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1

INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEM CYBER SECURITY: QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS RELEVANT TO NUCLEAR FACILITIES, SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Typical questions surrounding industrial control system (ICS) cyber security always lead back to: What could a cyber attack do to my system(s) and; how much should I worry about it? These two leading questions represent only a fraction of questions asked when discussing cyber security as it applies to any program, company, business, or organization. The intent of this paper is to open a dialog of important pertinent questions and answers that managers of nuclear facilities engaged in nuclear facility security and safeguards should examine, i.e., what questions should be asked; and how do the answers affect an organization's ability to effectively safeguard and secure nuclear material. When a cyber intrusion is reported, what does that mean? Can an intrusion be detected or go un-noticed? Are nuclear security or safeguards systems potentially vulnerable? What about the digital systems employed in process monitoring, and international safeguards? Organizations expend considerable efforts to ensure that their facilities can maintain continuity of operations against physical threats. However, cyber threats particularly on ICSs may not be well known or understood, and often do not receive adequate attention. With the disclosure of the Stuxnet virus that has recently attacked nuclear infrastructure, many organizations have recognized the need for an urgent interest in cyber attacks and defenses against them. Several questions arise including discussions about the insider threat, adequate cyber protections, program readiness, encryption, and many more. These questions, among others, are discussed so as to raise the awareness and shed light on ways to protect nuclear facilities and materials against such attacks.

Robert S. Anderson; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Paul Moskowitz

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Biodiversity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In tropical forests, on coral reefs, and in other threatened habitats, countless plant, animal, and microbial species face possible extinction - their names unknown, their numbers uncounted, their value unreckoned. Although popular attention has focused on the plight of more visible and widely known species like the whooping crane or the African elephant, most-experts agree that the loss of less-obvious organisms could be much more devastating. This is the subject of the volume. It calls attention to a most urgent global problem: the rapidly accelerating loss of plant and animal species to increasing human-population pressure and the demands of economic development. The book explores biodiversity from a wide variety of viewpoints.

Wilson, E.O.; Peter, F.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Safeguards Culture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concepts of nuclear safety and security culture are well established; however, a common understanding of safeguards culture is not internationally recognized. Supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, the authors prepared this report, an analysis of the concept of safeguards culture, and gauged its value to the safeguards community. The authors explored distinctions between safeguards culture, safeguards compliance, and safeguards performance, and evaluated synergies and differences between safeguards culture and safety/security culture. The report concludes with suggested next steps.

Frazar, Sarah L.; Mladineo, Stephen V.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Role of planners and public participation in planning for biodiversity.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The European Union (EU) is committed to conserving biodiversity, both in terms of natural and cultural legacies, and also to limiting biodiversity loss. Relevant policies… (more)

Blicharska, Malgorzata

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Biodiversity Concepts and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity Concepts and Measures Dr. Stacy Philpott Conservation Biology EEES 4750/5750/7750 #12;Biodiversity · What is biodiversity? · How much biodiversity is there? · Where is biodiversity found? · How do we measure biodiversity? · How do we collect and analyze biodiversity data? #12;Biodiversity · What

Gottgens, Hans

6

Building safeguards infrastructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Much has been written in recent years about the nuclear renaissance - the rebirth of nuclear power as a clean and safe source of electricity around the world. Those who question the nuclear renaissance often cite the risk of proliferation, accidents or an attack on a facility as concerns, all of which merit serious consideration. The integration of these three areas - sometimes referred to as 3S, for safety, security and safeguards - is essential to supporting the growth of nuclear power, and the infrastructure that supports them should be strengthened. The focus of this paper will be on the role safeguards plays in the 3S concept and how to support the development of the infrastructure necessary to support safeguards. The objective of this paper has been to provide a working definition of safeguards infrastructure, and to discuss xamples of how building safeguards infrastructure is presented in several models. The guidelines outlined in the milestones document provide a clear path for establishing both the safeguards and the related infrastructures needed to support the development of nuclear power. The model employed by the INSEP program of engaging with partner states on safeguards-related topics that are of current interest to the level of nuclear development in that state provides another way of approaching the concept of building safeguards infrastructure. The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative is yet another approach that underscored five principal areas for growth, and the United States commitment to working with partners to promote this growth both at home and abroad.

Stevens, Rebecca S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcclelland - Kerr, John [NNSA/NA-242

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The safeguards options study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Safeguards Options Study was initiated to aid the International Safeguards Division (ISD) of the DOE Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation in developing its programs in enhanced international safeguards. The goal was to provide a technical basis for the ISD program in this area. The Safeguards Options Study has been a cooperative effort among ten organizations. These are Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mound Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Sandia National Laboratories, and Special Technologies Laboratory. Much of the Motivation for the Safeguards Options Study is the recognition after the Iraq experience that there are deficiencies in the present approach to international safeguards. While under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards at their declared facilities, Iraq was able to develop a significant weapons program without being noticed. This is because negotiated safeguards only applied at declared sites. Even so, their nuclear weapons program clearly conflicted with Iraq`s obligations under the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) as a nonnuclear weapon state.

Hakkila, E.A.; Mullen, M.F.; Olinger, C.T.; Stanbro, W.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Olsen, A.P.; Roche, C.T.; Rudolph, R.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bieber, A.M.; Lemley, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Filby, E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Designing and Operating for Safeguards: Lessons Learned From the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will address the lessons learned during the implementation of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) which are relevant to the issue of ‘safeguards by design’. However, those lessons are a result of a cumulative history of international safeguards experiences starting with the West Valley reprocessing plant in 1969, continuing with the Barnwell plant, and then with the implementation of international safeguards at WAK in Germany and TRP in Japan. The design and implementation of safeguards at RRP in Japan is the latest and most challenging that the IAEA has faced. This paper will discuss the work leading up to the development of a safeguards approach, the design and operating features that were introduced to improve or aid in implementing the safeguards approach, and the resulting recommendations for future facilities. It will provide an overview of how ‘safeguardability’ was introduced into RRP.

Johnson, Shirley J.; Ehinger, Michael

2010-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

9

P R O G R A M M E Biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P R O G R A M M E Biodiversity The programme monitors and analyses the state of Swedish biodiversity. Findings are intended to support efforts to achieve the relevant Swedish environmental objectives and provide a ba- sis for monitoring of compliance with the Biodiversity Convention, the EC Habitats and Birds

10

Safeguards Guidance Document for Designers of Commercial Nuclear Facilities: International Nuclear Safeguards Requirements and Practices For Uranium Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the second in a series of guidelines on international safeguards requirements and practices, prepared expressly for the designers of nuclear facilities. The first document in this series is the description of generic international nuclear safeguards requirements pertaining to all types of facilities. These requirements should be understood and considered at the earliest stages of facility design as part of a new process called “Safeguards-by-Design.” This will help eliminate the costly retrofit of facilities that has occurred in the past to accommodate nuclear safeguards verification activities. The following summarizes the requirements for international nuclear safeguards implementation at enrichment plants, prepared under the Safeguards by Design project, and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Office of NA-243. The purpose of this is to provide designers of nuclear facilities around the world with a simplified set of design requirements and the most common practices for meeting them. The foundation for these requirements is the international safeguards agreement between the country and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), pursuant to the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). Relevant safeguards requirements are also cited from the Safeguards Criteria for inspecting enrichment plants, found in the IAEA Safeguards Manual, Part SMC-8. IAEA definitions and terms are based on the IAEA Safeguards Glossary, published in 2002. The most current specification for safeguards measurement accuracy is found in the IAEA document STR-327, “International Target Values 2000 for Measurement Uncertainties in Safeguarding Nuclear Materials,” published in 2001. For this guide to be easier for the designer to use, the requirements have been restated in plainer language per expert interpretation using the source documents noted. The safeguards agreement is fundamentally a legal document. As such, it is written in a legalese that is understood by specialists in international law and treaties, but not by most outside of this field, including designers of nuclear facilities. For this reason, many of the requirements have been simplified and restated. However, in all cases, the relevant source document and passage is noted so that readers may trace the requirement to the source. This is a helpful living guide, since some of these requirements are subject to revision over time. More importantly, the practices by which the requirements are met are continuously modernized by the IAEA and nuclear facility operators to improve not only the effectiveness of international nuclear safeguards, but also the efficiency. As these improvements are made, the following guidelines should be updated and revised accordingly.

Robert Bean; Casey Durst

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Safeguards and Security Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish the policy and responsibilities for the Department of Energy safeguards and security program. Does not cancel another directive. Canceled by DOE O 5630.11A dated 12-7-92.

1988-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

12

Safeguards and Security Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes roles and responsibilities for the Department of Energy Safeguards and Security Program. Cancels DOE O 470.4. Canceled by DOE O 470.4B

2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

13

Safeguards Envelope Methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear safeguards are intrinsic and extrinsic features of a facility which reduce probability of the successful acquisition of special nuclear material (SNM) by hostile actors. Future bulk handling facilities in the United States will include both...

Metcalf, Richard

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

14

Measuring Safeguards Culture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) implements a State Level Approach to its safeguards verification responsibilities, a number of countries are beginning new nuclear power programs and building new nuclear fuel cycle faculties. The State Level approach is holistic and investigatory in nature, creating a need for transparent, non-discriminatory judgments about a state's nonproliferation posture. In support of this need, the authors previously explored the value of defining and measuring a state's safeguards culture. We argued that a clear definition of safeguards culture and an accompanying set of metrics could be applied to provide an objective evaluation and demonstration of a country's nonproliferation posture. As part of this research, we outlined four high-level metrics that could be used to evaluate a state's nuclear posture. We identified general data points. This paper elaborates on those metrics, further refining the data points to generate a measurable scale of safeguards cultures. We believe that this work could advance the IAEA's goals of implementing a safeguards system that is fully information driven, while strengthening confidence in its safeguards conclusions.

Frazar, Sarah L.; Mladineo, Stephen V.

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

15

BIODIVERSITY Incorporating sociocultural adaptive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIODIVERSITY VIEWPOINT Incorporating sociocultural adaptive capacity in conservation hotspot of biodiversity threats. Conservation biogeography (Whittaker et al., 2005) has emerged as a critical area biodiversity (Mawdsley et al., 2009). Adjusting conservation strategies to maintain diversity in recognition

16

Safeguard Security and Awareness Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Provides detailed requirements and procedures to supplement DOE O 470.1, Safeguards and Security Program, Chapter IV.

2002-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

17

Safeguards and Security Program References  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The manual establishes definitions for terms related to the Department of Energy Safeguards and Security (S&S) Program and includes lists of references and acronyms/abbreviations applicable to S&S Program directives. Cancels the Safeguards and Security Glossary of Terms, dated 12-18-95. Current Safeguards and Security Program References can also be found at Safeguards and Security Policy Information Resource (http://pir.pnl.gov/)

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

18

Measuring biodiversity for conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring biodiversity for conservation Summary Policy document 10/03 May 2003 ISBN 0 85403 592 3. 2002). Conserving biodiversity is essential to sustainability. Biodiversity provides substantial socio This report can be found at www.royalsoc.ac.uk #12;The reality of ongoing biodiversity loss The living world

Reynolds, John D.

19

Global Biodiversity Conservation Priorities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Biodiversity Conservation Priorities T. M. Brooks,1,2,3 * R. A. Mittermeier,1 G. A. B. da is essential to minimize biodiversity loss. To address this need, biodiversity conservation organizations have conservation funding. H uman actions are causing a biodiversity crisis, with species extinction rates up

Wilmers, Chris

20

Safeguards Laboratory (SL) | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGEComplainant,.VisitorSafeguards &Safeguards

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Safeguards and Security Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish responsibilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Safeguards and Security (S&S) Program, and to establish program planning and management requirements for the S&S Program. Cancels DOE O 470.4A, DOE M 470.4-1, Chg. 2, and DOE O 142.1.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

22

Safeguards and Security Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes roles and responsibilities for the Department of Energy Safeguards and Security Program. Cancels: DOE O 470.1, DOE O 471.2A, DOE O 471.4, DOE O 472.1C, DOE O 473.1, DOE O 473.2, DOE O 474.1A. Canceled by DOE O 470.4A.

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

23

Safeguards and Security Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Safeguards and Security Program ensures that the Department of Energy efficiently and effectively meets all its obligations to protect Special Nuclear Material, other nuclear materials, classified matter, sensitive information, government property, and the safety and security of employees, contractors, and the general public. Cancels DOE P 470.1.

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

24

and Pollutant Safeguarding Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

commercial buildings, these flows are driven primarily by the building's ventilation system, but natural2004 Airflow and Pollutant Transport Group Safeguarding Buildings Against Chemical and Biological research since 1998 to protect buildings and building occupants from threats posed by airborne chemical

25

Incorporating Biodiversity Considerations Into Environmental...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Incorporating Biodiversity Considerations Into Environmental Impact Analysis Under NEPA Incorporating Biodiversity Considerations Into Environmental Impact Analysis Under NEPA This...

26

Statistics applied to safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Statistical methods are central to safeguards work. Measurements forming the basis of much materials accountancy are not perfect - ``perfect`` in the sense of being error free. Other sessions in this course address the destructive and nondestructive measurement of nuclear material, together with the inherent limitations in those measurements. The bottom line is that measurement errors are a fact of life and, since we can`t eliminate them, we have to find a rational way to deal with them. Which leads to the world of statistics. Beyond dealing with measurement errors, another area of statistical application involves the sampling of items for verification. Inspectors from the IAEA and domestic regulatory agencies periodically visit operating facilities and make measurements of selected items. By comparing their own measured values to those declared by the facilities, increased confidence is obtained. If verification measurements were not expensive, time consuming, and disruptive to operations, perhaps verification of 100% of the inventories would be desirable. In reality, many constraints lead to inspection of only a portion of those inventories. Drawing inferences about a larger ``population`` of declared items in a facility based on verification information obtained from a sample of those items is a statistical problem. There are few texts on statistics in safeguards. The lengthy exposition ``IAEA Safeguards: Statistical Concepts and Techniques`` and the US NRC book edited by Bowen and Bennet are two good sources of general information. In the next section, the subject of measurement quality is addressed. The third section covers the evaluation of MUFs, and discusses the related subjects of error propagation and sequential analysis. The final section covers verification, inspection sample size calculations, and the D statistic. The text is written at an elementary level, with references to the safeguards literature for more detailed treatment.

Picard, R.R.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Statistics applied to safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Statistical methods are central to safeguards work. Measurements forming the basis of much materials accountancy are not perfect - perfect'' in the sense of being error free. Other sessions in this course address the destructive and nondestructive measurement of nuclear material, together with the inherent limitations in those measurements. The bottom line is that measurement errors are a fact of life and, since we can't eliminate them, we have to find a rational way to deal with them. Which leads to the world of statistics. Beyond dealing with measurement errors, another area of statistical application involves the sampling of items for verification. Inspectors from the IAEA and domestic regulatory agencies periodically visit operating facilities and make measurements of selected items. By comparing their own measured values to those declared by the facilities, increased confidence is obtained. If verification measurements were not expensive, time consuming, and disruptive to operations, perhaps verification of 100% of the inventories would be desirable. In reality, many constraints lead to inspection of only a portion of those inventories. Drawing inferences about a larger population'' of declared items in a facility based on verification information obtained from a sample of those items is a statistical problem. There are few texts on statistics in safeguards. The lengthy exposition IAEA Safeguards: Statistical Concepts and Techniques'' and the US NRC book edited by Bowen and Bennet are two good sources of general information. In the next section, the subject of measurement quality is addressed. The third section covers the evaluation of MUFs, and discusses the related subjects of error propagation and sequential analysis. The final section covers verification, inspection sample size calculations, and the D statistic. The text is written at an elementary level, with references to the safeguards literature for more detailed treatment.

Picard, R.R.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Marine Biodiversity & Biotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Centre for Marine Biodiversity & Biotechnology No one knows how many species live in the sea this biodiversity needs expertise from classical marine biology to the latest molecular genetics techniques Biodiversity & Biotechnology. The CMBB was established in 1999 to tackle the challenges of understanding marine

Howie, Jim

29

BIODIVERSITY Danielle Sinnett  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAXIMISING BIODIVERSITY Danielle Sinnett BPG NOTE 9 Best Practice Guidance for Land Regeneration Introduction Biodiversity refers to the biological diversity of an area and can be defined as `the variety of biodiversity is widely publicised, but is often thought of in terms of very specific and vulnerable areas

30

EBONEEUROPEAN BIODIVERSITY OBSERVATION NETWORK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EBONEEUROPEAN BIODIVERSITY OBSERVATION NETWORK Geert De Blust, Guy Laurijssens, Hans Van Calster of biodiversity monitoring through close collaboration of users and data providers #12;#12;Design of a monitoring-effectiveness Optimization of biodiversity monitoring through close collaboration of users and data providers Geert De Blust1

31

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solutions Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions...

32

Full spectrum optical safeguard  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical safeguard device with two linear variable Fabry-Perot filters aligned relative to a light source with at least one of the filters having a nonlinear dielectric constant material such that, when a light source produces a sufficiently high intensity light, the light alters the characteristics of the nonlinear dielectric constant material to reduce the intensity of light impacting a connected optical sensor. The device can be incorporated into an imaging system on a moving platform, such as an aircraft or satellite.

Ackerman, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

33

Complex Forces Affect China's Biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

global efforts have been put into biodiversity conservation, but biodiversity loss continues rapidly in biodiversity conservation to the global level and help protect biodiversity in other developing countries Wiley & Sons, Ltd. #12;208 ConservationBiology COMPLEXITY OF INTERACTING FORCES AFFECTING BIODIVERSITY

34

Us-Japan cooperation on safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a long history of collaborative safeguards development between the United States and Japan. Japan has built, and continues to expand, the largest civil nuclear fuel cycle under full-scope IAEA safeguards in world. This development has posed unique challenges to the international safeguards system. Safeguards developments made through the US-Japan cooperation to address these unique challenges have significantly impacted the technologies deployed for international safeguards applications around the world.

Beddingfield, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hori, Masato [JAEA; Kawakubo, Yoko [JAEA; Mcclelland - Kerr, J [NNSA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Biodiversity Conservation in Tropical Agroecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity Conservation in Tropical Agroecosystems A New Conservation Paradigm Ivette Perfectoa areas of the world. Although most ecologists con- cerned with biodiversity conservation would agree. This conclusion has major consequences for biodiversity con- servation in fragmented tropical forests

36

Master Safeguards and Security Agreements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish the Department of Energy policy, requirements, responsibilities, and authorities for the development and implementation of Master Safeguards and Security Agreements (MSSA's). Does not cancel another directive. Canceled by DOE O 5630.13A

1988-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

37

Conservation science relevant to action: A research agenda identified and prioritized by practitioners  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research agenda Biodiversity conservation Research-implementation gap Prioritizing conservation research the implementation of biodiversity conservation recommendations. As subjects studied by conservation scientists mightConservation science relevant to action: A research agenda identified and prioritized

Richner, Heinz

38

Reactor safeguards against insider sabotage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conceptual safeguards system is structured to show how both reactor operations and physical protection resources could be integrated to prevent release of radioactive material caused by insider sabotage. Operational recovery capabilities are addressed from the viewpoint of both detection of and response to disabled components. Physical protection capabilities for preventing insider sabotage through the application of work rules are analyzed. Recommendations for further development of safeguards system structures, operational recovery, and sabotage prevention are suggested.

Bennett, H.A.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Safeguards and Security Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Ensures appropriate levels of protection against unauthorized access; theft, diversion, loss of custody, or destruction of nuclear weapons, or weapons components; espionage; loss or theft of classified matter or Government property; and other hostile acts that may cause unacceptable adverse impacts on national security or on the health and safety of Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor employees, the public, or the environment. DOE O 470.1 Extended until 5-11-06 by DOE N 251.63, dated 5-11-05. Chg 1, Safeguards and Security Program, dated 9/28/95, extended by DOE N 251.57, dated 4/28/2004. Change 1, 5/21/96, revises Chapter IV. Cancels: DOE 5630.11B, DOE 5630.13A, DOE 5630.14A, DOE 5630.15, DOE 5630.16A, DOE 5630.17, DOE 5631.1C, DOE 5631.4A, DOE 5634.1B, DOE 5634.3, DOE 5639.3, DOE M 5632.1C-1 in part.

1995-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

40

Darwinian shortfalls in biodiversity conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Darwinian shortfalls in biodiversity conservation Jose´ Alexandre F. Diniz-Filho1 , Rafael D, and biodiversity conservation Species are considered indisputable units in conservation and biodiversity analyses in conservation planning and biodiversity analyses has been continuously dis- cussed [3,4]. However, species

Mooers, Arne

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Safeguards and Security Program, acronyms and abbereviations...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Program, acronyms and abbereviations - DOE M 470.4-7 Safeguards and Security Program, acronyms and abbereviations - DOE M 470.4-7 August 26, 2005 Canceled Safeguards and Security...

42

The Biodiversity Bargaining Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes global biodiversity conservation as a co-operative bargaining problem. We model an interdependent ‘technology rich’ North and a ‘gene rich’ South who must co-operate in the biotechnology sector in order to combine their unique...

Gatti, J Rupert J; Goeschl, Timo; Groom, Ben; Swanson, Timothy

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

43

UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

UNCLASSIFIED Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System CONTACT INFORMATION UPDATE REPORTING IDENTIFICATION SYMBOL (RIS) RIS: Address: Facility Name: CONTACTS Name Email:...

44

REPORT OF THE WORKSHOP ON NUCLEAR FACILITY DESIGN INFORMATION EXAMINATION AND VERIFICATION FOR SAFEGUARDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive Summary The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) implements nuclear safeguards and verifies countries are compliant with their international nuclear safeguards agreements. One of the key provisions in the safeguards agreement is the requirement that the country provide nuclear facility design and operating information to the IAEA relevant to safeguarding the facility, and at a very early stage. , This provides the opportunity for the IAEA to verify the safeguards-relevant features of the facility and to periodically ensure that those features have not changed. The national authorities (State System of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material - SSAC) provide the design information for all facilities within a country to the IAEA. The design information is conveyed using the IAEA’s Design Information Questionnaire (DIQ) and specifies: (1) Identification of the facility’s general character, purpose, capacity, and location; (2) Description of the facility’s layout and nuclear material form, location, and flow; (3) Description of the features relating to nuclear material accounting, containment, and surveillance; and (4) Description of existing and proposed procedures for nuclear material accounting and control, with identification of nuclear material balance areas. The DIQ is updated as required by written addendum. IAEA safeguards inspectors examine and verify this information in design information examination (DIE) and design information verification (DIV) activities to confirm that the facility has been constructed or is being operated as declared by the facility operator and national authorities, and to develop a suitable safeguards approach. Under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), the National Nuclear Security Administrations (NNSA) Office of Non-Proliferation and International Security identified the need for more effective and efficient verification of design information by the IAEA for improving international safeguards in the future. Consequently, the NNSA Office of International Regimes and Agreements (NA-243) sponsored a team of U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratory nuclear safeguards experts and technologists to conduct a workshop on methods and technologies for improving this activity, under the ASA-100 Advanced Safeguards Approaches Project. The workshop focused on reviewing and discussing the fundamental safeguards needs, and presented technology and/or methods that could potentially address those needs more effectively and efficiently. Conclusions and Recommendations for technology to enhance the performance of DIV inspections are presented by the workshop team.

Richard Metcalf; Robert Bean

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Safeguards instrumentation: a computer-based catalog  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The information contained in this catalog is needed to provide a data base for safeguards studies and to help establish criteria and procedures for international safeguards for nuclear materials and facilities. The catalog primarily presents information on new safeguards equipment. It also describes entire safeguards systems for certain facilities, but it does not describe the inspection procedures. Because IAEA safeguards do not include physical security, devices for physical protection (as opposed to containment and surveillance) are not included. An attempt has been made to list capital costs, annual maintenance costs, replacement costs, and useful lifetime for the equipment. For equipment which is commercially available, representative sources have been listed whenever available.

Fishbone, L.G.; Keisch, B.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Nuclear materials safeguards for the future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Basic concepts of domestic and international safeguards are described, with an emphasis on safeguards systems for the fuel cycles of commercial power reactors. Future trends in institutional and technical measures for nuclear materials safeguards are outlined. The conclusion is that continued developments in safeguards approaches and technology, coupled with institutional measures that facilitate the global management and protection of nuclear materials, are up to the challenge of safeguarding the growing inventories of nuclear materials in commercial fuel cycles in technologically advanced States with stable governments that have signed the nonproliferation treaty. These same approaches also show promise for facilitating international inspection of excess weapons materials and verifying a fissile materials cutoff convention.

Tape, J.W.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Conservation Easements: Biodiversity Protection and Private Use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation Easements: Biodiversity Protection and Private Use ADENA R. RISSMAN, LYNN LOZIER.S.A. Abstract: Conservation easements are one of the primary tools for conserving biodiversity on private land easements for biodiversity conservation. Keywords: biodiversity protection, conservation easement, land

Rissman, Adena

48

Nuclear material safeguards for enrichments plants: Part 4, Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant: Diversion scenarios and IAEA safeguards activities: Safeguards training course  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication is Part 4 of a safeguards training course in Nuclear Material Safeguards for enrichment plants. This part of the course deals with diversion scenarios and safeguards activities at gas centrifuge enrichment plants.

Not Available

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity Turtle Biodiversity and Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity Turtle Biodiversity and Conservation Joseph C. Mitchell, Department of Biology, University of Richmond, Richmond, Va. Kurt A. Buhlmann, Conservation International, Center for Applied Biodiversity Science,Washington, D.C. T urtles are freshwater, marine, and terrestrial

Liskiewicz, Maciej

50

Biodiversity at St Anne's College  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity at St Anne's College CAN I VISIT ST ANNE'S COLLEGE? Yes! St Anne's grounds, visit http://www.stannes.ox.ac.uk/about/findus HOW IS ST ANNE'S HELPING BIODIVERSITY? Helping wildlife

51

Biodiversity in Human-Impacted  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 #12;1 Biodiversity in Human-Impacted Landscapes Biodiversidad en Paisajes Intervenidos Volumen-1 complex and dynamic. Traditionally, efforts to protect biodiversity and address environmental problems abilities of policy makers and on-the-ground practitioners is essential to biodiversity conservation

Haller, Gary L.

52

Integrating Food Production and Biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrating Food Production and Biodiversity Energy and Scale Issues in Implementation Kristina and biodiversity ­ energy and scale issues in implementation Abstract The aim of this thesis was to test the hypotheses that (1) biodiversity at a farm level differs between small and large farms, and (2

53

Focus On.... Biodiversity and Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Focus On.... Biodiversity and Conservation This resource guide aims to provide useful, detailed, high quality sources of information on biodiversity and conservation for students in Higher and Further into biodiversity and government bodies trying to implement conservation measures, but there are many others

Miranda, Eduardo Reck

54

Biodiversity and Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 23 Biodiversity and Conservation ISSN 0960-3115 Volume 19 Number 12 Biodivers Conserv (2010) 19@ebd.csic.es 123 Biodivers Conserv (2010) 19:3459­3469 DOI 10.1007/s10531-010-9907-9 Author's personal copy #12;on

Figuerola, Jordi

55

Simulation Enabled Safeguards Assessment Methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is expected that nuclear energy will be a significant component of future supplies. New facilities, operating under a strengthened international nonproliferation regime will be needed. There is good reason to believe virtual engineering applied to the facility design, as well as to the safeguards system design will reduce total project cost and improve efficiency in the design cycle. Simulation Enabled Safeguards Assessment MEthodology (SESAME) has been developed as a software package to provide this capability for nuclear reprocessing facilities. The software architecture is specifically designed for distributed computing, collaborative design efforts, and modular construction to allow step improvements in functionality. Drag and drop wireframe construction allows the user to select the desired components from a component warehouse, render the system for 3D visualization, and, linked to a set of physics libraries and/or computational codes, conduct process evaluations of the system they have designed.

Robert Bean; Trond Bjornard; Thomas Larson

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION DEVICES: EFFECTIVENESS IN IMPROVING SAFEGUARDS AT GAS-CENTRIFUGE URANIUM-ENRICHMENT PLANTS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advances in radio frequency identification devices (RFIDs) have engendered a growing interest among international safeguards experts. Potentially, RFIDs could reduce inspection work, viz. the number of inspections, number of samples, and duration of the visits, and thus improve the efficiency and effectiveness of international safeguards. This study systematically examined the applications of RFIDs for IAEA safeguards at large gas-centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). These analyses are expected to help identify the requirements and desirable properties for RFIDs, to provide insights into which vulnerabilities matter most, and help formulate the required assurance tests. This work, specifically assesses the application of RFIDs for the ''Option 4'' safeguards approach, proposed by Bruce Moran, U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), for large gas-centrifuge uranium-enrichment plants. The features of ''Option 4'' safeguards include placing RFIDs on all feed, product and tails (F/P/T) cylinders, along with WID readers in all FP/T stations and accountability scales. Other features of Moran's ''Option 4'' are Mailbox declarations, monitoring of load-cell-based weighing systems at the F/P/T stations and accountability scales, and continuous enrichment monitors. Relevant diversion paths were explored to evaluate how RFIDs improve the efficiency and effectiveness of safeguards. Additionally, the analysis addresses the use of RFIDs in conjunction with video monitoring and neutron detectors in a perimeter-monitoring approach to show that RFIDs can help to detect unidentified cylinders.

JOE,J.

2007-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

57

Safeguards and Security Program - DOE Directives, Delegations...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARCHIVED DOE O 470.1 Chg 1, Safeguards and Security Program by Website Administrator Functional areas: Environment, Safety, and Health, Hazardous Materials, Radiation Protection,...

58

ORO Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System and Visitor Control System PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office ORO Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System...

59

Proceedings of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards Safety...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Proceedings of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards Safety Culture Workshop Proceedings of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards Safety Culture Workshop December 16,...

60

Applications of virtual reality to nuclear safeguards and non-proliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents several applications of virtual reality relevant to the areas of nuclear safeguards and non-proliferation. Each of these applications was developed to the prototype stage at Sandia National Laboratories` Virtual Reality and Intelligent Simulation laboratory. These applications include the use of virtual reality for facility visualization, training of inspection personnel, and security and monitoring of nuclear facilities.

Stansfield, S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Materials management in an internationally safeguarded fuels reprocessing plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following appendices are included: aqueous reprocessing and conversion technology, reference facilities, process design and operating features relevant to materials accounting, operator's safeguards system structure, design principles of dynamic materials accounting systems, modeling and simulation approach, optimization of measurement control, aspects of international verification problem, security and reliability of materials measurement and accounting system, estimation of in-process inventory in solvent-extraction contactors, conventional measurement techniques, near-real-time measurement techniques, isotopic correlation techniques, instrumentation available to IAEA inspectors, and integration of materials accounting and containment and surveillance. (DLC)

Hakkila, E.A.; Baker, A.L.; Cobb, D.D.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Safeguards and Security Independent Oversight Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes the DOE Safeguards and Security Independent Oversight Program that provides DOE and contractor managers, Congress, and other stakeholders with an independent evaluation of the effectiveness of DOE safeguards and security policy and programs, and the implementation of those policies and programs. Cancels DOE 5630.12A.

1998-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

63

Nuclear Safeguards and Security Challenge:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArms Control R&D ConsortiumNuclearSafeguards and Security Challenge:

64

Achieving the Benefits of Safeguards by Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overarching driver for developing a formalized process to achieve safeguards by design is to support the global growth of nuclear power while reducing ‘nuclear security’ risks. This paper discusses an institutional approach to the design process for a nuclear facility, for designing proliferation resistance, international safeguards and U.S. national safeguards and security into new nuclear facilities. In the United States, the need exists to develop a simple, concise, formalized, and integrated approach for incorporating international safeguards and other non-proliferation considerations into the facility design process. An effective and efficient design process is one which clearly defines the functional requirements at the beginning of the project and provides for the execution of the project to achieve a reasonable balance among competing objectives in a cost effective manner. Safeguards by Design is defined as “the integration of international and national safeguards, physical security and non-proliferation features as full and equal partners in the design process of a nuclear energy system or facility,” with the objective to achieve facilities that are intrinsically more robust while being less expensive to safeguard and protect. This Safeguards by Design process has been developed such that it: • Provides improved safeguards, security, and stronger proliferation barriers, while reducing the life cycle costs to the operator and regulatory agencies, • Can be translated to any international context as a model for nuclear facility design, • Fosters a culture change to ensure the treatment of ‘nuclear security’ considerations as “full and equal” partners in the design process, • Provides a useful tool for the project manager responsible for the design, construction, and start-up of nuclear facilities, and • Addresses the key integration activities necessary to efficiently incorporate International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards into the design of nuclear facilities. This paper describes the work that has been completed in the development of a Safeguards by Design process for a project, illustrated by flow diagrams based upon the project phases described in U.S. Department of Energy Order 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. The institutionalization of the Safeguards by Design process directly supports the goals of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative and also aligns with goals and objectives of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Other benefits from institutionalizing this Safeguards by Design process are discussed within this paper.

Trond Bjornard; Robert Bean; David Hebditch; Jim Morgan; Bruce Meppen; Scott DeMuth; Michael Ehinger; John Hockert

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Safeguards and security issues during facility transition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transition of Department of Energy (DOE) production facilities to those destined for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) must consider traditional safeguards and security requirements governing nuclear materials. Current DOE safeguards and security policy establishes specific requirements for the removal of facilities and waste from safeguards. However, the current physical security policy does not differentiate the protection of waste from usable materials. Other transition issues include: access of uncleared individuals, positioning security zones, nuclear material holdup, accounting for difficult-to-measure materials, inventory difference and resolution, and radiological/toxicological sabotage. Safeguards and security goals for facility transitioning must provide a workable, efficient and cost-effective system for accounting and protecting nuclear material. In depth protection strategies utilizing combinations of safeguards and security systems should be developed to meet these goals.

Smith, M.R. [USDOE Office of Safeguards and Security, Washington, DC (United States); Zack, N.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Safeguards Systems Group

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

66

Biodiversity conservation and state sovereignty.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis examines the influence of contemporary approaches to biodiversity conservation on conceptions of state sovereignty over natural resources. Traditional approaches to state sovereignty have… (more)

Echeverria, Hugo.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

International Nuclear Safeguards Inspection Support Tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to developing technologies to meet escalating requirements for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) monitoring and associated inspections. This commitment involves the customization and transfer of existing remote monitoring/information management technologies for use by the IAEA. This paper describes an information management system called INSIST International Nuclear Safeguards Inspection Support Tool, which was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to support the IAEA Action Team in its role of monitoring and verifying compliance under United Nations Special Commission (UNSC) Resolutions 687, 707, and 715. Initial emphasis was placed on developing and deploying functionality and databases customized to support the Action Team. Throughout the design and customization of INSIST, emphasis was placed on information storage and retrieval capabilities for data gathered by the Action Team. In addition, PNL provided the Action Team with maps and satellite images and other relevant Iraqi databases to further facilitate the following activities: monitoring nuclear activities, facility operations, and nuclear material inventories assisting in inspection planning and training providing post inspection analysis providing onsite inspection support reporting on inspection findings.

Steinmaus, K.L.; Wukelic, G.E.; Beal, O.M.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

PROGRAMME GROUP RESEARCH UPDATE: Biodiversity indicators &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PROGRAMME GROUP RESEARCH UPDATE: Biodiversity indicators & knowledge management programme group Introduction Duncan Ray The programme group Biodiversity Indicators and Knowledge Management (BIKM) was established by the merger of the Biodiversity Indicators & Evaluation Programme and the Decision Support

69

Assessment of Research Quality Institute for Biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of Research Quality Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics January 2007 Faculty of Science #12;Evaluation report Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics Universiteit of the Universiteit van Amsterdam, the Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics (IBED) was one

van Rooij, Robert

70

Thematic Review Conservation of Biodiversity on Islands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thematic Review Conservation of Biodiversity on Islands: The contribution of the United Kingdom............................................................................................. 11 3. THE BIODIVERSITY OF ISLANDS INVOLVED WITH DI PROJECTS ........................................................................................... 49 6. THE DARWIN INITIATIVE'S CONTRIBUTION TO THE CBD'S ISLAND BIODIVERSITY PROGRAMME OF WORK

71

BIODIVERSITY Presence-only versus presenceabsence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIODIVERSITY RESEARCH Presence-only versus presence­absence data in species composition determinant in the study. Sampling locations were based on true observations from the Global Biodiversity Information of species composition. Keywords Biodiversity, canonical correspondence analysis, environmental determinants

72

Biodiversity and Wildlife Habitat Considerations for Opportunity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Biodiversity and Wildlife Habitat Considerations for Opportunity Harvesting Prepared for considerations for biodiversity and wildlife habitat values during their development of a discussion paper paper. #12;2 A. INTRODUCTION When evaluating the biodiversity and wildlife habitat implications

73

Planning for Biodiversity Conservation Using Stochastic Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9 Planning for Biodiversity Conservation Using Stochastic Programming Trevon Fuller,1 David P biodiversity features worldwide have prompted the development of a systematic planning framework biol- ogy, biodiversity. 9.1 Introduction Conservation areas are broadly defined as sites administered

Morton, David

74

Collaborative Networks for Biodiversity Domain Organizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, conservation groups, etc., referred to in this paper as BOs (Biodiversity-domain OrganizationsCollaborative Networks for Biodiversity Domain Organizations Ekaterina Ermilova, Hamideh, operating in the domains of biology, ecology, and biodiversity, strongly need to cooperate

Boyer, Edmond

75

Separations and safeguards model integration.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research and development of advanced reprocessing plant designs can greatly benefit from the development of a reprocessing plant model capable of transient solvent extraction chemistry. This type of model can be used to optimize the operations of a plant as well as the designs for safeguards, security, and safety. Previous work has integrated a transient solvent extraction simulation module, based on the Solvent Extraction Process Having Interaction Solutes (SEPHIS) code developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the Separations and Safeguards Performance Model (SSPM) developed at Sandia National Laboratory, as a first step toward creating a more versatile design and evaluation tool. The goal of this work was to strengthen the integration by linking more variables between the two codes. The results from this integrated model show expected operational performance through plant transients. Additionally, ORIGEN source term files were integrated into the SSPM to provide concentrations, radioactivity, neutron emission rate, and thermal power data for various spent fuels. This data was used to generate measurement blocks that can determine the radioactivity, neutron emission rate, or thermal power of any stream or vessel in the plant model. This work examined how the code could be expanded to integrate other separation steps and benchmark the results to other data. Recommendations for future work will be presented.

Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Zinaman, Owen

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Enhanced safeguards via solution monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solution monitoring is defined as the essentially continuous monitoring of solution level, density, and temperature in all tanks in the process that contain, or could contain, safeguards-significant quantities of nuclear material. This report describes some of the enhancements that solution monitoring could make to international safeguards. The focus is on the quantifiable benefits of solution monitoring, but qualitatively, solution monitoring can be viewed as a form of surveillance. Quantitatively, solution monitoring can in some cases improve diversion detection probability. For example, the authors show that under certain assumptions, solution monitoring can be used to reduce the standard deviation of the annual material balance, {sigma}{sub MB}, from approximately 17 kg to approximately 4 kg. Such reduction in {sigma}{sub MB} will not always be possible, as they discuss. However, in all cases, solution monitoring would provide assurance that the measurement error models are adequate so that one has confidence in his estimate of {sigma}{sub MB}. Some of the results in this report were generated using data that were simulated with prototype solution monitoring software that they are developing. An accompanying document describes that software.

Burr, T.; Wangen, L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

The Okanagan Institute for Biodiversity, Resilience, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2013-2014 The Okanagan Institute for Biodiversity, Resilience, and Ecosystem Services (formerly name ­ The Okanagan Institute for Biodiversity, Resilience, and Ecosystem Services (BRAES) ­ to better

Pulfrey, David L.

78

safeguards  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICE OF8/%2A ennike |1/%2A en9/%2Arussia |/%2A

79

Tropical rainforest biodiversity: field and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The Udzungwas in particular, are one of the single, most important areas in Africa for biodiversity conservationTropical rainforest biodiversity: field and GIS tools for assessing, monitoring and mapping II with Tanzania National ParksTanzania National Parks andand Wildlife Conservation SocietyWildlife Conservation

80

BIODIVERSITY Photo by Tom Iraci  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Olympia, WA 98512, USA. Email: acarey@fs.fed.us Balancing Ecosystem Values Proceedings, Biodiversity and degraded streams may be self-fulfilling prophecies of forest fragmentation and landscape dysfunction, and contribute to economic, social, and environmental sustainability. KEYWORDS: Biodiversity, northern spotted

Stephens, Scott L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Overview of the Facility Safeguardability Analysis (FSA) Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive Summary The safeguards system of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is intended to provide the international community with credible assurance that a State is fulfilling its safeguards obligations. Effective and cost-efficient IAEA safeguards at the facility level are, and will remain, an important element of IAEA safeguards as those safeguards evolve towards a “State-Level approach.” The Safeguards by Design (SBD) concept can facilitate the implementation of these effective and cost-efficient facility-level safeguards (Bjornard, et al. 2009a, 2009b; IAEA, 1998; Wonder & Hockert, 2011). This report, sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, introduces a methodology intended to ensure that the diverse approaches to Safeguards by Design can be effectively integrated and consistently used to cost effectively enhance the application of international safeguards.

Bari, Robert A.; Hockert, John; Wonder, Edward F.; Johnson, Scott J.; Wigeland, Roald; Zentner, Michael D.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

IAEA Safeguards: Past, Present, and Future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This talk will present an overview of the International Atomic Energy Agency with a specific focus on its international safeguards mission and activities. The talk will first present a brief history of the IAEA and discuss its current governing structure. It will then focus on the Safeguards Department and its role in providing assurance that nuclear materials are being used for peaceful purposes. It will then look at how the IAEA is currently evolving the way in which it executes its safeguards mission with a focus on the idea of a state-level approach.

Santi, Peter A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hypes, Philip A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

83

The Concept of Goals-Driven Safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IAEA, NRC, and DOE regulations and requirements for safeguarding nuclear material and facilities have been reviewed and each organization’s purpose, objectives, and scope are discussed in this report. Current safeguards approaches are re-examined considering technological advancements and how these developments are changing safeguards approaches used by these organizations. Additionally, the physical protection approaches required by the IAEA, NRC, and DOE were reviewed and the respective goals, objectives, and requirements are identified and summarized in this report. From these, a brief comparison is presented showing the high-level similarities among these regulatory organizations’ approaches to physical protection. The regulatory documents used in this paper have been assembled into a convenient reference library called the Nuclear Safeguards and Security Reference Library. The index of that library is included in this report, and DVDs containing the full library are available.

R. Wigeland; T Bjornard; B. Castle

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Safeguards and Security Program Planning and Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes program planning and management requirements for the Departments Safeguards and Security (S&S) Program. Cancels: DOE N 473.9 and DOE M 470.1-1

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

85

Safeguards and Security Program Planning and Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The manual establishes program planning and management requirements for the Departments Safeguards and Security. Chg 1, dated 3-7-06 Cancels DOE N 473.9, DOE M 470.1-1 Chg 2.

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

86

Safeguards and Security Program and Project Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The proposed revision to this Department of Energy Guide focuses on alignment of guidance for implementing key safeguard and security components to the DOE capital asset acquisition process with the revised DOE O 413.3B, Program and Project Management for Acquisition of Capital Assets, the revised DOE O 470.4B, Safeguard and Security Program, and the new series of DOE Orders replacing the DOE M 470.4 series of manuals.

2013-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

87

Integrated Safeguards and Security Management (ISSM) Policy  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The purpose of this Policy is to formalize an Integrated Safeguards and Security Management (ISSM) framework. Safeguards and security management systems provide a formal, organized process for planning, performing, assessing, and improving the secure conduct of work in accordance with risk-based protection strategies. These systems are institutionalized through Department of Energy (DOE) directives and contracts. Does not cancel other directives. Canceled by DOE P 470.1A.

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

88

Towards the global monitoring of biodiversity change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at biodiversity conservation inside and outside protected areas [4­6] and at limiting the causes of biodiversityTowards the global monitoring of biodiversity change Henrique M. Pereira1,2,* and H. David Cooper3, Canada, H2Y1N9 Governments have set the ambitious target of reducing biodiversity loss by the year 2010

Pereira, Henrique Miguel

89

AFCI Safeguards Enhancement Study: Technology Development Roadmap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Safeguards Campaign aims to develop safeguards technologies and processes that will significantly reduce the risk of proliferation in the U.S. nuclear fuel cycle of tomorrow. The Safeguards Enhancement Study was chartered with identifying promising research and development (R&D) directions over timescales both near-term and long-term, and under safeguards oversight both domestic and international. This technology development roadmap documents recognized gaps and needs in the safeguarding of nuclear fuel cycles, and outlines corresponding performance targets for each of those needs. Drawing on the collective expertise of technologists and user-representatives, a list of over 30 technologies that have the potential to meet those needs was developed, along with brief summaries of each candidate technology. Each summary describes the potential impact of that technology, key research questions to be addressed, and prospective development milestones that could lead to a definitive viability or performance assessment. Important programmatic linkages between U.S. agencies and offices are also described, reflecting the emergence of several safeguards R&D programs in the U.S. and the reinvigoration of nuclear fuel cycles across the globe.

Smith, Leon E.; Dougan, A.; Tobin, Stephen; Cipiti, B.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Bakel, A. J.; Bean, Robert; Grate, Jay W.; Santi, P.; Bryan, Steven; Kinlaw, M. T.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Burr, Tom; Lehn, Scott A.; Tolk, K.; Chichester, David; Menlove, H.; Vo, D.; Duckworth, Douglas C.; Merkle, P.; Wang, T. F.; Duran, F.; Nakae, L.; Warren, Glen A.; Friedrich, S.; Rabin, M.

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

90

Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Reprocessing Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. efforts to promote the international expansion of nuclear energy through the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) will result in a dramatic expansion of nuclear fuel cycle facilities in the United States. New demonstration facilities, such as the Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF), the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), and the Consolidated Fuel Treatment Center (CFTC) will use advanced nuclear and chemical process technologies that must incorporate increased proliferation resistance to enhance nuclear safeguards. The ASA-100 Project, “Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities,” commissioned by the NA-243 Office of NNSA, has been tasked with reviewing and developing advanced safeguards approaches for these demonstration facilities. Because one goal of GNEP is developing and sharing proliferation-resistant nuclear technology and services with partner nations, the safeguards approaches considered are consistent with international safeguards as currently implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This first report reviews possible safeguards approaches for the new fuel reprocessing processes to be deployed at the AFCF and CFTC facilities. Similar analyses addressing the ABR and transuranic (TRU) fuel fabrication lines at AFCF and CFTC will be presented in subsequent reports.

Durst, Philip C.; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Boyer, Brian; Wallace, Richard; Ehinger, Michael H.; Kovacic, Don N.; Tolk, K.

2007-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

91

Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2007, the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NA-24) completed a yearlong review of the challenges facing the international safeguards system today and over the next 25 years. The study found that without new investment in international safeguards, the U.S. safeguards technology base, and our ability to support International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards, will continue to erode and soon may be at risk. To reverse this trend, the then U.S. Secretary of Energy, Samuel Bodman, announced at the 2007 IAEA General Conference that the Department of Energy (DOE) would launch the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). He stated 'IAEA safeguards must be robust and capable of addressing proliferation threats. Full confidence in IAEA safeguards is essential for nuclear power to grow safely and securely. To this end, the U.S. Department of Energy will seek to ensure that modern technology, the best scientific expertise, and adequate resources are available to keep pace with expanding IAEA responsibilities.' To meet this goal, the NGSI objectives include the recruitment of international safeguards experts to work at the U.S. national laboratories and to serve at the IAEA's headquarters. Part of the latter effort will involve enhancing our existing efforts to place well-qualified Americans in a sufficient number of key safeguards positions within the IAEA's Department of Safeguards. Accordingly, the International Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) hosted a Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards (ERIS) on October 22 and 23, 2008. The ISPO used a workshop format developed earlier with Sonalysts, Inc., that was followed at the U.S. Support Program's (USSP's) technology road-mapping sessions. ISPO invited participants from the U.S. DOE, the IAEA, the U.S. national laboratories, private industry, academia, and professional societies who either are experts in international safeguards, or understand the challenges of recruiting for technical positions. The 44 participants represented eight national laboratories, four universities, three government organizations, two international organizations, two professional organizations, and three small companies. The goal of the ERIS workshop was to improve efforts to engage U.S. citizens for IAEA positions in the Department of Safeguards. The participants considered the specific challenges of recruiting professional staff, safeguards inspectors, and managers. At the workshop's conclusion, participants presented their findings to the NNSA Office of International Regimes and Agreements (NA-243). The report's major findings are summarized.

Pepper,S.; Rosenthal, M.; Fishbone, L.; Occhiogrosso, D.; Carroll, C.; Dreicer, M.; Wallace, R.; Rankhauser, J.

2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

92

BIODIVERSITY Freshwater fish introductions in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIODIVERSITY RESEARCH Freshwater fish introductions in mediterranean-climate regions and fragmenta- tion, hydrological alteration, climate change, overexploitation, pollution and the global mediterranean-climate regions: California (USA), central Chile, south-western Australia, the Iberian peninsula

Olden, Julian D.

93

The state-level approach: moving beyond integrated safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of a State-Level Approach (SLA) for international safeguards planning, implementation, and evaluation was contained in the Conceptual Framework for Integrated Safeguards (IS) agreed in 2002. This paper describes briefly the key elements of the SLA, including State-level factors and high-level safeguards objectives, and considers different cases in which application of the SLA methodology could address safeguards for 'suspect' States, 'good' States, and Nuclear Weapons States hosting fuel cycle centers. The continued use and further development of the SLA to customize safeguards for each State, including for States already under IS, is seen as central to effective and efficient safeguards for an expanding nuclear world.

Tape, James W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) hosted a Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards October 22 and 23, 2008. The workshop was sponsored by DOE/NA-243 under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). Placing well-qualified Americans in sufficient number and in key safeguards positions within the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA’s) Department of Safeguards is an important U.S. non-proliferation objective. The goal of the NGSI Workshop on Enhanced Recruiting for International Safeguards was to improve U.S. efforts to recruit U.S. citizens for IAEA positions in the Department of Safeguards. The participants considered the specific challenges of recruiting professional staff, safeguards inspectors, and managers. BNL’s International Safeguards Project Office invited participants from the U.S. Department of Energy, the IAEA, U.S. national laboratories, private industry, academia, and professional societies who are either experts in international safeguards or who understand the challenges of recruiting for technical positions. A final report for the workshop will be finalized and distributed in early 2009. The main finding of the workshop was the need for an integrated recruitment plan to take into account pools of potential candidates, various government and private agency stakeholders, the needs of the IAEA, and the NGSI human capital development plan. There were numerous findings related to and recommendations for maximizing the placement of U.S. experts in IAEA Safeguards positions. The workshop participants offered many ideas for increasing the pool of candidates and increasing the placement rate. This paper will provide details on these findings and recommendations

Pepper,S.E.; Rosenthal, M.D.; Fishbone, L.G.; Occhogrosso, D.M.; Lockwood, D.; Carroll, C.J.; Dreicer, M.; Wallace, R.; Fankhauser, J.

2009-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

95

Safeguards and Security Technology Development Directory. FY 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Safeguards and Security Technology Development Directory is published annually by the Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE), and is Intended to inform recipients of the full scope of the OSS R&D program. It is distributed for use by DOE headquarters personnel, DOE program offices, DOE field offices, DOE operating contractors, national laboratories, other federal agencies, and foreign governments. Chapters 1 through 7 of the Directory provide general information regarding the Technology Development Program, including the mission, program description, organizational roles and responsibilities, technology development lifecycle, requirements analysis, program formulation, the task selection process, technology development infrastructure, technology transfer activities, and current research and development tasks. These chapters are followed by a series of appendices which contain more specific information on aspects of the Program. Appendix A is a summary of major technology development accomplishments made during FY 1992. Appendix B lists S&S technology development reports issued during FY 1992 which reflect work accomplished through the OSS Technology Development Program and other relevant activities outside the Program. Finally, Appendix C summarizes the individual task statements which comprise the FY 1993 Technology Development Program.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Northwest Habitat Institute Integrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information SystemIntegrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Northwest Habitat Institute Integrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information SystemIntegrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information System (IBIS) for the Columbia River Basin(IBIS) for the Columbia

97

Fundamentals of materials accounting for nuclear safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Materials accounting is essential to providing the necessary assurance for verifying the effectiveness of a safeguards system. The use of measurements, analyses, records, and reports to maintain knowledge of the quantities of nuclear material present in a defined area of a facility and the use of physical inventories and materials balances to verify the presence of special nuclear materials are collectively known as materials accounting for nuclear safeguards. This manual, prepared as part of the resource materials for the Safeguards Technology Training Program of the US Department of Energy, addresses fundamental aspects of materials accounting, enriching and complementing them with the first-hand experiences of authors from varied disciplines. The topics range from highly technical subjects to site-specific system designs and policy discussions. This collection of papers is prepared by more than 25 professionals from the nuclear safeguards field. Representing research institutions, industries, and regulatory agencies, the authors create a unique resource for the annual course titled ''Materials Accounting for Nuclear Safeguards,'' which is offered at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Pillay, K.K.S. (comp.)

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Antineutrino reactor safeguards - a case study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Antineutrinos have been proposed as a means of reactor safeguards for more than 30 years and there has been impressive experimental progress in neutrino detection. In this paper we conduct, for the first time, a case study of the application of antineutrino safeguards to a real-world scenario - the North Korean nuclear crisis in 1994. We derive detection limits to a partial or full core discharge in 1989 based on actual IAEA safeguards access and find that two independent methods would have yielded positive evidence for a second core with very high confidence. To generalize our results, we provide detailed estimates for the sensitivity to the plutonium content of various types of reactors, including most types of plutonium production reactors, based on detailed reactor simulations. A key finding of this study is that a wide class of reactors with a thermal power of less than 0.1-1 GWth can be safeguarded achieving IAEA goals for quantitative sensitivity and timeliness with detectors right outside the reactor building. This type of safeguards does not rely on the continuity of knowledge and provides information about core inventory and power status in real-time.

Eric Christensen; Patrick Huber; Patrick Jaffke

2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

99

Training in Environmental Analyses for Safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Responding to recommendations of the DOE/NNSA's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, a new course, Training in Environmental Sample Analysis for IAEA Safeguards, is being offered as a summer internship opportunity at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first students completed the 8 week program during the summer of 2008. Interns are given training in the analysis of bulk environmental samples for safeguards through hands-on experience working in a clean laboratory, purifying U and Pu from bulk environmental samples, and measuring U and Pu isotope ratios by multi-collector ICP mass spectrometry. A series of lectures by invited safeguards and non-proliferation experts gives the students a broad picture of the safeguards work of the IAEA. At the end of the course, the students prepare a poster of their work to showcase at LLNL's summer student poster symposium. Both undergraduate and graduate students are recruited and hired as paid interns under the aegis of the Glenn T. Seaborg Institute in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate at LLNL. This training course seeks to introduce students to analytical and interpretive skill-sets that are not generally taught at universities, and to encourage them to pursue careers with the IAEA.

Williams, R W; Gaffney, A M; Hutcheon, N A; Kersting, A B

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

100

Integrated international safeguards concepts for fuel reprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the fourth in a series of efforts by the Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, to identify problems and propose solutions for international safeguarding of light-water reactor spent-fuel reprocessing plants. Problem areas for international safeguards were identified in a previous Problem Statement (LA-7551-MS/SAND79-0108). Accounting concepts that could be verified internationally were presented in a subsequent study (LA-8042). Concepts for containment/surveillance were presented, conceptual designs were developed, and the effectiveness of these designs was evaluated in a companion study (SAND80-0160). The report discusses the coordination of nuclear materials accounting and containment/surveillance concepts in an effort to define an effective integrated safeguards system. The Allied-General Nuclear Services fuels reprocessing plant at Barnwell, South Carolina, was used as the reference facility.

Hakkila, E.A.; Gutmacher, R.G.; Markin, J.T.; Shipley, J.P.; Whitty, W.J.; Camp, A.L.; Cameron, C.P.; Bleck, M.E.; Ellwein, L.B.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Allocation of inspection resources for international safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increasing numbers and complexity of facilities inspected by the International Atomic Energy Agency will require difficult decisions about the levels of safeguards to be assigned to materials and facilities should limitations on inspection resources continue. This paper examines some alternative strategies for assigning inspection effort that could improve effectiveness and efficiency of safeguards compared with current inspection practice. These allocation concepts are: (1) extension of inspection planning to include material strata and accounting areas that encompass multiple facilities and (2) the use of randomization of the quality and frequency of inspections and inspection activities.

Markin, J.T.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Safeguards and Security Program Planning and Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The manual establishes program planning and management requirements for the Department’s Safeguards and Security (S&S) Program. Change 2 is a revision to Section M of both the Manual and the CRD to realign the process for establishing deviations from DOE directives containing safeguards and security requirements to reflect established Departmental policy as set forth in DOE O 251.1C. Original publication, 8-26-05; Chg 1, 3-7-06. Canceled by DOE O 470.4B

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

103

Safeguards and Security Systems | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwardsSafeguards and Security Systems SHARE Safeguards

104

The Big Questions For Biodiversity Informatics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of biodiversity information. This emerging field of biodiversity informatics has been growing quickly, but without overarching scientific questions to guide its development; the result has been developments that have no connection to genuine insight and forward...

Peterson, A. Townsend; Knapp, Sandra; Guralnick, Robert P.; Soberó n, Jorge; Holder, Mark T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Forests and biodiversity UK Forestry Standard Guidelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forests and biodiversity UK Forestry Standard Guidelines #12;Key to symbols UKFS Requirements;Forests and biodiversity Forestry Commission: Edinburgh UK Forestry Standard Guidelines #12;© Crown Commission in 2011. ISBN 978-0-85538-831-7 FORESTRY COMMISSION (2011). Forests and Biodiversity. UK Forestry

106

California Urban and Biodiversity Analysis (CURBA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Urban and Biodiversity Analysis (CURBA) Model #12;Presentation Overview · Model Overview and Fragmentation Analysis Modules · Indication of Effects of Policy on Biodiversity Model Overview #12;· Urban on Biodiversity Model Overview #12;Urban Growth Model: Review · Estimate county based urbanization equations: Prob

Clarke, Keith

107

Monitoring change in biodiversity through composite indices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monitoring change in biodiversity through composite indices S.T. Buckland1,*, A.E. Magurran2 , R Zealand The need to monitor trends in biodiversity raises many technical issues. What are the features of a good biodiversity index? How should trends in abundance of individual species be estimated? How should

Buckland, Steve

108

Biodiversity measures revisited Natalia Petrovskaya a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity measures revisited Natalia Petrovskaya a , Sergei Petrovskii b,c,*, Bai-Lian Li c, Riverside, CA 92521-0124, USA 1. Introduction Loss of biodiversity in various ecosystems all over the world to recognize the main threats for communities functioning and reasons for biodiversity loss; examples

Petrovskaya, Natalia B.

109

Social and Economic Approaches to Biodiversity Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Social and Economic Approaches to Biodiversity Conservation: An Annotated Bibliography of the interdisciplinary work involved in the valuation of local-level biodiversity in aquaculture and in examining strategies for grass-roots biodiversity conservation. The project was jointly administered by Saint Mary

Charles, Anthony

110

"Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Poverty Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Poverty Reduction: Is conservation the answer?" Paul van. Most ecosystems will change in the future. 2. Loss of species and biodiversity will continue to happen Energy Demand Urbanisation Climate Change Water Availability Infectious Diseases Biodiversity Loss #12

111

ANU BIODIVERSITY MANAGEMENT ACTON CAMPUS, ACT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANU BIODIVERSITY MANAGEMENT PLAN ACTON CAMPUS, ACT January 2013 #12;ii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This Australian National University Biodiversity Management Plan (referred to as `the BMP') was prepared by the University in 2011 to fulfil its requirements under the Australian Environment Protection and Biodiversity

112

Contributed Paper Biodiversity Conservation in Local Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contributed Paper Biodiversity Conservation in Local Planning JAMES R. MILLER, MARTHA GROOM-use policy is increasingly being recognized as fundamental to biodiversity conservation in the United States to support the conservation of biodiversity at local scales. Yet little is known about the pervasiveness

Miller, James R.

113

Planning for Biodiversity Conservation Using Stochastic Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9 Planning for Biodiversity Conservation Using Stochastic Programming Trevon Fuller,1 David P biol- ogy, biodiversity. 9.1 Introduction Conservation areas are broadly defined as sites administered for the protection of threatened species and other features of biodiversity. However, many conservation ar- eas

Sarkar, Sahotra

114

BL4268 Conservation and Management of Biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BL4268 ­ Conservation and Management of Biodiversity Conservation of biological diversity is one understanding of some of the current issues associated with conservation and biodiversity management. Emphasis decision makers and the general public. Why is biodiversity important? What should be conserved? Alfredo F

Brierley, Andrew

115

BIODIVERSITY Global conservation strategies for two  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIODIVERSITY RESEARCH Global conservation strategies for two clades of snakes: combining taxon biodiversity losses world-wide (Ehrlich, 1994; Pimm et al., 1995). In response to an imminent crisis in biodiversity, several global schemes of prioritization have been developed in recent years, particularly by non

Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel

116

The University of Edinburgh Biodiversity Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

opportunities to conserve and enhance biodiversity. We are committed to actively enhancing and promoting 2004 placed a duty on all public bodies to further the conservation of biodiversity withinThe University of Edinburgh Biodiversity Policy Endorsed by Court 14 May 2012 The University

Swain, Peter

117

New Summer Pilot Course 2013 Biodiversity Informatics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to advanced under- graduates and graduate students interested in biodiversity, conservation biology, dataNew Summer Pilot Course ­ 2013 Biodiversity Informatics (BIO 494 / BIO 598 ­ 2 Credits) June 17 Franz, David Patterson, Ed Gilbert Contact nico.franz@asu.edu for additional information Biodiversity

Franz, Nico M.

118

Alleviating spatial conflict between people and biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

settlements are expanding in species-rich regions and pose a serious threat to biodiversity conservation. We to the conservation implications of where people live. Human settlement patterns impact biodiversity directly (eAlleviating spatial conflict between people and biodiversity Gary W. Luck* , Taylor H. Ricketts

Vermont, University of

119

UF in New Zealand Biodiversity and Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UF in New Zealand Biodiversity and Conservation Summer B: June 30-August 4, 2014 Learn About Ways to Conserve, Manage, and Restore Natural Habitats and to Promote Biodiversity in Urban and Rural Environments and Policymakers, Developers, and the Public, and their Roles in Conserving Biodiversity. Explore the Unique Flora

Jawitz, James W.

120

Evaluating safeguard effectiveness against violent insiders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The threat posed by a violent insiders presents a major challenge to safeguards managers. These insiders, in addition to their ability to exploit their special authorities, access, and knowledge of facility operations and safeguards, could use violence to defeat safeguards components and personnel. In protecting against theft of special nuclear material, facilities have emphasized the use of perimeter protection and physical barriers to protect against attacks by an outsider adversary group. Recently emphasis has begun to shift toward the implementation of hardware and procedural measures to protect against nonviolent insiders. Approaches are also needed to help assess the effectiveness of protection against those insiders who are willing to use violence. In this paper we describe an approach we're developing for dealing with violent insiders. We begin by categorizing insiders according to whether they are active or passive, rational or irrational, and whether they are willing to use force against safeguards components or coworkers. We define characteristics of each category, and describe the extent to which each category is adequately modelled by existing evaluation tools. We also discuss several modelling issues posed by active insiders, including: entry of contraband; reluctance to use violence; neutralization of insiders; and the ability to switch modes of attack between force, stealth, and deceit. 5 refs., 2 figs.

Al-Ayat, R.A.; Fortney, D.S.

1990-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This third report in the series reviews possible safeguards approaches for new fast reactors in general, and the ABR in particular. Fast-neutron spectrum reactors have been used since the early 1960s on an experimental and developmental level, generally with fertile blanket fuels to “breed” nuclear fuel such as plutonium. Whether the reactor is designed to breed plutonium, or transmute and “burn” actinides depends mainly on the design of the reactor neutron reflector and the whether the blanket fuel is “fertile” or suitable for transmutation. However, the safeguards issues are very similar, since they pertain mainly to the receipt, shipment and storage of fresh and spent plutonium and actinide-bearing “TRU”-fuel. For these reasons, the design of existing fast reactors and details concerning how they have been safeguarded were studied in developing advanced safeguards approaches for the new fast reactors. In this regard, the design of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II “EBR-II” at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was of interest, because it was designed as a collocated fast reactor with a pyrometallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication line – a design option being considered for the ABR. Similarly, the design of the Fast Flux Facility (FFTF) on the Hanford Site was studied, because it was a successful prototype fast reactor that ran for two decades to evaluate fuels and the design for commercial-scale fast reactors.

Durst, Philip C.; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Boyer, Brian; Wallace, Rick L.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Kovacic, Don N.; Tolk, K.

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

IBM Software Solution Brief Safeguarding the cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IBM Software Solution Brief Safeguarding the cloud with IBM Security solutions Maintain visibility and control with proven security solutions for public, private and hybrid clouds Highlights Address cloud internal and external users, data, applications and workloads as they move to and from the cloud Regain

123

Improving the Safeguardability of Nuclear Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of a Safeguards-by-Design (SBD) process for new nuclear facilities has the potential to reduce security risks and proliferation hazards while improving the synergy of major design features and raising operational efficiency, in a world where significant expansion of nuclear energy use may occur. Correspondingly, the U.S. DOE’s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) includes objectives to contribute to international efforts to develop SBD, and to apply SBD in the development of new U.S. nuclear infrastructure. Here, SBD is defined as a structured approach to ensure the timely, efficient and cost effective integration of international safeguards and other nonproliferation barriers with national material control and accountability, physical protection, and safety objectives into the overall design process for a nuclear facility, from initial planning through design, construction and operation. The SBD process, in its simplest form, may be applied usefully today within most national regulatory environments. Development of a mature approach to implementing SBD requires work in the areas of requirements definition, design processes, technology and methodology, and institutionalization. The U.S. efforts described in this paper are supportive of SBD work for international safeguards that has recently been initiated by the IAEA with the participation of many stakeholders including member States, the IAEA, nuclear technology suppliers, nuclear utilities, and the broader international nonproliferation community.

T. Bjornard; R. Bari; D. Hebditch; P. Peterson; M. Schanfein

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

The US Support Program Assistance to the IAEA Safeguards Information Technology, Collection, and Analysis 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the United States Support Program's (USSP) priorities for 2008 is to support the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) development of an integrated and efficient safeguards information infrastructure, including reliable and maintainable information systems, and effective tools and resources to collect and analyze safeguards-relevant information. The USSP has provided funding in support of this priority for the ISIS Re-engineering Project (IRP), and for human resources support to the design and definition of the enhanced information analysis architecture project (nVision). Assistance for several other information technology efforts is provided. This paper will report on the various ongoing support measures undertaken by the USSP to support the IAEA's information technology enhancements and will provide some insights into activities that the USSP may support in the future.

Tackentien,J.

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

125

Trial Application of the Facility Safeguardability Assessment Process to the NuScale SMR Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FSA is a screening process intended to focus a facility designer’s attention on the aspects of their facility or process design that would most benefit from application of SBD principles and practices. The process is meant to identify the most relevant guidance within the SBD tools for enhancing the safeguardability of the design. In fiscal year (FY) 2012, NNSA sponsored PNNL to evaluate the practical application of FSA by applying it to the NuScale small modular nuclear power plant. This report documents the application of the FSA process, presenting conclusions regarding its efficiency and robustness. It describes the NuScale safeguards design concept and presents functional "infrastructure" guidelines that were developed using the FSA process.

Coles, Garill A.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Hockert, John; Zentner, Michael D.

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

126

Trial Application of the Facility Safeguardability Assessment Process to the NuScale SMR Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FSA is a screening process intended to focus a facility designer’s attention on the aspects of their facility or process design that would most benefit from application of SBD principles and practices. The process is meant to identify the most relevant guidance within the SBD tools for enhancing the safeguardability of the design. In fiscal year (FY) 2012, NNSA sponsored PNNL to evaluate the practical application of FSA by applying it to the NuScale small modular nuclear power plant. This report documents the application of the FSA process, presenting conclusions regarding its efficiency and robustness. It describes the NuScale safeguards design concept and presents functional "infrastructure" guidelines that were developed using the FSA process.

Coles, Garill A.; Hockert, John; Gitau, Ernest TN; Zentner, Michael D.

2013-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

127

Overview of the Facility Safeguardability Analysis (FSA) Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The safeguards system of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) provides the international community with credible assurance that a State is fulfilling its nonproliferation obligations. The IAEA draws such conclusions from the evaluation of all available information. Effective and cost-efficient IAEA safeguards at the facility level are, and will remain, an important element of this “State-level” approach. Efficiently used, the Safeguards by Design (SBD) methodologies , , , now being developed can contribute to effective and cost-efficient facility-level safeguards. The Facility Safeguardability Assessment (FSA) introduced here supports SBD in three areas. 1. It describes necessary interactions between the IAEA, the State regulator, and the owner / designer of a new or modified facility to determine where SBD efforts can be productively applied, 2. It presents a screening approach intended to identify potential safeguard issues for; a) design changes to existing facilities; b) new facilities similar to existing facilities with approved safeguards approaches, and c) new designs, 3. It identifies resources (the FSA toolkit), such as good practice guides, design guidance, and safeguardability evaluation methods that can be used by the owner/designer to develop solutions for potential safeguards issues during the interactions with the State regulator and IAEA. FSA presents a structured framework for the application of the SBD tools developed in other efforts. The more a design evolves, the greater the probability that new safeguards issues could be introduced. Likewise, for first-of-a-kind facilities or research facilities that involve previously unused processes or technologies, it is reasonable to expect that a number of possible safeguards issues might exist. Accordingly, FSA is intended to help the designer and its safeguards experts identify early in the design process: • Areas where elements of previous accepted safeguards approach(es) may be applied to facility modifications or new designs • Modifications of the design that could mitigate a potential safeguards issue or facilitate a more efficient application of the safeguards approach • Possible innovative ideas for more efficient application of safeguards • The potential for changes in elements of the safeguard approach that may be required by IAEA as a result of facility design features and characteristics • Other potential concerns These issues will then be presented to the IAEA and the state regulator to be resolved in a timely manner, ensuring that the planned safeguards approach is acceptable and compatible with the facility design. The proposed approach should be validated by application to suitable facilities to assess its utility, comprehensiveness, and cost-effectiveness. The approach and example application should also be reviewed by industry to confirm the conclusions reached in the DOE review.

Bari, Robert A.; Hockert, John; Wonder, Edward F.; Johnson, Shirley J.; Wigeland, Roald; Zentner, Michael D.

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

128

Safeguards and Security progress report, January--December 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From January to December 1989, the Los Alamos Safeguards and Security Research and Development (R D) program carried out the activities described in the first four parts of this report: Science and Technology Base Development, Basic Systems Design, Onsite Test and Evaluation and Facility Support, and International Safeguards. For the most part, these activities were sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Safeguards and Security. Part 1 covers development of the basic technology essential to continuing improvements in the practice of safeguards and security. It includes our computer security R D and the activities of the DOE Center for Computer Security, which provides the basis for encouraging and disseminating this important technology. Part 2 treats activities aimed at developing methods for designing and evaluating safeguards systems, with special emphasis on the integration of the several subsystems into a real safeguards system. Part 3 describes efforts of direct assistance to the DOE and its contractors and includes consultation on materials control and accounting problems, development and demonstration of specialized techniques and instruments, and comprehensive participation in the design and demonstration of advanced safeguards systems. Part 3 also reports a series of training courses in various aspects of safeguards that makes the technology more accessible to those who must apply it. Finally, Part 4 covers international safeguards activities, including both support to the International Atomic Energy Agency and bilateral exchanges. Part 5 reports several safeguards-related activities that have sponsors other than the DOE/OSS. 87 refs., 52 figs.

Smith, D.B.; Jaramillo, G.R. (comps.)

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

The new geospatial tools: global transparency enhancing safeguards verification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the importance and potential role of the new, freely available, geospatial tools for enhancing IAEA safeguards and how, together with commercial satellite imagery, they can be used to promote 'all-source synergy'. As additional 'open sources', these new geospatial tools have heralded a new era of 'global transparency' and they can be used to substantially augment existing information-driven safeguards gathering techniques, procedures, and analyses in the remote detection of undeclared facilities, as well as support ongoing monitoring and verification of various treaty (e.g., NPT, FMCT) relevant activities and programs. As an illustration of how these new geospatial tools may be applied, an original exemplar case study provides how it is possible to derive value-added follow-up information on some recent public media reporting of a former clandestine underground plutonium production complex (now being converted to a 'Tourist Attraction' given the site's abandonment by China in the early 1980s). That open source media reporting, when combined with subsequent commentary found in various Internet-based Blogs and Wikis, led to independent verification of the reporting with additional ground truth via 'crowdsourcing' (tourist photos as found on 'social networking' venues like Google Earth's Panoramio layer and Twitter). Confirmation of the precise geospatial location of the site (along with a more complete facility characterization incorporating 3-D Modeling and visualization) was only made possible following the acquisition of higher resolution commercial satellite imagery that could be correlated with the reporting, ground photos, and an interior diagram, through original imagery analysis of the overhead imagery.

Pabian, Frank Vincent [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

130

SRS delayed neutron instruments for safeguards measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Six analytical systems measuring delayed neutrons have been used for safeguards measurements at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A predecessor, the 252Cf Activation Analysis Facility installed at the Savannah River Technology Center (formally SR Laboratory) has been used since 1974 to analyze small samples, measuring both delayed neutrons and gammas. The six shufflers, plus one currently being fabricated, were developed, designed and fabricated by the LANL N-1 group. These shufflers have provided safeguards measurements of product (2 each), in-process scrap (2 each plus a conceptual replacement) and process waste (2 each plus one being fabricated). One shuffler for scrap assay was the first shuffler to be installed (1978) in a process. Another (waste) was the first installed in a process capable of assaying barrels. A third (waste) is the first pass-through model and a fourth (product) is the most precise ({+-}.12%) and accurate NDA instrument yet produced.

Studley, R.V. [Westinghouse SRC, Aiken, SC (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Safeguard Requirements for Fusion Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear proliferation risks from magnetic fusion energy associated with access to fissile materials can be divided into three main categories: 1) clandestine production of fissile material in an undeclared facility, 2) covert production and diversion of such material in a declared and safeguarded facility, and 3) use of a declared facility in a breakout scenario, in which a state openly produces fissile material in violation of international agreements. The degree of risk in each of these categories is assessed, taking into account both state and non-state actors, and it is found that safeguards are required for fusion energy to be highly attractive from a non-proliferation standpoint. Specific safeguard requirements and R&D needs are outlined for each category of risk, and the technical capability of the ITER experiment, under construction, to contribute to this R&D is noted. A preliminary analysis indicates a potential legal pathway for fusion power systems to be brought under the Treaty for the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. "Vertical" proliferation risks associated with tritium and with the knowledge that can be gained from inertial fusion energy R&D are outlined.

Robert J. Goldston and Alexander Glaser

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

132

Digital Games and Biodiversity Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for mobile devices such as Endomondo), or the virtual world (e.g. the ability to „like? material on Facebook, creating a competitive dynamic and encouraging further engagement). 3. Digital games and the conservation of biodiversity This article... ConservationPark, a Facebook game, claims to support conservation, but gives no details of what proportion of in-game purchases are donated, or to which organisations. 3.2.3 Games for Conservation Research, Monitoring and Planning The use of games...

Sandbrook, Chris; Adams, William M.; Monteferri, Bruno

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

133

Safeguards and Security for Program and Project Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Guide provides a methodology for implementing the safeguards and security requirements of DOE O 413.3B. Cancels DOE G 413.3-3.

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

FAQS Reference Guide – Safeguards and Security General Technical Base  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the July 2009 edition of DOE-STD-1123-2009, Safeguards and Security General Technical Base Qualification Standard.

135

Safeguards and Security Oversight and Assessments Implementation Guide  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide identifies acceptable methods for implementing the safeguards and security provisions of DOE O 226.1A. Canceled by DOE N 251.80.

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

136

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Safeguards and Security General Technical...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Security General Technical Base FAQS Job Task Analyses - Safeguards and Security General Technical Base FAQS Job Task Analyses are performed on the Function Area Qualification...

137

Safeguards-by-Design: Early Integration of Physical Protection and Safeguardability into Design of Nuclear Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of a Safeguards-by-Design (SBD) process for new nuclear facilities has the potential to minimize proliferation and security risks as the use of nuclear energy expands worldwide. This paper defines a generic SBD process and its incorporation from early design phases into existing design / construction processes and develops a framework that can guide its institutionalization. SBD could be a basis for a new international norm and standard process for nuclear facility design. This work is part of the U.S. DOE’s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), and is jointly sponsored by the Offices of Non-proliferation and Nuclear Energy.

T. Bjornard; R. Bean; S. DeMuth; P. Durst; M. Ehinger; M. Golay; D. Hebditch; J. Hockert; J. Morgan

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

A study of a zone approach to IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) safeguards: The low-enriched-uranium zone of a light-water-reactor fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At present the IAEA designs its safeguards approach with regard to each type of nuclear facility so that the safeguards activities and effort are essentially the same for a given type and size of nuclear facility wherever it may be located. Conclusions regarding a state are derived by combining the conclusions regarding the effectiveness of safeguards for the individual facilities within a state. In this study it was convenient to define three zones in a state with a closed light-water-reactor nuclear fuel cycle. Each zone contains those facilities or parts thereof which use or process nuclear materials of the same safeguards significance: low-enriched uranium, radioactive spent fuel, or recovered plutonium. The possibility that each zone might be treated as an extended material balance area for safeguards purposes is under investigation. The approach includes defining the relevant features of the facilities in the three zones and listing the safeguards activities which are now practiced. This study has focussed on the fresh-fuel zone, the several facilities of which use or process low-enriched uranium. At one extreme, flows and inventories would be verified at each material balance area. At the other extreme, the flows into and out of the zone and the inventory of the whole zone would be verified. There are a number of possible safeguards approaches which fall between the two extremes. The intention is to develop a rational approach which will make it possible to compare the technical effectiveness and the inspection effort for the facility-oriented approach, for the approach involving the zone as a material balance area, and for some reasonable intermediate safeguards approaches.

Fishbone, L.G.; Higinbotham, W.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

ESM 595TT: Biodiversity in Forest and Ocean Ecosystems (2 units) Dimensions of Biodiversity Distributed Graduate Seminar (DBDGS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESM 595TT: Biodiversity in Forest and Ocean Ecosystems (2 units) Dimensions of Biodiversity, and taxonomic) of biodiversity and create fundamental advances within biodiversity science. The innovative on the relationship between biodiversity and environmental or anthropogenic drivers and/or the relationship between

California at Santa Barbara, University of

140

Biodiversity measurement, species interactions and sustainability.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Throughout the last two decades, biodiversity has been increasingly acknowledged as a valuable asset. However there are numerous challenges to managing the asset. Firstly, there… (more)

Gerber, Nicolas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Integrating conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The loss of biodiversity is recognised as a tremendous threat to ecosystems, but its maintenance is challenging. One important issue is seen as decisive… (more)

Solbrig, Franziska

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Measuring uncertainty in estimates of biodiversity loss: The example of biodiversity intactness variance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to accompany the recently developed biodiversity intactness index (BII) (Scholes and Biggs [Scholes, R.J., Biggs, R., 2005. A biodiversity intact- ness index. Nature 434, 45­49]). The BII is based on estimates and Cooper, 2006). To help meet this need, Scholes and Biggs (2005) developed the biodiversity intactness

Jackson, Robert B.

143

Poverty and biodiversity: Measuring the overlap of human poverty and the biodiversity hotspots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to prioritize conservation efforts, scientists have developed the concept of biodiversity hotspots. Since most such as development, poverty eradication, and biodiversity conservation need to be addressed not as individual the interconnectivity of global biodiversity conservation priorities with human poverty issues. These issues represent

Vermont, University of

144

E-Print Network 3.0 - activities safeguards training Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

safeguards training Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: activities safeguards training Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Title:...

145

The future of IAEA safeguards: challenges and responses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For nearly two decades, the International Atomic Energy Agency (lAEA) has been transforming its safeguards system to address the challenges posed by undeclared nuclear programs, the associated revelation of an extensive non-State nuclear procurement network and other issues, including past limits to its verification mandate and the burden of noncompliance issues. Implementing the new measures, including those in the Additional Protocol, and integrating new and old safeguards measures, remains a work in progress. Implementation is complicated by factors including the limited teclmological tools that are available to address such issues as safeguarding bulk handling facilities, detection of undeclared facilities/activities, especially related to enrichment, etc. As this process continues, new challenges are arising, including the demands of expanding nuclear power production worldwide, so-called safeguards by design for a new generation of facilities, the possible IAEA role in a fissile material cutoff treaty and other elements of the arms control and disarmament agenda, the possible role in 'rollback' cases, etc. There is no doubt safeguards will need to evolve in the future, as they have over the last decades. In order for the evolutionary path to proceed, there will inter alia be a need to identify technological gaps, especially with respect to undeclared facilities, and ensure they are filled by adapting old safeguards technologies, by developing and introducing new and novel safeguards teclmologies and/or by developing new procedures and protocols. Safeguards will also need to respond to anticipated emerging threats and to future, unanticipated threats. This will require strategic planning and cooperation among Member States and with the Agency. This paper will address challenges to IAEA safeguards and the technological possibilities and R&D strategies needed to meet those challenges in the context of the forty-year evolution of safeguards, including the ongoing transformation of safeguards by the Agency.

Pilat, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Budlong - Sylvester, Kory W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

ORIGINS OF MARINE PATTERNS OF BIODIVERSITY: SOME CORRELATES AND APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINS OF MARINE PATTERNS OF BIODIVERSITY: SOME CORRELATES AND APPLICATIONS by JAMES W. VALENTINE1, Brachiopoda, latitudinal diversity gradient, Neogene, provincial biodiversity. Many of the factors responsible for major biodiversity patterns are still unresolved, and thus macroecological and evolutionary theory

Boyce, C. Kevin

147

Biodiversity in Inland Waters --Priorities for its Protection and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Biodiversity Conservation in Freshwaters - brought together scientists, policy makers and managers to exchange ideas on the issues and challenges confronting the conservation of freshwater biodiversity in Australia in freshwater systems. Biodiversity conservation has received significant attention over the past decade

Canberra, University of

148

Remote Sensing for Biodiversity Conservation of the Albertine Rift  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

183 10 Remote Sensing for Biodiversity Conservation of the Albertine Rift in Eastern Africa Samuel of biodiversity conservation is understanding how environmental factors influence species abundance 2003). The rapidly developing field of remote sensing has been invaluable to biodiversity conservation

Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

149

Community Markets for Conservation (COMACO) links biodiversity conservation with sustainable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Community Markets for Conservation (COMACO) links biodiversity conservation with sustainable linked challenges to rural development and biodiversity conservation. Both household coping strategies, business-oriented model for poverty alleviation, food production, and biodiversity conservation

Lehmann, Johannes

150

ECOLOGICAL DIVERSITY AND BIODIVERSITY AS CONCEPTS FOR CONSERVATION PLANNING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECOLOGICAL DIVERSITY AND BIODIVERSITY AS CONCEPTS FOR CONSERVATION PLANNING: COMMENTS ON RICOTTA Sahotra Sarkar Biodiversity and Biocultural Conservation Laboratory, Section of Integrative Biology of measures of biodiversity which can be used for systematic conservation planning. Moreover, these measures

Sarkar, Sahotra

151

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Safeguards Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements, resonances are excited by an external photon beam leading to the emission of {gamma} rays with specific energies that are characteristic of the emitting isotope. The promise of NRF as a non-destructive analysis technique (NDA) in safeguards applications lies in its potential to directly quantify a specific isotope in an assay target without the need for unfolding the combined responses of several fissile isotopes as often required by other NDA methods. The use of NRF for detection of sensitive nuclear materials and other contraband has been researched in the past. In the safeguards applications considered here one has to go beyond mere detection and precisely quantify the isotopic content, a challenge that is discussed throughout this report. Basic NRF measurement methods, instrumentation, and the analytical calculation of NRF signal strengths are described in Section 2. Well understood modeling and simulation tools are needed for assessing the potential of NRF for safeguards and for designing measurement systems. All our simulations were performed with the radiation transport code MCNPX, a code that is widely used in the safeguards community. Our initial studies showed that MCNPX grossly underestimated the elastically scattered background at backwards angles due to an incorrect treatment of Rayleigh scattering. While new, corrected calculations based on ENDF form factors showed much better agreement with experimental data for the elastic scattering of photons on an uranium target, the elastic backscatter is still not rigorously treated. Photonuclear scattering processes (nuclear Thomson, Delbruck and Giant Dipole Resonance scattering), which are expected to play an important role at higher energies, are not yet included. These missing elastic scattering contributions were studied and their importance evaluated evaluated against data found in the literature as discussed in Section 3. A transmission experiment was performed in September 2009 to test and demonstrate the applicability of the method to the quantitative measurement of an isotope of interest embedded in a thick target. The experiment, data analysis, and results are described in Section 4. The broad goal of our NRF studies is to assess the potential of the technique in safeguards applications. Three examples are analyzed in Section 5: the isotopic assay of spent nuclear fuel (SNF), the measurement of {sup 235}U enrichment in UF{sub 6} cylinders, and the determination of {sup 239}Pu in mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. The study of NRF for the assay of SNF assemblies was supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. Department of Energy as part of a large multi-lab/university effort to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel assemblies and to detect the diversion of pins with non-destructive assay (NDA) methods. NRF is one of 14 NDA techniques being researched. The methodology for performing and analyzing quantitative NRF measurements was developed for determining Pu mass in SNF and is extensively discussed in this report. The same methodology was applied to the assessment of NRF for the measurement of {sup 235}U enrichment and the determination of {sup 239}Pu in MOX fuel. The analysis centers on determining suitable NRF measurement methods, measurement capabilities that could be realized with currently available instrumentation, and photon source and detector requirements for achieving useful NDA capabilities.

Ludewigt, Bernhard A; Quiter, Brian J; Ambers, Scott D

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

152

Safeguards and security modeling for electrochemical plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safeguards and security design for reprocessing plants can lead to excessive costs if not incorporated early in the design process. The design for electrochemical plants is somewhat uncertain since these plants have not been built at a commercial scale in the past. The Separation and Safeguards Performance Model (SSPM), developed at Sandia National Laboratories, has been used for safeguards design and evaluation for multiple reprocessing plant types. The SSPM includes the following capabilities: -) spent fuel source term library, -) mass tracking of elements 1-99 and bulk solid/liquids, -) tracking of heat load and activity, -) customisable measurement points, -) automated calculation of ID and error propagation, -) alarm conditions and statistical tests, and -) user-defined diversion scenarios. Materials accountancy and process monitoring data can provide more timely detection of material loss specifically to protect against the insider threat. While the SSPM is capable of determining detection probabilities and examining detection times for material loss scenarios, it does not model the operations or spatial effects for a plant design. The STAGE software was chosen to model the physical protection system. STAGE provides a framework to create end-to-end scalable force-on-force combat simulations. It allows for a complete 3D model of a facility to be designed along with the design of physical protection elements. This software, then, can be used to model operations and response for various material loss scenarios. The future integration of the SSPM model data with the STAGE software will provide a more complete analysis of diversion scenarios to assist plant designers.

Cipiti, B.B.; Duran, F.A.; Mendoza, L.A.; Parks, M.J.; Dominguez, D.; Le, T.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800 MS 0747, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Safeguarding Truck-Shipped Wholesale and Retail Fuels (STSWRF)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safeguarding Truck-Shipped Wholesale and Retail Fuels (STSWRF) Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the wholesaler/distributor level or below. This presents additional challenges in tracking untaxed fuel after approved ORNL's plan to conduct a Phase II Pilot Test titled Safeguarding Truck-Shipped Wholesale

154

NIH POLICY MANUAL 1345 -HANDLING AND SAFEGUARDING OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NIH POLICY MANUAL 1345 - HANDLING AND SAFEGUARDING OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES FOR NONHUMAN USE: This Chapter describes NIH policies and procedures for handling and safeguarding controlled substances the chapter in compliance with the NIH Office of Management Assessment standardized format. The revised

Bandettini, Peter A.

155

Safeguards & Security | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGEComplainant,.VisitorSafeguards & Security

156

Fuzzy risk analysis for nuclear safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis of a safeguards system, based on the notion of fuzzy sets and linguistic variables, concerns such as complexity and inherent imprecision in estimating the possibility of loss or compromise. The automated risk analysis allows the risk to be determined for an entire system based on estimates for lowest level components and the component proportion. In addition, for each component (asset) the most effective combination of protection mechanisms against a given set of threats is determined. A distinction between bar and featured risk is made.

Zardecki, A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Fuzzy risk analysis for nuclear safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis of a safeguards system, based on the notion of fuzzy sets and linguistic variables, concerns such as complexity and inherent imprecision in estimating the possibility of loss or compromise. The automated risk analysis allows the risk to be determined for an entire system based on estimates for lowest level components and the component proportion. In addition, for each component (asset) the most effective combination of protection mechanisms against a given set of threats is determined. A distinction between bar and featured risk is made.

Zardecki, A.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Safeguards & Security | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStoriesSANDIA1 0-SA-02 September 2013Safeguards &

159

A Biodiversity Scorecard for Colorado Colorado Natural Heritage Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Biodiversity Scorecard for Colorado Colorado Natural Heritage Program and The Nature Conservancy Conservancy. 2008. A Biodiversity Scorecard for Colorado. Colorado Natural Heritage Program, Colorado State

160

Biodiversity, Species Interactions and Ecological Networks in a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity, Species Interactions and Ecological Networks in a Fragmented World Melanie Hagen*, W 172 10. Conclusions 175 Acknowledgements 177 Appendix 177 References 181 Abstract Biodiversity

de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Farmland biodiversity - in the hands and minds of farmers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Recent declines in farmland biodiversity have been attributed to agricultural intensification. Organic farming and other Agri-Environmental Schemes have been implemented to counter the biodiversity decline.… (more)

Ahnström, Johan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Optimal forest management for carbon sequestration and biodiversity maintenance.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Managing planted forests for carbon sequestration and biodiversity maintenance has become increasingly important in times of rapid climate change and the loss of biodiversity worldwide.… (more)

Nghiem, Thi Hong Nhung

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Technology transfer significance of the International Safeguards Project Office  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The safeguards implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are of major importance to the non-proliferation objectives of the United States of America and other nations of the world. Assurance of safeguards effectiveness is mandatory to continued peaceful use of nuclear power. To enhance the ability of the IAEA to apply safeguards effectively, and to ensure that the IAEA does not lack technical assistance in critical areas, the US Congress has made available a special authorization for a Program for Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS). This substantial program of technology transfer was initiated in 1976. The United States Departments of State and Energy, the Arms control and Disarmament Agency and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have each accepted responsibility for parts of the Program for Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards. Funding is provided by state through the Foreign Assistance Act. This report provides a discussion of this program.

Marcuse, W.; Waligura, A.J.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Safeguards and security progress report, January-December 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From January to December 1985, the Los Alamos Safeguards and Security Program was involved in the activities described in the first four parts of this report: Safeguards Operations, Security Development and Support, Safeguards Technology Development, and International Support. Part 1 covers efforts of direct assistance to the Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensee facilities. This assistance includes consultation on materials accounting problems, development and demonstration of specialized techniques and instruments, and comprehensive participation in the design and evaluation of advanced safeguards systems. In addition, a series of training courses in various aspects of safeguards makes the technology more accessible to those who must apply it. Part 2 treats activities aimed at the security of information and computer systems. Our focus this period was on continuing the activities of the Center for Computer Security, which provides the basis for encouraging and disseminating this emerging technology, and on the development and demonstration of secure computer systems. Part 3 describes the broad development efforts essential to continuing improvements in the practice of safeguards. Although these projects are properly classified as developmental, they address recognized problems that commonly occur in operating facilities. Finally, Part 4 covers international safeguards activities, including both support to the International Atomic Energy Agency and bilateral exchanges. Enrichment plant safeguards and international safeguards for reprocessing plants required a significant portion of our resources. All of these efforts are beginning to provide substantial returns on our investment in technology transfer, not only in raising the level of safeguards effectiveness but also in our benefiting from field experiences in operating environments.

Not Available

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

A colalborative environment for information driven safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For two decades, the IAEA has recognized the need for a comprehensive and strongly integrated Knowledge Management system to support its Information Driven Safeguards activities. In the past, plans for the development of such a system have progressed slowly due to concerns over costs and feasibility. In recent years, Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a knowledge management system that could serve as the basis for an IAEA Collaborative Environment (ICE). The ICE derivative knowledge management system described in this paper addresses the challenge of living in an era of information overload coupled with certain knowledge shortfalls. The paper describes and defines a system that is flexible, yet ensures coordinated and focused collaboration, broad data evaluation capabilities, architected and organized work flows, and improved communications. The paper and demonstration of ICE will utilize a hypothetical scenario to highlight the functional features that facilitate collaboration amongst and between information analysts and inspectors. The scenario will place these two groups into a simulated planning exercise for a safeguards inspection drawing upon past data acquisitions, inspection reports, analyst conclusions, and a coordinated walk-through of a 3-D model of the facility. Subsequent to the conduct of the simulated facility inspection, the detection of an anomaly and pursuit of follow up activities will illustrate the event notification, information sharing, and collaborative capabilities of the system. The use of a collaborative environment such as ICE to fulfill the complicated knowledge management demands of the Agency and facilitate the completion of annual State Evaluation Reports will also be addressed.

Scott, Mark R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Michel, Kelly D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Safeguards Evaluation Method for evaluating vulnerability to insider threats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As protection of DOE facilities against outsiders increases to acceptable levels, attention is shifting toward achieving comparable protection against insiders. Since threats and protection measures for insiders are substantially different from those for outsiders, new perspectives and approaches are needed. One such approach is the Safeguards Evaluation Method. This method helps in assessing safeguards vulnerabilities to theft or diversion of special nuclear meterial (SNM) by insiders. The Safeguards Evaluation Method-Insider Threat is a simple model that can be used by safeguards and security planners to evaluate safeguards and proposed upgrades at their own facilities. The method is used to evaluate the effectiveness of safeguards in both timely detection (in time to prevent theft) and late detection (after-the-fact). The method considers the various types of potential insider adversaries working alone or in collusion with other insiders. The approach can be used for a wide variety of facilities with various quantities and forms of SNM. An Evaluation Workbook provides documentation of the baseline assessment; this simplifies subsequent on-site appraisals. Quantitative evaluation is facilitated by an accompanying computer program. The method significantly increases an evaluation team's on-site analytical capabilities, thereby producing a more thorough and accurate safeguards evaluation.

Al-Ayat, R.A.; Judd, B.R.; Renis, T.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Safeguards and security progress report, January-December 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From January to December 1984, the Los Alamos Safeguards and Security Program was involved in the activities described in the first four parts of this report: Nuclear Facility Support, Security Development and Support, Safeguards Technology Development, and International Safeguards. Part 1 covers efforts of direct assistance to the Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensee facilities. Part 2 treats activities aimed at the security of information and computer systems. was Part 3 describes the broad development efforts essential to continuing improvements in the practice of safeguards. Although these projects are properly classified as developmental, they address recognized problems that commonly occur in operating facilities. Finally, Part 4 covers international safeguards activities, including both support to the International Atomic Energy Agency and bilateral exchanges. Enrichment plant safeguards, especially those concerning the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant, required a significant portion of our resources. These efforts are beginning to provide substantial returns on our investment in technology transfer, not only in raising the level of safeguards effectiveness but also in benefiting from field experiences in operating environments.

Smith, D.B. (comp.)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

The European Safeguards Research and Development Association Addresses Safeguards and Nonproliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The renaissance of efforts to expand the use of nuclear energy requires the parallel development of a renewed and more sophisticated work force. Growth in the nuclear sector with high standard of safety, safeguards and security requires skilled staff for design, operations, inspections etc. High-quality nuclear technology educational programs are diminished from past years, and the ability of universities to attract students and to meet future staffing requirements of the nuclear industry is becoming seriously compromised. Thus, education and training in nuclear engineering and sciences is one of the cornerstones for the nuclear sector. Teaching in the nuclear field still seems strongly influenced by national history but it is time to strengthen resources and collaborate. Moreover with the current nuclear security threats it becomes critical that nuclear technology experts master the basic principles not only of safety, but also of nuclear safeguards, nonproliferation and nuclear security. In Europe the European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association has established the certificate 'European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering (EMSNE)' as the classic nuclear engineering program covering reactor operation and nuclear safety. However, it does not include courses on nonproliferation, safeguards, or dual-use technologies. The lack of education in nuclear safeguards was tackled by the European Safeguards Research and Development Association (ESARDA), through development and implementation of safeguards course modules. Since 2005 the ESARDA Working Group, called the Training and Knowledge Management Working Group, (TKMWG) has worked with the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy to organize a Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation course. This five-day course is held each spring at the JRC, and continues to show increasing interest as evidenced by the positive responses of international lecturers and students. The standard set of lectures covers a broad range of subjects, including nuclear material accountancy principles, legal definitions and the regulatory base and inspection tools and techniques. This 60% core part is given by representatives from regulatory bodies (The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Directorate General for Nuclear Energy and Transport), industry (AREVA, British Nuclear Group), and research (Stockholm University, Hamburg University, Joint Research Centre-Institute of Transuranic Elements, and Joint Research Centre-Institute for the Protection of the Citizen). The remaining part is completed with topical lectures addressed by invited lecturers, such as from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the IAEA addressing topics of physical protection, illicit trafficking, the Iraq case study, exercises, including satellite imagery interpretation etc. With this structure of a stable core plus a variable set of invited lectures, the course will remain sustainable and up-to-date. A syllabus provides the students a homogeneous set of information material in nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation matters at the European and international level. In this way, the ESARDA TKMWG aims to contribute to a two-fold scientific-technical and political-juridical education and training.

Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Kusumi, R.; Daures, Pascal A.; Janssens, Willem; Dickman, Deborah A.

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

169

Safeguards and security progress report, January-December 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From January to December 1983, the Los Alamos Safeguards and Security Program was involved in the activities described in the first four parts of this report: Nuclear Facility Support, Security Development and Support, Safeguards Technology Development, and International Safeguards. Part 1 covers efforts of direct assistance to the Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensee facilities. This assistance includes consultation on materials accounting problems, development of specialized techniques and instruments, and comprehensive participation in the design and implementation of advanced safeguards systems. In addition, a series of training courses in various aspects of safeguards makes the technology more accessible to those who must apply it. Part 2 treats activities aimed at the security of information and computer systems. Our focus this peiod was on continuing the activities of the Computer Security Center, which provides the basis for encouraging and disseminating this emerging technology, and on the development and demonstration of secure computer systems. Part 3 describes the broad development efforts essential to continuing improvements in the practice of safeguards. Although these projects are properly classified as developmental, they address recognized problems that commonly occur in operating facilities. Finally, Part 4 covers international safeguards activities, including both support to the International Atomic Energy Agency and bilateral exchanges. Enrichment plant safeguards, especially those concerning the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant, required a significant portion of our resources. These efforts are beginning to provide substantial returns on our investment in technology transfer, not only in raising the level of safeguards effectiveness but also in our benefiting from field experiences in operating environments.

Smith, D.B. (comp.)

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Motivations for Conserving Urban Biodiversity DONALD C. DEARBORN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Essay Motivations for Conserving Urban Biodiversity DONALD C. DEARBORN AND SALIT KARK Department, the fundamental value of conserving urban biodiversity re- mains controversial. How much of a fixed budget should seven possible motivations for urban biodiversity conservation: preserving local biodiversity, creating

Kark, Salit

171

Safeguards Approaches for Black Box Processes or Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to determine whether a safeguards approach can be developed for “black box” processes or facilities. These are facilities where a State or operator may limit IAEA access to specific processes or portions of a facility; in other cases, the IAEA may be prohibited access to the entire facility. The determination of whether a black box process or facility is safeguardable is dependent upon the details of the process type, design, and layout; the specific limitations on inspector access; and the restrictions placed upon the design information that can be provided to the IAEA. This analysis identified the necessary conditions for safeguardability of black box processes and facilities.

Diaz-Marcano, Helly; Gitau, Ernest TN; Hockert, John; Miller, Erin; Wylie, Joann

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

172

Panel on protection and management of plutonium: Subpanel on safeguards and security  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear materials safeguards and security systems are described in the context of the nuclear nonproliferation regime. Materials of interest to safeguards, threats, proposals to strengthen International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards, evolving safeguards issues and requirements, system effectiveness, and elements of a global nuclear materials management regime are discussed. Safeguards are seen as an essential element of nuclear materials management, but not a driver for decisions regarding nuclear power or the disposal of excess weapon nuclear materials.

Tape, J.W.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Report on BNLs Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Human Capital Development Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory’s (BNL’s) Nonproliferation and National Security Department contributes to the National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Nonproliferation and International Security Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) through university engagement, safeguards internships, safeguards courses, professional development, recruitment, and other activities aimed at ensuring the next generation of international safeguards professionals is adequately prepared to support the U.S. safeguards mission. This report is a summary of BNL s work under the NGSI program in Fiscal Year 2014.

Pepper S. E.

2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

174

Apparatus for safeguarding a radiological source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tamper detector is provided for safeguarding a radiological source that is moved into and out of a storage location through an access porthole for storage and use. The radiological source is presumed to have an associated shipping container approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for transporting the radiological source. The tamper detector typically includes a network of sealed tubing that spans at least a portion of the access porthole. There is an opening in the network of sealed tubing that is large enough for passage therethrough of the radiological source and small enough to prevent passage therethrough of the associated shipping cask. Generally a gas source connector is provided for establishing a gas pressure in the network of sealed tubing, and a pressure drop sensor is provided for detecting a drop in the gas pressure below a preset value.

Bzorgi, Fariborz M

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

175

Your biodiversity in my backyard : key local stakeholders' perceptions of biodiversity conservation in Gorontalo, Indonesia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The establishment of protected areas (PAs) has been the key national strategy in biodiversity conservation, through preserving the unique wildlife and ecosystems in Indonesia. As… (more)

Kartikasari, Sri Nurani

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

FY 2008 Next Generation Safeguards Initiative International Safeguards Education and Training Pilot Progerams Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Key component of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) launched by the National Nuclear Security Administration is the development of human capital to meet present and future challenges to the safeguards regime. An effective university-level education in safeguards and related disciplines is an essential element in a layered strategy to rebuild the safeguards human resource capacity. Two pilot programs at university level, involving 44 students, were initiated and implemented in spring-summer 2008 and linked to hands-on internships at LANL or LLNL. During the internships, students worked on specific safeguards-related projects with a designated Laboratory Mentor to provide broader exposure to nuclear materials management and information analytical techniques. The Safeguards and Nuclear Material Management pilot program was a collaboration between the Texas A&M University (TAMU), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). It included a 16-lecture course held during a summer internship program. The instructors for the course were from LANL together with TAMU faculty and LLNL experts. The LANL-based course was shared with the students spending their internship at LLNL via video conference. A week-long table-top (or hands-on) exercise on was also conducted at LANL. The student population was a mix of 28 students from a 12 universities participating in a variety of summer internship programs held at LANL and LLNL. A large portion of the students were TAMU students participating in the NGSI pilot. The International Nuclear Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis pilot program was implemented at the Monterey Institute for International Studies (MIIS) in cooperation with LLNL. It included a two-week intensive course consisting of 20 lectures and two exercises. MIIS, LLNL, and speakers from other U.S. national laboratories (LANL, BNL) delivered lectures for the audience of 16 students. The majority of students were senior classmen or new master's degree graduates from MIIS specializing in nonproliferation policy studies. Other university/organizations represented: University of California in LA, Stanford University, and the IAEA. Four of the students that completed this intensive course participated in a 2-month internship at LLNL. The conclusions of the two pilot courses and internships was a NGSI Summer Student Symposium, held at LLNL, where 20 students participated in LLNL facility tours and poster sessions. The Poster sessions were designed to provide a forum for sharing the results of their summer projects and providing experience in presenting their work to a varied audience of students, faculty and laboratory staff. The success of bringing together the students from the technical and policy pilots was notable and will factor into the planning for the continued refinement of their two pilot efforts in the coming years.

Dreicer, M; Anzelon, G; Essner, J; Dougan, A; Doyle, J; Boyer, B; Hypes, P; Sokova, E; Wehling, F

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

177

Patent Law, HIPPO, and the Biodiversity Crisis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the phenomena largely responsible for the current mass extinction event, and patent law offers valuable assistance in combating each one. Though it cannot offer a complete solution to the biodiversity crisis, the patent system can offer powerful tools to help...

Torrance, Andrew W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Advanced integrated safeguards using front-end-triggering devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses potential uses of front-end-triggering devices for enhanced safeguards. Such systems incorporate video surveillance as well as radiation and other sensors. Also covered in the report are integration issues and analysis techniques.

Howell, J.A.; Whitty, W.J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Safeguards for Uranium Extraction (UREX) +1a Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of nuclear material accountancy (MA), containment and surveillance (C/S) and solution monitoring (SM). Facility information was developed for a hypothesized UREX+1a plant with a throughput of 1000 Metric Tons Heavy Metal (MTHM) per year. Safeguard goals...

Feener, Jessica S.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

180

Development of Pattern Recognition Options for Combining Safeguards Subsystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This talk reviews project progress in combining process monitoring data and nuclear material accounting data to improve the over nuclear safeguards system. Focus on 2 subsystems: (1) nuclear materials accounting (NMA); and (2) process monitoring (PM).

Burr, Thomas L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hamada, Michael S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Influence of safeguards and fire protection on criticality safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are several positive influences of safeguards and fire protection on criticality safety. Experts in each discipline must be aware of regulations and requirements of the others and work together to ensure a fault-tree design. EG and G Idaho, Inc., routinely uses an Occupancy-Use Readiness Manual to consider all aspects of criticality safety, fire protection, and safeguards. The use of the analytical tree is described.

Six, D E

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Termination of Safeguards on ULWBR Material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management, has approved the disposition of 31 metric tons of Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor (ULWBR) material in canisters stored within dry wells of the Underground Fuel Storage Facility at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). This unirradiated material consists primarily of ceramic pellets of thorium oxide in stainless steel cladding, but it also contains 300 kilograms of uranium that is 98 wt% U-233. The ULWBR material was not processed at the INTEC because it was incompatible with prior chemical separation schemes. Other economical recovery options have not been identified, and expressions of interest for consolidating the material with existing projects at other DOE sites have not been received. The U-233 could be used for producing the medical isotope Actinium-225, but the proof-of-principle demonstration and follow-on pilot program have not been developed to the point of requiring production quantities of U-233. Consequently, the selected disposition of the ULWBR material was burial as Low Level Waste at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which required terminating safeguards controls for the contained Category II quantity of Attractiveness Level D special nuclear material (SNM). The requested termination followed the twelve point evaluation criteria of the Historical Defense Program Discard Guidance and included a security analysis for evaluating the risks of theft, diversion, and radiological sabotage associated with the material. Continuity of knowledge in the book inventory was assured by documenting that the original shipper’s measurements accurately reflected the quantities of materials received and that the ULWBR materials had remained under adequate physical protection and had been subject to periodic physical inventories. The method selected for substantiating the book values as the basis for terminating safeguards was the nondestructive assay used during physical inventories. Shipping arrangements included refurbishing a licensed cask to be reused over the duration of the termination process. An accompanying batching plan and shipping schedule were developed to accommodate multiple commercial shipments of Category III quantities of SNM in the selected cask, such that all canisters would be received at NTS prior to the expiration of the nonrenewable cask license.

Ivan R. Thomas; Ernest L. Laible

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

NDA safeguards techniques for LMFBR assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The significant safeguards concerns for liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs), and for the LMFBR fuel handling systems are the accountability, surveillance, and identification of fuel and blanket assemblies. The introduction of fuel assemblies with a high content of Pu into the receiving and shipping areas of the LMFBR fuel cycle does allow a more direct near-real-time assay profile of the disposition of Pu. Isotope correlations and neutron assay methods have been investigated and implemented for determining plutonium and burnup in fresh and spent LMFBR fuel assemblies. The methods are based on active and passive neutron coincidence counting (NCC) techniques. Preliminary studies on neutron yield rates from the spontaneous fission of plutonium and curium isotopes have indicated that the NCC system is a most effective measure in the verification of nuclear material flow in assembly form for the entire reactor fuel handling cycle, i.e., from the fresh- to the spent-fuel stage. A consequence of the high plutonium concentration level throughout the fuel irradiation period in an LMFBR, is that the spontaneous fission neutron yield from the 242-curium and 244-curium does not dominate the spontaneous fission neutron yield from the plutonium isotopes in the spent fuel stage.

Persiani, P.J.; Gundy, M.L.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY INTEGRATION WITH SAFETY ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to share the Savannah River Site lessons learned on Safeguards and Security (S&S) program integration with K-Area Complex (KAC) safety basis. The KAC Documented Safety Analysis (DSA), is managed by the Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC), and the S&S program, managed by Wackenhut Services, Incorporated--Savannah River Site (WSI-SRS). WSRC and WSI-SRS developed a contractual arrangement to recognize WSI-SRS requirements in the KAC safety analysis. Design Basis Threat 2003 (DBT03) security upgrades required physical modifications and operational changes which included the availability of weapons which could potentially impact the facility safety analysis. The KAC DSA did not previously require explicit linkage to the S&S program to satisfy the safety analysis. WSI-SRS have contractual requirements with the Department of Energy (DOE) which are separate from WSRC contract requirements. The lessons learned will include a discussion on planning, analysis, approval of the controls and implementation issues.

Hearn, J; James Lightner, J

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

185

Integrating Safeguards and Security with Safety into Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a need to minimize security risks, proliferation hazards, and safety risks in the design of new nuclear facilities in a global environment of nuclear power expansion, while improving the synergy of major design features and raising operational efficiency. In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) launched the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) covering many safeguards areas. One of these, launched by NNSA with support of the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, was a multi-laboratory project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), to develop safeguards by design. The proposed Safeguards-by-Design (SBD) process has been developed as a structured approach to ensure the timely, efficient, and cost effective integration of international safeguards and other nonproliferation barriers with national material control and accountability, physical security, and safety objectives into the overall design process for the nuclear facility lifecycle. A graded, iterative process was developed to integrate these areas throughout the project phases. It identified activities, deliverables, interfaces, and hold points covering both domestic regulatory requirements and international safeguards using the DOE regulatory environment as exemplar to provide a framework and guidance for project management and integration of safety with security during design. Further work, reported in this paper, created a generalized SBD process which could also be employed within the licensed nuclear industry and internationally for design of new facilities. Several tools for integrating safeguards, safety, and security into design are discussed here. SBD appears complementary to the EFCOG TROSSI process for security and safety integration created in 2006, which focuses on standardized upgrades to enable existing DOE facilities to meet a more severe design basis threat. A collaborative approach is suggested.

Robert S. Bean; John W. Hockert; David J. Hebditch

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Predictable waves of sequential forest degradation and biodiversity loss spreading from an African city  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- tainably reducing carbon storage and biodiversity. biodiversity conservation | carbon emissions | reducing, wood production, and biodiversity conservation. The impacts of individual forms of tropical forestPredictable waves of sequential forest degradation and biodiversity loss spreading from an African

Vermont, University of

187

Lessons Learned in International Safeguards - Implementation of Safeguards at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this report is lessons learned at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP). However, the subject of lessons learned for application of international safeguards at reprocessing plants includes a cumulative history of inspections starting at the West Valley (New York, U.S.A.) reprocessing plant in 1969 and proceeding through all of the efforts over the years. The RRP is the latest and most challenging application the International Atomic Energy Agency has faced. In many ways the challenges have remained the same, timely inspection and evaluation with limited inspector resources, with the continuing realization that planning and preparations can never start early enough in the life cycle of a facility. Lessons learned over the years have involved the challenges of using ongoing advances in technology and dealing with facilities with increased throughput and continuous operation. This report will begin with a review of historical developments and lessons learned. This will provide a basis for a discussion of the experiences and lessons learned from the implementation of international safeguards at RRP.

Ehinger, Michael H [ORNL; Johnson, Shirley [Tucker Creek Consulting

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New TRU Fuel Fabrication Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This second report in a series of three reviews possible safeguards approaches for the new transuranic (TRU) fuel fabrication processes to be deployed at AFCF – specifically, the ceramic TRU (MOX) fuel fabrication line and the metallic (pyroprocessing) line. The most common TRU fuel has been fuel composed of mixed plutonium and uranium dioxide, referred to as “MOX”. However, under the Advanced Fuel Cycle projects custom-made fuels with higher contents of neptunium, americium, and curium may also be produced to evaluate if these “minor actinides” can be effectively burned and transmuted through irradiation in the ABR. A third and final report in this series will evaluate and review the advanced safeguards approach options for the ABR. In reviewing and developing the advanced safeguards approach for the new TRU fuel fabrication processes envisioned for AFCF, the existing international (IAEA) safeguards approach at the Plutonium Fuel Production Facility (PFPF) and the conceptual approach planned for the new J-MOX facility in Japan have been considered as a starting point of reference. The pyro-metallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication process at EBR-II near Idaho Falls also provided insight for safeguarding the additional metallic pyroprocessing fuel fabrication line planned for AFCF.

Durst, Philip C.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Boyer, Brian; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Tolk, K.

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Safeguards-by-Design: An Element of 3S Integration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008, the “20/20 Vision for the Future” background report by the IAEA Director General identified the possibility of integrating certain activities related to safeguards, safety, and security. Later in the year, the independent Commission report prepared at the request of the IAEA Director General noted that the Agency’s roles in nuclear safeguards, safety, and security (3S) complement and can mutually reinforce each other. Safeguards-by-design (SBD) is a practical measure that strengthens 3S integration, especially for the stage of nuclear facility design and construction, but also with ramifications for other stages of the facility life-cycle. This paper describes the SBD concept, with examples for diverse regulatory environments, being developed in the U.S under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative and the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative. This is compared with related international SBD work performed in the recent IAEA workshop on “Facility Design and Plant Operation Features that Facilitate the Implementation of IAEA Safeguards”. Potential future directions for further development of SBD and its integration within 3S are identified.

R. S. Bean; T. A. Bjornard; D. J. Hebdich

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Task team approach to safeguards and security designs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1987, a US Department of Energy (DOE) supported task team was organized at the request of the DOE Idaho Field Office (DOE-ID) to provide support for safeguards and security (S S) designs of the Special Isotope Separation (SIS) facility. Prior to deferral of the project, the SIS facility was to be constructed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to produce weapons grade plutonium from DOE owned fuel grade plutonium. The task team was assembled to provide the resources necessary to assure that safeguards and security considerations were included as an integral part of the design of the facility, and that SIS designs would take advantage of available technology in the areas of physical security, measurements, accountability, and material and personnel tracking. The task team included personnel from DOE/Office of Safeguards and Security (DOE-OSS), DOE-ID, DOE contractors, and the national laboratories providing a wide range of expertise and experience. The team reviewed proposed designs and provided recommendations for safeguards and security features in each stage of the design process. The value of this approach to safeguards and security designs will be discussed with respect to benefits, lessons learned, and recommendations for future applications. 5 refs.

Zack, N.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Wilkey, D.D. (USDOE Idaho Operations Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Fossil Biodiversity: Red Noise Plus Signal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have examined the Fourier power spectrum as well as the Hurst exponent of extinction, origination, and total biodiversity in the marine fossil record, using a recently improved geologic timescale. We find all of them strongly inconsistent with past claims of self-similarity as well as inconsistent with random walk behavior. Instead, they are dominated by low-frequency power, with approximate f^-2 power over one decade in frequency. The spectrum turns over at about 10^8 y, lending plausibility to connections with galactic dynamics. Even in the background of this low-frequency dominance, a previously noted 62 My biodiversity cycle stands out with better than 99% confidence above the noise level, accounting for about 35% of the total variance in the fossil biodiversity record.

Adrian L. Melott; Bruce S. Lieberman

2006-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

192

Fossil Biodiversity: Red Noise Plus Signal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have examined the Fourier power spectrum as well as the Hurst exponent of extinction, origination, and total biodiversity in the marine fossil record, using a recently improved geologic timescale. We find all of them strongly inconsistent with past claims of self-similarity as well as inconsistent with random walk behavior. Instead, they are dominated by low-frequency power, with approximate f^-2 power over one decade in frequency. The spectrum turns over at about 10^5 y, lending plausibility to connections with galactic dynamics. Even in the background of this low-frequency dominance, a previously noted 62 My biodiversity cycle stands out with better than 99% confidence above the noise level, accounting for about 35% of the total variance in the fossil biodiversity record.

Melott, A L; Melott, Adrian L.; Lieberman, Bruce S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Sampling Efficiency and Biodiversity Peter Neal & John Moriary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sampling Efficiency and Biodiversity Peter Neal & John Moriary First version: 9 June 2009 Research #12;Sampling efficiency and biodiversity Peter Neal and John Moriary June 9, 2009 1 Introduction Given

Sidorov, Nikita

194

Safeguards and security research and development progress report, October 1993--September 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activities carried out by the Los Alamos Safeguards and Security Research and Development (R&D) program from October 1993 through September 1994. The activities presented in the first part of the report were directed primarily to domestic US safeguards applications and were, for the most part, sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Office of Safeguards and Security (DOE/OSS, NN-50). The activities described in Part 2, International Safeguards, were supported by the International Safeguards Division of the Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (DOE/OACN, NN-40). Part 3 describes several safeguards or safeguards-related activities that have other sponsors. The final part of the report lists titles and abstracts of Los Alamos safeguards R&D reports, technical journal articles, and conference papers that were published or presented in 1994.

Smith, D.B.; Jaramillo, G.R. [comp.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Proceedings of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards Safety Culture Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

NUREG/CP-0183, Proceedings of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards Safety Culture Workshop, June 12, 2003 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards Washington, DC 20555-0001.

196

Integrated safeguards & security for material protection, accounting, and control.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditional safeguards and security design for fuel cycle facilities is done separately and after the facility design is near completion. This can result in higher costs due to retrofits and redundant use of data. Future facilities will incorporate safeguards and security early in the design process and integrate the systems to make better use of plant data and strengthen both systems. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the integration of materials control and accounting (MC&A) measurements with physical security design for a nuclear reprocessing plant. Locations throughout the plant where data overlap occurs or where MC&A data could be a benefit were identified. This mapping is presented along with the methodology for including the additional data in existing probabilistic assessments to evaluate safeguards and security systems designs.

Duran, Felicia Angelica; Cipiti, Benjamin B.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Course Information Document MSc Quantitative Methods in Biodiversity, Conservation &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Course Information Document 2013/14 MSc Quantitative Methods in Biodiversity, Conservation, Veterinary and Life Sciences Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine #12;2 MSc/PgD Quantitative Methods in Biodiversity, Conservation & Epidemiology Animal Welfare Science, Ethics & Law TABLE

Guo, Zaoyang

198

Linking Biodiversity and Recreational Merits of Urban Green Spaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Linking Biodiversity and Recreational Merits of Urban Green Spaces Methodological Development Ling, Alnarp 2014 Cover: A view of Ramlösa Brunnspark, Helsingborg (photo: Ling Qiu) #12;Linking Biodiversity an important role in promoting both biodiversity and human recreation. This thesis therefore attempted to link

199

Extinction and the spatial dynamics of biodiversity David Jablonski*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extinction and the spatial dynamics of biodiversity David Jablonski* Department of Geophysical, and expansion of clades from the tropics fuels at least some recoveries, as well as biodiversity dynamics during on special consequence when attempting to evaluate the processes shaping present-day biodiversity, where

Boyce, C. Kevin

200

POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON BIODIVERSITY AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES IN THE SAN this paper. #12;ii ABSTRACT The San Francisco Bay Area contains a rich array of plant and animal biodiversity planning in the Bay Area is under way to enhance biodiversity conservation through continued open space

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

UNCORRECTED 2 Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNCORRECTED PROOF 2 Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial 3 and subsistence groups Biodiversity Science, Conservation International, 1919 M St., Washington, DC 20036, USA 7 c Energy as: Lisa Naughton-Treves et al., Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial

Kammen, Daniel M.

202

The Biodiversity of Catalytic Super-Brownian Motion Klaus Fleischmann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Biodiversity of Catalytic Super-Brownian Motion Klaus Fleischmann WeierstraÃ?-Institut f that the reactant has an infinite local biodiversity or genetic abundance. This contrasts the finite local biodiversity of the equilibrium of classical super-Brownian motion. Another question we address

Klenke, Achim

203

Biodiversity in fragmented landscapes: reviewing evidence on the effects of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity in fragmented landscapes: reviewing evidence on the effects of landscape features contributing factors to the loss of biodiversity. The movement of individuals among small, isolated populations. In the previous Information Notes on `Evaluating biodiversity in fragmented landscapes' (Watts et al., 2005; Watts

204

Assessing and Communicating the Loss of Biodiversity and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessing and Communicating the Loss of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services with Remote Sensing impacts on biodiversity, ecosystems and the services they provide. The summer school's goal is to learn about innovations in information technologies to generate information on changes of biodiversity

Schmidt, Matthias

205

Biodiversity in Planted Forests 1 Overmature Sitka spruce: a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity in Planted Forests 1 Overmature Sitka spruce: a natural reserve to encourage differ as to the potential value of these `new forests' for biodiversity. Attention has often been drawn to compare the biodiversity of planted forests with that of native or semi-natural woodlands. With continuing

206

Functional consequences of realistic biodiversity changes in a marine ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Functional consequences of realistic biodiversity changes in a marine ecosystem Matthew E. S, 2007) Declines in biodiversity have prompted concern over the conse- quences of species loss the functional consequences of realistic, nonrandom changes in biodiversity. Instead, most designs have used

Brody, James P.

207

Biodiversity and Conservation 11: 353356, 2002. Book review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity and Conservation 11: 353­356, 2002. Book review Enfoques contemporáneos para el journals are explicitly devoted to this subject (e.g., Biodiversity and Conservation, Diversity estudio de la biodiversidad1 (Current Approaches to the Study of Biodiversity) Edited by H.M. Hernández, A

Vazquez, Diego

208

The Optimal Design of Investments in Biodiversity Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Optimal Design of Investments in Biodiversity Conservation q1 p1 Area Price q2 p2 qd qc Paul R to terrestrial biodiversity and financial investment in habitat conservation efforts has become a cornerstone the needs of biodiversity leads to ineffective conservation programmes and may even risk conservation

Gray, Matthew

209

The efficiency of voluntary incentive policies for preventing biodiversity loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity Conservation Land use Spatial modeling A B S T R A C T Habitat loss is a primary cause of loss of biodiversity but conserving habitat for species presents challenges. Land parcels differ in their ability conservation objectives. This topic is important not just for biodiversity conservation but for any effort

Weiblen, George D

210

Global Biodiversity Change: The Bad, the Good, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

framework can be used to identify undesirable biodiversity change and allocate conservation efforts. 25 AnnuGlobal Biodiversity Change: The Bad, the Good, and the Unknown Henrique Miguel Pereira, Laetitia Abstract Global biodiversity change is one of the most pressing environmental is- sues of our time. Here

Pereira, Henrique Miguel

211

Biodiversity Conservation and Poverty Traps December 2, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity Conservation and Poverty Traps December 2, 2009 Co-organizers Alex Travis and Chris biodiversity conservation and poverty traps. Multiple participants observed that Cornell has relatively large. A good deal of discussion concerned the emphasis on biodiversity conservation as opposed to broader

Angenent, Lars T.

212

Amazonian biodiversity: assessing conservation priorities with taxonomic data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Amazonian biodiversity: assessing conservation priorities with taxonomic data W. J. KRESS*à , W. R areas recommended for conservation in an earlier qualitative study of Amazonian biodiversity. Museum be addressed. 0960-3115 � 1998 Chapman & Hall Biodiversity and Conservation 7, 1577±1587 (1998) #12

Erwin, Terry

213

Concordance of freshwater and terrestrial biodiversity Robin Abell1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global priorities for biodiversity conservation are only as robust as the data used to identify them of freshwater biodiversity patterns. Given that many conservation priorities are currently driven by terrestrialLETTER Concordance of freshwater and terrestrial biodiversity Robin Abell1 , Michele Thieme1

Vermont, University of

214

Freshwater biodiversity conservation: recent progress and future challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Freshwater biodiversity conservation: recent progress and future challenges David L. Strayer1 Cary their marine or terrestrial counterparts. Here, we review progress in conservation of freshwater biodiversity of Ecology and Biodiversity, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People

215

Restoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, explicitly link the conservation of biodiversity with the provision of ecosys- tem services to support services might be at the expense of biodiversity conservation [8,9], whereas others have suggestedRestoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and opportunities James M. Bullock1

Rey Benayas, José María

216

Hydrobiologia 500: 203211, 2003. K. Martens (ed.), Aquatic Biodiversity.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. 203 Biodiversity: bridging the gap between condition and conservation words: rivers, biodiversity assessment, conservation, restoration, predictive models Abstract The aim conservation value and; (3) a region that was identified as having significant biodiversity loss but with high

Canberra, University of

217

Ultra-high-resolution alpha spectrometry for nuclear forensics and safeguards applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We will present our work on the development of ultra-high-resolution detectors for alpha particle spectrometry. These detectors, based on superconducting transition-edge sensors, offer energy resolution that is five to ten times better than conventional silicon detectors. Using these microcalorimeter detectors, the isotopic composition of mixed-actinide samples can be determined rapidly without the need for actinide separation chemistry to isolate each element, or mass spectrometry to separate isotopic signatures that can not be resolved using traditional alpha spectrometry (e.g. Pu-239/Pu-240, or Pu-238/Am-241). This paper will cover the detector and measurement system, actinide source preparation, and the quantitative isotopic analysis of a number of forensics- and safeguards-relevant radioactive sources.

Bacrania, Minesh K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croce, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bond, Evelyn [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dry, Donald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moody, W. Allen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lamont, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rabin, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rim, Jung [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Audrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beall, James [NIST-BOULDER; Bennett, Douglas [NIST-BOULDER; Kotsubo, Vincent [NIST-BOULDER; Horansky, Robert [NIST-BOULDER; Hilton, Gene [NIST-BOULDER; Schmidt, Daniel [NIST-BOULDER; Ullom, Joel [NIST-BOULDER; Cantor, Robin [STAR CRYOELECTRONICS

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

International Safeguards Technology and Policy Education and Training Pilot Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major focus of the National Nuclear Security Administration-led Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) is the development of human capital to meet present and future challenges to the safeguards regime. An effective university-level education in safeguards and related disciplines is an essential element in a layered strategy to rebuild the safeguards human resource capacity. NNSA launched two pilot programs in 2008 to develop university level courses and internships in association with James, Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS) at the Monterey Institute of International Studies (MIIS) and Texas A&M University (TAMU). These pilot efforts involved 44 students in total and were closely linked to hands-on internships at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Safeguards and Nuclear Material Management pilot program was a collaboration between TAMU, LANL, and LLNL. The LANL-based coursework was shared with the students undertaking internships at LLNL via video teleconferencing. A weeklong hands-on exercise was also conducted at LANL. A second pilot effort, the International Nuclear Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis pilot program was implemented at MIIS in cooperation with LLNL. Speakers from MIIS, LLNL, and other U.S. national laboratories (LANL, BNL) delivered lectures for the audience of 16 students. The majority of students were senior classmen or new master's degree graduates from MIIS specializing in nonproliferation policy studies. The two pilots programs concluded with an NGSI Summer Student Symposium, held at LLNL, where 20 students participated in LLNL facility tours and poster sessions. The value of bringing together the students from the technical and policy pilots was notable and will factor into the planning for the continued refinement of the two programs in the coming years.

Dreicer, M; Anzelon, G A; Essner, J T; Dougan, A D; Doyle, J; Boyer, B; Hypes, P; Sokava, E; Wehling, F; Martin, J; Charlton, W

2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

219

Application of the sources code in nuclear safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sources Code System provides a greatly expanded calculational capacity in the field of nuclear safeguards. It is becoming more common that we are called upon to perform assays on materials for which no standards exist. These materials tend to be mixtures of nuclear materials and low-Z compounds (spent fuels in a variety of matrices, in-process compounds such as UF6, MOX with varying water content). We will present soma applications of the Sources Code and discuss the application calculated (a,n) source terms in neutron coincidence counting for nuclear safeguards.

Beddingfield, D. H. (David H.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

BIODIVERSITY Origin matters: alien consumers inflict  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIODIVERSITY RESEARCH Origin matters: alien consumers inflict greater damage on prey populations, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON N9B 3P4, Canada. E-mail: hughm@uwindsor.ca ABSTRACT Aim Introduced alien regard to whether such species are native or alien. This argument rests on the premise that native

Ricciardi, Anthony

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

BIODIVERSITY The contribution of newly established  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIODIVERSITY RESEARCH The contribution of newly established populations to the dynamics of range River and estuary. We first determined genetic origins among several potential wild and cultured source, in Lake Memphremagog. Populations from the Maritime provinces and domestic strains do not contribute

Bernatchez, Louis

222

BIODIVERSITY The geography of climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIODIVERSITY REVIEW The geography of climate change: implications for conservation biogeography D. J. B. Kraft1 INTRODUCTION It is widely recognized that climate change poses a grave threat., 2007). The impacts of climate change are broadly detectable in many taxa, including shifts in phenology

Kraft, Nathan

223

Navjot's nightmare revisited: logging, agriculture, and biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forests. Conversely, conversion of primary or logged forests to plantation crops, such as oil palm, causes the biodiversity of this region. Our analysis also suggests that, because South- east Asian forests are tightly and replaced with a nonforest landcover (e.g., agriculture including oil palm and rubber, timber plantations

Vermont, University of

224

Next Generation Safeguards Initiative: Analysis of Probability of Detection of Plausible Diversion Scenarios at Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants Using Advanced Safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last decade, efforts by the safeguards community, including inspectorates, governments, operators and owners of centrifuge facilities, have given rise to new possibilities for safeguards approaches in enrichment plants. Many of these efforts have involved development of new instrumentation to measure uranium mass and uranium-235 enrichment and inspection schemes using unannounced and random site inspections. We have chosen select diversion scenarios and put together a reasonable system of safeguards equipment and safeguards approaches and analyzed the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed safeguards approach by predicting the probability of detection of diversion in the chosen safeguards approaches. We analyzed the effect of redundancy in instrumentation, cross verification of operator instrumentation by inspector instrumentation, and the effects of failures or anomalous readings on verification data. Armed with these esults we were able to quantify the technical cost benefit of the addition of certain instrument suites and show the promise of these new systems.

Hase, Kevin R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hawkins Erpenbeck, Heather [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

225

Nuclear reactor safeguards and monitoring with antineutrino detectors A. Bernsteina)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear reactor safeguards and monitoring with antineutrino detectors A. Bernsteina) Sandia of nuclear reactor types, including power reactors, research reactors, and plutonium production reactors-understood principles that govern the core's evolution in time, can be used to determine whether the reactor is being

Gratta, Giorgio

226

Project Report on Development of a Safeguards Approach for Pyroprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory has undertaken an effort to develop a standard safeguards approach for international commercial pyroprocessing facilities. This report details progress for the fiscal year 2010 effort. A component by component diversion pathway analysis has been performed, and has led to insight on the mitigation needs and equipment development needed for a valid safeguards approach. The effort to develop an in-hot cell detection capability led to the digital cloud chamber, and more importantly, the significant potential scientific breakthrough of the inverse spectroscopy algorithm, including the ability to identify energy and spatial location of gamma ray emitting sources with a single, non-complex, stationary radiation detector system. Curium measurements were performed on historical and current samples at the FCF to attempt to determine the utility of using gross neutron counting for accountancy measurements. A solid cost estimate of equipment installation at FCF has been developed to guide proposals and cost allocations to use FCF as a test bed for safeguards measurement demonstrations. A combined MATLAB and MCNPX model has been developed to perform detector placement calculations around the electrorefiner. Early harvesting has occurred wherein the project team has been requested to provide pyroprocessing technology and safeguards short courses.

Robert Bean

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

China in the World Trade Organization: Antidumping and Safeguards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

China in the World Trade Organization: Antidumping and Safeguards Patrick A. Messerlin China finds of antidumping measures, but (so far) one of the smallest users of such measures. China's World Trade China's recent antidumping enforcement; how China could minimize its exposure to foreign antidumping

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

228

Long-term proliferation and safeguards issues in future technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the task was to assess the effect of potential new technologies, nuclear and non-nuclear, on safeguards needs and non-proliferation policies, and to explore possible solutions to some of the problems envisaged. Eight subdivisions were considered: New Enrichment Technologies; Non-Aqueous Reprocessing Technologies; Fusion; Accelerator-Driven Reactor Systems; New Reactor Types; Heavy Water and Deuterium; Long-Term Storage of Spent Fuel; and Other Future Technologies (Non-Nuclear). For each of these subdivisions, a careful review of the current world-wide effort in the field provided a means of subjectively estimating the viability and qualitative probability of fruition of promising technologies. Technologies for which safeguards and non-proliferation requirements have been thoroughly considered by others were not restudied here (e.g., the Fast Breeder Reactor). The time scale considered was 5 to 40 years for possible initial demonstration although, in some cases, a somewhat optimistic viewpoint was embraced. Conventional nuclear-material safeguards are only part of the overall non-proliferation regime. Other aspects are international agreements, export controls on sensitive technologies, classification of information, intelligence gathering, and diplomatic initiatives. The focus here is on safeguards, export controls, and classification.

Keisch, B.; Auerbach, C.; Fainberg, A.; Fiarman, S.; Fishbone, L.G.; Higinbotham, W.A.; Lemley, J.R.; O'Brien, J.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System Reporting and Data Submission  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The manual provides clear and detailed instructions and procedures for documenting and reporting data submissions for nuclear materials transactions, inventories, and material balances to the Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS). Cancels DOE 5633.3B. Canceled by DOE M 474.1-2A.

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

230

Process monitoring in support of International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of previous efforts in process monitoring for safeguards was conducted. Previous efforts touched on various concepts and a few specific applications, but none was comprehensive in addressing all aspects of a process monitoring application for safeguards. This report develops prototypical process monitoring concepts that can be incorporated into the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA's) general safeguards approach for fuel reprocessing plants. This effort considers existing approaches, recognizing limitations and needed improvements. Prototypical process monitoring applications are developed and proposed for implementation and demonstration in the Integrated Equipment Test facility, which is located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The specific information needed to accomplish the process monitoring objectives are defined, and the mechanics for obtaining that information are described. Effort is given to the identification and assessment of potential impacts and benefits associated with process monitoring concepts, with particular attention to IAEA, state, and plant operator interests. The historical development of process monitoring is described and the implications of using process monitoring in international safeguards are discussed. Specific process process monitoring applications for demonstration in the IET facility are developed in Sects. 6 through 14. 1 fig.

Ehinger, M.H.; Wachter, J.W.; Hebble, T.L.; Kerr, H.T.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Safeguards Agreement and Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To ensure that DOE complies with the Agreement Between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the United States, the Protocol to the Agreement, and the subsidiary arrangements to the Agreement. Canceled by DOE O 142.2A. Cancels DOE 1270.2B.

2004-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

232

The US Support program to IAEA Safeguards - 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Support Program to IAEA Safeguards (USSP) was established in 1977 to provide technical assistance to the IAEA Department of Safeguards. Since that time the U.S. Department of State has provided funding of over $200 million and over 900 tasks have been completed by USSP contractors on behalf of the KEA. The USSP is directed by a U.S. interagency subcommittee known as the Subgroup on Safeguards Technical Support (SSTS) and is managed by the International Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In recent years, the SSTS and ISPO have identified priorities to guide the process of determining which IAEA requests are aligned with US. policy and will be funded. The USSP priorities are reviewed and updated prior to the USSP Annual Review Meeting which is hosted by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) each spring in Vienna, Austria. This paper will report on the 2008 USSP priorities and be an introduction for a session which will consist of four papers on USSP priorities and four other papers related to USSP activities.

Pepper,S.

2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

233

Safeguards Issues at Nuclear Reactors and Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Agency's safeguards technical objective is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection.

Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Nuclear fission and nuclear safeguards: Common technologies and challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear fission and nuclear safeguards have much in common, including the basic physical phenomena and technologies involved as well as the commitments and challenges posed by expanding nuclear programs in many countries around the world. The unique characteristics of the fission process -- such as prompt and delayed neutron and gamma ray emission -- not only provide the means of sustaining and controlling the fission chain reaction, but also provide unique ''signatures'' that are essential to quantitative measurement and effective safeguarding of key nuclear materials (notably /sup 239/Pu and /sup 235/U) against theft, loss, or diversion. In this paper, we trace briefly the historical emergence of safeguards as an essential component of the expansion of the nuclear enterprise worldwide. We then survey the major categories of passive and active nondestructive assay techniques that are currently in use or under development for rapid, accurate measurement and verification of safe-guarded nuclear materials in the many forms in which they occur throughout the nuclear fuel cycle. 23 refs., 14 figs.

Keepin, G.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Relevant Videos: Stoichiometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;2 of 8 Relevant Videos: Stoichiometry Stoichiometry: Limiting Reagent Suspensions, Colloids note that MANY of these Khan chemistry videos contain errors, although the basic premise and overall content is sound. If you find an error in a video, please email me the following information: video title

Houston, Paul L.

236

assessing biodiversity management: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 281 Density Management In Pacific Northwest Forests Renewable Energy Websites Summary: lands Emphasis on managing for biodiversity and...

237

Processes that influence biodiversity, ecosystem functioning, and stability in grasslands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biodiversity is rapidly declining worldwide, and this may lead to subsequent declines in ecosystem functioning and stability. Here I consider whether: (i) stabilizing species interactions,… (more)

Isbell, Forest Isaac

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Processes that influence biodiversity, ecosystem functioning, and stability in grasslands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Biodiversity is rapidly declining worldwide, and this may lead to subsequent declines in ecosystem functioning and stability. Here I consider whether: (i) stabilizing species… (more)

Isbell, Forest Isaac

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Cost-efficient conservation strategies for boreal forest biodiversity.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Long and intensive forest management has made conservation measures in the forest landscape necessary to maintain forest biodiversity. The most common measure is to set… (more)

Perhans, Karin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

asian biodiversity resources: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

greenhouse Bohanec, Marko 2 Biodiversity impacts ecosystem productivity as much as resources, disturbance, or herbivory Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Safeguards instrumentation: a computer-based catalog. Second edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This catalog contains entries on new developments and on items listed in BNL 51450, which have either been carried over unchanged or been updated. More than 70 entries were deleted because of either obsolescence, insufficient interest in terms of safeguards, or lack of documentable development activities in recent years. Some old listings as well as new material was consolidated into more generic entries. As in the earlier document, the emphasis is on devices and instruments that are either in field use at this time or under active development. A few items such as NDA reference materials, instrument vans and certain shipping containers are included because they are important adjuncts to optimum utilization of safeguards instrumentation. This catalog does not include devices for physical protection. As was the case with its predecessor, most of the material in this catalog originated in the US and Canada; a few contributions came from member states of the European Community.

Auerbach, C.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Using Highly Interactive Virtual Environments for Safeguards Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highly interactive virtual environment (HIVE) is a term that refers to interactive educational simulations, serious games and virtual worlds. Studies indicate that learning with the aid of interactive environments produces better retention and depth of knowledge by promoting improved trainee engagement and understanding. Virtual reality or three dimensional (3D) visualization is often used to promote the understanding of something when personal observation, photographs, drawings, and/or sketches are not possible or available. Subjects and situations, either real or hypothetical, can be developed using a 3D model. Models can be tailored to the audience allowing safeguards and security features to be demonstrated for educational purposes in addition to engineering evaluation and performance analysis. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has begun evaluating the feasibility of HIVEs for improving safeguards activities such as training, mission planning, and evaluating worker task performance. This paper will discuss the development workflow of HIVEs and present some recent examples.

Weil, Bradley S [ORNL] [ORNL; Alcala, Benjamin S [ORNL] [ORNL; Alcala, Scott [ORNL] [ORNL; Eipeldauer, Mary D [ORNL] [ORNL; Weil, Logan B [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Protection and Control of Safeguards and Security Interests  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish policy, responsibilities, and authorities for the protection and control of safeguards and security interests. Cancels DOE O 5632.1B, DOE O 5632.2A, DOE O 5632.5, DOE O 5632.6, DOE O 5632.9A, DOE O 5632.11, DOE O 5635.1A, DOE O 5635.2B, DOE O 5635.3. Canceled by DOE O 473.1

1994-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Safeguards and security research and development: Program status report, February-July 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, one of a series of biannual progress reports, describes the status of research and development in the Safeguards and Security Program at Los Alamos from February-July 1981. Most work covered here is sponsored by the Office of Safeguards and Security of the Department of Energy; however, project activities that are technically closely related to nuclear safeguards and security also are included where appropriate for conveying information useful to the nuclear community. The report comprises four major subject areas: Security Development and Support; Nuclear Materials Measurement and Engineering; Nuclear Facility Safeguards Support; and International Safeguards, Technology Transfer, and Training. Some technical topics included in the subject areas are computer and informational security, chemical and nondestructive analysis of nuclear materials, process modeling and analysis, nuclear materials accounting systems, evaluation of prototype measurement instrumentation and procedures in nuclear facilities, design and consultation for facilities, technical exchange, training courses, and international safeguards.

Henry, C.N.; Walton, R.B. (comps.)

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Determining information management needs for enhanced international safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Safeguards Information Management System initiative is a program of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation aimed at supporting the International Atomic Energy Agency`s (IAEA) efforts to strengthen safeguards through the enhancement of information management capabilities. The DOE hopes to provide the IAEA with the ability to correlate and analyze data from existing and new sources of information, including publicly available information, information on imports and exports, design information, environmental monitoring data, and non-safeguards information. The first step in this effort is to identify and define IAEA requirements. In support of this, we have created a users` requirements document based on interviews with IAEA staff that describes the information management needs of the end user projected by the IAEA, including needs for storage, retrieval, analysis, communication, and visualization of data. Also included are characteristics of the end user and attributes of the current environment. This paper describes our efforts to obtain the required information. We discuss how to accurately represent user needs and involve users for an international organization with a multi-cultural user population. We describe our approach, our experience in setting up and conducting the interviews and brainstorming sessions, and a brief discussion of what we learned.

Badalamente, R.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); DeLand, S.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Whiteson, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Anzelon, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Report to Estates and Buildings, University of Edinburgh Biodiversity Baseline Review and Preliminary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report to Estates and Buildings, University of Edinburgh Biodiversity Baseline Review Pollock Halls Biodiversity Audit 2 Acknowledgements John Turpin, Landscape Maintenance Officer, University Biodiversity Audit 3 Summary Rationale The information in this report is the first stage in the development

247

Territorial biodiversity and consequences on physico-chemical characteristics of pollen collected  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Territorial biodiversity and consequences on physico-chemical characteristics of pollen collected France, the physico- chemical composition of honey bee-collected pollen, the territorial biodiversity%). agrosystem / honeybee / floral biodiversity / pollen analysis / chemical analysis 1. INTRODUCTION Since 1962

248

Session Title Biodiversity Without Borders: A Global Problem Demanding Global Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Session Title Biodiversity Without Borders: A Global Problem Biodiversity is the bedrock that sustains human societies and economies and scale. The threats biodiversity faces are inherently global and ultimately

Barnes, Elizabeth A.

249

Landscape connectivity promotes plant biodiversity spillover into non-target habitats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landscape connectivity promotes plant biodiversity spillover into non-target habitats Lars A for review September 26, 2008) Conservation efforts typically focus on maximizing biodiversity in protected increasingly consider how management of protected areas can promote biodiversity beyond reserve borders

250

Biodiversity Conservation in Contemporary Landscapes, Stressors, and Ranges of Variability: Scientific and Social Views  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity Conservation in Contemporary Landscapes, Stressors, and Ranges of Variability the risks to conservation of indigenous biodiversity, and portray the difference between scientific structure and function that must be considered when assessing biodiversity conservation: 1) climate change

Schweik, Charles M.

251

Modeling Multiple Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity Conservation, Commodity Production, and Tradeoffs at Landscape Scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Multiple Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity Conservation, Commodity Production ECOSYSTEM SERVICES_ 4 o Modeling multiple ecosystem services, biodiversity conservation, commodity tradeoff between biodiversity conservation and J?l ecosystem services. Scenarios involving more development

Vermont, University of

252

Global food security, biodiversity conservation and the future of agricultural intensification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global food security, biodiversity conservation and the future of agricultural intensification Teja increase, achieving efficient and productive agri- cultural land use while conserving biodiversity. In conclusion, linking agricultural intensifi- cation with biodiversity conservation and hunger reduction

253

Global Conservation of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services Author(s): WILL R. TURNER, KATRINA BRANDON, THOMAS M. BROOKS, ROBERT COSTANZA,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Conservation of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services Author(s): WILL R. TURNER, KATRINA, to analyze poten- tial synergies between conserving biodiversity and safe- guarding ecosystem services. Global-scale prioritization for biodiversity conservation is essential because biodiversity, threats

Vermont, University of

254

E-Print Network 3.0 - automated safeguards system Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Contact: Division Director: Alan S. Icenhour, Ph.D. Summary: areas. Leadership Areas: Nuclear Radiation Detection Safeguards Systems Development, Testing... Transportation...

255

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced safeguards technology Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measurements with Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning System and Coded-Aperture Gamma-Ray Imaging Systems for International Safeguards Applications Summary: -Ray Imaging...

256

E-Print Network 3.0 - acp safeguards neutron Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measurements with Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning System and Coded-Aperture Gamma-Ray Imaging Systems for International Safeguards Applications Summary: -Ray Imaging...

257

E-Print Network 3.0 - assembly safeguards summary Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measurements with Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning System and Coded-Aperture Gamma-Ray Imaging Systems for International Safeguards Applications Summary: -Ray Imaging...

258

Development of Superconducting High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometers for Nuclear Safeguards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of smuggling. Today, nuclear security is significantly morecritical importance of nuclear security, stating that thereJ. Doyle. Nuclear Safeguards, Security and Nonproliferation:

Dreyer, Jonathan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Seeing biodiversity through the farmer's eyes: A photovoice analysis in Story County, Iowa.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of this study is to understand farmer's perceptions of biodiversity and how it relates to their sense of self. Biodiversity is a concept… (more)

Oliveira, Caroline Felix

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Funding Opportunity: Advancing Digitization of Biodiversity Collections (ADBC) Sponsor: National Science Foundation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Funding Opportunity: Advancing Digitization of Biodiversity Collections (ADBC) Sponsor: National, is a rich resource providing the baseline from which to further biodiversity research and provide critical

Suzuki, Masatsugu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Does District Planning under the Resource Management Act 1991 Protect Biodiversity?.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biodiversity decline has continued at a rapid pace in New Zealand in the past 15 years (OECD 2007), in spite of specific provisions for biodiversity… (more)

Bellingham, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Assessment of Biodiversity Impacts in Swedish Forestry - Attitudes and Experiences in the Product Chain.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biodiversity is decreasing and is expected to decrease even more in the future. The fundamental roles of biodiversity make this decrease critical and impacts on… (more)

Arn, Kristina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Spatial Modeling of Geographic Patterns in Biodiversity and Biofuel Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial Modeling of Geographic Patterns in Biodiversity and Biofuel Production How can the US of biodiversity. The future of the biofuel industry will depend on public investment and trust that industry for increasing biofuel production have already come under fire because of real and perceived threats

264

Biodiversity Toolkit Why we DON'T DIG PEAT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity Toolkit Peat free Why we DON'T DIG PEAT The collegiate University is working to help the environment and wildlife by phasing out its use of products containing peat, such as compost and soil improver.admin.ox.ac.uk/estates/environment/biodiversity Cut your carbon emissions Wildlife living in peat bogs includes foxes, Irish hares, pygmy shrews, red

Melham, Tom

265

Defining the needs for gas centrifuge enrichment plants advanced safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current safeguards approaches used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to verify declared low-enriched (LEU) production, detect undeclared LEU production and detect highly enriched uranium (HEU) production with adequate detection probability using nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and {sup 235}U enrichment of declared UF{sub 6} containers used in the process of enrichment at GCEPs. In verifying declared LEU production, the inspectors also take samples for off-site destructive assay (DA) which provide accurate data, with 0.1% to 0.5% measurement uncertainty, on the enrichment of the UF{sub 6} feed, tails, and product. However, taking samples of UF{sub 6} for off-site analysis is a much more labor and resource intensive exercise for the operator and inspector. Furthermore, the operator must ship the samples off-site to the IAEA laboratory which delays the timeliness of results and interruptions to the continuity of knowledge (CofK) of the samples during their storage and transit. This paper contains an analysis of possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems such as process monitoring and possible on-site analysis of DA samples that could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector's measurements and provide more effective and efficient IAEA GCEPs safeguards. We also introduce examples advanced safeguards systems that could be assembled for unattended operation.

Boyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erpenbeck, Heather H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ianakiev, Kiril [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marlow, Johnna B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

266

Nuclear Safeguards Considerations For The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature reactors (HTRs) have been considered since the 1940s, and have been constructed and demonstrated in the United Kingdom (Dragon), United States (Peach Bottom and Fort Saint Vrain), Japan (HTTR), Germany (AVR and THTR-300), and have been the subject of conceptual studies in Russia (VGM). The attraction to these reactors is that they can use a variety of reactor fuels, including abundant thorium, which upon reprocessing of the spent fuel can produce fissile U-233. Hence, they could extend the stocks of available uranium, provided the fuel is reprocessed. Another attractive attribute is that HTRs typically operate at a much higher temperature than conventional light water reactors (LWRs), because of the use of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coated (TRISO) fuel particles embedded in ceramic graphite. Rather than simply discharge most of the unused heat from the working fluid in the power plant to the environment, engineers have been designing reactors for 40 years to recover this heat and make it available for district heating or chemical conversion plants. Demonstrating high-temperature nuclear energy conversion was the purpose behind Fort Saint Vrain in the United States, THTR-300 in Germany, HTTR in Japan, and HTR-10 and HTR-PM, being built in China. This resulted in nuclear reactors at least 30% or more thermodynamically efficient than conventional LWRs, especially if the waste heat can be effectively utilized in chemical processing plants. A modern variant of high temperature reactors is the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Originally developed in the United States and Germany, it is now being redesigned and marketed by the Republic of South Africa and China. The team examined historical high temperature and high temperature gas reactors (HTR and HTGR) and reviewed safeguards considerations for this reactor. The following is a preliminary report on this topic prepared under the ASA-100 Advanced Safeguards Project in support of the NNSA Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI).

Phillip Casey Durst; David Beddingfield; Brian Boyer; Robert Bean; Michael Collins; Michael Ehinger; David Hanks; David L. Moses; Lee Refalo

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Safeguards and security research and development: Progress report, October 1994--September 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Los Alamos Safeguards and Security Technology Development Program, International Safeguards, and other Safeguards and Security Programs is to continue to be the center of excellence in the field of Safeguards and Security. This annual report for 1995 describes those scientific and engineering projects that contribute to all of the aforementioned programs. The authors have presented the information in a different format from previous annual reports. Part I is devoted to Nuclear Material Measurement Systems. Part II contains projects that are specific to Integrated Safeguards Systems. Part III highlights Safeguards Systems Effectiveness Evaluations and Part IV is a compilation of highlights from Information Assurance projects. Finally Part V highlights work on the projects at Los Alamos for International Safeguards. The final part of this annual report lists titles and abstracts of Los Alamos Safeguards and Security Technology Development reports, technical journal articles, and conference papers that were presented and published in 1995. This is the last annual report in this format. The authors wish to thank all of the individuals who have contributed to this annual report and made it so successful over the years.

Rutherford, D.R.; Henriksen, P.W. [comp.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Extended Evaluations of the Commercial Spectrometer Systems for Safeguards Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safeguards applications require the best of the spectrometer system with excellent resolution, stability, and throughput. Instruments must perform well in all situations and environments. Data communication to the computer should be convenient, fast, and reliable. The software should have all the necessary tools and be easy to use. Portable systems should be small in size, lightweight, and have a long battery life. Nine commercially available spectrometer systems are tested with five different germanium detectors. Considering the performance of the Digital Signal Processors (DSP), digital-based spectroscope y may become the way of future gamma-ray spectroscopy.

Duc T. Vo

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Safeguards and Security Program - DOE Directives, Delegations, and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGEComplainant,.VisitorSafeguards

270

Safeguards and Security Program - DOE Directives, Delegations, and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGEComplainant,.VisitorSafeguardsRequirements

271

Safeguards and Security for Program and Project Management - DOE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwardsSafeguards and Security Systems SHARE

272

Safeguards and Security Program - DOE Directives, Delegations, and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStoriesSANDIA1 0-SA-02 September 2013Safeguards

273

Transportation Safeguards & Security Test Bed (TSSTB) | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2Topo II:LIGHT-DUTYTransportation Safeguards and

274

Development and Evaluation of a Safeguards System Concept for a Pebble-Fueled High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................... 24 8 Flow diagram for an Advanced CANDU reactor ..................................... 27 9 Implementation of safeguards measures at a CANDU facility using video surveillance and radiation monitors... ................................................ 28 10 Implementation of safeguards measures at a CANDU facility using core discharge monitor.............................................................................. 28 11 Primary safeguards measures at MONJU Fast Reactor in Japan...

Gitau, Ernest Travis Ngure

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

275

Evolution of Safeguards over Time: Past, Present, and Projected Facilities, Material, and Budget  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines the past trends and evolution of safeguards over time and projects growth through 2030. The report documents the amount of nuclear material and facilities under safeguards from 1970 until present, along with the corresponding budget. Estimates for the future amount of facilities and material under safeguards are made according to non-nuclear-weapons states’ (NNWS) plans to build more nuclear capacity and sustain current nuclear infrastructure. Since nuclear energy is seen as a clean and economic option for base load electric power, many countries are seeking to either expand their current nuclear infrastructure, or introduce nuclear power. In order to feed new nuclear power plants and sustain existing ones, more nuclear facilities will need to be built, and thus more nuclear material will be introduced into the safeguards system. The projections in this study conclude that a zero real growth scenario for the IAEA safeguards budget will result in large resource gaps in the near future.

Kollar, Lenka; Mathews, Caroline E.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Next-Generation Safeguards Initiative: Human Capital Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2007, the US Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NA-24) completed a comprehensive review of the current and potential future challenges facing the international safeguards system. The review examined • trends and events that have an effect on the mission of international safeguards; • the implications of expanding and evolving mission requirements of the legal authorities and institutions that serve as the foundation of the international safeguards system; and • the technological, financial, and human resources required for effective safeguards implementation. The review’s findings and recommendations were summarized in the report International Safeguards: Challenges and Opportunities for the 21st Century (October 2007).1 The executive summary is available at the following link: http://nnsa.energy.gov/sites/default/files/nnsa/inlinefiles/NGSI_Report.pdf.

Gilligan, Kimberly [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

biodiversity over the past two decades, but, except for a few flagship species, detailed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biodiversity over the past two decades, but, except for a few flagship species, detailed studies disturbance from increased navigation are also likely to negatively impact the riverine biodiversity. To alleviate these problems and conserve biodiversity, establishing nature reserves in biodiversity hotspots

Li, Zhanqing

278

Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2003200414 Biodiversity assessment in planted  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2003­200414 Biodiversity assessment in planted forests Publication of the results of the Biodiversity Assessment programme: Biodiversity in Britain's planted forests programme that investigated 54 plots of one hectare in 16 forests to capture a picture of the biodiversity

279

Implementation of remove monitoring in facilities under safeguards with unattended systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Remote monitoring is being applied by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at nuclear facilities around the world. At the Monju Reactor in Japan we have designed, developed and implemented a remote monitoring approach that can serve as a model for applying remote monitoring to facilities that are already under full-scope safeguards using unattended instrumentation. Remote monitoring implementations have historically relied upon the use of specialized data collection hardware and system design features that integrate remote monitoring into the safeguards data collection system. The integration of remote monitoring and unattended data collection increases the complexity of safeguards data collection systems. This increase in complexity necessarily produces a corresponding reduction of system reliability compared to less-complex unattended monitoring systems. At the Monju facility we have implemented a remote monitoring system that is decoupled from the activity of safeguards data collection. In the completed system the function of remote data transfer is separated from the function of safeguards data collection. As such, a failure of the remote monitoring function cannot produce an associated loss of safeguards data, as is possible with integrated remote-monitoring implementations. Currently, all safeguards data from this facility is available to the IAEA on a 24/7 basis. This facility employs five radiation-based unattended systems, video surveillance and numerous optical seal systems. The implementation of remote monitoring at this facility, while increasing the complexity of the safeguards system, is designed to avoid any corresponding reduction in reliability of the safeguards data collection systems by having decoupled these functions. This design and implementation can serve as a model for implementation of remote monitoring at nuclear facilities that currently employ unattended safeguards systems.

Beddingfield, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nordquist, Heather A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Umebayaashi, Eiji [JAEA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Safeguards and security by design (SSBD) for the domestic threat - theft and sabotage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safeguards by Design (SBD) is receiving significant interest with respect to international safeguards objectives. However, less attention has been focused on the equally important topic of domestic Safeguards and Security by Design (SSBD), which addresses requirements such as those of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the United States. While international safeguards are concerned with detecting State diversion of nuclear material from peaceful to nuclear explosives purposes, domestic Material Protection, Control and Accounting measures (MPC&A) are focused on non-State theft and sabotage. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has described the Safeguards by Design (SBD) concept as an approach in which 'international safeguards are fully integrated into the design process of a new nuclear facility from the initial planning through design, construction, operation, and decommissioning.' This same concept is equally applicable to SSBD for domestic requirements. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a project through its Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) and more specifically its Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program, to develop a domestic SSBD discipline and methodology in parallel with similar efforts sponsored by the DOE Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) and the IAEA for international safeguards. This activity includes the participation of industry (through DOE-sponsored contracts) and DOE National Laboratories. This paper will identify the key domestic safeguards and security requirements (i.e. MC&A and physical protection) and explain how and why Safeguards and Security by Design (SSBD) is important and beneficial for the design of future US nuclear energy systems.

Demuth, Scott F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mullen, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fully integrated safeguards and security for reprocessing plant monitoring.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel reprocessing plants contain a wealth of plant monitoring data including material measurements, process monitoring, administrative procedures, and physical protection elements. Future facilities are moving in the direction of highly-integrated plant monitoring systems that make efficient use of the plant data to improve monitoring and reduce costs. The Separations and Safeguards Performance Model (SSPM) is an analysis tool that is used for modeling advanced monitoring systems and to determine system response under diversion scenarios. This report both describes the architecture for such a future monitoring system and present results under various diversion scenarios. Improvements made in the past year include the development of statistical tests for detecting material loss, the integration of material balance alarms to improve physical protection, and the integration of administrative procedures. The SSPM has been used to demonstrate how advanced instrumentation (as developed in the Material Protection, Accounting, and Control Technologies campaign) can benefit the overall safeguards system as well as how all instrumentation is tied into the physical protection system. This concept has the potential to greatly improve the probability of detection for both abrupt and protracted diversion of nuclear material.

Duran, Felicia Angelica; Ward, Rebecca; Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Middleton, Bobby D.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Application of safeguards technology in DOE's environmental restoration program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the last two decades, the Department of Energy's Office of Safeguards and Security (DOE/OSS) has supported the research and development of safeguards systems analysis methodologies and nondestructive assay (NDS) technology for characterizing, monitoring, and accounting nuclear materials. This paper discusses methodologies and NDA instrumentation developed by the DOE/OSS program that could be applied in the Environmental Restoration Program. NDA instrumentation could be used for field measurements during site characterization and to monitor nuclear materials, heavy metals, and other hazardous materials during site remediation. Systems methodologies can minimize the expenditure of resources and help specify appropriate combinations of NDA instrumentation and chemical analyses to characterize a variety of materials quickly and reduce personnel exposure in hazardous environments. A training program is available to teach fundamental and advanced principles and approaches to characterize and quantify nuclear materials properly and to organize and analyze measurement information for decision making. The ability to characterize the overall volume and distribution of materials at a waste site is difficult because of the inhomogeneous distribution of materials, the requirement for extreme sensitivity, and the lack of resources to collect and chemically analyze a sufficient number of samples. Using a systems study approach based on statistical sampling, the resources necessary to characterize a site can be enhanced by appropriately combining in situ and field NDA measurements with laboratory analyses. 35 refs., 1 figs., 2 tabs.

Eccleston, G.W.; Baker, M.P.; Hansen, W.R.; Lucas, M.C.; Markin, J.T.; Phillips, J.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

International Internships in Nuclear Safeguards and Security: Challenges and Successes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All students in the Russian safeguards and security degree programs at the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI and Tomsk Polytechnic University, sponsored by the Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Education Project, take part in a domestic internship at a Russian enterprise or facility. In addition, a select few students are placed in an international internship. These internships provide students with a better view of how MPC&A and nonproliferation in general are addressed outside of Russia. The possibility of an international internship is a significant incentive for students to enroll in the safeguards and security degree programs. The U.S. members of the MPC&A Education Project team interview students who have been nominated by their professors. These students must have initiative and reasonable English skills. The project team and professors then select students to be tentatively placed in various international internships during the summer or fall of their final year of study. Final arrangements are then made with the host organizations. This paper describes the benefits of the joint United States/Russia cooperation for next-generation workforce development, some of the international internships that have been carried out, the benefits of these international internships, and lessons learned in implementing them.

Duncan, Cristen L.; Heinberg, Cynthia L.; Killinger, Mark H.; Goodey, Kent O.; Kryuchkov, Eduard F.; Geraskin, Nikolai I.; Silaev, Maxim E.; Sokova, Elena K.; Ford, David G.

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

284

West Lothian Biodiversity Action Plan: Oil Shale Bings   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report establishes the importance of the West Lothian oil-shale bings at both a national (UK) and local (West Lothian) scale, for their contribution to local biodiversity, their historical importance, their education ...

Harvie, Barbra

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Termination of Safeguards for Accountable Nuclear Materials at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Termination of safeguards ends requirements of Nuclear Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) and thereby removes the safeguards basis for applying physical protection requirements for theft and diversion of nuclear material, providing termination requirements are met as described. Department of Energy (DOE) M 470.4 6 (Nuclear Material Control and Accountability [8/26/05]) stipulates: 1. Section A, Chapter I (1)( q) (1): Safeguards can be terminated on nuclear materials provided the following conditions are met: (a) 'If the material is special nuclear material (SNM) or protected as SNM, it must be attractiveness level E and have a measured value.' (b) 'The material has been determined by DOE line management to be of no programmatic value to DOE.' (c) 'The material is transferred to the control of a waste management organization where the material is accounted for and protected in accordance with waste management regulations. The material must not be collocated with other accountable nuclear materials.' Requirements for safeguards termination depend on the safeguards attractiveness levels of the material. For attractiveness level E, approval has been granted from the DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE ID) to Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) Safeguards and Security (S&S). In some cases, it may be necessary to dispose of nuclear materials of attractiveness level D or higher. Termination of safeguards for such materials must be approved by the Departmental Element (this is the DOE Headquarters Office of Nuclear Energy) after consultation with the Office of Security.

Michael Holzemer; Alan Carvo

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Developing the Next Generation of International Safeguards and Nonproliferation Experts: Highlights of Select Activities at the National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With many safeguards experts in the United States at or near retirement age, and with the growing and evolving mission of international safeguards, attracting and educating a new generation of safeguards experts is an important element of maintaining a credible and capable international safeguards system. The United States National Laboratories, with their rich experience in addressing the technical and policy challenges of international safeguards, are an important resource for attracting, educating, and training future safeguards experts. This presentation highlights some of the safeguards education and professional development activities underway at the National Laboratories. These include university outreach, summer courses, internships, mid-career transition, knowledge retention, and other projects. The presentation concludes with thoughts on the challenge of interdisciplinary education and the recruitment of individuals with the right balance of skills and backgrounds are recruited to meet tomorrow's needs.

Reed, J; Mathews, C; Kirk, B; Lynch, P; Doyle, J; Meek, E; Pepper, S; Metcalf, R

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

A Monte Carlo based spent fuel analysis safeguards strategy assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safeguarding nuclear material involves the detection of diversions of significant quantities of nuclear materials, and the deterrence of such diversions by the risk of early detection. There are a variety of motivations for quantifying plutonium in spent fuel assemblies by means of nondestructive assay (NDA) including the following: strengthening the capabilities of the International Atomic Energy Agencies ability to safeguards nuclear facilities, shipper/receiver difference, input accountability at reprocessing facilities and burnup credit at repositories. Many NDA techniques exist for measuring signatures from spent fuel; however, no single NDA technique can, in isolation, quantify elemental plutonium and other actinides of interest in spent fuel. A study has been undertaken to determine the best integrated combination of cost effective techniques for quantifying plutonium mass in spent fuel for nuclear safeguards. A standardized assessment process was developed to compare the effective merits and faults of 12 different detection techniques in order to integrate a few techniques and to down-select among the techniques in preparation for experiments. The process involves generating a basis burnup/enrichment/cooling time dependent spent fuel assembly library, creating diversion scenarios, developing detector models and quantifying the capability of each NDA technique. Because hundreds of input and output files must be managed in the couplings of data transitions for the different facets of the assessment process, a graphical user interface (GUI) was development that automates the process. This GUI allows users to visually create diversion scenarios with varied replacement materials, and generate a MCNPX fixed source detector assessment input file. The end result of the assembly library assessment is to select a set of common source terms and diversion scenarios for quantifying the capability of each of the 12 NDA techniques. We present here the generalized assessment process, the techniques employed to automate the coupled facets of the assessment process, and the standard burnup/enrichment/cooling time dependent spent fuel assembly library. We also clearly define the diversion scenarios that will be analyzed during the standardized assessments. Though this study is currently limited to generic PWR assemblies, it is expected that the results of the assessment will yield an adequate spent fuel analysis strategy knowledge that will help the down-select process for other reactor types.

Fensin, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Nathan P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Future challenges and DOE/NNSA-JAEA cooperation for the development of advanced safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) has been cooperating with Japan on nuclear safeguards for over thirty years. DOE/NNSA has collaborated with the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and its predecessors in addressing the need for innovative solutions to nuclear transparency and verification issues in one of the world's most advanced nuclear fuel cycle states. This collaboration includes over ninety activities that have involved nearly every facility in the JAEA complex and many national laboratories in the U.S. complex. The partnership has yielded new technologies and approaches that have benefited international safeguards not only in Japan, but around the world. The International Atomic Energy Agency uses a number of safeguards solutions developed under this collaboration to improve its inspection efforts in Japan and elsewhere. Japanese facilities serve as test beds for emerging safeguards technologies and are setting the trend for new nuclear energy and fuel cycle development worldwide. The collaboration continues to be an essential component of U.S. safeguards outreach and is integral to the DOE/NNSA's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative. In addition to fostering international safeguards development, the cooperation is an opportunity for U.S. scientists to work in facilities that have no analog in the United States, thus providing crucial real-life experience for and aiding development of the next generation of U.S. safeguards specialists. It is also an important element of promoting regional transparency thereby building confidence in the peaceful nature of nuclear programs in the region. The successes engendered by this partnership provide a strong basis for addressing future safeguards challenges, in Japan and elsewhere. This paper summarizes these challenges and the associated cooperative efforts that are either underway or anticipated.

Stevens, Rebecca S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Clelland - Kerr, John [NNSA-NA-242; Senzaki, Masao [JAEA; Hori, Masato [JAEA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Nuclear Reactor Safeguards and Monitoring with Antineutrino Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cubic-meter-sized antineutrino detectors can be used to non-intrusively, robustly and automatically monitor and safeguard a wide variety of nuclear reactor types, including power reactors, research reactors, and plutonium production reactors. Since the antineutrino spectra and relative yields of fissioning isotopes depend on the isotopic composition of the core, changes in composition can be observed without ever directly accessing the core itself. Information from a modest-sized antineutrino detector, coupled with the well-understood principles that govern the core's evolution in time, can be used to determine whether the reactor is being operated in an illegitimate way. A group at Sandia is currently constructing a one cubic meter antineutrino detector at the San Onofre reactor site in California to demonstrate these principles.

Adam Bernstein; Yifang Wang; Giorgio Gratta; Todd West

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Next Generations Safeguards Initiative: The Life of a Cylinder  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Nonproliferation and International Security's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) has begun a program based on a five-year plan to investigate the concept of a global monitoring scheme that uniquely identifies uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders and their locations throughout the life cycle. A key initial activity in the NGSI program is to understand and document the 'life of a UF6 cylinder' from cradle to grave. This document describes the life of a UF6 cylinder and includes cylinder manufacture and procurement processes as well as cylinder-handling and operational practices at conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, and depleted UF6 conversion facilities. The NGSI multiple-laboratory team is using this document as a building block for subsequent tasks in the five-year plan, including development of the functional requirements for cylinder-tagging and tracking devices.

Morgan, James B [ORNL; White-Horton, Jessica L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

The uranium cylinder assay system for enrichment plant safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safeguarding sensitive fuel cycle technology such as uranium enrichment is a critical component in preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. A useful tool for the nuclear materials accountancy of such a plant would be an instrument that measured the uranium content of UF{sub 6} cylinders. The Uranium Cylinder Assay System (UCAS) was designed for Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) for use in the Rokkasho Enrichment Plant in Japan for this purpose. It uses total neutron counting to determine uranium mass in UF{sub 6} cylinders given a known enrichment. This paper describes the design of UCAS, which includes features to allow for unattended operation. It can be used on 30B and 48Y cylinders to measure depleted, natural, and enriched uranium. It can also be used to assess the amount of uranium in decommissioned equipment and waste containers. Experimental measurements have been carried out in the laboratory and these are in good agreement with the Monte Carlo modeling results.

Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marlow, Johnna B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rael, Carlos D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Iwamoto, Tomonori [JNFL; Tamura, Takayuki [JNFL; Aiuchi, Syun [JNFL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Evaluation of a Business Case for Safeguards by Design in Nuclear Power Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safeguards by Design (SbD) is a well-known paradigm for consideration and incorporation of safeguards approaches and associated design features early in the nuclear facility development process. This paradigm has been developed as part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), and has been accepted as beneficial in many discussions and papers on NGSI or specific technologies under development within NGSI. The Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security funded the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to examine the business case justification of SbD for nuclear power reactors. Ultimately, the implementation of SbD will rely on the designers of nuclear facilities. Therefore, it is important to assess the incentives which will lead designers to adopt SbD as a standard practice for nuclear facility design. This report details the extent to which designers will have compelling economic incentives to adopt SbD.

Wood, Thomas W.; Seward, Amy M.; Lewis, Valerie A.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Zentner, Michael D.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A framework for nuclear facility safeguard evaluation using probabilistic methods and expert elicitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the advancement of the next generation of nuclear fuel cycle facilities, concerns of the effectiveness of nuclear facility safeguards have been increasing due to the inclusion of highly enriched material and reprocessing ...

Iamsumang, Chonlagarn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Feasibility Study of Implementing a Mobile Collaborative Information Platform for International Safeguards Inspections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to the growing pervasiveness of mobile technologies such as tablets and smartphones, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories have been exploring the potential use of these platforms for international safeguards activities. Specifically of interest are information systems (software, and accompanying servers and architecture) deployed on mobile devices to increase the situational awareness and productivity of an IAEA safeguards inspector in the field, while simultaneously reducing paperwork and pack weight of safeguards equipment. Exploratory development in this area has been met with skepticism regarding the ability to overcome technology deployment challenges for IAEA safeguards equipment. This report documents research conducted to identify potential challenges for the deployment of a mobile collaborative information system to the IAEA, and proposes strategies to mitigate those challenges.

Gastelum, Zoe N.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Doehle, Joel R.; Toomey, Christopher M.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

The U.S./IAEA Workshop on Software Sustainability for Safeguards Instrumentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration’s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, the U.S. Department of State, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) organized a a workshop on the subject of ”Software Sustainability for Safeguards Instrumentation.” The workshop was held at the Vienna International Centre in Vienna, Austria, May 6-8, 2014. The workshop participants included software and hardware experts from national laboratories, industry, government, and IAEA member states who were specially selected by the workshop organizers based on their experience with software that is developed for the control and operation of safeguards instrumentation. The workshop included presentations, to orient the participants to the IAEA Department of Safeguards software activities related to instrumentation data collection and processing, and case studies that were designed to inspire discussion of software development, use, maintenance, and upgrades in breakout sessions and to result in recommendations for effective software practices and management. This report summarizes the results of the workshop.

Pepper S. E.; .; Worrall, L.; Pickett, C.; Bachner, K.; Queirolo, A.

2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

296

Design of a Safeguards Instrument for Plutonium Quantification in an Electrochemical Refining System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There has been a strong international interest in using pyroprocessing to close the fast nuclear reactor fuel cycle and reprocess spent fuel efficiently. To commercialize pyroprocessing, safeguards technologies are required to be developed...

Le Coq, Annabelle G

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

297

US statutes of general interest to safeguards and security officers. Revision 12/95  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is one of a three volume set. This document, BNL 52202, it titled, ``US Statutes of General Interest to Safeguards and Security Officers``, and is intended for use by officers.

Cadwell, J.J.; Ruger, C.J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Safeguards-by-Design: Guidance for High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs) With Pebble Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following is a guidance document from a series prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), to assist facility designers and operators in implementing international Safeguards-by-Design (SBD). SBD has two main objectives: (1) to avoid costly and time consuming redesign work or retrofits of new nuclear fuel cycle facilities and (2) to make the implementation of international safeguards more effective and efficient at such facilities. In the long term, the attainment of these goals would save industry and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) time, money, and resources and be mutually beneficial. This particular safeguards guidance document focuses on pebble fuel high temperature gas reactors (HTGR). The purpose of the IAEA safeguards system is to provide credible assurance to the international community that nuclear material and other specified items are not diverted from peaceful nuclear uses. The safeguards system consists of the IAEA’s statutory authority to establish safeguards; safeguards rights and obligations in safeguards agreements and additional protocols; and technical measures implemented pursuant to those agreements. Of foremost importance is the international safeguards agreement between the country and the IAEA, concluded pursuant to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). According to a 1992 IAEA Board of Governors decision, countries must: notify the IAEA of a decision to construct a new nuclear facility as soon as such decision is taken; provide design information on such facilities as the designs develop; and provide detailed design information based on construction plans at least 180 days prior to the start of construction, and on "as-built" designs at least 180 days before the first receipt of nuclear material. Ultimately, the design information will be captured in an IAEA Design Information Questionnaire (DIQ), prepared by the facility operator, typically with the support of the facility designer. The IAEA will verify design information over the life of the project. This design information is an important IAEA safeguards tool. Since the main interlocutor with the IAEA in each country is the State Regulatory Authority/SSAC (or Regional Regulatory Authority, e.g. EURATOM), the responsibility for conveying this design information to the IAEA falls to the State Regulatory Authority/SSAC.

Philip Casey Durst; Mark Schanfein

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Safeguards and security requirements for weapons plutonium disposition in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper explores the issues surrounding the safeguarding of the plutonium disposition process in support of the United States nuclear weapons dismantlement program. It focuses on the disposition of the plutonium by burning mixed oxide fuel in light water reactors (LWR) and addresses physical protection, material control and accountability, personnel security and international safeguards. The S and S system needs to meet the requirements of the DOE Orders, NRC Regulations and international safeguards agreements. Experience has shown that incorporating S and S measures into early facility designs and integrating them into operations provides S and S that is more effective, more economical, and less intrusive. The plutonium disposition safeguards requirements with which the US has the least experience are the implementation of international safeguards on plutonium metal; the large scale commercialization of the mixed oxide fuel fabrication; and the transportation to and loading in the LWRs of fresh mixed oxide fuel. It is in these areas where the effort needs to be concentrated if the US is to develop safeguards and security systems that are effective and efficient.

Thomas, L.L.; Strait, R.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Fission Energy and Systems Safety Program

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Gas centrifuge enrichment plants inspection frequency and remote monitoring issues for advanced safeguards implementation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current safeguards approaches used by the IAEA at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to verify declared low enriched uranium (LEU) production, detect undeclared LEU production and detect high enriched uranium (BEU) production with adequate probability using non destructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and {sup 235}U enrichment of declared cylinders of uranium hexafluoride that are used in the process of enrichment at GCEPs. This paper contains an analysis of how possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems including process monitoring and possible on-site destructive analysis (DA) of samples could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector's measurements providing more effective and efficient IAEA GCEPs safeguards. We have also studied a few advanced safeguards systems that could be assembled for unattended operation and the level of performance needed from these systems to provide more effective safeguards. The analysis also considers how short notice random inspections, unannounced inspections (UIs), and the concept of information-driven inspections can affect probability of detection of the diversion of nuclear material when coupled to new GCEPs safeguards regimes augmented with unattended systems. We also explore the effects of system failures and operator tampering on meeting safeguards goals for quantity and timeliness and the measures needed to recover from such failures and anomalies.

Boyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erpenbeck, Heather H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reimold, Benjamin A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ward, Steven L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Howell, John [GLASGOW UNIV.

2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Building Resilience for Sustainable Development of the Sundarbans through Estuary Management, Poverty Reduction, and Biodiversity Conservation: A Non-Lending  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Poverty Reduction, and Biodiversity Conservation: A Non-Lending Technical Assistance Appendix D. Effective Adaptation, Biodiversity Conservation, and Sustainable Socioeconomic Development of the Sundarbans Region

Webster, Peter J.

302

DEVELOPMENT OF A CANDLE FILTER FAILURE SAFEGUARD DEVICE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The full-flow mechanical safeguard device (FFMSGD) has been developed under contract to the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to address problems with the reliability of ceramic candle filter elements installed on high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) Hot Gas Cleanup (HGCU) filters. Although systems candle filters are expected to perform satisfactorily when in good operating condition, the failure of even a single filter element can increase the filter system outlet dust loading enough to potentially damage gas turbine blades, contaminate other downstream processes, and limit the availability of the power system. Filter failure safeguard devices that are installed on each individual candle filter element are envisioned as a guarantee of a candle filter system's ability to withstand some number of element failures and continue operation without these negative consequences. The intention of the FFMSGD is to provide this guarantee without incurring any significant pressure drop penalty or constraining the filter system's reverse-pulse cleaning procedures. The FFMSGD provides a clear flow path for filtered and reverse-flow cleaning gases when its filter element is intact, and activates to provide a positive mechanical seal against gas flow in either direction when its filter element breaks or fails. This activation is induced by the increase in the flow rate of gas through the device in event of filter failure. The FFMSGD is designed to be easily removed and reconditioned when the filter system is taken off line for routine maintenance. This report is intended to be issued with a companion appendix. As instructed in Section J.12 of Contract No. DE-AC26-99FT40678, all the restricted, proprietary, and patentable information (not yet disclosed through the patent application process) related to the FFMSGD and its evaluation under this contract has been included only in the appendix. This Final Report, which is available to the public, contains background information and general descriptions of the operating principles of the FFMSGD. This report also describes the results of various evaluations of the device at room temperature and in HTHP environments. This Final Report also includes discussions of commercialization issues. For clarity and completeness, all of the information contained in this Final Report has also been included in the appendix.

Todd R. Snyder

2002-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

303

Enabling International Safeguards Research and Development in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is the lead laboratory in nuclear energy research and development within the U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory complex. INL is tasked with the advancement of nuclear energy research and development, and leadership in the renaissance of nuclear power globally. INL scientists have been central to the assessment of needs and the integration of technical programs aimed at the world-wide growth of nuclear power. One of the grand challenges of the nuclear energy resurgence is nuclear nonproliferation. Nonproliferation technology development is key to meeting this challenge. The needed advances in nonproliferation technologies are being made more difficult by the growing gap between increasing demands for nuclear materials to support technology development, and reduced availability of these materials. The gap is caused by the reduction, consolidation and more stringent lockdown of nuclear materials, made necessary by heightened and evolving security concerns, in the face of increased demand for materials to support technology development. Ironically, the increased demand for materials for technology development is made necessary by these same security concerns. The situation will continue to worsen if safeguards and security budgets remain limited for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and many member states, while growth in global nuclear energy becomes a reality. Effective U.S. leadership in the closing of this gap is vital to homeland security and global stability. INL has taken positive steps, described in this paper, to close this gap by reestablishing a viable base for the development, testing and demonstration of safeguards and security technologies. Key attributes of this technology development base are (1) the availability of a wide variety of special nuclear materials in forms that allow for enhanced accessibility; (2) ease of access by U.S. government, national laboratory, industry and academic institution researchers; (3) openness to and ease of access by international users working through U.S. government sponsoring agencies; and (4) the availability of requisite infrastructure to support research, testing and demonstration. While there is still work to do in closing the gap between material accessibility and demand, the steps taken by INL to date begin to address this important challenge.

John E. Dwight; Mark J. Schanfein; Trond A. Bjornard

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

FY09 Advanced Instrumentation and Active Interrogation Research for Safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multiple small-scale projects have been undertaken to investigate advanced instrumentation solutions for safeguard measurement challenges associated with advanced fuel cycle facilities and next-generation fuel reprocessing installations. These activities are in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Research and Development program and its Materials Protection, Accounting, and Control for Transmutation (MPACT) campaign. 1) Work was performed in a collaboration with the University of Michigan (Prof. Sara Pozzi, co-PI) to investigate the use of liquid-scintillator radiation detectors for assaying mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel, to characterize its composition and to develop advanced digital pulse-shape discrimination algorithms for performing time-correlation measurements in the MOX fuel environment. This work included both simulations and experiments and has shown that these techniques may provide a valuable approach for use within advanced safeguard measurement scenarios. 2) Work was conducted in a collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Dr. Paul Hausladen, co-PI) to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the fast-neutron coded-aperture imaging technique for locating and characterizing fissile material, and as a tool for performing hold-up measurements in fissile material handling facilities. This work involved experiments at Idaho National Laboratory, using MOX fuel and uranium metal, in both passive and active interrogation configurations. A complete analysis has not yet been completed but preliminary results suggest several potential uses for the fast neutron imaging technique. 3) Work was carried out to identify measurement approaches for determining nitric acid concentration in the range of 1 – 4 M and beyond. This work included laboratory measurements to investigate the suitability of prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis for this measurement and product reviews of other commercial solutions. Ultrasonic density analysis appears to be the best candidate technology for determining nitric acid concentrations but the PGNAA approach may also be applicable. 4) Work was also carried out to begin investigating the use of remote UV imaging to detect air-ionization induced by alpha particle emission from plutonium. This approach has been shown elsewhere as a useful tool for detecting and quantifying plutonium contamination and has the potential of providing a unique and powerful approach for quantifying hold-up in reprocessing facilities. Based on these simple scoping experiments the potential far-reaching capabilities of the measurement are clear.

D. L. Chichester; S. A. Pozzi; E. H. Seabury; J. L. Dolan; M. Flaska; J. T. Johnson; S. M. Watson; J. Wharton

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Enhanced AFCI Sampling, Analysis, and Safeguards Technology Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this study includes the investigation of sampling technologies used in industry and their potential application to nuclear fuel processing. The goal is to identify innovative sampling methods using state of the art techniques that could evolve into the next generation sampling and analysis system for metallic elements. Sampling and analysis of nuclear fuel recycling plant processes is required both to monitor the operations and ensure Safeguards and Security goals are met. In addition, environmental regulations lead to additional samples and analysis to meet licensing requirements. The volume of samples taken by conventional means, can restrain productivity while results samples are analyzed, require process holding tanks that are sized to meet analytical issues rather than process issues (and that create a larger facility footprint), or, in some cases, simply overwhelm analytical laboratory capabilities. These issues only grow when process flowsheets propose new separations systems and new byproduct material for transmutation purposes. Novel means of streamlining both sampling and analysis are being evaluated to increase the efficiency while meeting all requirements for information. This report addresses just a part of the effort to develop and study novel methods by focusing on the sampling and analysis of aqueous samples for metallic elements. It presents an overview of the sampling requirements, including frequency, sensitivity, accuracy, and programmatic drivers, to demonstrate the magnitude of the task. The sampling and analysis system needed for metallic element measurements is then discussed, and novel options being applied to other industrial analytical needs are presented. Inductively coupled mass spectrometry instruments are the most versatile for metallic element analyses and are thus chosen as the focus for the study. Candidate novel means of process sampling, as well as modifications that are necessary to couple such instruments to introduce these samples, are discussed. A suggested path forward based on an automated microchip capillary based sampling system interfaced to the analysis spectrometer is presented. The ability to obtain micro liter volume samples coupled with remote automated means of sample tracking and transport to the instrument would greatly improve analytical efficiency while reducing both personnel exposure and radioactive waste. Application of this sampling technique to new types of mass spectrometers for selective elemental isotopic analysis could also provide significant improvements in safeguards and security analyses.

John Svoboda

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Biodiversity Analysis of Vegetation on the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) located in south central Nevada encompasses approximately 3,561 square kilometers and straddles two major North American deserts, Mojave and Great Basin. Transitional areas between the two desert types have been created by gradients in elevation, precipitation, temperature, and soils. From 1996-1998, more than 1,500 ecological landform units were sampled at the NTS for numerous biotic and abiotic parameters. These data provide a basis for spatial evaluations of biodiversity over landscape scales at the NTS. Species diversity maps (species richness vs. species abundance) have been produced. Differences in ecosystem diversity at the ecoregion, alliance, association, and ecological landform unit levels are presented. Spatial distribution maps of species presence and abundance provide evidence of where transition zones occur and the resulting impact on biodiversity. The influences of abiotic factors (elevation, soil, precipitation) and anthropogenic disturbance on biodiversity are assessed.

W. K. Ostler; D. J. Hansen

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

South African National Biodiversity Institute and University of Cape Town (South Africa) Postdoctoral Fellow (1position)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

South African National Biodiversity Institute and University of Cape Town (South Africa from designated groups in terms of South Africa's employment equity targets will have preference) Postdoctoral Fellow (1position) (Two year Contract) The South African National Biodiversity Institute

Jarrett, Thomas H.

308

Preliminary global assessment of terrestrial biodiversity consequences of sea level rise mediated by climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Considerable attention has focused on the climatic effects of global climate change on biodiversity, but few analyses and no broad assessments have evaluated the effects of sea level rise on biodiversity. Taking advantage of new maps of marine...

Menon, Shaily; Soberó n, Jorge; Li, Xingong; Peterson, A. Townsend

2010-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

309

Biological Sciences, Biochemistry, Chemistry and Environmental Science and Policy-Biodiversity and Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological Sciences, Biochemistry, Chemistry and Environmental Science and Policy-Biodiversity of C- ENSP-Biodiversity and Conservation majors · Completion of MATH 140, 130 or 220 with a minimum

Shapiro, Benjamin

310

Biological Sciences, Biochemistry, Chemistry and Environmental Science and Policy-Biodiversity and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological Sciences, Biochemistry, Chemistry and Environmental Science and Policy-Biodiversity/232 (or CHEM 146/177and CHEM 237) with a minimum grade of C- ENSP-Biodiversity and Conservation majors

Shapiro, Benjamin

311

A relevance of documentation metric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A RELEVANCE OF DOCUMENTATION METRIC A Thesis by JUSTIN WILLIAM PATTERSON Submitted to the Oflice of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1996 Major... Subject: Computer Science A RELEVANCE OF DOCUMENTATION METRIC A Thesis by JUSTIN WILLIAM PATTERSON Submitted to Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by...

Patterson, Justin William

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

EMCAS, an evaluation methodology for safeguards and security systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EMCAS is an evaluation methodology for safeguards and security systems. It provides a score card of projected or actual system performance for several areas of system operation. In one area, the performance of material control and accounting and security systems, which jointly defend against the insider threat to divert or steal special nuclear material (SNM) using stealth and deceit, is evaluated. Time-dependent and time-independent risk equations are used for both diversion and theft risk calculations. In the case of loss detection by material accounting, a detailed timeliness model is provided to determine the combined effects of loss detection sensitivity and timeliness on the overall effectiveness of the material accounting detection procedure. Calculated risks take into account the capabilities of process area containment/surveillance, material accounting mass balance tests, and physical protection barriers and procedures. In addition, EMCAS evaluates the Material Control and Accounting (MCandA) System in the following areas: (1) system capability to detect errors in the official book inventory of SNM, using mass balance accounting methods, (2) system capability to prevent errors from entering the nuclear material data base during periods of operation between mass balance tests, (3) time to conduct inventories and resolve alarms, and (4) time lost from production to carry out material control and accounting loss detection activities.

Eggers, R.F.; Giese, E.W.; Bichl, F.J.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

EMCAS: An evaluation methodology for safeguards and security systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EMCAS is an evaluation methodology for safeguards and security systems. It provides a score card of projected or actual system performance for several areas of system operation. In one area, the performance of material control and accounting and security systems, which jointly defend against the insider threat to divert or steal special nuclear material (SNM) using stealth and deceit, is evaluated. Time-dependent and time-independent risk equations are used for both diversion and theft risk calculations. In the case of loss detection by material accounting, a detailed timeliness model is provided to determine the combined effects of loss detection sensitivity and timeliness on the overall effectiveness of the material accounting detection procedure. Calculated risks take into account the capabilities of process area containment/surveillance, material accounting mass balance tests, and physical protection barriers and procedures. In addition, EMCAS evaluates the Material Control and Accounting (MC and A) System in the following areas: (1) system capability to detect errors in the official book inventory of SNM, using mass balance accounting methods, (2) system capability to prevent errors from entering the nuclear material data base during periods of operation between mass balance tests, (3) time to conduct inventories and resolve alarms, and (4) time lost from production to carry out material control and accounting loss detection activities. 3 figs., 5 tabs.

Eggers, R.F.; Giese, E.W.; Bichl, F.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Applications of a portable MCA in nuclear safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1981 a small, battery-operated multichannel analyzer (MCA) prototype developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory was delivered to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The intent was to produce an instrument for inspector (nonscientist) use. Automated measurement programs were built into the MCA. An enhanced, commercially produced MCA is now available, which was patterned after and is software compatible with the prototype. After an extensive review of the hardware and software of the available portable MCAs, the IAEA has chosen this MCA to be used by IAEA inspectors throughout the world. Inspectors from the EURATOM Directorate of Safeguards are also using these MCAs in inspections throughout Europe. While this MCA's portability and programmability make it ideally suited for infield applications, its powerful built-in intelligence and communications protocol make it a strong candidate for distributed data acquisition and control systems. The user-instrument interface philosophy is so easy to use that in domestic and international training schools, the operators manual is not used.

Halbig, J.K.; Klosterbuer, F.; Cameron, R.A.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Safeguards First Principles Initiative at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) program at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was selected as a test bed for the Safeguards First Principles Initiative (SFPI). The implementation of the SFPI is evaluated using the system effectiveness model and the program is managed under an approved MC&A Plan. The effectiveness model consists of an evaluation of the critical elements necessary to detect, deter, and/or prevent the theft or diversion of Special Nuclear Material (SNM). The modeled results indicate that the MC&A program established under this variance is still effective, without creating unacceptable risk. Extensive performance testing is conducted through the duration of the pilot to ensure the protection system is effective and no material is at an unacceptable risk. The pilot was conducted from January 1, 2007, through May 30, 2007. This paper will discuss the following activities in association with SFPI: 1. Development of Timeline 2. Crosswalk of DOE Order and SFPI 3. Peer Review 4. Deviation 5. MC&A Plan and Procedure changes 6. Changes implemented at NTS 7. Training 8. Performance Test

Geneva Johnson

2007-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

316

Authentication of reprocessing plant safeguards data through correlation analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report investigates the feasibility and benefits of two new approaches to the analysis of safeguards data from reprocessing plants. Both approaches involve some level of plant modeling. All models involve some form of mass balance, either applied in the usual way that leads to material balances for individual process vessels at discrete times or applied by accounting for pipe flow rates that leads to material balances for individual process vessels at continuous times. In the first case, material balances are computed after each tank-to-tank transfer. In the second case, material balances can be computed at any desired time. The two approaches can be described as follows. The first approach considers the application of a new multivariate sequential test. The test statistic is a scalar, but the monitored residual is a vector. The second approach considers the application of recent nonlinear time series methods for the purpose of empirically building a model for the expected magnitude of a material balance or other scalar variable. Although the report restricts attention to monitoring scalar time series, the methodology can be extended to vector time series.

Burr, T.L.; Wangen, L.E.; Mullen, M.F.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Ecological ranking of Phanerozoic biodiversity crises: ecological and taxonomic severities are decoupled  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological ranking of Phanerozoic biodiversity crises: ecological and taxonomic severities extensive analyses of the taxonomic severity of major biodiversity crises in geologic time. In contrast, we propose here an alternative analysis of the ecological severity of biodiversity crises. It is clear

Lyubomirsky, Ilya

318

Hydrology as a driver of biodiversity: Controls on carrying capacity, niche formation, and dispersal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrology as a driver of biodiversity: Controls on carrying capacity, niche formation online 3 March 2012 Keywords: Hydrology Biodiversity Dispersal Carrying capacity Niches Climate change and dynamics to biodiversity patterns. The focus of this paper is the key hydrologic controls crucial towards

Konar, Megan

319

ESTIMATING BIODIVERSITY OF DRY FORESTS AND CORAL REEFS WITH HYPERPECTRAL DATA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESTIMATING BIODIVERSITY OF DRY FORESTS AND CORAL REEFS WITH HYPERPECTRAL DATA: A NASA EPSCOR effective biodiversity assessment methodologies for a gradient of Neotropical habitats from coastal marine is to develop remote-sensing derived surrogates of biodiversity that are applicable across different ecosystems

Gilbes, Fernando

320

Design and analysis of experiments testing for biodiversity effects in ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design and analysis of experiments testing for biodiversity effects in ecology R. A. Baileya is that a nested family of plausible models is fitted. The results of three experiments suggest that biodiversity are discussed. Keywords: Biodiversity, Design of experiments, Family of models, Hasse diagram 2008 MSC: 62K99

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Biotype 24 Page 1 The Biodiversity & Conservation Newsletter of Woodland Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biotype 24 Page 1 The Biodiversity & Conservation Newsletter of Woodland Ecology Branch Number 24 important to set clear management objectives. Low stock grazing is generally good for biodiversity but heavy over winter. Hence conservation of this UK Biodiversity Action Plan Priority Species requires a form

322

PROJECT SUMMARY The proposed research program uses the restoration and conservation of biodiversity in woodlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROJECT SUMMARY The proposed research program uses the restoration and conservation of biodiversity and conservation planning process relates to biodiversity outcomes in complex metropolitan landscapes. Chicago, restoration and management of biodiversity on 360,000 acres of open space in the greater Chicago metropolitan

Illinois at Chicago, University of

323

Assessment of Climate Change Effect to Regional and Global Biodiversity: a MetaAnalysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of Climate Change Effect to Regional and Global Biodiversity: a Meta­Analysis Talk given on biodiversity main- tenance in regional ecosystems. Based on works by Hans van Houwelingen and colleagues, we. The effect of this change on biodiversity has been widely discussed where peer-review publications have

Breuer, Florian

324

Diversity, Entropy and Thermodynamics http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/biodiversity/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diversity, Entropy and Thermodynamics John Baez http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/biodiversity/ July 5, 2012 The Mathematics of Biodiversity CRM #12;The Shannon entropy S(p) = - n i=1 pi ln(pi) appears in thermodynamics and information theory, but it can also be used to measure biodiversity. Is this a coincidence

Baez, John

325

Carbon sequestration and biodiversity of re-growing miombo woodlands in Mozambique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon sequestration and biodiversity of re-growing miombo woodlands in Mozambique M. Williams a in tropical woodlands is being used to sequester carbon (C), alleviate poverty and protect biodiversity, among and soil C stocks and biodiversity on an area of miombo woodland in Mozambique, and how C stocks

326

Predation on infected host promotes evolutionary branching of virulence and pathogens' biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predation on infected host promotes evolutionary branching of virulence and pathogens' biodiversity G H L I G H T S c We investigate the role of predators in biodiversity of the pathogens of prey. c investigate the possible role of predators in promoting biodiversity and disruptive evolution (evolutionary

327

Biodiversity, Entropy and Thermodynamics http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/bio info/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity, Entropy and Thermodynamics John Baez http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/bio info/ October(pi ) is fundamental to thermodynamics and information theory. But it's also used to measure biodiversity, where pi. In biodiversity studies, the entropy of an ecosystem is the expected amount of information we gain about

Baez, John

328

The Role of Biodiversity for the Functioning of Rocky Reef Communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 26 The Role of Biodiversity for the Functioning of Rocky Reef Communities Lars Gamfeldt and provide suggestions for future research into the functional roles of marine biodiversity in temperate 31 #12;362 L. Gamfeldt and M.E.S. Bracken 26.2 How and Why Biodiversity Can Be Linked to Ecosystem

Brody, James P.

329

Biocomplexity and conservation of biodiversity hotspots: three case studies from the Americas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biocomplexity and conservation of biodiversity hotspots: three case studies from the Americas J-0920, USA 2 Omora Botanical Park, Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity, University of Magallanes, Puerto and human systems' represents a resource for the future conservation of biodiversity hotspots in three

Monticino, Michael

330

Funding Opportunity: Advancing Digitization of Biodiversity Collections (ADBC) Sponsor: National Science Foundation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Funding Opportunity: Advancing Digitization of Biodiversity Collections (ADBC) Sponsor: National, is a rich resource providing the baseline from which to further biodiversity research and provide critical. The name of the program is modified from Biological to Biodiversity to indicate more clearly the joint

Suzuki, Masatsugu

331

PERSPECTIVE Resolving the biodiversity paradox James S. Clark,1,2,3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IDEA AND PERSPECTIVE Resolving the biodiversity paradox James S. Clark,1,2,3 * Mike Dietze,1 The paradox of biodiversity involves three elements, (i) mathematical models predict that species must differ-dimensional tradeoffs nor neutrality can resolve the biodiversity paradox, in part by showing that they do not properly

Agarwal, Pankaj K.

332

Report to Estates and Buildings, University of Edinburgh Biodiversity Baseline Review of the King's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report to Estates and Buildings, University of Edinburgh Biodiversity Baseline Review of the KingSciences, University of Edinburgh April 2009 #12;Harvie April 2009 KB Biodiversity Audit 2 Acknowledgements John Turpin 2009 KB Biodiversity Audit 3 Summary Rationale The information in this report is the first stage

333

2006 Nature Publishing Group Global tests of biodiversity concordance and the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the delineation of Conservation International's hotspots19 and high biodiversity wilderness areas20 . Because© 2006 Nature Publishing Group Global tests of biodiversity concordance and the importance , Meghan W. McKnight4 & Herman H. Shugart1 Understanding patterns of biodiversity distribution is essential

Vermont, University of

334

Cost-effective conservation: calculating biodiversity and logging trade-offs in Southeast Asia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTER Cost-effective conservation: calculating biodiversity and logging trade-offs in Southeast and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA Keywords Biodiversity conservation; birds-off between economic interests and biodiversity conservation. Here, we provide an empirical examination

Vermont, University of

335

Assessing biodiversity conservation conflict on military installations Grace D. Lee Jenni a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessing biodiversity conservation conflict on military installations Grace D. Lee Jenni a, , M for biodiversity conservation given the US mili- tary alone manages over 12 million ha of land providing habitat can be addressed by both acknowledging biodiversity conservation conflict exists and allowing dissent

Peterson, M. Nils

336

Population viability, ecological processes and biodiversity: Valuing sites for reserve selection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Representation of biodiversity is necessary in reserve planning, but will ultimately fail for conservation unlessPopulation viability, ecological processes and biodiversity: Valuing sites for reserve selection of Washington, Box 351800, Seattle, WA, 98195-1800, United States b Center for Biodiversity Research, Department

337

An Overview of Marine Biodiversity in United States Waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in this region is extremely steep, and thus is of particular interest for monitoring biodiversity changes in a warming climate. The Gulf of Maine is topographically and geologically complex, containing three major basins up to 300 m deep, and numerous smaller...

Fautin, Daphne G.; Dalton, Penelope; Incze, Lewis S.; Leong, Jo-Ann C.; Pautzke, Clarence; Rosenberg, Andrew; Sandifer, Paul A.; Sedberry, George R.; Tunnell, John W. Jr.; Abbott, Isabella; Brainard, Russell E.; Broduer, Melissa; Eldredge, Lucius G.; Feldman, Michael; Moretzsohn, Fabio; Vroom, Peter S.; Wainstein, Michelle; Wolf, Nicholas

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

338

Evolution, biodiversity, taxonomy Polymorphism of eps loci involved in exopolysaccharide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolution, biodiversity, taxonomy Polymorphism of eps loci involved in exopolysaccharide synthesis ORFs and five copies of three insertion sequences (IS) types belonging to the eps locus and ORFs sequences from Lactococcus lactis. Further- more, sequence comparison of eps loci of three S

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

339

Biofuels, biodiversity, and people: Understanding the conflicts and finding opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Biofuels, biodiversity, and people: Understanding the conflicts and finding opportunities interests in biofuels. Biofuels are viewed by many policy makers as a key to reducing reliance on foreign concerns, and by reports questioning the rationale that biofuels substantially reduce carbon emissions. We

340

REVIEW PAPER Factors and processes affecting plant biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, ecosystems provide provisioning, regulating, supporting, and cultural services. The global value of annual ecosystem services of grasslands and rangelands is about US$ 232 ha-1 year-1 . Nevertheless, the precise evaluation of biodiversity benefits remains challenging. This issue is due to valuation methods, subjective

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Balancing biodiversity in a changing environment: extinction debt,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Balancing biodiversity in a changing environment: extinction debt, immigration credit and species Dynamics Species immigration and extinction are the dominant forces underlying changes in species diversity environmental change. The model incorporates lags in extinction and immigration, which lead to extinction debt

Sax, Dov

342

Biodiversity Database Developer/Programmer Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity Database Developer/Programmer Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia (Position of Philadelphia seeks a database programmer who can develop desktop and web-based solutions for managing specimen), paleontology (fossils) and general invertebrates. Current databases hold more than 1 million records in various

Plotkin, Joshua B.

343

Logging threatens Indonesia's biodiversity By Dianthus Saputra Estey in Jakarta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Logging threatens Indonesia's biodiversity By Dianthus Saputra Estey in Jakarta Monday 13 October 2003, 16:57 Makka Time, 13:57 GMT A tenth of the world's tropical rainforests lie in Indonesia year," Togu Manurung from Forest Watch Indonesia said. This ranks the depletion of Indonesia

344

Evaluating biodiversity in fragmented landscapes: applications of landscape ecology tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Evaluating biodiversity in fragmented landscapes: applications of landscape ecology tools Kevin landscapes: applications of landscape ecology tools" will soon be published. It will expand on the basic information on Forest Research's work on landscape ecology contact: Kevin Watts Alice Holt Tel: 01420 526200 E

345

Bioenergy to Biodiversity: Downscaling scenarios of land use change   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioenergy crops are a key component of Scotland’s strategy to meet 2050 carbon emissions targets. The introduction of these crops could have large scale impacts on the biodiversity of lowland farmland. These impacts depend on the change in land use...

MacKenzie, Ian

2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

346

Conserving biodiversity is not about preserving the past but  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conserving biodiversity is not about preserving the past but about ensuring the future, which means conservation sci- entists, but increasingly our own food supplies are at risk. Whether powered by communism forward conservation research made recently in Cambridge with the founding of three new chairs. He is also

347

Climate change and tropical biodiversity: a new focus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change and tropical biodiversity: a new focus Jedediah Brodie1 , Eric Post2 and William F, Australia Considerable efforts are focused on the consequences of climate change for tropical rainforests climatic changes and human land use) remain understudied. Key concerns are that aridification could

Wisenden, Brian D.

348

Coupling a transient solvent extraction module with the separations and safeguards performance model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of codes have been developed in the past for safeguards analysis, but many are dated, and no single code is able to cover all aspects of materials accountancy, process monitoring, and diversion scenario analysis. The purpose of this work was to integrate a transient solvent extraction simulation module developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the Separations and Safeguards Performance Model (SSPM), developed at Sandia National Laboratory, as a first step toward creating a more versatile design and evaluation tool. The SSPM was designed for materials accountancy and process monitoring analyses, but previous versions of the code have included limited detail on the chemical processes, including chemical separations. The transient solvent extraction model is based on the ORNL SEPHIS code approach to consider solute build up in a bank of contactors in the PUREX process. Combined, these capabilities yield a more robust transient separations and safeguards model for evaluating safeguards system design. This coupling and initial results are presented. In addition, some observations toward further enhancement of separations and safeguards modeling based on this effort are provided, including: items to be addressed in integrating legacy codes, additional improvements needed for a fully functional solvent extraction module, and recommendations for future integration of other chemical process modules.

DePaoli, David W. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Birdwell, Joseph F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Gauld, Ian C. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Cipiti, Benjamin B.; de Almeida, Valmor F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN)

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Safeguards by design - industry engagement for new uranium enrichment facilities in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NA-24) has initiated a Safeguards by Design (SBD) effort to encourage the incorporation of international (IAEA) safeguards features early in the design phase of a new nuclear facility in order to avoid the need to redesign or retrofit the facility at a later date. The main goals of Safeguards by Design are to (1) make the implementation of international safeguards at new civil nuclear facilities more effective and efficient, (2) avoid costly and time-consuming re-design work or retrofits at such facilities and (3) design such facilities in a way that makes proliferation as technically difficult, as time-consuming, and as detectable as possible. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has recently hosted efforts to facilitate the use of Safeguards by Design for new uranium enrichment facilities currently being planned for construction in the U.S. While SBD is not a NRC requirement, the NRC is aiding the implementation of SBD by coordinating discussions between DOE's NA-24 and industry's facility design teams. More specifically, during their normal course of licensing discussions the NRC has offered industry the opportunity to engage with NA-24 regarding SBD.

Demuth, Scott F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Grice, Thomas [NRC; Lockwood, Dunbar [DOE/NA-243

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Nuclear Safeguards Infrastructure Required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) to be constructed near Idaho Falls, Idaho The NGNP is intrinsically safer than current reactors and is planned for startup ca. 2021 Safety is more prominent in the minds of the Public and Governing Officials following the nuclear reactor meltdown accidents in Fukushima, Japan The authors propose that the NGNP should be designed with International (IAEA) Safeguards in mind to support export to Non-Nuclear-Weapons States There are two variants of the NGNP design; one using integral Prismatic-shaped fuel assemblies in a fixed core; and one using recirculating fuel balls (or Pebbles) The following presents the infrastructure required to safeguard the NGNP This infrastructure is required to safeguard the Prismatic and Pebble-fueled NGNP (and other HTGR/VHTR) The infrastructure is based on current Safeguards Requirements and Practices implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for similar reactors The authors of this presentation have worked for decades in the area of International Nuclear Safeguards and are recognized experts in this field Presentation for INMM conference in July 2012.

Dr. Mark Schanfein; Philip Casey Durst

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Behavior of 241Am in fast reactor systems - a safeguards perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced fuel-cycle developments around the world currently under development are exploring the possibility of disposing of {sup 241}Am from spent fuel recycle processes by burning this material in fast reactors. For safeguards practitioners, this approach could potentially complicate both fresh- and spent-fuel safeguards measurements. The increased ({alpha},n) production in oxide fuels from the {sup 241}Am increases the uncertainty in coincidence assay of Pu in MOX assemblies and will require additional information to make use of totals-based neutron assay of these assemblies. We have studied the behavior of {sup 241}Am-bearing MOX fuel in the fast reactor system and the effect on neutron and gamma-ray source-terms for safeguards measurements. In this paper, we will present the results of simulations of the behavior of {sup 241}Am in a fast breeder reactor system. Because of the increased use of MOX fuel in thermal reactors and advances in fuel-cycle designs aimed at americium disposal in fast reactors, we have undertaken a brief study of the behavior of americium in these systems to better understand the safeguards impacts of these new approaches. In this paper we will examine the behavior of {sup 241}Am in a variety of nuclear systems to provide insight into the safeguards implications of proposed Am disposition schemes.

Beddingfield, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lafleur, Adrienne M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

IMPACT OF THE U.S. SUPPORT PROGRAM SAFEGUARDS INTERNSHIP PROGRAM.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Support Program began funding an internship program in the IAEA Department of Safeguards in 2002. Since that time, 39 U.S. citizens and permanent residents have been placed in one-year, paid internships with the IAEA. The management of the internship program was originally the responsibility of the International Safeguards Project Office but was transferred to the Office of Educational Programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 2004. Feedback on the internship program from the U.S. government and the IAEA has been positive. The interns have completed basic yet essential work for the Department of Safeguards and freed IAEA staff members to perform more complex tasks. The cost of an intern is low relative to other forms of human resources support. After the conclusion of their assignments, many of the interns go on to work for the U.S. government, the national laboratories, or companies in international safeguards and nonproliferation. This paper will discuss the work done by the interns for the IAEA, factors influencing the success of the internship program, and the effects the program has had on the careers of interns, in preparing the next generation to work in the nuclear industry, participation in INMM activities, and recruitment for U.S. citizens for safeguards positions.

PEPPER, S.; OSIECKI, C.

2006-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

353

Alternative materials to cadmium for neutron absorbers in safeguards applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cadmium is increasingly difficult to use in safeguards applications because of rising cost and increased safety regulations. This work examines the properties of two materials produced by Ceradyne, inc. that present alternatives to cadmium for neutron shielding. The first is an aluminum metal doped with boron and the second is a boron carbide powder, compressed into a ceramic. Both are enriched in the {sup 10}B isotope. Two sheets of boron doped aluminum (1.1 mm and 5.2mm thick) and one sheet of boron carbide (8.5mm thick) were provided by Ceradyne for testing. An experiment was designed to test the neutron absorption capabilities of these three sheets against two different thicknesses of cadmium (0.6mm and 1.6mm thick). The thinner piece of aluminum boron alloy (1.1mm) performed as well as the cadmium pieces at absorbing neutrons. The thicker aluminum-boron plate provided more shielding than the cadmium sheets and the boron carbide performed best by a relatively large margin. Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code modeling of the experiment was performed to provide validaLed computational tools for predicting the behavior of systems in which these materials may be incorporated as alternatives to cadmium. MCNPX calculations predict that approximately 0.17mm of the boron carbide is equivalent to 0.6mm of cadmium. There are drawbacks to these materials that need to be noted when considering using them as replacements for cadmium. Notably, they may need to be thicker than cadmium, and are not malleable, requiring machining to fit any curved forms.

Freeman, Corey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Geist, William H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; West, James D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

PHYSICAL REVIEW E 83, 011917 (2011) Pattern formation, synchronization, and outbreak of biodiversity in cyclically competing games  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of biodiversity in cyclically competing games Wen-Xu Wang,1 Xuan Ni,2 Ying-Cheng Lai,1,2,3 and Celso Grebogi3 1 on biodiversity. Addressing the role of migration in biodiversity microscopically is fundamental but remains mutations, leading to an outbreak of biodiversity. A surprising phenomenon is that target waves in different

Lai, Ying-Cheng

355

Estimating biodiversity of dry forests and coral reefs with hyperspectral data: a NASA EPSCOR project at UPRM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating biodiversity of dry forests and coral reefs with hyperspectral data: a NASA EPSCOR and modelsensing and field data to assess and model components of ecosystem biodiversity · Utilize hyperspectral service in PR and PR department ofp Natural Resources #12;What is ecosystem biodiversity ?biodiversity ? D

Gilbes, Fernando

356

Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL), January 1, 1990--December 31, 1996, Vol. 2, Rev. 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL), Vol. 2, Rev. 5, provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) which occurred and were reported from January 1, 1990, through December 31, 1996. Because of public interest, the Miscellaneous category includes a few events which involve either source material, byproduct material, or natural uranium which are exempt from safeguards requirements. Events are described under the categories of Bomb-related, Intrusion, Missing and/or Allegedly Stolen, Transportation-related, Tampering/Vandalism, Arson, Firearms, Radiological Sabotage, Nonradiological Sabotage, and Miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Safeguards on uranium ore concentrate? the impact of modern mining and milling process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increased purity in uranium ore concentrate not only raises the question as to whether Safeguards should be applied to the entirety of uranium conversion facilities, but also as to whether some degree of coverage should be moved back to uranium ore concentrate production at uranium mining and milling facilities. This paper looks at uranium ore concentrate production across the globe and explores the extent to which increased purity is evident and the underlying reasons. Potential issues this increase in purity raises for IAEA's strategy on the Starting Point of Safeguards are also discussed.

Francis, Stephen [National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Birchwood Park, Warrington WA3 6AE (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Fragmentation Energetics of Clusters Relevant to Atmospheric...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Clusters Relevant to Atmospheric New Particle Formation. Fragmentation Energetics of Clusters Relevant to Atmospheric New Particle Formation. Abstract: The exact mechanisms by...

359

Integrated Safeguards and Security Management Self-Assessment 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2002 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory deployed the first Integrated Safeguards and Security Management (ISSM) Self-Assessment process, designed to measure the effect of the Laboratory's ISSM efforts. This process was recognized by DOE as a best practice and model program for self-assessment and training. In 2004, the second Self-Assessment was launched. The cornerstone of this process was an employee survey that was designed to meet several objectives: (1) Ensure that Laboratory assets are protected. (2) Provide a measurement of the Laboratory's current security status that can be compared against the 2002 Self-Assessment baseline. (3) Educate all Laboratory staff about security responsibilities, tools, and practices. (4) Provide security staff with feedback on the effectiveness of security programs. (5) Provide line management with the information they need to make informed decisions about security. This 2004 Self Assessment process began in July 2004 with every employee receiving an information packet and instructions for completing the ISSM survey. The Laboratory-wide survey contained questions designed to measure awareness and conformance to policy and best practices. The survey response was excellent--90% of Berkeley Lab employees completed the questionnaire. ISSM liaisons from each division followed up on the initial survey results with individual employees to improve awareness and resolve ambiguities uncovered by the questionnaire. As with the 2002 survey, the Self-Assessment produced immediate positive results for the ISSM program and revealed opportunities for longer-term corrective actions. Results of the questionnaire provided information for organizational profiles and an institutional summary. The overall level of security protection and awareness was very high--often above 90%. Post-survey work by the ISSM liaisons and line management consistently led to improved awareness and metrics, as shown by a comparison of profiles at the end of phase one (August 6, 2004) and phase two (November 1, 2004). The Self-Assessment confirmed that classified information is not held or processed at Berkeley Lab. The survey results also identified areas where increased employee knowledge and awareness of Laboratory policy would be beneficial, the two most prominent being password usage and wireless network service. Line management will be able to determine additional corrective actions based on the results of the Self-Assessment. Future assessments will raise the ratings bar for some existing program elements and add new elements to stimulate further improvements in Laboratory security.

Lunford, Dan; Ramsey, Dwayne

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Initial Evaluation of a New Electromechanical Cooler for Safeguards Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) constitutes the current state of the art in cryogenic cooling for high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, which are widely used for {gamma}-ray and characteristic X-ray spectroscopy because of their excellent energy discrimination. Use of LN{sub 2} requires a liquid nitrogen supply, cumbersome storage tanks and plumbing, and the frequent attention of personnel to be sure that nitrogen levels are sufficient to maintain the detectors at a sufficiently low operating temperature. Safety hazards also are associated with the use of LN{sub 2}, both because of the potential for severe frostbite on exposure to skin and because it displaces ambient oxygen when it evaporates in closed spaces. Existing electromechanical coolers have, until now, been more expensive to procure and maintain than LN{sub 2} systems. Performance and reliability have also been serious issues because of microphonic degradation of photon energy peak resolution and cooler failures due to compressor oil becoming entrained in the refrigerant. This report describes the results of tests of a new HPGe detector cooling technology, the PerkinElmer ORTEC{reg_sign} Products X-Cooler{trademark} that, according to the manufacturer, significantly reduces the lifetime cost of the cooling system without degradation of the output signal. The manufacturer claims to have overcome cost, performance and reliability problems of older-generation electromechanical coolers, but the product has no significant history of use, and this project is the first independent evaluation of its performance for Total cost savings for the DOE and other agencies that use HPGe systems extensively for safeguards monitoring is expected to be quite significant if the new electromechanical cooler technology is shown to be reliable and if performance characteristics indicate its usefulness for this application. The technology also promises to make HPGe monitoring, characterization and detection available for unattended or covert operation and in remote or inaccessible locations where the unavailability of LN{sub 2} and signal degradation from existing mechanical coolers prevent its use at the present time.

Coleman, RL

2002-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

DEVELOPMENT OF AN ADHESIVE CANDLE FILTER SAFEGUARD DEVICE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to reach the highest possible efficiencies in a coal-fired turbine-based power system, the turbine should be directly fired with the products of coal conversion. Two main types of systems employ these turbines: those based on pressurized fluidized-bed combustors and those based on integrated gasification combined cycles. In both systems, suspended particulates must be cleaned from the gas stream before it enters the turbine so as to prevent fouling and erosion of the turbine blades. To produce the cleanest gas, barrier filters are being developed and are in use in several facilities. Barrier filters are composed of porous, high-temperature materials that allow the hot gas to pass but collect the particulates on the surface. The three main configurations of the barrier filters are candle, cross-flow, and tube filters. Both candle and tube filters have been tested extensively. They are composed of coarsely porous ceramic that serves as a structural support, overlain with a thin, microporous ceramic layer on the dirty gas side that serves as the primary filter surface. They are highly efficient at removing particulate matter from the gas stream and, because of their ceramic construction, are resistant to gas and ash corrosion. However, ceramics are brittle and individual elements can fail, allowing particulates to pass through the hole left by the filter element and erode the turbine. Preventing all failure of individual ceramic filter elements is not possible at the present state of development of the technology. Therefore, safeguard devices (SGDs) must be employed to prevent the particulates streaming through occasional broken filters from reaching the turbine. However, the SGD must allow for the free passage of gas when it is not activated. Upon breaking of a filter, the SGD must either mechanically close or quickly plug with filter dust to prevent additional dust from reaching the turbine. Production of a dependable rapidly closing autonomous mechanical device at high temperatures in a dusty gas stream is difficult because of problems with materials corrosion, dust leakage, and detection of filter failure. Therefore, the Energy & Environmental Research Center is using its knowledge of the factors that make filter dust sticky at gas filtration temperatures to make a simple and inexpensive SGD that employs an adhesive yet thermodynamically stable coating on a highly porous ceramic substrate. The SGDs are placed on top of individual candle filters at the filtered gas exit. Upon failure of the filter, the dirty gas flows through the SGD where the adhesive surface rapidly and permanently traps dust particles, causing the device to plug and prevent the dust from reaching the turbine.

John P. Hurley; Ann K. Henderson; Jan W. Nowok; Michael L. Swanson

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Darwin Core: An Evolving Community-Developed Biodiversity Data Standard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, United States of America, 2University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, United States of America, 3California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, California, United States of America, 4Global Biodiversity Information Facility, Copenhagen, Denmark, 5Centro... that do not repeat, as simple text files or XML. There is also an XML Guide with reference XML schemas for highly structured data and a Text Guide explaining the construction of Darwin Core Archives (a combination of CSV files and a simple XML document...

Wieczorek, John; Bloom, David; Gualnick, Robert; Blum, Stan; Dö ring, Markus; Giovanni, Renato; Robertson, Tim; Vieglais, David A.

2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

363

NNSA Signs Memorandum with Kuwait to Increase Cooperation on Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

On June 23, 2010, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) signed a Memorandum of Cooperation on nuclear safeguards and other nonproliferation topics with the Kuwait National Nuclear Energy Committee (KNNEC). NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino and KNNEC's Secretary General, Dr. Ahmad Bishara, signed the memorandum at a ceremony at U.S. Department of Energy headquarters in Washington.

Thomas D'Agostino

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Here is a partial list of safeguards for explosive actuated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Here is a partial list of safeguards for explosive actuated the design requirements in "American National Standards Institute Safety Requirements for Explosive Actuated on the other side. Portable Power Tools Safety Tip #14 Don't be a fool. Inspect your tools. Operators

Minnesota, University of

365

Analysis of the effectiveness of gas centrifuge enrichment plants advanced safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current safeguards approaches used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to verify declared low-enriched uranium (LEU) production, detect undeclared LEU production and detect highly enriched uranium (HEU) production with adequate detection probability using non destructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and 235U enrichment of declared UF6 containers used in the process of enrichment at GCEPs. This paper contains an analysis of possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems including process monitoring and possible on-site destructive assay (DA) of samples that could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector's measurements. These improvements could reduce the difference between the operator's and inspector's measurements providing more effective and efficient IAEA GCEPs safeguards. We also explore how a few advanced safeguards systems could be assembled for unattended operation. The analysis will focus on how unannounced inspections (UIs), and the concept of information-driven inspections (IDS) can affect probability of detection of the diversion of nuclear materials when coupled to new GCEPs safeguards regimes augmented with unattended systems.

Boyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erpenbeck, Heather H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinjoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marlow, Johnna B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Reactor antineutrino monitoring with a plastic scintillator array as a new safeguards method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We developed a segmented reactor-antineutrino detector made of plastic scintillators for application as a tool in nuclear safeguards inspection and performed mostly unmanned field operations at a commercial power plant reactor. At a position outside the reactor building, we measured the difference in reactor antineutrino flux above the ground when the reactor was active and inactive.

S. Oguri; Y. Kuroda; Y. Kato; R. Nakata; Y. Inoue; C. Ito; M. Minowa

2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

367

Education in Safeguards and Security Technology Meeting Challenges with Technology and Experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Education and hands-on experience are crucial to ensuring a workforce of safeguards and security professionals who can meet the challenges currently faced in global nuclear safeguards and security. Global demand for nuclear energy and technology, the new Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START), and the cleanup of Cold War facilities have resulted in an increased need for trained safeguards and security personnel. At the same time, the global community is facing a growing shortage of experienced workers with hands-on knowledge of nuclear material processing. Limited access to operating facilities has dramatically reduced the opportunities for next-generation practitioners to obtain hands-on training experience. To address these needs, the Safeguards Technology Integration Center (STIC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was created as a Department of Energy User Facility to provide access both to the latest technology and to field-experienced professionals. The STIC provides real-world conditions, process equipment mock-ups, and controlled access to encapsulated radioactive materials (including highly enriched uranium and plutonium) for training and technology evaluation encompassing various techniques and skills, such as Radiation Inspection Systems, Containment and Surveillance Systems, Nondestructive Assay, Security System Performance Testing, and System Design and Analysis. The STIC facilities, laboratories, test beds, and training facilities are described along with the more notable aspects of the training program, which has included more than 1000 participants in the last four years.

Paschal, Linda J [ORNL; Chapman, Jeffrey Allen [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL; Stinson, Brad J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

56647Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 187 / Wednesday, September 28, 2005 / Notices SAFEGUARDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(PEIS) entitled, ``Designation of Energy Corridors on Federal Land in the 11 Western States'' (DOE56647Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 187 / Wednesday, September 28, 2005 / Notices SAFEGUARDS FOR THE SYSTEM: None. [FR Doc. 05­19326 Filed 9­27­05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 5001­06­M DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

369

Role of IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) safeguards in confidence building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, I will examine some attributes of confidence building and connect them with how the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) interacts with its member states in carrying out its safeguards function. These interactions and the structure set up to define them help maintain and strengthen confidence between the IAEA and the member states and among these states. 3 refs.

Augustson, R.H.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Plutonium assay for safeguards purposes: material heterogeneity and the application of calorimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of nuclear materials measurement techniques have been employed by the facility operator (WHC) and the IAEA during the two physical inventory verifications (PIVs) and at other items to determine and verify the quantities of plutonium present in the safeguarded inventory. Results of these analyses were statistically evaluated and are presented in this report.

Welsh, T.I., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Manual for Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System Reporting and Data Submission  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The manual provides detailed instructions for documenting and reporting data submissions for nuclear materials transactions, inventories, and material balances to the Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS). Cancels DOE M 474.1-2. Canceled by DOE M 470.4-6.

2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

372

Keywords. Area selection; biodiversity; place prioritization; surrogacy J. Biosci. | Vol. 27 | No. 4 | Suppl. 2 | July 2002 | 299308 | Indian Academy of Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for conservation planning SAHOTRA SARKAR* and CHRIS MARGULES Biodiversity and Biocultural Conservation Laboratory at biodiversity conservation. Because biodiversity is rooted in place, the task of conserving biodiversity should target places for conservation action; and because all places contain biodiversity, but not all places

Sarkar, Sahotra

373

Abstract: The challenges in nuclear safeguards and in nuclear security have significantly changed over the last decades. On the one side nuclear safeguards evolved from the simple verifica9on of declared amounts of material to a more informa9on driven app  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract: The challenges in nuclear safeguards and in nuclear security have significantly changed over the last decades. On the one side nuclear safeguards evolvedon driven approach based on the verifica9on of absence of undeclared nuclear

374

E-Print Network 3.0 - atoll coral biodiversity Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to form his beloved atolls. It is these deep, cold-water corals that are the focus... broad research areas: links and connectivity, biodiversity ... Source: Brierley, Andrew -...

375

Maple Sugar Bush Management and Biodiversity Conservation in Eastern Ontario, Canada .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis examines the extent to which sugar bush management in Eastern Ontario might contribute to biodiversity maintenance and conservation and therefore be promoted as… (more)

Clark, Kristin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Agricultural biodiversity, farm level technical efficiency and conservation benefits : an empirical investigation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The issues involved in agricultural biodiversity are important and interesting areas for the application of economic theory. However, very little theoretical and empirical work has… (more)

Karunarathna, Kolombugamage Muditha Rathnamala

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Creating Partnerships Between Governmental Authorities and Indigenous peoples: a New Strategy for Biodiversity Conservation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Securing the interactions between plants, animals, microorganisms and the physical environment forms the foundation of sustainable development (Global Biodiversity Strategy, World Resources Institute, 1992).… (more)

Duboisset-Broust, Lauren

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

An evaluation of the conservation of New Zealand's threatened biodiversity : management, species recovery and legislation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??It is only recently that New Zealand wildlife managers have become aware of both the taxonomic range of New Zealand’ indigenous biodiversity and the number… (more)

Seabrook-Davison, Mark Nicholas Hawdon

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Terminating Safeguards on Excess Special Nuclear Material: Defense TRU Waste Clean-up and Nonproliferation - 12426  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) manages defense nuclear material that has been determined to be excess to programmatic needs and declared waste. When these wastes contain plutonium, they almost always meet the definition of defense transuranic (TRU) waste and are thus eligible for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The DOE operates the WIPP in a manner that physical protections for attractiveness level D or higher special nuclear material (SNM) are not the normal operating condition. Therefore, there is currently a requirement to terminate safeguards before disposal of these wastes at the WIPP. Presented are the processes used to terminate safeguards, lessons learned during the termination process, and how these approaches might be useful for future defense TRU waste needing safeguards termination prior to shipment and disposal at the WIPP. Also described is a new criticality control container, which will increase the amount of fissile material that can be loaded per container, and how it will save significant taxpayer dollars. Retrieval, compliant packaging and shipment of retrievably stored legacy TRU waste has dominated disposal operations at WIPP since it began operations 12 years ago. But because most of this legacy waste has successfully been emplaced in WIPP, the TRU waste clean-up focus is turning to newly-generated TRU materials. A major component will be transuranic SNM, currently managed in safeguards-protected vaults around the weapons complex. As DOE and NNSA continue to consolidate and shrink the weapons complex footprint, it is expected that significant quantities of transuranic SNM will be declared surplus to the nation's needs. Safeguards termination of SNM varies due to the wide range of attractiveness level of the potential material that may be directly discarded as waste. To enhance the efficiency of shipping waste with high TRU fissile content to WIPP, DOE designed an over-pack container, similar to the pipe component, called the criticality control over-pack, which will significantly enhance the efficiency of disposal. Hundreds of shipments of transuranic SNM, suitably packaged to meet WIPP waste acceptance criteria and with safeguards terminated have been successfully emplaced at WIPP (primarily from the Rocky Flats site clean-up) since WIPP opened. DOE expects that thousands more may eventually result from SNM consolidation efforts throughout the weapons complex. (authors)

Hayes, Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Carlsbad Operations Group (United States); Nelson, Roger [Department Of Energy, Carlsbad Operations Office (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Global Climate Change Adaptation Priorities for Biodiversity and Food Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Climate Change Adaptation Priorities for Biodiversity and Food Security Lee Hannah 1,2* , Makihiko Ikegami 3 , David G. Hole 1,4 , Changwan Seo 5 , Stuart H. M. Butchart 6 , A. Townsend Peterson 7 , Patrick R. Roehrdanz 2 1 The Betty...72590. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0072590 Editor: Alex J Cannon, Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium, Canada Received November 13, 2012; Accepted July 14, 2013; Published August 21, 2013 Copyright: © 2013 Hannah et al. This is an open-access article...

Hannah, Lee; Ikegami, Makihiko; Hole, David G.; Seo, Changwan; Butchart, Stuart H. M.; Peterson, A. Townsend; Roehrdanz, Patrick

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The Sun Asphericities: Astrophysical Relevance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Of all the fundamental parameters of the Sun (diameter, mass, temperature...), the gravitational multipole moments (of degree l and order m) that determine the solar moments of inertia, are still poorly known. However, at the first order (l=2), the quadrupole moment is relevant to many astrophysical applications. It indeed contributes to the relativistic perihelion advance of planets, together with the post-Newtonian (PN) parameters; or to the precession of the orbital plane about the Sun polar axis, the latter being unaffected by the purely relativistic PN contribution. Hence, a precise knowledge of the quadrupole moment is necessary for accurate orbit determination, and alternatively, to obtain constraints on the PN parameters. Moreover, the successive gravitational multipole moments have a physical meaning: they describe deviations from a purely spherical mass distribution. Thus, their precise determination gives indications on the solar internal structure. Here, we explain why it is difficult to compute these parameters, how to derive the best values, and how they will be determined in a near future by means of space experiments.

J-P. Rozelot; S. Pireaux; S. Lefebvre; T. Corbard

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Patterns of extinction and biodiversity in the fossil record Ricard V. Sole and Mark Newman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

extinction of all time took place, killing at least 90% of all species on the Earth, and ending the eraPatterns of extinction and biodiversity in the fossil record Ricard V. Sol´e and Mark Newman Santa in biodiversity towards the present, punctuated by a number of large extinction events which wiped out a signi#2

Newman, Mark

383

Predicting the responsiveness of soil biodiversity to deforestation: a cross-biome study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting the responsiveness of soil biodiversity to deforestation: a cross-biome study T H O M Abstract The consequences of deforestation for aboveground biodiversity have been a scientific throughput sequencing, we characterize the effects of deforestation on micro- bial communities across

Colorado at Boulder, University of

384

Atlas de la Biodiversit Marine du Gabon Marine Biodiversity Atlas for Gabon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atlas de la Biodiversité Marine du Gabon Marine Biodiversity Atlas for Gabon Version 1: Avril 2012, Matthew J Witt #12;Atlas de la Biodiversité Marine du Gabon Marine Biodiversity Atlas for Gabon 1 Introduction Bienvenue à l'atlas Darwin de la Biodiversité Marine du Gabon (version 1; avril 2012). La mission

Exeter, University of

385

NEO-LIBERALISM IN CHILE AND ITS IMPACTS ON AGRICULTURE AND BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION OF QUINOA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEO-LIBERALISM IN CHILE AND ITS IMPACTS ON AGRICULTURE AND BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION OF QUINOA, Montpellier, June 28-30, 2010 1 NEO-LIBERALISM IN CHILE AND ITS IMPACTS ON AGRICULTURE AND BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION OF QUINOA: A LESSON FOR STRENGTHENING AND DEVELOPING NEW PARTNERSHIPS Enrique A. MARTÍNEZ*, Didier

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

386

STUDENT CONFERENCE IN CONSERVATION SCIENCE, THEME: BIODIVERSITY IN AFRICA PRESENT STATE, CHALLENGES AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDENT CONFERENCE IN CONSERVATION SCIENCE, THEME: BIODIVERSITY IN AFRICA ­ PRESENT STATE, Biodiversity and ecosystem functioning and services and Conservation of carnivores. Although all 4 workshops, CHALLENGES AND PROSPECTS ON ITS CONSERVATION. 2ND -4TH JULY 2013, NATIONAL MUSEUMS OF KENYA, NAIROBI, KENYA

387

Biodiversity and Conservation 10: 711723, 2001. 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity and Conservation 10: 711­723, 2001. © 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed 2000 Abstract. Understanding the impact of agriculture on biodiversity is critical for effective conservation management. Our goal was to determine the impact of agricultural disturbance on the lizard fauna

Glor, Rich

388

New Prototype Safeguards Technology Offers Improved Confidence and Automation for Uranium Enrichment Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important requirement for the international safeguards community is the ability to determine the enrichment level of uranium in gas centrifuge enrichment plants and nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. This is essential to ensure that countries with nuclear nonproliferation commitments, such as States Party to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, are adhering to their obligations. However, current technologies to verify the uranium enrichment level in gas centrifuge enrichment plants or nuclear fuel fabrication facilities are technically challenging and resource-intensive. NNSA’s Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) supports the development, testing, and evaluation of future systems that will strengthen and sustain U.S. safeguards and security capabilities—in this case, by automating the monitoring of uranium enrichment in the entire inventory of a fuel fabrication facility. One such system is HEVA—hybrid enrichment verification array. This prototype was developed to provide an automated, nondestructive assay verification technology for uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders at enrichment plants.

Brim, Cornelia P.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Safeguard By Design Lessons Learned from DOE Experience Integrating Safety into Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper identifies the lessons to be learned for the institutionalization of Safeguards by Design (SBD) from the Department of Energy (DOE) experience developing and implementing DOE-STD-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process. The experience is valuable because of the similarity of the challenges of integrating safety and safeguards into the design process. The paper reviews the content and development of DOE-STD-1189-2008 from its initial concept in January 2006 to its issuance in March 2008. Lessons learned are identified in the areas of the development and structure of requirements for the SBD process; the target audience for SBD requirements and guidance, the need for a graded approach to SBD, and a possible strategy for development and implementation of SBD within DOE.

Hockert, John; Burbank, Roberta L.

2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

390

New Prototype Safeguards Technology Offers Improved Confidence and Automation for Uranium Enrichment Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important requirement for the international safeguards community is the ability to determine the enrichment level of uranium in gas centrifuge enrichment plants and nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. This is essential to ensure that countries with nuclear nonproliferation commitments, such as States Party to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, are adhering to their obligations. However, current technologies to verify the uranium enrichment level in gas centrifuge enrichment plants or nuclear fuel fabrication facilities are technically challenging and resource-intensive. NNSA’s Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) supports the development, testing, and evaluation of future systems that will strengthen and sustain U.S. safeguards and security capabilities—in this case, by automating the monitoring of uranium enrichment in the entire inventory of a fuel fabrication facility. One such system is HEVA—hybrid enrichment verification array. This prototype was developed to provide an automated, nondestructive assay verification technology for uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders at enrichment plants.

Brim, Cornelia P.

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

391

Plutonium Measurements with a Fast-Neutron Multiplicity Counter for Nuclear Safeguards Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements were performed at the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy to field test a fast-neutron multiplicity counter developed at the University of Michigan. The measurements allowed the illustration of the system’s photon discrimination abilities, efficiency when measuring neutron multiplicity, ability to characterize 240Pueff mass, and performance relative to a currently deployed neutron coincidence counter. This work is motivated by the need to replace and improve upon 3He neutron detection systems for nuclear safeguards applications.

Jennifer L. Dolan; Marek Flaska; Alexis Poitrasson-Riviere; Andreas Enqvist; Paolo Peerani; David L. Chichester; Sara A. Pozzi

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement and Additional Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order defines requirements for Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with the Agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the United States, the Protocol to the Agreement, the Additional Protocol to the Agreement, and the Subsidiary Arrangements to the Agreement and Additional Protocol. Cancels DOE O 142.2. Admin Chg 1, 6-27-13.

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement and Additional Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order defines requirements for Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with the Agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the United States, the Protocol to the Agreement, the Additional Protocol to the Agreement, and the Subsidiary Arrangements to the Agreement and Additional Protocol. Cancels DOE O 142.2. Admin Chg 1, dated 6-27-13, cancels DOE O 142.1A. Certified 12-3-14.

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

ASSESS (Analytic System and Software for Evaluating Safeguards and Security) update: Current status and future developments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Analytic System and Software for Evaluating Safeguards and Security (ASSESS) has been released for use by DOE field offices and their contractors. In October, 1989, we offered a prototype workshop to selected representatives of the DOE community. Based on the prototype results, we held the first training workshop at the Central Training Academy in January, 1990. Four additional workshops are scheduled for FY 1990. ASSESS is a state-of-the-art analytical tool for management to conduct integrated evaluation of safeguards systems at facilities handling facilities. Currently, ASSESS focuses on the threat of theft/diversion of special nuclear material by insiders, outsiders, and a special form of insider/outsider collusion. ASSESS also includes a neutralization module. Development of the tool is continuing. Plans are underway to expand the capabilities of ASSESS to evaluate against violent insiders, to validate the databases, to expand the neutralization module, and to assist in demonstrating compliance with DOE Material Control and Accountability (MC A) Order 5633.3. These new capabilities include the ability to: compute a weighted average for performance capability against a spectrum of insider adversaries; conduct defense-in-depth analyses; and analyze against protracted theft scenarios. As they become available, these capabilities will be incorporated in our training program. ASSESS is being developed jointly by Lawrence Livermore and Sandia National Laboratories under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Safeguards and Security.

Al-Ayat, R.A. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Cousins, T.D. (USDOE, Washington, DC (USA)); Hoover, E.R. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Under-sodium viewing technology for improvement of fast-reactor safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current safeguards approach for fast reactors relies exclusively on maintenance of continuity of knowledge to track the movement of fuel assemblies through these facilities. The remote handling of fuel assemblies, the visual opacity of the liquid metal coolant. and the chemical reactivity of sodium all combine and result in significant limitations on the available options to verify fuel assembly identification numbers or the integrity of these assemblies. These limitations also serve to frustrate attempts to restore the continuity-of-knowledge in instances where the information is under a variety of scenarios. The technology of ultrasonic under-sodium viewing offers new options to the safeguards community for recovering continuity-of-knowledge and applying more traditional item accountancy to fast reactor facilities. We have performed a literature review to investigate the development of under-sodium viewing technologies. In this paper we will summarize our findings and report the state of development of this technology and we will present possible applications to the fast reactor system to improve the existing safeguards approach at these reactors and in future fast reactors.

Beddingfield, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gerhart, Jeremy J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kawakubo, Yoko [JAEA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

I N F O R M A T I O N N O T E Evaluating Biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 I N F O R M A T I O N N O T E Evaluating Biodiversity in Fragmented Landscapes: Principles 231 value to biodiversity. There is now a growing need to evaluate the impacts of forest management on biodiversity, in order to maintain and enhance the wildlife value at the landscape scale. The development

397

Evolution and Biodiversity All of biology rests on the fundamental principle that organisms, and their characteristics, are the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Evolution and Biodiversity All of biology rests on the fundamental principle that organisms and Biodiversity Option will enable students to pursue jobs in a diversity of biological fields. Many students, Phylogenetics, and Biodiversity group familiarizes students with organisms in an evolutionary context, while

Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

398

Higher Taxa in Biodiversity Studies: Patterns from Eastern Pacific Marine K. Roy; D. Jablonski; J. W. Valentine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Higher Taxa in Biodiversity Studies: Patterns from Eastern Pacific Marine Molluscs K. Roy; D #12;Higher taxa in biodiversity studies : patterns from eastern Pacific marine molluscs Department for species-level biodiversity patterns. Here this premise is evaluated by using a large database of benthic

Boyce, C. Kevin

399

Bull. Fr. Pche Piscic. (2003) 370-371 : 7-14 --7 --UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING BIODIVERSITY IN RELATION TO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to population levels. Key-words : biodiversity, native crayfish, conservation, management. COMPRÃ?HENSION ET, conservation, gestion. INTRODUCTION Biodiversity is expressed as a core concern of a number of EC networks to biodiversity conservation and management in Europe. CRAYNET is thus linked to BIOTA Cluster and among other

Boyer, Edmond

400

Safeguards and security concept for the Secure Automated Fabrication (SAF) and Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) fuel cycle, SAF line technical support  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a safeguards and security concept system review for the secure automated fabrication (SAF) and national liquid metal reactor (LMR) fuel programs.

Schaubert, V.J.; Remley, M.E.; Grantham, L.F.

1986-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Assessing the influence of the solar orbit on terrestrial biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The terrestrial fossil record shows a significant variation in the extinction and origination rates of species during the past half billion years. Numerous studies have claimed an association between this variation and the motion of the Sun around the Galaxy, invoking the modulation of cosmic rays, gamma rays and comet impact frequency as a cause of this biodiversity variation. However, some of these studies exhibit methodological problems, or were based on coarse assumptions (such as a strict periodicity of the solar orbit). Here we investigate this link in more detail, using a model of the Galaxy to reconstruct the solar orbit and thus a predictive model of the temporal variation of the extinction rate due to astronomical mechanisms. We compare these predictions as well as those of various reference models with paleontological data. Our approach involves Bayesian model comparison, which takes into account the uncertainties in the paleontological data as well as the distribution of solar orbits consistent wi...

Feng, F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Performance, Market and Manufacturing Constraints relevant to...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Constraints relevant to the Industrialization of Thermoelectric Devices Market pricing of thermoelectric raw materials and processing, cost of manufacture of devices and...

403

A comparison of some relevance feedback techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the relevant documents. Needless to say, perfect indexing does not exist in document retr1eval systems. Yet to use relevance feedback a basic assumption has to be made. Specifically 1t must be assumed that documents relevant to a given query will res1de... results. Out ut de ictin the functionin of each strate . The vector mentioned above is printed for each iteration of each strategy. At a glance it shows how the ranks of the relevant documents vacillate from one iteration to the next. In addition...

Cashman, Leslie Edward

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Report on the US Program of Technical Assistance to Safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (POTAS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the work done under the US Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS), providing the US Government, IAEA, and others with a short review of the progress made in the program since its inception. Becaue of the size and complexity of the program, only major accomplishments are presented. These are grouped under the following categories: (1) equipment and standard which cover assay of irradiated and unirradiated nuclear materials, automatic data processing, and physical standards; (2) experts who are involved in technology transfer, training, system design, and safeguard information processing and analysis; (3) system studies which cover diversion hazard analysis, safeguards approaches and application, and inspection effort planning and forecasting; (4) techniques, procedures, and equipment evaluation; (5) training of IAEA inspectors and safeguards specialists from member states. The major achievement has been the provisions of safeguards equipment designed to be reliable, and tamper resistant, some of which have already been in use in the field by inspector or by IAEA staff members in Vienna. These are listed in a table. (AT)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Center for Gas Separations Relevant to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Gas Separations Relevant to Clean Energy Technologies #12;Director Berend Smit Jeffrey, metal-organic framework. © 2013 EFRC Center for Gas Separation Relevant to Clean Energy Technology. All the current separation technology, developed over sixty years ago, requires 25-35% more coal to produce

Cohen, Ronald C.

406

High-resolution microcalorimeter detectors as a tool in the future of nuclear safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New measurements are presented from the LANL-NIST microcalorimeter array for two standard plutonium sources. The results demonstrate substantially smaller error bars obtained from the spectral analysis program FRAM. Some areas of improvement to the analysis technique have been identified, indicating that the micro calorimeter results can be improved upon. These results support the viability of a device for performing real nuclear safeguards measurements in the near future. The challenge of providing reliably accurate and precise data is a critical component of any safeguards initiative. In the realm of nuclear safeguards, this is an especially daunting task since inaccurate and/or imprecise data could have very serious international consequences. As such, there is a constant drive within the community to establish better measurement and analysis techniques in order to further reduce the associated errors and uncertainties. Even with todays state of the art equipment, measurement uncertainties can extend to several significant quantities worth of material over a relatively modest period of time. Furthermore, there is a strong desire for improved nondestructive analysis techniques in order to reduce both the cost, turnover rate, and inconvenience of destructive analyses. One promising new technology that may help to realize these goals is that of gamma-ray microcalorimeter detectors. The hallmark quality of this new technique is the ability to achieve energy resolution nearly an order of magnitude better than typical planar high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. Such an improvement may help reduce uncertainties associated with, for instance, plutonium isotopics or uranium enrichment measurements. This may, in turn, help to reduce uncertainties in total plutonium and/or uranium content in a given sample without the need for destructive analysis. In this paper, we will describe this new detector technology as well as some recent measurements carried out with the LANL-NIST gamma-ray microcalorimeter ({micro}cal) array. Discussion will focus on the capabilities of this technology as well as the progress toward a practical measurement device.

Hoteling, Nathan J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hoover, Andrew S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Integrated safeguards testing laboratories in support of the advanced fuel cycle initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key enabler for advanced fuel cycle safeguards research and technology development for programs such as the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) is access to facilities and nuclear materials. This access is necessary in many cases in order to ensure that advanced safeguards techniques and technologies meet the measurement needs for which they were designed. One such crucial facility is a hot cell based laboratory which would allow developers from universities, national laboratories, and commercial companies to perform iterative research and development of advanced safeguards instrumentation under realistic operating conditions but not be subject to production schedule limitations. The need for such a facility arises from the requirement to accurately measure minor actinide and/or fission product bearing nuclear materials that cannot be adequately shielded in glove boxes. With the contraction of the DOE nuclear complex following the end of the cold war, many suitable facilities at DOE sites are increasingly costly to operate and are being evaluated for closure. A hot cell based laboratory that allowed developers to install and remove instrumentation from the hot cell would allow for both risk mitigation and performance optimization of the instrumentation prior to fielding equipment in facilities where maintenance and repair of the instrumentation is difficult or impossible. These benefits are accomplished by providing developers the opportunity to iterate between testing the performance of the instrumentation by measuring realistic types and amounts of nuclear material, and adjusting and refining the instrumentation based on the results of these measurements. In this paper, we review the requirements for such a facility using the Wing 9 hot cells in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Chemistry and Metallurgy Research facility as a model for such a facility and describe recent use of these hot cells in support of AFCI.

Santi, Peter A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Demuth, Scott F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Klasky, Kristen L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Haeok [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sprinkle, James K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Bradley [DOE, NE

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Evaluating Safeguards Benefits of Process Monitoring as compared with Nuclear Material Accountancy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper illustrates potential safeguards benefits that process monitoring (PM) may have as a diversion deterrent and as a complementary safeguards measure to nuclear material accountancy (NMA). This benefit is illustrated by quantifying the standard deviation associated with detecting a considered material diversion scenario using either an NMA-based method or a PM-based approach. To illustrate the benefits of PM for effective safeguards, we consider a reprocessing facility. We assume that the diversion of interest for detection manifests itself as a loss of Pu caused by abnormally operating a dissolver for an extended period to accomplish protracted diversion (or misdirection) of Pu to a retained (unconditioned) waste stream. For detecting the occurrence of this diversion (which involves anomalous operation of the dissolver), we consider two different data evaluation and integration (DEI) approaches, one based on NMA and the other based on PM. The approach based on PM does not directly do mass balance calculations, but rather monitors for the possible occurrence of anomaly patterns related to potential loss of nuclear material. It is thus assumed that the loss of a given mass amount of nuclear material can be directly associated with the execution of proliferation-driven activities that trigger the occurrence of an anomaly pattern consisting of series of events or signatures occurring at different unit operations and time instances. By effectively assessing these events over time and space, the PM-based DEI approach tries to infer whether this specific pattern of events has occurred and how many times within a given time period. To evaluate the goodness of PM, the 3 Sigma of the estimated mass loss is computed under both DEI approaches as function of the number of input batches processed. Simulation results are discussed.

Humberto Garcia; Wen-Chiao Lin; Reed Carlson

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Safeguards & Security (S&S) Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial CarbonArticlesHuman Resources HumanOfficeOrganizationProjectsofSafeguards

410

Safeguards & Security | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGEComplainant,.VisitorSafeguards &

411

Marine renewable energy: potential benefits to biodiversity? An urgent call for research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marine renewable energy: potential benefits to biodiversity? An urgent call for research Richard 1 Centre for Ecology and Conservation and Peninsula Research Institute for Marine Renewable Energy driver. In response, many governments have initiated programmes of energy production from renewable

Exeter, University of

412

XIII World Forestry Congress Buenos Aires, Argentina, 18 23 October 2009 Landscape biodiversity monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

XIII World Forestry Congress Buenos Aires, Argentina, 18 ­ 23 October 2009 1 Landscape biodiversity #12;XIII World Forestry Congress Buenos Aires, Argentina, 18 ­ 23 October 2009 2 management. Moreover

413

Incorporating costs and processes into systematic conservation planning in a biodiversity hotspot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Given inadequate budgets with which to stem the rapid destruction of biodiversity, conservationists must set clear priorities for action. Systematic Conservation Planning (SCP) is an approach that uses spatially explicit data to identify areas...

Green, Jonathan Michael Halsey

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

414

Money for something? Investigating the effectiveness of biodiversity conservation interventions in the Northern Plains of Cambodia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite substantial investments in biodiversity conservation interventions over the past two decades there is relatively little evidence about whether interventions work, and how they work. Whether an intervention is deemed to “work” depends upon...

Clements, Thomas

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

415

Protecting Important Sites for Biodiversity Contributes to Meeting Global Conservation Targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protecting Important Sites for Biodiversity Contributes to Meeting Global Conservation Targets Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 3 National Centre, Nairobi, Kenya, 6 The Nature Conservancy, Arlington, Virginia, United States of America, 7 Nature

Vermont, University of

416

EcoTRADE - a multi player network game of a tradable permit market for biodiversity credits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EcoTRADE is a multi player network game of a virtual biodiversity credit market. Each player controls the land use of a certain amount of parcels on a virtual landscape. The biodiversity credits of a particular parcel depend on neighboring parcels, which may be owned by other players. The game can be used to study the strategies of players in experiments or classroom games and also as a communication tool for stakeholders participating in credit markets that include spatially interdependent credits.

Hartig, Florian; Drechsler, Martin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Manual for Implementation of the Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement and Additional Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual provides detailed information for implementing the requirements of DOE O 142.2A, dated 12-15-06; the Agreement Between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for the Application of Safeguards in the United States; the Original Protocol to the Agreement; the Additional Protocol to the Agreement signed by the United States and the IAEA on June 12, 1998; and the Interagency Procedures for the Implementation of the U.S.-IAEA Safeguards Agreement. No cancellation. Admin Chg 1, dated 6-27-13, cancels DOE M 142.2-1. Certified 12-3-14.

1998-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

418

Manual for Implementation of the Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement and Additional Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual provides detailed information for implementing the requirements of DOE O 142.2A, dated 12-15-06; the Agreement Between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for the Application of Safeguards in the United States; the Original Protocol to the Agreement; the Additional Protocol to the Agreement signed by the United States and the IAEA on June 12, 1998; and the Interagency Procedures for the Implementation of the U.S.-IAEA Safeguards Agreement. No cancellation. Admin Chg 1, 6-27-13

1998-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

419

Implementation of safeguards and security for fissile materials disposition reactor alternative facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of different disposition alternatives are being considered and include facilities which provide for long-ten-n and interim storage, convert and stabilize fissile materials for other disposition alternatives, immobilize fissile material in glass and/or ceramic material, fabricate fissile material into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for reactors, use reactor based technologies to convert material into spent fuel, and dispose of fissile material using a number of geologic alternatives. Particular attention will be given to the reactor alternatives which include existing, partially completed, advanced or evolutionary LWRs and CANDU reactors. The various reactor alternatives are all very similar and include processing which converts Pu to a usable form for fuel fabrication, a MOX fuel fab facility located in either the US or in Europe, US LWRs or the CANDU reactors and ultimate disposal of spent fuel in a geologic repository. This paper focuses on how the objectives of reducing security risks and strengthening arms reduction and nonproliferation will be accomplished and the possible impacts of meeting these objectives on facility operations and design. Some of the areas in this paper include: (1) domestic and international safeguards requirements, (2) non-proliferation criteria and measures, (3) the threat, and (4) potential proliferation risks, the impacts on the facilities, and safeguards and security issues unique to the presence of Category 1 or strategic special nuclear material.

Jaeger, C.D.; Duggan, R.A.; Tolk, K.M.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

AUTHENTICATED SENSOR INTERFACE DEVICE FOR JOINT USE SAFEGUARDS APPLICATIONS - CONCEPTS AND CHALLENGES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will discuss the key features of the Authenticated Sensor Interface Device that collectively provide the ability to share data among a number of parties while ensuring the authentication of data and protecting both the operator’s and the IAEA’s interests. The paper will also discuss the development of the prototype, the initial testing with an accountancy scale, and future plans and challenges to implementation into the joint use and remote monitoring applications. As nuclear fuel cycle technology becomes more prevalent throughout the world and the capacity of plants increases, limited resources of the IAEA are being stretched near a breaking point. A strategy is to increase efficiency in safeguards monitoring using “joint use” equipment that will provide the facility operator process data while also providing the IAEA key safeguards data. The data, however, must be authenticated and validated to ensure the data have not been tampered with. The Authenticated Sensor Interface Device provides the capability to share data and can be a valuable component in the IAEA’s ability to collect accountancy data from scales in Uranium conversion and enrichment plants, as well as nuclear fuel fabrication plants. Likewise, the Authenticated Sensor Interface Device can be configured to accept a diverse array of input signals, ranging from analog voltage, to current, to digital interfaces and more. These modular capabilities provide the ability to collect authenticated, joint-use, data streams from various process monitoring sensors.

Poland, R.; Drayer, R.; Wilson, J.

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Study Guide Development-relevant Education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................ xxxvii 3P250 - Energy and sustainabilityStudy Guide Development-relevant Education TU/e Academic Year 2010-2011 Technische Universiteit:.................................................................................................... xxviii 0C205 - Background of sustainable development

Franssen, Michael

422

BN-350 unattended safeguards system current status and initial fuel movement data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Unattended and Remote Monitoring (UNARM) system at the BN-350 fast breeder reactor facility in Aktau, Kazakhstan continues to provide safeguards monitoring data as the spent fuel disposition project transitions from wet fuel storage to dry storage casks. Qualitative data from the initial cask loading procedures has been released by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and is presented here for the first time. The BN-350 fast breeder reactor in Aktau, Kazakhstan, operated as a plutonium-producing facility from 1973 W1til 1999. Kazakhstan signed the Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) in February 1994, and shortly afterwards the IAEA began safeguarding the reactor facility and its nuclear material. Slnce the cessation of reactor operations ten years ago, the chief proliferation concern has been the spent fuel assemblies stored in the pond on-site. By 2002, all fuel assemblies in wet storage had been repackaged into proliferation-resistant canisters. From the beginning, the IAEA's safeguards campaign at the BN-350 included a constant unattended sensor presence in the form of UNARM which monitors nuclear material activities at the facility in the absence of inspector presence. The UNARM equipment at the BN-350 was designed to be modular and extensible, allowing the system to adapt as the safeguards requirements change. This has been particularly important at the BN-350 due to the prolonged wet storage phase of the project. The primary function of the BN-350 UNARM system is to provide the IAEA with an independent, radiation-centric Containment and Surveillance (C&S) layer in addition to the standard seals and video systems. The UNARM system has provided continuous Continuity of Knowledge (COK) data for the BN-350's nuclear material storage areas in order to ensure the validity of the attended measurements during the lifetime of the project. The first of these attended measurements was characterization of the spent fuel assemblies. This characterization utilized the Spent Fuel Coincidence Counter (SFCC) instrument [ref] to measure neutron multiplicity and calculate Pu mass. These calculated masses were then compared to modeling simulation of the assemblies as well as declarations from the facility in order to baseline the amount of material under IAEA safeguards [ref]. Once the baseline was established, bundles of four or six assemblies were repackaged into proliferati n-resistant canisters. This provided an additional physical barrier to material diversion and provided further protection by choosing assemblies for each canister so that the overall dose rate met self-protection requirements. Each of the canisters were then characterized using a similar technique to the SFCC, but with the Spent Fuel Attribute Monitor (SPAM) instnunent (ref). The data from these measurements were then used to calculate an attribute proportional to the total Pu mass in each canister. This attribute was then compared to the know Pu mass of each assembly in order to verify the accuracy of SPAM. In the event that COK is lost, the SPAM detector remains positioned to reverify Pu content of individual canisters without requiring the canister to be opened.

Williams, Richard Brady [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Browne, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Parker, Robert F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ingegneri, Maurizio [IAEA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

HABITAT AND BIODIVERSITY MAPPING, FOR THE DETERMINATION OF ALGAL BIOMASS AQUACULTURE SITES IN THE COSTAL AREAS OF PUERTO RICO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HABITAT AND BIODIVERSITY MAPPING, FOR THE DETERMINATION OF ALGAL BIOMASS AQUACULTURE SITES production of algal biomass for the production of biofuels in Puerto Rico. The study evaluates

Gilbes, Fernando

424

The Value of Small-Scale Projects in Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Rural Development in the Ecuadorian Chocó  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecotourism and Sustainable Development: Who Owns Paradise?Biodiversity for Sustainable Development. Oslo: ScandinavianConservation and Sustainable Development. Washington D.C. :

Fernández, Sarah Haidée

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Semantics in Support of Biodiversity Knowledge Discovery: An Introduction to the Biological Collections Ontology and Related Ontologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The study of biodiversity spans many disciplines and includes data pertaining to species distributions and abundances, genetic sequences, trait measurements, and ecological niches, complemented by information on collection ...

Walls, Ramona L.; Deck, John; Guralnick, Robert P.; Baskauf, Steve; Beaman, Reed; Blum, Stanley; Bowers, Shawn; Buttigieg, Pier Luigi; Davies, Neil; Endressen, Dag; Gandolfo, Maria Alejandro; Hanner, Robert; Janning, Alyssa; Krishtalka, Leonard; Matsunaga, André a; Midford, Peter E.; Morrison, Norman; Tuama, É amonn Ó .; Schildhauer, Mark; Smith, Barry; Stucky, Brian J.; Thomer, Andrea; Wieczorek, John; Whitacre, Jamie; Wooley, John

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

426

Cross-shelf coral reef biodiversity : does data and ecological theory fit with habitat-based species conservation models?.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??[Truncated abstract] Selection of priority areas for Marine Park conservation is often compromised by the lack of comprehensive biodiversity data and the resources and expertise… (more)

Radford, Benedict

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Integrated Process Monitoring based on Systems of Sensors for Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards Sensitivity and Robustness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper illustrates safeguards benefits that process monitoring (PM) can have as a diversion deterrent and as a complementary safeguards measure to nuclear material accountancy (NMA). In order to infer the possible existence of proliferation-driven activities, the objective of NMA-based methods is often to statistically evaluate materials unaccounted for (MUF) computed by solving a given mass balance equation related to a material balance area (MBA) at every material balance period (MBP), a particular objective for a PM-based approach may be to statistically infer and evaluate anomalies unaccounted for (AUF) that may have occurred within a MBP. Although possibly being indicative of proliferation-driven activities, the detection and tracking of anomaly patterns is not trivial because some executed events may be unobservable or unreliably observed as others. The proposed similarity between NMA- and PM-based approaches is important as performance metrics utilized for evaluating NMA-based methods, such as detection probability (DP) and false alarm probability (FAP), can also be applied for assessing PM-based safeguards solutions. To this end, AUF count estimates can be translated into significant quantity (SQ) equivalents that may have been diverted within a given MBP. A diversion alarm is reported if this mass estimate is greater than or equal to the selected value for alarm level (AL), appropriately chosen to optimize DP and FAP based on the particular characteristics of the monitored MBA, the sensors utilized, and the data processing method employed for integrating and analyzing collected measurements. To illustrate the application of the proposed PM approach, a protracted diversion of Pu in a waste stream was selected based on incomplete fuel dissolution in a dissolver unit operation, as this diversion scenario is considered to be problematic for detection using NMA-based methods alone. Results demonstrate benefits of conducting PM under a system-centric strategy that utilizes data collected from a system of sensors and that effectively exploits known characterizations of sensors and facility operations in order to significantly improve anomaly detection, reduce false alarm, and enhance assessment robustness under unreliable partial sensor information.

Humberto E. Garcia

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Integrating Safety, Operations, Security, and Safeguards (ISOSS) into the design of small modular reactors : a handbook.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The existing regulatory environment for nuclear reactors impacts both the facility design and the cost of operations once the facility is built. Delaying the consideration of regulatory requirements until late in the facility design - or worse, until after construction has begun - can result in costly retrofitting as well as increased operational costs to fulfill safety, security, safeguards, and emergency readiness requirements. Considering the scale and scope, as well as the latest design trends in the next generation of nuclear facilities, there is an opportunity to evaluate the regulatory requirements and optimize the design process for Small Modular Reactors (SMRs), as compared to current Light Water Reactors (LWRs). To this end, Sandia has embarked on an initiative to evaluate the interactions of regulations and operations as an approach to optimizing the design of SMR facilities, supporting operational efficiencies, as well as regulatory requirements. The early stages of this initiative consider two focus areas. The first focus area, reported by LaChance, et al. (2007), identifies the regulatory requirements established for the current fleet of LWR facilities regarding Safety, Security, Operations, Safeguards, and Emergency Planning, and evaluates the technical bases for these requirements. The second focus area, developed in this report, documents the foundations for an innovative approach that supports a design framework for SMR facilities that incorporates the regulatory environment, as well as the continued operation of the facility, into the early design stages, eliminating the need for costly retrofitting and additional operating personnel to fulfill regulatory requirements. The work considers a technique known as Integrated Safety, Operations, Security and Safeguards (ISOSS) (Darby, et al., 2007). In coordination with the best practices of industrial operations, the goal of this effort is to develop a design framework that outlines how ISOSS requirements can be incorporated into the pre-conceptual through early facility design stages, seeking a cost-effective design that meets both operational efficiencies and the regulatory environment. The larger scope of the project, i.e., in future stages, includes the identification of potentially conflicting requirements identified by the ISOSS framework, including an analysis of how regulatory requirements may be changed to account for the intrinsic features of SMRs.

Middleton, Bobby D.; Mendez, Carmen Margarita [Sociotecnia Solutions] [Sociotecnia Solutions

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

The ASSESS (Analytic System and Software for Evaluating Safeguards and Security) Outsider module with multiple analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Analytic System and Software for Evaluating Safeguards and Security (ASSESS) includes modules for analyzing vulnerabilities against outsider and insider adversaries. The ASSESS Outsider Analysis Module has been upgraded to allow for defining, analyzing, and displaying the results of multiple analyses. Once a set of threat definitions have been defined in one Outsider file, they can be readily copied to other Outsider files. This multiple analysis, or batch, mode of operation provides an efficient way of covering the standard DOE outsider threat spectrum. A new approach for coupling the probability of interruption, P(I), values and values calculated by the ASSESS Neutralization module has been implemented in Outsider and is described. An enhanced capability for printing results of these multiple analyses is also included in the upgraded Outside module. 7 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Snell, M.K.; Winblad, A.E. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Bingham, B.; Key, B.; Walker, S. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Strategic analysis for safeguards systems: a feasibility study. Volume 2. Appendix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix provides detailed information regarding game theory (strategic analysis) and its potential role in safeguards to supplement the main body of this report. In particualr, it includes an extensive, though not comprehensive review of literature on game theory and on other topics that relate to the formulation of a game-theoretic model (e.g. the payoff functions). The appendix describes the basic form and components of game theory models, and the solvability of various models. It then discusses three basic issues related to the use of strategic analysis in material accounting: (1) its understandability; (2) its viability in regulatory settings; and (3) difficulties in the use of mixed strategies. Each of the components of a game theoretic model are then discussed and related to the present context.

Goldman, A J

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Safeguards and Security FY 1996 Program Plan: WBS 6.6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Safeguards and Security (SAS) Program is based upon integrity, competence and innovation in the protection of the public and Hanford resources through: (1) outstanding assistance, oversight, education, and counsel to their customers to ensure the protection of the public, site personnel, assets, and information; (2) value-added and cost-effective solutions to Hanford issues; and (3) risk management techniques to ensure effective asset protection, site accessibility, and the flexibility to adapt to changing customer needs. This plan is divided into two parts: overview and SAS WBS (work breakdown structure) dictionary sheets. The overview is divided into vision and mission, goals and objectives, assumptions and priorities, milestones, and a summary. The SAS WBS dictionary sheets are divided into department overhead, general and administrative, sitewide support, Hanford patrol, traffic safety, and locksmith services.

Lee, F.D.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Considerations for Possible Light Impact of Spent Nuclear Fuel for Safeguards Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This effort is designed to be a preliminary study to determine the appropriateness of lightly contacting SNF with zirconium-based cladding, in wet storage, for the purpose of taking safeguards measurements. Contact will likely consist of an initial impact followed by a light tensile load on the exterior surface of the SNF cladding. In the past, concerns have been raised that contacting SNF cladding could result in a loss of long-term mechanical integrity due to crack initiation, uncontrolled crack propagation, and a mechanical exfoliation of the protective oxide layer. The mechanical integrity concerns are addressed with an analytic model that evaluates the threshold impact limits for degraded, but undamaged SNF cladding. Aqueous corrosion concerns, associated with exfoliation of the protective oxide layer, are addressed with a qualitative argument, focusing on the possible corrosion mechanisms of zirconium-based cladding.

Brian K. Castle; Kelly D. Ellis

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Precision Information Environment (PIE) for International Safeguards: Pre-Demonstration Development Use Cases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In FY2013, the PIE International Safeguards team demonstrated our development progress to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) staff from the Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NA-24, our client) and the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (NA-22). Following the demonstration, the team was asked by our client to complete additional development prior to a planned demonstration at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), scheduled tentatively for January or spring of 2014. The team discussed four potential areas for development (in priority order), and will develop them as time and funding permit prior to an IAEA demonstration. The four capability areas are: 1. Addition of equipment manuals to PIE-accessible files 2. Optical character recognition (OCR) of photographed text 3. Barcode reader with information look-up from a database 4. Add Facilities to Data Model 5. Geospatial capabilities with information integration Each area will be described below in a use case.

Gastelum, Zoe N.; Henry, Michael J.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

434

International and national security applications of cryogenic detectors - mostly nuclear safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As with science, so with security - in both arenas, the extraordinary sensitivity of cryogenic sensors enables high-confidence detection and high-precision measurement even of the faintest signals. Science applications are more mature, but several national and international security applications have been identified where cryogenic detectors have high potential payoff. International safeguards and nuclear forensics are areas needing new technology and methods to boost speed, sensitivity, precision and accuracy. Successfully applied, improved nuclear materials analysis will help constrain nuclear materials diversion pathways and contribute to treaty verification. Cryogenic microcalorimeter detectors for X-ray, gamma ray, neutron, and alpha particle spectrometry are under development with these aims in mind. In each case the unsurpassed energy resolution of microcalorimeters reveals previously invi sible spectral features of nuclear materials. Preliminary results of quantitative analysis indicate substantial improvements are still possible, but significant work will be required to fully understand the ultimate performance limits.

Rabin, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Safeguards design strategies: designing and constructing new uranium and plutonium processing facilities in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) is transforming its outdated and oversized complex of aging nuclear material facilities into a smaller, safer, and more secure National Security Enterprise (NSE). Environmental concerns, worker health and safety risks, material security, reducing the role of nuclear weapons in our national security strategy while maintaining the capability for an effective nuclear deterrence by the United States, are influencing this transformation. As part of the nation's Uranium Center of Excellence (UCE), the Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, will advance the U.S.'s capability to meet all concerns when processing uranium and is located adjacent to the Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility (HEUMF), designed for consolidated storage of enriched uranium. The HEUMF became operational in March 2010, and the UPF is currently entering its final design phase. The designs of both facilities are for meeting anticipated security challenges for the 21st century. For plutonium research, development, and manufacturing, the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement (CMRR) building at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in Los Alamos, New Mexico is now under construction. The first phase of the CMRR Project is the design and construction of a Radiological Laboratory/Utility/Office Building. The second phase consists of the design and construction of the Nuclear Facility (NF). The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) selected these two sites as part of the national plan to consolidate nuclear materials, provide for nuclear deterrence, and nonproliferation mission requirements. This work examines these two projects independent approaches to design requirements, and objectives for safeguards, security, and safety (3S) systems as well as the subsequent construction of these modern processing facilities. Emphasis is on the use of Safeguards-by-Design (SBD), incorporating Systems Engineering (SE) principles for these two projects.

Scherer, Carolynn P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Long, Jon D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

436

An ubiquitous ~62 Myr periodic fluctuation superimposed on general trends in fossil biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A 62 Myr periodicity is superimposed on other longer-term trends in fossil biodiversity. This cycle can be discerned in marine data based on the Sepkoski compendium, the Paleobiology Database, and the Fossil Record 2. The signal also exists in changes in sea level/sediment, but is much weaker than in biodiversity itself. A significant excess of 19 previously identified Phanerozoic mass extinctions occur on the declining phase of the 62 Myr cycle. appearance of the signal in sampling-standardized biodiversity data, it is likely not to be a sampling artifact, but either a consequence of sea-level changes or an additional effect of some common cause for them both. In either case, it is intriguing why both changes would have a regular pattern.

Melott, A L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Mobility promotes and jeopardizes biodiversity in rock-paper-scissors games  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity is essential to the viability of ecological systems. Species diversity in ecosystems is promoted by cyclic, non-hierarchical interactions among competing populations. Such non-transitive relations lead to an evolution with central features represented by the `rock-paper-scissors' game, where rock crushes scissors, scissors cut paper, and paper wraps rock. In combination with spatial dispersal of static populations, this type of competition results in the stable coexistence of all species and the long-term maintenance of biodiversity. However, population mobility is a central feature of real ecosystems: animals migrate, bacteria run and tumble. Here, we observe a critical influence of mobility on species diversity. When mobility exceeds a certain value, biodiversity is jeopardized and lost. In contrast, below this critical threshold all subpopulations coexist and an entanglement of travelling spiral waves forms in the course of temporal evolution. We establish that this phenomenon is robust, it do...

Reichenbach, Tobias; Frey, Erwin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Brain Evolution Relevant to P. Thomas Schoenemann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brain Evolution Relevant to Language P. Thomas Schoenemann James Madison University 1. Introduction The evolution of language obviously presupposes a brain that made language possible. At the same time, given of the human brain must have been language. Given that language is at least as much a cultural

Schoenemann, P. Thomas

439

LOCKOUT/TAGOUT PROGRAM The purpose of the Lockout/Tagout program is to safeguard employees from unexpected start-up of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOCKOUT/TAGOUT PROGRAM The purpose of the Lockout/Tagout program is to safeguard employees from the Lockout/Tagout Program, please contact the EH&S Occupational Health and Safety Program at 725-3209. #12;

440

35/36CURRENT ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL RURAL DEVELOPMENT PUBLISHED BY THE SWEDISH UNIVERSITY OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES ! NOVEMBER 2004 BIODIVERSITY AND FOOD SYSTEMS?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES ! NOVEMBER 2004 BIODIVERSITY AND FOOD SYSTEMS? #12;Currents No. 35/36 November 2004 Tryckeri AB Cover Photo Johan Toborn Biodiversity and Food Systems ­- What to Do? Other photos: No direct link to the respective article is intended. ISSN No. 1403-6304 Biodiversity and Food Systems 4 Food

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The camp will expose students to local biodiversity and provide abundant immersive hands-on experiences with the plant and animal life found within the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The camp will expose students to local biodiversity and provide abundant immersive hands? If yes, fill out the application to be considered for a spot in a week-long camp studying biodiversity! The 2014 Richard P. Garmany Biodiversity Camp will be held July 7th -11th at the Environmental Sciences

Alpay, S. Pamir

442

Challenges and a checklist for biodiversity conservation in fire-prone forests: Perspectives from the Pacific Northwest of USA and Southeastern Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Challenges and a checklist for biodiversity conservation in fire-prone forests: Perspectives a b s t r a c t Conserving biodiversity in fire-prone forest ecosystems is challenging for several biodiversity conservation is conceptualized and applied. Important research and management challenges include

Stephens, Scott L.

443

American Indian Policy and Relevant DOE and Executive Orders...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Services Communication & Engagement Tribal Programs American Indian Policy and Relevant DOE and Executive Orders American Indian Policy and Relevant DOE and Executive...

444

Burning Modes and Oxidation Rates of Soot: Relevance to Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Burning Modes and Oxidation Rates of Soot: Relevance to Diesel Particulate Traps Burning Modes and Oxidation Rates of Soot: Relevance to Diesel Particulate Traps Presentation given...

445

Design and development of a 3He replacement safeguards neutron counter based on 10B-lined proportional detector technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation represents an overview of the experimental evaluation of a boron-lined proportional technology performed within an NA-241 sponsored project on testing of boron-lined proportional counters for the purpose of replacement of {sup 3}He technologies. The presented boron-lined technology will be utilized in a design of a full scale safeguards neutron coincidence counter. The design considerations and the Monte Carlo performance predictions for the counter are also presented.

Henzlova, Daniela [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, Louise [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rael, Carlos D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Isaac P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marlow, Johnna B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

446

Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 30013002 A synthesis of soil biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 3001­3002 Editorial A synthesis of soil biodiversity-free soils in Antarctica has exploded, drastically altering general perceptions about the diversity of life on this cold, dark and windy continent. In Victoria Land, Antarctica (701300 S to 78100S), where soil biota

Wall, Diana

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Biodiversity and Ecosystem Processes in Freshwater Sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Biodiversity and Ecosystem Processes in Freshwater Sediments: Springer on behalf of Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4314671@jstor.org. . Springer and Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences are collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve

Palmer, Margaret A.

448

V Biodiversity and Conservation6, The non-volant mammal fauna of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,- - V Biodiversity and Conservation6, The non-volant mammal fauna of Mexico: speciesrichnessin Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Po.l'tal 70-275, 04510 México. D, F., Mexico Received10January 1995;revisedand accepted8 February 1996 ,:j J ~, The mammalian fauna of Mexico is one of the world's richest

Nacional Autónoma de México, Universidad

449

Species invasions and extinction: The future of native biodiversity on islands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Species invasions and extinction: The future of native biodiversity on islands Dov F. Sax, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 Predation by exotic species has caused the extinction these scenarios have for the future retention or extinction of native plant species. Finally, we identify invasion

Sax, Dov

450

Deforestation and biodiversity conservation in Mexico1 Vctor Snchez-Cordero1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deforestation and biodiversity conservation in Mexico1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1180, USA. Abstract Deforestation is one of the main factors negatively affecting the conservation of biological diversity. We assess the impact of deforestation

Sarkar, Sahotra

451

Tree biodiversity in farmer cooperatives of a shade coffee landscape in western El Salvador  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Department of Plant & Soil Science, Hills Agricultural Building, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405, percent shade, distance to the forest, coffee density, and coffee age) on tree biodiversity in shade of a neighboring forest and in the cooperatives (N = 227 species combined), 16% were present at both sites

Vermont, University of

452

Plant biodiversity and ethnobotany inside the projected impact area of the Upper Seti Hydropower Project,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plant biodiversity and ethnobotany inside the projected impact area of the Upper Seti Hydropower hydropower project, currently under feasibility study. The objective of the study was to document plant the construction of major hydropower infrastructure (Pokharel 2001; Bartle 2002). However, potential impacts

Asselin, Hugo

453

The Multifaceted Nature of Biodiversity Conservation: Reply to Leroux and Schmiegelow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Multifaceted Nature of Biodiversity Conservation: Reply to Leroux and Schmiegelow JOHN F tests of concordance for species richness and endemism and their implications for conservation. Although of richness, are of lit- tle practical use for conservation. And we said as much in the paper: "Global

Vermont, University of

454

Biotype 25 Page 1 The Biodiversity & Conservation Newsletter of Woodland Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biotype 25 Page 1 The Biodiversity & Conservation Newsletter of Woodland Ecology Branch Number 25 sample. In England and Wales, sites tended to be owned by public bodies or by conservation charities and Wales was for nature conservation and in Scotland for cattle production. The nature conservation

455

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Targets for maintenance of dead wood for biodiversity conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Targets for maintenance of dead wood for biodiversity conservation based and restore dead wood in managed forest landscapes should be defined. Several studies suggest extinction. In managed forests, conservation efforts should focus on the landscape scale and on certain types of dead

456

A Tale of Two Rivers: Implications of Water Management Practices for Mussel Biodiversity Outcomes During Droughts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPORT A Tale of Two Rivers: Implications of Water Management Practices for Mussel Biodiversity Outcomes During Droughts Daniel C. Allen, Heather S. Galbraith, Caryn C. Vaughn, Daniel E. Spooner Received Abstract Droughts often pose situations where stream water levels are lowest while human demand for water

Allen, Daniel C.

457

National Inventory of Woodland and Trees Analysis of Management and Biodiversity Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Inventory of Woodland and Trees 1995-1999 Analysis of Management and Biodiversity Data collected during the first National Inventory of Woodland and Trees (NIWT1) that were not published this National Inventory project. The new types of data reflect the rapid expansion in the information needs

458

River restoration, habitat heterogeneity and biodiversity: a failure of theory or practice?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heterogeneity (HH) promotes restoration of biodiversity. This paradigm is reflected in stream restoration in streams that were not in need of restoration. 3. We found habitat and macroinvertebrate data for 78 independent stream or river restoration projects described by 18 different author groups in which invertebrate

Palmer, Margaret A.

459

Visualizing Biodiversity with Voronoi Treemaps Michael S. Horn, Matthew Tobiasz, and Chia Shen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Voronoi treemap algorithm that employs force-directed graph drawing techniques both to guide visualization; multi-touch tabletop displays; interaction design; biodiversity I. INTRODUCTION In this paper, we found it useful to integrate phylogenetic information (i.e. in- formation about the evolutionary history

460

Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA): A Nondestructive Assay Technique for the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative’s Plutonium Assay Challenge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an end-of-year report for a project funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241). The goal of this project is to investigate the feasibility of using Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) to assay plutonium in commercial light-water-reactor spent fuel. This project is part of a larger research effort within the Next-Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) to evaluate methods for assaying plutonium in spent fuel, the Plutonium Assay Challenge. The first-year goals for this project were modest and included: 1) developing a zero-order MCNP model for the NRTA technique, simulating data results presented in the literature, 2) completing a preliminary set of studies investigating important design and performance characteristics for the NRTA measurement technique, and 3) documentation of this work in an end of the year report (this report). Research teams at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and at several universities are also working to investigate plutonium assay methods for spent-fuel safeguards. While the NRTA technique is well proven in the scientific literature for assaying individual spent fuel pins, it is a newcomer to the current NGSI efforts studying Pu assay method techniques having just started in March 2010; several analytical techniques have been under investigation within this program for two to three years or more. This report summarizes a nine month period of work.

J. W. Sterbentz; D. L. Chichester

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

FEMO, A FLOW AND ENRICHMENT MONITOR FOR VERIFYING COMPLIANCE WITH INTERNATIONAL SAFEGUARDS REQUIREMENTS AT A GAS CENTRIFUGE ENRICHMENT FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of countries have received construction licenses or are contemplating the construction of large-capacity gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). The capability to independently verify nuclear material flows is a key component of international safeguards approaches, and the IAEA does not currently have an approved method to continuously monitor the mass flow of 235U in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) gas streams. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is investigating the development of a flow and enrichment monitor, or FEMO, based on an existing blend-down monitoring system (BDMS). The BDMS was designed to continuously monitor both 235U mass flow and enrichment of UF6 streams at the low pressures similar to those which exists at GCEPs. BDMSs have been installed at three sites-the first unit has operated successfully in an unattended environment for approximately 10 years. To be acceptable to GCEP operators, it is essential that the instrument be installed and maintained without interrupting operations. A means to continuously verify flow as is proposed by FEMO will likely be needed to monitor safeguards at large-capacity plants. This will enable the safeguards effectiveness that currently exists at smaller plants to be maintained at the larger facilities and also has the potential to reduce labor costs associated with inspections at current and future plants. This paper describes the FEMO design requirements, operating capabilities, and development work required before field demonstration.

Gunning, John E [ORNL; Laughter, Mark D [ORNL; March-Leuba, Jose A [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Copyright 2003 by the author(s). Published here under licence by The Resilience Alliance. Ricketts, T. and M. Imhoff. 2003. Biodiversity, urban areas, and agriculture: locating priority ecoregions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity, Urban Areas, and Agriculture: Locating Priority Ecoregions for Conservation Taylor Ricketts1 for biodiversity conservation. In this study, we combine distribution data for eight major plant and animal taxa threats and biodiversity coincide. These areas are clear priorities for biodiversity conservation, where

Vermont, University of

463

Application of EMCAS timeliness model to the safeguards/facility interface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford operating contractor has developed a timeliness model for periodic mass balance tests (MBTs) for loss of special nuclear material (SNM). The purpose of the model is to compute the probability that an adversary will be detected by a periodic MBT before he could escape from a facility with stolen SNM using stealth and deceit to avoid detection. The model considers (a) the loss detection sensitivity of the MBT, (b) the time between MBTs, and (c) the statistical distribution of the total time required to complete stealth and deceit strategies. The model shows whether or not it is cost-effective to conduct frequent MBTs for loss and where improvements should be made. The Evaluation Methods for Material Control and Accountability Safeguards Systems (EMCAS) timeliness model computes the loss detection capability of periodic materials control and accounting (MC A) tests in terms of (a) the ability of the test to detect the specified target quantity and (b) the probability that the MC A test will occur before the adversary can complete the sequence of stealth and deceit strategies required to avoid detection.

Eggers, R.F.; Giese, E.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Savannah River Site delayed neutron instruments for safeguards measurements. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) includes a variety of nuclear production facilities that, since 1953, have processed special nuclear materials (SNM) including highly-enriched uranium (>90% {sup 235}U), recycled enriched uranium ({approximately}50% {sup 235}U + 40% {sup 236}U), low burnup plutonium (> 90% {sup 239}Pu + < 6% {sup 240}Pu ) and several other nuclear materials such as heat source plutonium ({sup 238}Pu). DOE Orders, primarily 5633.3, require all nuclear materials to be safeguarded through accountability and material control. Accountability measurements determine the total amount of material in a facility, balancing inventory changes against receipts and shipments, to provide assurance (delayed) that all material was present. Material control immediately detects or deters theft or diversion by assuring materials remain in assigned locations or by impeding unplanned movement of materials within or from a material access area. Goals for accountability or material control, and, therefore, the design of measurement systems, are distinctly different. Accountability measurements are optimized for maximum precision and accuracy, usually for large amounts of special nuclear material. Material control measurements are oriented more toward security features and often must be optimized for sensitivity, to detect small amounts of materials where none should be.

Studley, R.V.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

465

AUTOMATED PROCESS MONITORING: APPLYING PROVEN AUTOMATION TECHNIQUES TO INTERNATIONAL SAFEGUARDS NEEDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Identification and quantification of specific alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides in complex liquid matrices is highly challenging, and is typically accomplished through laborious wet chemical sample preparation and separations followed by analysis using a variety of detection methodologies (e.g., liquid scintillation, gas proportional counting, alpha energy analysis, mass spectrometry). Analytical results may take days or weeks to report. Chains of custody and sample security measures may also complicate or slow the analytical process. When an industrial process-scale plant requires the monitoring of specific radionuclides as an indication of the composition of its feed stream or of plant performance, radiochemical measurements must be fast, accurate, and reliable. Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have assembled a fully automated prototype Process Monitor instrument capable of a variety of tasks: automated sampling directly from a feed stream, sample digestion / analyte redox adjustment, chemical separations, radiochemical detection and data analysis / reporting. The system is compact, its components are fluidically inter-linked, and analytical results could be immediately transmitted to on- or off-site locations. The development of a rapid radiochemical Process Monitor for 99Tc in Hanford tank waste processing streams, capable of performing several measurements per hour, will be discussed in detail. More recently, the automated platform was modified to perform measurements of 90Sr in Hanford tank waste stimulant. The system exemplifies how automation could be integrated into reprocessing facilities to support international nuclear safeguards needs.

O'Hara, Matthew J.; Durst, Philip C.; Grate, Jay W.; Devol, Timothy A.; Egorov, Oleg; Clements, John P.

2008-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

466

Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids, producing a small atomic uranium vapor plume. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. LAARS has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for U-235. The sample is scanned and assayed point-by-point at rates reaching 1 million measurements/hour, enabling LAARS to detect and analyze uranium in trace samples. The spectrometer is assembled using primarily commercially available components and features a compact design and automated analysis.Two specific gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) applications of the spectrometer are currently under development: 1) LAARS-Environmental Sampling (ES), which collects and analyzes aerosol particles for GCEP misuse detection and 2) LAARS-Destructive Assay (DA), which enables onsite enrichment DA sample collection and analysis for protracted diversion detection. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in GCEP safeguards verification.

Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Munley, John T.; Nelson, Danny A.; Qiao, Hong (Amy) [Amy; Phillips, Jon R.

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

467

The Feasibility of Cask "Fingerprinting" as a Spent-Fuel, Dry-Storage Cask Safeguards Technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a week-long measurement campaign conducted on six, dry-storage, spent-nuclear-fuel storage casks at the Idaho National Laboratory. A gamma-ray imager, a thermal-neutron imager and a germanium spectrometer were used to collect data on the casks. The campaign was conducted to examine the feasibility of using the cask radiation signatures as unique identifiers for individual casks as part of a safeguards regime. The results clearly show different morphologies for the various cask types although the signatures are deemed insufficient to uniquely identify individual casks of the same type. Based on results with the germanium spectrometer and differences between thermal neutron images and neutron-dose meters, this result is thought to be due to the limitations of the extant imagers used, rather than of the basic concept. Results indicate that measurements with improved imagers could contain significantly more information. Follow-on measurements with new imagers either currently available as laboratory prototypes or under development are recommended.

Ziock, K P; Vanier, P; Forman, L; Caffrey, G; Wharton, J; Lebrun, A

2005-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

468

Satellite image texture and a vegetation index predict avian biodiversity in the Chihuahuan Desert of New Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., Fort Bliss, TX 79916, USA. Predicting broad-scale patterns of biodiversity is challenging, particularly for forty-two 108 ha plots in the McGregor Range of Fort Bliss Military Reserve between 1996 and 1998. Six

Radeloff, Volker C.

469

An ubiquitous ~62 Myr periodic fluctuation superimposed on general trends in fossil biodiversity: Part I, Documentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use Fourier Analysis and related techniques to investigate the question of periodicities in fossil biodiversity. These techniques are able to identify cycles superimposed on the long-term trends of the Phanerozoic. We review prior results and analyze data previously reduced and published. Joint time series analysis of various reductions of the Sepkoski Data, Paleobiology Database, and Fossil Record 2 indicate the same periodicity in biodiversity of marine animals at 62 Myr. We have not found this periodicity in the terrestrial fossil record. We have found that the signal strength decreases with time because of the accumulation of apparently "resistant" long-lived genera. The existence of a 62 Myr periodicity despite very different treatment of systematic error, particularly sampling-strength biases, in all three major databases strongly argues for its reality in the fossil record.

Melott, Adrian L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Considering the Case for Biodiversity Cycles: Reexamining the Evidence for Periodicity in the Fossil Record  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Medvedev and Melott (2007) have suggested that periodicity in fossil biodiversity may be induced by cosmic rays which vary as the Solar System oscillates normal to the galactic disk. We re-examine the evidence for a 62 million year (Myr) periodicity in biodiversity throughout the Phanerozoic history of animal life reported by Rohde & Mueller (2005), as well as related questions of periodicity in origination and extinction. We find that the signal is robust against variations in methods of analysis, and is based on fluctuations in the Paleozoic and a substantial part of the Mesozoic. Examination of origination and extinction is somewhat ambiguous, with results depending upon procedure. Origination and extinction intensity as defined by RM may be affected by an artifact at 27 Myr in the duration of stratigraphic intervals. Nevertheless, when a procedure free of this artifact is implemented, the 27 Myr periodicity appears in origination, suggesting that the artifact may ultimately be based on a signal in the...

Lieberman, Bruce S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Uranium-233 waste definition: Disposal options, safeguards, criticality control, and arms control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US investigated the use of {sup 233}U for weapons, reactors, and other purposes from the 1950s into the 1970s. Based on the results of these investigations, it was decided not to use {sup 233}U on a large scale. Most of the {sup 233}U-containing materials were placed in long-term storage. At the end of the cold war, the US initiated, as part of its arms control policies, a disposition program for excess fissile materials. Other programs were accelerated for disposal of radioactive wastes placed in storage during the cold war. Last, potential safety issues were identified related to the storage of some {sup 233}U-containing materials. Because of these changes, significant activities associated with {sup 233}U-containing materials are expected. This report is one of a series of reports to provide the technical bases for future decisions on how to manage this material. A basis for defining when {sup 233}U-containing materials can be managed as waste and when they must be managed as concentrated fissile materials has been developed. The requirements for storage, transport, and disposal of radioactive wastes are significantly different than those for fissile materials. Because of these differences, it is important to classify material in its appropriate category. The establishment of a definition of what is waste and what is fissile material will provide the guidance for appropriate management of these materials. Wastes are defined in this report as materials containing sufficiently small masses or low concentrations of fissile materials such that they can be managed as typical radioactive waste. Concentrated fissile materials are defined herein as materials containing sufficient fissile content such as to warrant special handling to address nuclear criticality, safeguards, and arms control concerns.

Forsberg, C.W.; Storch, S.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lewis, L.C. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.

1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

472

Modeling of UF{sub 6} enrichment with gas centrifuges for nuclear safeguards activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physical modeling of uranium isotopes ({sup 235}U, {sup 238}U) separation process by centrifugation of is a key aspect for predicting the nuclear fuel enrichment plant performances under surveillance by the Nuclear Safeguards Authorities. In this paper are illustrated some aspects of the modeling of fast centrifuges for UF{sub 6} gas enrichment and of a typical cascade enrichment plant with the Theoretical Centrifuge and Cascade Simulator (TCCS). The background theory for reproducing the flow field characteristics of a centrifuge is derived from the work of Cohen where the separation parameters are calculated using the solution of a differential enrichment equation. In our case we chose to solve the hydrodynamic equations for the motion of a compressible fluid in a centrifugal field using the Berman - Olander vertical velocity radial distribution and the solution was obtained using the Matlab software tool. The importance of a correct estimation of the centrifuge separation parameters at different flow regimes, lies in the possibility to estimate in a reliable way the U enrichment plant performances, once the separation external parameters are set (feed flow rate and feed, product and tails assays). Using the separation parameters of a single centrifuge allow to determine the performances of an entire cascade and, for this purpose; the software Simulink was used. The outputs of the calculation are the concentrations (assays) and the flow rates of the enriched (product) and depleted (tails) gas mixture. These models represent a valid additional tool, in order to verify the compliance of the U enrichment plant operator declarations with the 'on site' inspectors' measurements.

Mercurio, G.; Peerani, P.; Richir, P.; Janssens, W.; Eklund, G. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements Via Fermi, 2749-TP181,20127 Ispra (Italy)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

473

Advances toward a transportable antineutrino detector system for reactor monitoring and safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear reactors have served as the neutrino source for many fundamental physics experiments. The techniques developed by these experiments make it possible to use these very weakly interacting particles for a practical purpose. The large flux of antineutrinos that leaves a reactor carries information about two quantities of interest for safeguards: the reactor power and fissile inventory. Our SNL/LLNL collaboration has demonstrated that such antineutrino based monitoring is feasible using a relatively small cubic meter scale liquid scintillator detector at tens of meters standoff from a commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). With little or no burden on the plant operator we have been able to remotely and automatically monitor the reactor operational status (on/off), power level, and fuel burnup. The initial detector was deployed in an underground gallery that lies directly under the containment dome of an operating PWR. The gallery is 25 meters from the reactor core center, is rarely accessed by plant personnel, and provides a muon-screening effect of some 20-30 meters of water equivalent earth and concrete overburden. Unfortunately, many reactor facilities do not contain an equivalent underground location. We have therefore attempted to construct a complete detector system which would be capable of operating in an aboveground location and could be transported to a reactor facility with relative ease. A standard 6-meter shipping container was used as our transportable laboratory - containing active and passive shielding components, the antineutrino detector and all electronics, as well as climate control systems. This aboveground system was deployed and tested at the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) in southern California in 2010 and early 2011. We will first present an overview of the initial demonstrations of our below ground detector. Then we will describe the aboveground system and the technological developments of the two antineutrino detectors that were deployed. Finally, some preliminary results of our aboveground test will be shown. (authors)

Reyna, D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lund, J.; Kiff, S.; Cabrera-Palmer, B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Bowden, N. S.; Dazeley, S.; Keefer, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Remote-Reading Safety and Safeguards Surveillance System for 3013 Containers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), plutonium oxide is being loaded into stainless steel containers for long-term storage on the Hanford Site. These containers consist of two weld-sealed stainless steel cylinders nested one within the other. A third container holds the plutonium within the inner cylinder. This design meets the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) storage standard, DOE-STD- 3013-2000, which anticipates a 50-year storage lifetime. The 3013 standard also requires a container surveillance program to continuously monitor pressure and to assure safeguards are adequate. However, the configuration of the container system makes using conventional measurement and monitoring methods difficult. To better meet the 3013 monitoring requirements, a team from Fluor Hanford (who manages the PFP), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Vista Engineering Technologies, LLC, developed a safer, cost-efficient, remote PFP 3013 container surveillance system. This new surveillance system is a combination of two successfully deployed technologies: (1) a magnetically coupled pressure gauge developed by Vista Engineering and (2) a radio frequency (RF) tagging device developed by PNNL. This system provides continuous, 100% monitoring of critical parameters with the containers in place, as well as inventory controls. The 3013 container surveillance system consists of three main elements: (1) an internal magnetic pressure sensor package, (2) an instrument pod (external electronics package), and (3) a data acquisition storage and display computer. The surveillance system described in this paper has many benefits for PFP and DOE in terms of cost savings and reduced personnel exposure. In addition, continuous safety monitoring (i.e., internal container pressure and temperature) of every container is responsible nuclear material stewardship and fully meets and exceeds DOE's Integrated Surveillance Program requirements.

Lechelt, W. M.; Skorpik, J. R.; Silvers, K. L.; Szempruch, R. W.; Douglas, D. G.; Fein, K. O.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

475

Next Generation Safeguards Initiative: Overview and Policy Context of UF6 Cylinder Tracking Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thousands of cylinders containing uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) move around the world from conversion plants to enrichment plants to fuel fabrication plants, and their contents could be very useful to a country intent on diverting uranium for clandestine use. Each of these large cylinders can contain close to a significant quantity of natural uranium (48Y cylinder) or low-enriched uranium (LEU) (30B cylinder) defined as 75 kg {sup 235}U which can be further clandestinely enriched to produce 1.5 to 2 significant quantities of high enriched uranium (HEU) within weeks or months depending on the scale of the clandestine facility. The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) kicked off a 5-year plan in April 2011 to investigate the concept of a unique identification system for UF{sub 6} cylinders and potentially to develop a cylinder tracking system that could be used by facility operators and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The goal is to design an integrated solution beneficial to both industry and inspectorates that would improve cylinder operations at the facilities and provide enhanced capabilities to deter and detect both diversion of low-enriched uranium and undeclared enriched uranium production. The 5-year plan consists of six separate incremental tasks: (1) define the problem and establish the requirements for a unique identification (UID) and monitoring system; (2) develop a concept of operations for the identification and monitoring system; (3) determine cylinder monitoring devices and technology; (4) develop a registry database to support proof-of-concept demonstration; (5) integrate that system for the demonstration; and (6) demonstrate proof-of-concept. Throughout NNSA's performance of the tasks outlined in this program, the multi-laboratory team emphasizes that extensive engagement with industry stakeholders, regulatory authorities and inspectorates is essential to its success.

Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitaker, J. Michael [ORNL; White-Horton, Jessica L. [ORNL; Durbin, Karyn R. [NNSA

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

476

Enabling Biodiversity Research with Open Source Workflow, GIS and Metadata Tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for conservation and management decisions • Challenges – Large extents (> 10,000 km2) – Fine resolution (< 1000 m2 ? 30m x 30m) –Many species (10,000 +) QGIS with Lifemapper MacroEcology plug?in Hexagonal Grid Mouse ‘Presence’ Sites / Species Plot VisTrails Reproducibility • Simple... process metadata • Process metadata extensions • Lifemapper client metadata reader Collaborations • KU Biodiversity Institute • NSF Cyber?Commons • Change Thinking • CI Team http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VCFixtqlimg Future Directions • Publish...

Grady, C.J.

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

477

A maximum entropy theorem with applications to the measurement of biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a preliminary article stating and proving a new maximum entropy theorem. The entropies that we consider can be used as measures of biodiversity. In that context, the question is: for a given collection of species, which frequency distribution(s) maximize the diversity? The theorem provides the answer. The chief surprise is that although we are dealing not just with a single entropy, but a one-parameter family of entropies, there is a single distribution maximizing all of them simultaneously.

Leinster, Tom

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Implications of Export/Import Reporting Requirements in the United States - International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Additional Protocol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States has signed but not ratified the US/IAEA Safeguards Additional Protocol. If ratified, the Additional Protocol will require the US to report to the IAEA certain nuclear-related exports and imports to the IAEA. This document identifies and assesses the issues associated with the US making those reports. For example, some regulatory changes appear to be necessary. The document also attempts to predict the impact on the DOE Complex by assessing the historical flow of exports and imports that would be reportable if the Additional Protocol were in force.

Killinger, Mark H.; Benjamin, Eugene L.; McNair, Gary W.

2001-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

479

Contextual Risk and Its Relevance in Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncertainty in economics still poses some fundamental problems illustrated, e.g., by the Allais and Ellsberg paradoxes. To overcome these difficulties, economists have introduced an interesting distinction between 'risk' and 'ambiguity' depending on the existence of a (classical Kolmogorovian) probabilistic structure modeling these uncertainty situations. On the other hand, evidence of everyday life suggests that 'context' plays a fundamental role in human decisions under uncertainty. Moreover, it is well known from physics that any probabilistic structure modeling contextual interactions between entities structurally needs a non-Kolmogorovian quantum-like framework. In this paper we introduce the notion of 'contextual risk' with the aim of modeling a substantial part of the situations in which usually only 'ambiguity' is present. More precisely, we firstly introduce the essentials of an operational formalism called 'the hidden measurement approach' in which probability is introduced as a consequence of fluctuations in the interaction between entities and contexts. Within the hidden measurement approach we propose a 'sphere model' as a mathematical tool for situations in which contextual risk occurs. We show that a probabilistic model of this kind is necessarily non-Kolmogorovian, hence it requires either the formalism of quantum mechanics or a generalization of it. This insight is relevant, for it explains the presence of quantum or, better, quantum-like, structures in economics, as suggested by some authors, and can serve to solve the aforementioned paradoxes.

Diederik Aerts; Sandro Sozzo

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

480

I s s u e N o . 5 1, s e p t e m b e r 2 0 1 0 Biodiversity conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ETFRNNEws I s s u e N o . 5 1, s e p t e m b e r 2 0 1 0 Biodiversity conservation in certifiedETwork etFrN News Biodiversity conservation in certified forests issuE no. 51, sEpTEmBEr 2010 #12;This and roderick J. Zagt (eds.). (2010). Biodiversity conservation in certified forests. Tropenbos international

Slik, Ferry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relevant biodiversity safeguards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Rethinking Biodiversity Conservation Effectiveness and Evaluation in the National Protected Areas Systems of Tropical Islands: The Case of Jamaica and the Dominican Republic.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Island conservation theory and practice with regard to conservation of tropical terrestrial biodiversity in protected areas systems has yet to be adequately addressed in conservation… (more)

Davis, Suzanne Mae Camille

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Beaver Dams Maintain Native Fish Biodiversity Via Altered Habitat Heterogeneity in a Coastal Stream Network: Evaluating Gear, Quantifying Fish Assemblages, and Testing Ecological Hypotheses.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Understanding the relationship between heterogeneity, biodiversity and ecosystem function is an active focus of ecological research that has direct applications to the formulation of sustainable,… (more)

Smith, Joseph Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

DOE/DHS INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEM CYBER SECURITY PROGRAMS: A MODEL FOR USE IN NUCLEAR FACILITY SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many critical infrastructure sectors have been investigating cyber security issues for several years especially with the help of two primary government programs. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National SCADA Test Bed and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program have both implemented activities aimed at securing the industrial control systems that operate the North American electric grid along with several other critical infrastructure sectors (ICS). These programs have spent the last seven years working with industry including asset owners, educational institutions, standards and regulating bodies, and control system vendors. The programs common mission is to provide outreach, identification of cyber vulnerabilities to ICS and mitigation strategies to enhance security postures. The success of these programs indicates that a similar approach can be successfully translated into other sectors including nuclear operations, safeguards, and security. The industry regulating bodies have included cyber security requirements and in some cases, have incorporated sets of standards with penalties for non-compliance such as the North American Electric Reliability Corporation Critical Infrastructure Protection standards. These DOE and DHS programs that address security improvements by both suppliers and end users provide an excellent model for nuclear facility personnel concerned with safeguards and security cyber vulnerabilities and countermeasures. It is not a stretch to imagine complete surreptitious collapse of protection against the removal of nuclear material or even initiation of a criticality event as witnessed at Three Mile Island or Chernobyl in a nuclear ICS inadequately protected against the cyber threat.

Robert S. Anderson; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Paul Moskowitz

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids producing a small plume containing uranium atoms. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for uranium. It is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. High speed sample scanning and pinpoint characterization allow measurements on millions of particles/hour to detect and analyze the enrichment of trace uranium in samples. The spectrometer is assembled using commercially available components at comparatively low cost, and features a compact and low power design. Future designs can be engineered for reliable, autonomous deployment within an industrial plant environment. Two specific applications of the spectrometer are under development: 1) automated unattended aerosol sampling and analysis and 2) on-site small sample destructive assay measurement. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) safeguards verification. The aerosol measurement instrument, LAARS-environmental sampling (ES), collects aerosol particles from the plant environment in a purpose-built rotating drum impactor and then uses LAARS-ES to quickly scan the surface of the impactor to measure the enrichments of the captured particles. The current approach to plant misuse detection involves swipe sampling and offsite analysis. Though this approach is very robust it generally requires several months to obtain results from a given sample collection. The destructive assay instrument, LAARS-destructive assay (DA), uses a simple purpose-built fixture with a sampling planchet to collect adsorbed UF6 gas from a cylinder valve or from a process line tap or pigtail. A portable LAARS-DA instrument scans the microgram quantity of uranium collected on the planchet and the assay of the uranium is measured to ~0.15% relative precision. Currently, destructive assay samples for bias defect measurements are collected in small sample cylinders for offsite mass spectrometry measurement.

Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy) [Amy; Phillips, Jon R.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory safeguards and security quarterly progress report to the U.S. Department of Energy. Quarter ending December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) carries out safeguards and security activities for the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS), as well as other organizations, both within and outside the DOE. This document summarizes the activities conducted for the OSS during the First Quarter of Fiscal Year 1997 (October through December, 1996). The nature and scope of the activities carried out for OSS at LLNL require a broad base of technical expertise. To assure projects are staffed and executed effectively, projects are conducted by the organization at LLNL best able to supply the needed technical expertise. These projects are developed and managed by senior program managers. Institutional oversight and coordination is provided through the LLNL Deputy Director`s office. At present, the Laboratory is supporting OSS in four areas: (1) safeguards technology; (2) safeguards and material accountability; (3) computer security--distributed systems; and (4) physical and personnel security support. The remainder of this report describes the activities in each of these four areas. The information provided includes an introduction which briefly describes the activity, summary of major accomplishments, task descriptions with quarterly progress, summaries of milestones and deliverables and publications published this quarter.

Davis, G.; Mansur, D.L.; Ruhter, W.D.; Strauch, M.S.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Safeguards and Security quarterly progress report to the US Department of Energy: Quarter ending December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) carries out safeguards and security activities for the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS), as well as other organizations, both within and outside the DOE. This document summarizes the activities conducted for the OSS during the first quarter of fiscal year 1994 (October through December, 1993). The nature and scope of the activities carried out for OSS at LLNL require a broad base of technical expertise. To assure projects are staffed and executed effectively, projects are conducted by the organization at LLNL best able to supply the needed technical expertise. These projects are developed and managed by senior program managers. Institutional oversight and coordination is provided through the LLNL Deputy Director`s office. At present, the Laboratory is supporting OSS in five areas: (1) Safeguards Technology, (2) Safeguards and Decision Support, (3) Computer Security, (4) DOE Automated Physical Security, and (5) DOE Automated Visitor Access Control System. This report describes the activities in each of these five areas. The information provided includes an introduction which briefly describes the activity, summary of major accomplishments, task descriptions with quarterly progress, summaries of milestones and deliverables and publications published this quarter.

Davis, G.; Mansur, D.L.; Ruhter, W.D.; Steele, E.; Strait, R.S.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory safeguards and security quarterly progress report to the US Department of Energy: Quarter ending September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) carries out safeguards and security activities for the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS), as well as other organizations, both within and outside the DOE. This document summarizes the activities conducted for the OSS during the fourth quarter of Fiscal Year 1993 (July through September, 1993). The nature and scope of the activities carried out for OSS at LLNL require a broad base of technical expertise. To assure projects are staffed and executed effectively, projects are conducted by the organization at LLNL best able to supply the needed technical expertise. These projects are developed and managed by senior program managers. Institutional oversight and coordination is provided through the LLNL Deputy Director`s office. At present, the Laboratory is supporting OSS in five areas: Safeguards Technology, Safeguard System Studies, Computer Security, DOE Automated Physical Security and DOE Automated Visitor Access Control System. The remainder of this report describes the activities in each of these five areas. The information provided includes an introduction which briefly describes the activity, summary of major accomplishments, task descriptions with quarterly progress, summaries of milestones and deliverables and publications published this quarter.

Ruhter, W.D.; Strait, R.S.; Mansur, D.L.; Davis, G.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Power spectra of fossil biodiversity time series: a connection with Galactic dynamics?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systematic error is a major issue in the quantitative analysis of fossil biodiversity data in paleontology. I present results of time series analysis of a new and expanded data set (the Paleobiology Database) controlled and corrected for systematic error, and find that periodicities at approximately 62 and 150 Myr reported from previous data emerge at higher significance than before. This provides increased confidence that the periodicities are not collection, sampling, or binning artifacts. Both of these timescales are interestingly close to dynamical timescales of Solar motion in the Milky Way galaxy.

Melott, Adrian L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

BIODIVERSITY INVENTORIES: Boletineae (Fungi) in Queensland, Australia The Boletineae (Fungi: Basidiomycetes) is a large suborder (~32 genera) of putrescent mushrooms with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIODIVERSITY INVENTORIES: Boletineae (Fungi) in Queensland, Australia The Boletineae (Fungi in the world. The work outlined in this proposal will provide a first biodiversity inventory of this group this partnership, it will be possible to thoroughly inventory the Boletineae of the rich and varied forests

Hibbett, David S.

490

Dieckmann U & Ferrire R (2004). Adaptive Dynamics and Evolving Biodiversity. In: Evolutionary Conservation Biology, eds. Ferrire R, Dieckmann U & Couvet D, pp. 188224. Cambridge University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dieckmann U & Ferrière R (2004). Adaptive Dynamics and Evolving Biodiversity. In: Evolutionary Conservation Biology, eds. Ferrière R, Dieckmann U & Couvet D, pp. 188­224. Cambridge University Press. c International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis 11 Adaptive Dynamics and Evolving Biodiversity Ulf

Dieckmann, Ulf

491

Considering the Case for Biodiversity Cycles: Reexamining the Evidence for Periodicity in the Fossil Record  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Medvedev and Melott (2007) have suggested that periodicity in fossil biodiversity may be induced by cosmic rays which vary as the Solar System oscillates normal to the galactic disk. We re-examine the evidence for a 62 million year (Myr) periodicity in biodiversity throughout the Phanerozoic history of animal life reported by Rohde & Mueller (2005), as well as related questions of periodicity in origination and extinction. We find that the signal is robust against variations in methods of analysis, and is based on fluctuations in the Paleozoic and a substantial part of the Mesozoic. Examination of origination and extinction is somewhat ambiguous, with results depending upon procedure. Origination and extinction intensity as defined by RM may be affected by an artifact at 27 Myr in the duration of stratigraphic intervals. Nevertheless, when a procedure free of this artifact is implemented, the 27 Myr periodicity appears in origination, suggesting that the artifact may ultimately be based on a signal in the data. A 62 Myr feature appears in extinction, when this same procedure is used. We conclude that evidence for a periodicity at 62 Myr is robust, and evidence for periodicity at approximately 27 Myr is also present, albeit more ambiguous.

Bruce S. Lieberman; Adrian L. Melott

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

492

Year of Biodiversity Podcast Welcome to Bug Bytes, a bimonthly podcast from Texas A&M University's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are affected. Biodiversity encompasses humans, plants, animals, fungi, bacteria, food, and water at the scale that we don't! Join us on this excursion as we learn from the bugs that share in every aspect of our lives the human element, the diversity of cultures and how we impact the world around us. How, in turn we

Behmer, Spencer T.

493

A Comparison of the Performance of Compact Neutrino Detector Designs for Nuclear Reactor Safeguards and Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There has been an increasing interest in the monitoring of nuclear fuel for power reactors by detecting the anti-neutrinos produced during operation. Small liquid scintillator detectors have already demonstrated sensitivity to operational power levels, but more sensitive monitoring requires improvements in the efficiency and uniformity of these detectors. In this work, we use a montecarlo simulation to investigate the detector performance of four different detector configurations. Based on the analysis of neutron detection efficiency and positron energy response, we find that the optimal detector design will depend on the goals and restrictions of the specific installation or application. We have attempted to present the relevant information so that future detector development can proceed in a profitable direction.

McKeown, R W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Detection of Physiologically Relevant Alcohol Concentrations Using Raman Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is the first step in a series of studies to test the feasibility of using Raman Spectroscopy (RS) to non-invasively detect physiologically relevant blood alcohol concentrations. Blood tests, urine tests, and the breathalyzer are currently...

McKay, Joshua L.

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

495

Interim Update: Global Automotive Power Electronics R&D Relevant...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Automotive Power Electronics R&D Relevant To DOE 2015 and 2020 Cost Targets 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and...

496

Stabilization of biodiversity in the coevolutionary rock-paper-scissors game on complex networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dynamical mechanisms that can stabilize the coexistence of species (or strategies) are of substantial interest for the maintenance of biodiversity and in sociobehavioural dynamics. We investigate the mean extinction time in the coevolutionary dynamics of three cyclically invading strategies for different evolutionary processes on various classes of complex networks, including random graphs, scale-free and small world networks. We find that scale-free and random graphs lead to a strong stabilization of coexistence both for the Moran process and the Local Update process. The stabilization is of an order of magnitude stronger compared to a lattice topology, and is mainly caused by the degree heterogeneity of the gr