also requires assessments of impacts to water resources and to hypothetical inadvertent intruders for purposes of establishing limits on radionuclides that may be disposed near-surface. According to the Order, calculations of potential doses and releases from the facility should address a 1,000-year period after facility closure. The point of compliance for the performance measures relevant to the all pathways and air pathway performance objective, as well as to the impact on water resources assessment requirement, must correspond to the point of highest projected dose or concentration beyond a 100-m buffer zone surrounding the disposed waste following the assumed end of active institutional controls 100 years after facility closure. During the operational and institutional control periods, the point of compliance for the all pathways and air pathway performance measures is the SRS boundary. However, for the water resources impact assessment, the point of compliance remains the point of highest projected dose or concentration beyond a 100-m buffer zone surrounding the disposed waste during the operational and institutional control periods. For performance measures relevant to radon and inadvertent intruders, the points of compliance are the disposal facility surface for all time periods and the disposal facility after the assumed loss of active institutional controls 100 years after facility closure, respectively. The E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility is located in the central region of the SRS known as the General Separations Area. It is an elbow-shaped, cleared area, which curves to the northwest, situated immediately north of the Mixed Waste Management Facility. The E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility is comprised of 200 acres for waste disposal and a surrounding buffer zone that extends out to the 100-m point of compliance. Disposal units within the footprint of the low-level waste facilities include the Slit Trenches, Engineered Trenches, Component-in-Grout Trenches, the Low-Activity Waste Vault, the Intermediate-Level Vault, and the Naval Reactor Component Disposal Area. Radiological waste disposal operations at the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility began in 1994. E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility closure will be conducted in three phases: operational closure, interim closure, and final closure. Operational closure will be conducted during the 25-year operation period (30-year period for Slit and Engineered Trenches) as disposal units are filled; interim closure measures will be taken for some units. Interim closure will take place following the end of operations and will consist of an area-wide runoff cover along with additional grading over the trench units. Final closure of all disposal units in the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility will take place at the end of the 100-year institutional control period and will consist of the installation of an integrated closure system designed to minimize moisture contact with the waste and to serve as a deterrent to intruders. Radiological dose to human receptors is analyzed in this PA in the all-pathways analysis, the inadvertent intruder analysis and the air pathway analysis, and the results are compared to the relevant performance measures. For the all-pathways analysis, the performance measure of relevance is a 25-mrem/yr EDE to representative members of the public, excluding dose from radon and its progeny in air. For the inadvertent intruder, the applicable performance measures are 100-mrem/yr EDE and 500 mrem/yr EDE for chronic and exposure scenarios, respectively. The relevant performance measure for the air pathway is 10-mrem/yr EDE via the air pathway, excluding dose from radon and its progeny in air. Protecti

  11. Thermodynamic assessment of the variation of the surface areas of two synthetic swelling clays during adsorption of water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Thermodynamic assessment of the variation of the surface areas of two synthetic swelling clays; Synthetic smectite; Water; Adsorption; Surface area; Swelling clay; Interlayer space #12;1. Introduction Synthetic clays are very interesting materials, both for scientific research and for industrial applications

  12. California GAMA Program: A Contamination Vulnerability Assessment for the Bakersfield Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as MTBE from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater-monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the GAMA Program is to assess the water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement this groundwater assessment program. In 2003, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the groundwater basin that underlies Bakersfield, in the southern San Joaquin Valley. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3 method). In addition, stable oxygen isotope measurements help determine the recharge water source location. Interpreted together, and in the context of existing water quality and hydrogeologic data, these observable parameters help define the flow field of a groundwater basin, and indicate the degree of vertical communication between near-surface sources (or potential sources) of contamination, and deeper groundwater pumped at high capacity production wells.

  13. Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aden, Nathaniel; Qin, Yining; Fridley, David

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Buildings are at the locus of three trends driving China's increased energy use and emissions: urbanization, growing personal consumption, and surging heavy industrial production. Migration to cities and urban growth create demand for new building construction. Higher levels of per-capita income and consumption drive building operational energy use with demand for higher intensity lighting, thermal comfort, and plug-load power. Demand for new buildings, infrastructure, and electricity requires heavy industrial production. In order to quantify the implications of China's ongoing urbanization, rising personal consumption, and booming heavy industrial sector, this study presents a lifecycle assessment (LCA) of the energy use and carbon emissions related to residential and commercial buildings. The purpose of the LCA model is to quantify the impact of a given building and identify policy linkages to mitigate energy demand and emissions growth related to China's new building construction. As efficiency has become a higher priority with growing energy demand, policy and academic attention to buildings has focused primarily on operational energy use. Existing studies estimate that building operational energy consumption accounts for approximately 25% of total primary energy use in China. However, buildings also require energy for mining, extracting, processing, manufacturing, and transporting materials, as well as energy for construction, maintenance, and decommissioning. Building and supporting infrastructure construction is a major driver of industry consumption--in 2008 industry accounted for 72% of total Chinese energy use. The magnitude of new building construction is large in China--in 2007, for example, total built floor area reached 58 billion square meters. During the construction boom in 2007 and 2008, more than two billion m{sup 2} of building space were added annually; China's recent construction is estimated to account for half of global construction. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed an integrated LCA model to capture the energy and emissions implications of all aspects of new buildings from material mining through construction, operations, and decommissioning. Over the following four sections, this report describes related existing research, the LBNL building LCA model structure and results, policy linkages of this lifecycle assessment, and conclusions and recommendations for follow-on work. The LBNL model is a first-order approach to gathering local data and applying lifecycle assessment to buildings in the Beijing area--it represents one effort among a range of established, predominantly American and European, LCA models. This report identifies the benefits, limitations, and policy applications of lifecycle assessment modeling for quantifying the energy and emissions impacts of specific residential and commercial buildings.

  14. A Multi-State Model for the Reliability Assessment of a Distributed Generation System via Universal Generating Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , Milan, Italy, Dipartimento di Energia Enrico.zio@polimi.it Abstract The current and future developments renewable technology (e.g. wind or solar, etc.) whose behavior is described by a binary state, working assessment, multi-state modeling, universal generating function #12;2 Notations Solar irradiance Total number

  15. Low Energy Accelerator Laboratory Technical Area 53, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts that would be expected to occur if the Department of Energy (DOE) were to construct and operate a small research and development laboratory building at Technical Area (TA) 53 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico. DOE proposes to construct a small building to be called the Low Energy Accelerator Laboratory (LEAL), at a previously cleared, bladed, and leveled quarter-acre site next to other facilities housing linear accelerator research activities at TA-53. Operations proposed for LEAL would consist of bench-scale research, development, and testing of the initial section of linear particle accelerators. This initial section consists of various components that are collectively called an injector system. The anticipated life span of the proposed development program would be about 15 years.

  16. Hawaii electric system reliability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Loose, Verne William

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses Hawaii electric system reliability issues; greater emphasis is placed on short-term reliability but resource adequacy is reviewed in reference to electric consumers' views of reliability %E2%80%9Cworth%E2%80%9D and the reserve capacity required to deliver that value. The report begins with a description of the Hawaii electric system to the extent permitted by publicly available data. Electrical engineering literature in the area of electric reliability is researched and briefly reviewed. North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and measures for generation and transmission are reviewed and identified as to their appropriateness for various portions of the electric grid and for application in Hawaii. Analysis of frequency data supplied by the State of Hawaii Public Utilities Commission is presented together with comparison and contrast of performance of each of the systems for two years, 2010 and 2011. Literature tracing the development of reliability economics is reviewed and referenced. A method is explained for integrating system cost with outage cost to determine the optimal resource adequacy given customers' views of the value contributed by reliable electric supply. The report concludes with findings and recommendations for reliability in the State of Hawaii.

  17. Biological assessment for the remedial action at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Dunn, C.P.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Weldon Spring site in St.Charles County, Missouri, became contaminated during the 1940s through the 1960s as a result of explosives production by the US Army and uranium and thorium processing by the predecessor agency of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency, and DOE is responsible for its cleanup. Contaminants are present in soil, surface water, and aquatic sediments. Alternatives identified for site remediation are no action (included as baseline for comparison), treatment and disposal of the wastes at the Weldon Spring site, and on-site treatment followed by off-site disposal at either a commercial facility near Clive, Utah, or at DOE`s Hanford site near Richland, Washington. In accordance with the requirements of the Endangered Species Act, this biological assessment has been prepared to evaluate the potential effects of proposed remedial action alternatives on federal listed (endangered or threatened) and candidate species at the respective sites. The assessment includes consideration of the environmental setting at each site; the federal listed and candidate species that could occur at each site; the construction, excavation, and treatment activities under each alternative; and the amount of land area affected at each site.

  18. Biological assessment for the remedial action at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Dunn, C.P.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Weldon Spring site in St.Charles County, Missouri, became contaminated during the 1940s through the 1960s as a result of explosives production by the US Army and uranium and thorium processing by the predecessor agency of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency, and DOE is responsible for its cleanup. Contaminants are present in soil, surface water, and aquatic sediments. Alternatives identified for site remediation are no action (included as baseline for comparison), treatment and disposal of the wastes at the Weldon Spring site, and on-site treatment followed by off-site disposal at either a commercial facility near Clive, Utah, or at DOE's Hanford site near Richland, Washington. In accordance with the requirements of the Endangered Species Act, this biological assessment has been prepared to evaluate the potential effects of proposed remedial action alternatives on federal listed (endangered or threatened) and candidate species at the respective sites. The assessment includes consideration of the environmental setting at each site; the federal listed and candidate species that could occur at each site; the construction, excavation, and treatment activities under each alternative; and the amount of land area affected at each site.

  19. Assessment of unsaturated zone radionuclide contamination in the 200 areas of the Hanford site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodeur, J.R.; Wittreich, C.D.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 200 East and 200 West Areas at the Department of Energy`s Hanford site in southeastern Washington, contain chemical and nuclear fuel processing facilities that disposed of large volumes of chemical and radionuclide effluents to the ground via various structures such as ponds, cribs and ditches. A geophysical logging investigation was implemented in 1992 to assess the nature and extent of contamination beneath select liquid disposal sites in the 200 Areas. The borehole geophysical logging was accomplished with a recently developed spectral gamma-ray logging system called the Radionuclide Logging System (RLS). This system has a high-resolution, intrinsic germanium detector mounted in a downhole probe and is calibrated and operated specifically for use in a borehole environment. It provides a means to develop in-situ, gamma-emitting radioelement concentration profiles. Approximately 50 boreholes were logged in this study. The RLS log data provided information about the migration and deposition patterns of specific radionuclides in the unsaturated zone and their impacts on the groundwater. Approximately 10 radionuclide species were detected and quantified. Results of the field investigation are being used to refine site specific conceptual models, support Hanford Site remediation decisions and focus future characterization activities.

  20. Cognitive environment simulation: An artificial intelligence system for human performance assessment: Cognitive reliability analysis technique: (Technical report, May 1986-June 1987)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, D.D.; Roth, E.M.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of Phase II of a three phase research program to develop and validate improved methods to model the cognitive behavior of nuclear power plant (NPP) personnel. In Phase II a dynamic simulation capability for modeling how people form intentions to act in NPP emergency situations was developed based on techniques from artificial intelligence. This modeling tool, Cognitive Environment Simulation or CES, simulates the cognitive processes that determine situation assessment and intention formation. It can be used to investigate analytically what situations and factors lead to intention failures, what actions follow from intention failures (e.g., errors of omission, errors of commission, common mode errors), the ability to recover from errors or additional machine failures, and the effects of changes in the NPP person-machine system. The Cognitive Reliability Assessment Technique (or CREATE) was also developed in Phase II to specify how CES can be used to enhance the measurement of the human contribution to risk in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) studies. 34 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Software Quality Assurance Plan for GoldSim Models Supporting the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites Performance Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory J. Shott, Vefa Yucel

    2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) applies to the development and maintenance of GoldSim models supporting the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs). Two PA models have been approved by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as of November 2006 for the PA maintenance work undertaken by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). NNSA/NSO asked NSTec to assume the custodianship of the models for future development and maintenance. The models were initially developed by Neptune and Company (N&C).

  2. Post-Fire Debris-Flow Hazard Assessment of the Area Burned by the 2013 Beaver Creek Fire near Hailey, Central Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Post-Fire Debris-Flow Hazard Assessment of the Area Burned by the 2013 Beaver Creek Fire near-flow hazard assessment of the area burned by the 2013 Beaver Creek Fire near Hailey, central Idaho: U­1273 Prepared in cooperation with Blaine County, Idaho #12;#12;Post-Fire Debris-Flow Hazard Assessment

  3. North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC): Reliability...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (NERC): Reliability Considerations from the Integration of Smart Grid North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC): Reliability Considerations from the Integration of...

  4. Performance Assessment Transport Modeling of Uranium at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Radioactive Waste

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Following is a brief summary of the assumptions that are pertinent to the radioactive isotope transport in the GoldSim Performance Assessment model of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, with special emphasis on the water-phase reactive transport of uranium, which includes depleted uranium products.

  5. Electricity Reliability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electric power equipment with more energy efficiency and higher capacity than today's systems of modernizing the electric grid to meet the nations's need for reliable, electric power, enhancing security continues to increase within the electricity infrastructure. DOE is conducting research, development

  6. Measurement Practices for Reliability and Power Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kueck, JD

    2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a distribution reliability measurement ''toolkit'' that is intended to be an asset to regulators, utilities and power users. The metrics and standards discussed range from simple reliability, to power quality, to the new blend of reliability and power quality analysis that is now developing. This report was sponsored by the Office of Electric Transmission and Distribution, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Inconsistencies presently exist in commonly agreed-upon practices for measuring the reliability of the distribution systems. However, efforts are being made by a number of organizations to develop solutions. In addition, there is growing interest in methods or standards for measuring power quality, and in defining power quality levels that are acceptable to various industries or user groups. The problems and solutions vary widely among geographic areas and among large investor-owned utilities, rural cooperatives, and municipal utilities; but there is still a great degree of commonality. Industry organizations such as the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the American Public Power Association (APPA), and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) have made tremendous strides in preparing self-assessment templates, optimization guides, diagnostic techniques, and better definitions of reliability and power quality measures. In addition, public utility commissions have developed codes and methods for assessing performance that consider local needs. There is considerable overlap among these various organizations, and we see real opportunity and value in sharing these methods, guides, and standards in this report. This report provides a ''toolkit'' containing synopses of noteworthy reliability measurement practices. The toolkit has been developed to address the interests of three groups: electric power users, utilities, and regulators. The report will also serve to support activities to develop and share information among industry and regulatory participants about critical resources and practices. The toolkit has been developed by investigating the status of indices and definitions, surveying utility organizations on information sharing, and preparing summaries of reliability standards and monitoring requirements--the issues, needs, work under way, existing standards, practices and guidelines--for the following three classifications: (1) terms and definitions of reliability; (2) power quality standards, guidelines, and measurements; and (3) activities and organizations developing and sharing information on distribution reliability. As these synopses of reliability measurement practices are provided, it must be noted that an economic penalty may be associated with requiring too high a reliability level from the distribution system for all customers. It may be appropriate for the distribution system to supply only some base, generally accepted level of reliability. This base level would be adequate for the majority of customers. Users who need a higher level may find it economical to supply using distributed energy resources (DER) and other local solutions to reliability and power quality needs. Local solutions implemented by the customer may be the most cost-effective method for addressing the more stringent needs of a digital economy. These local solutions include energy storage, small distributed generators, and microgrids. This report also considers the market's role in addressing reliability issues and requirements. The customer's needs are discussed in view of issues such as power quality requirements of digital electronic equipment, the cost of outages, the cost of storage and new infrastructure, and natural gas prices. The market role in addressing these issues and requirements is explored. The economic considerations associated with the reliability issues are discussed, as well as the levels at which these economic decisions could be made. Finally, a discussion is provided of the role DER could play in addressing

  7. First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (F, H, J, S, and Z Areas), and the Reactor Areas (C, K, L, P, and R). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) are located...

  8. Sandia Energy - Human Reliability Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-VoltagePower Company's (ORPC's)Nanomaterials

  9. Groundwater impact assessment for the 216-U-17 Crib, 200 West Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, S.P.; Johnson, V.G.; Kline, N.W.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement milestone M-17-00A), this report assesses the impact to groundwater from discharge of process condensate to the ground at the 216-U-17 Crib. The assessment considers impacts associated with moisture movement through soil beneath the crib and the potential transport of contaminants to the groundwater.

  10. First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Concern COPC Constituent of Potential Concern CPT Cone Penetration Test CRC Cesium Removal Column CSH Calcium Silicate Hydrate CSRA Central Savannah River Area CTS...

  11. Avian Monitoring and Risk Assessment at the San Gorgonio Wind Resource Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R.; Tom, J.; Neumann, N.; Erickson, W. P.; Strickland, M. D.; Bourassa, M.; Bay, K. J.; Sernka, K. J.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study at the San Gorgonio Wind Resource Area was to estimate and compare bird utilization, fatality rates, and the risk index among factors including bird taxonomic groups, wind turbine and reference areas, wind turbine sizes and types, and geographic locations. The key questions addressed to meet this objective include: (1) Are there any differences in the level of bird activity, called ''utilization rate'' or ''use'', with the operating wind plant and within the surrounding undeveloped areas (reference area)?; (2) Are there any differences in the rate of bird fatalities (or avian fatality) within the operating wind plant or the surrounding undeveloped areas (reference area)?; (3) Does bird use, fatality rates, or bird risk index vary according to the geographic location, type and size of wind turbine, and/or type of bird within the operating wind plant and surrounding undeveloped areas (reference area)?; and (4) How do raptor fatality rates at San Gorgonio compare to other wind projects with comparable data?

  12. Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy assessment." Energy and Buildings 41: 1263-1268.Canada, and USA,” Energy and Buildings 36, no. 12 (Decemberbuildings (LC-ZEB),” Energy and Buildings 42, no. 6 (June

  13. Waste area grouping 2 Phase I task data report: Ecological risk assessment and White Oak Creek watershed screening ecological risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroymson, R.A.; Jackson, B.L.; Jones, D.S. [and others] [and others

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an ecological risk assessment for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 based on the data collected in the Phase I remedial investigation (RI). It serves as an update to the WAG 2 screening ecological risk assessment that was performed using historic data. In addition to identifying potential ecological risks in WAG 2 that may require additional data collection, this report serves to determine whether there are ecological risks of sufficient magnitude to require a removal action or some other expedited remedial process. WAG 2 consists of White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) main plant area, White Oak Lake (WOL), the White Oak Creek Embayment of the Clinch River, associated flood plains, and the associated groundwater. The WOC system drains the WOC watershed, an area of approximately 16.8 km{sup 2} that includes ORNL and associated WAGs. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminants released from ORNL and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent WAGs.

  14. Issues in benchmarking human reliability analysis methods : a literature review.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lois, Erasmia (US Nuclear Regulatory Commission); Forester, John Alan; Tran, Tuan Q. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt; Boring, Ronald L. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a diversity of human reliability analysis (HRA) methods available for use in assessing human performance within probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). Due to the significant differences in the methods, including the scope, approach, and underlying models, there is a need for an empirical comparison investigating the validity and reliability of the methods. To accomplish this empirical comparison, a benchmarking study is currently underway that compares HRA methods with each other and against operator performance in simulator studies. In order to account for as many effects as possible in the construction of this benchmarking study, a literature review was conducted, reviewing past benchmarking studies in the areas of psychology and risk assessment. A number of lessons learned through these studies are presented in order to aid in the design of future HRA benchmarking endeavors.

  15. Groundwater impact assessment report for the 216-Z-20 Crib, 200 West Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, V.G.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order ([Tri-Party Agreement] Milestone M-17-00A), this report assesses the impact of wastewater discharges to the 216-Z-20 Crib on groundwater quality. The assessment reported herein extends the initial analysis conducted from 1989 through 1990 for the Liquid Effluent Study Final Project Report. Three primary issues are addressed in response to regulator concerns with the initial analysis: The magnitude and status of the soil column transuranic inventory. Potential interactions of wastewater with carbon tetrachloride from adjacent facilities. Preferential pathways created by unsealed monitoring wells.

  16. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, C.J.; Johnson, V.G.

    1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A groundwater quality assessment plan was prepared for waste management area S-SX at the Hanford Site. Groundwater monitoring is conducted at this facility in accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) Part 265, Subpart F [and by reference of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-400(3)]. The facility was placed in assessment groundwater monitoring program status after elevated waste constituents and indicator parameter measurements (i.e., chromium, technetium-99 and specific conductance) in downgradient monitoring wells were observed and confirmed. A first determination, as allowed under 40 CFR 265.93(d), provides the owner/operator of a facility an opportunity to demonstrate that the regulated unit is not the source of groundwater contamination. Based on results of the first determination it was concluded that multiple source locations in the waste management area could account for observed spatial and temporal groundwater contamination patterns. Consequently, a continued investigation is required. This plan, developed using the data quality objectives process, is intended to comply with the continued investigation requirement. Accordingly, the primary purpose of the present plan is to determine the rate and extent of dangerous waste (hexavalent chromium and nitrate) and radioactive constituents (e.g., technetium-99) in groundwater and to determine their concentrations in groundwater beneath waste management area S-SX. Comments and concerns expressed by the Washington State Department of Ecology on the initial waste management area S-SX assessment report were addressed in the descriptive narrative of this plan as well as in the planned activities. Comment disposition is documented in a separate addendum to this plan.

  17. Tracking the Reliability of the U.S. Electric Power System: An Assessment of Publicly Available Information Reported to State Public Utility Commissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaCommare, Kristina H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Distribution Reliabilityand Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Standard 1366-2003, IEEE Guide for Electric Power Distribution Reliabilityand Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Standard 1366-2003, IEEE Guide for Electric Power Distribution Reliability

  18. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area B-BX-BY at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narbutovskih, Susan M.

    2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document was prepared as a groundwater quality assessment plan revision for the single-shell tank systems in Waste Management Area B-BX-BY at the Hanford Site. Groundwater monitoring is conducted at this facility in accordance with 40 CFR Part 265, Subpart F. In FY 1996, the groundwater monitoring program was changed from detection-level indicator evaluation to a groundwater quality assessment program when elevated specific conductance in downgradient monitoring well 299 E33-32 was confirmed by verification sampling. During the course of the ensuing investigation, elevated technetium-99 and nitrate were observed above the drinking water standard at well 299-E33-41, a well located between 241-B and 241-BX Tank Farms. Earlier observations of the groundwater contamination and tank farm leak occurrences combined with a qualitative analysis of possible solutions, led to the conclusion that waste from the waste management area had entered the groundwater and were observed in this well. Based on 40 CFR 265.93 [d] paragraph (7), the owner-operator must continue to make the minimum required determinations of contaminant level and rate/extent of migrations on a quarterly basis until final facility closure. These continued determinations are required because the groundwater quality assessment was implemented prior to final closure of the facility.

  19. High-potential geothermal energy resource areas of Nigeria and their geologic and geophysical assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babalola, O.O.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The widespread occurrence of geothermal manifestations in Nigeria is significant because the wide applicability and relative ease of exploitation of geothermal energy is of vital importance to an industrializing nation like Nigeria. There are two known geothermal resource areas (KGRAs) in Nigeria: the Ikogosi Warm Springs of Ondo State and the Wikki Warm Springs of Bauchi State. These surficial effusions result from the circulation of water to great depths through faults in the basement complex rocks of the area. Within sedimentary areas, high geothermal gradient trends are identified in the Lagos subbasin, the Okitipupa ridge, the Auchi-Agbede are of the Benin flank/hinge line, and the Abakaliki anticlinorium. The deeper Cretaceous and Tertiary sequences of the Niger delta are geopressured geothermal horizons. In the Benue foldbelt, extending from the Abalaliki anticlinorium to the Keana anticline and the Zambuk ridge, several magmatic intrusions emplaced during the Late Cretaceous line the axis of the Benue trough. Positive Bouguer gravity anomalies also parallel this trough and are interpreted to indicate shallow mantle. Parts of this belt and the Ikom, the Jos plateau, Bauchi plateau, and the Adamawa areas, experienced Cenozoic volcanism and magmatism.

  20. Damage Assessment from Storm Surge to Coastal Cities: Lessons from the Miami Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Hurricane Andrew hit Dade County with Category 5 force, generating 17-foot (more than 5 meters) storm surges evolution of hurricane intensity and sea level rise. The area of Miami represents a clear hotspot of human sea level, considering different hurricane parameters (storm category and direction, wind speed

  1. Human Reliability Program Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landers, John; Rogers, Erin; Gerke, Gretchen

    2014-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A Human Reliability Program (HRP) is designed to protect national security as well as worker and public safety by continuously evaluating the reliability of those who have access to sensitive materials, facilities, and programs. Some elements of a site HRP include systematic (1) supervisory reviews, (2) medical and psychological assessments, (3) management evaluations, (4) personnel security reviews, and (4) training of HRP staff and critical positions. Over the years of implementing an HRP, the Department of Energy (DOE) has faced various challenges and overcome obstacles. During this 4-day activity, participants will examine programs that mitigate threats to nuclear security and the insider threat to include HRP, Nuclear Security Culture (NSC) Enhancement, and Employee Assistance Programs. The focus will be to develop an understanding of the need for a systematic HRP and to discuss challenges and best practices associated with mitigating the insider threat.

  2. Photovoltaics performance and reliability workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mrig, L. (ed.) [ed.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document consists of papers and viewgraphs compiled from the proceedings of a workshop held in September 1992. This workshop was the fifth in a series sponsored by NREL/DOE under the general subject areas of photovoltaic module testing and reliability. PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities and others exchanged technical knowledge and field experience. The topics of cell and module characterization, module and system performance, materials and module durability/reliability research, solar radiation, and applications are discussed.

  3. Photovoltaics performance and reliability workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mrig, L. [ed.] [ed.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document consists of papers and viewgraphs compiled from the proceedings of a workshop held in September 1992. This workshop was the fifth in a series sponsored by NREL/DOE under the general subject areas of photovoltaic module testing and reliability. PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities and others exchanged technical knowledge and field experience. The topics of cell and module characterization, module and system performance, materials and module durability/reliability research, solar radiation, and applications are discussed.

  4. Performance assessment for the disposal of low-level waste in the 200 West Area Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, M.I.; Khaleel, R.; Rittmann, P.D.; Lu, A.H.; Finfrock, S.H.; DeLorenzo, T.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Serne, R.J.; Cantrell, K.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports the findings of a performance assessment (PA) analysis for the disposal of solid low-level radioactive waste (LLW) in the 200 West Area Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG) in the northwest corner of the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. This PA analysis is required by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A (DOE 1988a) to demonstrate that a given disposal practice is in compliance with a set of performance objectives quantified in the order. These performance objectives are applicable to the disposal of DOE-generated LLW at any DOE-operated site after the finalization of the order in September 1988. At the Hanford Site, DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) has issued a site-specific supplement to DOE Order 5820.2A, DOE-RL 5820.2A (DOE 1993), which provides additiona I ce objectives that must be satisfied.

  5. Canby Area Service Project substation and associated transmission line. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides power to Surprise Valley Electrification Corporation (SVEC) in Modoc County, California. BPA uses PacificCorp`s substation and transmission facilities between Alturas and Canby, California to transfer power to SVEC`s Canby Substation. In the next year, SVEC expects increased industrial, agricultural, and residential electric loads on their 69-kV transmission system south of Canby. SVEC`s substation can accommodate only about 10 percent of the expected additional electric load. BPA`s proposed action is intended to meet SVEC`s increasing electric load. BPA proposes to meet SVEC`s increasing energy load by tapping into BPA`s existing BPA Malin-Warner 230-kV transmission line, and building an 7.9-mile transmission line to a new BPA substation. BPA proposes to build the new substation next to the west side of SVEC`s Canby Substation (Figure 1). This new substation will allow SVEC to move the additional power over their existing transmission or distribution lines. This report is the environmental assessment of the potential impact of the proposed project. The assessment determined that no ``environmental impact statement`` is not required.

  6. Canby Area Service Project : Substation and Associated Transmission Line : Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides power to Surprise Valley Electrification Corporation (SVEC) in Modoc County, California. BPA uses PacificCorp's substation and transmission facilities between Alturas and Canby, California to transfer power to SVEC's Canby Substation. In the next year, SVEC expects increased industrial, agricultural, and residential electric loads on their 69-kV transmission system south of Canby. SVEC's substation can accommodate only about 10 percent of the expected additional electric load. BPA's proposed action is intended to meet SVEC's increasing electric load. BPA proposes to meet SVEC's increasing energy load by tapping into BPA's existing BPA Malin-Warner 230-kV transmission line, and building an 7.9-mile transmission line to a new BPA substation. BPA proposes to build the new substation next to the west side of SVEC's Canby Substation (Figure 1). This new substation will allow SVEC to move the additional power over their existing transmission or distribution lines. This report is the environmental assessment of the potential impact of the proposed project. The assessment determined that no environmental impact statement'' is not required.

  7. Savannah River Site H-Area Tank Farm Performance Assessment Scoping Meeting

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergy SmallImplementing J-F-1 SECTION JtheNEWMR.Y : H-Area Tank Farm

  8. Technology demonstration: geostatistical and hydrologic analysis of salt areas. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doctor, P.G.; Oberlander, P.L.; Rice, W.A.; Devary, J.L.; Nelson, R.W.; Tucker, P.E.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) requested Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to: (1) use geostatistical analyses to evaluate the adequacy of hydrologic data from three salt regions, each of which contains a potential nuclear waste repository site; and (2) demonstrate a methodology that allows quantification of the value of additional data collection. The three regions examined are the Paradox Basin in Utah, the Permian Basin in Texas, and the Mississippi Study Area. Additional and new data became available to ONWI during and following these analyses; therefore, this report must be considered a methodology demonstration here would apply as illustrated had the complete data sets been available. A combination of geostatistical and hydrologic analyses was used for this demonstration. Geostatistical analyses provided an optimal estimate of the potentiometric surface from the available data, a measure of the uncertainty of that estimate, and a means for selecting and evaluating the location of future data. The hydrologic analyses included the calculation of transmissivities, flow paths, travel times, and ground-water flow rates from hypothetical repository sites. Simulation techniques were used to evaluate the effect of optimally located future data on the potentiometric surface, flow lines, travel times, and flow rates. Data availability, quality, quantity, and conformance with model assumptions differed in each of the salt areas. Report highlights for the three locations are given.

  9. Residential and Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Financing in California Rooftop Solar Challenge Areas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This version of the report updates the original report published in March 2013. It identifies and describes the current state of residential and commercial property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing programs in California. The report discusses the Improvement Act of 1911, the Mello-Roos Act of 1982, the different philosophies cities have adopted in implementing PACE financing, and various PACE program structures. It also discusses the first implementation of PACE by cities that used their charter authority to create programs under the Mello-Roos Act of 1982 before the enactment of AB 811 and SB 555.1. This report focuses on PACE as a mechanism to increase the amount of rooftop solar systems installed, but also recognizes that these programs provide an effective means to finance energy and water efficiency projects. The updated report provides new information on California’s Residential PACE Loss Reserve Program, the Federal Housing Finance Agency, program requirements, and program performance.

  10. Radiological performance assessment for the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, J.R.; Fowler, J.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1992-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This radiological performance assessment (RPA) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) was prepared in accordance with the requirements of Chapter III of the US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. The Order specifies that an RPA should provide reasonable assurance that a low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility will comply with the performance objectives of the Order. The performance objectives require that: (1) exposures of the general public to radioactivity in the waste or released from the waste will not result in an effective dose equivalent of 25 mrem per year; (2) releases to the atmosphere will meet the requirements of 40 CFR 61; (3) inadvertent intruders will not be committed to an excess of an effective dose equivalent of 100 mrem per year from chronic exposure, or 500 mrem from a single acute exposure; and (4) groundwater resources will be protected in accordance with Federal, State and local requirements.

  11. Program Plan for Revision of the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, James R.

    2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Saltstone Project, are embarking on the next revision to the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) performance assessment (PA). This program plan has been prepared to outline the general approach, scope, schedule and resources for the PA revision. The plan briefly describes the task elements of the PA process. It discusses critical PA considerations in the development of conceptual models and interpretation of results. Applicable quality assurance (QA) requirements are identified and the methods for implementing QA for both software and documentation are described. The plan identifies project resources supporting the core team and providing project oversight. Program issues and risks are identified as well as mitigation of those risks. Finally, a preliminary program schedule has been developed and key deliverables identified. A number of significant changes have been implemented since the last PA revision resulting in a new design for future SDF disposal units. This revision will encompass the existing and planned disposal units, PA critical radionuclides and exposure pathways important to SDF performance. An integrated analysis of the overall facility layout, including all disposal units, will be performed to assess the impact of plume overlap on PA results. Finally, a rigorous treatment of uncertainty will be undertaken using probabilistic simulations. This analysis will be reviewed and approved by DOE-SR, DOE-HQ and potentially the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This revision will be completed and ready for the start of the DOE review at the end of December 2006. This work supports a Saltstone Vault 2 fee-bearing milestone. This milestone includes completion of the Vault 2 module of the PA revision by the end of FY06.

  12. The value trees contribute to residential property in the Austin metropolitan area: a factor in assessing the impact of oak wilt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Clay Whitney

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE VALUE TREES CONTRIBUTE TO RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY IN THE AUSTIN METROPOLITAN AREA: A FACTOR IN ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF OAK WILT A Thesis by CLAY WHITNEY MARTIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Forestry THE VALUE TREES CONTRIBUTE TO RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY IN THE AUSTIN METROPOLITAN AREA: A FACTOR IN ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF OAK WILT A Thesis by CLAY WHITNEY MARTIN...

  13. Geothermal assessment of the MX deployment area in Nevada. Final report, April 1, 1981-April 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trexler, D.T.; Bruce, J.L.; Cates, D.; Dolan, H.H.; Covington, C.H.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary geothermal resource assessment of the MX deployment area in Nevada focused on Coyote Spring Valley in southeastern Nevada. Initially, an extensive literature search was conducted and a bibliography consisting of 750 entries was compiled covering all aspects of geology pertaining to the study area. A structural study indicates that Coyote Spring Valley lies in a tectonically active area which is favorable for the discovery of geothermal resources. Hot water may be funneled to the near-surface along an extensive fracture and fault system which appears to underlie the valley, according to information gathered during the literature search and aerial photo survey. A total of 101 shallow temperature probes were emplanted in Coyote Spring Valley. Three anomalous temperature points all lying within the same vicinity were identified in the north-central portion of the valley near a fault. A soil-mercury study also identified one zone of anomalous mercury concentrations around the north end of the Arrow Canyon Range. A literature search covering regional fluid geochemistry indicated that the three fluid samples taken from Coyote Spring Valley have a higher concentration of Na + K. During field work, seven fluid samples were collected in Coyote Spring Valley which also appear to be derived from volcanic units due to the presence of Ca-Mg or Na-K carbonate-bicarbonate. A temperature gradient study of six test water wells indicates that only one geothermal well with a temperature of 35.5/sup 0/C (96/sup 0/F) exists in the central portion of the valley at the north end of Arrow Canyon Range near the zone of anomalous soil-mercury points. A cultural assessment of Coyote Spring Valley was performed prior to field work.

  14. Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada; Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that it is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.

  15. Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada; Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high- level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guideline for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EA), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that it is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as of five sites suitable for characterization.

  16. Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada; Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that is is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.

  17. Software Reliability Cases: The Bridge Between Hardware, Software and System Safety and Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmann, D.S.; Peercy, D.E.

    1999-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    High integrity/high consequence systems must be safe and reliable; hence it is only logical that both software safety and software reliability cases should be developed. Risk assessments in safety cases evaluate the severity of the consequences of a hazard and the likelihood of it occurring. The likelihood is directly related to system and software reliability predictions. Software reliability cases, as promoted by SAE JA 1002 and 1003, provide a practical approach to bridge the gap between hardware reliability, software reliability, and system safety and reliability by using a common methodology and information structure. They also facilitate early insight into whether or not a project is on track for meeting stated safety and reliability goals, while facilitating an informed assessment by regulatory and/or contractual authorities.

  18. Radiological Conditions in Areas of Kuwait with Residues of Depleted Uranium RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Under the terms of Article III of its Statute, the IAEA is authorized to establish standards of safety for protection against ionizing radiation and to provide for the application of these standards to peaceful nuclear activities. The regulatory related publications by means of which the IAEA establishes safety standards and measures are issued in the IAEA Safety Standards Series. This series covers nuclear safety, radiation safety, transport safety and waste safety, and also general safety (that is, of relevance in two or more of the four areas), and the categories within it are Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. Safety Fundamentals (blue lettering) present basic objectives, concepts and principles of safety and protection in the development and application of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. Safety Requirements (red lettering) establish the requirements that must be met to ensure safety. These requirements, which are expressed as ‘shall ’ statements, are governed by the objectives and principles presented in the Safety Fundamentals. Safety Guides (green lettering) recommend actions, conditions or procedures for meeting safety requirements. Recommendations in Safety Guides are expressed as ‘should ’ statements, with the implication that it is necessary to take the measures recommended or equivalent alternative measures to comply with the requirements. The IAEA’s safety standards are not legally binding on Member States but may be adopted by them, at their own discretion, for use in national regulations in respect of their own activities. The standards are binding on the IAEA in relation to its own operations and on States in relation to operations assisted by the IAEA. Information on the IAEA’s safety standards programme (including editions in languages other than English) is available at the IAEA Internet site www.iaea.org/ns/coordinet

  19. Real Time Grid Reliability Management 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joe

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactive Power Reserve Work Group, Western ElectricityReactive Voltage Security Assessment Wide Area Network Western Area Power Administration Western Electricity

  20. Micronucleus frequency and hematologic index in Colossoma macropomum (Pisces, Ariidae) for environmental impact assessment at a protected area in Brazil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sousa, Debora Batista Pinheiro, E-mail: deborabpsousa@gmail.com [Postgraduate Program of Aquatic Resources and Fishery (PPGRAP/UEMA), State University of Maranhão (Brazil); Neta, Raimunda Nonata Fortes Carvalho [Department of Chemistry and Biology, State University of Maranhão (Brazil)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This study used micronucleus assays and erythrocyte indices in the freshwater fish tambaqui, Colossoma macropomum, to assess environmental impacts in the Environmental Protection Area at Maracanã, São Luis, Brazil. Fish were sampled from two locations within the protected area, Serena Lagoon and Ambude River, on four occasions. Biometric data (length and weight) and an aliquot of blood were collected from each fish for analysis. Erythrocyte indices including: mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration were calculated, and blood samples were examined for micronuclei and nuclear morphological changes. Micronuclei were found in fish from both locations, although the frequency was higher in fish from Ambude River. Nuclear morphological changes were identified only in fish collected from Ambude River. Several nuclear morphological changes were found in erythrocytes stained with Giemsa, including: micronuclei and binucleate nuclei. On average, erythrocyte indices were lower in fish collected from Ambude River than in those from Serena Lagoon. Our results indicate that micronuclei and erythrocyte indices can be used in C. macropomum as indicators of environmental health.

  1. ,"Table 1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice Sold to Electric Powere. Historical7,1. Net

  2. Estimated Value of Service Reliability for Electric Utility Customers in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, M.J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reliability of their transmission and distribution systemsdistribution against the incremental benefits of enhanced (or maintained) system reliabilitysystem reliability reinforcements; Assessing the economic benefits of distribution

  3. Reliability as a measure of transportation system performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Dena Delise

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This investigation involved a comparative analysis to assess the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of seven previously proposed methods of measuring travel time reliability. For each method, reliability was calculated using a l2-week...

  4. Environmental Assessment for the Transfer of 1100 AREA, Southern Rail Connection and Rolling Stock, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared to assess potential environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's proposed action: the transfer of the 1100 Area, southern rail connection and rolling stock to a non-federal entity. Impact information contained herein will be used by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Manager, to determine if the proposed action is a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. If the proposed action is determined to be major and significant, an environmental impact statement will be prepared. If the proposed action is determined not to be major and significant, a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) will be issued and the action can proceed. Criteria used to evaluate significance can be found in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1508.27. This EA was prepared in compliance with the ''National Environmental Policy Act'' (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the U.S. Department of Energy Implementing Procedures for NEPA (10 CFR 1021). The following is a description of each section of the EA. (1) Purpose and Need for Action. This provides a brief statement concerning the problem or opportunity the U.S. Department of Energy is addressing with the proposed action. As necessary, background information is provided. (2) Description of the Proposed Action. A description with sufficient detail to identify potential environmental impacts is provided. (3) Alternatives to the Proposed Action. Reasonable alternative actions, which would address the Purpose and Need, are described. A no action alternative, as required by 10 CFR 1021, also is described. (4) Affected Environment. This provides a brief description of the locale in which the proposed action takes place, and which may be environmentally impacted. (5) Environmental Impacts. The range of environmental impacts, beneficial and adverse, are described for the proposed action. Impacts of alternatives briefly are discussed. (6) Permits and Regulatory Requirements. A brief description of permits and regulatory requirements for the proposed action is provided. (7) Organizations Consulted. Any outside agencies, groups, or individuals contacted as part of environmental assessment documentation preparation are listed. (8) References. Documents used to provide information or data are listed. The appendices contain additional information necessary to support an understanding of the proposed action, alternatives, and potential impacts is provided. Comments resulting from review of the environmental assessment by states and tribes or other stakeholders and the response to those comments will be included in the appendices.

  5. Reliability-Centered Maintenance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reliability-centered maintenance leverages the same practices and technologies of predictive maintenance.

  6. Results of phase 1 groundwater quality assessment for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas B-BX-BY at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narbutovskih, S.M.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a Phase 1 (or first determination) groundwater quality assessment for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, in accordance with the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement. The purpose of the assessment was to determine if the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area (WMA) B-BX-BY has impacted groundwater quality. This report will document the evidence demonstrating that the WMA has impacted groundwater quality.

  7. Power as a function of reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abate, M.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McCabe, G.P.; Lynch, M.P. [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many studies employ multiple measurement instruments such as human raters, observers, judges, or mechanical gauges to record subject data. It is well known that the consistency of these instruments, commonly called rater reliability, limits the extent to which conclusions should be drawn from the observed data. However, the degree to which rater reliability limits conclusions has traditionally been assessed in only subjective manners. In this paper, a method is developed for objectively quantifying the impact of rate reliability on the statistical analysis of data from a commonly used collection scheme. This method allows the inclusion of a reliability index in statistical power calculations and is an invaluable tool in the planning of experiments.

  8. 2013 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada; Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shott, Gregory [NSTec] [NSTec

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs), with the results submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE 1999a, 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2013. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2013 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2013 include the following: • Development of a new Area 5 RWMS closure inventory estimate based on disposals through FY 2013 • Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis • Development of version 4.115 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA/CA model The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. The FY 2013 review of operations, facility design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D results for the Area 3 RWMS indicates no changes that would impact PA validity. The conclusion of the annual review is that all performance objectives can be met and the Area 3 RWMS PA remains valid. There is no need to the revise the Area 3 RWMS PA. Review of Area 5 RWMS operations, design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D activities indicates that no significant changes have occurred. The FY 2013 PA results, generated with the Area 5 RWMS v4.115 GoldSim PA model, indicate that there continues to be a reasonable expectation of meeting all performance objectives. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. A review of changes potentially impacting the CAs indicates that no significant changes occurred in FY 2013. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter the CAs results or conclusions were found. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the Yucca Flat Underground Test Area (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 97) source term, is scheduled for FY 2024, following the completion of the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan in FY 2015. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat Underground Test Area (CAU 98) results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the CAU 98 Closure Report in FY 2015. Near-term R&D efforts will focus on continuing development of the PA, CA, and inventory models for the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS.

  9. RELIABILITY IMPROVEMENT OF BART TRAIN CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, D.B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    equipment to resolve equipment reliability problems must bereliability problems was seen to be a mandatory first step in improving equipmentreliability of the Bay Area Rapid Tran- sit district's vehicle-borne Automatic Train Control equipment.

  10. Evaluation/disposition of observations no. 6-17, 6-18, and 6-22 from site electrical assessment report, 300 area powerhouse and emergency sys.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahola, E.L.

    1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Disposition of Observations 6-17, 6-18, 6-22 of Site Electrical Assessment Report. Application of generator differential protection, and synchro-check relay rewiring for generators of building 3621-D. In 1990, the WHC Site Electrical Task Group issued a Site Electrical Assessment Report, ``300 Area Powerhouse and Emergency System.`` This report included numerous findings and observations relating to observed deficiencies or opportunities for improvement in maintenance of the inspected electrical systems. The purpose of this letter report is to provide an evaluation and proposed disposition of Observations No. 6-1 7, 6-1 8, and 6-22 of the Site Electrical Assessment Report.

  11. 2008 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) for each of the facilities, with the results submitted annually to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) performed an annual review in fiscal year (FY) 2008 by evaluating operational factors and research results that impact the continuing validity of the PAs and CAs. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2008 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

  12. Regional groundwater flow and tritium transport modeling and risk assessment of the underground test area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The groundwater flow system of the Nevada Test Site and surrounding region was evaluated to estimate the highest potential current and near-term risk to the public and the environment from groundwater contamination downgradient of the underground nuclear testing areas. The highest, or greatest, potential risk is estimated by assuming that several unusually rapid transport pathways as well as public and environmental exposures all occur simultaneously. These conservative assumptions may cause risks to be significantly overestimated. However, such a deliberate, conservative approach ensures that public health and environmental risks are not underestimated and allows prioritization of future work to minimize potential risks. Historical underground nuclear testing activities, particularly detonations near or below the water table, have contaminated groundwater near testing locations with radioactive and nonradioactive constituents. Tritium was selected as the contaminant of primary concern for this phase of the project because it is abundant, highly mobile, and represents the most significant contributor to the potential radiation dose to humans for the short term. It was also assumed that the predicted risk to human health and the environment from tritium exposure would reasonably represent the risk from other, less mobile radionuclides within the same time frame. Other contaminants will be investigated at a later date. Existing and newly collected hydrogeologic data were compiled for a large area of southern Nevada and California, encompassing the Nevada Test Site regional groundwater flow system. These data were used to develop numerical groundwater flow and tritium transport models for use in the prediction of tritium concentrations at hypothetical human and ecological receptor locations for a 200-year time frame. A numerical, steady-state regional groundwater flow model was developed to serve as the basis for the prediction of the movement of tritium from the underground testing areas on a regional scale. The groundwater flow model was used in conjunction with a particle-tracking code to define the pathlines followed by groundwater particles originating from 415 points associated with 253 nuclear test locations. Three of the most rapid pathlines were selected for transport simulations. These pathlines are associated with three nuclear test locations, each representing one of the three largest testing areas. These testing locations are: BOURBON on Yucca Flat, HOUSTON on Central Pahute Mesa, and TYBO on Western Pahute Mesa. One-dimensional stochastic tritium transport simulations were performed for the three pathlines using the Monte Carlo method with Latin hypercube sampling. For the BOURBON and TYBO pathlines, sources of tritium from other tests located along the same pathline were included in the simulations. Sensitivity analyses were also performed on the transport model to evaluate the uncertainties associated with the geologic model, the rates of groundwater flow, the tritium source, and the transport parameters. Tritium concentration predictions were found to be mostly sensitive to the regional geology in controlling the horizontal and vertical position of transport pathways. The simulated concentrations are also sensitive to matrix diffusion, an important mechanism governing the migration of tritium in fractured carbonate and volcanic rocks. Source term concentration uncertainty is most important near the test locations and decreases in importance as the travel distance increases. The uncertainty on groundwater flow rates is as important as that on matrix diffusion at downgradient locations. The risk assessment was performed to provide conservative and bounding estimates of the potential risks to human health and the environment from tritium in groundwater. Risk models were designed by coupling scenario-specific tritium intake with tritium dose models and cancer and genetic risk estimates using the Monte Carlo method. Estimated radiation doses received by individuals from chronic exposure to tritium, and the corre

  13. Power electronics reliability analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Mark A.; Atcitty, Stanley

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the DOE and industry with a general process for analyzing power electronics reliability. The analysis can help with understanding the main causes of failures, downtime, and cost and how to reduce them. One approach is to collect field maintenance data and use it directly to calculate reliability metrics related to each cause. Another approach is to model the functional structure of the equipment using a fault tree to derive system reliability from component reliability. Analysis of a fictitious device demonstrates the latter process. Optimization can use the resulting baseline model to decide how to improve reliability and/or lower costs. It is recommended that both electric utilities and equipment manufacturers make provisions to collect and share data in order to lay the groundwork for improving reliability into the future. Reliability analysis helps guide reliability improvements in hardware and software technology including condition monitoring and prognostics and health management.

  14. Human Reliability Program Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodin, Michael

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

  15. Review of Quantitative Software Reliability Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, T.L.; Yue, M.; Martinez-Guridi, M.; Lehner, J.

    2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The current U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing process for digital systems rests on deterministic engineering criteria. In its 1995 probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) policy statement, the Commission encouraged the use of PRA technology in all regulatory matters to the extent supported by the state-of-the-art in PRA methods and data. Although many activities have been completed in the area of risk-informed regulation, the risk-informed analysis process for digital systems has not yet been satisfactorily developed. Since digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems are expected to play an increasingly important role in nuclear power plant (NPP) safety, the NRC established a digital system research plan that defines a coherent set of research programs to support its regulatory needs. One of the research programs included in the NRC's digital system research plan addresses risk assessment methods and data for digital systems. Digital I&C systems have some unique characteristics, such as using software, and may have different failure causes and/or modes than analog I&C systems; hence, their incorporation into NPP PRAs entails special challenges. The objective of the NRC's digital system risk research is to identify and develop methods, analytical tools, and regulatory guidance for (1) including models of digital systems into NPP PRAs, and (2) using information on the risks of digital systems to support the NRC's risk-informed licensing and oversight activities. For several years, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has worked on NRC projects to investigate methods and tools for the probabilistic modeling of digital systems, as documented mainly in NUREG/CR-6962 and NUREG/CR-6997. However, the scope of this research principally focused on hardware failures, with limited reviews of software failure experience and software reliability methods. NRC also sponsored research at the Ohio State University investigating the modeling of digital systems using dynamic PRA methods. These efforts, documented in NUREG/CR-6901, NUREG/CR-6942, and NUREG/CR-6985, included a functional representation of the system's software but did not explicitly address failure modes caused by software defects or by inadequate design requirements. An important identified research need is to establish a commonly accepted basis for incorporating the behavior of software into digital I&C system reliability models for use in PRAs. To address this need, BNL is exploring the inclusion of software failures into the reliability models of digital I&C systems, such that their contribution to the risk of the associated NPP can be assessed.

  16. Technical Assessment of DOE Savannah River Site-Sponsored Radionuclide Monitoring Efforts in the Central Savannah River Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    Technical Assessment of DOE Savannah River Site-Sponsored Radionuclide Monitoring Efforts...................................................................................................... 3 Summary Conclusions to DOE Regarding CAB Recommendation 317........................... 4............................................................................................................ 8 Standards

  17. 2012 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shott, G. [National Security Technologies, LLC

    2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs), with the results submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE 1999a, 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2012. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2012 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2012 include the following: ? Release of a special analysis for the Area 3 RWMS assessing the continuing validity of the PA and CA ? Development of a new Area 5 RWMS closure inventory estimate based on disposals through FY 2012 ? Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis ? Development of version 4.114 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA model The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. The FY 2012 review of operations, facility design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D results for the Area 3 RWMS indicates no changes that would impact PA validity. A special analysis using the Area 3 RWMS v2.102 GoldSim PA model was prepared to update the PA results for the Area 3 RWMS in FY 2012. The special analysis concludes that all performance objectives can be met and the Area 3 RWMS PA remains valid. There is no need to the revise the Area 3 RWMS PA. Review of Area 5 RWMS operations, design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D activities indicates no significant changes other than an increase in the inventory disposed. The FY 2012 PA results, generated with the Area 5 RWMS v4.114 GoldSim PA model, indicate that there continues to be a reasonable expectation of meeting all performance objectives. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. A review of changes potentially impacting the CAs indicates that no significant changes occurred in FY 2012. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter CA results or conclusions were found. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the Underground Test Area source term (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 97), is scheduled for FY 2024, following the completion of the Yucca Flat CAU 97 Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan in FY 2016. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat CAU 98 results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the CAU 98 closure report in FY 2015. Near-term R&D efforts will focus on continuing development of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA/CA and inventory models.

  18. FY2010 ANNUAL REVIEW E-AREA LOW-LEVEL WASTE FACILITY PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT AND COMPOSITE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butcher, T.; Swingle, R.; Crapse, K.; Millings, M.; Sink, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (ELLWF) consists of a number of disposal units described in the Performance Assessment (PA)(WSRC, 2008b) and Composite Analysis (CA)(WSRC, 1997; WSRC, 1999): Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vault, Intermediate Level (IL) Vault, Trenches (Slit Trenches [STs], Engineered Trenches [ETs], and Component-in-Grout [CIG] Trenches), and Naval Reactor Component Disposal Areas (NRCDAs). This annual review evaluates the adequacy of the approved 2008 ELLWF PA along with the Special Analyses (SAs) approved since the PA was issued. The review also verifies that the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 low-level waste (LLW) disposal operations were conducted within the bounds of the PA/SA baseline, the Savannah River Site (SRS) CA, and the Department of Energy (DOE) Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS). Important factors considered in this review include waste receipts, results from monitoring and research and development (R&D) programs, and the adequacy of controls derived from the PA/SA baseline. Sections 1.0 and 2.0 of this review are a summary of the adequacy of the PA/SA and CA, respectively. An evaluation of the FY2010 waste receipts and the resultant impact on the ELLWF is summarized in Section 3.1. The results of the monitoring program, R&D program, and other relevant factors are found in Section 3.2, 3.3 and 3.4, respectively. Section 4.0 contains the CA annual determination similarly organized. SRS low-level waste management is regulated under DOE Order 435.1 (DOE, 1999a) and is authorized under a DAS as a federal permit. The original DAS was issued by the DOE-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) on September 28, 1999 (DOE, 1999b) for the operation of the ELLWF and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The 1999 DAS remains in effect for the regulation of the SDF. Those portions of that DAS applicable to the ELLWF were superseded by revision 1 of the DAS on July 15, 2008 (DOE, 2008b). The 2008 PA and DAS were officially implemented by the facility on October 31, 2008 and are the authorization documents for this FY2010 Annual Review. Department of Energy Headquarters approval of the 2008 DAS was subject to numerous conditions specified in the document. Two of those conditions are to update the ELLWF closure plan and monitoring plan to align with the conceptual model analyzed in the PA. Both of these conditions were met with the issuance of the PA Monitoring Plan (Millings, 2009a) and the Closure Plan (Phifer et al, 2009a). The PA Monitoring Plan was approved by DOE on July 22, 2009 and the Closure Plan was approved by DOE on May 21, 2009. Both will be updated as needed to remain consistent with the PA. The DAS also specifies that the maintenance plan include activities to resolve each of the secondary issues identified in the DOEHQ review of the 2008 PA that were not completely addressed either with supplemental material provided to the review team or in final revisions to the PA. These outstanding issues were originally documented in the 2008 update of the PA/CA Maintenance Plan (WSRC, 2008a) and in subsequent PA/CA Maintenance Plans (most recently SRNS, 2010a) as required and are actively being worked.

  19. Geothermal assessment of the lower Bear River drainage and northern East Shore ground-water areas, Box Elder County, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klauk, R.H.; Budding, K.E.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Utah Geological and Mineral Survey (UGMS) has been researching the low-temperature geothermal resource potential in Utah. This report, part of an area-wide geothermal research program along the Wasatch Front, concerns the study conducted in the lower Bear River drainage and northern East Shore ground-water areas in Box Elder County, Utah. The primary purpose of the study is to identify new areas of geothermal resource potential. There are seven known low-temperature geothermal areas in this part of Box Elder County. Geothermal reconnaissance techniques used in the study include a temperature survey, chemical analysis of well and spring waters, and temperature-depth measurements in accessible wells. The geothermal reconnaissance techniques identified three areas which need further evaluation of their low-temperature geothermal resource potential. Area 1 is located in the area surrounding Little Mountain, area 2 is west and southwest of Plymouth, and area 3 is west and south of the Cutler Dam. 5 figures, 4 tables.

  20. Executive summary. Wind-energy assessment studies in the Goodnoe Hills and Cape Blanco areas. Progress report, October 1980-September 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, R W; Wade, J E; Persson, P O.G.; Katz, R W

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Work performed in FY81 on Wind Energy Assessment Studies in the Goodnoe Hills and Cape Blanco Areas is summarized. The research centers on defining the extent of the wind resource at site specific locations that have been documented earlier as having good wind power potential. The work consists of spatial wind surveys in the Goodnoe Hills and Cape Blanco area, wind turbine generator wake measurements at the Goodnoe Hills site, and developing a methodology for sampling the wind flow using a kite anemometer. (LEW)

  1. Stochastic Methods in Reliability and Risk Management This volume focuses on stochastic methods developed for reliability modeling and risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haijun

    such as quantitative risk management, decision analysis under uncertainty, and their applications in areas methods developed for reliability modeling and risk analysis. Reliability theory and risk analysis have. This special volume highlights this convergence of reliability modeling and risk analysis, that forms the core

  2. Medical Aspects of Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation covers the medical evaluation as part of a human reliability program, particularly the various medical qualifications and potential disqualifiers.

  3. Lifetime and Reliability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A DOE Solid-State Lighting Program technology fact sheet on lifetime, reliability, and failure as related to LED-based products.

  4. 2011 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs), with the results submitted annually to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE, 1999a; 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2011. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2011 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R and D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R and D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2011 include the following: (1) Operation of a new shallow land disposal unit and a new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-compliant lined disposal unit at the Area 5 RWMS; (2) Development of new closure inventory estimates based on disposals through FY 2011; (3) Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis; (4) Development of version 2.102 of the Area 3 RWMS GoldSim PA model; and (5) Development of version 4.113 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA model. Analysis of the latest available data using the Area 5 RWMS v4.113 GoldSim PA model indicates that all performance objectives can be met. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. In FY 2011, there were no operational changes, monitoring results, or R and D results for the Area 3 RWMS that would impact PA validity. Despite the increase in waste volume and inventory at the Area 3 RWMS since 1996 when the PA was approved, the facility performance evaluated with the Area 3 RWMS PA GoldSim model, version 2.0 (with the final closure inventory), remains well below the performance objectives set forth in U.S. Department of Energy Order DOE O 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management' (DOE, 2001). The conclusions of the Area 3 RWMS PA remain valid. A special analysis was prepared to update the PA and CA results for the Area 3 RWMS in FY 2011. Release of the special analysis is planned for FY 2012. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter CA results or conclusions were found. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat Underground Test Area (UGTA) results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the closure report for the Frenchman Flat UGTA corrective action unit (CAU) in FY 2015. An industrial site, CAU 547, with corrective action sites near the Area 3 RWMS was found to have a significant plutonium inventory in 2009. CAU 547 will be evaluated for inclusion of future revisions or updates of the Area 3 RWMS CA. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the UGTA source terms, is expected in FY 2024, following the completion of the Yucca Flat CAU Corrective Action Decision Document, scheduled for FY 2023. Near-term R and D efforts will focus on continuing development of the Are

  5. Flood Assessment at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site and the Proposed Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, DOE/Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmeltzer, J. S., Millier, J. J., Gustafson, D. L.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flood assessment at the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) and the proposed Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was performed to determine the 100-year flood hazard at these facilities. The study was conducted to determine whether the RWMS and HWSU are located within a 100-year flood hazard as defined by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and to provide discharges for the design of flood protection.

  6. Low-to-moderate temperature geothermal resource assessment for Nevada, area specific studies. Final report, June 1, 1980-August 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trexler, D.T.; Koenig, B.A.; Flynn, T.; Bruce, J.L.; Ghusn, G. Jr.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hawthorne study area is located in Mineral County, Nevada and surrounds the municipality of the same name. It encompasses an area of approximately 310 sq. km (120 sq. mi), and most of the land belongs to the US Army Ammunition Plant. The energy needs of the military combined with those of the area population (over 5,000 residents) are substantial. The area is classified as having a high potential for direct applications using the evaluation scheme described in Texler and others (1979). A variety of scientific techniques was employed during area-wide resource assessment. General geologic studies demonstrate the lithologic diversity in the area; these studies also indicate possible sources for dissolved fluid constituents. Geophysical investigations include aero-magnetic and gravity surveys which aid in defining the nature of regional, and to a lesser extent, local variations in subsurface configurations. Surface and near-surface structural features are determined using various types of photo imagery including low sun-angle photography. An extensive shallow depth temperature probe survey indicates two zones of elevated temperature on opposite sides of the Walker Lake basin. Temperature-depth profiles from several wells in the study area indicate significant thermal fluid-bearing aquifers. Fluid chemical studies suggest a wide spatial distribution for the resource, and also suggest a meteoric recharge source in the Wassuk Range. Finally, a soil-mercury survey was not a useful technique in this study area. Two test holes were drilled to conclude the area resource assessment, and thermal fluids were encountered in both wells. The western well has measured temperatures as high as 90 C (194 F) within 150 meters (500 ft) of the surface. Temperature profiles in this well indicate a negative temperature gradient below 180 meters (590 ft). The eastern hole had a bottom hole temperature of 61 C (142 F) at a depth of only 120 meters (395 ft). A positive gradient is observed to a total depth in the well. Several conclusions are drawn from this study: the resource is distributed over a relatively large area; resource fluid temperatures can exceed 90 C (194 F), but are probably limited to a maximum of 125 C (257 F); recharge to the thermal system is meteoric, and flow of the fluids in the near surface (< 500 m) is not controlled by faults; heat supplied to the system may be related to a zone of partially melted crustal rocks in the area 25 km (15 mi) south of Hawthorne. Four papers and an introduction are included. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper. (MHR)

  7. Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.110

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Results for Version 4.110 of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) performance assessment (PA) model are summarized. Version 4.110 includes the fiscal year (FY) 2010 inventory estimate, including a future inventory estimate. Version 4.110 was implemented in GoldSim 10.11(SP4). The following changes have been implemented since the last baseline model, Version 4.105: (1) Updated the inventory and disposal unit configurations with data through the end of FY 2010. (1) Implemented Federal Guidance Report 13 Supplemental CD dose conversion factors (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1999). Version 4.110 PA results comply with air pathway and all-pathways annual total effective dose (TED) performance objectives (Tables 2 and 3, Figures 1 and 2). Air pathways results decrease moderately for all scenarios. The time of the maximum for the air pathway open rangeland scenario shifts from 1,000 to 100 years (y). All-pathways annual TED increases for all scenarios except the resident scenario. The maximum member of public all-pathways dose occurs at 1,000 y for the resident farmer scenario. The resident farmer dose was predominantly due to technetium-99 (Tc-99) (82 percent) and lead-210 (Pb-210) (13 percent). Pb-210 present at 1,000 y is produced predominantly by radioactive decay of uranium-234 (U-234) present at the time of disposal. All results for the postdrilling and intruder-agriculture scenarios comply with the performance objectives (Tables 4 and 5, Figures 3 and 4). The postdrilling intruder results are similar to Version 4.105 results. The intruder-agriculture results are similar to Version 4.105, except for the Pit 6 Radium Disposal Unit (RaDU). The intruder-agriculture result for the Shallow Land Burial (SLB) disposal units is a significant fraction of the performance objective and exceeds the performance objective at the 95th percentile. The intruder-agriculture dose is due predominantly to Tc-99 (75 percent) and U-238 (9.5 percent). The acute intruder scenario results comply with all performance objectives (Tables 6 and 7, Figures 5 and 6). The acute construction result for the SLB disposal units decreases significantly with this version. The maximum acute intruder dose occurs at 1,000 y for the SLB disposal units under the acute construction scenario. The acute intruder dose is caused by multiple radionuclides including U-238 (31 percent), Th-229 (28 percent), plutonium-239 (8.6 percent), U-233 (7.8 percent), and U-234 (6.7 percent). All results for radon-222 (Rn-222) flux density comply with the performance objective (Table 8, Figure 7). The mean Pit 13 RaDU flux density is close to the 0.74 Bq m{sup -2} s{sup -1} limit.

  8. ISSUES IN THE ASSESSMENT OF GRAVITY MASS FLOW HAZARD IN THE STOREGGA AREA OFF THE WESTERN NORWEGIAN COAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NORWEGIAN COAST D. ISSLER, F. V. DE BLASIO, A. ELVERHØI, T. ILSTAD, Institutt for geologi, Universitetet i. Introduction: scope of the study and general approach The Storegga area off the western Norwegian coast (6°E­6

  9. Medical Device Reliability BIOMATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NEMI Medical Electronics team to address short- and long-term reliability issues with medical devices. OurMedical Device Reliability BIOMATERIALS Our goal is to provide medical device manufacturers, and consistency of active implantable medical devices. These devices, including pacemakers, cardiac defibrillators

  10. An assessment of the available windy land area and wind energy potential in the contiguous United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.L.; Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimates of land areas with various levels of wind energy resource and resultant wind energy potential have been developed for each state in the contiguous United States. The estimates are based on published wind resource data and account for the exclusion of some windy lands as a result of environmental and land-use considerations. Despite these exclusions, the amount of wind resource estimated over the contiguous United States is surprisingly large and has the potential to supply a substantial fraction of the nation's energy needs, even with the use of today's wind turbine technology. Although this study shows that, after exclusions, only about 0.6% of the land area in the contiguous United States is characterized by high wind resource (comparable to that found in windy areas of California where wind energy is being cost-effectively developed), the wind electric potential that could be extracted with today's technology from these areas across the United States is equivalent to about 20% of the current US electric consumption. Future advances in wind turbine technology will further enhance the potential of wind energy. As advances in turbine technology allow areas of moderate wind resource to be developed, more than a tenfold increase in the wind energy potential is possible. These areas, which cover large sections of the Great Plains and are widely distributed throughout many other sections of the country, have the potential of producing more than three times the nation's current electric consumption. 9 refs., 12 figs., 13 tabs.

  11. 2009 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Wate Management Site (RWMS) Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) in fiscal year (FY) 2009. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2009 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

  12. Hydrologic assessment, Eastern Coal Province, Area 23, Alabama: Black Warrior River; Buttahatchee River; Cahaba River; Sipsey River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harkins, J.R.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Area 23 is located at the southern end of the Eastern Coal Province, in the Mobile River basin, includes the Warrior, Cahaba, and edges of the Plateau coal fields in Alabama, and covers an area of 4716 square miles. This report is designed to be useful to mine owners and operators and consulting engineers by presenting information about existing hydrologic conditions and identification of sources of hydrologic information. General hydrologic information is presented in a brief text and illustrations on a single water-resources related topic. Area 23 is underlain by the Coker and Pottsville Formations and the pre-Pennsylvanian rocks. Area 23 has a moist temperate climate with an annual average rainfall of 54 inches and the majority of the area is covered by forest. The soils have a high erosion potential when the vegetative cover is removed. Use of water is primarily from surface-water sources as ground-water supplies generally are not sufficient for public supplies. The US Geological Survey operates a network of hydrologic data collection stations to monitor the streamflow and ground-water conditions. This network includes data for 180 surface-water stations and 49 ground-water observation wells. These data include rate of flow, water levels, and water-quality parameters. Hydrologic problems relating to surface mining are (1) erosion and sedimentation, (2) decline in ground-water levels, and (3) degradation of water quality. Decline in ground-water levels can occur in and near surface-mining areas when excavation extends below the static water level in the aquifer. This can cause nearby wells and springs to go dry. Acid mine drainage is a problem only adjacent to the mined area.

  13. 1/18/11 1:21 PMNBMG Report XX, Geologic Assessment of Piedmont and Playa Flood Hazards in the Ivanpah Valley Area, Clark County, Nevada Page 1 of 58http://dev.nbmg.unr.edu/Pubs/Reports/rXX/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    of Contents NBMG Report XX Geologic Assessment of Piedmont and Playa Flood Hazards in the Ivanpah Valley Area management and more detailed studies related to hazard mitigation efforts in the area. Ideally, the maps `none', and nearly 53% of that area (125 mi2) is classified as having a hazard status high List

  14. Area- and site-specific geothermal leasing/permitting profiles; updated geothermal leasing/permitting performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beeland, G.V.; Schumann, E.; Wieland, M.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sufficient discussion of the elements of the leasing and permitting programs is included to place the information developed in proper context. A table and process flow diagram developed previously which outline the steps in the non-competitive leasing process, is reprinted. Computer printout profiles are presented on 195 identifiable areas in the following states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. Sufficient information on the boundaries of these areas is contained in the report to permit identification of their general location on any map of the appropriate state which shows township and range locations.

  15. Photovoltaic system reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maish, A.B.; Atcitty, C. [Sandia National Labs., NM (United States); Greenberg, D. [Ascension Technology, Inc., Lincoln Center, MA (United States)] [and others

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the reliability of several photovoltaic projects including SMUD`s PV Pioneer project, various projects monitored by Ascension Technology, and the Colorado Parks project. System times-to-failure range from 1 to 16 years, and maintenance costs range from 1 to 16 cents per kilowatt-hour. Factors contributing to the reliability of these systems are discussed, and practices are recommended that can be applied to future projects. This paper also discusses the methodology used to collect and analyze PV system reliability data.

  16. Reliable solar: powering communities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliability Technology earns award ReliabilityReliable

  17. Assessing reliability in energy supply systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Daniel

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    developed for the electricity sector, which are extended tofragility in the electricity sector. But massive outagesframework used in the electricity sector, which considers

  18. Assessing Reliability in Energy Supply Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    developed for the electricity sector, which are extended tofragility in the electricity sector. But massive outagesframework used in the electricity sector, which considers

  19. Assessing Reliability in Energy Supply Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    appropriate security indices for the natural gas sector. Insecurity in the electricity sector, a primary emphasis in natural gas

  20. Assessing reliability in energy supply systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Daniel

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    appropriate security indices for the natural gas sector. Insecurity in the electricity sector, a primary emphasis in natural gas

  1. Assessing reliability in energy supply systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Daniel

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H. , 2004. Energy infrastructure and security. Annual Reviewdisruption, and energy security – valued by a total of 15History Consequences Energy security Economic Import levels

  2. Assessing Reliability in Energy Supply Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H. , 2004. Energy infrastructure and security. Annual Reviewdisruption, and energy security – valued by a total of 15History Consequences Energy security Economic Import levels

  3. Assessing reliability in energy supply systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Daniel

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pathway supplying hydrogen via pipeline from a centralizedgas with pipeline distribution of hydrogen, and 2) on-sitehydrogen is transported to the refueling stations via pipeline

  4. Assessing Reliability in Energy Supply Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pathway supplying hydrogen via pipeline from a centralizedgas with pipeline distribution of hydrogen, and 2) on-sitehydrogen is transported to the refueling stations via pipeline

  5. Assessing reliability in energy supply systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Daniel

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    liquefied natural gas (LNG) trading expected to increase insteam reformation production facility using imported LNG.The LNG supplies come primarily from Trinidad and Tobago,

  6. Assessing Reliability in Energy Supply Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    liquefied natural gas (LNG) trading expected to increase insteam reformation production facility using imported LNG.The LNG supplies come primarily from Trinidad and Tobago,

  7. Assessing Reliability in Energy Supply Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physical security Information security Interdepend- enciesagainst threats. Information security: The degree to whichPhysical security Information security Interdependencies

  8. Assessing reliability in energy supply systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Daniel

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physical security Information security Interdepend- enciesagainst threats. Information security: The degree to whichPhysical security Information security Interdependencies

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Human Reliability Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (NESL) Brayton Lab SCO2 Brayton Cycle Technology Videos Heat Exchanger Development Diffusion Bonding Characterization Mechanical Testing Deep Borehole Disposal Nuclear...

  10. Reliability and Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE solar reliability and safety research and development (R&D) focuses on testing photovoltaic (PV) modules, inverters, and systems for long-term performance, and helping investors, consumers,...

  11. Reliability Standards Owner

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Internal Operations and Asset Management group of Planning and Asset Management (TP). A successful candidate in this position will serve as the Reliability Standards...

  12. Magnetic fusion energy plasma interactive and high heat flux components. Volume I. Technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in the plasma materials interaction field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conn, R.W.; Gauster, W.B.; Heifetz, D.; Marmar, E.; Wilson, K.L. (eds.)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in the field of plasma materials interactions (PMI) in magnetic fusion devices shows these problems to be central for near-term experiments, for intermediate-range reactor devices including D-T burning physics experiments, and for long-term reactor machines. Critical technical issues are ones central to understanding and successful operation of existing and near-term experiments/reactors or devices of great importance for the long run, i.e., ones which will require an extensive, long-term development effort and thus should receive attention now. Four subgroups were formed to assess the critical PMI issues along four major lines: (1) PMI and plasma confinement physics experiments; (2) plasma-edge modelling and theory; (3) surface physics; and (4) materials technology for in-vessel components and the first wall. The report which follows is divided into four major sections, one for each of these topics.

  13. Groundwater quality assessment report for Solid Waste Storage Area 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee -- 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6, located at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) facility, is a shallow land burial site for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and other waste types. Wastes were disposed of in unlined trenches and auger holes from 1969 until May 1986, when it was determined that Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulated wastes were being disposed of there. DOE closed SWSA 6 until changes in operating procedures prevented the disposal of RCRA wastes at SWSA 6. The site, which reopened for waste disposal activities in July 1986, is the only currently operating disposal area for low-level radioactive waste at ORNL. In addition to SWSA 6, it was determined that hazardous wastes were treated at the Explosives Detonation Trench (EDT). Explosives and shock-sensitive chemicals such as picric acid, phosphorus, and ammonium nitrate were detonated; debris from the explosions was backfilled into the trench.

  14. Assessment of impacts and evaluation of restoration methods on areas affected by a well blowout, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warrick, G.D.; Kato, T.T.; Phillips, M.V. [and others

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 1994, an oil well on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 blew-out and crude oil was deposited downwind. After the well was capped, information was collected to characterize the release and to assess effects to wildlife and plants. Oil residue was found up to 13.7 km from the well site, but deposition was relatively light and the oil quickly dried to form a thin crust on the soil surface. Elevated levels of hydrocarbons were found in livers collected from Heermann`s kangaroo rats (Dipodomys heermanni) from the oiled area but polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (known carcinogens or mutagens) were not detected in the livers. Restoration techniques (surface modification and bioremediation) and natural recovery were evaluated within three portions of the oiled area. Herbaceous cover and production, and survival and vigor of desert saltbush (Atriplex polycarpa) were also monitored within each trapping grid.

  15. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Update (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, S.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation was given at the Sandia Reliability Workshop in August 2013 and provides information on current statistics, a status update, next steps, and other reliability research and development activities related to the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative.

  16. Sandia Energy - PV Systems Reliability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems Reliability Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics PV Systems Reliability PV Systems ReliabilityCoryne Tasca2015-05-08T03:40:54+00:00...

  17. Photovoltaic module reliability workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mrig, L. (ed.)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper and presentations compiled in this volume form the Proceedings of the fourth in a series of Workshops sponsored by Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI/DOE) under the general theme of photovoltaic module reliability during the period 1986--1990. The reliability Photo Voltaic (PV) modules/systems is exceedingly important along with the initial cost and efficiency of modules if the PV technology has to make a major impact in the power generation market, and for it to compete with the conventional electricity producing technologies. The reliability of photovoltaic modules has progressed significantly in the last few years as evidenced by warranties available on commercial modules of as long as 12 years. However, there is still need for substantial research and testing required to improve module field reliability to levels of 30 years or more. Several small groups of researchers are involved in this research, development, and monitoring activity around the world. In the US, PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities and others are engaged in the photovoltaic reliability research and testing. This group of researchers and others interested in this field were brought together under SERI/DOE sponsorship to exchange the technical knowledge and field experience as related to current information in this important field. The papers presented here reflect this effort.

  18. Culture Representation in Human Reliability Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Gertman; Julie Marble; Steven Novack

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding human-system response is critical to being able to plan and predict mission success in the modern battlespace. Commonly, human reliability analysis has been used to predict failures of human performance in complex, critical systems. However, most human reliability methods fail to take culture into account. This paper takes an easily understood state of the art human reliability analysis method and extends that method to account for the influence of culture, including acceptance of new technology, upon performance. The cultural parameters used to modify the human reliability analysis were determined from two standard industry approaches to cultural assessment: Hofstede’s (1991) cultural factors and Davis’ (1989) technology acceptance model (TAM). The result is called the Culture Adjustment Method (CAM). An example is presented that (1) reviews human reliability assessment with and without cultural attributes for a Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system attack, (2) demonstrates how country specific information can be used to increase the realism of HRA modeling, and (3) discusses the differences in human error probability estimates arising from cultural differences.

  19. Mind the gap in SEA: An institutional perspective on why assessment of synergies amongst climate change mitigation, adaptation and other policy areas are missing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vammen Larsen, Sanne, E-mail: sannevl@plan.aau.dk [Aalborg University, Lautrupvang 1A, 2750 Ballerup (Denmark); Kornov, Lone, E-mail: lonek@plan.aau.dk [Aalborg University, Fibigerstraede 13, 9220 Aalborg O (Denmark); Wejs, Anja, E-mail: wejs@plan.aau.dk [Aalborg University, Fibigerstraede 13, 9220 Aalborg O (Denmark)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article takes its point of departure in two approaches to integrating climate change into Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA): Mitigation and adaptation, and in the fact that these, as well as the synergies between them and other policy areas, are needed as part of an integrated assessment and policy response. First, the article makes a review of how positive and negative synergies between a) climate change mitigation and adaptation and b) climate change and other environmental concerns are integrated into Danish SEA practice. Then, the article discusses the implications of not addressing synergies. Finally, the article explores institutional explanations as to why synergies are not addressed in SEA practice. A document analysis of 149 Danish SEA reports shows that only one report comprises the assessment of synergies between mitigation and adaptation, whilst 9,4% of the reports assess the synergies between climate change and other environmental concerns. The consequences of separation are both the risk of trade-offs and missed opportunities for enhancing positive synergies. In order to propose explanations for the lacking integration, the institutional background is analysed and discussed, mainly based on Scott's theory of institutions. The institutional analysis highlights a regulatory element, since the assessment of climate change synergies is underpinned by legislation, but not by guidance. This means that great focus is on normative elements such as the local interpretation of legislation and of climate change mitigation and adaptation. The analysis also focuses on how the fragmentation of the organisation in which climate change and SEA are embedded has bearings on both normative and cultural-cognitive elements. This makes the assessment of synergies challenging. The evidence gathered and presented in the article points to a need for developing the SEA process and methodology in Denmark with the aim to include climate change in the assessments in a more systematic and integrated manner. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synergies between climate change mitigation, adaptation and other environmental concerns are not addressed in Danish SEA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Institutional explanations relate to organisational set-ups and understandings of climate change as a new planning issue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The paper points to a need for developing SEA to include climate change in a more systematic and integrated manner.

  20. Cultural Resource Assessment of the Test Area North Demolition Landfill at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenda R. Pace

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed new demolition landfill at Test Area North on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) will support ongoing demolition and decontamination within the facilities on the north end of the INEEL. In June of 2003, the INEEL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, field surveys, and coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify all cultural resources that might be adversely affected by the project and to provide recommendations to protect those listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. These investigations showed that landfill construction and operation would affect two significant cultural resources. This report outlines protective measures to ensure that these effects are not adverse.

  1. ISSAT 2012 KCoverage Reliability Evaluation K-COVERAGE RELIABILITY EVALUATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing, Liudong

    #12;7/20/2012 ISSAT 2012 KCoverage Reliability Evaluation forWSNs 2 Introduction Wireless sensor;7/20/2012 ISSAT 2012 KCoverage Reliability Evaluation forWSNs 7 Model 13 Consider a set of sensor nodes (SN7/20/2012 ISSAT 2012 KCoverage Reliability Evaluation forWSNs 1 K-COVERAGE RELIABILITY EVALUATION

  2. Maximizing Service Reliability in Distributed Computing Systems with Random Node

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayat, Majeed M.

    Maximizing Service Reliability in Distributed Computing Systems with Random Node Failures: Theory Member, IEEE Abstract--In distributed computing systems (DCSs) where server nodes can fail permanently with nonzero probability, the system performance can be assessed by means of the service reliability, defined

  3. 1992 annual report of the North American Electric Reliability Council

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the operation and concerns of the North American Electric Reliability Council and contains contributions from each of its member regional councils concerning reliability of electric power in their representative areas. The topics of the reports include current and future electric system reliability, regional monitoring, planning, telecommunications, the generating availability data system, technical services available, installed capacity changes, equipment changes, unusual events, hurricane Andrew, and ice storms.

  4. Reliability of Electrical Interconnects (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devoto, D.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses the status of NREL's research on the reliability of electrical interconnects.

  5. RADIONUCLIDE DATA PACKAGE FOR PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT CALCULATIONS RELATED TO THE E-AREA LOW-LEVEL WASTE FACILITY AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, J

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site disposes of low-level radioactive waste within on-site engineered disposal facilities. The Savannah River Site must demonstrate that these disposals meet the requirements of DOE Order 435 . 1 through a process known as performance assessment (PA). The objective of this document is to provide the radionuclide -specific data needed for the PA calculations . This work is part of an on-going program to periodically review and update existing PA work as new data becomes available. Revision of the E -Area Low-Level Waste Facility PA is currently underway. The number of radionuclides selected to undergo detailed analysis in the PA is determined by a screening process. The basis of this process is described. Radionuclide-specific data for half-lives, decay modes, daughters, dose conversion factors and groundwater concentration limits are presented with source references and methodologies.

  6. Power electronics reliability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplar, Robert James; Brock, Reinhard C.; Marinella, Matthew; King, Michael Patrick; Stanley, James K.; Smith, Mark A.; Atcitty, Stanley

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project's goals are: (1) use experiments and modeling to investigate and characterize stress-related failure modes of post-silicon power electronic (PE) devices such as silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN) switches; and (2) seek opportunities for condition monitoring (CM) and prognostics and health management (PHM) to further enhance the reliability of power electronics devices and equipment. CM - detect anomalies and diagnose problems that require maintenance. PHM - track damage growth, predict time to failure, and manage subsequent maintenance and operations in such a way to optimize overall system utility against cost. The benefits of CM/PHM are: (1) operate power conversion systems in ways that will preclude predicted failures; (2) reduce unscheduled downtime and thereby reduce costs; and (3) pioneering reliability in SiC and GaN.

  7. Reliable computation Peter Gacs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gacs, Peter

    of compressors 28 4.6. Exercises 30 5. The reliable storage problem 32 5.1. Clocked circuits 32 5.2. Storage 34 5.1. Cables 21 4.2. Compressors 23 4.3. Propagating safety 25 4.4. Endgame 26 4.5. The construction.3. Error-correcting codes 35 5.4. Refreshers 39 5.5. Exercises 48 6. Problems 49 7. Historical remarks 51

  8. Reliability Compliance Management Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration, Corporate Services Office, Office of the Chief Operating Office, Risk and...

  9. 2014 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of Electricity and Energy Reliability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2014 and 2015 within the Office of Electricity and Energy Reliability.

  10. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE).

  11. Testing for PV Reliability (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.; Bansal, S.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE SUNSHOT workshop is seeking input from the community about PV reliability and how the DOE might address gaps in understanding. This presentation describes the types of testing that are needed for PV reliability and introduces a discussion to identify gaps in our understanding of PV reliability testing.

  12. Environmental Assessment for the Closure of the High-Level Waste Tanks in F- & H-Areas at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the closure of 51 high-level radioactive waste tanks and tank farm ancillary equipment (including transfer lines, evaporators, filters, pumps, etc) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. The waste tanks are located in the F- and H-Areas of SRS and vary in capacity from 2,839,059 liters (750,000 gallons) to 4,921,035 liters (1,300,000 gallons). These in-ground tanks are surrounded by soil to provide shielding. The F- and H-Area High-Level Waste Tanks are operated under the authority of Industrial Wastewater Permits No.17,424-IW; No.14520, and No.14338 issued by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). In accordance with the Permit requirements, DOE has prepared a Closure Plan (DOE, 1996) and submitted it to SCDHEC for approval. The Closure Plan identifies all applicable or relevant and appropriate regulations, statutes, and DOE Orders for closing systems operated under the Industrial Wastewater Permits. When approved by SCDHEC, the Closure Plan will present the regulatory process for closing all of the F- and H-Area High Level Waste Tanks. The Closure Plan establishes performance objectives or criteria to be met prior to closing any tank, group of tanks, or ancillary tank farm equipment. The proposed action is to remove the residual wastes from the tanks and to fill the tanks with a material to prevent future collapse and bind up residual waste, to lower human health risks, and to increase safety in and around the tanks. If required, an engineered cap consisting of clay, backfill (soil), and vegetation as the final layer to prevent erosion would be applied over the tanks. The selection of tank system closure method will be evaluated against the following Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) criteria described in 40 CFR 300.430(e)(9): ( 1) overall protection of human health and the environment; (2) compliance with applicable or relevant and appropriated requirement: (ARARs); (3) long-term effectiveness and permanence; (4) reduction of toxicity, mobility, or volume through treatment; (5) short-term effectiveness; (6) implementability; (7) cost; (8) state acceptable; and (9) community acceptance. Closure of each tank involves two separate operations after bulk waste removal has been accomplished: (1) cleaning of the tank (i.e., removing the residual contaminants), and (2) the actual closure or filling of the tank with an inert material, (e.g., grout). This process would continue until all the tanks and ancillary equipment and systems have been closed. This is expected to be about year 2028 for Type I, II, and IV tanks and associated systems. Subsequent to that, Type III tanks and systems will be closed.

  13. Application of reliability concepts to the Nepal power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billinton, R.; Pandey, M.; Aboreshaid, S.; Fotuhi-Firuzabad, M. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada). Power Systems Research Group

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In many of the less industrialized countries throughout the world, reliability is incorporated in power system planning and operation using traditional deterministic techniques. This is the case with the Nepal Power System (NPS), where developed expansion plans have been based on non-probabilistic criteria. This paper illustrates the application of probabilistic methods to reliability evaluation of the NPS. Evaluations at both the generation and composite generation and transmission system levels have been performed. The overall system and nine major load centers have been assessed. These load points carry in total more than 54% of the system load. An assessment of an expansion plan proposed by the Nepal Electricity Authority (NEA) has been performed. The results indicate the reliability implications associated with the system and the proposed expansion plan, and show that quantitative reliability evaluation of the NPS is both possible and practical.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Inverter Reliability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Hosted by Sandia National Laboratories and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Inverter reliability drives project life cycle costs and plant performance. This...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Component Reliability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Hosted by Sandia National Laboratories and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Inverter reliability drives project life cycle costs and plant performance. This...

  16. 2014 Human Reliability Program Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Announcing The Human Reliability Program Workshop Sponsored by Office of Security (AU-50), U.S Department of Energy In collaboration with NA, NE, EM and SC

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: PV Reliability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reliability Sandia Research on PV Arc-Fault Detection Submitted for US Patent On March 4, 2015, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events,...

  18. area electric reliability: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of three gas sensor, one temperature sensor and one pyro-electric infrared sensor (PIR) which enhance the sensing intelligence. Sensed data digitized and processed by...

  19. ELECTRIC INFRASTRUCTURE TECHNOLOGY, TRAINING, AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TREMEL, CHARLES L

    2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Electric Infrastructure Technology, Training and Assessment Program was to enhance the reliability of electricity delivery through engineering integration of real-time technologies for wide-area applications enabling timely monitoring and management of grid operations. The technologies developed, integrated, tested and demonstrated will be incorporated into grid operations to assist in the implementation of performance-based protection/preventive measures into the existing electric utility infrastructure. This proactive approach will provide benefits of reduced cost and improved reliability over the typical schedule-based and as needed maintenance programs currently performed by utilities. Historically, utilities have relied on maintenance and inspection programs to diagnose equipment failures and have used the limited circuit isolation devices, such as distribution main circuit breakers to identify abnormal system performance. With respect to reliable problem identification, customer calls to utility service centers are often the sole means for utilities to identify problem occurrences and determine restoration methodologies. Furthermore, monitoring and control functions of equipment and circuits are lacking; thus preventing timely detection and response to customer outages. Finally, the two-way flow of real-time system information is deficient, depriving decision makers of key information required to effectively manage and control current electric grid demands to provide reliable customer service in abnormal situations. This Program focused on advancing technologies and the engineering integration required to incorporate them into the electric grid operations to enhance electrical system reliability and reduce utility operating costs.

  20. RELIABILITY OF CAPACITOR CHARGING UNITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    experience little change while those using the electronic cutoff would drift due to ageing components and changing parameters. The first few shots using the electronic cutoff were less reliable than subsequentRELIABILITY OF CAPACITOR CHARGING UNITS Clint Sprott July 30, 1965 University of Wisconsin

  1. Photovoltaic performance and reliability workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mrig, L. [ed.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This workshop was the sixth in a series of workshops sponsored by NREL/DOE under the general subject of photovoltaic testing and reliability during the period 1986--1993. PV performance and PV reliability are at least as important as PV cost, if not more. In the US, PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities, and others are engaged in the photovoltaic reliability research and testing. This group of researchers and others interested in the field were brought together to exchange the technical knowledge and field experience as related to current information in this evolving field of PV reliability. The papers presented here reflect this effort since the last workshop held in September, 1992. The topics covered include: cell and module characterization, module and system testing, durability and reliability, system field experience, and standards and codes.

  2. Final report on reliability and lifetime prediction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillen, Kenneth Todd; Wise, Jonathan; Jones, Gary D.; Causa, Al G. [Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co., Akron, OH; Terrill, Edward R. [Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co., Akron, OH; Borowczak, Marc [Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co., Akron, OH

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document highlights the important results obtained from the subtask of the Goodyear CRADA devoted to better understanding reliability of tires and to developing better lifetime prediction methods. The overall objective was to establish the chemical and physical basis for the degradation of tires using standard as well as unique models and experimental techniques. Of particular interest was the potential application of our unique modulus profiling apparatus for assessing tire properties and for following tire degradation. During the course of this complex investigation, extensive relevant information was generated, including experimental results, data analyses and development of models and instruments. Detailed descriptions of the findings are included in this report.

  3. Brief scales to assess physical activity and sedentary equipment in the home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assess test- retest reliability of equipment counts for eachhigher test-retest reliability for all equipment scales thanreliability of report- ing portable electronic equipment and

  4. Value and Technology Assessment to Enhance the Business Case for the CERTS Microgrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasseter, Robert

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Genset Reliability The genset equipment is consideredAssessments of reliability for the generating equipment asreliability considerations, into its optimization of microgrid equipment

  5. Geology of the McMillan Ranch in Mason, Texas: An Assessment of the Nature of Normal Faults in the Mason Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper, Rebecca Anne

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Mason, Texas and the surrounding areas have been previously studied and mapped at small scales, showing the large normal faults that cut through the area. Many secondary faults exist close to the large faults, and are not mapped in previous studies...

  6. Robust Design of Reliability Test Plans Using Degradation Measures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Jonathan Wesley; Lane, Jonathan Wesley; Crowder, Stephen V.; Crowder, Stephen V.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With short production development times, there is an increased need to demonstrate product reliability relatively quickly with minimal testing. In such cases there may be few if any observed failures. Thus, it may be difficult to assess reliability using the traditional reliability test plans that measure only time (or cycles) to failure. For many components, degradation measures will contain important information about performance and reliability. These measures can be used to design a minimal test plan, in terms of number of units placed on test and duration of the test, necessary to demonstrate a reliability goal. Generally, the assumption is made that the error associated with a degradation measure follows a known distribution, usually normal, although in practice cases may arise where that assumption is not valid. In this paper, we examine such degradation measures, both simulated and real, and present non-parametric methods to demonstrate reliability and to develop reliability test plans for the future production of components with this form of degradation.

  7. DAKOTA reliability methods applied to RAVEN/RELAP-7.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID; Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID; Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the result of a NEAMS project focused on the use of reliability methods within the RAVEN and RELAP-7 software framework for assessing failure probabilities as part of probabilistic risk assessment for nuclear power plants. RAVEN is a software tool under development at the Idaho National Laboratory that acts as the control logic driver and post-processing tool for the newly developed Thermal-Hydraulic code RELAP-7. Dakota is a software tool developed at Sandia National Laboratories containing optimization, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification algorithms. Reliability methods are algorithms which transform the uncertainty problem to an optimization problem to solve for the failure probability, given uncertainty on problem inputs and a failure threshold on an output response. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the use of reliability methods in Dakota with RAVEN/RELAP-7. These capabilities are demonstrated on a demonstration of a Station Blackout analysis of a simplified Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR).

  8. Reliability analysis of fatigue sensitive joints in FPSO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaminski, M.L. [Nevesbu, The Hague (Netherlands); Krekel, M. [Bluewater, Hoofddorp (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper contains a general description and the results of a reliability analysis made for fatigue sensitive joints in an FPSO. The main aim of the analysis was to demonstrate that the inspection program, which was specified based on the IMO resolution, will guarantee an acceptable probability level of fatigue and fracture failure during 20 years of service of the unit. Three approaches have been followed: the SN-approach and the fracture mechanics approach with and without allowance for fracture. The planned inspection program has been taken into account in the third approach. The stress assessment has been based on the spectral analysis corrected for the intermittent wetting effect. A short description of the deterministic analyses which preceded the reliability analysis has been included. It has been demonstrated in the paper that the probability of fatigue and fracture failure in an inspected structure can be assessed and judged by use of the reliability analysis.

  9. Assessment of Geothermal Resource Potential at a High-Priority Area on the Utah Testing and Training Range–South (UTTR–S)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard P. Smith, PhD., PG; Robert P. Breckenridge, PhD.; Thomas R. Wood, PhD.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field investigations conducted during 2011 support and expand the conclusion of the original Preliminary Report that discovery of a viable geothermal system is possible in the northwestern part of the Utah Testing and Training Range-South (UTTR-S), referred to henceforth as Focus Area 1. The investigations defined the southward extent of the Wendover graben into and near Focus Area 1, enhanced the understanding of subsurface conditions, and focused further geothermal exploration efforts towards the northwestern-most part of Focus Area 1. Specifically, the detailed gravity survey shows that the Wendover graben, first defined by Cook et al. (1964) for areas north of Interstate Highway 80, extends and deepens southwest-ward to the northwest corner of Focus Area 1. At its deepest point, the intersection with a northwest-trending graben there is favorable for enhanced permeability associated with intersecting faults. Processing and modeling of the gravity data collected during 2011 provide a good understanding of graben depth and distribution of faults bounding the graben and has focused the interest area of the study. Down-hole logging of temperatures in wells made available near the Intrepid, Inc., evaporation ponds, just north of Focus Area 1, provide a good understanding of the variability of thermal gradients in that area and corroborate the more extensive temperature data reported by Turk (1973) for the depth range of 300-500 m. Moderate temperature gradients in the northern part of the Intrepid area increase to much higher gradients and bottom-hole temperatures southeastward, towards graben-bounding faults, suggesting upwelling geothermal waters along those faults. Water sampling, analysis, and temperature measurements of Blue Lakes and Mosquito Willey's springs, on the western boundary of Focus Area 1, also show elevated temperatures along the graben-bounding fault system. In addition, water chemistry suggests origin of those waters in limestone rocks beneath the graben in areas with temperatures as high as 140 C (284 F). In conclusion, all of the field data collected during 2011 and documented in the Appendices of this report indicate that there is reasonable potential for a viable geothermal resource along faults that bound the Wendover graben. Prospects for a system capable of binary electrical generation are especially good, and the possibility of a flash steam system is also within reason. The next steps should focus on securing the necessary funding for detailed geophysical surveys and for drilling a set of temperature gradient wells to further evaluate the resource, and to focus deep exploration efforts in the most promising areas.

  10. Dynamical systems probabilistic risk assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denman, Matthew R.; Ames, Arlo Leroy

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is the primary tool used to risk-inform nuclear power regulatory and licensing activities. Risk-informed regulations are intended to reduce inherent conservatism in regulatory metrics (e.g., allowable operating conditions and technical specifications) which are built into the regulatory framework by quantifying both the total risk profile as well as the change in the risk profile caused by an event or action (e.g., in-service inspection procedures or power uprates). Dynamical Systems (DS) analysis has been used to understand unintended time-dependent feedbacks in both industrial and organizational settings. In dynamical systems analysis, feedback loops can be characterized and studied as a function of time to describe the changes to the reliability of plant Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs). While DS has been used in many subject areas, some even within the PRA community, it has not been applied toward creating long-time horizon, dynamic PRAs (with time scales ranging between days and decades depending upon the analysis). Understanding slowly developing dynamic effects, such as wear-out, on SSC reliabilities may be instrumental in ensuring a safely and reliably operating nuclear fleet. Improving the estimation of a plant's continuously changing risk profile will allow for more meaningful risk insights, greater stakeholder confidence in risk insights, and increased operational flexibility.

  11. MULTIAREA SYSTEM RELIABILITY: THE ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF SYSTEM SECURITY CRITERIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    MULTIAREA SYSTEM RELIABILITY: THE ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF SYSTEM SECURITY CRITERIA BY TEOMAN GULER B assessment studies and the quantification of the economics of secure power system operations security and the economics of secure operations in the competitive market environment. The advent

  12. Reliability Modeling and Evaluation in Aging Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hag-Kwen

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewal process has been often employed as a mathematical model of the failure and repair cycle of components in power system reliability assessment. This implies that after repair, the component is assumed to be restored to be in as good as new...

  13. angren industrial area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    because of their reliability, cost effectiveness and manageability. The automotive industry uses Controller Area Network (CAN) for exchanging (more) Hegde, Bharatkumar...

  14. Constructing Reliable Distributed Communication Systems with CORBA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Douglas C.

    Constructing Reliable Distributed Communication Systems with CORBA Silvano Maffeis Douglas C model to support reliable data- and process- oriented distributed systems that communicate through syn distributed object computing systems with CORBA. First, we examine the question of whether reliable applica

  15. ELECTRICAL SUBSTATION RELIABILITY EVALUATION WITH EMPHASIS ON EVOLVING INTERDEPENDENCE ON COMMUNICATION INFRASTRUCTURE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AZARM,M.A.BARI,R.A.MUSICKI,Z.

    2004-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to develop a methodology for a probabilistic assessment of the reliability and security of electrical energy distribution networks. This includes consideration of the future grid system, which will rely heavily on the existing digitally based communication infrastructure for monitoring and protection. Another important objective of this study is to provide information and insights from this research to Consolidated Edison Company (Con Edison) that could be useful in the design of the new network segment to be installed in the area of the World Trade Center in lower Manhattan. Our method is microscopic in nature and relies heavily on the specific design of the portion of the grid being analyzed. It extensively models the types of faults that a grid could potentially experience, the response of the grid, and the specific design of the protection schemes. We demonstrate that the existing technology can be extended and applied to the electrical grid and to the supporting communication network. A small subsection of a hypothetical grid based on the existing New York City electrical grid system of Con Edison is used to demonstrate the methods. Sensitivity studies show that in the current design the frequency for the loss of the main station is sensitive to the communication network reliability. The reliability of the communication network could become a more important contributor to the electrical grid reliability as the utilization of the communication network significantly increases in the near future to support ''smart'' transmission and/or distributed generation. The identification of potential failure modes and their likelihood can support decisions on potential modifications to the network including hardware, monitoring instrumentation, and protection systems.

  16. Distributed Reliable Object-Oriented Programming (DROOP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerraoui, Rachid

    Distributed Reliable Object-Oriented Programming (DROOP) P. Eugster November 3, 2003 Abstract with such failures, coining the term Distributed Reliable Object-Oriented Programming (DROOP). 1 SCOOP

  17. Thermoelectric Materials By Design: Mechanical Reliability (Agreement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    By Design: Mechanical Reliability (Agreement 14957) Thermoelectric Materials By Design: Mechanical Reliability (Agreement 14957) Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle...

  18. PEEM Thermal Stress and Reliability (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Keefe, M. P.

    2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Advancing power electronics thermal stress and reliability is a critical factor in power electronics equipment. NREL aims to improve thermal stress and reliability of power electronics technologies.

  19. Distributed Generation Operational Reliability and Availability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reliability and Availability Database, Final Report, January 2004 Distributed Generation Operational Reliability and Availability Database, Final Report, January 2004 This final...

  20. Recommendations to Address Power Reliability Concerns Raised...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reliability Concerns Raised as a Result of Pending Environmental Regulations for Electric Generation Stations Recommendations to Address Power Reliability Concerns Raised as a...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: photovoltaic plant reliability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    photovoltaic plant reliability Sandia-Electric Power Research Institute Partnership Publishes Photovoltaic Reliability Report On January 21, 2014, in Energy, Facilities, Grid...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: national reliability database

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    national reliability database Third Annual Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind (CREW) Database Report Now Available On October 17, 2013, in Energy, News, News & Events,...

  3. Smart Grid Investments Improve Grid Reliability, Resilience,...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Investments Improve Grid Reliability, Resilience, and Storm Responses (November 2014) Smart Grid Investments Improve Grid Reliability, Resilience, and Storm Responses (November...

  4. Assessment Statute Academic Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frean, Marcus

    ) and reliability (accurately representing the student's performance). #12;Assessment Statute Academic Policy to write clearly and accurately may be an important component of the assessment. 4.2 Passing a Course (a items. Lectures, tutorials, electronic and other distance- learning resources, practical and fieldwork

  5. Vadose Zone Remediation Assessment: M-Area Process Sewer Soil Vapor Extraction Units 782-5M, 782-7M, and 782-8M

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riha, B.D.

    2001-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focuses on the status of the vadose zone remediation along 1600 ft of the process sewer line between the M-Area security fence and the M-Area settling basin. Three soil vapor extraction (SVE) units 782-5M, 782-7M, and 782-8M, connected to 4 vertical wells and 3 horizontal wells have been addressing the vadose zone volatile organic contamination (VOC) since 1995. The specific objectives of this study were to obtain soil gas and sediment samples, evaluate SVE units and vadose zone remediation, and make recommendations to address further remediation needs.

  6. Dynamic Human Reliability Analysis: Benefits and Challenges of Simulating Human Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. L. Boring

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, there has been considerable work on dynamic event trees and other areas related to dynamic probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). The counterpart to these efforts in human reliability analysis (HRA) has centered on the development of specific methods to account for the dynamic nature of human performance. In this paper, the author posits that the key to dynamic HRA is not in the development of specific methods but in the utilization of cognitive modeling and simulation to produce a framework of data that may be used in quantifying the likelihood of human error. This paper provides an overview of simulation approaches to HRA; reviews differences between first, second, and dynamic generation HRA; and outlines potential benefits and challenges of this approach.

  7. Health assessment for Del Norte County Pesticide Storage Area, Cresent City, Del Norte County, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CAD000626176. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Del Norte County Pesticide Storage Area is located northwest of Cresent City, California. The site soils and ground water were contaminated with a myriad of pesticides and herbicides. The data also indicated an elevated concentration of chromium was present on-site and off-site; however, it does not appear to be related to the activities involving the use of the site as a pesticide storage area. The site was included on the National Priorities List in 1983. The storage area operated from 1970 until 1981, accepting containers from local agricultural and forestry-related industries. The intended use of the site was as an interim or emergency storage area for pesticide containers which had been triple rinsed and punctured prior to coming to the site. There were 9 private wells monitored within 0.50 miles of the site and the results indicated these wells were not contaminated by site contaminants. This site is of public health concern because of the potential for exposure to pesticides, herbicides, and chromium at concentrations of health concern.

  8. DOE Nuclear Weapon Reliability Definition: History, Description, and Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, D.L.; Cashen, J.J.; Sjulin, J.M.; Bierbaum, R.L.; Kerschen, T.J.

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overarching goal of the Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapon reliability assessment process is to provide a quantitative metric that reflects the ability of the weapons to perform their intended function successfully. This white paper is intended to provide insight into the current and long-standing DOE definition of nuclear weapon reliability, which can be summarized as: The probability of achieving the specified yield, at the target, across the Stockpile-To-Target Sequence of environments, throughout the weapon's lifetime, assuming proper inputs.

  9. Real Time Grid Reliability Management 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joe; Eto, Joe; Lesieutre, Bernard; Lewis, Nancy Jo; Parashar, Manu

    2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The increased need to manage California?s electricity grid in real time is a result of the ongoing transition from a system operated by vertically-integrated utilities serving native loads to one operated by an independent system operator supporting competitive energy markets. During this transition period, the traditional approach to reliability management -- construction of new transmission lines -- has not been pursued due to unresolved issues related to the financing and recovery of transmission project costs. In the absence of investments in new transmission infrastructure, the best strategy for managing reliability is to equip system operators with better real-time information about actual operating margins so that they can better understand and manage the risk of operating closer to the edge. A companion strategy is to address known deficiencies in offline modeling tools that are needed to ground the use of improved real-time tools. This project: (1) developed and conducted first-ever demonstrations of two prototype real-time software tools for voltage security assessment and phasor monitoring; and (2) prepared a scoping study on improving load and generator response models. Additional funding through two separate subsequent work authorizations has already been provided to build upon the work initiated in this project.

  10. Reliability of dynamic systems under limited information.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, Richard V., Jr. (.,; .); Grigoriu, Mircea

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is developed for reliability analysis of dynamic systems under limited information. The available information includes one or more samples of the system output; any known information on features of the output can be used if available. The method is based on the theory of non-Gaussian translation processes and is shown to be particularly suitable for problems of practical interest. For illustration, we apply the proposed method to a series of simple example problems and compare with results given by traditional statistical estimators in order to establish the accuracy of the method. It is demonstrated that the method delivers accurate results for the case of linear and nonlinear dynamic systems, and can be applied to analyze experimental data and/or mathematical model outputs. Two complex applications of direct interest to Sandia are also considered. First, we apply the proposed method to assess design reliability of a MEMS inertial switch. Second, we consider re-entry body (RB) component vibration response during normal re-entry, where the objective is to estimate the time-dependent probability of component failure. This last application is directly relevant to re-entry random vibration analysis at Sandia, and may provide insights on test-based and/or model-based qualification of weapon components for random vibration environments.

  11. Ris-R-1235(EN) Reliability Databases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1 ISO standard: Gas and Oil - Collection of Reliability and Maintenance Data for Equipment 17 5.2 EDF standard for collection of reliability and maintenance data for equipment (also called MCD ­ Mode et Cause judgements on new equipment reliability parameters or using standard values or standard reliability models (e

  12. The design of a reliable reputation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swamynathan, Gayatri; Almeroth, Kevin C.; Zhao, Ben Y.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reliability by spreading its transactions evenly across all 20 peers in the system (shown by Distribution

  13. Photovoltaic performance and reliability workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroposki, B.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This proceedings is the compilation of papers presented at the ninth PV Performance and Reliability Workshop held at the Sheraton Denver West Hotel on September 4--6, 1996. This years workshop included presentations from 25 speakers and had over 100 attendees. All of the presentations that were given are included in this proceedings. Topics of the papers included: defining service lifetime and developing models for PV module lifetime; examining and determining failure and degradation mechanisms in PV modules; combining IEEE/IEC/UL testing procedures; AC module performance and reliability testing; inverter reliability/qualification testing; standardization of utility interconnect requirements for PV systems; need activities to separate variables by testing individual components of PV systems (e.g. cells, modules, batteries, inverters,charge controllers) for individual reliability and then test them in actual system configurations; more results reported from field experience on modules, inverters, batteries, and charge controllers from field deployed PV systems; and system certification and standardized testing for stand-alone and grid-tied systems.

  14. Wind turbine reliability database update.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Valerie A.; Hill, Roger Ray; Stinebaugh, Jennifer A.; Veers, Paul S.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the status of the Sandia National Laboratories' Wind Plant Reliability Database. Included in this report are updates on the form and contents of the Database, which stems from a fivestep process of data partnerships, data definition and transfer, data formatting and normalization, analysis, and reporting. Selected observations are also reported.

  15. FIELD RELIABILITY OF ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    study of in-the-field experience of electronics reliability. Tage Elm. Abstract. This report and internally) induced failures. The report is not meant to be merely an indication of the state of the art for the re- liability prediction methods we know, but also as a contribution to the investigation of man-machine

  16. Decomposition algorithms for multi-area power system analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min, Liang

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A power system with multiple interconnected areas needs to be operated coordinately for the purposes of the system reliability and economic operation, although each area has its own ISO under the market environment. In consolidation of different...

  17. Adhesion and Thin-Film Module Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, T. J.; Jorgenson, G. J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the infrequently measured but essential properties for thin-film (T-F) module reliability are the interlayer adhesion and cohesion within a layer. These can be cell contact layers to glass, contact layers to the semiconductor, encapsulant to cell, glass, or backsheet, etc. We use an Instron mechanical testing unit to measure peel strengths at 90deg or 180deg and, in some cases, a scratch and tape pull test to evaluate inter-cell layer adhesion strengths. We present peel strength data for test specimens laminated from the three T-F technologies, before and after damp heat, and in one instance at elevated temperatures. On laminated T-F cell samples, failure can occur uniformly at any one of the many interfaces, or non-uniformly across the peel area at more than one interface. Some peel strengths are Lt1 N/mm. This is far below the normal ethylene vinyl acetate/glass interface values of >10 N/mm. We measure a wide range of adhesion strengths and suggest that adhesion measured under higher temperature and relative humidity conditions is more relevant for module reliability.

  18. Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina. Final report on macroinvertebrate stream assessments for F/H area ETF effluent discharge, July 1987--February 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, W.L.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F?H area effluent on the creek, the study includes qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. This final report presents the results of both pre-operational and post-operational qualitative and quantitative (artificial substrate) macroinvertebrate studies. Six quantitative and three qualitative studies were conducted prior to the initial release of the F/H ETF effluent and five quantitative and two qualitative studies were conducted post-operationally.

  19. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator reliability and safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, R.; Klein, J.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are numerous occasions when a planetary mission requires energy in remote areas of the solar system. Anytime power is required much beyond Mars or the Asteroid Belts, solar power is not an option. The radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) was developed for such a mission requirement. It is a relatively small and lightweight power source that can produce power under adverse conditions. Just this type of source has become the backbone of the power system for far outer plant exploration. Voyagers I and II are utilizing RTGs, which will soon power the Galileo spacecraft to Jupiter and the Ulysses spacecraft to study the solar poles. The paper discusses RTG operation including thermoelectric design, converter design, general-purpose heat source; RTG reliability including design, testing, experience, and launch approval; and RTG safety issues and methods of ensuring safety.

  20. Probabilistic Wind Resource Assessment and Power Predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Probabilistic Wind Resource Assessment and Power Predictions Luca Delle Monache (lucadm Accurate wind resource assessment and power forecasts and reliable quanXficaXon of their uncertainty Mo5va5on · Power forecast: o Increase wind energy penetra

  1. Procedure for conducting a human-reliability analysis for nuclear power plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, B.J.; Swain, A.D.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes in detail a procedure to be followed in conducting a human reliability analysis as part of a probabilistic risk assessment when such an analysis is performed according to the methods described in NUREG/CR-1278, Handbook for Human Reliability Analysis with Emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications. An overview of the procedure describing the major elements of a human reliability analysis is presented along with a detailed description of each element and an example of an actual analysis. An appendix consists of some sample human reliability analysis problems for further study.

  2. Transmission Matters Now: How Will Power Market Regulations Impact the Industrial's Power Supply Costs and Reliability?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, F.; Beidas, H.; Fox, R.

    and reliability. The paper also identifies what specifically may be involved, from a technical and regulatory standpoint, in the following three areas: 1) Transmission Risks -SMD and RTO/ISO, 2) Alternative Retail Supply, and 3) Self-Generation....

  3. Understanding Bulk Power Reliability: The Importance of Good Data and A Critical Review of Existing Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, Emily; Eto, Joseph H.; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi

    2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulk power system reliability is of critical importance to the electricity sector. Complete and accurate information on events affecting the bulk power system is essential for assessing trends and efforts to maintain or improve reliability. Yet, current sources of this information were not designed with these uses in mind. They were designed, instead, to support real-time emergency notification to industry and government first-responders. This paper reviews information currently collected by both industry and government sources for this purpose and assesses factors that might affect their usefulness in supporting the academic literature that has relied upon them to draw conclusions about the reliability of the US electric power system.

  4. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Bearing Calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Dam, J.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL has initiated the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) to investigate the root cause of the low wind turbine gearbox reliability. The GRC follows a multi-pronged approach based on a collaborative of manufacturers, owners, researchers and consultants. The project combines analysis, field testing, dynamometer testing, condition monitoring, and the development and population of a gearbox failure database. At the core of the project are two 750kW gearboxes that have been redesigned and rebuilt so that they are representative of the multi-megawatt gearbox topology currently used in the industry. These gearboxes are heavily instrumented and are tested in the field and on the dynamometer. This report discusses the bearing calibrations of the gearboxes.

  5. Power Reliability at BASF Corporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theising, T. R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power Reliability at BASF Corporation Thomas R. Theising Energy Systems Manager BASF Corporation ABSTRACT: Quality is defined not as what the supplier puts into the product but what the customer gets out and is willing to pay for. Power.... INTRODUCTION: BASF often identifies its? power quality by the effects it has on its ability to manufacture products. Improvements are made to remedy the power quality problems either through the elimination of the problems or through some means...

  6. Power Reliability at BASF Corporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theising, T. R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power Reliability at BASF Corporation Thomas R. Theising Energy Systems Manager BASF Corporation ABSTRACT: Quality is defined not as what the supplier puts into the product but what the customer gets out and is willing to pay for. Power.... INTRODUCTION: BASF often identifies its? power quality by the effects it has on its ability to manufacture products. Improvements are made to remedy the power quality problems either through the elimination of the problems or through some means...

  7. Utility View of Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bickham, J.

    This paper will address a utility perspective in regard to risk assessment, reliability, and impact on the utility system. Discussions will also include the critical issues for utilities when contracting for energy and capacity from cogenerators...

  8. Risk assessment of soil-based exposures to plutonium at experimental sites located on the Nevada Test Site and adjoining areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Bogen, K.T.; Straume, T.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1950s and early 1960s, a series of tests was conducted at or near the Nevada Test Site to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of {sup 239,240}Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Access to the sites is strictly controlled; therefore, it does not constitute a threat to human health at the present time. However, because the residual {sup 239} Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), the sites could indeed represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, we defined three basic exposure scenarios that could bring individuals in contact with {sup 239,240}Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision located at a test site, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility. Our screening analyses indicated that doses to organs are dominated by the intemal deposition of Pu via the inhalation pathway, and thus our risk assessment focused on those factors that affect inhalation exposures and associated doses, including inhalation rates, activity patterns, tenure at a residence or occupation, indoor/outdoor air relationships, and resuspension outdoors. Cancer risks were calculated as a function of lifetime cumulative doses to the key target organs (i.e., bone surface, liver, and lungs) and risk factors for those organs. Uncertainties in the predicted cancer risks were analyzed using Monte-Carlo simulations of the probability distributions used to represent assessment parameters. The principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung.

  9. Microgrids and Heterogeneous Security, Quality, Reliability, and Availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Energy Reliability, Distribution System Integrationand Energy Reliability, Distribution System Integration

  10. Structural Reliability: Assessing the Condition and Reliability of Casing in Compacting Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chantose, Prasongsit

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Casing has a higher risk of failure in a compacting reservoir than in a typical reservoir. Casing fails when reservoir compaction induces compression and shear stresses onto it. They compact as reservoir pressure depletes during production. High...

  11. Agile machining and inspection thrust area team-on-machine probing / compatibility assessment of Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) pro/CMM DMIS with Zeiss DMISEngine.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, James Rokwel; Tomlinson, Kurt; Bryce, Edwin Anthony

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The charter goal of the Agile Machining and Inspection Thrust Area Team is to identify technical requirements, within the nuclear weapons complex (NWC), for Agile Machining and Inspection capabilities. During FY 2008, the team identified Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) Pro/CMM as a software tool for use in off-line programming of probing routines--used for measurement--for machining and turning centers. The probing routine would be used for in-process verification of part geometry. The same Pro/CMM program used on the machine tool could also be employed for program validation / part verification using a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Funding was provided to determine the compatibility of the Pro/CMM probing program with CMM software (Zeiss DMISEngine).

  12. Natural streamflow cycles and effects on water supply reliability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felden, Fabrice

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Natural Streamf low Cycles and Effects on Water Supply Reliability. (August 2002) Fabrice Felden, Diploma de I'Ecole Speciale des Travaux Publics Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ralph A. Wurbs The Texas Natural Resource Conservation... and cycles in streamflows that could be directly correlated to climate changes. The presence of trends and/or cycles in streamflows is primarily studied to assess the significance of not directly considering climate change in the Texas Water Availability...

  13. Electric Power Reliability in Chemical Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cross, M. B.

    The quality and reliability of utility-generated electric power is presently receiving a great deal of attention from the chemical and refining industry. What changes have taken place to make electric power reliability a major topic of discussion...

  14. Arnold Schwarzenegger REAL-TIME GRID RELIABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Research (PIER) California Energy Commission Beth Chambers Contract Manager Jamie Patterson (VSA) prototype to monitor system voltage conditions and provide real time dispatchers with reliabilityArnold Schwarzenegger Governor REAL-TIME GRID RELIABILITY MANAGEMENT California ISO Real

  15. Data Communication Principles Reliable Data Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramkumar, Mahalingam

    Data Communication Principles Switching Reliable Data Transfer Data Communication Basics Mahalingam Ramkumar Mississippi State University, MS September 8, 2014 Ramkumar CSE 4153 / 6153 #12;Data Communication Principles Switching Reliable Data Transfer 1 Data Communication Principles Data Rate of a Communication

  16. Reliability Analysis of Microelectronic Components and Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1 Reliability Analysis of Microelectronic Components and Materials Increasing numbers on the structural integrity of embedded micro- electronic components and assemblies. Improved knowledge and modeling methods are critical for the reliable use of electronic packages. In particular, since the advent

  17. Electric Power Reliability in Chemical Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cross, M. B.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at plants across the country? Has the quality and reliability of utility-generated power deteriorated over the past five or ten years? Or, has the perception of what constitutes reliable power changed with the advent, installation, and increasing usage...

  18. Design report on the test system used to assess treatment of trench water from Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent, T.E.; Taylor, P.A.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New liquid waste streams will be generated as a consequence of closure activities at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It is proposed that these waste streams be treated for removal of contaminants by adding them to the ORNL wastewater treatment facilities. Previous bench-scale treatability studies indicate that ORNL treatment operations will adequately remove the contaminants, although additional study is required to characterize the secondary waste materials produced as a result of the treatment. A larger scale treatment system was constructed to produce secondary wastes in the quantities necessary for characterization and US Environmental protection Agency toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) testing. The test system is designed to simulate the operation of the ORNL process waste treatment facilities and to treat a mixture of ORNL process wastewater and WAG 6 wastewater at a combined flow rate of 0.5 L/min. The system is designed to produce the necessary quantities of waste sludges and spent carbon for characterization studies and TCLP testing.

  19. Human Reliability Analysis for Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Boring; David I. Gertman

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because no human reliability analysis (HRA) method was specifically developed for small modular reactors (SMRs), the application of any current HRA method to SMRs represents tradeoffs. A first- generation HRA method like THERP provides clearly defined activity types, but these activity types do not map to the human-system interface or concept of operations confronting SMR operators. A second- generation HRA method like ATHEANA is flexible enough to be used for SMR applications, but there is currently insufficient guidance for the analyst, requiring considerably more first-of-a-kind analyses and extensive SMR expertise in order to complete a quality HRA. Although no current HRA method is optimized to SMRs, it is possible to use existing HRA methods to identify errors, incorporate them as human failure events in the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), and quantify them. In this paper, we provided preliminary guidance to assist the human reliability analyst and reviewer in understanding how to apply current HRA methods to the domain of SMRs. While it is possible to perform a satisfactory HRA using existing HRA methods, ultimately it is desirable to formally incorporate SMR considerations into the methods. This may require the development of new HRA methods. More practicably, existing methods need to be adapted to incorporate SMRs. Such adaptations may take the form of guidance on the complex mapping between conventional light water reactors and small modular reactors. While many behaviors and activities are shared between current plants and SMRs, the methods must adapt if they are to perform a valid and accurate analysis of plant personnel performance in SMRs.

  20. Distributed Generation Operational Reliability, Executive Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2004 This report summarizes the results of the project, "Distributed Generation Market Transformation Tools: Distributed Generation Reliability and Availability Database,"...

  1. Reliability Challenges for Solar Energy (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation that reviews reliability issues related to various types of photovoltaic tecnnologies, including crystalline silicon, thin films, and concentrating PV.

  2. LUNAR MASS SPECTROMETER RELIABILITY LOGIC DIAGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    point (A) to (F). The block diagram also defines the reliability functions for the purpose of FMEA 1

  3. Reliability-based casing design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maes, M.A. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Civil Engineering Dept.; Gulati, K.C.; Johnson, R.C. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States); McKenna, D.L. [Mobil Producing Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria); Brand, P.R.; Lewis, D.B. [Mobil E and P Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper describes the development of reliability-based design criteria for oil and/or gas well casing/tubing. The approach is based on the fundamental principles of limit state design. Limit states for tubulars are discussed and specific techniques for the stochastic modeling of loading and resistance variables are described. Zonation methods and calibration techniques are developed which are geared specifically to the characteristic tubular design for both hydrocarbon drilling and production applications. The application of quantitative risk analysis to the development of risk-consistent design criteria is shown to be a major and necessary step forward in achieving more economic tubular design.

  4. RELIABILITY OF WIND POWER FROM DISPERSED SITES: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to expect that wind generation will be sufficiently reliableload for the case with wind generation measured at the LOLPcan be displaced by wind generation. tions form the basis

  5. RELIABILITY OF WIND POWER FROM DISPERSED SITES: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in El ectric Utility Systems, EPRI RP 651-1, Summary Report,380 MW. ELCC of 430 MW. EPRI, however, estimates At thatthey were as bad as the EPRI estimate, both of the proposed

  6. RELIABILITY OF WIND POWER FROM DISPERSED SITES: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PG&E 4:00 p.m. Summer Wind Generator Model Wind Array ELCCexpect from an array of wind generators spread over a largean array of dispersed wind generators will be. wind speed

  7. RELIABILITY OF WIND POWER FROM DISPERSED SITES: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ON METHODOLOGY: FROM WIND POWER FREQUENCY TO LOSS-OF-LOADJ.P. , "Some Aspects of Wind Power Statistics, " J. of Appl.J • J METHODOLOGY: FROM WIND POWER FREQUENCY TO LOSS-OF-LOAD

  8. Viability, Development, and Reliability Assessment of Coupled Coastal Forecasting Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singhal, Gaurav

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    disaster, Cook Inlet (CI) and Prince William Sound (PWS) are regions that suffer from a lack of accurate wave forecast information. This dissertation develops high- resolution integrated wave forecasting schemes for these regions in order to meet...

  9. Reliability based assessment of FRP rehabilitation of reinforced concrete girders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcox, Patrick Carlo

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer Reinforcing Bars in Concrete Environment. 2002 ,Corrosion of Steel in Concrete; Wiley-VCH: Weinheim, 2004.Mitchell, D. Prestressed Concrete Structures; Prentice Hall:

  10. RELIABILITY OF WIND POWER FROM DISPERSED SITES: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coincidence of Demand and Wind Resource Diurnal PowerOutput Variations for Three Wind Regimes List of TablesCAPACITY CREDIT FOR WIND ARRAYS: THE PROBLEM . . . . . . .

  11. Reliability assessment of electrical power systems using genetic algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samaan, Nader Amin Aziz

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of the dissertation, a GA based method for state sampling of composite generation-transmission power systems is introduced. Binary encoded GA is used as a state sampling tool for the composite power system network states. A linearized optimization load flow model...

  12. RELIABILITY OF WIND POWER FROM DISPERSED SITES: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hav e verified the General Electric Company, in a study of85, pp. 910-19, 1966. General Electric Company, Wind Energyl /2, February 17, 1977. General Electric Company, Requir em

  13. assessing reactor reliability: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    constructions in an industrial environment. Radiography is one of the classical nondestructive testing techniques widely applied in industry. Over the years modelling became...

  14. assessing system reliability: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: and prognostics. The current paper uses the creation of automotive diag- nostics as an example domain for the production of diagnostics. The...

  15. Dispatcher Reliability Analysis : SPICA-RAIL Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    consider that humans are fully reliable. But experience shows that many accidents involve human failuresDispatcher Reliability Analysis : SPICA-RAIL Experiments Fabien Belmonte, Jean-Louis Boulanger of scenarios and evaluate the behaviour of human operators. A state of the art in human reliability is pre

  16. RELIABILITY-BASED CASTING PROCESS DESIGN OPTIMIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    RELIABILITY-BASED CASTING PROCESS DESIGN OPTIMIZATION Richard Hardin1 , K.K. Choi1 , and Christoph 52242-1527 Keywords: Casting Process Design, Optimization, Reliability-Based Design Optimization purpose reliability-based design optimization (RBDO) software tool previously developed at the University

  17. Dynamic reliability using entry-time approach for maintenance of nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shuwen

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    V APPLICATION OF ENTRY-TIME MODEL TO NPP APPLICATIONS .......................................................................................116 5.1 Introduction to the Main Generator System...................................... 117 vii... of methods such as Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), Markov models (cf. [1]), simulation [13] and other methods for risk assessment of dynamic systems [14] have been used to evaluate SSC (System, Structure and Component) reliability in NPP (Nuclear...

  18. Fire Hazards Analysis for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, D.M.

    2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This documents the Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area. The Interim Storage Cask, Rad-Vault, and NAC-1 Cask are analyzed for fire hazards and the 200 Area Interim Storage Area is assessed according to HNF-PRO-350 and the objectives of DOE Order 5480 7A. This FHA addresses the potential fire hazards associated with the Interim Storage Area (ISA) facility in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480 7A. It is intended to assess the risk from fire to ensure there are no undue fire hazards to site personnel and the public and to ensure property damage potential from fire is within acceptable limits. This FHA will be in the form of a graded approach commensurate with the complexity of the structure or area and the associated fire hazards.

  19. Application of reliability analysis method to fusion component testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ying, A.Y.; Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The term reliability here implies that a component satisfies a set of performance criteria while under specified conditions of use over a specified period of time. For fusion nuclear technology, the reliability goal to be pursued is the development of a mean time between failures (MTBF) for a component which is longer than its lifetime goal. While the component lifetime is mainly determined by the fluence limitation (i.e., damage level) which leads to performance degradation or failure, the MTBF represents an arithmetic average life of all units in a population. One method of assessing the reliability goal involves determining component availability needs to meet the goal plant availability, defining a test-analyze-fix development program to improve component reliability, and quantifying both test times and the number of test articles that would be required to ensure that a specified target MTBF is met. Statistically, constant failure rates and exponential life distributions are assumed for analyses and blanket component development is used as an example. However, as data are collected the probability distribution of the parameter of interest can be updated in a Bayesian fashion. The nuclear component testing program will be structured such that reliability requirements for DEMO can be achieved. The program shall not exclude the practice of a good design (such as reducing the complexity of the system to the minimum essential for the required operation), the execution of high quality manufacturing and inspection processes, and the implication of quality assurance and control for component development. In fact, the assurance of a high quality testing/development program is essential so that there is no question left for reliability.

  20. OPTIMAL RELIABILITY ALLOCATION IN SERIES-PARALLEL SYSTEMS FROM COMPONENTS' DISCRETE COST -RELIABILITY DATA SETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Alice E.

    is not known. Instead, we consider the more realistic assumption of discrete cost-reliability data sets expressions for cost-reliability curves, we consider discrete cost-reliability data sets for each componentOPTIMAL RELIABILITY ALLOCATION IN SERIES-PARALLEL SYSTEMS FROM COMPONENTS' DISCRETE COST

  1. Software reliability models for critical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pham, H.; Pham, M.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the first phase of the ongoing EG G Idaho, Inc. Software Reliability Research Program. The program is studying the existing software reliability models and proposes a state-of-the-art software reliability model that is relevant to the nuclear reactor control environment. This report consists of three parts: (1) summaries of the literature review of existing software reliability and fault tolerant software reliability models and their related issues, (2) proposed technique for software reliability enhancement, and (3) general discussion and future research. The development of this proposed state-of-the-art software reliability model will be performed in the second place. 407 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Software reliability models for critical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pham, H.; Pham, M.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the first phase of the ongoing EG&G Idaho, Inc. Software Reliability Research Program. The program is studying the existing software reliability models and proposes a state-of-the-art software reliability model that is relevant to the nuclear reactor control environment. This report consists of three parts: (1) summaries of the literature review of existing software reliability and fault tolerant software reliability models and their related issues, (2) proposed technique for software reliability enhancement, and (3) general discussion and future research. The development of this proposed state-of-the-art software reliability model will be performed in the second place. 407 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. North Area Right-of-Way Maintenance Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    North Area Right-of-Way Maintenance Project North Area Right-of-Way Maintenance Project Western FONSI (PDF - 487 KB) Final Environmental Assessment (PDF - 4200 KB) Environmental...

  4. Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability information about the delivery of electricity and energy reliability Electricity Delivery...

  5. Microgrids and Heterogeneous Security, Quality, Reliability, and Availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    quality, reliability, and availability,” IEEE Power & EnergyReliability, and Availability Chris Marnay EnvironmentalQuality, Reliability, and Availability C. Marnay Ernest

  6. Reliable computation of homogeneous azeotropes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maier, R.W.; Brennecke, J.F.; Stadtherr, M.A. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is important to determine the existence and composition of homogeneous azeotropes in the analysis of phase behavior and in the synthesis and design of separation systems, from both theoretical and practical standpoints. A new method for reliably locating any and all homogeneous azeotropes for multicomponent mixtures is presented. The method also verifies the nonexistence of homogeneous azeotropes if none are present. The method is based on interval analysis, in particular an interval-Newton/generalized-bisection-algorithm providing a mathematical and computational guarantee that all azeotropes are located. This general-purpose technique can be applied in connection with any thermodynamic models. The technique is illustrated in several example problems using the Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC activity-coefficient models.

  7. Chip-Level Electromigration Reliability for Cu Interconnects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gall, M.; Oh, C.; Grinshpon, A.; Zolotov, V.; Panda, R.; Demircan, E.; Mueller, J.; Justison, P.; Ramakrishna, K.; Thrasher, S.; Hernandez, R.; Herrick, M.; Fox, R.; Boeck, B.; Kawasaki, H. [Technology Solutions Organization, Freescale Semiconductor (United States); Haznedar, H.; Ku, P. [Sector Quality, Freescale Semiconductor (United States)

    2004-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Even after the successful introduction of Cu-based metallization, the electromigration (EM) failure risk has remained one of the most important reliability concerns for most advanced process technologies. Ever increasing operating current densities and the introduction of low-k materials in the backend process scheme are some of the issues that threaten reliable, long-term operation at elevated temperatures. The traditional method of verifying EM reliability only through current density limit checks is proving to be inadequate in general, or quite expensive at the best. A Statistical EM Budgeting (SEB) methodology has been proposed to assess more realistic chip-level EM reliability from the complex statistical distribution of currents in a chip. To be valuable, this approach requires accurate estimation of currents for all interconnect segments in a chip. However, no efficient technique to manage the complexity of such a task for very large chip designs is known. We present an efficient method to estimate currents exhaustively for all interconnects in a chip. The proposed method uses pre-characterization of cells and macros, and steps to identify and filter out symmetrically bi-directional interconnects. We illustrate the strength of the proposed approach using a high-performance microprocessor design for embedded applications as a case study.

  8. Accident Sequence Evaluation Program: Human reliability analysis procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swain, A.D.

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a shortened version of the procedure, models, and data for human reliability analysis (HRA) which are presented in the Handbook of Human Reliability Analysis With emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications (NUREG/CR-1278, August 1983). This shortened version was prepared and tried out as part of the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP) funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and managed by Sandia National Laboratories. The intent of this new HRA procedure, called the ''ASEP HRA Procedure,'' is to enable systems analysts, with minimal support from experts in human reliability analysis, to make estimates of human error probabilities and other human performance characteristics which are sufficiently accurate for many probabilistic risk assessments. The ASEP HRA Procedure consists of a Pre-Accident Screening HRA, a Pre-Accident Nominal HRA, a Post-Accident Screening HRA, and a Post-Accident Nominal HRA. The procedure in this document includes changes made after tryout and evaluation of the procedure in four nuclear power plants by four different systems analysts and related personnel, including human reliability specialists. The changes consist of some additional explanatory material (including examples), and more detailed definitions of some of the terms. 42 refs.

  9. Energy-aware scheduling under reliability and makespan constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aupy, Guillaume; Robert, Yves

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a task graph to be executed on a set of homogeneous processors. We aim at minimizing the energy consumption while enforcing two constraints: a prescribed bound on the execution time or makespan), and a reliability threshold. Dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) is a model frequently used to reduce the energy consumption of a schedule, but it has negative effect on its reliability. In this work, to improve the reliability of a schedule while reducing the energy consumption, we allow for the re-execution of some tasks. We assess the complexity of the tri-criteria scheduling problem (makespan, reliability, energy) with two different speed models: either processors can have arbitrary speeds (continuous speeds), or a processor can run at a finite number of different speeds, and it can change its speed during a computation. We propose several novel tri-criteria scheduling heuristics under the continuous speed model, and we evaluate them through a set of simulations. Our two best heuristics turn ...

  10. Reliability Analysis of Electric Power Systems Using an Object-oriented Hybrid Modeling Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schläpfer, Markus; Kröger, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ongoing evolution of the electric power systems brings about the need to cope with increasingly complex interactions of technical components and relevant actors. In order to integrate a more comprehensive spectrum of different aspects into a probabilistic reliability assessment and to include time-dependent effects, this paper proposes an object-oriented hybrid approach combining agent-based modeling techniques with classical methods such as Monte Carlo simulation. Objects represent both technical components such as generators and transmission lines and non-technical components such as grid operators. The approach allows the calculation of conventional reliability indices and the estimation of blackout frequencies. Furthermore, the influence of the time needed to remove line overloads on the overall system reliability can be assessed. The applicability of the approach is demonstrated by performing simulations on the IEEE Reliability Test System 1996 and on a model of the Swiss high-voltage grid.

  11. Advancing Equipment Reliability via a Natural Disaster Opportunities for Thinking Outside the Box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advancing Equipment Reliability via a Natural Disaster, Opportunities for Thinking Outside the Box Robert Stephens, Senior Electrical Engineer, ExxonMobil, Chalmette Abstract As the equipment assessments came in after hurricane Katrina... was driven by the desire to harden equipment against future hurricanes, not just replace the equipment in kind. Pre-Katrina reliability teams had defined the architecture of the future. The devastation provided an opportunity for the vision to become...

  12. Reliability estimates for selected sensors in fusion applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a study to define several types of sensors in use, the qualitative reliability (failure modes) and quantitative reliability (average failure rates) for these types of process sensors. Temperature, pressure, flow, and level sensors are discussed for water coolant and for cryogenic coolants. The failure rates that have been found are useful for risk assessment and safety analysis. Repair times and calibration intervals are also given when found in the literature. All of these values can also be useful to plant operators and maintenance personnel. Designers may be able to make use of these data when planning systems. The final chapter in this report discusses failure rates for several types of personnel safety sensors, including ionizing radiation monitors, toxic and combustible gas detectors, humidity sensors, and magnetic field sensors. These data could be useful to industrial hygienists and other safety professionals when designing or auditing for personnel safety.

  13. How to Estimate the Value of Service Reliability Improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Michael J.; Mercurio, Matthew G.; Schellenberg, Josh A.; Eto, Joseph H.

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A robust methodology for estimating the value of service reliability improvements is presented. Although econometric models for estimating value of service (interruption costs) have been established and widely accepted, analysts often resort to applying relatively crude interruption cost estimation techniques in assessing the economic impacts of transmission and distribution investments. This paper first shows how the use of these techniques can substantially impact the estimated value of service improvements. A simple yet robust methodology that does not rely heavily on simplifying assumptions is presented. When a smart grid investment is proposed, reliability improvement is one of the most frequently cited benefits. Using the best methodology for estimating the value of this benefit is imperative. By providing directions on how to implement this methodology, this paper sends a practical, usable message to the industry.

  14. Magnet reliability in the Fermilab Main Injector and implications for the ILC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tartaglia, M.A.; Blowers, J.; Capista, D.; Harding, D.J.; Kiemschies, O.; Rahimzadeh-Kalaleh, S.; Tompkins, J.C.; /Fermilab

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Linear Collider reference design requires over 13000 magnets, of approximately 135 styles, which must operate with very high reliability. The Fermilab Main Injector represents a modern machine with many conventional magnet styles, each of significant quantity, that has now accumulated many hundreds of magnet-years of operation. We review here the performance of the magnets built for this machine, assess their reliability and categorize the failure modes, and discuss implications for reliability of similar magnet styles expected to be used at the ILC.

  15. Reliability and validity of the Premie-Neuro in detecting early neurodevelopmental delay and disability in preterm infants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagnon, Kendra

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    There are few reliable and valid methods available for clinicians to assess the functional neurological status of the preterm infant. In this study, we set out to determine whether the Premie-Neuro, a new standardized ...

  16. General Order Ensuring Reliable Electric Service (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The standards set forth herein have been developed to provide consumers, the Louisiana Public Service Commission, and jurisdictional electric utilities with a uniform method of ensuring reliable...

  17. Thermoelectric Materials By Design: Mechanical Reliability (Agreement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    enable improvements in TE device design, optimization, and maximum reliability. * Next year will involve: - Continued TE material database generation. - TE modeling and...

  18. Improving Wind Turbine Gearbox Reliability: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Butterfield, S.; McNiff, B.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new research and development initiative to improve gearbox reliability in wind turbines begun at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, USA.

  19. RTI International Develops SSL Luminaire Reliability Model |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    is developing and validating accelerated life testing (ALT) methodologies and a reliability model for predicting the lifetime of integrated solid-state lighting...

  20. Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (PSA) program provides expert technical assistance to states, tribes and regions on electricity policies, programs and market mechanisms that increase access to reliable,...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Inverter Reliablity Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulations to look for corresponding changes in behavioral parameters of ... Inverter Reliability Program On December 18, 2012, in As scientists and engineers improve the...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: PV Reliability Operations Maintenance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Maintenance database Sandia-Electric Power Research Institute Partnership Publishes Photovoltaic Reliability Report On January 21, 2014, in Energy, Facilities, Grid...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: PV Systems Reliability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fluid phenomena of internal inverter components, and their impact on ... Inverter Reliability Program On December 18, 2012, in As scientists and engineers improve the...

  4. NORTH AMERICAN ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCIL: Preliminary Disturbance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Preliminary Disturbance Report The following information represents a partial sequence of events based upon Reliability Coordinator information available to NERC. It is not...

  5. Sandia Energy - Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enhancement for Wind (CREW): Project Update Home Renewable Energy Energy News Wind Energy News & Events Systems Analysis Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind (CREW):...

  6. Comments of North American Electric Reliability Corporation ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    currently developing a report, entitled "Reliability Consideration from Integration of Smart Grid" that will address many of the issues raised in the DOE RFI. North American...

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Materials & Manufacturing Reliability...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials & Manufacturing Reliability Program Biofouling Studies on Sandia's Marine Hydrokinetic Coatings Initiated at PNNL's Sequim Bay On June 26, 2014, in Energy, Materials...

  8. Competition and Reliability in North American Electricity Markets...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electricity Markets Technical Workshop Competition and Reliability in North American Electricity Markets Technical Workshop Competition and Reliability in North American...

  9. PV Performance and Reliability Validation Capabilities at Sandia...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance and Reliability Validation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories PV Performance and Reliability Validation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories This...

  10. Evaluation of MHTGR fuel reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wichner, R.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Barthold, W.P. [Barthold Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) concepts that house the reactor vessel in a tight but unsealed reactor building place heightened importance on the reliability of the fuel particle coatings as fission product barriers. Though accident consequence analyses continue to show favorable results, the increased dependence on one type of barrier, in addition to a number of other factors, has caused the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to consider conservative assumptions regarding fuel behavior. For this purpose, the concept termed ``weak fuel`` has been proposed on an interim basis. ``Weak fuel`` is a penalty imposed on consequence analyses whereby the fuel is assumed to respond less favorably to environmental conditions than predicted by behavioral models. The rationale for adopting this penalty, as well as conditions that would permit its reduction or elimination, are examined in this report. The evaluation includes an examination of possible fuel-manufacturing defects, quality-control procedures for defect detection, and the mechanisms by which fuel defects may lead to failure.

  11. Cathedral Rock Picnic Area Rehabilitation Environmental Assessment

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AO 474.2 Chg U.S. S p e c t i R yAL

  12. Some results of studies of system reliability in power engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudenko, Y.N.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1973 the Scientific Council on Indicated Problems of Power Engineering of the Division of Physicotechnical Problems of Power Engineering (OFTPE) of the AS USSR set up the permanent scientific seminar on the topic of ''Methodological Questions of Research on the Reliability of Large Energy Systems.'' The Siberian Energy Institute (SEI) of the Siberian Branch of the AS USSR was designated the base organization. The principal goals of the seminar are: discussion, analysis, and evaluation of the most interesting results of research in the field of energy-system reliability as well as suggestions relevant to their practical employment in the national economy; the exchange of opinions on the latest achievements and controversial questions associated with solution of this problem; comparison of Soviet and foreign levels of research in this area; discussion of problems and formulation of viewpoints concerning the most urgent trends in future research and, on this basis, the coordination of investigations into this subject.

  13. Int. J. Reliability and Safety, Vol. x, No. x, xxxx 1 Scale-Invariant Approach to Multi-Criterion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Int. J. Reliability and Safety, Vol. x, No. x, xxxx 1 Scale-Invariant Approach to Multi Placement in Environmental Research', Int. J. Reliability and Safety, Vol. x, No. x, pp and maintenance of sensors in these areas are expensive. It is therefore desirable to find out how, within a given

  14. Fundamental mechanisms of micromachine reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; SNIEGOWSKI,JEFFRY J.; KNAPP,JAMES A.; REDMOND,JAMES M.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.; MAYER,THOMAS K.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to extreme surface to volume ratios, adhesion and friction are critical properties for reliability of Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS), but are not well understood. In this LDRD the authors established test structures, metrology and numerical modeling to conduct studies on adhesion and friction in MEMS. They then concentrated on measuring the effect of environment on MEMS adhesion. Polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) is the primary material of interest in MEMS because of its integrated circuit process compatibility, low stress, high strength and conformal deposition nature. A plethora of useful micromachined device concepts have been demonstrated using Sandia National Laboratories' sophisticated in-house capabilities. One drawback to polysilicon is that in air the surface oxidizes, is high energy and is hydrophilic (i.e., it wets easily). This can lead to catastrophic failure because surface forces can cause MEMS parts that are brought into contact to adhere rather than perform their intended function. A fundamental concern is how environmental constituents such as water will affect adhesion energies in MEMS. The authors first demonstrated an accurate method to measure adhesion as reported in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 through 5, they then studied the effect of water on adhesion depending on the surface condition (hydrophilic or hydrophobic). As described in Chapter 2, they find that adhesion energy of hydrophilic MEMS surfaces is high and increases exponentially with relative humidity (RH). Surface roughness is the controlling mechanism for this relationship. Adhesion can be reduced by several orders of magnitude by silane coupling agents applied via solution processing. They decrease the surface energy and render the surface hydrophobic (i.e. does not wet easily). However, only a molecular monolayer coats the surface. In Chapters 3-5 the authors map out the extent to which the monolayer reduces adhesion versus RH. They find that adhesion is independent of RH up to a threshold value, depending on the coating chemistry. The mechanism for the adhesion increase beyond this threshold value is that the coupling agent reconfigures from a surface to a bulk phase (Chapter 3). To investigate the details of how the adhesion increase occurs, the authors developed the mechanics for adhesion hysteresis measurements. These revealed that near-crack tip compression is the underlying cause of the adhesion increase (Chapter 4). A vacuum deposition chamber for silane coupling agent deposition was constructed. Results indicate that vapor deposited coatings are less susceptible to degradation at high RH (Chapter 5). To address issues relating to surfaces in relative motion, a new test structure to measure friction was developed. In contrast to other surface micromachined friction test structures, uniform apparent pressure is applied in the frictional contact zone (Chapter 6). The test structure will enable friction studies over a large pressure and dynamic range. In this LDRD project, the authors established an infrastructure for MEMS adhesion and friction metrology. They then characterized in detail the performance of hydrophilic and hydrophobic films under humid conditions, and determined mechanisms which limit this performance. These studies contribute to a fundamental understanding for MEMS reliability design rules. They also provide valuable data for MEMS packaging requirements.

  15. Demand Response and Electric Grid Reliability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wattles, P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response and Electric Grid Reliability Paul Wattles Senior Analyst, Market Design & Development, ERCOT CATEE Conference, Galveston October 10, 2012 2 North American Bulk Power Grids CATEE Conference October 10, 2012 ? The ERCOT... adequacy ? ?Achieving more DR participation would . . . displace some generation investments, but would achieve the same level of reliability... ? ?Achieving this ideal requires widespread demand response and market structures that enable loads...

  16. Wind Energy Facility Reliability and Maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Yu

    Wind Energy Facility Reliability and Maintenance Eunshin Byon, Lewis Ntaimo, Chanan Singh and Yu related to wind energy facility reliability and mainte- nance focused more on qualitative aspects. In this chapter, we provide a comprehensive account of the existing research regarding wind energy facility

  17. Probabilistic Reliable Message Transmission Subodh Kumar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    Probabilistic Reliable Message Transmission Subodh Kumar January 17, 1996 Abstract Most communication systems require reliable transmission of a sequence of messages over a physical network which can with messages by the sender and they are acknowledged by the receiver. It is known that protocols that use

  18. Advances in Safety, Reliability and Risk Management -Proceedings of the European Safety and Reliability Conference, ESREL 2011 -European Safety and Reliability Conference: Advances in Safety, Reliability and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Advances in Safety, Reliability and Risk Management - Proceedings of the European Safety, Reliability and Risk Management, ESREL 2011, Troyes : France (2011) In France, more than 99% of failed is global risk management. This allows analysis of the major risks faced by the busi- ness (loss

  19. Engineering Reliability into Web Sites: Google SRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomkins, Andrew

    Engineering Reliability into Web Sites: Google SRE Alex Perry alex.perry@google.com Santa Monica SRE, Google #12;Abstract This talk introduces Site Reliability Engineering (SRE) at Google, explaining team responsibilities by site Failures and instability consuming manpower Engineering being applied

  20. : : ". RSST I Lunar Day Counter Reliability Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    : : ". RSST I Lunar Day Counter Reliability Analysis NO. ATM 846 PAGE 1 REV. MO. OF 10 DATE 12/3/69 This ATM presents a Reliability analysis of the Lunar Day Counter, the Resettable Solid State Timer (RSST equipment. The analysis is based on a parts count, average failure rates and two (2) years operation

  1. NISTIR 7817 A Credential Reliability and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NISTIR 7817 A Credential Reliability and Revocation Model for Federated Identities Hildegard Ferraiolo http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.7817 #12;NISTIR 7817 A Credential Reliability and Revocation Interagency Report 7817 22 pages (Nov. 2012) Certain commercial entities, equipment, or materials may

  2. Reliable Distributed Computing for Decision Support Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bargiela, Andrzej

    Reliable Distributed Computing for Decision Support Systems Taha Osman, Andrzej Bargiela Department of application tasks on the currently avail- able computing nodes. Distributed Systems Reliability Due decision-support systems such as water distribution net- works, involving hundreds or even thousands

  3. Reliability of underwater hearing thresholds in pinnipeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichmuth, Colleen

    Reliability of underwater hearing thresholds in pinnipeds Brandon L. Southall Long Marine and certain testing parameters (e.g., equipment and research personnel), measured underwater hearing (0.2­6.4 kHz). These data address the reliability of acoustic signal detection measurements over time

  4. EA-1177: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Assessment SalvageDemolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to salvage and...

  5. TO BE PRESENTED AT 2006 POWERCON, CHONGQING, CHINA, OCT 2006 A Hybrid Method for Multi-Area Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Area Generation Expansion using Tabu-search and Dynamic Programming Panida Jirutitijaroen, Student Member, IEEE using dynamic programming for the solution of generation expansion and placement considering reliability, Reliability, Tabu Search, Power System Optimization, Global Decomposition, Generation Adequacy, Dynamic

  6. Robot-Powered Reliability Testing at NREL's ESIF

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Harrison; Kevin

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    With auto manufacturers expected to roll out fuel cell electric vehicles in the 2015 to 2017 timeframe, the need for a reliable hydrogen fueling infrastructure is greater than ever. That's why the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is using a robot in its Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) to assess the durability of hydrogen fueling hoses, a largely untested-and currently costly-component of hydrogen fueling stations. The automated machine mimics the repetitive stress of a human bending and twisting the hose to refuel a vehicle-all under the high pressure and low temperature required to deliver hydrogen to a fuel cell vehicle's onboard storage tank.

  7. Shutdown heat removal system reliability in thermal reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Y.H.; Bari, R.A.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of the failure probability per year of the shutdown heat removal system (SHRS) at hot standby conditions for two thermal reactor designs is presented. The selected reactor designs are the Pressurized Water Reactor and the Nonproliferation Alternative System Assessment Program Heavy Water Reactor. Failures of the SHRS following the initiating transients of loss of offsite power and loss of main feedwater system are evaluated. Common mode failures between components are incorporated in this anlaysis via the ..beta..-factor method and the sensitivity of the system reliability to common mode failures is investigated parametrically.

  8. Robot-Powered Reliability Testing at NREL's ESIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison; Kevin

    2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    With auto manufacturers expected to roll out fuel cell electric vehicles in the 2015 to 2017 timeframe, the need for a reliable hydrogen fueling infrastructure is greater than ever. That's why the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is using a robot in its Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) to assess the durability of hydrogen fueling hoses, a largely untested-and currently costly-component of hydrogen fueling stations. The automated machine mimics the repetitive stress of a human bending and twisting the hose to refuel a vehicle-all under the high pressure and low temperature required to deliver hydrogen to a fuel cell vehicle's onboard storage tank.

  9. NREL's Gearbox Reliability Collaborative leads to wind turbine gearbox reliability, lowering the cost of energy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the cost of energy. Unintended gearbox failures have a significant impact on the cost of wind farm will result in increased gearbox reliability and an overall reduction in the cost of wind energy. ProjectNREL's Gearbox Reliability Collaborative leads to wind turbine gearbox reliability, lowering

  10. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press Releases 2014References by WebsitehomeResearch Areas

  11. Report on the analysis of field data relating to the reliability of solar hot water systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menicucci, David F. (Building Specialists, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilities are overseeing the installations of thousand of solar hot water (SHW) systems. Utility planners have begun to ask for quantitative measures of the expected lifetimes of these systems so that they can properly forecast their loads. This report, which augments a 2009 reliability analysis effort by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), addresses this need. Additional reliability data have been collected, added to the existing database, and analyzed. The results are presented. Additionally, formal reliability theory is described, including the bathtub curve, which is the most common model to characterize the lifetime reliability character of systems, and for predicting failures in the field. Reliability theory is used to assess the SNL reliability database. This assessment shows that the database is heavily weighted with data that describe the reliability of SHW systems early in their lives, during the warranty period. But it contains few measured data to describe the ends of SHW systems lives. End-of-life data are the most critical ones to define sufficiently the reliability of SHW systems in order to answer the questions that the utilities pose. Several ideas are presented for collecting the required data, including photometric analysis of aerial photographs of installed collectors, statistical and neural network analysis of energy bills from solar homes, and the development of simple algorithms to allow conventional SHW controllers to announce system failures and record the details of the event, similar to how aircraft black box recorders perform. Some information is also presented about public expectations for the longevity of a SHW system, information that is useful in developing reliability goals.

  12. POWER GRID RELIABILITY AND SECURITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bose, Anjan; Venkatasubramanian, Vaithianathan; Hauser, Carl; Bakken, David; Anderson, David; Zhao, Chuanlin; Liu, Dong; Yang, Tao; Meng, Ming; Zhang, Lin; Ning, Jiawei; Tashman, Zaid

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has led to the development of a real-time simulation platform for electric power grids called Grid Simulator or GridSim for simulating the dynamic and information network interactions of large- scale power systems. The platform consists of physical models of power system components including synchronous generators, loads and control, which are simulated using a modified commercial power simulator namely Transient Stability Analysis Tool (TSAT) [1] together with data cleanup components, as well as an emulated substation level and wide-area power analysis components. The platform also includes realistic representations of communication network middleware that can emulate the real-time information flow back and forth between substations and control centers in wide-area power systems. The platform has been validated on a realistic 6000-bus model of the western American power system. The simulator GridSim developed in this project is the first of its kind in its ability to simulate real-time response of large-scale power grids, and serves as a cost effective real-time stability and control simulation platform for power industry.

  13. Bonneville - Hood River Vegetation Management Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To maintain the reliability of its electrical system, BPA, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, needs to expand the range of vegetation management options used to clear unwanted vegetation on about 20 miles of BPA transmission line right-of-way between Bonneville Dam and Hood River; Oregon, within the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). We propose to continue controlling undesirable vegetation using a program of Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) which includes manual, biological and chemical treatment methods. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1257) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/ REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/ REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS Area and Regulatory Amendments for Bering Sea Habitat Conservation May 2008 Lead Agency: National Juneau, AK 99802 (907) 586-7228 Abstract: This Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review

  15. Stochastic PV performance/reliability model : preview of alpha version.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Miller, Steven P.

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Problem Statement: (1) Uncertainties in PV system performance and reliability impact business decisions - Project cost and financing estimates, Pricing service contracts and guarantees, Developing deployment and O&M strategies; (2) Understanding and reducing these uncertainties will help make the PV industry more competitive (3) Performance has typically been estimated without much attention to reliability of components; and (4) Tools are needed to assess all inputs to the value proposition (e.g., LCOE, cash flow, reputation, etc.). Goals and objectives are: (1) Develop a stochastic simulation model (in GoldSim) that can represent PV system performance as a function of system design, weather, reliability, and O&M policies; (2) Evaluate performance for an example system to quantify sources of uncertainty and identify dominant parameters via a sensitivity study; and (3) Example System - 1 inverter, 225 kW DC Array latitude tilt (90 strings of 12 modules {l_brace}1080 modules{r_brace}), Weather from Tucumcari, NM (TMY2 with annual uncertainty).

  16. DOE limited standard: Operations assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose of this standard is to provide DOE Field Element assessors with a guide for conducting operations assessments, and provide DOE Field Element managers with the criteria of the EM Operations Assessment Program. Sections 6.1 to 6.21 provide examples of how to assess specific areas; the general techniques of operations assessments (Section 5) may be applied to other areas of health and safety (e.g. fire protection, criticality safety, quality assurance, occupational safety, etc.).

  17. Adaptive Reliability Analysis of Excavation Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jun Kyung

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    . This analysis couples the adaptive design capabilities of the observational method with updated reliability indices, to be used in risk-based design decisions. A probabilistic framework is developed to predict three-dimensional deformation profiles due...

  18. Demand Response For Power System Reliability: FAQ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response is the most underutilized power system reliability resource in North America. Technological advances now make it possible to tap this resource to both reduce costs and improve. Misconceptions concerning response capabilities tend to force loads to provide responses that they are less able to provide and often prohibit them from providing the most valuable reliability services. Fortunately this is beginning to change with some ISOs making more extensive use of load response. This report is structured as a series of short questions and answers that address load response capabilities and power system reliability needs. Its objective is to further the use of responsive load as a bulk power system reliability resource in providing the fastest and most valuable ancillary services.

  19. Reliability-Based Optimization Using Evolutionary Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deb, Kalyanmoy

    Uncertainties in design variables and problem parameters are often inevitable and must be considered in an optimization task if reliable optimal solutions are sought. Besides a number of sampling techniques, there exist ...

  20. Reliability Challenges for Solar Energy (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.

    2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    PV industry can benefit from reliability testing experience of microelectronics industry . Si modules perform well in field; CdTe/CIGS must be sealed to moisture; CPV in product development stage.

  1. PV Module Reliability Research (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This National Center for Photovoltaics sheet describes the capabilities of its PV module reliability research. The scope and core competencies and capabilities are discussed and recent publications are listed.

  2. Photovoltaic Reliability and Engineering (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Photovoltaic Reliability and Engineering. One-sided sheet that includes Scope, Core Competencies and Capabilities, and Contact/Web information.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Physics of Reliability: Evaluating...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics of Reliability: Evaluating Design Insights for Component Technologies in Solar program Sandia R&D Funded under New DOE SunShot Program On November 27, 2013, in Energy,...

  4. Reliability Issues for Photovoltaic Modules (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Si modules good in field; new designs need reliability testing. CdTe & CIGS modules sensitive to moisture; carefully seal. CPV in product development stage; benefits from expertise in other industries.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: increase power system reliability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reliability Sandia, DOE Energy Storage Program, GeneSiC Semiconductor, U.S. Army ARDEC: Ultra-High-Voltage Silicon Carbide Thyristors On March 29, 2013, in Capabilities,...

  6. Improving Network Reliability: Analysis, Methodology, and Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Booker, Graham B.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The reliability of networking and communication systems is vital for the nation's economy and security. Optical and cellular networks have become a critical infrastructure and are indispensable in emergency situations. This dissertation outlines...

  7. Reliability of EUCLIDIAN: An autonomous robotic system for image-guided prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Podder, Tarun K.; Buzurovic, Ivan; Huang Ke; Showalter, Timothy; Dicker, Adam P.; Yu, Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center (NCI-designated), Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Recently, several robotic systems have been developed to perform accurate and consistent image-guided brachytherapy. Before introducing a new device into clinical operations, it is important to assess the reliability and mean time before failure (MTBF) of the system. In this article, the authors present the preclinical evaluation and analysis of the reliability and MTBF of an autonomous robotic system, which is developed for prostate seed implantation. Methods: The authors have considered three steps that are important in reliability growth analysis. These steps are: Identification and isolation of failures, classification of failures, and trend analysis. For any one-of-a-kind product, the reliability enhancement is accomplished through test-fix-test. The authors have used failure mode and effect analysis for collection and analysis of reliability data by identifying and categorizing the failure modes. Failures were classified according to severity. Failures that occurred during the operation of this robotic system were considered as nonhomogenous Poisson process. The failure occurrence trend was analyzed using Laplace test. For analyzing and predicting reliability growth, commonly used and widely accepted models, Duane's model and the Army Material Systems Analysis Activity, i.e., Crow's model, were applied. The MTBF was used as an important measure for assessing the system's reliability. Results: During preclinical testing, 3196 seeds (in 53 test cases) were deposited autonomously by the robot and 14 critical failures were encountered. The majority of the failures occurred during the first few cases. The distribution of failures followed Duane's postulation as well as Crow's postulation of reliability growth. The Laplace test index was -3.82 (<0), indicating a significant trend in failure data, and the failure intervals lengthened gradually. The continuous increase in the failure occurrence interval suggested a trend toward improved reliability. The MTBF was 592 seeds, which implied that several prostate seed implantation cases would be possible without encountering any critical failure. The shape parameter for the MTBF was 0.3859 (<1), suggesting a positive reliability growth of this robotic system. At 95% confidence, the reliability for deposition of 65 seeds was more than 90%. Conclusions: Analyses of failure mode strongly indicated a gradual improvement of reliability of this autonomous robotic system. High MTBF implied that several prostate seed implant cases would be possible without encountering any critical failure.

  8. On the internet grouping for reliable multicasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghanem, Mohamed M.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ON THE INTERNET GROUPING FOR RELIABLE MULTICASTING A Thesis by MOHAMED M. GHANEM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1996... Major Subject: Computer Science ON THF, INTERNET GROUPING I'OR RELIABLE MULTICASTING A Thesis by MOHAMED M. GHANEM Submitted to Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved...

  9. Reliability and Functional Availability of HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myrefelt, S.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RELIABILITY AND FUNCTIONAL AVAILABILITY OF HVAC SYSTEMS Sonny Myrefelt Dep. of Build. Serv. Eng., KTH, 10044 Stockholm, Sweden, and SKANSKA Sydost, V?xj?, Sweden Summary This paper presents a model to calculate the reliability... system, therefore, there must be sufficient documentation of design airflow rates. The compulsory ventilation checks performed in Sweden have focused on the importance of maintaining the design air flow rates. More about this activity can be seen...

  10. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) Description and Loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oyague, F.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes simulated turbine load cases in accordance to the IEC 61400-1 Ed.3 standard, which is representative of the typical wind turbine design process. The information presented herein is intended to provide a broad understanding of the gearbox reliability collaborative 750kW drivetrain and turbine configuration. In addition, fatigue and ultimate strength drivetrain loads resulting from simulations are presented. This information provides the bases for the analytical work of the gearbox reliability collaborative effort.

  11. Nuclear Power - Control, Reliability and Human Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Actinides: Where Do We Stand with the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Technique? 167 Mario De Cesare Part 2 Reliability and Failure Mechanisms 187 Chapter 10 Evaluation of Dynamic J-R Curve for Leak Before Break Design of Nuclear Reactor Coolant Piping... Network 6. Autonomous Control for Space 7. Radiation-Hard and Intelligent Optical Fiber Sensors 8. Monitoring Radioactivity 9. Origin and Detection of Actinides ? Reliability and Failure Mechanisms 10. Dynamic J-R Curve for Leak Analysis 11...

  12. New Logic Modeling Paradigms for Complex System Reliability and Risk Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Joseph B.

    New Logic Modeling Paradigms for Complex System Reliability and Risk Analysis Antoine Rauzy Chair ground ... is a mature technology ... is a great tool for decision making So, what's next? · More://www.lgi.ecp.fr/pmwiki.php/PagesPerso/ARauzy *Sponsored by SAFRAN group #12;Probabilistic Risk Assessment ... ... is now established on a solid scientific

  13. Quantifying transmission reliability margin J. Zhang, I. Dobson*, F.L. Alvarado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Ian

    , it is likely that the power system will remain secure despite the uncertainty. The transmission reliability uses in electric power system operation and planning. In the operation of bilateral markets, available capability can be used to assess power system security when local power sources are replaced by imported

  14. INTERMOUNTAIN INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MELINDA KRAHENBUHL

    2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The U. S. Department of Energy’s Intermountain Industrial Assessment Center (IIAC) at the University of Utah has been providing eligible small- and medium-sized manufacturers with no-cost plant assessments since 2001, offering cost-effective recommendations for improvements in the areas of energy efficiency, pollution prevention, and productivity improvement.

  15. Measuring eating disorder attitudes and behaviors: a reliability generalization study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, Crystal Anne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    I used reliability generalization procedures to determine the mean score reliability of the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI), the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT), and the Bulimia Test (BULIT). Reliability generalization is a type of meta-analysis used...

  16. Basic concepts defining the property of ''reliability'' for energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudenko, Yu.N.; Sin'chugov, F.I.; Smirnov, E.P.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The basic concepts defining the complex property of ''reliability'' for energy systems (electric-power and pipeline systems) are considered; they include the properties, states, and events that characterize reliability as well as the reliability indices.

  17. Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Recovery...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Recovery Program Plan Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Recovery Program Plan Microsoft Word - OE PSRP June 5 2009...

  18. Effect of Jatropha based Biodiesel, on Engine Hardware Reliability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Jatropha based Biodiesel, on Engine Hardware Reliability, Emission and Performance Effect of Jatropha based Biodiesel, on Engine Hardware Reliability, Emission and Performance...

  19. Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability FY 2012 Budget...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Energy Reliability FY 2012 Budget Request Presentation Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability FY 2012 Budget Request Presentation Presentation by Patricia Hoffman of...

  20. An environmental sample chamber for reliable scanning transmission...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    environmental sample chamber for reliable scanning transmission x-ray microscopy measurements under water vapor. An environmental sample chamber for reliable scanning transmission...

  1. Improving the Reliability and Resiliency of the US Electric Grid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improving the Reliability and Resiliency of the US Electric Grid: SGIG Article in Metering International, March 2012 Improving the Reliability and Resiliency of the US Electric...

  2. The Business Case for Fuel Cells 2013: Reliability, Resiliency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3: Reliability, Resiliency & Savings The Business Case for Fuel Cells 2013: Reliability, Resiliency & Savings This report, compiled by Fuel Cells 2000 with support from the Fuel...

  3. Reliability of islanded microgrids with stochastic generation and prioritized load

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marden, Mirjana Milosevic

    The potential to improve distribution system reliability is a primary motivation behind the development and deployment of microgrids. Previous studies have illustrated substantial reliability benefits of dispatchable ...

  4. Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance and Reliability of Bonded Interfaces Physics of Failure of Electrical Interconnects Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines...

  5. Now Available: Smart Grid Investments Improve Grid Reliability...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Smart Grid Investments Improve Grid Reliability, Resilience, and Storm Responses (November 2014) Now Available: Smart Grid Investments Improve Grid Reliability, Resilience, and...

  6. Letter from Pepco Holdings Regarding the Reliability of Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Pepco Holdings Regarding the Reliability of Electric Service in the District of Columbia Letter from Pepco Holdings Regarding the Reliability of Electric Service in the...

  7. Energy Conservation in Reliable Wireless Sensor Fatma Bouabdallah, Nizar Bouabdallah and Raouf Boutaba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutaba, Raouf

    Energy Conservation in Reliable Wireless Sensor Networks Fatma Bouabdallah, Nizar Bouabdallah in the event area, enables significant energy conservation. I. INTRODUCTION Energy-efficiency is a critical the significant energy conservation that could be achieved when spatial correlation is exploited to reduce

  8. Reliability of Wireless On-Chip Interconnects Based on Carbon Nanotube Antennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pande, Partha Pratim

    Reliability of Wireless On-Chip Interconnects Based on Carbon Nanotube Antennas A. Nojeh1 , P Engineering University of British Columbia 2332 Main Mall Vancouver, BC, Canada 2 School of Electrical of the research effort in the emerging area of nanoelectronics has revolved around creating novel devices

  9. Integration of NDE Reliability and Fracture Mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, F. L.; Doctor, S. R.; Heas!er, P. G.; Morris, C. J.; Pitman, S. G.; Selby, G. P.; Simonen, F. A.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting a four-phase program for measuring and evaluating the effectiveness and reliability of in-service inspection (lSI} performed on the primary system piping welds of commercial light water reactors (LWRs). Phase I of the program is complete. A survey was made of the state of practice for ultrasonic rsr of LWR primary system piping welds. Fracture mechanics calculations were made to establish required nondestrutive testing sensitivities. In general, it was found that fatigue flaws less than 25% of wall thickness would not grow to failure within an inspection interval of 10 years. However, in some cases failure could occur considerably faster. Statistical methods for predicting and measuring the effectiveness and reliability of lSI were developed and will be applied in the "Round Robin Inspections" of Phase II. Methods were also developed for the production of flaws typical of those found in service. Samples fabricated by these methods wilI be used in Phase II to test inspection effectiveness and reliability. Measurements were made of the influence of flaw characteristics {i.e., roughness, tightness, and orientation) on inspection reliability. These measurernents, as well as the predictions of a statistical model for inspection reliability, indicate that current reporting and recording sensitivities are inadequate.

  10. Resource investigation of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal areas in San Bernardino, California. Part of the third year report, 1980-81, of the US Department of Energy-California State-Coupled Program for Reservoir Assessment and Confirmation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youngs, L.G.; Bezore, S.P.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ninety-seven geothermal wells and springs were identified and plotted on a compiled geologic map of the 40-square-mile study area. These wells and springs were concentrated in three distinguishable resource areas: Arrowhead Hot Springs; South San Bernardino; and Harlem Hot Springs - in each of which detailed geophysical, geochemical, and geological surveys were conducted. The Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area lies just north of the City of San Bernardino in the San Bernardino Mountains astride a shear zone (offshoot of the San Andreas fault) in pre-Cambrian gneiss and schist. The Harlem Hot Springs geothermal area, on the east side of the City, and the south San Bernardino geothermal area, on the south side, have geothermal reservoirs in Quaternary alluvial material which overlies a moderately deep sedimentary basin bound on the southwest by the San Jacinto fault (a ground water barrier). Geothermometry calculations suggest that the Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area, with a maximum reservoir temperature of 142/sup 0/C, may have the highest maximum reservoir temperature of the three geothermal areas. The maximum temperature recorded by CDMG in the south San Bernardino geothermal area was 56/sup 0/C from an artesian well, while the maximum temperature recorded in the Harlem Hot Springs geothermal area was 49.5/sup 0/C at 174 meters (570 feet) in an abandoned water well. The geophysical and geological surveys delineated fault traces in association with all three of the designated geothermal areas.

  11. Practical reliability and uncertainty quantification in complex systems : final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grace, Matthew D.; Ringland, James T.; Marzouk, Youssef M. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA); Boggs, Paul T.; Zurn, Rena M.; Diegert, Kathleen V. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Pebay, Philippe Pierre; Red-Horse, John Robert (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to investigate the use of Bayesian methods for the estimation of the reliability of complex systems. The goals were to find methods for dealing with continuous data, rather than simple pass/fail data; to avoid assumptions of specific probability distributions, especially Gaussian, or normal, distributions; to compute not only an estimate of the reliability of the system, but also a measure of the confidence in that estimate; to develop procedures to address time-dependent or aging aspects in such systems, and to use these models and results to derive optimal testing strategies. The system is assumed to be a system of systems, i.e., a system with discrete components that are themselves systems. Furthermore, the system is 'engineered' in the sense that each node is designed to do something and that we have a mathematical description of that process. In the time-dependent case, the assumption is that we have a general, nonlinear, time-dependent function describing the process. The major results of the project are described in this report. In summary, we developed a sophisticated mathematical framework based on modern probability theory and Bayesian analysis. This framework encompasses all aspects of epistemic uncertainty and easily incorporates steady-state and time-dependent systems. Based on Markov chain, Monte Carlo methods, we devised a computational strategy for general probability density estimation in the steady-state case. This enabled us to compute a distribution of the reliability from which many questions, including confidence, could be addressed. We then extended this to the time domain and implemented procedures to estimate the reliability over time, including the use of the method to predict the reliability at a future time. Finally, we used certain aspects of Bayesian decision analysis to create a novel method for determining an optimal testing strategy, e.g., we can estimate the 'best' location to take the next test to minimize the risk of making a wrong decision about the fitness of a system. We conclude this report by proposing additional fruitful areas of research.

  12. Software engineering practices for control system reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. K. Schaffner; K. S White

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will discuss software engineering practices used to improve Control System reliability. The authors begin with a brief discussion of the Software Engineering Institute's Capability Maturity Model (CMM) which is a framework for evaluating and improving key practices used to enhance software development and maintenance capabilities. The software engineering processes developed and used by the Controls Group at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab), using the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) for accelerator control, are described. Examples are given of how their procedures have been used to minimized control system downtime and improve reliability. While their examples are primarily drawn from their experience with EPICS, these practices are equally applicable to any control system. Specific issues addressed include resource allocation, developing reliable software lifecycle processes and risk management.

  13. ASCE Specialty Conference on Probabilistic Mechanics and Structural Reliability ESTIMATING STRUCTURAL RELIABILITY UNDER HURRICANE WIND HAZARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balaji, Rajagopalan

    STRUCTURAL RELIABILITY UNDER HURRICANE WIND HAZARD: APPLICATIONS TO WOOD STRUCTURES Balaji Rajagopalan.frangopol@colorado.edu Abstract A stochastic nonparametric framework to estimate structural reliability under hurricane wind Natural hazards in general and hurricanes in particular, lead to loss of life and tremendous property

  14. Accepted for publication in Reliability Engineering and System Safety Analyzing the topological, electrical and reliability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Accepted for publication in Reliability Engineering and System Safety Analyzing the topological, electrical and reliability characteristics of a power transmission system for identifying its critical.zio@polimi.it Abstract The subject of this paper is the analysis of an electrical transmission system with the objective

  15. Historical Background on the Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RECHARD,ROBERT P.

    1999-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1979, six years after selecting the Delaware Basin as a potential disposal area, Congress authorized the U.S. Department of Energy to build the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, as a Research and development facility for the safe management storage, and disposal of waste contaminated with transuranic radioisotopes. In 1998, 19 years after authorization and after site selection, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified that the WIPP disposal system complied with its regulations. The EPA's decision was primarily based on the results from a performance. assessment conducted in 1996, which is summarized in this special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety. This performance assessment was the culmination of four preliminary performance assessments conducted between 1989 and 1992. This paper provides a historical setting and context for how the performance of the deep geologic repository at the WIPP was analyzed. Also included is background on political forces acting on the project.

  16. CRAD, Configuration Management Assessment Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this assessment is to determine whether a Configuration Management Program (CM) is in place which allows for the availability and retrievability of accurate information, improves response to design and operational decisions, enhances worker safety, increases facility safety and reliability, increases efficiency of work efforts, and helps maintain integrity of interfacing orders.

  17. Technique for Measuring Hybrid Electronic Component Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, C.C.; Hernandez, C.L.; Hosking, F.M.; Robinson, D.; Rutherford, B.; Uribe, F.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials compatibility studies of aged, engineered materials and hardware are critical to understanding and predicting component reliability, particularly for systems with extended stockpile life requirements. Nondestructive testing capabilities for component reliability would significantly enhance lifetime predictions. For example, if the detection of crack propagation through a solder joint can be demonstrated, this technique could be used to develop baseline information to statistically determine solder joint lifelengths. This report will investigate high frequency signal response techniques for nondestructively evaluating the electrical behavior of thick film hybrid transmission lines.

  18. Reliability Technology earns prestigious Los Alamos award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliability Technology earns award Reliability Technology

  19. RELIABILITY CONSIDERATIONS OF ELECTRONICS COMPONENTS FOR THE DEEP UNDERWATER MUON AND NEUTRINO DETECTION SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leskovar, B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1980 RELIABILITY CONSIDERATIONS OF ELECTRONICS COMPONENTS10548 RELIABILITY CONSIDERATIONS OF ELECTRONICS COMPONENTS™**"* ' Reliability Considerations of Electronics Components

  20. Traffic flow wide-area surveillance system definition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allgood, G.O.; Ferrell, R.K.; Kercel, S.W.; Abston, R.A.; Carnal, C.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Moynihan, P.I. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traffic Flow Wide-Area Surveillance (TFWAS) is a system for assessing the state of traffic flow over a wide area for enhanced traffic control and improved traffic management and planning. The primary purpose of a TFWAS system is to provide a detailed traffic flow description and context description to sophisticated traffic management and control systems being developed or envisioned for the future. A successful TFWAS system must possess the attributes of safety, reconfigurability, reliability, and expandability. The primary safety premise of TFWAS is to ensure that no action or failure of the TFWAS system or its components can result in risk of injury to humans. A wide variety of communication techniques is available for use with TFWAS systems. These communication techniques can be broken down into two categories, landlines and wireless. Currently used and possible future traffic sensing technologies have been examined. Important criteria for selecting TFWAS sensors include sensor capabilities, costs, operational constraints, sensor compatibility with the infrastructure, and extent. TFWAS is a concept that can take advantage of the strengths of different traffic sensing technologies, can readily adapt to newly developed technologies, and can grow with the development of new traffic control strategies. By developing innovative algorithms that will take information from a variety of sensor types and develop descriptions of traffic flows over a wide area, a more comprehensive understanding of the traffic state can be provided to the control system to perform the most reasonable control actions over the entire wide area. The capability of characterizing the state of traffic over an entire region should revolutionize developments in traffic control strategies.

  1. On the reliability of microvariability tests in quasars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Diego, José A., E-mail: jdo@astro.unam.mx [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Avenida Universidad 3000, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 04510, Distrito Federal, MexicoAND (Mexico); Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias-Universidad de La Laguna, CEI Canarias: Campus Atlántico Tricontinental, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microvariations probe the physics and internal structure of quasars. Unpredictability and small flux variations make this phenomenon elusive and difficult to detect. Variance-based probes such as the C and F tests, or a combination of both, are popular methods to compare the light curves of the quasar and a comparison star. Recently, detection claims in some studies have depended on the agreement of the results of the C and F tests, or of two instances of the F-test, for rejecting the non-variation null hypothesis. However, the C-test is a non-reliable statistical procedure, the F-test is not robust, and the combination of tests with concurrent results is anything but a straightforward methodology. A priori power analysis calculations and post hoc analysis of Monte Carlo simulations show excellent agreement for the analysis of variance test to detect microvariations as well as the limitations of the F-test. Additionally, the combined tests yield correlated probabilities that make the assessment of statistical significance unworkable. However, it is possible to include data from several field stars to enhance the power in a single F-test, increasing the reliability of the statistical analysis. This would be the preferred methodology when several comparison stars are available. An example using two stars and the enhanced F-test is presented. These results show the importance of using adequate methodologies and avoiding inappropriate procedures that can jeopardize microvariability detections. Power analysis and Monte Carlo simulations are useful tools for research planning, as they can demonstrate the robustness and reliability of different research approaches.

  2. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring Area sampler Control measures (best management practices) installed at the Site Monitoring Area Structures such as...

  3. Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain areas of the State are designated as wildlife protection areas and refuges; new construction and development is restricted in these areas.

  4. On the reliability of seasonal forecasts Antje Weisheimer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    to plant in the coming season #12;Antje Weisheimer EQUIP workshop 14 March 2013 Reliability of reliability #12;Antje Weisheimer EQUIP workshop 14 March 2013 category 5 Perfect reliability Uncertainty ranges do include perfect reliability slope #12;Antje Weisheimer EQUIP workshop

  5. A Hierarchical Model for Estimating the Reliability of Complex Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reese, Shane

    an approximation to the joint posterior distribution on the total system reliability was obtained. Many reliability or bounding moments of the system reliability posterior distribution (Cole (1975), Mastran (1976), DostalA Hierarchical Model for Estimating the Reliability of Complex Systems Valen E. Johnson, Todd L

  6. Interval Analysis and Reliability in Robotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    be highly reliable (i.e. for a robot used in surgical applications). The sources of uncertainties will restrict ourself in this paper to industrial robot. These type of robots have a base that is attached the mechanism motion). There are two main classes of industrial robots mechani- cal architecture: serial

  7. New correlation calculates reliable paraffin solubilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaws, C.L.; Pan, X. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (US))

    1991-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A new correlation based on boiling point has been developed which accurately calculates paraffin solubilities in water. The correlation provides reliable solubility values down to very low concentrations (parts per million and less), for which the API correlation is not accurate. It can be used for initial engineering studies, including those involving health, safety, and environmental considerations.

  8. Implementing the Reliable Server Pooling Thomas Dreibholz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dreibholz, Thomas

    Implementing the Reliable Server Pooling Framework Thomas Dreibholz University of Duisburg Server Pooling (RSerPool) pro- tocol suite currently under standardization by the IETF is designed, configuring, accessing and monitoring pools of server resources. But RSerPool is not only able to manage pools

  9. Grid Reliability- An Electric Utility Company's Perspective

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—covers Southern Company's business continuity, North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) cybersecurity, and homeland security as well as physical recovery after a major outage, and five questions to ask your local utility.

  10. Y AND RELIABILITY: LOGO MANUAL COLOR SCHEME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    AND RELIABILITY: LOGO MANUAL COLOR SCHEME TYPOGRAPHY RECOMMENDED DISPLAY SPACE PMS 131C PMS COOL GRAY 11C VERSION HORIZONTAL 1J COLOR SCHEME R=203 G=163 B=57 C=21 M=34 Y=93 K=2 20,0 @Me Nas $10M in equipment Machine shop equipped conference facility All-purpose machine shop Skilled engineering staff

  11. Invited Paper GaN HEMT reliability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesús A.

    Invited Paper GaN HEMT reliability J.A. del Alamo *, J. Joh Microsystems Technology Laboratories mechanism recently identified in GaN high-electron mobility transistors subject to electrical stress. Under high voltage, it has been found that electrically active defects are generated in the AlGaN barrier

  12. "Reliability, Resiliency, and Restoration for Smarter Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    "Reliability, Resiliency, and Restoration for Smarter Grid Workshop" Save the Date April 3 and 4 at mohlsen@bnl.gov "The Resilient Smart Grid" to be held at Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, Long Island://www.bnl.gov/maps/. This is the 5th workshop that BNL is hosting on the Smart Grid. This Workshop will build on the previous

  13. Adhesion and Thin-Film Module Reliability: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, T. J.; Jorgensen, G. J.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the infrequently measured but essential properties for thin-film (T-F) module reliability are the interlayer adhesion and cohesion within a layer. These can be cell contact layers to glass, contact layers to the semiconductor, encapsulant to cell, glass, or backsheet, etc. We use an Instron mechanical testing unit to measure peel strengths at 90{sup o} or 180{sup o} and, in some cases, a scratch and tape pull test to evaluate inter-cell layer adhesion strengths. We present peel strength data for test specimens laminated from the three T-F technologies, before and after damp heat, and in one instance at elevated temperatures. On laminated T-F cell samples, failure can occur uniformly at any one of the many interfaces, or non-uniformly across the peel area at more than one interface. Some peel strengths are << 1 N/mm. This is far below the normal Instron mechanical testing unit Instron mechanical testing unit; glass interface values of >10 N/mm. We measure a wide range of adhesion strengths and suggest that adhesion measured under higher temperature and relative humidity conditions is more relevant for module reliability.

  14. Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

  15. An Examination of Temporal Trends in Electricity Reliability Based on Reports from U.S. Electric Utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Larsen, Peter; Todd, Annika; Fisher, Emily

    2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the 1960s, the U.S. electric power system has experienced a major blackout about once every 10 years. Each has been a vivid reminder of the importance society places on the continuous availability of electricity and has led to calls for changes to enhance reliability. At the root of these calls are judgments about what reliability is worth and how much should be paid to ensure it. In principle, comprehensive information on the actual reliability of the electric power system and on how proposed changes would affect reliability ought to help inform these judgments. Yet, comprehensive, national-scale information on the reliability of the U.S. electric power system is lacking. This report helps to address this information gap by assessing trends in U.S. electricity reliability based on information reported by electric utilities on power interruptions experienced by their customers. Our research augments prior investigations, which focused only on power interruptions originating in the bulk power system, by considering interruptions originating both from the bulk power system and from within local distribution systems. Our research also accounts for differences among utility reliability reporting practices by employing statistical techniques that remove the influence of these differences on the trends that we identify. The research analyzes up to 10 years of electricity reliability information collected from 155 U.S. electric utilities, which together account for roughly 50% of total U.S. electricity sales. The questions analyzed include: 1. Are there trends in reported electricity reliability over time? 2. How are trends in reported electricity reliability affected by the installation or upgrade of an automated outage management system? 3. How are trends in reported electricity reliability affected by the use of IEEE Standard 1366-2003?

  16. Current Human Reliability Analysis Methods Applied to Computerized Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Boring

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computerized procedures (CPs) are an emerging technology within nuclear power plant control rooms. While CPs have been implemented internationally in advanced control rooms, to date no US nuclear power plant has implemented CPs in its main control room (Fink et al., 2009). Yet, CPs are a reality of new plant builds and are an area of considerable interest to existing plants, which see advantages in terms of enhanced ease of use and easier records management by omitting the need for updating hardcopy procedures. The overall intent of this paper is to provide a characterization of human reliability analysis (HRA) issues for computerized procedures. It is beyond the scope of this document to propose a new HRA approach or to recommend specific methods or refinements to those methods. Rather, this paper serves as a review of current HRA as it may be used for the analysis and review of computerized procedures.

  17. EA-1178: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    178: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1178: Final Environmental Assessment 300 Area Steam Plant Replacement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington This EA evaluates the environmental...

  18. A statistical analysis of personnel contaminations in 200 Area facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, M.A.; Stoddard, D.H.

    1983-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This study determined the frequency statistics of personnel contaminations in 200 Area facilities. These statistics are utilized in probability calculations for contamination risks, and are part of an effort to provide reliable information for use in safety studies. Data for this analysis were obtained from the 200 Area and the Tritium Area Fault Tree Data Banks and were analyzed with the aid of the STATPAC computer code.

  19. LED Provides Effective and Efficient Parking Area Lighting at...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    White Light Options for Parking Area Lighting Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting, Final Report Guide to FEMP-Designated Parking Lot...

  20. Numerical Modeling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Iovenitti...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Eric Sonnenthal, Jon Sainsbury, Joe Iovenitti, B. Mack Kennedy (2013) Assessing Thermo-Hydrodynamic-Chemical Processes at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Area- A Reactive...

  1. Ground Magnetics At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration...

  2. Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration...

  3. Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration...

  4. 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Southwestern Area Power Administration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2013 and 2014 for the Southwestern Area Power Administration.

  5. Liquid fuels for gas turbines and their effects on fuel system reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purcell, J.E.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas turbines are operated on a wide range of gaseous and liquid fuels. The liquid fuels range from very thin distillates to very thick residual oils, and can also include unrefined fuels, such as crude oils. Several of the components in the turbine's liquid fuel system depend on the fuel to lubricate moving parts, so the lubricating qualities of the fuel are a key consideration in assessing the reliability of the fuel system. The fuel may also corrode parts of the fuels system, also affecting its reliability. Increased fuel system reliability is possible through selecting components for the fuel system which are compatible with the characteristics of the fuel used. Lubrication can be improved by the use of fuel additives, special materials, and design of components for poorly lubricating fuels. Corrosion can be reduced by good materials selection and by the use of cathodic protection. All of these measures will reduce the number of fuel system failures.

  6. Human Reliability Analysis for Design: Using Reliability Methods for Human Factors Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Laurids Boring

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the application of human reliability analysis methods to human factors design issues. An application framework is sketched in which aspects of modeling typically found in human reliability analysis are used in a complementary fashion to the existing human factors phases of design and testing. The paper provides best achievable practices for design, testing, and modeling. Such best achievable practices may be used to evaluate and human system interface in the context of design safety certifications.

  7. Sample sizes for confidence limits for reliability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darby, John L.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We recently performed an evaluation of the implications of a reduced stockpile of nuclear weapons for surveillance to support estimates of reliability. We found that one technique developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under-estimates the required sample size for systems-level testing. For a large population the discrepancy is not important, but for a small population it is important. We found that another technique used by SNL provides the correct required sample size. For systems-level testing of nuclear weapons, samples are selected without replacement, and the hypergeometric probability distribution applies. Both of the SNL techniques focus on samples without defects from sampling without replacement. We generalized the second SNL technique to cases with defects in the sample. We created a computer program in Mathematica to automate the calculation of confidence for reliability. We also evaluated sampling with replacement where the binomial probability distribution applies.

  8. Bridging Resilience Engineering and Human Reliability Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Boring

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been strong interest in the new and emerging field called resilience engineering. This field has been quick to align itself with many existing safety disciplines, but it has also distanced itself from the field of human reliability analysis. To date, the discussion has been somewhat one-sided, with much discussion about the new insights afforded by resilience engineering. This paper presents an attempt to address resilience engineering from the perspective of human reliability analysis (HRA). It is argued that HRA shares much in common with resilience engineering and that, in fact, it can help strengthen nascent ideas in resilience engineering. This paper seeks to clarify and ultimately refute the arguments that have served to divide HRA and resilience engineering.

  9. Reliability Estimation for Double Containment Piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Cadwallader; T. Pinna

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Double walled or double containment piping is considered for use in the ITER international project and other next-generation fusion device designs to provide an extra barrier for tritium gas and other radioactive materials. The extra barrier improves confinement of these materials and enhances safety of the facility. This paper describes some of the design challenges in designing double containment piping systems. There is also a brief review of a few operating experiences of double walled piping used with hazardous chemicals in different industries. This paper recommends approaches for the reliability analyst to use to quantify leakage from a double containment piping system in conceptual and more advanced designs. The paper also cites quantitative data that can be used to support such reliability analyses.

  10. Electronic logic for enhanced switch reliability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, J.A.

    1984-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A logic circuit is used to enhance redundant switch reliability. Two or more switches are monitored for logical high or low output. The output for the logic circuit produces a redundant and fail-safe representation of the switch outputs. When both switch outputs are high, the output is high. Similarly, when both switch outputs are low, the logic circuit's output is low. When the output states of the two switches do not agree, the circuit resolves the conflict by memorizing the last output state which both switches were simultaneously in and produces the logical complement of this output state. Thus, the logic circuit of the present invention allows the redundant switches to be treated as if they were in parallel when the switches are open and as if they were in series when the switches are closed. A failsafe system having maximum reliability is thereby produced.

  11. The Lightswitch Wizard -- reliable daylight simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    For Initial Design; C. F. Morrison; M. Dubrous; C. F. Reinhart ?; M. Morrison; F. Dubrous

    A web-based, non-expert daylighting analysis tool has been developed to support daylighting-related design decisions in peripheral private offices during an early design stage (http://buildwiz.com). The tool offers a comparative, reliable, and fast analysis of the annual amount of daylight in the offices (daylight factor and daylight autonomy) and the lighting energy performance of automated lighting controls (occupancy sensors, photocells) compared to standard on/off switches. Blinds are either manually or automatically controlled.

  12. Handbook of human-reliability analysis with emphasis on nuclear power plant applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swain, A D; Guttmann, H E

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of the Handbook is to present methods, models, and estimated human error probabilities (HEPs) to enable qualified analysts to make quantitative or qualitative assessments of occurrences of human errors in nuclear power plants (NPPs) that affect the availability or operational reliability of engineered safety features and components. The Handbook is intended to provide much of the modeling and information necessary for the performance of human reliability analysis (HRA) as a part of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of NPPs. Although not a design guide, a second purpose of the Handbook is to enable the user to recognize error-likely equipment design, plant policies and practices, written procedures, and other human factors problems so that improvements can be considered. The Handbook provides the methodology to identify and quantify the potential for human error in NPP tasks.

  13. Real Time Grid Reliability Management 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joe

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    implementation of on-line power flow and security analysis,Line Contingency Filtering Scheme for Dynamic Security Assessment," IEEE Transactions on PowerPower Systems PSCE’2004, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, September [116] “Voltage Stability/Security Assessment and On-Line

  14. Ashland Area Support Substation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides wholesale electric service to the City of Ashland (the City) by transferring power over Pacific Power Light Company's (PP L) 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines and through PP L's Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. The City distributes power over a 12.5-kV system which is heavily loaded during winter peak periods and which has reached the limit of its ability to serve peak loads in a reliable manner. Peak loads under normal winter conditions have exceeded the ratings of the transformers at both the Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. In 1989, the City modified its distribution system at the request of PP L to allow transfer of three megawatts (MW's) of electric power from the overloaded Ashland Substation to the Oak Knoll Substation. In cooperation with PP L, BPA installed a temporary 6-8 megavolt-amp (MVA) 115-12.5-kV transformer for this purpose. This additional transformer, however, is only a temporary remedy. BPA needs to provide additional, reliable long-term service to the Ashland area through additional transformation in order to keep similar power failures from occurring during upcoming winters in the Ashland area. The temporary installation of another 20-MVA mobile transformer at the Ashland Substation and additional load curtailment are currently being studied to provide for sustained electrical service by the peak winter period 1992. Two overall electrical plans-of-service are described and evaluated in this report. One of them is proposed for action. Within that proposed plan-of-service are location options for the substation. Note that descriptions of actions that may be taken by the City of Ashland are based on information provided by them.

  15. Soil-structure interaction effects on the reliability evaluation of reactor containments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pires, J.; Hwang, H.; Reich, M.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The probability-based method for the seismic reliability assessment of nuclear structures, which has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is extended to include the effects of soil-structure interaction. A reinforced concrete containment building is analyzed in order to examine soil-structure interaction effects on: (1) structural fragilities; (2) floor response spectra statistics; and (3) correlation coefficients for total acceleration responses at specified structural locations.

  16. Playas Grid Reliability and Distributed Energy Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero, Van; Weinkauf, Don; Khan, Mushtaq; Helgeson, Wes; Weedeward, Kevin; LeClerc, Corey; Fuierer, Paul

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The future looks bright for solar and renewable energies in the United States. Recent studies claim that by 2050, solar power could supply a third of all electricity demand in the country’s western states. Technology advances, soft policy changes, and increased energy consciousness will all have to happen to achieve this goal. But the larger question is, what would it take to do more throughout the United States? The studies tie future solar and renewable growth in the United States to programs that aim to lower the soft costs of solar adoption, streamline utility interconnections, and increase technology advances through research and development. At the state and local levels, the most important steps are: • Net metering: Net metering policies lets customers offset their electric bills with onsite solar and receive reliable and fair compensation for the excess electricity they provide to the grid. Not surprisingly, what utilities consider fair is not necessarily a rate that’s favorable to solar customers. • Renewable portfolio standards (RPS): RPS policies require utilities to provide a certain amount of their power from renewable sources; some set specific targets for solar and other renewables. California’s aggressive RPS1 of 33% renewable energy by 2020 is not bankrupting the state, or its residents. • Strong statewide interconnection policies: Solar projects can experience significant delays and hassles just to get connected to the grid. Streamlined feasibility and impact analysis are needed. Good interconnection policies are crucial to the success of solar or renewable energy development. • Financing options: Financing is often the biggest obstacle to solar adoption. Those obstacles can be surmounted with policies that support creative financing options like third-party ownership (TPO) and property assessed clean energy (PACE). Attesting to the significance of TPO is the fact that in Arizona, it accounted for 86% of all residential photovoltaic (PV) installations in Q1 20132. Policies beyond those at the state level are also important for solar. The federal government must play a role including continuation of the federal Investment tax credit,3 responsible development of solar resources on public lands, and support for research and development (R&D) to reduce the cost of solar and help incorporate large amounts of solar into the grid. The local level can’t be ignored. Local governments should support: solar rights laws, feed-in tariffs (FITs), and solar-friendly zoning rules. A great example of how effective local policies can be is a city like Gainesville, Florida4, whose FIT policy has put it on the map as a solar leader. This is particularly noteworthy because the Sunshine State does not appear anywhere on the list of top solar states, despite its abundant solar resource. Lancaster, California5, began by streamlining the solar permitting process and now requires solar on every new home. Cities like these point to the power of local policies, and the ability of local governments to get things done. A conspicuously absent policy is Community Choice energy6, also called community choice aggregation (CCA). This model allows local governments to pool residential, business, and municipal electricity loads and to purchase or generate on their behalf. It provides rate stability and savings and allows more consumer choice and local control. The model need not be focused on clean energy, but it has been in California, where Marin Clean Energy7, the first CCA in California, was enabled by a state law -- highlighting the interplay of state and local action. Basic net metering8 has been getting a lot of attention. Utilities are attacking it9 in a number of states, claiming it’s unfair to ratepayers who don’t go solar. On the other hand, proponents of net metering say utilities’ fighting stance is driven by worries about their bottom line, not concern for their customers. Studies in California10, Vermont11, New York12, and Texas13 have found that the benefits of net metering (like savings on investments

  17. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Supplemental Environmental Analysis, Schultz Substation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the purpose, function, and the environmental consequences of the proposed Schultz substation near Ellensburg, Washington. The affected environment is described in detail, including aerial survey photographs. The impacts on vegetation, fish and wildlife, soils, and water resources are described. (GHH)

  18. Reliability Evaluation of Electric Power Generation Systems with Solar Power 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samadi, Saeed

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    reliability evaluation of generation systems including Photovoltaic (PV) and Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants. Unit models of PV and CSP are developed first, and then generation system model is constructed to evaluate the reliability of generation systems...

  19. ORNL/TM-2004/91 MEASUREMENT PRACTICES FOR RELIABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    ................................................................................... 4 4. Loss of Load Probability: A Historical Perspective ................................................................................. 8 6. Pitfalls in Methods for Reliability Index Calculation............................................................ 27 C. Activities and Organizations Developing and Sharing Information on Reliability and Power

  20. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative - Phase 1 and 2 Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, H.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presentation given at the Wind Turbine Reliability Workshop at Sandia National Laboratories, August 2-3, 2011, serves as an overview for the findings from the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Project Report: Findings from Phase 1 and Phase 2 Testing

  1. Reliability of the generation supply in an interconnected power system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holditch, Damon Will

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    method of calculating generation supply reliability was first described by Calabrese. This method has been expanded and refined by numerous other authors. The reliability figure of meri. t usually calculated using Calabrese's method is called loss...

  2. Ensuring the Availability and Reliability of Urea Dosing For...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ensuring the Availability and Reliability of Urea Dosing For On-Road and Non-Road Ensuring the Availability and Reliability of Urea Dosing For On-Road and Non-Road 2003 DEER...

  3. actions human reliability: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reliability is not easy Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 171 Software Reliability Using SPC and Weibull Order Statistics CiteSeer Summary: Control charts are widely used for...

  4. Energy Department Invests Over $10 Million to Improve Grid Reliability...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    10 Million to Improve Grid Reliability and Resiliency Energy Department Invests Over 10 Million to Improve Grid Reliability and Resiliency June 11, 2014 - 6:20pm Addthis NEWS...

  5. Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind (CREW) database : wind plant reliability benchmark.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hines, Valerie Ann-Peters; Ogilvie, Alistair B.; Bond, Cody R.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To benchmark the current U.S. wind turbine fleet reliability performance and identify the major contributors to component-level failures and other downtime events, the Department of Energy funded the development of the Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind (CREW) database by Sandia National Laboratories. This report is the third annual Wind Plant Reliability Benchmark, to publically report on CREW findings for the wind industry. The CREW database uses both high resolution Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) data from operating plants and Strategic Power Systems' ORAPWind%C2%AE (Operational Reliability Analysis Program for Wind) data, which consist of downtime and reserve event records and daily summaries of various time categories for each turbine. Together, these data are used as inputs into CREW's reliability modeling. The results presented here include: the primary CREW Benchmark statistics (operational availability, utilization, capacity factor, mean time between events, and mean downtime); time accounting from an availability perspective; time accounting in terms of the combination of wind speed and generation levels; power curve analysis; and top system and component contributors to unavailability.

  6. Geothermal Site Assessment Using the National Geothermal Data...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Geothermal Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Case studiesexamples, Publications Website: www.unr.edugeothermalpdffiles...

  7. SUGGESTED ANALYTIC APPROACH TO TRANSMISSION RELIABILITY MARGIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang Ian Dobson Fernando L. Alvarado POWER SYSTEMS ENGINEERING RESEARCH CENTER Electrical & Computer to TRM. 1 Introduction Successful implementation of electric power deregu- lation requires powers flowing on all the lines which directly connect one area to the other area. A list

  8. Substations reliability-centered maintenance and predictive maintenance - a strategic partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colsher, R.J. [Electric Power Research Institute, Eddystone, PA (United States); Abbott, P.D.; Matusheski, R.L. [EPRI & MD Center, Eddystone, PA (United States); Smith, S.B. [ERIN Engineering & Research, Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A maintenance optimization study for substation components can be most effective when Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) Analysis is combined with a Predictive Maintenance (PDM) Assessment. If the two processes are performed concurrently, the benefit-to-cost ratios for each is increased. Also, the cost of implementing RCM recommendations for condition monitoring can be minimized, while maximizing their impact at the same time. This paper presents the essential elements of both the RCM and PDM processes, and describes how they work together in a substation environment as a comprehensive maintenance assessment tool. Descriptions of recent experiences are also included.

  9. Assessing Visuospatial Neglect in Children with Brain Injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahlberg, Andrea Christine

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    . While some individual adult tests have been modified for use with children, no standardized battery to assess VSN in young children currently exists. The present study investigated the reliability and validity of a five-task neuropsychological testing...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Cyber-Based Vulnerability Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assessments Digital Instrument and Control (I&C) is an integral part of the nuclear power industry in the United States. I&C systems monitor the safe, reliable and secure...

  11. In-Plant Reliability Data base for nuclear plant components. Interim report: diesel generators, batteries, chargers and inverters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahl, W.K.; Borkowski, R.J.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the In-Plant Reliability Data (IPRD) program is to develop a comprehensive, component-specific reliability data base for probabilistic risk assessment and for other statistical analyses relevant to component reliability evaluations. This document is the product of a pilot study that was undertaken to demonstrate the methodology and feasibility of applying IPRDS techniques to develop and analyze the reliability characteristics of key electrical components in five nuclear power plants. These electrical components include diesel generators, batteries, battery chargers and inverters. The sources used to develop the data base and produce the component failure rates and mean repair times were the plant equipment lists, plant drawings, maintenance work requests, Final Safety Analysis Reports (FSARs), and interviews with plant personnel. The data spanned approximately 33 reactor-years of commercial operation.

  12. Western Area Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    29-30, 2011 2 Agenda * Overview of Western Area Power Administration * Post-1989 Loveland Area Projects (LAP) Marketing Plan * Energy Planning and Management Program * Development...

  13. Final report for CCS cross-layer reliability visioning study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Heather M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dehon, Andre [U. PENN; Carter, Nicj [INTEL

    2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The geometric rate of improvement of transistor size and integrated circuit performance known as Moore's Law has been an engine of growth for our economy, enabling new products and services, creating new value and wealth, increasing safety, and removing menial tasks from our daily lives. Affordable, highly integrated components have enabled both life-saving technologies and rich entertainment applications. Anti-lock brakes, insulin monitors, and GPS-enabled emergency response systems save lives. Cell phones, internet appliances, virtual worlds, realistic video games, and mp3 players enrich our lives and connect us together. Over the past 40 years of silicon scaling, the increasing capabilities of inexpensive computation have transformed our society through automation and ubiquitous communications. Looking forward, increasing unpredictability threatens our ability to continue scaling integrated circuits at Moore's Law rates. As the transistors and wires that make up integrated circuits become smaller, they display both greater differences in behavior among devices designed to be identical and greater vulnerability to transient and permanent faults. Conventional design techniques expend energy to tolerate this unpredictability by adding safety margins to a circuit's operating voltage, clock frequency or charge stored per bit. However, the rising energy costs needed to compensate for increasing unpredictability are rapidly becoming unacceptable in today's environment where power consumption is often the limiting factor on integrated circuit performance and energy efficiency is a national concern. Reliability and energy consumption are both reaching key inflection points that, together, threaten to reduce or end the benefits of feature size reduction. To continue beneficial scaling, we must use a cross-layer, Jull-system-design approach to reliability. Unlike current systems, which charge every device a substantial energy tax in order to guarantee correct operation in spite of rare events, such as one high-threshold transistor in a billion or one erroneous gate evaluation in an hour of computation, cross-layer reliability schemes make reliability management a cooperative effort across the system stack, sharing information across layers so that they only expend energy on reliability when an error actually occurs. Figure 1 illustrates an example of such a system that uses a combination of information from the application and cheap architecture-level techniques to detect errors. When an error occurs, mechanisms at higher levels in the stack correct the error, efficiently delivering correct operation to the user in spite of errors at the device or circuit levels. In the realms of memory and communication, engineers have a long history of success in tolerating unpredictable effects such as fabrication variability, transient upsets, and lifetime wear using information sharing, limited redundancy, and cross-layer approaches that anticipate, accommodate, and suppress errors. Networks use a combination of hardware and software to guarantee end-toend correctness. Error-detection and correction codes use additional information to correct the most common errors, single-bit transmission errors. When errors occur that cannot be corrected by these codes, the network protocol requests re-transmission of one or more packets until the correct data is received. Similarly, computer memory systems exploit a cross-layer division of labor to achieve high performance with modest hardware. Rather than demanding that hardware alone provide the virtual memory abstraction, software page-fault and TLB-miss handlers allow a modest piece of hardware, the TLB, to handle the common-case operations on a cyc1e-by-cycle basis while infrequent misses are handled in system software. Unfortunately, mitigating logic errors is not as simple or as well researched as memory or communication systems. This lack of understanding has led to very expensive solutions. For example, triple-modular redundancy masks errors by triplicating computations in either time or area. T

  14. The quantitative failure of human reliability analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, C.T.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This philosophical treatise argues the merits of Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) in the context of the nuclear power industry. Actually, the author attacks historic and current HRA as having failed in informing policy makers who make decisions based on risk that humans contribute to systems performance. He argues for an HRA based on Bayesian (fact-based) inferential statistics, which advocates a systems analysis process that employs cogent heuristics when using opinion, and tempers itself with a rational debate over the weight given subjective and empirical probabilities.

  15. Granite Reliable Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to: navigation,II Wind Farm JumpReliable Power Jump

  16. Microsoft Word - Pv Reliability Paper.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE LMI-EFRCAddendumNo. 1 Contract0 1RELIABILITY AND

  17. Photovoltaic Module Reliability Workshop 2013: February 26-27, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's Photovoltaic (PV) Module Reliability Workshop (PVMRW) brings together PV reliability experts to share information, leading to the improvement of PV module reliability. Such improvement reduces the cost of solar electricity and promotes investor confidence in the technology--both critical goals for moving PV technologies deeper into the electricity marketplace.

  18. Photovoltaic Module Reliability Workshop 2010: February 18-19, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's Photovoltaic (PV) Module Reliability Workshop (PVMRW) brings together PV reliability experts to share information, leading to the improvement of PV module reliability. Such improvement reduces the cost of solar electricity and promotes investor confidence in the technology--both critical goals for moving PV technologies deeper into the electricity marketplace.

  19. Photovoltaic Module Reliability Workshop 2011: February 16-17, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's Photovoltaic (PV) Module Reliability Workshop (PVMRW) brings together PV reliability experts to share information, leading to the improvement of PV module reliability. Such improvement reduces the cost of solar electricity and promotes investor confidence in the technology--both critical goals for moving PV technologies deeper into the electricity marketplace.

  20. ELECTROMECHANICAL RELIABILITY TESTING OF THREE-AXIAL SILICON FORCE SENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , available automatic test equipment for integrated circuits (ICs) can be leveraged [2]. The reliabilityELECTROMECHANICAL RELIABILITY TESTING OF THREE-AXIAL SILICON FORCE SENSORS S. Spinner1,2, J the measurement results. 1. INTRODUCTION The reliability of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) receives growing