National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for relativistic heavy ion

  1. Partonic coalescence in relativistic heavy ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greco, V.; Ko, Che Ming; Levai, P.

    2003-01-01

    Using a covariant coalescence model, we study hadron production in relativistic heavy ion collisions from both soft partons in the quark-gluon plasma and hard partons in minijets. Including transverse flow of soft partons and independent...

  2. Jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xin-Nian; Gyulassy, M.

    1990-09-01

    Several aspects of hard and semihard QCD jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed, including multiproduction of minijets and the interaction of a jet with dense nuclear matter. The reduction of jet quenching effect in deconfined phase of nuclear matter is speculated to provide a signature of the formation of quark gluon plasma. HIJING Monte Carlo program which can simulate events of jets production and quenching in heavy ion collisions is briefly described. 35 refs., 13 figs.

  3. COMMISSIONING OF THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TRBOJEVIC,D.; AHRENS,L.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRENNAN,M.; BAI,M.; CAMERON,P.; CARDONA,J.; CONNOLLY,R.; ET AL; TSOUPAS,N.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.

    2001-06-18

    This report describes in detail steps performed in bringing the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) from the commissioning into the operational stage when collisions between 60 bunches of fully striped gold ions, were routinely provided. Corrections of the few power supplies connections by the beam measurements are described. Beam lifetime improvements at injection, along the acceleration are shown. The beam diagnostic results; like Schottky detector, beam profile monitor, beam position monitors, tune meter and others, are shown [1].

  4. RELATIVISTIC HEAVY-ION PHYSICS WITHOUT NUCLEAR CONTACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    RELATIVISTIC HEAVY-ION PHYSICS WITHOUT NUCLEAR CONTACT The large electromagnetic field generated physics research--for example, for investigating nuclear structure, hadronic structure, atomic physics Berkeley Laboratory--it became clear that heavy-ion physics without nuclear contact could be very useful

  5. Heavy flavor in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. L. Bratkovskaya; T. Song; H. Berrehrah; D. Cabrera; J. M. Torres-Rincon; L. Tolos; W. Cassing

    2015-08-17

    We study charm production in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions by using the Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics (PHSD) transport approach. The initial charm quarks are produced by the PYTHIA event generator tuned to fit the transverse momentum spectrum and rapidity distribution of charm quarks from Fixed-Order Next-to-Leading Logarithm (FONLL) calculations. The produced charm quarks scatter in the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) with the off-shell partons whose masses and widths are given by the Dynamical Quasi-Particle Model (DQPM), which reproduces the lattice QCD equation-of-state in thermal equilibrium. The relevant cross sections are calculated in a consistent way by employing the effective propagators and couplings from the DQPM. Close to the critical energy density of the phase transition, the charm quarks are hadronized into $D$ mesons through coalescence and/or fragmentation. The hadronized $D$ mesons then interact with the various hadrons in the hadronic phase with cross sections calculated in an effective lagrangian approach with heavy-quark spin symmetry. The nuclear modification factor $R_{AA}$ and the elliptic flow $v_2$ of $D^0$ mesons from PHSD are compared with the experimental data from the STAR Collaboration for Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ =200 GeV and to the ALICE data for Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ =2.76 TeV. We find that in the PHSD the energy loss of $D$ mesons at high $p_T$ can be dominantly attributed to partonic scattering while the actual shape of $R_{AA}$ versus $p_T$ reflects the heavy-quark hadronization scenario, i.e. coalescence versus fragmentation. Also the hadronic rescattering is important for the $R_{AA}$ at low $p_T$ and enhances the $D$-meson elliptic flow $v_2$.

  6. Measurements of phi meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S. -L; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, M. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X. -H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, A. M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R., Jr.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.

    2009-01-01

    REVIEW C 79, 064903 (2009) Measurements of ? meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) B. I. Abelev,9 M. M. Aggarwal,30 Z. Ahammed,46 B. D. Anderson,19 D. Arkhipkin,13 G. S. Averichev,12 Y.... Bland,3 S.-L. Blyth,22 M. Bombara,2 B. E. Bonner,36 M. Botje,28 J. Bouchet,19 E. Braidot,28 A. V. Brandin,26 E. Bruna,51 S. Bueltmann,3 T. P. Burton,2 M. Bystersky,11 X. Z. Cai,39 H. Caines,51 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,5 J. Callner,9 O. Catu,51...

  7. Heavy flavor in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bratkovskaya, E L; Berrehrah, H; Cabrera, D; Torres-Rincon, J M; Tolos, L; Cassing, W

    2015-01-01

    We study charm production in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions by using the Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics (PHSD) transport approach. The initial charm quarks are produced by the PYTHIA event generator tuned to fit the transverse momentum spectrum and rapidity distribution of charm quarks from Fixed-Order Next-to-Leading Logarithm (FONLL) calculations. The produced charm quarks scatter in the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) with the off-shell partons whose masses and widths are given by the Dynamical Quasi-Particle Model (DQPM), which reproduces the lattice QCD equation-of-state in thermal equilibrium. The relevant cross sections are calculated in a consistent way by employing the effective propagators and couplings from the DQPM. Close to the critical energy density of the phase transition, the charm quarks are hadronized into $D$ mesons through coalescence and/or fragmentation. The hadronized $D$ mesons then interact with the various hadrons in the hadronic phase with cross sections calculated in an effective...

  8. K+ Production in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Che Ming.

    1981-01-01

    VOLUME 23, NUMBER 6 E+ production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions JUNE 1981 Che Ming Ko Cydotron Institute and Physics Department, Texas AckM University, College Station, Texas 7?843 (Received 15 December 1980j Recent experimental data on K... by the temperature of the pion. The model is able to explain the data. The possibility of studying K+ yield as a signature for the pionic instability in heavy-ion collisions is indicated. NUCLEAR REACTIONS &' production, X' -7t' interaction. ? Recently...

  9. Quarkonium formation time in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taesoo Song; Che Ming Ko; Su Houng Lee

    2015-02-19

    We calculate the quarkonium formation time in relativistic heavy-ion collisions from the space-time correlator of heavy quark vector currents in a hydrodynamics background with the initial nonequilibrium stage expanding only in the longitudinal direction. Using in-medium quarkonia properties determined with the heavy quark potential taken to be the free energy from lattice calculations and the fact that quarkonia can only be formed below their dissociation temperatures due to color screening, we find that $\\Upsilon$(1S), $\\Upsilon$(2S), $\\Upsilon$(3S), $J/\\psi$ and $\\psi^\\prime$ are formed, respectively, at 1.2, 6.6, 8.8, 5.8, and 11.0 fm/c after the quark pair are produced in central Au+Au collisions at the top energy of Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), and these times become shorter in semi-central collisions. We further show, as an example, that including the effect of formation time enhances appreciably the survivability of $\\Upsilon$(1S) in the produced hot dense matter.

  10. Ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics with AFTER@LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rakotozafindrabe, A; Brodsky, S J; Chambert, V; Didelez, J P; Genolini, B; Ferreiro, E G; Fleuret, F; Hadjidakis, C; Lansberg, J P; Rosier, P; Schienbein, I; Scomparin, E; Uggerhoj, U I

    2012-01-01

    We outline the opportunities for ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics which are offered by a next generation and multi-purpose fixed-target experiment exploiting the proton and ion LHC beams extracted by a bent crystal.

  11. Realistic expanding source model for relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, S; Chapman, Scott; Nix, J Rayford

    1996-01-01

    We introduce a new realistic expanding source model for invariant one-particle multiplicity distributions and two-particle correlations in nearly central relativistic heavy-ion collisions that contains nine adjustable parameters, which are necessary and sufficient to properly characterize the gross properties of the source during its freezeout from a hydrodynamical fluid into a collection of noninteracting, free-streaming hadrons. These nine physically relevant parameters fall into three categories of three parameters each, with the first category corresponding to the source's longitudinal motion, the second category corresponding to its transverse motion, and the third category corresponding to its intrinsic properties. As an initial application, we apply our model to the analysis of invariant pi^+, pi^-, K^+, and K^- one-particle multiplicity distributions and pi^+ and K^+ two-particle correlations for nearly central Si + Au collisions at p_lab/A = 14.6 GeV/c. In a minimization with 1416 data points, the re...

  12. Observation of snake resonances at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, M.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Alessi, J.; et al

    2010-09-27

    The Siberian snakes are powerful tools in preserving polarization in high energy accelerators has been demonstrated at the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, polarization is preserved during acceleration from injection to 100 GeV. However, the Siberian snakes also introduce a new set of depolarization resonances, i.e. snake resonances as first discovered by Lee and Tepikian. The intrinsic spin resonances above 100 GeV are about a factor of two stronger than those below 100 GeV which raises the challenge to preserve the polarization up to 250 GeV. In 2009, polarized protons collided for the first time at the RHIC design store energy of 250 GeV. This paper presents the experimental measurements of snake resonances at RHIC. The plan for avoiding these resonances is also presented.

  13. MARTINI: An event generator for relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjoern Schenke; Charles Gale; Sangyong Jeon

    2009-10-23

    We introduce the Modular Algorithm for Relativistic Treatment of heavy IoN Interactions (MARTINI), a comprehensive event generator for the hard and penetrating probes in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Its main components are a time evolution model for the soft background, PYTHIA 8.1 and the McGill-AMY parton evolution scheme including radiative as well as elastic processes. This allows us to generate full event configurations in the high p_T region that take into account thermal QCD and QED effects as well as effects of the evolving medium. We present results for the neutral pion nuclear modification factor in Au+Au collisions at RHIC as a function of p_T for different centralities, and also as a function of the angle with respect to the reaction plane for non-central collisions. Furthermore, we study the production of high transverse momentum photons incorporating a complete set of photon-production channels.

  14. Consequences of energy conservation in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back

    2005-08-15

    Complete characterization of particle production and emission in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is in general not feasible experimentally. This work demonstrates, however, that the availability of essentially complete pseudorapidity distributions for charged particles allows for a reliable estimate of the average transverse momenta and energy of emitted particles by requiring energy conservation in the process. The results of such an analysis for Au+Au collisions at sqrt{s_{NN}}= 130 and 200 GeV are compared with measurements of mean-p_T and mean-E_T in regions where such measurements are available. The mean-p_T dependence on pseudorapidity for Au+Au collisions at 130 and 200 GeV is given for different collision centralities.

  15. Photons from Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sourav Sarkar

    2009-01-07

    It is believed that a novel state of matter - Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) will be transiently produced if normal hadronic matter is subjected to sufficiently high temperature and/or density. We have investigated the possibility of QGP formation in the ultra-relativistic collisions of heavy ions through the electromagnetic probes - photons and dileptons. The formulation of the real and virtual photon production rate from strongly interacting matter is studied in the framework of Thermal Field Theory. Since signals from the QGP will pick up large backgrounds from hadronic matter we have performed a detailed study of the changes in the hadronic properties induced by temperature within the ambit of the Quantum Hadrodynamic model, gauged linear and non-linear sigma models, hidden local symmetry approach and QCD sum rule approach. The possibility of observing the direct thermal photons and lepton pairs from quark gluon plasma has been contrasted with that from hot hadronic matter with and without medium effects for various mass variation scenarios. The effects of medium induced modifications have also been incorporated in the evolution dynamics through the equation of state. We find that the in-medium effects on the hadronic properties in the framework of the Quantum Hadrodynamic model, Brown-Rho scaling and Nambu scaling scenarios are conspicuously visible through the low invariant mass distribution of dileptons and transverse momentum spectra of photons. We have compared our evaluation of the photon and dilepton spectra with experimental data obtained by the WA80, WA98 and CERES Collaborations in the heavy ion experiments performed at the CERN SPS. Predictions of electromagnetic spectra for RHIC energies have also been made.

  16. Kaon dispersion relation and flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ba; Ko, Che Ming.

    1996-01-01

    Within the framework of a relativistic transport model (ART) for heavy-ion collisions at AGS energies, we examine the effects of a kaon dispersion relation on the transverse flow of kaons and their transverse momentum and ...

  17. Partonic effects on the elliptic flow at relativistic heavy ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, ZW; Ko, Che Ming.

    2002-01-01

    The elliptic flow in heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider is studied in a multiphase transport model. By converting the strings in the high energy density regions into partons, we find that the final elliptic flow is sensitive...

  18. Electromagnetic Heavy Lepton Pair Production in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengul, M Y; Mercan, O; Karakus, N G

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the cross sections of electromagnetic productions of muon and tauon pair productions from the ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Since the Compton wavelengths of muon and tauon are comparable to the radius of the colliding ions, nuclear form factors play important roles for calculating the cross sections. Recent measurement [1] indicates that the neutrons are differently distributed from the protons therefore this affects the cross section of the heavy lepton pair production. In order to see the effects of the neutron distributions in the nucleus, we used analytical expression of the Fourier transforms of the Wood-Saxon distribution. Cross section calculations show that Wood-Saxon distribution function is more sensitive to the parameter R compare to the parameter a.

  19. Triangularity and dipole asymmetry in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teaney, Derek; Yan Li [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3800 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    We introduce a cumulant expansion to parametrize possible initial conditions in relativistic heavy ion collisions. We show that the cumulant expansion converges and that it can systematically reproduce the results of Glauber type initial conditions. At third order in the gradient expansion the cumulants characterize the triangularity and the dipole asymmetry of the initial entropy distribution. We show that for midperipheral collisions the orientation angle of the dipole asymmetry {psi}{sub 1,3} has a 20% preference out of plane. This leads to a small net v{sub 1} out of plane. In peripheral and midcentral collisions the orientation angles {psi}{sub 1,3} and {psi}{sub 3,3} are strongly correlated, but this correlation disappears towards central collisions. We study the ideal hydrodynamic response to these cumulants and determine the associated v{sub 1}/{epsilon}{sub 1} and v{sub 3}/{epsilon}{sub 3} for a massless ideal gas equation of state. The space time development of v{sub 1} and v{sub 3} is clarified with figures. These figures show that v{sub 1} and v{sub 3} develop toward the edge of the nucleus, and consequently the final spectra are more sensitive to the viscous dynamics of freezeout. The hydrodynamic calculations for v{sub 3} are provisionally compared to Alver and Roland fit of STAR inclusive two-particle correlation functions. Finally, we propose to measure the v{sub 1} associated with the dipole asymmetry and the correlations between {psi}{sub 1,3} and {psi}{sub 3,3} by measuring a two-particle correlation with respect to the participant plane . The hydrodynamic prediction for this correlation function is several times larger than a correlation currently measured by the STAR collaboration . This experimental measurement would provide convincing evidence for the hydrodynamic and geometric interpretation of two-particle correlations at RHIC.

  20. Chiral electric field in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang Zhong; Chun-Bin Yang; Xu Cai; Sheng-Qin Feng

    2015-10-03

    It was proposed that the electric fields may lead to chiral separation in QGP, which is called the chiral electric separation effect. The strong electromagnetic field and the QCD vacuum can both completely be produced in the off-central nuclear-nuclear collision. We used the Wood-Saxon nucleon distribution to calculate the electric field distributions of the off-central collisions. The chiral electro field spatial distribution at Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energy regions are systematically studied in this paper. Compared with magnetic field spatial distribution, electric field shows some different features in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The dependence of the electric field produced by the thermal quark in the central position with different impact parameters on the proper time with different collision energies in the RHIC and LHC energy region are studied in this paper.

  1. P(t) Dependence of Transverse Flow in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Bao-An; Ko, Che Ming; Li, GQ.

    1996-01-01

    and th was thus informatio R(pt)[( number o ~opposite the projectil spirit to tha bevalac/si gate whethe transverse state of th heavy-ion transversel x n transverse s ~ f!# /T , ~2! azimuthal e mo- the reac- 1 /ptdpt) e flow.... It is shown that the pt e flow that is complementary to that obtained from g features of using the pt dependence to study formed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions are demon- z relativistic transport model ~ART! @15# we show that the ra- tio R(pt...

  2. Relativistic Heavy Ion Physics: Results from AGS to RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Steinberg

    2002-10-04

    High-energy collisions of heavy ions provide a means to study QCD in a regime of high parton density, and may provide insight into its phase structure. Results from the four experiments at RHIC (BRAHMS, PHENIX, PHOBOS and STAR) are presented, and placed in context with the lower energy data from the AGS and SPS accelerators. The focus is on the insights these measurements provide into the time history of the collision process. Taken together, the data point to the creation of a deconfined state of matter that forms quickly, expands rapidly and freezes out suddenly.

  3. Studies of multiplicity in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back

    2004-11-29

    In this talk I'll review the present status of charged particle multiplicity measurements from heavy-ion collisions. The characteristic features of multiplicity distributions obtained in Au+Au collisions will be discussed in terms of collision centrality and energy and compared to those of p+p collisions. Multiplicity measurements of d+Au collisions at 200 GeV nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy will also be discussed. The results will be compared to various theoretical models and simple scaling properties of the data will be identified.

  4. Low Energy Nuclear Structure from Ultra-relativistic Heavy-Light Ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrique Ruiz Arriola; Wojciech Broniowski

    2014-11-21

    The search for specific signals in ultra-relativistic heavy-light ion collisions addressing intrinsic geometric features of nuclei may open a new window to low energy nuclear structure. We discuss specifically the phenomenon of {\\alpha}-clustering in $^{12}$C when colliding with $^{208}$Pb at almost the speed of light.

  5. Multi Module Modeling of Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magas, V. K.; Csernai, L. P.; Keranen, A.; Manninen, J.; Strottman, D. D.

    2002-01-01

    Multi Module Model is required for the realistic and detailed description of an ultrarelativistic heavy ion reaction. We are working in the framework of such a model: initial stages are described by Effective String Rope Model with expanding final streaks; hydrodynamical approach is used for the intermediate stages. This paper is mainly devoted to Third Module - the one dealing with Freeze Out (FO). Two possibilities are discussed in details: (A) freeze out at the constant time hypersurface, where the statistical production model is used to describe post FO particle species; and (B) simultaneous hadronization and freeze out from supercooled QGP. For the last case the ALCOR-like algorithm for calculation of the post FO particle species is presented, due to the fact that these do not have time to reach chemical equilibrium.

  6. Hydro-kinetic approach to relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Akkelin; Y. Hama; Iu. A. Karpenko; Yu. M. Sinyukov

    2008-08-28

    We develop a combined hydro-kinetic approach which incorporates a hydrodynamical expansion of the systems formed in \\textit{A}+\\textit{A} collisions and their dynamical decoupling described by escape probabilities. The method corresponds to a generalized relaxation time ($\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$) approximation for the Boltzmann equation applied to inhomogeneous expanding systems; at small $\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$ it also allows one to catch the viscous effects in hadronic component - hadron-resonance gas. We demonstrate how the approximation of sudden freeze-out can be obtained within this dynamical picture of continuous emission and find that hypersurfaces, corresponding to a sharp freeze-out limit, are momentum dependent. The pion $m_{T}$ spectra are computed in the developed hydro-kinetic model, and compared with those obtained from ideal hydrodynamics with the Cooper-Frye isothermal prescription. Our results indicate that there does not exist a universal freeze-out temperature for pions with different momenta, and support an earlier decoupling of higher $p_{T}$ particles. By performing numerical simulations for various initial conditions and equations of state we identify several characteristic features of the bulk QCD matter evolution preferred in view of the current analysis of heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies.

  7. Exclusive Vector Meson Production in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer Klein; Joakim Nystrand

    1999-02-06

    Exclusive vector meson production reactions such as $Au + Au \\to Au + Au + V$, where $V=\\rho, \\omega, \\phi$ or $J/\\psi$ can proceed through photon-Pomeron and photon-meson interactions. Photons from the electromagnetic field of one nucleus interact coherently with the other nucleus. Photonuclear cross sections are scaled from $\\gamma p$ data, and convoluted with the photon spectrum to find the exclusive rates. The cross sections at the RHIC and LHC heavy ion colliders are huge, 10% of the total hadronic cross section at RHIC, and 50% at LHC. These accelerators may be useful as vector meson factories. With iodine beams at RHIC, 640 $\\rho$ are produced each second (10^{10}/year); with calcium at the LHC the rate is 240 kHz. The $\\phi$ rates are 39 Hz at RHIC and 15 kHz at LHC, while the $J/\\psi$ rate is 0.3 Hz at RHIC and 780 Hz at the LHC. Because of the coherent couplings, the reactions kinematics are similar to coherent two-photon interactions; we discuss the interplay between the two reactions.

  8. Hydro-inspired parameterizations of freeze-out in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojciech Florkowski; Wojciech Broniowski

    2004-10-19

    Popular parameterizations of the freeze-out conditions in relativistic heavy-ion collisions are discussed. Similarities and differences between the blast-wave model and the single-freeze-out model, both used recently to interpret the RHIC data, are outlined. A non-boost-invariant extension of the single-freeze-out model is proposed and applied to describe the recent BRAHMS data.

  9. Partonic effects on higher-order anisotropic flows in relativistic heavy-ion collisions RID A-2398-2009 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, LW; Ko, Che Ming; Lin, ZW.

    2004-01-01

    Higher-order anisotropic flows v(4) and v(6) of charged hadrons in heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider are studied in a multiphase transport model that has previously been used successfully for describing the elliptic flow v...

  10. Cavitation and thermal photon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jitesh R. Bhatt; Hiranmaya Mishra; V. Sreekanth

    2010-11-08

    We investigate the thermal photon production-rates using one dimensional boost-invariant second order relativistic hydrodynamics to find proper time evolution of the energy density and the temperature. The effect of bulk-viscosity and non-ideal equation of state are taken into account in a manner consistent with recent lattice QCD estimates. It is shown that the \\textit{non-ideal} gas equation of state i.e $\\epsilon-3 P \

  11. The iEBE-VISHNU code package for relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chun Shen; Zhi Qiu; Huichao Song; Jonah Bernhard; Steffen Bass; Ulrich Heinz

    2014-10-01

    The iEBE-VISHNU code package performs event-by-event simulations for relativistic heavy-ion collisions using viscous hydrodynamics (+ hadronic cascade model). We present the detailed model implementations accompanied with some numerical code tests for this package. The iEBE-VISHNU builds up a general theoretical framework for model-data comparisons through large scale Monte-Carlo simulations. The numerical interface between hydrodynamical evolving medium and thermal photon radiation is also discussed. This interface is designed for generic calculations of all kinds of rare probes, which are coupled to the temperature and flow velocity evolution of the bulk medium, such as jet energy loss and heavy quark diffusion.

  12. Copper vs. Copper at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (2005)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab - Fulvia Pilat

    2009-06-09

    To investigate a new form of matter not seen since the Big Bang, scientists are using a new experimental probe: collisions between two beams of copper ions. The use of intermediate size nuclei is expected to result in intermediate energy density - not as

  13. Copper vs. Copper at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (2005)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab - Fulvia Pilat

    2010-01-08

    To investigate a new form of matter not seen since the Big Bang, scientists are using a new experimental probe: collisions between two beams of copper ions. The use of intermediate size nuclei is expected to result in intermediate energy density - not as

  14. Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics 2003: Relativistic Heavy Ion Parallel Session Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. L. Nagle; T. Hallman

    2003-08-19

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) came online in 2000, and the last three years have provided a wealth of new experimental data and theoretical work in this new energy frontier for nuclear physics. The transition from quarks and gluons bound into hadrons to a deconfined quark-gluon plasma is expected to occur at these energies, and the effort to understand the time evolution of these complex systems has been significantly advanced. The heavy ion parallel session talks from the Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics (CIPANP) 2003 are posted at: http://www.phenix.bnl.gov/WWW/publish/nagle/CIPANP/. We provide a brief summary of these sessions here.

  15. Relativistic heavy ion collisions with realistic non-equilibrium mean fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuchs, C; Wolter, H H

    1996-01-01

    We study the influence of non-equilibrium phase space effects on the dynamics of heavy ion reactions within the relativistic BUU approach. We use realistic Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (DBHF) mean fields determined for two-Fermi-ellipsoid configurations, i.e. for colliding nuclear matter, in a local phase space configuration approximation (LCA). We compare to DBHF mean fields in the local density approximation (LDA) and to the non-linear Walecka model. The results are further compared to flow data of the reaction Au on Au at 400 MeV per nucleon measured by the FOPI collaboration. We find that the DBHF fields reproduce the experiment if the configuration dependence is taken into account. This has also implications on the determination of the equation of state from heavy ion collisions.

  16. Relativistic heavy ion collisions with realistic non-equilibrium mean fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Fuchs; T. Gaitanos; H. H. Wolter

    1996-05-17

    We study the influence of non-equilibrium phase space effects on the dynamics of heavy ion reactions within the relativistic BUU approach. We use realistic Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (DBHF) mean fields determined for two-Fermi-ellipsoid configurations, i.e. for colliding nuclear matter, in a local phase space configuration approximation (LCA). We compare to DBHF mean fields in the local density approximation (LDA) and to the non-linear Walecka model. The results are further compared to flow data of the reaction $Au$ on $Au$ at 400 MeV per nucleon measured by the FOPI collaboration. We find that the DBHF fields reproduce the experiment if the configuration dependence is taken into account. This has also implications on the determination of the equation of state from heavy ion collisions.

  17. Coherent Vector Meson Photoproduction with Nuclear Breakup in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony J. Baltz; Spencer R. Klein; Joakim Nystrand

    2002-05-10

    Relativistic heavy ions are copious sources of virtual photons. The large photon flux gives rise to a substantial photonuclear interaction probability at impact parameters where no hadronic interactions can occur. Multiple photonuclear interactions in a single collision are possible. In this letter, we use mutual Coulomb excitation of both nuclei as a tag for moderate impact parameter collisions. We calculate the cross section for coherent vector meson production accompanied by mutual excitation, and show that the median impact parameter is much smaller than for untagged production. The vector meson rapidity and transverse momentum distribution are very different from untagged exclusive vector meson production.

  18. Anisotropic flow fluctuations in hydro-inspired freeze-out model for relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. V. Bravina; E. S. Fotina; V. L. Korotkikh; I. P. Lokhtin; L. V. Malinina; E. N. Nazarova; S. V. Petrushanko; A. M. Snigirev; E. E. Zabrodin

    2015-09-09

    The possible mechanisms contributing to anisotropic flow fluctuations in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed. The LHC data on event-by-event harmonic flow coefficients measured in PbPb collisions at center-of-mass energy 2.76 TeV per nucleon pair are analyzed and interpreted within the HYDJET++ model. To compare the model results with the experimental data the unfolding procedure is employed. It is shown that HYDJET++ correctly reproduces dynamical fluctuations of elliptic and triangular flows and related to it eccentricity fluctuations of the initial state.

  19. Anisotropic flow fluctuations in hydro-inspired freeze-out model for relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bravina, L V; Korotkikh, V L; Lokhtin, I P; Malinina, L V; Nazarova, E N; Petrushanko, S V; Snigirev, A M; Zabrodin, E E

    2015-01-01

    The possible mechanisms contributing to anisotropic flow fluctuations in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed. The LHC data on event-by-event harmonic flow coefficients measured in PbPb collisions at center-of-mass energy 2.76 TeV per nucleon pair are analyzed and interpreted within the HYDJET++ model. To compare the model results with the experimental data the unfolding procedure is employed. It is shown that HYDJET++ correctly reproduces dynamical fluctuations of elliptic and triangular flows and related to it eccentricity fluctuations of the initial state.

  20. Scaling properties at freeze-out in relativistic heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anson, C. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Dash, S.; Leyva, A. Davila; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L-X; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kizka, V.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Lukashov, E. V.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nayak, T. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Ruan, L.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xie, W.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.

    2011-01-01

    REVIEW C 83, 034910 (2011) Scaling properties at freeze-out in relativistic heavy-ion collisions M. M. Aggarwal,30 Z. Ahammed,22 A. V. Alakhverdyants,18 I. Alekseev,16 J. Alford,19 B. D. Anderson,19 C. D. Anson,28 D. Arkhipkin,3 G. S. Averichev,18 J.... Balewski,23 L. S. Barnby,2 D. R. Beavis,3 R. Bellwied,50 M. J. Betancourt,23 R. R. Betts,8 A. Bhasin,17 A. K. Bhati,30 H. Bichsel,49 J. Bielcik,10 J. Bielcikova,11 B. Biritz,6 L. C. Bland,3 W. Borowski,41 J. Bouchet,19 E. Braidot,27 A. V. Brandin,26 A...

  1. Ultraviolet energy dependence of particle production sources in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georg Wolschin

    2015-01-13

    The energy dependence of particle production sources in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is investigated from RHIC to LHC energies. Whereas charged-hadron production in the fragmentation sources follows a ln(s_NN/s_0) law, particle production in the mid-rapidity gluon-gluon source exhibits a much stronger dependence proportional to ln^3(s_NN/s_0), and becomes dominant between RHIC and LHC energies. The production of particles with pseudorapidities beyond the beam rapidity is also discussed.

  2. Fourth workshop on experiments and detectors for a relativistic heavy ion collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fatyga, M.; Moskowitz, B.

    1990-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: physics at RHIC; flavor flow from quark-gluon plasma; space-time quark-gluon cascade; jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions; parton distributions in hard nuclear collisions; experimental working groups, two-arm electron/photon spectrometer collaboration; total and elastic pp cross sections; a 4{pi} tracking TPC magnetic spectrometer; hadron spectroscopy; efficiency and background simulations for J/{psi} detection in the RHIC dimuon experiment; the collision regions beam crossing geometries; Monte Carlo simulations of interactions and detectors; proton-nucleus interactions; the physics of strong electromagnetic fields in collisions of relativistic heavy ions; a real time expert system for experimental high energy/nuclear physics; the development of silicon multiplicity detectors; a pad readout detector for CRID/tracking; RHIC TPC R D progress and goals; development of analog memories for RHIC detector front-end electronic systems; calorimeter/absorber optimization for a RHIC dimuon experiment; construction of a highly segmented high resolution TOF system; progress report on a fast, particle-identifying trigger based on ring-imaging and highly integrated electronics for a TPC detector.

  3. Hanbury-Brown-Twiss Interferometry with Identical Bosons in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions: Comparisons with Hadronic Scattering Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas J. Humanic

    2005-10-17

    Identical boson Hanbury-Brown-Twiss interferometry as applied to relativistic heavy-ion collisions is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the use of hadronic scattering models to interpret the physical significance of experimental results. Interferometric studies with center-of-mass energies from < 1 GeV/nucleon up to 5500 GeV/nucleon are considered.

  4. Quark-gluon plasma in the early Universe and in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greco, V.

    2014-05-09

    We briefly give an elementary introduction to the expansion of the Early Universe till when the phase transition of the quark-gluon plasma to a hadronic matter takes place. Then we describe some main element of the study of QGP by mean of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions (uRHIC's)

  5. Chemical properties of super-hadronic matter created in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Pratt; Claudia Ratti; William Patrick McCormack

    2014-09-07

    Preliminary charge balance functions from the STAR Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are compared to a model where quarks are produced in two waves. If a chemically equilibrated quark-gluon plasma (QGP) is created the strength and diffusive spread of the first wave should be governed by the chemical composition of the QGP, while the second wave should be determined by the increased number of quarks required to make the observed final-state hadrons. A simple model parameterizes the chemistry of the super-hadronic matter and the two correlation lengths for the two waves. Calculations are compared to preliminary data from the STAR Collaboration. The chemistry of the super-hadronic matter appears to be within 20\\% of expectations from lattice gauge theory.

  6. Fluctuations of conserved charges in relativistic heavy ion collisions: An introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masayuki Asakawa; Masakiyo Kitazawa

    2015-12-16

    Bulk fluctuations of conserved charges measured by event-by-event analysis in relativistic heavy ion collisions are observables which are believed to carry significant information on the primordial thermodynamics of the hot medium created by the collisions. Active studies have been done recently experimentally, theoretically, and on the lattice. In particular, non-Gaussianity of the fluctuations aquires much attention recently. In this review, we give a pedagogical introduction to these physics, and overview recent developments in this field of research. Starting from the definition of cumulants, basic concepts in fluctuation physics, such as thermal fluctuations in statistical mechanics and time evolution of fluctuations in diffusive systems, are described. Physics which are expected to occur in the QCD phase diagram and their measurement by event-by-event analyses are also elucidated.

  7. Constraints on models for the initial collision geometry in ultra relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy A. Lacey; Rui Wei; N. N. Ajitanand; J. M. Alexander; X. Gong; J. Jia; A. Taranenko; R. Pak; Horst Stocker

    2010-05-21

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are used to compute the centrality dependence of the collision zone eccentricities ($\\epsilon_{2,4}$), for both spherical and deformed ground state nuclei, for different model scenarios. Sizable model dependent differences are observed. They indicate that measurements of the $2^{\\text{nd}}$ and $4^{\\text{th}}$ order Fourier flow coefficients $v_{2,4}$, expressed as the ratio $\\frac{v_4}{(v_2)^2}$, can provide robust constraints for distinguishing between different theoretical models for the initial-state eccentricity. Such constraints could remove one of the largest impediments to a more precise determination of the specific viscosity from precision $v_{2,4}$ measurements at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  8. Initialization of hydrodynamics in relativistic heavy ion collisions with an energy-momentum transport model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Yu. Naboka; S. V. Akkelin; Iu. A. Karpenko; Yu. M. Sinyukov

    2015-01-14

    A key ingredient of hydrodynamical modeling of relativistic heavy ion collisions is thermal initial conditions, an input that is the consequence of a pre-thermal dynamics which is not completely understood yet. In the paper we employ a recently developed energy-momentum transport model of the pre-thermal stage to study influence of the alternative initial states in nucleus-nucleus collisions on flow and energy density distributions of the matter at the starting time of hydrodynamics. In particular, the dependence of the results on isotropic and anisotropic initial states is analyzed. It is found that at the thermalization time the transverse flow is larger and the maximal energy density is higher for the longitudinally squeezed initial momentum distributions. The results are also sensitive to the relaxation time parameter, equation of state at the thermalization time, and transverse profile of initial energy density distribution: Gaussian approximation, Glauber Monte Carlo profiles, etc. Also, test results ensure that the numerical code based on the energy-momentum transport model is capable of providing both averaged and fluctuating initial conditions for the hydrodynamic simulations of relativistic nuclear collisions.

  9. Heavy-quark probes of the quark-gluon plasma and interpretation of recent data taken at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Hees, H.; Greco, V.; Rapp, Ralf.

    2006-01-01

    strongly interacting QGP (sQGP), as well as parton coalescence, can play an essential role in the interpretation of recent data from the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC), and thus illuminate the nature of the sQGP and its hadronization. Our main...

  10. The study of background electric field in relativistic heavy-ion collisions in the RHIC and LHC energy regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Yang; Cai, Xu; Feng, Sheng-Qin

    2015-01-01

    It was proposed that the electric fields may lead to chiral separation in QGP, which is called the chiral electric separation effect. The strong electromagnetic field and the QCD vacuum can both completely be produced in the off-central nuclear-nuclear collision. Based on the theory of Kharzeev, McLerran, and Warringa, we used the Wood-Saxon nucleon distribution to replace that of the uniform distribution to improve the electric field calculation method of the off-central collision. The chiral electro field distribution at Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energy regions are systematically studied in this paper. Compared with magnetic field spatial distribution, electric field shows some different features in relativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  11. Operational head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fischer, W.; Gu, X.; Altinbas, Z.; Costanzo, M.; Hock, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Miller, T. A.; et al

    2015-12-23

    Head-on beam-beam compensation has been implemented in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in order to increase the luminosity delivered to the experiments. We discuss the principle of combining a lattice for resonance driving term compensation and an electron lens for tune spread compensation. We describe the electron lens technology and its operational use. As of this date the implemented compensation scheme approximately doubled the peak and average luminosities.

  12. Optics measurement and correction during beam acceleration in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C.; Marusic, A.; Minty, M.

    2014-09-09

    To minimize operational complexities, setup of collisions in high energy circular colliders typically involves acceleration with near constant ?-functions followed by application of strong focusing quadrupoles at the interaction points (IPs) for the final beta-squeeze. At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam acceleration and optics squeeze are performed simultaneously. In the past, beam optics correction at RHIC has taken place at injection and at final energy with some interpolation of corrections into the acceleration cycle. Recent measurements of the beam optics during acceleration and squeeze have evidenced significant beta-beats which if corrected could minimize undesirable emittance dilutions and maximize the spin polarization of polarized proton beams by avoidance of higher-order multipole fields sampled by particles within the bunch. In this report the methodology now operational at RHIC for beam optics corrections during acceleration with simultaneous beta-squeeze will be presented together with measurements which conclusively demonstrate the superior beam control. As a valuable by-product, the corrections have minimized the beta-beat at the profile monitors so reducing the dominant error in and providing more precise measurements of the evolution of the beam emittances during acceleration.

  13. (3+1)D hydrodynamic simulation of relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenke, Bjoern; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2010-07-15

    We present music, an implementation of the Kurganov-Tadmor algorithm for relativistic 3+1 dimensional fluid dynamics in heavy-ion collision scenarios. This Riemann-solver-free, second-order, high-resolution scheme is characterized by a very small numerical viscosity and its ability to treat shocks and discontinuities very well. We also incorporate a sophisticated algorithm for the determination of the freeze-out surface using a three dimensional triangulation of the hypersurface. Implementing a recent lattice based equation of state, we compute p{sub T}-spectra and pseudorapidity distributions for Au+Au collisions at sq root(s)=200 GeV and present results for the anisotropic flow coefficients v{sub 2} and v{sub 4} as a function of both p{sub T} and pseudorapidity eta. We were able to determine v{sub 4} with high numerical precision, finding that it does not strongly depend on the choice of initial condition or equation of state.

  14. Two-Photon Interactions with Nuclear Breakup in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony J. Baltz; Yuri Gorbunov; Spencer R. Klein; Joakim Nystrand

    2009-08-26

    Highly charged relativistic heavy ions have high cross-sections for two-photon interactions. The photon flux is high enough that two-photon interactions may be accompanied by additional photonuclear interactions. Except for the shared impact parameter, these interactions are independent. Additional interactions like mutual Coulomb excitation are of experimental interest, since the neutrons from the nuclear dissociation provide a simple, relatively unbiased trigger. We calculate the cross sections, rapidity, mass and transverse momentum ($p_T)$ distributions for exclusive $\\gamma\\gamma$ production of mesons and lepton pairs, and for $\\gamma\\gamma$ reactions accompanied by mutual Coulomb dissociation. The cross-sections for $\\gamma\\gamma$ interactions accompanied by multiple neutron emission ($XnXn$) and single neutron emission ($1n1n$) are about 1/10 and 1/100 of that for the unaccompanied $\\gamma\\gamma$ interactions. We discuss the accuracy with which these cross-sections may be calculated. The typical $p_T$ of $\\gamma\\gamma$ final states is several times smaller than for comparable coherent photonuclear interactions, so $p_T$ may be an effective tool for separating the two classes of interactions.

  15. Two-photon interactions with nuclear breakup in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltz, Anthony J.; Gorbunov, Yuri; Klein, Spencer R.; Nystrand, Joakim

    2009-10-15

    Highly charged relativistic heavy ions have high cross sections for two-photon interactions. The photon flux is high enough that two-photon interactions may be accompanied by additional photonuclear interactions. Except for the shared impact parameter, these interactions are independent. Additional interactions like mutual Coulomb excitation are of experimental interest, because the neutrons from the nuclear dissociation provide a simple, relatively unbiased trigger. We calculate the cross sections, rapidity, mass, and transverse momentum (p{sub T}) distributions for exclusive {gamma}{gamma} production of mesons and lepton pairs and for {gamma}{gamma} reactions accompanied by mutual Coulomb dissociation. The cross sections for {gamma}{gamma} interactions accompanied by multiple neutron emission (XnXn) and single-neutron emission (1n1n) are about 1/10 and 1/100 of that for the unaccompanied {gamma}{gamma} interactions. We discuss the accuracy with which these cross sections may be calculated. The typical p{sub T} of {gamma}{gamma} final states is several times smaller than for comparable coherent photonuclear interactions, so p{sub T} may be an effective tool for separating the two classes of interactions.

  16. Two-Photon Interactions with Nuclear Breakup in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltz, Anthony J.; Gorbunov, Yuri; R Klein, Spencer; Nystrand, Joakim

    2010-07-07

    Highly charged relativistic heavy ions have high cross-sections for two-photon interactions. The photon flux is high enough that two-photon interactions may be accompanied by additional photonuclear interactions. Except for the shared impact parameter, these interactions are independent. Additional interactions like mutual Coulomb excitation are of experimental interest, since the neutrons from the nuclear dissociation provide a simple, relatively unbiased trigger. We calculate the cross sections, rapidity, mass and transverse momentum (p{sub T}) distributions for exclusive {gamma}{gamma} production of mesons and lepton pairs, and for {gamma}{gamma} reactions accompanied by mutual Coulomb dissociation. The cross-sections for {gamma}{gamma} interactions accompanied by multiple neutron emission (XnXn) and single neutron emission (1n1n) are about 1/10 and 1/100 of that for the unaccompanied {gamma}{gamma} interactions. We discuss the accuracy with which these cross-sections may be calculated. The typical p{sub T} of {gamma}{gamma} final states is several times smaller than for comparable coherent photonuclear interactions, so p{sub T} may be an effective tool for separating the two classes of interactions.

  17. Alternative Scenarios of Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions: I. Baryon Stopping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. B. Ivanov

    2013-02-23

    Simulations of relativistic heavy-ion collisions within the three-fluid model employing a purely hadronic equation of state (EoS) and two versions of the EoS involving deconfinement transition are presented. The latter are an EoS with the first-order phase transition and that with a smooth crossover transition. The model setup is described in detail. The analysis is performed in a wide range of incident energies 2.7 GeV $< \\sqrt{s_{NN}} <$ 39 GeV in terms of the center-of-mass energy. Results on proton and net-proton rapidity distributions are reported. Comparison with available data indicate certain preference of the crossover EoS. It is found that predictions within deconfinement-transition scenarios exhibit a "peak-dip-peak-dip" irregularity in the incident energy dependence of the form of the net-proton rapidity distributions in central collisions. This irregularity is a signal of deconfinement onset occurring in the hot and dense stage of the nuclear collision.

  18. K-*(892)(0) production in relativistic heavy ion collisions at root s(NN)=130 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Anderson, M.; Averichev, GS; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, RV; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, SP; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Draper, JE; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, KJ; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, TJ; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Henry, TW; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Horsley, M.; Huang, HZ; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, YI; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Klyachko, A.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, AS; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, AD; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kunde, GJ; Kunz, CL; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Lansdell, CP; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, VM; LeVine, MJ; Li, Q.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, QJ; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; LoCurto, G.; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, J.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, J.; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Messer, M.; Miller, ML; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, NG; Mitchell, J.; Moore, CF; Morozov, V.; de Moura, MM; Munhoz, MG; Nelson, JM; Nevski, P.; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Norman, B.; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Paic, G.; Pandey, SU; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potrebenikova, E.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rai, G.; Rakness, G.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevski, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Rykov, V.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Savin, I.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, LS; Schuttauf, A.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seliverstov, D.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskii, SS; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stephenson, EJ; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Struck, C.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Thompson, M.; Tikhomirov, V.; Tokarev, M.; Tonjes, MB; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Trofimov, V.; Tsai, O.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Van Buren, G.; VanderMolen, AM; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vigdor, SE; Voloshin, SA; Wang, F.; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Wells, R.; Westfall, GD; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Willson, R.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Yakutin, AE; Yamamoto, E.; Yang, J.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zanevski, YV; Zborovsky, I.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zubarev, AN; STAR Collaboration.

    2002-01-01

    COMMUNICATIONS PHYSICAL REVIEW C 66, 061901~R! ~2002! K*?892?0 production in relativistic heavy ion collisions at AsNN?130 GeV C. Adler,11 Z. Ahammed,23 C. Allgower,12 J. Amonett,14 B. D. Anderson,14 M. Anderson,5 G. S. Averichev,9 J. Balewski,12 O.... Barannikova,9,23 L. S. Barnby,14 J. Baudot,13 S. Bekele,20 V. V. Belaga,9 R. Bellwied,31 J. Berger,11 H. Bichsel,30 A. Billmeier,31 L. C. Bland,2 C. O. Blyth,3 B. E. Bonner,24 A. Boucham,26 A. Brandin,18 A. Bravar,2 R. V. Cadman,1 H. Caines,33 M. Caldero...

  19. rho(0) photoproduction in ultraperipheral relativistic heavy ion collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S. -L; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, A.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; LaPointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qattan, I. A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Relyea, D.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, X. -H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.

    2008-01-01

    REVIEW C 77, 034910 (2008) ?0 photoproduction in ultraperipheral relativistic heavy ion collisions at?sNN = 200 GeV B. I. Abelev,10 M. M. Aggarwal,32 Z. Ahammed,47 B. D. Anderson,21 D. Arkhipkin,14 G. S. Averichev,13 Y. Bai,30 J. Balewski,18 O.... Barannikova,10 L. S. Barnby,2 J. Baudot,19 S. Baumgart,52 D. R. Beavis,3 R. Bellwied,50 F. Benedosso,30 R. R. Betts,10 S. Bhardwaj,37 A. Bhasin,20 A. K. Bhati,32 H. Bichsel,49 J. Bielcik,12 J. Bielcikova,12 L. C. Bland,3 S.-L. Blyth,24 M. Bombara,2 B. E...

  20. Challenging the utility of third-order azimuth harmonics in the description of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. L. Ray; D. J. Prindle; T. A. Trainor

    2013-08-20

    In recent years it has become conventional practice to include higher-order cylindrical harmonics in the phenomenological description of two-particle angular correlations from ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. These model elements, whose dependence on relative azimuth angle has the form $\\cos[m(\\phi_1-\\phi_2)]$ where $m > 2$, were introduced to support a hydrodynamic flow interpretation of the same-side ($|\\phi_1-\\phi_2| 2$ harmonics are not required by the data, that they destabilize the fitting models, and that their net effect is to decompose the same-side peak into two components, one being dependent on and the other being independent of relative pseudorapidity. Thus we are lead to question whether descriptions of angular correlation data including higher-order harmonics inform our understanding of the same-side peak or heavy-ion collisions in general. Results from analysis of two-dimensional angular correlation data from the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) show that the RHIC data do not exclude a single-Gaussian hypothesis for the same-side peak. We find that the net effect of including the $m = 3$ harmonic or azimuth sextupole in the fitting model is the inclusion of small non-Gaussian dependence in the mathematical description of the same-side peak. Those non-Gaussian effects are systematically insignificant and can be accommodated by minor perturbations to the same-side 2D Gaussian peak model, which act locally at small relative azimuth. We also demonstrate that the 0-1% 2D angular correlation data for 2.76 TeV Pb+Pb collisions from ATLAS, which display an away-side double peak on azimuth, do not require a sextupole and exclude a positive same-side sextupole.

  1. Recent results in relativistic heavy ion collisions: from ``a new state of matter'' to "the perfect fluid"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Tannenbaum

    2006-07-28

    Experimental Physics with Relativistic Heavy Ions dates from 1992 when a beam of 197Au of energy greater than 10A GeV/c first became available at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) soon followed in 1994 by a 208Pb beam of 158A GeV/c at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN (European Center for Nuclear Research). Previous pioneering measurements at the Berkeley Bevalac in the late 1970's and early 1980's were at much lower bombarding energies (~ 1 A GeV/c) where nuclear breakup rather than particle production is the dominant inelastic process in A+A collisions. More recently, starting in 2000, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL has produced head-on collisions of two 100A GeV beams of fully stripped Au ions, corresponding to nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy, sqrt(sNN)=200 GeV, total c.m. energy 200A GeV. The objective of this research program is to produce nuclear matter with extreme density and temperature, possibly resulting in a state of matter where the quarks and gluons normally confined inside individual nucleons (r < 1 fm) are free to act over distances an order of magnitude larger. Progress from the period 1992 to the present will be reviewed, with reference to previous results from light ion and proton-proton collisions where appropriate. Emphasis will be placed on the measurements which formed the basis for the announcements by the two major laboratories: "A new state of matter", by CERN on Feb 10, 2000 and "The perfect fluid", by BNL on April 19, 2005.

  2. Event-shape fluctuations and flow correlations in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jia, Jiangyong

    2014-12-01

    I review recent measurements of a large set of flow observables associated with event-shape fluctuations and collective expansion in heavy ion collisions. First, these flow observables are classified and experiment methods are introduced. The experimental results for each type of observables are then presented and compared to theoretical calculations. A coherent picture of initial condition and collective flow based on linear and non-linear hydrodynamic responses is derived, which qualitatively describe most experimental results. I discuss new types of fluctuation measurements that can further our understanding of the event-shape fluctuations and collective expansion dynamics.

  3. The Smallest Drops of the Hottest Matter? New Investigations at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (493rd Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sickles, Anne

    2014-03-19

    Pool sharks at the billiards hall know that sometimes you aim to rocket the cue ball for a head-on collision, and other times, a mere glance will do. Physicists need to know more than a thing or two about collision geometry too, as they sift through data from the billions of ions that smash together at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Determining whether ions crash head-on or just glance is crucial for the physicists analyzing data to study quark-gluon plasma—the ultra-hot, "perfect" liquid of quarks and gluons that existed more than 13 billion years ago, before the first protons and neutrons formed. For these physicists, collision geometry data provides insights about quark-gluon plasma's extremely low viscosity and other unusual properties, which are essential for understanding more about the "strong force" that holds together the nucleus, protons, and neutrons of every atom in the universe. Dr. Sickles explains how physicists use data collected at house-sized detectors like PHENIX and STAR to determine what happens before, during, and after individual particle collisions among billions at RHIC. She also explains how the ability to collide different "species" of nuclei at RHIC—including protons and gold ions today and possibly more with a proposed future electron-ion collider upgrade (eRHIC)—enables physicists to probe deeper into the mysteries of quark-gluon plasma and the strong force.

  4. Hadronic resonance production in d+Au collisions at root S(NN) = 200 GeV measured at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopdhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangaharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, M. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; deToledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.

    2008-01-01

    tracker at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider). The masses and widths of these resonances are studied as a function of transverse momentum p(T). We observe that the resonance spectra follow a generalized scaling law with the transverse mass m...

  5. Effect of the Wood-Saxon nuclear distribution on the chiral magnetic field in Relativistic Heavy-ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu-Jun Mo; Sheng-Qin Feng; Ya-Fei Shi

    2013-08-20

    The formation of the QCD vacuum with nonzero winding number $Q_w$ during relativistic heavy-ion collisions breaks the parity and charge-parity symmetry. A new kind of field configuration can separate charge in the presence of a background magnetic field-the "chiral magnetic effect". The strong magnetic field and the QCD vacuum can both completely be produced in the noncentral nuclear-nuclear collision. Basing on the theory of Kharzeev,Mclerran and Warringa, we use the Wood-Saxon nucleon distribution to replace that of the uniform distribution to improve the magnetic field calculation method of the noncentral collision. The chiral magnetic field distribution at LHC(Large Hadron Collider) energy regions are predicted. We also consider the contributions to the magnetic field of the total charge given by the produced quarks.

  6. Energy and Atomic Mass Dependence of Nuclear Stopping Power in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions in Interacting Gluon Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Q. J. Liu; W. Q. Chao; G. Wilk

    1995-04-05

    We present a Monte-Carlo simulation of energy deposition process in relativistic heavy-ion collisions based on a new realization of the Interacting-Gluon-Model (IGM) for high energy $N-N$ collisions. In particular we show results for proton spectra from collisions of $E_{lab}=200 \\ GeV/N$ $^{32}$S beam incident on $^{32}$S target and analyze the energy and mass dependence of nuclear stopping power predicted by our model. Theoretical predictions for proton rapidity distributions of both $^{208}$Pb + $^{208}$Pb collisions at $E_{lab}=160 \\ GeV/N$ CERN SPS and $^{197}$Au + $^{197}$Au at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200 \\ GeV$ BNL RHIC are given.

  7. Alternative Scenarios of Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions: II. Particle Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. B. Ivanov

    2013-06-04

    Particle production in relativistic collisions of heavy nuclei is analyzed in a wide range of incident energies 2.7 GeV $\\le \\sqrt{s_{NN}}\\le$ 62.4 GeV. The analysis is performed within the three-fluid model employing three different equations of state (EoS): a purely hadronic EoS, an EoS with the first-order phase transition and that with a smooth crossover transition. It is found that the hadronic scenario fails to reproduce experimental yields of antibaryons (strange and nonstrange), starting already from lower SPS energies, i.e. $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}>$ 5 GeV. Moreover, at energies above the top SPS one, i.e. $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}>$ 17.4 GeV, the mid-rapidity densities predicted by the hadronic scenario considerably exceed the available RHIC data on all species. At the same time the deconfinement-transition scenarios reasonably agree (to a various extent) with all the data. The present analysis demonstrates certain advantage of the deconfinement-transition EoS's. However, all scenarios fail to reproduce the strangeness enhancement in the incident energy range near 30A GeV (i.e. a horn anomaly in the $K^+/\\pi^+$ ratio) and yields of $\\phi$-mesons at 20A--40A GeV.

  8. Interactions of $B_{c}$ Meson in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irfan, Shaheen; Masud, Bilal

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the absorbtion cross-sections of $B_{c}$ mesons by $\\pi$ and $\\rho$ mesons including anomalous processes using an effective hadronic Lagrangian. The enhancement of Bc production is expected due to QGP formation in heavy-ion experiments. However it is also expected that the production rate of Bc meson can be affected due to the interaction with comovers. These processes are relevant for experiments at RHIC. Thermal average cross-sections of $B_{c}$ are evaluated with form factor when a cut off parameter in it is 1 and 2 GeV. Using these thermal average cross-sections in the kinetic equation we investigate the time evolution of $B_{c}$ mesons due to dissociation in the hadronic matter formed at RHIC.

  9. A Tale of Tails: Photon Rates and Flow in Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larry McLerran; Bjoern Schenke

    2015-04-28

    We consider the possibility that quark and gluon distributions in the medium created in high energy heavy ion collisions may be modified by a power law tail at energies much higher than the temperature. We parametrize such a tail by Tsallis distributions with an exponent motivated by phenomenology. These distributions are characterized by an effective temperature scale that we assume to evolve in time like the temperature for thermal distributions. We find that including such a tail increases the rates for photon production and significantly delays the emission times for photons of a fixed energy. We argue that these effects are sufficiently large that they should be able to account for photon yields and flow patterns seen in LHC and RHIC experiments.

  10. Quark charge balance function and hadronization effects in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Song; Feng-lan Shao; Zuo-tang Liang

    2012-04-17

    We calculate the charge balance function of the bulk quark system before hadronization and those for the directly produced and the final hadron system in high energy heavy ion collisions. We use the covariance coefficient to describe the strength of the correlation between the momentum of the quark and that of the anti-quark if they are produced in a pair and fix the parameter by comparing the results for hadrons with the available data. We study the hadronization effects and decay contributions by comparing the results for hadrons with those for the bulk quark system. Our results show that while hadronization via quark combination mechanism slightly increases the width of the charge balance functions, it preserves the main features of these functions such as the longitudinal boost invariance and scaling properties in rapidity space. The influence from resonance decays on the width of the balance function is more significant but it does not destroy its boost invariance and scaling properties in rapidity space either. The balance functions in azimuthal direction are also presented.

  11. J/psi production in relativistic heavy ion collisions from a multiphase transport model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, B.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Lin, ZW; Pal, S.

    2002-01-01

    Using a multiphase transport model, we study J/psi production from interactions between charm and anticharm quarks in the initial parton phase and between D and (D) over bar mesons in the final hadron phase of relativistic ...

  12. Summary of Heavy Ion Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean Gavin

    1994-09-20

    Can we study hot QCD using nuclear collisions? Can we learn about metallic hydrogen from the impact of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 on Jupiter? The answer to both questions may surprise you! I summarize progress in relativistic heavy ion theory reported at DPF `94 in the parallel sessions.

  13. Final Report for Project ``Theory of ultra-relativistic heavy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and the stream of new high-quality data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory (which started operations in the summer of the year 2000) to...

  14. PHENIX Conceptual Design Report. An experiment to be performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagamiya, Shoji; Aronson, Samuel H.; Young, Glenn R.; Paffrath, Leo

    1993-01-29

    The PHENIX Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the detector design of the PHENIX experiment for Day-1 operation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The CDR presents the physics capabilities, technical details, cost estimate, construction schedule, funding profile, management structure, and possible upgrade paths of the PHENIX experiment. The primary goals of the PHENIX experiment are to detect the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and to measure its properties. Many of the potential signatures for the QGP are measured as a function of a well-defined common variable to see if any or all of these signatures show a simultaneous anomaly due to the formation of the QGP. In addition, basic quantum chromodynamics phenomena, collision dynamics, and thermodynamic features of the initial states of the collision are studied. To achieve these goals, the PHENIX experiment measures lepton pairs (dielectrons and dimuons) to study various properties of vector mesons, such as the mass, the width, and the degree of yield suppression due to the formation of the QGP. The effect of thermal radiation on the continuum is studied in different regions of rapidity and mass. The e{mu} coincidence is measured to study charm production, and aids in understanding the shape of the continuum dilepton spectrum. Photons are measured to study direct emission of single photons and to study {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} production. Charged hadrons are identified to study the spectrum shape, production of antinuclei, the {phi} meson (via K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} decay), jets, and two-boson correlations. The measurements are made down to small cross sections to allow the study of high p{sub T} spectra, and J/{psi} and {Upsilon} production. The PHENIX collaboration consists of over 300 scientists, engineers, and graduate students from 43 institutions in 10 countries. This large international collaboration is supported by US resources and significant foreign resources.

  15. Heavy-Ion Physics with CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aneta Iordanova

    2008-06-06

    This article presents a brief overview of the CMS experiment capabilities to study the hot and dense matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The CERN Large Hadron Collider will provide collisions of Pb nuclei at 5.5 TeV per nucleon. The CMS heavy ion group has developed a plethora of physics analyses addressing many important aspects of heavy-ion physics in preparation for a competitive and successful program.

  16. RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westfall, G.D.

    2010-01-01

    Viyogi, G.D. Westfall; P. Doll, D.E. Greiner, H. Faraggi,Viyogi, T.J.M. Symons, P. Doll, D.E. Greiner, H.H. Heckman,

  17. HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keefe, D.

    2008-01-01

    Accelerators as Drivers for Inertially Confined Fusion, W.B.LBL-9332/SLAC-22l (1979) Fusion Driven by Heavy Ion Beams,OF CALIFORNIA f Accelerator & Fusion Research Division

  18. Formation of Superdense Hadronic Matter in High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ba0-An; Ko, Che Ming.

    1995-01-01

    We present the detail of a newly developed relativistic transport model (ART 1.0) for high energy heavy-ion collisions. Using this model, we first study the general collision dynamics between heavy ions at the AGS energies. ...

  19. Net-baryon-, net-proton-, and net-charge kurtosis in heavy-ion collisions within a relativistic transport approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marlene Nahrgang; Tim Schuster; Michael Mitrovski; Reinhard Stock; Marcus Bleicher

    2012-09-03

    We explore the potential of net-baryon, net-proton and net-charge kurtosis measurements to investigate the properties of hot and dense matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Contrary to calculations in a grand canonical ensemble we explicitly take into account exact electric and baryon charge conservation on an event-by-event basis. This drastically limits the width of baryon fluctuations. A simple model to account for this is to assume a grand-canonical distribution with a sharp cut-off at the tails. We present baseline predictions of the energy dependence of the net-baryon, net-proton and net-charge kurtosis for central ($b\\leq 2.75$ fm) Pb+Pb/Au+Au collisions from $E_{lab}=2A$ GeV to $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV from the UrQMD model. While the net-charge kurtosis is compatible with values around zero, the net-baryon number decreases to large negative values with decreasing beam energy. The net-proton kurtosis becomes only slightly negative for low $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$.

  20. Realistic expanding source model for invariant one-particle multiplicity distributions and two-particle correlations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, S; Chapman, Scott; Nix, J Rayford

    1996-01-01

    We present a realistic expanding source model with nine parameters that are necessary and sufficient to describe the main physics occuring during hydrodynamical freezeout of the excited hadronic matter produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. As a first test of the model, we compare it to data from central Si + Au collisions at p_lab/A = 14.6 GeV/c measured in experiment E-802 at the AGS. An overall chi-square per degree of freedom of 1.055 is achieved for a fit to 1416 data points involving invariant pi^+, pi^-, K^+, and K^- one-particle multiplicity distributions and pi^+ and K^+ two-particle correlations. The 99-percent-confidence region of parameter space is identified, leading to one-dimensional error estimates on the nine fitted parameters and other calculated physical quantities. Three of the most important results are the freezeout temperature, longitudinal proper time, and baryon density along the symmetry axis. For these we find values of 92.9 +/- 4.4 MeV, 8.2 +/- 2.2 fm/c, and 0.0222 + 0.0097...

  1. THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER (RHIC) CRYOGENIC SYSTEM AT BNL: REVIEW OF THE MODIFICATIONS AND UPGRADES SINCE 2002 AND PLANNED IMPROVEMENTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    THAN,Y.R.; TUOZZOLO, J.; SIDI-YAKHLEF, A.; GANNI, V.; KNUDSEN, P.; ARENIUS, D.

    2007-07-16

    Brookhaven National Laboratory continues its multi-year program to improve the operational efficiency, reliability, and stability of the cryogenic system which also resulted in improved beam availability of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This paper summarizes the work and changes made after each phase over the past four years to the present, as well as proposed future improvements. Power usage dropped from an initial 9.4 MW to the present 5.1 MW and is expected to drop below 5 MW after the completion of the remaining proposed improvements. The work proceeded in phases by balancing the Collider's schedule of operation, time required for the modifications and budget constraints. The main changes include process control, compressor oil removal and management, elimination of the use of cold compressors and two liquid helium storage tanks, insulation of the third liquid helium storage tank, compressor bypass flow reduction and the addition of a load turbine (Joule-Thompson expander) with associated heat exchangers at the cold end of the plant. Also, liquid helium pumps used for forced circulation of the sub-cooled helium through the magnet loops were eliminated by an accelerator supply flow reconfiguration. Planned future upgrades include the resizing of expanders 5 and 6 to increase their efficiencies.

  2. High energy heavy ions: techniques and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, J.R.

    1985-04-01

    Pioneering work at the Bevalac has given significant insight into the field of relativistic heavy ions, both in the development of techniques for acceleration and delivery of these beams as well as in many novel areas of applications. This paper will outline our experiences at the Bevalac; ion sources, low velocity acceleration, matching to the synchrotron booster, and beam delivery. Applications discussed will include the observation of new effects in central nuclear collisions, production of beams of exotic short-lived (down to 1 ..mu..sec) isotopes through peripheral nuclear collisions, atomic physics with hydrogen-like uranium ions, effects of heavy ''cosmic rays'' on satellite equipment, and an ongoing cancer radiotherapy program with heavy ions. 39 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Heavy Quark Photoproduction in Ultra-peripheral Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer R. Klein; Joakim Nystrand; Ramona Vogt

    2002-08-09

    Heavy quarks are copiously produced in ultra-peripheral heavy ion collisions. In the strong electromagnetic fields, c c-bar and b b-bar are produced by photonuclear and two-photon interactions; hadroproduction can occur in grazing interactions. We present the total cross sections, quark transverse momentum and rapidity distributions, as well as the Q Q-bar invariant mass spectra from the three production channels. We consider AA and pA collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and Large Hadron Collider. We discuss techniques for separating the three processes and describe how the AA to pA production ratios might be measured accurately enough to study nuclear shadowing.

  4. Breaking of the number-of-constituent-quark scaling for identified-particle elliptic flow as a signal of phase change in low-energy data taken at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Tian; J. H. Chen; Y. G. Ma; X. Z. Cai; F. Jin; G. L. Ma; S. Zhang; C. Zhong

    2009-06-29

    We argue that measurements of identified-particle elliptic flow in a wide energy range could shed light on the possible phase change in high-energy heavy ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). When the hadronization process is dominated by quark coalescence, the number-of-constituent-quark (NCQ) scaling for the identified-particle elliptic flow can serve as a probe for studying the strong interacting partonic matter. In the upcoming RHIC low-energy runs, the NCQ scaling behavior may be broken because of the change of the effective degrees of freedom of the hot dense matter, which corresponds to the transition from the dominant partonic phase to the dominant hadronic phase. A multiphase transport model is used to present the dependence of NCQ scaling behavior on the different hadronization mechanisms.

  5. Searching for Jets in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salur, Sevil

    2008-01-01

    measurements with full jet reconstruction in heavy ionDirect measurement of jets in s N N = 200 GeV Heavy Ion5–12, 2008 Searching for Jets in Heavy Ion Collisions Sevil

  6. RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLISIONS: EXPERIMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedlander, Erwin M.

    2010-01-01

    63, Sc 63, Gu 76, Go 77, Ka 80a] and thermodynamic [Me 80,by Meyer et al. [Me 80a],where the transverse momenta of thechamber experiment [ ~ a 80a] with 1.8 AGeV 4 0 ~ r incident

  7. Thermal, chemical and spectral equilibration in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gábor András Almási; György Wolf

    2014-07-08

    We have considered the equilibration in a relativistic heavy ion collision using our transport model. We applied periodic boundary conditions to close the system in a box. We found that the thermal equilibration takes place in the first 20-40 fm/c which time is comparable to the duration of a heavy ion collision. The chemical equilibration is a much slower process and the system does not equilibrate in a heavy ion collision. We have also shown that the mass spectra of broad resonances immediately follows their in-medium spectral functions.

  8. A short introduction to heavy-ion physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sourendu Gupta

    2015-08-23

    Heavy-ion collisions provide the only laboratory tests of relativistic quantum field theory at finite temperature. Understanding these is a necessary step in understanding the origins of our universe. These lectures introduce the subject to experimental particle physicists, in the hope that they will be useful to others as well. The phase diagram of QCD is briefly touched upon. Kinematic variables which arise in the collisions of heavy-ions beyond those in the collisions of protons or electrons are introduced. Finally, a few of the signals studied in heavy-ion collisions, and the kind of physics questions which they open up are discussed.

  9. Flow, spectra and HBT radii in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Bozek; Iwona Wyskiel

    2009-09-12

    The expansion of the fireball created in relativistic heavy ion collisions is described using the 3+1D hydrodynamical model. Experimentally observed transverse momentum spectra at different rapdities, elliptic flow and HBT correlations of produced particles can be reproduced. We give estimates of shear viscosity corrections at freeze-out, which we find important only for the elliptic flow coefficient.

  10. Title Quantum Optics and Heavy Ion Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy J. Glauber

    2006-04-10

    I shall try to say a few words about two particular ways in which my own work has a certain relation to your work with heavy ions. My title is therefore "Quantum Optics and Heavy Ion Physics".

  11. Antikaon flow in heavy-ion collisions: Effects of absorption and mean-field potential 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, GQ; Ko, Che Ming.

    1996-01-01

    We study antikaon flow in heavy-ion collisions at SIS energies based on the relativistic transport model (RVUU 1.0). The production of antikaons from both baryon-baryon and pion-baryon collisions are included. Taking into ...

  12. Studies of high transverse momentum phenomena in heavy ion collisions using the PHOBOS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenger, Edward (Edward Allen)

    2008-01-01

    The use of high-pT particles as calibrated probes has proven to be an effective tool for understanding the properties of the system produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions. In this thesis, two such measurements are ...

  13. Azimuthal anisotropy in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ShinIchi Esumi

    2004-05-19

    Directed and elliptic event anisotropy parameters measured in the experiments at relativistic heavy-ion collider are presented. The possible origin of the measured elliptic anisotropy parameter $v_2$ and its sensitivity to the early phase of the high-energy heavy-ion collisions are discussed.

  14. Heavy ion medical accelerator options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gough, R.A.; Alonso, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper briefly explores the accelerator technology available for heavy ion medical accelerators in the mass range of 1 to 40 (protons through argon). Machines that are designed to produce the required intensities of a particular design ion, such as silicon (mass 28), can satisfy the intensity requirements for all lighter ions, and can produce beams with higher mass, such as argon, at somewhat reduced, but still useful intensity levels. They can also provide beams of radioactive ions, such as carbon-11 and neon-19, which are useful in diagnostic imaging and for directly verifiable treatments. These accelerators are all based on proven technology, and can be built at predictable costs. It is the conclusion of several design studies that they can be operated reliably in a hospital-based environment. 8 refs., 22 figs.

  15. Gluon contribution to open heavy meson production in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Shanshan; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2015-01-01

    A sizable contribution to heavy quark production in high-energy hadronic and nuclear collisions comes from heavy quark-antiquark pair production from gluon splitting during the parton shower evolution. We investigate the effect of gluon-medium interaction on open heavy flavor spectra in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The interaction of hard gluons and heavy quarks with the hot QCD medium is simulated utilizing a Langevin transport model that simultaneously incorporates contributions from collisional and radiative processes. It is found that while the gluon splitting channel has quite important contribution to single D meson production cross section, its influence on the final heavy meson nuclear modification turns out to be quite modest due to the short average lifetime of hard gluons before splitting to heavy quark pairs during the evolution and propagation of the parton shower.

  16. Medical heavy ion accelerator proposals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gough, R.A.

    1985-05-01

    For several decades, accelerators designed primarily for research in nuclear and high energy physics have been adapted for biomedical research including radiotherapeutic treatment of human diseases such as pituitary disorders, cancer, and more recently, arteriovascular malformations. The particles used in these treatments include pions, protons and heavier ions such as carbon, neon, silicon and argon. Maximum beam energies must be available to penetrate into an equivalent of about 30 cm of water, requiring treatment beams of 250 to 1000 MeV/nucleon. Certain special treatments of superficial melanoma, however, require that beam energies as low as 70 MeV/nucleon also be available. Intensities must be adequate to complete a 100 rad treatment fraction in about 1 minute. For most heavy ion treatments, this corresponds to 10/sup 7/-10/sup 9/ ions/second at the patient. Because this research is best conducted in a dedicated, hospital-based facility, and because of the clinical need for ultra-high reliability, the construction of new and dedicated facilities has been proposed. Heavy ion accelerators can provide a variety of ions and energies, permitting treatment plans that exploit the properties of the ion best suited to each individual treatment, and that employ radioactive beams (such as /sup 11/C and /sup 19/Ne) to precisely confirm the dose localization. The favored technical approach in these proposals utilizes a conventional, strong-focusing synchrotron capable of fast switching between ions and energies, and servicing multiple treatment rooms. Specialized techniques for shaping the dose to conform to irregularly-shaped target volumes, while simultaneously sparing surrounding, healthy tissue and critical structures, are employed in each treatment room, together with the sophisticated dosimetry necessary for verification, monitoring, and patient safety. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Transport Theory of Heavy Flavor in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Shanshan

    2015-01-01

    A short overview is presented for the recent progress in the theory of heavy flavor transport in ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions, including a summary of different transport models, their phenomenological results of heavy meson quenching and flow at RHIC and LHC, a possible solution to the $R_\\mathrm{AA}$ vs. $v_2$ puzzle and predictions for heavy flavor observables beyond the current measurements.

  18. Photoproduction of top in peripheral heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer R. Klein; Joakim Nystrand; Ramona Vogt

    2001-07-09

    In relativistic heavy ion collisions, top quarks can be produced by photon-gluon fusion when a photon from the Weizs\\"acker-Williams virtual photon field of one nucleus interacts with a gluon in the other nucleus. Photoproduction with heavy ions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be the first accessible non-hadronic top production channel. We calculate the $t \\bar t$ photoproduction cross sections, pair mass and top quark rapidity distributions in peripheral heavy ion collisions. The cross sections are sensitive to the top quark charge and the large-$Q^2$ gluon distribution in the nucleus. We find a cross section of 94 pb in calcium-calcium collisions, leading to 190 pairs in a one month ($10^6$ sec) LHC run. We also find $p$Pb and $p$Ca cross sections of 5.8 and 3.4 pb respectively, resulting in 6 and 34 $t\\bar t$ pairs per month.

  19. The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory The Heavy Ion Path to Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -consistent power plant design for a multi- beam induction linac, final focus and chamber propagationThe Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory The Heavy Ion Path to Fusion Energy Grant Logan Director Heavy-Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory Presented to FESAC Workshop on Development Paths

  20. Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slide 1 Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory B. Grant Logan Director, U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory, (HIFS-VNL) - collaboration of LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL by the Lawrence Berkeley and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories under Contract Numbers DE-AC02-05CH1123

  1. Searching for Jets in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sevil Salur

    2008-09-09

    Jet quenching measurements using leading particles and their correlations suffer from known biases, which can be removed via direct reconstruction of jets in central heavy ion collisions. In this talk, we discuss several modern jet reconstruction algorithms and background subtraction techniques that are appropriate to heavy ion collisions.

  2. Dynamics of Ultra-Relativistic Nuclear Collisions with Heavy Beams: An Experimental Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Braun-Munzinger; Johanna Stachel

    1998-03-30

    We review, from an experimental point of view, the current status of ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions with heavy beams.

  3. Heavy-flavor production in heavy-ion collisions and implications for the properties of hot QCD matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Averbeck

    2015-05-14

    Hadrons carrying open heavy flavor, i.e. single charm or bottom quarks, are among the key diagnostic tools available today for the hot and dense state of strongly interacting matter which is produced in collisions of heavy atomic nuclei at ultra-relativistic energies. First systematic heavy-flavor measurements in nucleus-nucleus collisions and the reference proton-proton system at Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) have led to tantalizing results. These studies are now continued and extended at RHIC and at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where considerably higher collision energies are available. This review focuses on experimental results on open heavy-flavor observables at RHIC and the LHC published until July 2012. Yields of heavy-flavor hadrons and their decay products, their transverse momentum and rapidity distributions, as well as their azimuthal distributions with respect to the reaction plane in heavy-ion collisions are investigated. Various theoretical approaches are confronted with the data and implications for the properties of the hot and dense medium produced in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions are discussed.

  4. Production, formation, and transport of high-brightness atomic hydrogen beam studies for the relativistic heavy ion collider polarized source upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolmogorov, A. Stupishin, N.; Atoian, G.; Ritter, J.; Zelenski, A.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk

    2014-02-15

    The RHIC polarized H{sup ?} ion source had been successfully upgraded to higher intensity and polarization by using a very high brightness fast atomic beam source developed at BINP, Novosibirsk. In this source the proton beam is extracted by a four-grid multi-aperture ion optical system and neutralized in the H{sub 2} gas cell downstream from the grids. The proton beam is extracted from plasma emitter with a low transverse ion temperature of ?0.2 eV which is formed by plasma jet expansion from the arc plasma generator. The multi-hole grids are spherically shaped to produce “geometrical” beam focusing. Proton beam formation and transport of atomic beam were experimentally studied at test bench.

  5. Progress in Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1988-09-01

    The progress of the field of Heavy Ion Fusion has been documented in the proceedings of the series of International Symposia that, in recent years, have occurred every second year. The latest of these conferences was hosted by Gesellshaft fuer Schwerionenforshung (GSI) in Darmstadt, West Germany, June 28-30, 1988. For this report, a few highlights from the conference are selected, stressing experimental progress and prospects for future advances. A little extra time is devoted to report on the developments at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) which is the center for most of the HIFAR program. The Director of the HIFAR program at LBL is Denis Keefe, who presented the HIF report at the last two of the meetings in this series, and in whose place the author is appearing now. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Yield and suppression of electrons from open heavy-flavor decays in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders Knospe

    2011-12-31

    Measurements by the STAR and PHENIX collaborations indicate that a quark-gluon plasma, a hot and dense state of matter in which quarks and gluons are not confined inside hadrons, is formed in heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Charm and bottom quarks have been predicted to interact with the medium differently than the light quarks; a study of heavy quark interactions with the medium provides an important test of theoretical models of the quark-gluon plasma. The spectrum of non-photonic electrons (and positrons) is dominated by electrons from the semileptonic decays of D and B mesons. Therefore, non-photonic electrons serve as proxies for heavy quarks. A measurement of the modification of the non-photonic electron spectrum in nucleus-nucleus collisions relative to p + p collisions allows the interactions of heavy quarks with the medium to be studied. Previous measurements indicate that high-transverse-momentum non-photonic electrons are suppressed in Au + Au collisions at 200 GeV (center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair) relative to p + p collisions at the same energy. The magnitude of that suppression is larger than was anticipated and it has been a challenge for theoretical models to predict the in-medium energy loss of light and heavy quarks simultaneously. This dissertation presents the first measurement of the yield of non-photonic electrons from open heavy-flavor decays in Cu + Cu collisions at 200 GeV and the suppression of that yield relative to p + p collisions. A comparison of this result to similar results for Au + Au collisions provides some indication that the geometry of a heavy-ion collision affects the average amount of energy loss by heavy quarks passing through the quark-gluon plasma.

  7. Hadron Production in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmut Oeschler; Hans Georg Ritter; Nu Xu

    2009-08-12

    We review hadron production in heavy ion collisions with emphasis on pion and kaon production at energies below 2 AGeV and on partonic collectivity at RHIC energies.

  8. Five Years of Tracking Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Franz

    2006-03-13

    Five years have passed since the first collisions of Au nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on Long Island. With nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energies of up to sqrt(s_NN)=200GeV RHIC provides the highest energy heavy ion collisions at any existing collider. To study the dynamics of nuclear matter at extreme temperatures and pressures hundreds of produced particles need to be tracked and identified, which provides a sizable challenge to the four experiments. This article tries to summarize these first years of RHIC operation from the detector point of view and give a glimpse at the future of the accelerator and its experiments.

  9. Selected experimental results from heavy-ion collisions at LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Singh, Ranbir; Kumar, Lokesh; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2013-01-01

    We review a subset of experimental results from the heavy-ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) facility at CERN. Excellent consistency is observed across all the experiments at the LHC (at center of mass energysNN=2.76 TeV) for the measurements such as charged particle multiplicity density, azimuthal anisotropy coefficients, and nuclear modification factor of charged hadrons. Comparison to similar measurements from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at lower energy (sNN=200 GeV) suggests that the system formed at LHC has a higher energy density and larger system size and lives for a longer time. These measurements aremore »compared to model calculations to obtain physical insights on the properties of matter created at the RHIC and LHC.« less

  10. Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to today's large NP accelerators like GSI-FAIR, RHIC economical for 1-2 GWe baseload power plants. Heavy chambers. · Competitive economics: projected in several power plant studies and with no high levelSlide 1 Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory Briefing for the National Academy

  11. Future Experiments in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rene Bellwied

    2007-10-22

    The measurements at RHIC have revealed a new state of matter, which needs to be further characterized in order to better understand its implications for the early evolution of the universe and QCD. I will show that, in the near future, complementary key measurements can be performed at RHIC, LHC, and FAIR. I will focus on results than can be obtained using identified particles, a probe which has been the basis for this conference over the past three decades. The sophisticated detectors, built and planned, for all three accelerator facilities enable us to measure leptons, photons, muons as well as hadrons and resonances of all flavors almost equally well, which makes these experiments unprecedented precision tools for the comprehensive understanding of the physics of the early universe.

  12. Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Funding Agencies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Promotion of Science National Council for Scientific and Technological Development, Brazil Research Supporting Foundation of the State of Sao Paulo, Brazil National Natural...

  13. The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory Overview of Heavy Ion Fusion / High Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with GSI, Germany, to develop HEDP diagnostics. · Unique diagnostic measurements of electron cloud effects program · Compressed intense heavy ion beams in neutralizing background plasma in NDCX-I: 150 ns down to 2 on intense heavy-ion beam transport in both quadrupole and solenoid magnets. · Computer simulation models

  14. Pair creation in heavy ion channeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolay A. Belov; Zoltán Harman

    2014-11-20

    Heavy ions channeling through crystals with multi-GeV kinetic energies can create electron-positron pairs. In the framework of the ion, the energy of virtual photons arising from the periodic crystal potential may exceed the threshold $2mc^2$. The repeated periodic collisions with the crystal ions yield high pair production rates. When the virtual photon frequency matches a nuclear transition in the ion, the production rate can be resonantly increased. In this two-step excitation-pair conversion scheme, the excitation rates are coherently enhanced, and they scale approximately quadratically with the number of crystal sites along the channel.

  15. Motion of the plasma critical layer during relativistic-electron laser interaction with immobile and comoving ion plasma for ion acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahai, Aakash A., E-mail: aakash.sahai@gmail.com [Department of Electrical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    We analyze the motion of the plasma critical layer by two different processes in the relativistic-electron laser-plasma interaction regime (a{sub 0}>1). The differences are highlighted when the critical layer ions are stationary in contrast to when they move with it. Controlling the speed of the plasma critical layer in this regime is essential for creating low-? traveling acceleration structures of sufficient laser-excited potential for laser ion accelerators. In Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration (RITA) scheme, the heavy plasma-ions are fixed and only trace-density light-ions are accelerated. The relativistic critical layer and the acceleration structure move longitudinally forward by laser inducing transparency through apparent relativistic increase in electron mass. In the Radiation Pressure Acceleration (RPA) scheme, the whole plasma is longitudinally pushed forward under the action of the laser radiation pressure, possible only when plasma ions co-propagate with the laser front. In RPA, the acceleration structure velocity critically depends upon plasma-ion mass in addition to the laser intensity and plasma density. In RITA, mass of the heavy immobile plasma-ions does not affect the speed of the critical layer. Inertia of the bared immobile ions in RITA excites the charge separation potential, whereas RPA is not possible when ions are stationary.

  16. ? Production in Heavy Ion Collisions at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai Zhou; Nu Xu; Pengfei Zhuang

    2014-08-19

    We investigate the {\\Upsilon} production in heavy ion collisions at LHC energy in the frame of a dynamical transport approach. Both the initial production and in-medium regeneration and both the cold and hot nuclear matter effects are included in the calculations. In comparison with the ground state {\\Upsilon}(1s), the excited state {\\Upsilon}(2s) is much more sensitive to the heavy quark potential at finite temperature.

  17. Contribution of Pi-N-]Lambda-K to Subthreshold Kaon Production in Heavy-Ion Collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiong, L.; Ko, Che Ming; Wu, J. Q.

    1990-01-01

    We report the first observation of K-*(892)(0)-->piK in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The transverse momentum spectrum of (K-*0+(K) over bar (*0))/2 from central Au+Au collisions at roots(NN)=130 GeV is presented. The ...

  18. Alternative Size and Lifetime Measurements for High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Pratt; Silvio Petriconi

    2003-06-16

    Two-Particle correlations based on the interference of identical particles has provided the chief means for determining the shape and lifetime of sources in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Here, Strong and Coulomb induced correlations are shown to provide equivalent information.

  19. High-energy accelerator for beams of heavy ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Ronald L. (La Grange, IL); Arnold, Richard C. (Chicago, IL)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for accelerating heavy ions to high energies and directing the accelerated ions at a target comprises a source of singly ionized heavy ions of an element or compound of greater than 100 atomic mass units, means for accelerating the heavy ions, a storage ring for accumulating the accelerated heavy ions and switching means for switching the heavy ions from the storage ring to strike a target substantially simultaneously from a plurality of directions. In a particular embodiment the heavy ion that is accelerated is singly ionized hydrogen iodide. After acceleration, if the beam is of molecular ions, the ions are dissociated to leave an accelerated singly ionized atomic ion in a beam. Extraction of the beam may be accomplished by stripping all the electrons from the atomic ion to switch the beam from the storage ring by bending it in magnetic field of the storage ring.

  20. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W. M.

    2011-01-01

    HIFAN 1830 INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMSAC02-05CH11231. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION467 (1992). [38] R. W. Moir, Fusion Tech. 25, 5 (1994) [39

  1. STAR Highlights on Heavy Ion Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shusu Shi

    2014-09-30

    RHIC-STAR is a mid-rapidity collider experiment for studying high energy nuclear collisions. The main physics goals of STAR experiment are 1) studying the properties of the strongly coupled Quark Gluon Plasma, 2) explore the QCD phase diagram structure. In these proceedings, we will review the recent results of heavy ion physics at STAR.

  2. Thermoacoustic imaging using heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claytor, T.N.; Tesmer, J.R.; Deemer, B.C.; Murphy, J.C.

    1995-10-01

    Ion beams have been used for surface modification, semiconductor device fabrication and for material analysis, which makes ion-material interactions of significant importance. Ion implantation will produce new compositions near the surface by ion mixing or directly by implanting desired ions. Ions exchange their energy to the host material as they travel into the material by several different processes. High energy ions ionize the host atoms before atomic collisions transfer the remaining momentum and stop the incident ion. As they penetrate the surface, the low energy ions ionize the host atoms, but also have a significantly large momentum transfer mechanism near the surface of the material. This leads to atoms, groups of atoms and electrons being ejected from the surface, which is the momentum transfer process of sputtering. This talk addresses the acoustic waves generated during ion implantation using modulated heavy ion beams. The mechanisms for elastic wave generation during ion implantation, in the regimes where sputtering is significant and where implantation is dominant and sputtering is negligible, has been studied. The role of momentum transfer and thermal energy production during ion implantation was compared to laser generated elastic waves in an opaque solid as a reference, since laser generated ultrasound has been extensively studied and is fairly well understood. The thermoelastic response dominated in both high and low ion energy regimes since, apparently, more energy is lost to thermal heat producing mechanisms than momentum transfer processes. The signal magnitude was found to vary almost linearly with incident energy as in the laser thermoelastic regime. The time delays for longitudinal and shear waves-were characteristic of those expected for a purely thermal heating source. The ion beams are intrinsically less sensitive to the albedo of the surface.

  3. Multiphase transport model for relativistic nuclear collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, B.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Lin, ZW.

    2000-01-01

    To study heavy ion collisions at energies available from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we have developed a multiphase transport model that includes both initial partonic and final hadronic interactions. ...

  4. The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory Status and new physics directions for heavy-ion-driven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for compact driver-scale injectors. Two LLNL injector test stands #12;The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual NationalThe Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory Status and new physics directions for heavy-ion-driven high energy density physics and fusion* G. Logan, F. Bieniosek, C. Celata, E. Henestroza, J. Kwan, E. P

  5. Medium energy heavy ion operations at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drees, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.M.C.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brown, K.A.; Brennan, M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gassner, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Hulsart, R.; Ingrassia, P.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.C.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Marr, G.; Mapes. M.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Naylor, C.; Nemesure, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Sampson, P.; Satogata, T.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.S.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; van Kuik, B.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    As part of the search for a phase transition or critical point on the QCD phase diagram, an energy scan including 5 different energy settings was performed during the 2010 RHIC heavy ion run. While the top beam energy for heavy ions is at 100 GeV/n and the lowest achieved energy setpoint was significantly below RHICs injection energy of approximately 10 GeV/n, we also provided beams for data taking in a medium energy range above injection energy and below top beam energy. This paper reviews RHIC experience and challenges for RHIC medium energy operations that produced full experimental data sets at beam energies of 31.2 GeV/n and 19.5 GeV/n. The medium energy AuAu run covered two beam energies, both above the RHIC injection energy of 9.8 GeV but well below the standard store energy of 100 GeV (see table 1). The low energy and full energy runs with heavy ions in FY10 are summarized in [1] and [2]. Stochastic Cooling ([3]) was only used for 100 GeV beams and not used in the medium energy run. The efficiency of the transition from 100 GeV operation to 31.2 GeV and then to 19.5 GeV was remarkable. Setup took 32 h and 19 h respectively for the two energy settings. The time in store, defined to be the percentage of time RHIC provides beams in physics conditions versus calendar time, was approximately 52% for the entire FY10 heavy ion run. In both medium energy runs it was well above this average, 68% for 31.5 GeV and 82% for 19.5 GeV. For both energies RHIC was filled with 111 bunches with 1.2 10{sup 9} and 1.3 10{sup 9} ions per bunch respectively.

  6. A Radiographic Technique With Heavy Ion Microbeams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muscio, J.; Somacal, H.; Burlon, A. A.; Debray, M. E.; Valda, A. A.; Kreiner, A. J.; Kesque, J. M.; Minsky, D. M.

    2007-02-12

    In this work, we introduce a new technique to perform densitometric and multielemental analysis of samples at the same time using a simple detector with heavy ion micro-beams. It consists in the simultaneous analysis of X-rays induced in the sample and in a secondary target arranged behind the specimen. The X-rays originated in the secondary target are attenuated when crossing the specimen producing a radiographic image with a monochromatic source.

  7. Pseudorapidity correlations in heavy ion collisions from viscous fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akihiko Monnai; Bjoern Schenke

    2015-09-16

    We demonstrate by explicit calculations in 3+1 dimensional viscous relativistic fluid dynamics how two-particle pseudorapidity correlation functions in heavy ion collisions at the LHC and RHIC depend on the number of particle producing sources and the transport properties of the produced medium. In particular, we present results for the Legendre coefficients of the two-particle pseudorapidity correlation function in Pb+Pb collisions at 2760 GeV and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV from viscous hydrodynamics with three dimensionally fluctuating initial conditions. Our results suggest that these coefficients provide important constraints on initial state fluctuations and the transport properties of the quark gluon plasma.

  8. Pseudorapidity correlations in heavy ion collisions from viscous fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monnai, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate by explicit calculations in 3+1 dimensional viscous relativistic fluid dynamics how two-particle pseudorapidity correlation functions in heavy ion collisions at the LHC and RHIC depend on the number of particle producing sources and the transport properties of the produced medium. In particular, we present results for the Legendre coefficients of the two-particle pseudorapidity correlation function in Pb+Pb collisions at 2760 GeV and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV from viscous hydrodynamics with three dimensionally fluctuating initial conditions. Our results suggest that these coefficients provide important constraints on initial state fluctuations and the transport properties of the quark gluon plasma.

  9. Interference in Exclusive Vector Meson Production in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer R. Klein; Joakim Nystrand

    1999-09-03

    Photons emitted from the electromagnetic fields of relativistic heavy ions can fluctuate into quark anti-quark pairs and scatter from a target nucleus, emerging as vector mesons. These coherent interactions are identifiable by final states consisting of the two nuclei and a vector meson with a small transverse momentum. The emitters and targets can switch roles, and the two possibilities are indistinguishable, so interference may occur. Vector mesons are negative parity so the amplitudes have opposite signs. When the meson transverse wavelength is larger than the impact parameter, the interference is large and destructive. The short-lived vector mesons decay before amplitudes from the two sources can overlap, and so cannot interfere directly. However, the decay products are emitted in an entangled state, and the interference depends on observing the complete final state. The non-local wave function is an example of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox.

  10. Heavy ion irradiation of crystalline water ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dartois, E; Boduch, P; Brunetto, R; Chabot, M; Domaracka, A; Ding, J J; Kamalou, O; Lv, X Y; Rothard, H; da Silveira, E F; Thomas, J C

    2015-01-01

    Under cosmic irradiation, the interstellar water ice mantles evolve towards a compact amorphous state. Crystalline ice amorphisation was previously monitored mainly in the keV to hundreds of keV ion energies. We experimentally investigate heavy ion irradiation amorphisation of crystalline ice, at high energies closer to true cosmic rays, and explore the water-ice sputtering yield. We irradiated thin crystalline ice films with MeV to GeV swift ion beams, produced at the GANIL accelerator. The ice infrared spectral evolution as a function of fluence is monitored with in-situ infrared spectroscopy (induced amorphisation of the initial crystalline state into a compact amorphous phase). The crystalline ice amorphisation cross-section is measured in the high electronic stopping-power range for different temperatures. At large fluence, the ice sputtering is measured on the infrared spectra, and the fitted sputtering-yield dependence, combined with previous measurements, is quadratic over three decades of electronic ...

  11. Commissioning of the EBIS-based heavy ion preinjector at Brookhaven

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Binello, S.; Hoff, L.; Kondo, K.; Lambiase, R.; LoDestro, V.; Mapes, M.; McNerney, A.; Morris, J.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A.I.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Smart, L.; Snydstrup, L.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Schempp, A.; Ratzinger, U.; Kanesue, T.

    2010-09-12

    The status is presented of the commissioning of a new heavy ion preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This preinjector uses an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), and an RFQ and IH Linac, both operating at 100.625 MHz, to produce 2 MeV/u ions of any species for use, after further acceleration, at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Among the increased capabilities provided by this preinjector are the ability to produce ions of any species, and the ability to switch between multiple species in 1 second, to simultaneously meet the needs of both science programs. For initial setup, helium beam from EBIS was injected and circulated in the Booster synchrotron. Following this, accelerated Au{sup 32+} and Fe{sup 20+} beams were transported to the Booster injection point, fulfilling DOE requirements for project completion.

  12. Microscopic Models of Heavy Ion Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capella, A

    2003-01-01

    An introduction to dynamical microscopic models of hadronic and nuclear interactions is presented. Special emphasis is put in the relation between multiparticle production and total cross-section contributions. In heavy ion collisions, some observables, considered as signals of the production of a Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), are studied. It is shown that they can only be described if final state interactions are introduced. It is argued that the cross-sections required are too small to drive the system to thermal equilibrium within the duration time of the final state interaction.

  13. Jets in heavy ion collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Kapitan

    2009-11-25

    Full jet reconstruction in heavy-ion collisions enables a complete study of the modification of jet structure due to energy loss in hot and dense QCD matter, but is challenging due to the high multiplicity environment. The STAR and PHENIX collaborations at RHIC have recently presented measurements of fully reconstructed jets from p+p, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_\\mathrm{NN}} = 200 \\mathrm{GeV}$. We review the first results on inclusive jet spectra, di-jets and fragmentation functions and discuss their implications on understanding of jet quenching.

  14. Induction linacs for heavy ion fusion research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1984-05-01

    The new features of employing an induction linac as a driver for inertial fusion involve (1) transport of high-current low-emittance heavy ion beams, (2) multiple independently-focussed beams threading the same accelerator structure, and (3) synthesis of voltage waveforms to accomplish beam current amplification. A research program is underway at LBL to develop accelerators that test all these features with the final goal of producing an ion beam capable of heating matter to approx. 70 eV. This paper presents a discussion of some properties of induction linacs and how they may be used for HIF research. Physics designs of the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) and the Multiple Beam Experiment (MBE) accelerators are presented along with initial concepts of the MBE induction units.

  15. Hadronic physics in peripheral heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Natale

    2002-01-22

    We discuss the production of hadronic resonances in very peripheral heavy ion collisions, where the ions collide with impact parameter larger than twice the nuclear radius and remain intact after the collision. We compare the resonance production through two-photon and double Pomeron exchange, showing that when we impose the condition for a peripheral interaction the $\\gamma \\gamma$ process dominates over the Pomeron interaction, due to the short range propagation of this last one. We also discuss the observation of light resonances through the subprocess $\\gamma \\gamma \\to R \\to \\gamma \\gamma $, which is a clean signal for glueball candidates as well as one way to check the existence of a possible scalar $\\sigma$ meson.

  16. Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components at LBNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of...

  17. Can CP violation be observed in heavy-ion collisions?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khriplovich, I. B. Rudenko, A. S.

    2012-09-15

    We demonstrate that, at least at present, there is no convincing way to detect CP violation in heavy-ion collisions.

  18. Accelerating Solutions of Perfect Fluid Hydrodynamics for Initial Energy Density and Life-Time Measurements in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Csorgo; M. I. Nagy; M. Csanad

    2007-04-17

    A new class of accelerating, exact, explicit and simple solutions of relativistic hydrodynamics is presented. Since these new solutions yield a finite rapidity distribution, they lead to an advanced estimate of the initial energy density and life-time of high energy heavy ion reactions. Accelerating solutions are also given for spherical expansions in arbitrary number of spatial dimensions.

  19. Parton energy loss in heavy-ion collisions via direct-photon and charged-particle azimuthal correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balewski, Jan T.

    Charged-particle spectra associated with direct photon (?dir) and pi0 are measured in p+p and Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energy [sqrt]sNN=200 GeV with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. A ...

  20. Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Abreu; S. V. Akkelin; J. Alam; J. L. Albacete; A. Andronic; D. Antonov; F. Arleo; N. Armesto; I. C. Arsene; G. G. Barnafoldi; J. Barrette; B. Bauchle; F. Becattini; B. Betz; M. Bleicher; M. Bluhm; D. Boer; F. W. Bopp; P. Braun-Munzinger; L. Bravina; W. Busza; M. Cacciari; A. Capella; J. Casalderrey-Solana; R. Chatterjee; L. -W. Chen; J. Cleymans; B. A. Cole; Z. Conesa Del Valle; L. P. Csernai; L. Cunqueiro; A. Dainese; J. Dias de Deus H. -T. Ding; M. Djordjevic; H. Drescher; I. M. Dremin A. Dumitru; A. El; R. Engel; D. d'Enterria; K. J. Eskola; G. Fai; E. G. Ferreiro; R. J. Fries; E. Frodermann; H. Fujii; C. Gale; F. Gelis; V. P. Goncalves; V. Greco; C. Greiner; M. Gyulassy; H. van Hees; U. Heinz; H. Honkanen; W. A. Horowitz; E. Iancu; G. Ingelman; J. Jalilian-Marian; S. Jeon; A. B. Kaidalov; B. Kampfer; Z. -B. Kang; Iu. A. Karpenko; G. Kestin; D. Kharzeev; C. M. Ko; B. Koch; B. Kopeliovich; M. Kozlov; I. Kraus; I. Kuznetsova; S. H. Lee; R. Lednicky; J. Letessier; E. Levin; B. -A. Li; Z. -W. Lin; H. Liu; W. Liu; C. Loizides; I. P. Lokhtin; M. V. T. Machado; L. V. Malinina; A. M. Managadze; M. L. Mangano; M. Mannarelli; C. Manuel; G. Martinez; J. G. Milhano; A. Mocsy; D. Molnar; M. Nardi; J. K. Nayak; H. Niemi; H. Oeschler; J. -Y. Ollitrault; G. Paic; C. Pajares; V. S. Pantuev; G. Papp; D. Peressounko; P. Petreczky; S. V. Petrushanko; F. Piccinini; T. Pierog; H. J. Pirner; S. Porteboeuf; I. Potashnikova; G. Y. Qin; J. -W. Qiu; J. Rafelski; K. Rajagopal; J. Ranft; R. Rapp; S. S. Rasanen; J. Rathsman; P. Rau; K. Redlich; T. Renk; A. H. Rezaeian; D. Rischke; S. Roesler; J. Ruppert; P. V. Ruuskanen; C. A. Salgado; S. Sapeta; I. Sarcevic; S. Sarkar; L. I. Sarycheva; I. Schmidt; A. I. Shoshi; B. Sinha; Yu. M. Sinyukov; A. M. Snigirev; D. K. Srivastava; J. Stachel; A. Stasto; H. Stocker; C. Yu. Teplov; R. L. Thews; G. Torrieri; V. Topor Pop; D. N. Triantafyllopoulos; K. L. Tuchin; S. Turbide; K. Tywoniuk; A. Utermann; R. Venugopalan; I. Vitev; R. Vogt; E. Wang; X. N. Wang; K. Werner; E. Wessels; S. Wheaton; S. Wicks; U. A. Wiedemann; G. Wolschin; B. -W. Xiao; Z. Xu; S. Yasui; E. Zabrodin; K. Zapp; B. Zhang; B. -W. Zhang; H. Zhang; D. Zhou

    2007-11-06

    This writeup is a compilation of the predictions for the forthcoming Heavy Ion Program at the Large Hadron Collider, as presented at the CERN Theory Institute 'Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions', held from May 14th to June 10th 2007.

  1. The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    Final Focus Solenoid and Target Chamber ­ Cathodic Arc Plasma Source (CAPS) Developed by André AndersThe Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory Plasma Sources for Drivers and NDCX-II 19 P. Gilson Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory #12;The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National

  2. Collective Phenomena in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Petrovici; A. Pop

    2009-04-23

    A review of the main results of detailed flow analysis in highly central and semi-central heavy ion collisions at SIS energies is presented in the first part of this paper. The influence of the mass of the colliding nuclei and centrality on the collective expansion and the information on the equation of state of compressed and hot baryonic matter is discussed. The second part is dedicated to a similar type of analysis, based on the behaviour of the average transverse momentum as a function of mass of different hadrons, at the other extreme of energy range, where free baryonic fireballs are produced. Information on the partonic and hadronic expansion, temperature and degree of thermal equilibrium in p+p and Au+Au central collisions at 200 A.GeV is presented.

  3. Resonance of relativistic electrons with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Denton, R. E.; Jordanova, V. K.; Bortnik, J.

    2015-06-29

    Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion cyclotron EMIC waves if the total density is large. We show that, for a particular EMIC mode, this dependence is weak due to the dependence of the wave frequency and wave vector on the density. A significant increase in relativistic electron minimum resonant energy might occur for the H band EMIC mode only for small density, but no changes in parameters significantly decrease the minimum resonant energy from a nominal value. The minimum resonant energy depends most strongly on the thermal velocity associated with the field line motionmore »of the hot ring current protons that drive the instability. High density due to a plasmasphere or plasmaspheric plume could possibly lead to lower minimum resonance energy by causing the He band EMIC mode to be dominant. We demonstrate these points using parameters from a ring current simulation.« less

  4. Multistage ion acceleration in finite overdense target with a relativistic laser pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinha, Ujjwal [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-07-15

    “Multistage ion acceleration” has been analytically and computationally studied in the relativistic regime. For non-relativistic piston velocities, this phenomenon has been described before. But, as we go to relativistic piston velocities, the non-relativistic results hold no more. We have presented a fully relativistic calculation for second stage ion velocities and energies. To verify our calculations, we performed a fully relativistic 1D3V particle in cell simulations using the code LPIC++. It has been found that the relativistic calculations matched very well with the simulation results. Also, it has been seen that at relativistic piston velocities, the non-relativistic results differed by a significant margin. The feasibility of this process has been further established by three dimensional particle in cell simulations.

  5. Initial state in relativistic nuclear collisions and Color Glass Condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Gelis

    2014-12-01

    In this talk, I discuss recent works related to the pre-hydrodynamical stages of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  6. Systematic studies of the centrality and root S(NN) dependence of the dE(T)/d eta and dN(ch)/d eta in heavy ion collisions at midrapidity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, SS; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, NN; Akiba, Y.; Alexander, J.; Amirikas, R.; Aphecetche, L.; Aronson, SH; Averbeck, R.; Awes, TC; Azmoun, R.; Babintsev, V.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, KN; Barnes, PD; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhagavatula, S.; Boissevain, JG; Borel, H.; Borenstein, S.; Brooks, ML; Brown, DS; Bruner, N.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, JM; Butsyk, S.; Camard, X.; Chai, JS; Chand, P.; Chang, WC; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, CY; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, IJ; Choi, J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Chujo, T.; Cianciolo, V.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, BA; Constantin, P.; d'Enterria, DG; David, G.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, EJ; Dietzsch, O.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; du Rietz, R.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Efremenko, YV; El Chenawi, K.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Ewell, L.; Fields, DE; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, SL; Fox, BD; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, JE; Franz, A.; Frawley, AD; Fung, SY; Garpman, S.; Ghosh, TK; Glenn, A.; Gogiberidze, G.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; de Cassagnac, RG; Grau, N.; Greene, SV; Perdekamp, MG; Guryn, W.; Gustafsson, HA; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, JS; Hamagaki, H.; Hansen, AG; Hartouni, EP; Harvey, M.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, TK; Heuser, JM; Hibino, M.; Hill, JC; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoover, A.; Ichihara, T.; Ikonnikov, VV; Imai, K.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Jacak, BV; Jang, WY; Jeong, Y.; Jia, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, BM; Johnson, SC; Joo, KS; Jouan, D.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kang, JH; Kapoor, SS; Katou, K.; Kelly, S.; Khachaturov, B.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, DH; Kim, DJ; Kim, DW; Kim, E.; Kim, GB; Kim, HJ; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Kiyoyama, K.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kobayashi, H.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Koehler, D.; Kohama, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Kroon, PJ; Kuberg, CH; Kurita, K.; Kuroki, Y.; Kweon, MJ; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, GS; Lacey, R.; Ladygin, V.; Lajoie, JG; Lebedev, A.; Leckey, S.; Lee, DM; Lee, S.; Leitch, MJ; Li, XH; Lim, H.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, MX; Liu, Y.; Maguire, CF; Makdisi, YI; Malakhov, A.; Manko, VI; Mao, Y.; Martinez, G.; Marx, MD; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; Matsumoto, T.; McGaughey, PL; Melnikov, E.; Mendenhall, M.; Messer, F.; Miake, Y.; Milan, J.; Miller, TE; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, RE; Mishra, GC; Mitchell, JT; Mohanty, AK; Morrison, DP; Moss, JM; Muhlbacher, F.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Muniruzzaman, M.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, JL; Nakamura, T.; Nandi, BK; Nara, M.; Newby, J.; Nilsson, P.; Nyanin, AS; Nystrand, J.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, CA; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, ID; Okada, K.; Ono, M.; Onuchin, V.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pal, D.; Palounek, APT; Pantuev, VS; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J.; Parmar, A.; Pate, SF; Peitzmann, T.; Peng, JC; Peresedov, V.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, RP; Plasil, F.; Purschke, ML; Purwar, AK; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, KF; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Roche, G.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosnet, P.; Ryu, SS; Sadler, ME; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, M.; Sakai, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanfratello, L.; Santo, R.; Sato, HD; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schutz, Y.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Shaw, MR; Shea, TK; Shibata, TA; Shigaki, K.; Shiina, T.; Silva, CL; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, KS; Singh, CP; Singh, V.; Sivertz, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, RA; Sondheim, WE; Sorensen, SP; Sourikova, IV; Staley, F.; Stankus, PW; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, SP; Sugitate, T.; Sullivan, J. P.; Takagui, EM; Taketani, A.; Tamai, M.; Tanaka, KH; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, MJ; Tarjan, P.; Tepe, JD; Thomas, TL; Tojo, J.; Torii, H.; Towell, RS; Tserruya, I.; Tsuruoka, H.; Tuli, SK; Tydesjo, H.; Tyurin, N.; van Hecke, HW; Velkovska, J.; Velkovsky, M.; Villatte, L.; Vinogradov, AA; Volkov, MA; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, XR; Watanabe, Y.; White, SN; Wohn, FK; Woody, CL; Xie, W.; Yang, Y.; Yanovich, A.; Yokkaichi, S.; Young, GR; Yushmanov, IE; Zajc, WA; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zhou, SJ; Zolin, L.; PHENIX Collaboration.

    2005-01-01

    Within a relativistic transport model for heavy-ion collisions, we show that the recently observed characteristic change from out-of-plane to in-plane elliptic flow of protons in midcentral Au+Au collisions as the incident ...

  7. Inertially confined fusion using heavy ion drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Bangerter, R.O.; Bock, R.; Hogan, W.J.; Lindl, J.D.

    1991-10-01

    The various technical issues of HIF will be briefly reviewed in this paper. It will be seen that there are numerous areas in common in all the approaches to HIF. In the recent International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, the attendees met in specialized workshop sessions to consider the needs for research in each area. Each of the workshop groups considered the key questions of this report: (1) Is this an appropriate time for international collaboration in HIF? (2) Which problems are most appropriate for such collaboration? (3) Can the sharing of target design information be set aside until other driver and systems issues are better resolved, by which time it might be supposed that there could be a relaxation of classification of target issues? (4) What form(s) of collaboration are most appropriate, e.g., bilateral or multilateral? (5) Can international collaboration be sensibly attempted without significant increases in funding for HIF? The authors of this report share the conviction that collaboration on a broad scale is mandatory for HIF to have the resources, both financial and personnel, to progress to a demonstration experiment. Ultimately it may be possible for a single driver with the energy, power, focusibility, and pulse shape to satisfy the needs of the international community for target physics research. Such a facility could service multiple experimental chambers with a variety of beam geometries and target concepts.

  8. Inertially confined fusion using heavy ion drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B. ); Bangerter, R.O. ); Bock, R. ); Hogan, W.J.; Lindl, J.D. )

    1991-10-01

    The various technical issues of HIF will be briefly reviewed in this paper. It will be seen that there are numerous areas in common in all the approaches to HIF. In the recent International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, the attendees met in specialized workshop sessions to consider the needs for research in each area. Each of the workshop groups considered the key questions of this report: (1) Is this an appropriate time for international collaboration in HIF (2) Which problems are most appropriate for such collaboration (3) Can the sharing of target design information be set aside until other driver and systems issues are better resolved, by which time it might be supposed that there could be a relaxation of classification of target issues (4) What form(s) of collaboration are most appropriate, e.g., bilateral or multilateral (5) Can international collaboration be sensibly attempted without significant increases in funding for HIF The authors of this report share the conviction that collaboration on a broad scale is mandatory for HIF to have the resources, both financial and personnel, to progress to a demonstration experiment. Ultimately it may be possible for a single driver with the energy, power, focusibility, and pulse shape to satisfy the needs of the international community for target physics research. Such a facility could service multiple experimental chambers with a variety of beam geometries and target concepts.

  9. Study of formation of stable fragments in central heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supriya Goyal; Rajeev K. Puri

    2011-02-19

    We study the stability of fragments using microscopic binding energy criteria in heavy-ion collisions.

  10. Energy loss characteristics of heavy ions in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon, hydrocarbon gases and tradescantia tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennis, J A

    1971-01-01

    Energy loss characteristics of heavy ions in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon, hydrocarbon gases and tradescantia tissue

  11. Physics of Ultra-Relativistic Nuclear Collisions with Heavy Beams at LHC Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Braun-Munzinger

    1999-08-18

    We discuss current plans for experiments with ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions with heavy beams at LHC energy ($\\sqrt{s} = 5.5$ TeV/nucleon pair). Emphasis will be placed on processes which are unique to the LHC program. They include event-by-event interferometry, complete spectroscopy of the $\\Upsilon$ resonances, and open charm and open beauty measurements.

  12. Direct photon emission in Heavy Ion Collisions from Microscopic Transport Theory and Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjoern Baeuchle; Marcus Bleicher

    2010-03-29

    Direct photon emission in heavy-ion collisions is calculated within a relativistic micro+macro hybrid model and compared to the microscopic transport model UrQMD. In the hybrid approach, the high-density part of the collision is calculated by an ideal 3+1-dimensional hydrodynamic calculation, while the early (pre-equilibrium-) and late (rescattering-) phase are calculated with the transport model. Different scenarios of the transition from the macroscopic description to the transport model description and their effects are studied. The calculations are compared to measurements by the WA98-collaboration and predictions for the future CBM-experiment are made.

  13. Constraining the equation of state of superhadronic matter from heavy-ion collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pratt, Scott; Sorensen, Paul; Sangaline, Evan; Wang, Hui

    2015-05-19

    The equation of state of QCD matter for temperatures near and above the quark-hadron transition (~165 MeV) is inferred within a Bayesian framework through the comparison of data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and from the Large Hadron Collider to theoretical models. State-of-the-art statistical techniques are applied to simultaneously analyze multiple classes of observables while varying 14 independent model parameters. Thus, the resulting posterior distribution over possible equations of state is consistent with results from lattice gauge theory.

  14. K+ production in baryon-baryon and heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, GQ; Ko, Che Ming; Chung, WS.

    1998-01-01

    Kaon production cross sections in nucleon-nucleon, nucleon-Delta, and Delta-Delta interactions are studied in a boson exchange model. For the latter two interactions, the exchanged pion can be on-mass shell...only contributions due to a virtual pion an included via the Peierls method by taking into account the finite Delta width. With these cross sections and also those for pion-baryon interactions, subthreshold kaon production from heavy-ion collisions is studied in the relativistic transport model....

  15. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorf, M. A.; Lund, S. M.; Perkins, L. J.; Terry, M. R.; Logan, B. G.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.; Reginato, L. L.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Koniges, A. E.

    2011-03-31

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  16. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND HEAVY-ION FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokstad, R.G.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear Structure and Heavy-Ton Fusion* A series of lecturesthe cross section for fusion in the experiments consideredEffects g in III. Subharrier Fusion Cross Sections for Light

  17. Inferring Magnetospheric Heavy Ion Density using EMIC Waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.; Kim, Hyomin; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2014-05-01

    We present a method to infer heavy ion concentration ratios from EMIC wave observations that result from ionion hybrid (IIH) resonance. A key feature of the ion-ion hybrid resonance is the concentration of wave energy in a field-aligned resonant mode that exhibits linear polarization. This mode converted wave is localized at the location where the frequency of a compressional wave driver matches the IIH resonance condition, which depends sensitively on the heavy ion concentration. This dependence makes it possible to estimate the heavy ion concentration ratio. In this letter, we evaluate the absorption coefficients at the IIH resonance at Earth's geosynchronous orbit for variable concentrations of He+ and field-aligned wave numbers using a dipole magnetic field. Although wave absorption occurs for a wide range of heavy ion concentrations, it only occurs for a limited range of field-aligned wave numbers such that the IIH resonance frequency is close to, but not exactly the same as the crossover frequency. Using the wave absorption and observed EMIC waves from GOES-12 satellite, we demonstrate how this technique can be used to estimate that the He+ concentration is around 4% near L = 6.6.

  18. RECENT PROGRESS IN HEAVY ION SOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    of hydrogen into thermonuclear fusion reactors. A summary ofFusion Plasma Sources Other sources of high charge state ions include the dense plasma in magnetic confinement thermonuclear

  19. RHIC performance for FY2011 Au+Au heavy ion run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, G.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.J.; Gassner, D.M.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.F.; Jamilkowski, J.P.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Laster, J.S.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Mapes, M.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.J.; Minty, M.G.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Naylor, C.; Nemesure, S.; Polizzo, S.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; VanKuik, B.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-09-04

    Following the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 (Run-10) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Au+Au run, RHIC experiment upgrades sought to improve detector capabilities. In turn, accelerator improvements were made to improve the luminosity available to the experiments for this run (Run-11). These improvements included: a redesign of the stochastic cooling systems for improved reliability; a relocation of 'common' RF cavities to alleviate intensity limits due to beam loading; and an improved usage of feedback systems to control orbit, tune and coupling during energy ramps as well as while colliding at top energy. We present an overview of changes to the Collider and review the performance of the collider with respect to instantaneous and integrated luminosity goals. At the conclusion of the FY 2011 polarized proton run, preparations for heavy ion run proceeded on April 18, with Au+Au collisions continuing through June 28. Our standard operations at 100 GeV/nucleon beam energy was bracketed by two shorter periods of collisions at lower energies (9.8 and 13.5 GeV/nucleon), continuing a previously established program of low and medium energy runs. Table 1 summarizes our history of heavy ion operations at RHIC.

  20. The Shape and Flow of Heavy Ion Collisions (490th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenke, Bjoern

    2014-12-18

    The sun can’t do it, but colossal machines like the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven Lab and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Europe sure can. Quarks and gluons make up protons and neutrons found in the nucleus of every atom in the universe. At heavy ion colliders like RHIC and the LHC, scientists can create matter more than 100,000 times hotter than the center of the sun—so hot that protons and neutrons melt into a plasma of quarks and gluons. The particle collisions and emerging quark-gluon plasma hold keys to understanding how these fundamental particles interact with each other, which helps explain how everything is held together—from atomic nuclei to human beings to the biggest stars—how all matter has mass, and what the universe looked like microseconds after the Big Bang. Dr. Schenke discusses theory that details the shape and structure of heavy ion collisions. He will also explain how this theory and data from experiments at RHIC and the LHC are being used to determine properties of the quark-gluon plasma.

  1. THE DEVELOPMENT OF HEAVY-ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIALLY CONFINED FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.b.

    2010-01-01

    29 The Fission-fusion Hybrid - iii - General DiscussionInteraction in Heavy Ion Fusion BIBLIOGRAPHY HEAVY IONReactor Designs . . . 27 Pure Fusion Power Reactor Tritium

  2. Heavy metal ions are potent inhibitors of protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Sandeep K. [Biochemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Departement de Biologie Moleculaire Vegetale, Universite de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Goloubinoff, Pierre [Departement de Biologie Moleculaire Vegetale, Universite de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Christen, Philipp [Biochemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: christen@bioc.uzh.ch

    2008-07-25

    Environmental and occupational exposure to heavy metals such as cadmium, mercury and lead results in severe health hazards including prenatal and developmental defects. The deleterious effects of heavy metal ions have hitherto been attributed to their interactions with specific, particularly susceptible native proteins. Here, we report an as yet undescribed mode of heavy metal toxicity. Cd{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} proved to inhibit very efficiently the spontaneous refolding of chemically denatured proteins by forming high-affinity multidentate complexes with thiol and other functional groups (IC{sub 50} in the nanomolar range). With similar efficacy, the heavy metal ions inhibited the chaperone-assisted refolding of chemically denatured and heat-denatured proteins. Thus, the toxic effects of heavy metal ions may result as well from their interaction with the more readily accessible functional groups of proteins in nascent and other non-native form. The toxic scope of heavy metals seems to be substantially larger than assumed so far.

  3. Preliminary result of rapid solenoid for controlling heavy-ion beam parameters of laser ion source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Okamura, M.; Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Kanesue, T.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.

    2015-03-13

    To realize a heavy ion inertial fusion driver, we have studied a possibility of laser ion source (LIS). A LIS can provide high current high brightness heavy ion beams, however it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters. To overcome the issue, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The rapid ramping magnetic field could enhance limited time slice of the current and simultaneously the beam emittance changed accordingly. This approach may also useful to realize an ion source for HIF power plant.

  4. Direct Photons in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus Reygers

    2006-11-06

    A brief overview of direct-photon measurements in ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions is given. The results for Pb+Pb collisions at sqrt{s_NN} = 17.3 GeV and for Au+Au collisions at sqrt{s_NN} = 200 GeV are compared to estimates of the direct-photon yield from hard scattering. Both results leave room for a significant thermal photon component. A description purely based on hard scattering processes, however, is not ruled out so far.

  5. US Heavy Ion Beam Research for Energy Density Physics Applications and Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01

    heavy ion inertial fusion energy. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Thisheavy ion inertial fusion energy. These include: neutralizedto drift axially). For fusion energy applications, either

  6. Heavy-Ion-Fusion-Science: Summary of U.S. Progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    IAEA-06 Topic IF Heavy-Ion-Fusion-Science: Summary of U.S.W.L. Waldron, U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual NationalExperiment at PPPL. [1] Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory

  7. A Cone Jet-Finding Algorithm for Heavy-Ion Collisions at LHC Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    G 30 (2004) S1155 A Cone Jet-Finding Algorithm for Heavy-IonA Cone Jet-Finding Algorithm for Heavy-Ion Collisions at LHCSwitzerland Abstract. Standard jet ?nding techniques used in

  8. Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion Summary Report of the Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seidl, P.A.

    2013-01-01

    Molten-Salt Inertial Fusion Energy Power Plant Design— FinalTargets for Heavy Ion Fusion Energy," http:// ahif.lbl.gov/to develop heavy-ion fusion energy. 3. Economy of scale

  9. Photon and dilepton production in high energy heavy ion collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sakaguchi, Takao

    2015-05-07

    The recent results on direct photons and dileptons in high energy heavy ion collisions, obtained particularly at RHIC and LHC are reviewed. The results are new not only in terms of the probes, but also in terms of the precision. We shall discuss the physics learned from the results.

  10. Chemical Equilibrium in Heavy Ion Collisions: Rapidity Dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Becattini; J. Cleymans

    2007-01-05

    Particle yields in heavy ion collisions show an overwhelming evidence for chemical or relative chemical equilibrium at all beam energies. The rapidity dependence of the thermal parameters $T$ and $\\mu_B$ can now be determined over a wide range of rapidities and show a systematic behavior towards an increase in $\\mu_B$ away from mid-rapidity.

  11. Office of Science HEDP and Heavy Ion Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy: Visions of the Future, Dec 10-11, 2013 Session on The DOE Program in High Energy Density Physics) a renewed Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program · Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) enables approach and outlines elements of a balanced IFE program. · A renewed HIF / IFE program should include

  12. Direct photons ~basis for characterizing heavy ion collisions~

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takao Sakaguchi

    2008-07-30

    After years of experimental and theoretical efforts, direct photons become a strong and reliable tool to establish the basic characteristics of a hot and dense matter produced in heavy ion collisions. The recent direct photon measurements are reviewed and a future prospect is given.

  13. Absence of anomalous stopping in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Capella

    2002-05-21

    We show that the baryon stopping observed in heavy ion collisions both at CERN-SPS and at RHIC can be derived from the one observed in proton-proton collisions. No increase in the size of the baryon junction component is required between small size $(pp)$ and large size (AA) systems.

  14. Photoproduction in Ultra-Peripheral Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joakim Nystrand

    2008-02-13

    The strong electromagnetic fields present in ultra-peripheral collisions of heavy-ions offer a possibility to study two-photon and photonuclear collisions complementary to similar studies with lepton beams but over an increased photon energy range. This presentation will give an overview of photoproduction at hadron colliders.

  15. Heavy ion collisions and the pre-equilibrium exciton model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betak, E.

    2012-10-20

    We present a feasible way to apply the pre-equilibrium exciton model in its masterequation formulation to heavy-ion induced reactions including spin variables. Emission of nucleons, {gamma}'s and also light clusters is included in our model.

  16. The B*Bpi coupling using relativistic heavy quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Flynn; P. Fritzsch; T. Kawanai; C. Lehner; B. Samways; C. T. Sachrajda; R. S. Van de Water; O. Witzel; for the RBC/UKQCD Collaboration

    2015-06-21

    We report on a calculation of the B*Bpi coupling in lattice QCD. The strong matrix element for a B* to Bpi transition is directly related to the leading order low-energy constant in heavy meson chiral perturbation theory (HMChPT) for B mesons. We carry out our calculation directly at the b-quark mass using a non-perturbatively tuned clover action that controls discretization effects of order pa and (ma)^n for all n. Our analysis is performed on RBC/UKQCD gauge configurations using domain-wall fermions and the Iwasaki gauge action at two lattice spacings of ainverse = 1.729(25) GeV, ainverse = 2.281(28) GeV, and unitary pion masses down to 290 MeV. We achieve good statistical precision and control all systematic uncertainties, giving a final result for the HMChPT coupling g_b = 0.56(3)stat(7)sys in the continuum and at the physical light-quark masses. This is the first calculation performed directly at the physical b-quark mass and lies in the region one would expect from carrying out an interpolation between previous results at the charm mass and at the static point.

  17. The B*Bpi coupling using relativistic heavy quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, J M; Kawanai, T; Lehner, C; Samways, B; Sachrajda, C T; Van de Water, R S; Witzel, O

    2015-01-01

    We report on a calculation of the B*Bpi coupling in lattice QCD. The strong matrix element for a B* to Bpi transition is directly related to the leading order low-energy constant in heavy meson chiral perturbation theory (HMChPT) for B mesons. We carry out our calculation directly at the b-quark mass using a non-perturbatively tuned clover action that controls discretization effects of order pa and (ma)^n for all n. Our analysis is performed on RBC/UKQCD gauge configurations using domain-wall fermions and the Iwasaki gauge action at two lattice spacings of ainverse = 1.729(25) GeV, ainverse = 2.281(28) GeV, and unitary pion masses down to 290 MeV. We achieve good statistical precision and control all systematic uncertainties, giving a final result for the HMChPT coupling g_b = 0.56(3)stat(7)sys in the continuum and at the physical light-quark masses. This is the first calculation performed directly at the physical b-quark mass and lies in the region one would expect from carrying out an interpolation between ...

  18. The $B^*B?$ coupling with relativistic heavy quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Flynn; P. Fritzsch; T. Kawanai; C. Lehner; C. T. Sachrajda; B. Samways; R. S. Van de Water; O. Witzel

    2013-11-10

    We report on a calculation of the $B^*B\\pi$ coupling in lattice QCD. The strong matrix element $\\langle B \\pi | B^*\\rangle$ is directly related to the leading order low-energy constant in heavy meson chiral perturbation theory (HM$\\chi$PT) for $B$-mesons. We carry out our calculation directly at the $b$-quark mass using a non-perturbatively tuned clover action that controls discretisation effects of order $|\\vec{p}a|$ and $(ma)^n$ for all $n$. Our analysis is performed on RBC/UKQCD gauge configurations using domain wall fermions and the Iwasaki gauge action at two lattice spacings of $a^{-1}=1.73(3)$ GeV, $a^{-1}=2.28(3)$ GeV, and unitary pion masses down to 290 MeV. We achieve good statistical precision and control all systematic uncertainties, giving a final result for the HM$\\chi$PT coupling $g_b = 0.569(48)_{stat}(59)_{sys}$ in the continuum and at the physical light-quark masses. This is the first calculation performed directly at the physical $b$-quark mass and lies in the region one would expect from carrying out an interpolation between previous results at the charm mass and at the static point.

  19. Overview of heavy-ion fusion focus on computer simulation aspect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vay, Jean-Luc

    2002-01-01

    Thermonuclear burn spreads rapidly through the compressed fuel, yielding many times the imput energy Blowoff Radiation The Heavy Ion Fusion

  20. Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Energy: Summaries of Program Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Kaganovich, I; Seidl, P A; Briggs, R J; Faltens, A; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Logan, B G

    2011-02-28

    The goal of the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program is to apply high-current accelerator technology to IFE power production. Ion beams of mass {approx}100 amu and kinetic energy {>=} 1 GeV provide efficient energy coupling into matter, and HIF enjoys R&D-supported favorable attributes of: (1) the driver, projected to be robust and efficient; see 'Heavy Ion Accelerator Drivers.'; (2) the targets, which span a continuum from full direct to full indirect drive (and perhaps fast ignition), and have metal exteriors that enable injection at {approx}10 Hz; see 'IFE Target Designs'; (3) the near-classical ion energy deposition in the targets; see 'Beam-Plasma Interactions'; (4) the magnetic final lens, robust against damage; see 'Final Optics-Heavy Ion Beams'; and (5) the fusion chamber, which may use neutronically-thick liquids; see 'Liquid-Wall Chambers.' Most studies of HIF power plants have assumed indirect drive and thick liquid wall protection, but other options are possible.

  1. Heavy-ion performance of the LHC and future colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)696614; Jowett, John M.

    2015-10-09

    In 2008 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments started operation at the European Centre of Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva with the main aim of finding or excluding the Higgs boson. Only four years later, on the 4th of July 2012, the discovery of a Higgs-like particle was proven and first published by the two main experiments ATLAS and CMS. Even though proton–proton collisions are the main operation mode of the LHC, it also acts as an heavy-ion collider. Here, the term “heavy-ion collisions” refers to the collision between fully stripped nuclei. While the major hardware system of the LHC is compatible with heavy-ion operation, the beam dynamics and performance limits of ion beams are quite different from those of protons. Because of the higher mass and charge of the ions, beam dynamic effects like intra-beam scattering and radiation damping are stronger. Also the electromagnetic cross-sections in the collisions are larger, leading to significantly faster intensity decay and thus shorter l...

  2. 2009 SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-InspiredAtmosphericdevicesPPONe β+-Decay EvaluatedThe6search for super heavy

  3. Antiflow of kaons in relativistic heavy ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pal, S.; Ko, Che Ming; Lin, ZW; Zhang, B.

    2000-01-01

    processes, the kaon production cross sections in- volving resonances are assumed to be the same as those for Antiflow of kaons in relativisti Subrata Pal,1 C. M. Ko,1 Ziwe 1Cyclotron Institute and Physics Department, Texas 2Department of Chemistry... collisions we investigate in this Rapid Com- munication if the appreciable kaon antiflow can be explained by the repulsive kaon potential in dense nuclear matter. We ?2000 The American Physical Society1 RAPID COMMUNICATIONS SUBRATA PAL, C. M. KO, ZIWEI...

  4. Multiphase transport model for relativistic heavy ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, ZW; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Zhang, B.; Pal, S.

    2005-01-01

    &M University, College Station, Texas 77843, USA Bao-An Li and Bin Zhang Department of Chemistry and Physics, Arkansas State University, State University, Arkansas 72467, USA Subrata Pal Department of Physics, Michigan State University, East Lansing...-2813/2005/72(6)/064901(29)/$23.00 064901-1 2005 The American Physical Society LIN, KO, LI, ZHANG, AND PAL PHYSICAL REVIEW C 72, 064901 (2005) strings and minijets dominate the initial energy production and effects from final-state interactions are important. For the initial conditions...

  5. Isospin fluctuations in QCD and relativistic heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prakash, M.; Rapp, Ralf; Wambach, J.; Zahed, I.

    2002-01-01

    was accomplished by varying model particle spacing, sub-particle scale (SPS) turbulence inclusion in the conservation of momentum equation, and kernel weighting function for two test cases. The model particle spacing sets the initial distance between the moving...

  6. Hydro-kinetic approach to relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akkelin, S V; Karpenko, Iu A; Sinyukov, Yu M

    2008-01-01

    We develop a combined hydro-kinetic approach which incorporates hydrodynamical expansion of the systems formed in \\textit{A}+\\textit{A} collisions and their dynamical decoupling described by escape probabilities. The method corresponds to a generalized relaxation time ($\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$) approximation for Boltzmann equation applied to inhomogeneous expanding systems; at small $\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$ it also allows one to catch the viscous effects in hadronic component - hadron-resonance gas. We demonstrate how the approximation of sudden freeze-out can be obtained within this dynamical picture of continuous emission and find that hypersurfaces, corresponding to sharp freeze-out limit, are momentum dependent. The pion $m_{T}$ spectra are computed in the developed hydro-kinetic model, and compared with those obtained from ideal hydrodynamics with the Cooper-Frye isothermal prescription. Our results indicate that there does not exist a universal freeze-out temperature for pions with different momenta, and support ...

  7. Kaon differential flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ba; Zhang, B.; Sustich, AT; Ko, Che Ming.

    1999-01-01

    Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). We find that in the absence of kaon potential the kaon differential flow is positive and increases with transverse momentum as that of nucleons. The repulsive kaon potential...

  8. Hydrodynamics and fluctuations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : centrality dependence Data > hydro Small discrepancy between STAR and PHENIX data Au-Au collision per nucleon is in the details! A small effect: Average value 0.3%, maximum value 3% Should we care? #12;A primer is independent of pT, as predicted by hydro. But... the value is significantly larger than 0.5 #12;More data

  9. Triangularity and dipole asymmetry in relativistic heavy ion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Institute of Physics Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; ASYMMETRY; BROOKHAVEN RHIC; COLLISIONS; CORRELATION...

  10. Pion flow and antiflow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Bao-An; Ko, Che Ming.

    1996-01-01

    needs to be cautious in R24 53BAO-AN LI AND C. M. KO range of uy22.95u<0.35 are included. We note that the pro- jectile rapidity of 3.1 for the Au1Au reaction at pbeam /A510.8 GeV/c is in this rapidity bin. It is clear that the observation of R(pt... to provide new information about the collective flow that is complementary to that ob- tained from the analysis of the average transverse momen- tum in the reaction plane @8#. Figure 4 shows the ratio R(pt) as a function of pt for pions from the central...

  11. COMPLEX FRAGMENT EMISSION IN RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemaire, M.-C.

    2010-01-01

    39;Amsden, Phys. Rev. gig (1978) I293. (28) C.Y. Wong,Gosset et al. , Phys. Rev. gig (1977) 629. L. Anderson, Ph.the high momentum region. For a giG%n fragment, the slope of

  12. Triangularity and dipole asymmetry in relativistic heavy ion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Society Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Free Publicly Accessible Full Text Publisher's Accepted Manuscript...

  13. Elliptic flow of deuterons in relativistic heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Yongseok; Ko, Che Ming.

    2007-01-01

    T ? p0T , which gives a similar result as Eq. (7) if we choose p0T = 0.75 GeV, a = 0.293, b = 0.460 GeV?1, c = ?0.175, ?? = 0.0332 GeV?1, and ? ? = 0.0579 GeV?3. B. Pion spectrum and elliptic flow For the pion pT spectrum, the parametrization used...

  14. Deuteron production and elliptic flow in relativistic heavy ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Yongseok; Lin, Zi-Wei; Ko, Che Ming.

    2009-01-01

    3p1d3p2 d6Np dx31dp31 d6Nn dx32dp32 ? fW (x?1, x?2; p?1, p?2)?(3)( pd ? p1 ? p2) (14) 064902-4 DEUTERON PRODUCTION AND ELLIPTIC FLOW IN . . . PHYSICAL REVIEW C 80, 064902 (2009) 0 5 10 15 20 t (fm/c) 0.02 0.03 0.04 0.05 0.06 0.07 N... [panel (b)]. It is seen that the nucleon number scaling of the proton and 064902-5 YONGSEOK OH, ZI-WEI LIN, AND CHE MING KO PHYSICAL REVIEW C 80, 064902 (2009) 0 0.5 1 1.5 pT /nN (GeV) 0 0.1 0.2 v 2 /n N p (expt) d (PHENIX) d (STAR) 0 0.2 0...

  15. Supersonic Jets in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuqiang Wang

    2006-10-23

    Mach-cone shock waves were proposed to explain the broad and perhaps double-peaked away-side 2-particle jet-correlations at RHIC; however, other mechanisms cannot be ruled out. Three-particle jet-correlation is needed in order to distinguish various physics mechanisms. In this talk the 3-particle jet-correlation measurements are presented and their implications are discussed.

  16. Triangularity and dipole asymmetry in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaon and PionExperimentsConnect Conference:electronExamples

  17. Triangularity and dipole asymmetry in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaon and PionExperimentsConnect

  18. Design and operation of the LBL heavy ion RFQ linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gouch, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    LBL has designed and tested a heavy ion RFQ linac for ions in the mass range of 1 to 40. Designed as part of a preinjector package for synchrotron applications, it is a low duty factor device, operating at 200 MHz with maximum surface fields as high as 28 MV/meter. It is a loop-driven, four vane structure employing several innovative design concepts. These include an exit matcher section, to ensure efficient capture by a following Alvarez linac; advanced mechanical design features, to ensure accurate positioning of the vane pole-tips; and vane coupling rings, to ensure field stabilization and balance. This RFQ has been used on a test bench to accelerate a variety of ions as heavy as silicon, with charge to mass ratios as low as 1/7. Results of the initial operation show that the structure meets all of the design performance criteria, and that it holds promise for a long lifetime of simple and reliable service. This RFQ linac will soon be incorporated into the Bevatron operations program as part of th 200 MHz injector upgrade. A further application of this same RFQ design is in the dedicated Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator presently under study at LBL. Details of the design, construction and testing of the RFQ linac are given.

  19. Measurements of phi meson production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakuma, Tai

    We present results for the measurement of ? meson production via its charged kaon decay channel ??K[superscript +]K[superscript -] in Au+Au collisions at ?(s[subscript NN])=62.4,130, and 200 GeV, and in p+p and d+Au ...

  20. The heavy ion beam diagnostic for the tokamak ISTTOK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, J.A.C.; Malaquias, A.; Praxedes, A.; Toledo, W. van; Varandas, C.A.F. )

    1994-08-01

    In this paper the authors describe the heavy ion beam diagnostic for the tokamak ISTTOK, which has been designed to determine the temporal evolution of the plasma density, poloidal magnetic field and plasma potential profiles. This diagnostic makes use of a new type of high density caesium plasma source, a multiple cell detector and a fast data acquisition system. The authors describe the numerical code for trajectory and beam attenuation simulations, a method for the experimental determination of the poloidal field profile, the ion gun and the detection, control and data acquisition systems. Calibration tests and the first experimental results are presented.

  1. Kaon production in heavy ion reactions at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Fuchs

    2005-09-01

    The article reviews the physics related to kaon and antikaon production in heavy ion reactions at intermediate energies. Chiral dynamics predicts substantial modifications of the kaon properties in a dense nuclear environment. The status of the theoretical predictions as well as experimental evidences for medium effects such as repulsive/attractive mass shifts for $K^+/K^-$ are reviewed. In the vicinity of the thresholds, and even more pronounced below threshold, the production of strangeness is a highly collective process. Starting from elementary reaction channels the phenomenology of $K^+$ and $K^-$ production, i.e. freeze-out densities, time scales etc. as derived from experiment and theoretical transport calculations is presented. Below threshold kaon production shows a high sensitivity on the nuclear compression reached in heavy ion reactions. This allows to put constraints on the nuclear equation-of-state which are finally discussed.

  2. The Nuclear Symmetry Energy in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolter, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution I discuss the nuclear symmetry energy in the regime of hadronic degrees of freedom. The density dependence of the symmetry energy is important from very low densities in supernova explosions, to the structure of neutron-rich nuclei around saturation density, and to several times saturation density in neutron stars. Heavy ion collisions are the only means to study this density dependence in the laboratory. Numerical simulations of transport theories are used to extract the equation-of-state, and thus also the symmetry energy. I discuss some examples, which relate particularly to the high density symmetry energy, which is of particular interest today. I review the status and point out some open problems in the determination of the symmetry energy in heavy ion collisions.

  3. Universal Behavior of Charged Particle Production in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Steinberg; PHOBOS Collaboration

    2002-11-01

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two kinds of universal behavior are observed in charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/pbar-p and e+e- data. N_tot/(N_part/2) in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with sqrt(s) in a similar way as N_tot in e+e- collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. This feature may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  4. The Nuclear Symmetry Energy in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hermann Wolter

    2015-06-15

    In this contribution I discuss the nuclear symmetry energy in the regime of hadronic degrees of freedom. The density dependence of the symmetry energy is important from very low densities in supernova explosions, to the structure of neutron-rich nuclei around saturation density, and to several times saturation density in neutron stars. Heavy ion collisions are the only means to study this density dependence in the laboratory. Numerical simulations of transport theories are used to extract the equation-of-state, and thus also the symmetry energy. I discuss some examples, which relate particularly to the high density symmetry energy, which is of particular interest today. I review the status and point out some open problems in the determination of the symmetry energy in heavy ion collisions.

  5. LHC INTERACTION REGION CORRECTION IN HEAVY ION OPERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PTITSIN,V.; FISCHER,W.; WEI,J.

    1999-09-07

    In heavy ion operation the LHC interaction region at IP2 will have a low-{beta} optics for collisions. The dynamic aperture is therefore sensitive to magnetic field errors in the interaction region quadrupoles and dipoles. The authors investigate the effect of the magnetic field errors on the dynamic aperture and evaluate the effectiveness of local interaction region correctors. The dynamic aperture and the tune space are computed for different crossing angles.

  6. Hybrid approaches to heavy ion collisions and future perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marlene Nahrgang; Christoph Herold; Stefan Schramm; Marcus Bleicher

    2011-03-03

    We present the current status of hybrid approaches to describe heavy ion collisions and their future challenges and perspectives. First we present a hybrid model combining a Boltzmann transport model of hadronic degrees of freedom in the initial and final state with an optional hydrodynamic evolution during the dense and hot phase. Second, we present a recent extension of the hydrodynamical model to include fluctuations near the phase transition by coupling a chiral field to the hydrodynamic evolution.

  7. Measurements of thermal photons in heavy ion collisions with PHENIX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torsten Dahms; for the PHENIX Collaboration

    2008-04-29

    Thermal photons are thought to be the ideal probe to measure the temperature of the quark-gluon plasma created in heavy ion collisions. PHENIX has measured direct photons with p_T < 5 GeV/c via their internal conversions into e+e- pairs in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV and has now provided a baseline measurement from p+p data.

  8. Cross Section Fluctuations and Chaoticity in Heavy-Ion Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Rapisarda

    1992-12-16

    Cross section fluctuations in nuclear scattering are briefly reviewed in order to show the main important features. Then chaotic scattering is introduced by means of a very simple model. It is shown that chaoticity produces the same kind of irregular fluctuations observed in light heavy--ion collisions. The transition from order to chaos allows a new general framework for a deeper understanding of reaction mechanisms.

  9. Photons from Heavy-Ion Collisions at Fermi Velocity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Che Ming; Alchelin, J.

    1987-01-01

    field and the Pauli blocking of nucleon-nucleon collisions has been introduced recently to describe heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies. ' Important information about the properties of dense nu- clear matter has been extracted by comparing... as a probe of the properties of the dense nu- clear matter, it is necessary to study reactions at higher incident energies where the maximum density reached in the collision is appreciable. One then expects significant eff'ects due to the equation...

  10. Study of ?-charge correlation in heavy ion collisions, various approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prithwish Tribedy; Subhasis Chattopadhyay; Aihong Tang

    2011-08-11

    Event-by-event \\gamma-charge correlation is used in studying systems going through QCD chiral phase transition. In this paper various methods for measuring \\gamma-charge correlation in heavy ion collisions have been discussed. Dynamical fluctuation due to formation of domains of DCC that can affect \\gamma-charge correlation has been discussed. We study known detector and statistical effects involved in these measurements and suggest suitable robust observables \\Delta\

  11. First Order Phase Transition in Intermediate Energy Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Pan; S. Das Gupta; M. Grant

    1997-11-01

    We model the disassembly of an excited nuclear system formed as a result of a heavy ion collision. We find that, as the beam energy in central collisions in varied, the dissociating system crosses a liquid-gas coexistence curve, resulting in a first-order phase transition. Accessible experimental signatures are identified: a peak in specific heat, a power-law yield for composites, and a maximum in the second moment of the yield distribution.

  12. Dynamical description of heavy-ion collisions at Fermi energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napolitani, P

    2015-01-01

    Descriptions of heavy-ion collisions at Fermi energies require to take into account in-medium dissipation and phase-space fluctuations. The interplay of these correlations with the one-body collective behaviour determines the properties (kinematics and fragment production) and the variety of mechanisms (from fusion to neck formation and multifragmentation) of the exit channel. Starting from fundamental concepts tested on nuclear matter, we build up a microscopic description which addresses finite systems and applies to experimental observables.

  13. AN INTENSE NON-RELATIVISTIC CESIUM ION BEAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampel, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    by Keefe (Ref. 1.7). Thermonuclear fusion of light nucleiand Thermonuclear Reaction: Achieving Fusion on Earth: HeavyFUSION AND THE LBL PROGRAM Introduction and Thermonuclear

  14. Elliptic Flow, Initial Eccentricity and Elliptic Flow fluctuations in Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rachid Nouicer; for the PHOBOS Collaboration

    2007-07-30

    We present measurements of elliptic flow and event-by-event fluctuations established by the PHOBOS experiment. Elliptic flow scaled by participant eccentricity is found to be similar for both systems when collisions with the same number of participants or the same particle area density are compared. The agreement of elliptic flow between Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions provides evidence that the matter is created in the initial stage of relativistic heavy ion collisions with transverse granularity similar to that of the participant nucleons. The event-by-event fluctuation results reveal that the initial collision geometry is translated into the final state azimuthal particle distribution, leading to an event-by-event proportionality between the observed elliptic flow and initial eccentricity.

  15. Electromagnetic probes in heavy-ion collisions: Messengers from the hot and dense phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. van Hees; J. Weil; S. Endres; M. Bleicher

    2015-02-12

    Due to their penetrating nature, electromagnetic probes, i.e., lepton-antilepton pairs (dileptons) and photons are unique tools to gain insight into the nature of the hot and dense medium of strongly-interacting particles created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, including hints to the nature of the restoration of chiral symmetry of QCD. Of particular interest are the spectral properties of the electromagnetic current-correlation function of these particles within the dense and/or hot medium. The related theoretical investigations of the in-medium properties of the involved particles in both the partonic and hadronic part of the QCD phase diagram underline the importance of a proper understanding of the properties of various hadron resonances in the medium.

  16. Recent U.S. advances in ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy ion fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    physics and heavy ion fusion energy drivers, including bothoptions towards inertial fusion energy. Acknowledgements:fusion drivers for inertial fusion energy. 1. Introduction A

  17. Review of Heavy-Ion Inertial Fusion Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawata1, S; Ogoyski, A I

    2015-01-01

    In this review paper on heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF), the state-of-the-art scientific results are presented and discussed on the HIF physics, including physics of the heavy ion beam (HIB) transport in a fusion reactor, the HIBs-ion illumination on a direct-drive fuel target, the fuel target physics, the uniformity of the HIF target implosion, the smoothing mechanisms of the target implosion non- uniformity and the robust target implosion. The HIB has remarkable preferable features to release the fusion energy in inertial fusion: in particle accelerators HIBs are generated with a high driver efficiency of ~ 30-40%, and the HIB ions deposit their energy inside of materials. Therefore, a requirement for the fusion target energy gain is relatively low, that would be ~50-70 to operate a HIF fusion reactor with the standard energy output of 1GW of electricity. The HIF reactor operation frequency would be ~10~15 Hz or so. Several- MJ HIBs illuminate a fusion fuel target, and the fuel target is imploded to about a...

  18. RELATIVISTIC POSITRON-ELECTRON-ION SHEAR FLOWS AND APPLICATION TO GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Edison; Fu, Wen; Smith, Ian; Roustazadeh, Parisa [Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Boettcher, Markus, E-mail: liang@rice.edu [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa)

    2013-12-20

    We present particle-in-cell simulation results of relativistic shear flows for hybrid positron-electron-ion plasmas and compare to those for pure e {sup +} e {sup –} and pure e {sup –} ion plasmas. Among the three types of relativistic shear flows, we find that only hybrid shear flow is able to energize the electrons to form a high-energy spectral peak plus a hard power law tail. Such electron spectra are needed to model the observational properties of gamma-ray bursts.

  19. Heavy-ion irradiation induced diamond formation in carbonaceous materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daulton, T. L.

    1999-01-08

    The basic mechanisms of metastable phase formation produced under highly non-equilibrium thermodynamic conditions within high-energy particle tracks are investigated. In particular, the possible formation of diamond by heavy-ion irradiation of graphite at ambient temperature is examined. This work was motivated, in part, by earlier studies which discovered nanometer-grain polycrystalline diamond aggregates of submicron-size in uranium-rich carbonaceous mineral assemblages of Precambrian age. It was proposed that the radioactive decay of uranium formed diamond in the fission particle tracks produced in the carbonaceous minerals. To test the hypothesis that nanodiamonds can form by ion irradiation, fine-grain polycrystalline graphite sheets were irradiated with 400 MeV Kr ions. The ion irradiated graphite (and unirradiated graphite control) were then subjected to acid dissolution treatments to remove the graphite and isolate any diamonds that were produced. The acid residues were then characterized by analytical and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The acid residues of the ion-irradiated graphite were found to contain ppm concentrations of nanodiamonds, suggesting that ion irradiation of bulk graphite at ambient temperature can produce diamond.

  20. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fries, David P. (St. Petersburg, FL); Browning, James F. (Palm Harbour, FL)

    1999-01-01

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  1. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fries, D.P.; Browning, J.F.

    1999-02-16

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu. 3 figs.

  2. Nonperturbative tuning of an improved relativistic heavy-quark action with application to bottom spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasumichi Aoki; Norman H. Christ; Jonathan M. Flynn; Taku Izubuchi; Christoph Lehner; Min Li; Hao Peng; Amarjit Soni; Ruth S. Van de Water; Oliver Witzel

    2012-06-12

    We calculate the masses of bottom mesons using an improved relativistic action for the b-quarks and the RBC/UKQCD Iwasaki gauge configurations with 2+1 flavors of dynamical domain-wall light quarks. We analyze configurations with two lattice spacings: a^{-1} = 1.729 GeV (a ~ 0.11 fm) and a^{-1} = 2.281 GeV (a ~ 0.086 fm). We use an anisotropic, clover-improved Wilson action for the b-quark, and tune the three parameters of the action nonperturbatively such that they reproduce the experimental values of the B_s and B_s* heavy-light meson states. The masses and mass-splittings of the low-lying bottomonium states (such as the eta_b and Upsilon) can then be computed with no additional inputs, and comparison between these predictions and experiment provides a test of the validity of our method. We obtain bottomonium masses with total uncertainties of ~0.5-0.6% and fine-structure splittings with uncertainties of ~35-45%; for all cases we find good agreement with experiment. The parameters of the relativistic heavy-quark action tuned for b-quarks presented in this work can be used for precise calculations of weak matrix elements such as B-meson decay constants and mixing parameters with lattice discretization errors that are of the same size as in light pseudoscalar meson quantities. This general method can also be used for charmed meson masses and matrix elements if the parameters of the heavy-quark action are appropriately tuned.

  3. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  4. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2010-03-16

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  5. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-08-01

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  6. Progress on the Los Alamos heavy-ion injector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, D.C.; Riepe, K.B.; Ballard, E.O.; Meyer, E.A.; Shurter, R.P.; Van Haaften, F.W.; Humphries, S. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Heavy-ion fusion using an induction linac requires injection of multiple high-current beams from a pulsed electrostatic accelerator at as high a voltage as practical. Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing a 16-beam, 2-MeV, pulsed electrostatic accelerator for Al/sup +/ ions. The ion source will use a pulsed metal vapor arc plasma. A biased grid will control plasma flux into the ion extraction region. This source has achieved a normalized emittance of epsilon/sub n/ < 3.10/sup -7/..pi..-m-rad with Al/sup +/ ions. An 800 kV Marx prototype with a laser fired diverter is being assembled. The ceramic accelerating column sections have been brazed and leak tested. Voltage hold off on a brazed sample was more than doubled by selective removal of the Ticusil braze fillet extending along the ceramic. A scaled test module held 250 kV for 50 ..mu..s, giving confidence that the full module can hold 175 kV per section. The pressure vessel should be received in June 1986. High-voltage testing of a 1 MV column will begin by early 1987.

  7. Strangeness production in heavy ion reactions at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Fuchs

    2004-03-05

    Kaon production, in particular $K^+$ production in heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies is discussed. Main emphasis is put on the question if subthreshold $K^+$ production can serve as a suitable tool to test the high density phase of such reactions and to deliver information on the high density behavior of the nuclear equation of state. It is shown that the $K^+$ excitation function in heavy ($Au+Au$) over light ($C+C$) systems provides a robust observable which, by comparison to data, strongly favors a soft equation of state. A second question of interest is the existence of an in-medium kaon potential as predicted by effective chiral Lagrangiens. Here it is argued that transport calculations support this scenario with, in the meantime, a significant level of consistency.

  8. Modeling heavy ion ionization energy loss at low and intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakhno, I.L.; /Fermilab

    2009-11-01

    The needs of contemporary accelerator and space projects led to significant efforts made to include description of heavy ion interactions with matter in general-purpose Monte Carlo codes. This paper deals with an updated model of heavy ion ionization energy loss developed previously for the MARS code. The model agrees well with experimental data for various projectiles and targets including super-heavy ions in low-Z media.

  9. Differential flow in heavy-ion collisions at balance energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao-An Li; Andrew T. Sustich

    1999-05-18

    A strong differential transverse collective flow is predicted for the first time to occur in heavy-ion collisions at balance energies. We also give a novel explanation for the disappearance of the total transverse collective flow at the balance energies. It is further shown that the differential flow especially at high transverse momenta is a useful microscope capable of resolving the balance energy's dual sensitivity to both the nuclear equation of state and in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections in the reaction dynamics.

  10. Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility computer handbook, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This document is intended to acquaint a prospective user with the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) data acquisition/analysis computer facility. The HHIRF data acquisition/analysis computer facility is comprised of 3 CONCURRENT 3230 computers and peripherals. These are 32-bit word machines, each 16 megabytes of semiconductor memory. Peripherals on each system include: three or more disk drives, 2 or 3 TELEX (1600/6450 bpi) tape drives, a line printer, several CPU-shared TRILOG printer/plotters, a CPU-shared TEK-4696 color Ink-Jet plotter, several graphics terminals, a number of VDT terminals and CAMAC interfaces.

  11. Reaction Cross Section in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheuk-Yin Wong

    2012-12-05

    Previously a compact formula for total reaction cross section for heavy-ion collisions as a function of energy was obtained by treating the angular momentum $l$ as a continuous variable. The accuracy of the continuum approximation is assessed and corrections are evaluated. The accuracy of the compact equation can be improved by a simple modification, if a higher accuracy is required. Simple rules to determine the barrier heights and the penetration probability for the $l$ partial wave from experimental data are presented, for the collision of identical or non-identical light nuclei.

  12. Medical applications of nuclear physics and heavy-ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, Jose R.

    2000-08-01

    Isotopes and accelerators, hallmarks of nuclear physics, are finding increasingly sophisticated and effective applications in the medical field. Diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radioisotopes are now a $10B/yr business worldwide, with over 10 million procedures and patient studies performed every year. This paper will discuss the use of isotopes for these applications. In addition, beams of protons and heavy ions are being more and more widely used clinically for treatment of malignancies. To be discussed here as well will be the rationale and techniques associated with charged-particle therapy, and the progress in implementation and optimization of these technologies for clinical use.

  13. Superconducting focusing quadrupoles for heavy ion fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabbi, G.L.; Faltens, A.; Leitner, M.; Lietzke, A.; Seidl, P.; Barnard, J.; Lund, S.; Martovetsky, N.; Gung, C.; Minervini, J.; Radovinsky, A.; Schultz, J.; Meinke, R.

    2003-05-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program is developing superconducting focusing magnets for both near-term experiments and future driver accelerators. In particular, single bore quadrupoles have been fabricated and tested for use in the High Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The next steps involve the development of magnets for the planned Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) and the fabrication of the first prototype multi-beam focusing arrays for fusion driver accelerators. The status of the magnet R&D program is reported, including experimental requirements, design issues and test results.

  14. Progress in heavy ion drivers inertial fusion energy: From scaled experiments to the integrated research experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01

    ION DRIVEN INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY: FROM SCALED EXPERIMENTSThe promise of inertial fusion energy driven by heavy ionleading to an inertial fusion energy power plant. The focus

  15. Development of a polarized Helium-3 ion source for RHIC using the electron beam ion source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, Charles Samuel

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents my work on the design and development of a source of polarized Helium-3 ions for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, NY. The 3He atoms will be polarized using the ...

  16. Uniformity of fuel target implosion in Heavy Ion Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawata, S; Suzuki, T; Karino, T; Barada, D; Ogoyski, A I; Ma, Y Y

    2015-01-01

    In inertial confinement fusion the target implosion non-uniformity is introduced by a driver beams' illumination non-uniformity, a fuel target alignment error in a fusion reactor, the target fabrication defect, et al. For a steady operation of a fusion power plant the target implosion should be robust against the implosion non-uniformities. In this paper the requirement for the implosion uniformity is first discussed. The implosion uniformity should be less than a few percent. A study on the fuel hotspot dynamics is also presented and shows that the stagnating plasma fluid provides a significant enhancement of vorticity at the final stage of the fuel stagnation. Then non-uniformity mitigation mechanisms of the heavy ion beam (HIB) illumination are also briefly discussed in heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF). A density valley appears in the energy absorber, and the large-scale density valley also works as a radiation energy confinement layer, which contributes to a radiation energy smoothing. In HIF a wobbling he...

  17. Relativistic Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Kapusta; Berndt Mueller; Misha Stephanov

    2012-01-17

    The relativistic theory of hydrodynamic fluctuations, or noise, is derived and applied to high energy heavy ion collisions. These fluctuations are inherent in any space-time varying system and are in addition to initial state fluctuations. We illustrate the effects with the boost-invariant Bjorken solution to the hydrodynamic equations. Long range correlations in rapidity are induced by propagation of sound modes. The magnitude of these correlations are directly proportional to the viscosities. These fluctuations should be enhanced near a phase transition or rapid crossover.

  18. ?b ? p?¯?¯? and ?b ? ?c?¯?¯? form factors from lattice QCD with relativistic heavy quarks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Detmold, William; Lehner, Christoph; Meinel, Stefan

    2015-08-04

    Measurements of the ?b ? p?¯?¯? and ?b ? ?c?¯?¯? decay rates can be used to determine the magnitudes of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements Vub and Vcb, provided that the relevant hadronic form factors are known. Here we present a precise calculation of these form factors using lattice QCD with 2+1 flavors of dynamical domain-wall fermions. The b and c quarks are implemented with relativistic heavy-quark actions, allowing us to work directly at the physical heavy-quark masses. The lattice computation is performed for six different pion masses and two different lattice spacings, using gauge-field configurations generated by the RBC andmore »UKQCD Collaborations. The b ? u and b ? c currents are renormalized with a mostly nonperturbative method. We extrapolate the form factor results to the physical pion mass and the continuum limit, parametrizing the q² dependence using z expansions. The form factors are presented in such a way as to enable the correlated propagation of both statistical and systematic uncertainties into derived quantities such as differential decay rates and asymmetries. Using these form factors, we present predictions for the ?b ? p?¯?¯? and ?b ? ?c?¯?¯?differential and integrated decay rates. Combined with experimental data, our results enable determinations of |Vub|, |Vcb|, and |Vub/Vcb| with theory uncertainties of 4.4%, 2.2%, and 4.9%, respectively.« less

  19. Ion Response to Relativistic Electron Bunches in the Blowout Regime of Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popov, K. I.; Rozmus, W.; Naseri, N. [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton T6G 2J1, Alberta (Canada); Bychenkov, V. Yu. [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton T6G 2J1, Alberta (Canada); P. N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Capjack, C. E. [Department of Electrical Computer, Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton T6G 2J1, Alberta (Canada); Brantov, A. V. [P. N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2010-11-05

    The ion response to relativistic electron bunches in the so called bubble or blowout regime of a laser-plasma accelerator is discussed. In response to the strong fields of the accelerated electrons the ions form a central filament along the laser axis that can be compressed to densities 2 orders of magnitude higher than the initial particle density. A theory of the filament formation and a model of ion self-compression are proposed. It is also shown that in the case of a sharp rear plasma-vacuum interface the ions can be accelerated by a combination of three basic mechanisms. The long time ion evolution that results from the strong electrostatic fields of an electron bunch provides a unique diagnostic of laser-plasma accelerators.

  20. Short Communication Kinetics and thermodynamics of heavy metal ions sequestration onto novel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Jian Ru

    Short Communication Kinetics and thermodynamics of heavy metal ions sequestration onto novel biomasses had been chosen and utilized by researchers to sequester toxic heavy metal ions from industrial seeds {Cu(II)} (Chowdhury and Saha, 2011) and Mustard oil cake {Ni(II)} (Khan et al., 2012). Adsorbents

  1. Prompt dimuons and D meson production in heavy-ion collisions at the SPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Lenkeit; NA60-Collaboration

    2001-08-14

    NA60, a follow-up of NA38/50 at the CERN-SPS, is a third generation heavy-ion experiment finally approved in November 2000 for heavy-ion runs in 2002 and 2003. This article will report about the main motivations which lead to this experiment, the main detector concept and the foreseen physics performance.

  2. High energy heavy ion jets emerging from laser plasma generated by long pulse laser beams from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High energy heavy ion jets emerging from laser plasma generated by long pulse laser beams from, Darmstadt, Germany 2 GSI, Darmstadt, Germany 3 Université de Provence et CNRS, Marseille, France 4, Albuquerque, New Mexico. ~Received 21 February 2005; Accepted 20 April 2005! Abstract High energy heavy ions

  3. On pseudorapidity distribution and speed of sound in high energy heavy ion collisions based on a new revised Landau hydrodynamic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Li-Na

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new revised Landau hydrodynamic model to study systematically the pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles produced in heavy ion collisions over an energy range from a few GeV to a few TeV per nucleon pair. The interacting system is divided into three sources namely the central, target, and projectile sources respectively. The large central source is described by the Landau hydrodynamic model and further revised by the contributions of the small target/projectile sources. In the calculation, to avoid the errors caused by an unapt conversion or non-division, the rapidity and pseudorapidity distributions are obtained respectively. The modeling results are in agreement with the available experimental data at relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC), large hadron collider (LHC), and other energies for different centralities. The value of square speed of sound parameter in different collisions has been extracted by us from the widths of rapidity distributions. Our results show that, in heavy io...

  4. Determining the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy using heavy-ion reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lie-Wen Chen; Che Ming Ko; Bao-An Li; Gao-Chan Yong

    2007-11-12

    We review recent progress in the determination of the subsaturation density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy from heavy-ion collisions as well as the theoretical progress in probing the high density behavior of the symmetry energy in heavy-ion reactions induced by high energy radioactive beams. We further discuss the implications of these results for the nuclear effective interactions and the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei.

  5. SYSTEMATIC STUDIES OF HEAVY ION COLLISIONS TO SEARCH FOR QUARK-GLUON PLASMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuqiang Wang

    2007-11-29

    This is the final technical report for DOE Outstanding Junior Investigator (OJI) Award, 'Systematic Studies of Heavy Ion Collisions to Search for Quark-Gluon Plasma', grant DE-FG02-02ER41219, Principal Investigator (PI) Fuqiang Wang. The research under the grant was divided into two phases. The first concentrated on systematic studies of soft hadron production at low transverse momentum (p{sub T}), in particular the production of (anti-)baryon and strangeness in heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies. The second concentrated on measurements of di-hadron and multi-hadron jet-correlations and investigations of medium response to jets. The research was conducted at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL with the Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) experiment. The total grant is $214,000. The grant established a PC farm solely used for this research. The PC farm consists of 8 nodes with a total of 16 CPUs and 3 disk servers of total 2 TB shared storage. The current balance of the grant is $19,985. The positive balance is because an initial purchase of $22,600 for the PC farm came out of the PI's start-up fund due to the lateness of the award. The PC farm is an integral part of the Purdue Physics Department's computer cluster. The grant supported two Ph.D. graduate students. Levente Molnar was supported from July 2002 to December 2003, and worked on soft hadron production. His thesis title is Systematics of Identified Particle Production in pp, d-Au and Au-Au Collisions at RHIC Energies. He graduated in 2006 and now is a Postdoctoral fellow at INFN Sezione di Bari, Italy working on the ALICE experiment at the LHC. Jason Ulery was supported from January 2004 to July 2007. His thesis title is Two- and Three-Particle Jet-Like Correlations. He defended his thesis in October 2007 and is moving to Frankfurt University, Germany to work on the ALICE experiment at the LHC. The research by this grant resulted in 7 journal publications (2 PRL, 1 PLB, 1 PRC, 2 submitted and 1 in preparation), and 14 invited talks and 10 contributed talks at major conferences. These are listed at end of this report.

  6. A semi-holographic model for heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edmond Iancu; Ayan Mukhopadhyay

    2015-06-09

    We develop a semi-holographic model for the out-of-equilibrium dynamics during the partonic stages of an ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collision. The model combines a weakly-coupled hard sector, involving gluon modes with energy and momenta of the order of the saturation momentum and relatively large occupation numbers, with a strongly-coupled soft sector, which physically represents the soft gluons radiated by the hard partons. The hard sector is described by perturbative QCD, more precisely, by its semi-classical approximation (the classical Yang-Mills equations) which becomes appropriate when the occupation numbers are large. The soft sector is described by a marginally deformed conformal field theory, which in turn admits a holographic description in terms of classical Einstein's equations in $AdS_5$ with a minimally coupled massless `dilaton'. The model involve two free parameters which characterize the gauge-invariant couplings between the hard and soft sectors. Via these couplings, the hard modes provide dynamical sources for the gravitational equations at the boundary of $AdS_5$ and feel the feedback of the latter as additional soft sources in the classical Yang-Mills equations. Importantly, the initial conditions for this coupled dynamics are fully determined by the hard sector alone, i.e. by perturbative QCD, and are conveniently given by the color glass condensate (CGC) effective theory. We also develop a new semi-holographic picture of jets in the QGP by attaching a non-Abelian charge to the endpoint of the trailing string in $AdS_5$ representing a heavy quark. This leads to modified Nambu-Goto equations for the string which govern the (collisional and radiative) energy loss by the heavy quark towards both hard and soft modes.

  7. Non-linear Ion-wake Excitation by Ultra-relativistic Electron Wakefields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahai, Aakash A

    2015-01-01

    The excitation of a non-linear ion-wake by a train of ultra-relativistic plasmons is modeled and its use for a novel regime of positron acceleration is explored. Its channel-like structure is independent of the energy-source driving the bubble-shaped slowly-propagating high phase-velocity electron density waves. The back of the bubble electron compression sucks-in the ions and the space-charge within the bubble expels them, forming a near-void channel with on-axis and bubble-edge density-spikes. The channel-edge density-spike is driven radially outwards as a non-linear ion acoustic-wave by the wake electron thermal pressure. OSIRIS PIC simulations are used to study the ion-wake structure, its evolution and its use for positron acceleration.

  8. Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion: Summary Report of the Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seidl, P.A.; Barnard, J.J.

    2011-04-29

    The Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion was held at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory May 23-26, 2011. The workshop began with plenary sessions to review the state of the art in HIF (heavy ion fusion), followed by parallel working groups, and concluded with a plenary session to review the results. There were five working groups: IFE (inertial fusion energy) targets, RF approach to HIF, induction accelerator approach to HIF, chamber and driver interface, ion sources and injectors.

  9. From many body wee partons dynamics to perfect fluid: a standard model for heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venugopalan, R.

    2010-07-22

    We discuss a standard model of heavy ion collisions that has emerged both from experimental results of the RHIC program and associated theoretical developments. We comment briefly on the impact of early results of the LHC program on this picture. We consider how this standard model of heavy ion collisions could be solidified or falsified in future experiments at RHIC, the LHC and a future Electro-Ion Collider.

  10. Atomic nuclei decay modes by spontaneous emission of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poenaru, D.N.; Ivascu, M.; Sndulescu, A.; Greiner, W.

    1985-08-01

    The great majority of the known nuclides with Z>40, including the so-called stable nuclides, are metastable with respect to several modes of spontaneous superasymmetric splitting. A model extended from the fission theory of alpha decay allows one to estimate the lifetimes and the branching ratios relative to the alpha decay for these natural radioactivities. From a huge amount of systematic calculations it is concluded that the process should proceed with maximum intensity in the trans-lead nuclei, where the minimum lifetime is obtained from parent-emitted heavy ion combinations leading to a magic (/sup 208/Pb) or almost magic daughter nucleus. More than 140 nuclides with atomic number smaller than 25 are possible candidates to be emitted from heavy nuclei, with half-lives in the range of 10/sup 10/--10/sup 30/ s: /sup 5/He, /sup 8en-dash10/Be, /sup 11,12/B, /sup 12en-dash16/C, /sup 13en-dash17/N, /sup 15en-dash22/O, /sup 18en-dash23/F, /sup 20en-dash26/Ne, /sup 23en-dash28/Na, /sup 23en-dash30/Mg, /sup 27en-dash32/Al, /sup 28en-dash36/Si, /sup 31en-dash39/P, /sup 32en-dash42/S, /sup 35en-dash45/Cl, /sup 37en-dash47/Ar, /sup 40en-dash49/ K, . .Ca, /sup 44en-dash53/ Sc, /sup 46en-dash53/Ti, /sup 48en-dash54/V, and /sup 49en-dash55/ Cr. The shell structure and the pairing effects are clearly manifested in these new decay modes.

  11. Electromagnetic fields and anomalous transports in heavy-ion collisions --- A pedagogical review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xu-Guang

    2015-01-01

    The hot and dense matter generated in heavy-ion collisions may contain domains in which the P and CP symmetries of QCD are violated. Moreover, heavy-ion collisions can generate extremely strong magnetic fields as well as electric fields. The interplay among the electromagnetic field, triangle anomaly, and the P and CP violation of QCD leads to a number of macroscopic quantum phenomena known as the anomalous transports. The purpose of the article is to give a pedagogical review of various properties of the electromagnetic fields, the anomalous transports phenomena, and their experimental signatures in heavy-ion collisions.

  12. Electromagnetic fields and anomalous transports in heavy-ion collisions --- A pedagogical review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu-Guang Huang

    2015-09-14

    The hot and dense matter generated in heavy-ion collisions may contain domains in which the P and CP symmetries of QCD are violated. Moreover, heavy-ion collisions can generate extremely strong magnetic fields as well as electric fields. The interplay among the electromagnetic field, triangle anomaly, and the P and CP violation of QCD leads to a number of macroscopic quantum phenomena known as the anomalous transports. The purpose of the article is to give a pedagogical review of various properties of the electromagnetic fields, the anomalous transports phenomena, and their experimental signatures in heavy-ion collisions.

  13. Identification and Rejection of Fake Reconstructed Jets From a Fluctuating Heavy Ion Background in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Grau; B. A. Cole; W. G. Holzmann; M. Spousta; P. Steinberg

    2008-10-07

    Full jet reconstruction in relativistic heavy ion collisions provides new and unique insights to the physics of parton energy loss. Because of the large underlying event multiplicity in $A+A$ collisions, random and correlated fluctuations in the background can result in the reconstruction of fake jets. These fake jets must be identified and rejected to obtain the purest jet sample possible. A large but reducible fake rate of jets reconstructed using an iterative cone algorithm on HIJING events is observed. The absolute rate of fake jets exceeds the binary-scaled p+p jet rate below 50 GeV and is not negligible until 100 GeV. The variable $\\Sigma j_{T}$, the sum of the jet constituent's $E_{T}$ perpendicular to the jet axis, is introduced to identify and reject fake jets at by a factor of 100 making it negligible. This variable is shown to not strongly depend on jet energy profiles modified by energy loss. By studying azimuthal correlations of reconstructed di-jets, the fake jet rate can be evaluated in data.

  14. Elliptic flow fluctuations in heavy ion collisions at RHIC and the perfect fluid hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sascha Vogel; Giorgio Torrieri; Marcus Bleicher

    2010-08-05

    We analyse the recently measured $v_2$ fluctuation in the context of establishing the degree of fluidity of the matter produced in heavy ion collisions. We argue that flow observables within systems with a non-negligible mean free path should acquire a "dynamical" fluctuation, due to the random nature of each collision between the system's degrees of freedom. Because of this, $v_2$ fluctuations can be used to estimate the Knudsen number of the system produced at RHIC. To illustrate this quantitatively, we apply the UrQMD model, with scaled cross sections, to show that collisions at RHIC have a Knudsen number at least one order of magnitude above the expected value for an interacting hadron gas. Furthermore, we argue that the Knudsen number is also bound from above by the $v_2$ fluctuation data, because too large a Knudsen number would break the observed scaling of $v_2$ fluctuations due to the onset of turbulent flow. We propose, therefore that $v_2$ fluctuation measurements, together with an understanding of the turbulent regime for relativistic hydrodynamics, will provide an upper as well as a lower limit for the Knudsen number.

  15. Study of electromagnetic dissociation of heavy nuclei at the relativistic heavy ion collider 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makeev, Andrei

    2001-01-01

    the interaction vertex, making collision centrality measurements, forming triggers, rejecting background and are also used for a number of physics measurements. The experimental data from the BRAHMS zero-degree calorimeters, beam-beam counters and tile...

  16. A power-law description of heavy ion collision centrality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas A. Trainor; Duncan J. Prindle

    2007-01-30

    The minimum-bias distribution on heavy ion collision multiplicity $n_{ch}$ is well approximated by power-law form $n_{ch}^{-3/4}$, suggesting that a change of variable to $n_{ch}^{1/4}$ may provide more precise access to the structure of the distribution and to A-A collision centrality. We present a detailed centrality study of Hijing-1.37 Monte Carlo data at 200 GeV using the power-law format. We find that the minimum-bias distribution on $n_{participant}^{1/4}$, determined with a Glauber Monte Carlo simulation, is uniform except for a 5% sinusoidal variation. The power-law format reveals precise linear relations between Glauber parameters $n_{part}$ and $n_{bin}$ and the fractional cross section. The power-law format applied to RHIC data facilitates incorporation of extrapolation constraints on data and Glauber distributions to obtain a ten-fold improvement in centrality accuracy for peripheral collisions.

  17. Heavy Ion Beams for Investigation of Thermophysical Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor Iosilevskiy

    2010-05-23

    Perspectives for study of thermophysical properties via uniform quasi-stationary volumetric heating under Heavy Ion Beam (HIB) heating with moderate but realistic energy deposition (~ 1 kJ/g) are under discussion. New quasi-isobaric regime of heating is proposed as combination of the HIB energy deposition with the use of highly dispersed porous material as an irradiating sample. Regime of "tracing saturation curve" is proposed also when heating the evaporating porous materials. Consequent preferences and priorities are emphasized. In frames of this technique HIB could became an uncompetitive tool for study of phase transition phenomenon for a wide number of materials with high-temperature location of critical point. Two important thermophysical problems, which could approve using of HIB facility, are discussed as the first-row candidates. Evaporation in Uranium is one of the most tempting candidates to be studied under HIB heating in such manner. When being successful this experiment has a good chance to resolve the old contradiction within the problem of Uranium critical point parameters estimations. The heating by HIB seems to be especially promising as an effective tool for systematic study of so-called "non-congruent" phase transition -- striking and mostly unusual sort of high-temperature phase equilibrium in chemically active strongly coupled plasmas. Phase transition in uranium dioxide is remarkable example of such non-congruency. New information on the thermophysical properties of phase transitions in uranium and uranium dioxide could be valuable for application in nuclear reactor safety analysis

  18. Microscopic Calculation of Pre-Compound Excitation Energies for Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Umar; V. E. Oberacker; J. A. Maruhn; P. -G. Reinhard

    2009-09-18

    We introduce a microscopic approach for calculating the excitation energies of systems formed during heavy-ion collisions. The method is based on time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory and allows the study of the excitation energy as a function of time or ion-ion separation distance. We discuss how this excitation energy is related to the estimate of the excitation energy using the reaction $Q$-value, as well as its implications for dinuclear pre-compound systems formed during heavy-ion collisions.

  19. Self-pinched beam transport experiments Relevant to Heavy Ion Driven inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1998-01-01

    Heavy Ion Driven Inertial Fusion Energy January 30, 1998 W.C. L . Olson, J. Fusion Energy 1, 309 (1982). "Filamentationof Energy Research [Office of Fusion Energy Science], U . S.

  20. DESIGN/COST STUDY OF AN INDUCTION LINAC FOR HEAVY IONS FOR PELLET-FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faltens, A.

    2010-01-01

    LINAC FOR HEAVY IONS FOR PELLET-FUSION* Andris Faltens. EgonContract The physics of the pellet implosion sets strin-deposition in the pellet > 20 MJ/g. Thus, considerable

  1. Drift compression and final focus systems for heavy ion inertial fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Hoon, M.J.L.

    2001-01-01

    cheapest source of energy; an a?ordable cost of electricitycheapest source of energy in the near future, partic- ularly heavy ion fusion is expected to be able to provide electricity

  2. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) year-end report, April 1, 1985-September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    The heavy ion accelerator is profiled. Energy losses, currents, kinetic energy, beam optics, pulse models and mechanical tolerances are included in the discussion. In addition, computational efforts and an energy analyzer are described. 37 refs., 27 figs. (WRF)

  3. Heavy-Ion Irradiation of Thulium(III) Oxide Targets Prepared by Polymer-Assisted Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Mitch A.

    2008-01-01

    Heavy-Ion Irradiation of Thulium(III) Oxide Targets PreparedRMS) roughness prior to irradiation is 1.1 nm for a ~250roughness of 2.0 nm after irradiation was measured by atomic

  4. A Cone Jet-Finding Algorithm for Heavy-Ion Collisions at LHC Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    A Cone Jet-Finding Algorithm for Heavy-Ion Collisions at LHCf CERN, Abstract Standard jet ?nding techniques used indescribes a modi?ed cone-type jet ?nding algorithm developed

  5. Self-pinched beam transport experiments Relevant to Heavy Ion Driven inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1998-01-01

    C. L . Olson, J. Fusion Energy 1, 309 (1982). "FilamentationHeavy Ion Driven Inertial Fusion Energy January 30, 1998 W.of Energy Research [Office of Fusion Energy Science], U . S.

  6. Generation, transport and focusing of high-brightness heavy ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henestroza, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) has been built at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory. NTX is the first successful integrated beam system experiment that explores various physical phenomena, and ...

  7. Identified particle production and freeze-out properties in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC Beam Energy Scan program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabita Das

    2014-12-01

    The first phase of Beam Energy Scan (BES) program at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) was started in the year 2010 with the aim to study the several aspects of the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) phase diagram. The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) detector has taken data at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = $ 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, and 39 GeV in Au+Au collisions in the years 2010 and 2011 as part of the BES programme. For these beam energies, we present the results on the particle yields, average transverse mass and particle ratios for identified particles in mid-rapidity ($|y|$ chemical freeze-out dynamics within the framework of a statistical model.

  8. Silica coated magnetite nanoparticles for removal of heavy metal ions from polluted waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dash, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic removal of Hg2+ and other heavy metal ions like Cd2+, Pb2+ etc. using silica coated magnetite particles from polluted waters is a current topic of active research to provide efficient water recycling and long term high quality water. The technique used to study the bonding characteristics of such kind of nanoparticles with the heavy metal ions is a very sensitive hyperfine specroscopy technique called the perturbed angular correlation technique (PAC).

  9. Isospin relaxation time in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ba; Ko, Che Ming.

    1998-01-01

    Using an isospin-dependent transport model, we have studied the isospin and momentum relaxation times in the heavy residues formed in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies. It is found that only at incident energies below the Fermi energy...

  10. Systematics of cross sections for target K-vacancy production in heavy ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Yong

    2007-04-25

    Cross sections for K-shell ionization by heavy ions have been determined from the measurements of target K x-ray yields. The measurements were performed with Ar, Kr, and Xe ions at energies from 2.5 to 25 MeV/amu and ...

  11. Swift heavy ion irradiation of Pt nanocrystals: I. shape transformation and dissolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giulian, R.; Araujo, L.L.; Kluth, P.; Sprouster, D.J.; Schnohr, C.S.; Byrne, A.P.; Ridgway, M.C. (ANU)

    2014-09-24

    We report on the effects of swift heavy ion irradiation of embedded Pt nanocrystals (NCs), which change from spheres to prolate spheroids to rods upon irradiation. Using a broad range of ion irradiation energies and NC mean sizes we demonstrate that the elongation and dissolution processes are energy and size dependent, attaining comparable levels of shape transformation and dissolution upon a given energy density deposited in the matrix. The NC shape transformation remains operative despite discontinuous ion tracks in the matrix and exhibits a constant threshold size for elongation. In contrast, for ion irradiations in which the ion tracks are continuous, the threshold size for elongation is clearly energy dependent.

  12. The "ripples" on relativistically expanding fluid

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shi, Shuzhe [Tsinghua Univ., and Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Liao, Jinfeng [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Zhuang, Pengfei [Tsinghua Univ., and Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China)

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that fluctuations of various types play important roles in the evolution of the fireball created in relativistic heavy ion collisions and bear many phenomenological consequences for experimental observables. The bulk dynamics of the fireball is well described by relativistic hydrodynamic expansion and the fluctuations on top of such expanding background can be studied within the linearized hydrodynamic framework. In this paper we present complete and analytic sound wave solutions on top of both Bjorken flow and Hubble flow backgrounds.

  13. The "ripples" on relativistically expanding fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Shuzhe; Liao, Jinfeng; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2014-12-29

    Recent studies have shown that fluctuations of various types play important roles in the evolution of the fireball created in relativistic heavy ion collisions and bear many phenomenological consequences for experimental observables. The bulk dynamics of the fireball is well described by relativistic hydrodynamic expansion and the fluctuations on top of such expanding background can be studied within the linearized hydrodynamic framework. In this paper we present complete and analytic sound wave solutions on top of both Bjorken flow and Hubble flow backgrounds.

  14. THERMINATOR 2: THERMal heavy IoN generATOR 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikolaj Chojnacki; Adam Kisiel; Wojciech Florkowski; Wojciech Broniowski

    2011-02-01

    We present an extended version of THERMINATOR, a Monte Carlo event generator dedicated to studies of the statistical production of particles in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The increased functionality of the code contains the following features: The input of any shape of the freeze-out hypersurface and the expansion velocity field, including the 3+1 dimensional profiles, in particular those generated externally with various hydrodynamic codes. The hypersufraces may have variable thermal parameters, which allows for studies departing significantly from the mid-rapidity region, where the baryon chemical potential becomes large. We include a library of standard sets of hypersurfaces and velocity profiles describing the RHIC Au+Au data at sqrt(s_(NN)) = 200 GeV for various centralities, as well as those anticipated for the LHC Pb+Pb collisions at sqrt(s_(NN)) = 5.5 TeV. A separate code, FEMTO-THERMINATOR, is provided to carry out the analysis of femtoscopic correlations which are an important source of information concerning the size and expansion of the system. We also include several useful scripts that carry out auxiliary tasks, such as obtaining an estimate of the number of elastic collisions after the freeze-out, counting of particles flowing back into the fireball and violating causality (typically very few), or visualizing various results: the particle p_T-spectra, the elliptic flow coefficients, and the HBT correlation radii. We also investigate the problem of the back-flow of particles into the hydrodynamic region, as well as estimate the elastic rescattering in terms of trajectory crossings. The package is written in C++ and uses the CERN ROOT environment.

  15. Microscopic Calculation of Heavy-Ion Potentials Based on TDHF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Umar; V. E. Oberacker; J. A. Maruhn; P. -G. Reinhard\\

    2011-06-17

    We discuss the implementation and results of a recently developed microscopic method for calculating ion-ion interaction potentials and fusion cross-sections. The method uses the TDHF evolution to obtain the instantaneous many-body collective state using a density constraint. The ion-ion potential as well as the coordinate dependent mass are calculated from these states. The method fully accounts for the dynamical processes present in the TDHF time-evolution and provides a parameter-free way of calculating fusion cross-sections.

  16. Electron and Ion Acceleration in Relativistic Shocks with Applications to GRB Afterglows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Donald C; Bykov, Andrei M; Lee, Shiu-Hang

    2015-01-01

    We have modeled the simultaneous first-order Fermi shock acceleration of protons, electrons, and helium nuclei by relativistic shocks. By parameterizing the particle diffusion, our steady-state Monte Carlo simulation allows us to follow particles from particle injection at nonthermal thermal energies to above PeV energies, including the nonlinear smoothing of the shock structure due to cosmic-ray (CR) backpressure. We observe the mass-to-charge (A/Z) enhancement effect believed to occur in efficient Fermi acceleration in non-relativistic shocks and we parameterize the transfer of ion energy to electrons seen in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. For a given set of environmental and model parameters, the Monte Carlo simulation determines the absolute normalization of the particle distributions and the resulting synchrotron, inverse-Compton, and pion-decay emission in a largely self-consistent manner. The simulation is flexible and can be readily used with a wide range of parameters typical of gamma-ray burst ...

  17. Fluctuations of pion flow harmonics and HBT correlation functions in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ying Hu; Wei-Ning Zhang; Yan-Yu Ren

    2015-02-10

    We investigate the fluctuations of pion elliptic flow, triangular flow, and Hanbury-Brown-Twiss (HBT) correlation functions for the hydrodynamic sources with fluctuating initial conditions in the heavy ion collisions of the Au-Au at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV and the Pb-Pb at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} =2.76$ TeV. A method based on event-subcollection analysis is used to detect these fluctuations in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. We introduce a granularity length to describe the granular inhomogeneity of the initial sources, and investigate its relationships with the fluctuations of the flow harmonics and HBT correlation functions. Our investigations indicate that the fluctuations of the triangular flow of event subcollections are sensitive to the granularity length of the initial source. This dependence may provide a way to study the granular inhomogeneity of the initial source through the analyses of the fluctuations of triangular flow in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions.

  18. Comparison of heavy ion-induced K? x-ray satellite spectra from gases and solids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demarest, John Allen

    1977-01-01

    COMPARISON OF HEAVY ION-INDUCED IQX X-RAY SATELLITE SPECTRA FROM GASES AND SOLIDS A Thesis by JOHN ALLEN DEMAREST Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1977 Ma)or Subject: Chemistry COMPARISON OF HEAVY ION-INDUCED Ks X-RAY SATELLITE SPECTRA FROM GASES AND SOLIDS A Thesis by JOHN ALLEN DEMAREST Approved as to style and content by (Chairman of Committee) 7&F~. ~MA (Head...

  19. Lattice QCD and Hydro/Cascade Model of Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Cheng

    2010-05-11

    We report here on a recent lattice study of the QCD transition region at finite temperature and zero chemical potential using domain wall fermions (DWF). We also present a parameterization of the QCD equation of state obtained from lattice QCD that is suitable for use in hydrodynamics studies of heavy ion collisions. Finally, we show preliminary results from a multi-stage hydrodynamics/hadron cascade model of a heavy ion collision, in an attempt to understand how well the experimental data (e.g. particle spectra, elliptic flow, and HBT radii) can constrain the inputs (e.g. initial temperature, freezeout temperature, shear viscosity, equation of state) of the theoretical model.

  20. Lattice QCD and Hydro/Cascade Model of Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We report here on a recent lattice study of the QCD transition region at finite temperature and zero chemical potential using domain wall fermions (DWF). We also present a parameterization of the QCD equation of state obtained from lattice QCD that is suitable for use in hydrodynamics studies of heavy ion collisions. Finally, we show preliminary results from a multi-stage hydrodynamics/hadron cascade model of a heavy ion collision, in an attempt to understand how well the experimental data (e.g. particle spectra, elliptic flow, and HBT radii) can constrain the inputs (e.g. initial temperature, freezeout temperature, shear viscosity, equation of state) of the theoretical model.

  1. Azimuthally anisotropic emission of pions in symmetric heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brill, D.; Ahner, W.; Baltes, P.; Barth, R.; Bormann, C.; Cieslak, M.; Debowski, M.; Grosse, E.; Henning, W.; Koczon, P.; Kohlmeyer, B.; Miskowiec, D.; Muentz, C.; Oeschler, H.; Poeppl, H.; Puehlhofer, F.; Sartorius, S.; Schicker, R.; Senger, P.; Shin, Y.; Speer, J.; Stein, J.; Stiebing, K.; Stock, R.; Stroebele, H.; Voelkel, K.; Wagner, A.; Walus, W. (Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, D-6000 Frankfurt/Main (Germany) Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-6100 Darmstadt (Germany) Technische Hochschule Darmstadt, D-6100 Darmstadt (Germany) Philipps-Universitaet, D-3550 Marburg (Germany) Jagiellonian University, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland))

    1993-07-19

    Triple differential cross sections [ital d][sup 3][sigma]/[ital dp][sup 3] for charged pions produced in symmetric heavy-ion collisions were measured with the KaoS magnetic spectrometer at the heavy-ion synchrotron facility SIS at GSI. The correlations between the momentum vectors of charged pions and the reaction plane in [sup 197]Au+[sup 197]Au collisions at an incident energy of 1 GeV/nucleon were determined. We observe, for the first time, an azimuthally anisotropic distribution of pions, with enhanced emission perpendicular to the reaction plane. The anisotropy is most pronounced for pions of high transverse momentum in semicentral collisions.

  2. Constancy of energy partition in central heavy-ion reactions at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Basrak; Ph. Eudes; M. Zori?; F. Sébille

    2012-09-10

    Semiclassical transport simulation of nucleus-nucleus collisions for the range of incident energy from about the Fermi energy up to a few hundred MeV per nucleon evidences that the maximal excitation energy put into a nuclear system during the early compact stage of heavy-ion reaction is a constant fraction of the center-of-mass available energy of the system. Analysis of experimental data without presuming reaction mechanism dominating the collision process on the best corroborate the found constancy of energy partition in central heavy-ion reactions.

  3. Selected Topics in the Physics of Heavy Ion Collisions (1/3)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    In these lectures, I discuss some classes of measurements accessible in heavy ion collisions at the LHC. How can these observables be measured, to what extent can they be calculated, and what do they tell us about the dense mesoscopic system created during the collision? In the first lecture, I shall focus in particular on measurements that constrain the spatio-temporal picture of the collisions and that measure centrality, orientations and extensions. In the subsequent lectures, I then discuss on how classes of measurements allow one to characterize collective phenomena, and to what extent these measurements can constrain the properties of matter produced in heavy ion collisions.

  4. Studies of Limits on Uncontrolled Heavy Ion Beam Losses for Allowing Hands-On Maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reginald M. Ronningen; Igor Remec

    2010-09-11

    Dose rates from accelerator components activated by 1 W/m beam losses are obtained semiempirically for a 1 GeV proton beam and by use of Monte Carlo transport codes for the proton beam and for 777 MeV/u 3He, 500 MeV/u 48Ca, 86Kr, 136Xe, and 400 MeV/u 238U ions. The dose rate obtained by the semi-empirical method, 0.99 mSv/h (99 mrem/h) at 30 cm, 4 h after 100 d irradiation by a 1-GeV proton beam, is consistent with studies at several accelerator facilities and with adopted hands-on maintenance dose rate limits. Monte Carlo simulations verify this result for protons and extend studies to heavy ion beam losses in drift-tube linac and superconducting linac accelerating structures. The studies indicate that the 1 W/m limit imposed on uncontrolled beam losses for high-energy proton beams might be relaxed for heavy ion beams. These studies further suggest that using the ratio of neutrons produced by a heavy ion beam to neutrons produced by a proton beam along with the dose rate from the proton beam (for thin-target scenarios) should allow an estimate of the dose rates expected from heavy ion beam losses.

  5. Heavy Quark Kinetic Energy in B Mesons by a QCD Relativistic Potential Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. De Fazio

    1996-11-04

    The matrix element of the kinetic energy operator between B meson states is computed by means of a QCD relativistic potential model, with the result: $\\mu_\\pi^2=0.66 GeV^2$. A comparison with the outcome of other theoretical approaches and a discussion of the phenomenological implications of this result are carried out.

  6. More than mass proportional heating of heavy ions by supercritical collisionless shocks in the solar corona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimbardo, Gaetano

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new model for explaining the observations of more than mass proportional heating of heavy ions in the polar solar corona. We point out that a large number of small scale intermittent shock waves can be present in the solar corona. The energization mechanism is, essentially, the ion reflection off supercritical quasi-perpendicular collisionless shocks in the corona and the subsequent acceleration by the motional electric field ${\\bf E} = - (1/c) {\\bf V} \\times {\\bf B}$. The acceleration due to ${\\bf E}$ is perpendicular to the magnetic field, in agreement with observations, and is more than mass proportional with respect to protons, because the heavy ion orbit is mostly upstream of the quasi-perpendicular shock foot. The observed temperature ratios between O$^{5+}$ ions and protons in the polar corona, and between $\\alpha$ particles and protons in the solar wind are easily recovered.

  7. Estimation of Heavy Ion Densities From Linearly Polarized EMIC Waves At Earth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Johnson, Jay R.; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2014-02-24

    Linearly polarized EMIC waves are expected to concentrate at the location where their wave frequency satisfies the ion-ion hybrid (IIH) resonance condition as the result of a mode conversion process. In this letter, we evaluate absorption coefficients at the IIH resonance in the Earth geosynchronous orbit for variable concentrations of helium and azimuthal and field-aligned wave numbers in dipole magnetic field. Although wave absorption occurs for a wide range of heavy ion concentration, it only occurs for a limited range of azimuthal and field-aligned wave numbers such that the IIH resonance frequency is close to, but not exactly the same as the crossover frequency. Our results suggest that, at L = 6.6, linearly polarized EMIC waves can be generated via mode conversion from the compressional waves near the crossover frequency. Consequently, the heavy ion concentration ratio can be estimated from observations of externally generated EMIC waves that have polarization.

  8. Solar-wind protons and heavy ions sputtering of lunar surface materials A.F. Barghouty a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar-wind protons and heavy ions sputtering of lunar surface materials A.F. Barghouty a, , F Available online 21 December 2010 Keywords: Solar wind sputtering Lunar regolith KREEP soil Potential a c t Lunar surface materials are exposed to $1 keV/amu solar-wind protons and heavy ions on almost

  9. Design and characterization of a neutralized-transport experiment for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henestroza, E.; Eylon, S.; Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Greenway, W.G.; Logan, B.G.; MacGill, R.A.; Shuman, D.B.; Vanecek, D.L.; Waldron, W.L.; Sharp, W.M.; Houck, T.L.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Sefkow, A.B.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Olson, C.L.

    2004-03-14

    In heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion systems, intense beams of ions must be transported from the exit of the final focus magnet system through the fusion chamber to hit millimeter-sized spots on the target. Effective plasma neutralization of intense ion beams in this final transport is essential for a heavy-ion fusion power plant to be economically competitive. The physics of neutralized drift has been studied extensively with particle-in-cell simulations. To provide quantitative comparisons of theoretical predictions with experiment, the Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy Ion Fusion has completed the construction and has begun experimentation with the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX). The experiment consists of three main sections, each with its own physics issues. The injector is designed to generate a very high-brightness, space-charge-dominated potassium beam while still allowing variable perveance by a beam aperturing technique. The magnetic-focusing section, consisting of four pulsed magnetic quadrupoles, permits the study of beam tuning, as well as the effects of phase space dilution due to higher-order nonlinear fields. In the final section, the converging ion beam exiting the magnetic section is transported through a drift region with plasma sources for beam neutralization, and the final spot size is measured under various conditions of neutralization. In this paper, we discuss the design and characterization of the three sections in detail and present initial results from the experiment.

  10. Production of Dileptons in Heavy Ion Collisions at SPS-Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Koch

    1999-03-02

    In this contribution we will discuss the production of low mass dileptons in SPS-energy heavy ion collisions. We briefly review the current theoretical situation before we turn to the analysis of the recent data for Pb+Au. We also will discuss the role of baryons as a source for dileptons.

  11. Isospin Equilibration in Fermi-energy Heavy-ion Nuclear Collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May Jr., Larry

    2015-08-11

    The nuclear Equation of State and the density dependence of the asymmetry energy have been explored via heavy-ion collisions of 35 MeV/nucleon 70Zn,64Ni+64Zn and 64Zn+70Zn,64Ni. The experimental data were collected on the NIMROD-ISiS (Neutron...

  12. Structural changes induced by heavy ion irradiation in titanium silicon carbide J.C. Nappa,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Structural changes induced by heavy ion irradiation in titanium silicon carbide Authors J.C. Nappéa, UMR 8609, Bât. 108, 91405 Orsay, France ABSTRACT Carbide-type ceramics, which have remarkable thermomechanical properties, are sensed to manufacture the fuel cladding of Generation IV reactors that should work

  13. Microstructural changes induced by low energy heavy ion irradiation in titanium silicon carbide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to these working conditions, non-oxide refractory ceramics are required as fuel cladding. Thus, carbides turn outMicrostructural changes induced by low energy heavy ion irradiation in titanium silicon carbide, and it was validated on irradiated silicon carbide. The swelling of Ti3SiC2 was estimated to 2.2 ±0

  14. Present and future perspectives for high energy density physics with intense heavy ion and laser beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Germany! accelerator facilities, together with two high energy laser systems: petawatt high energy laserPresent and future perspectives for high energy density physics with intense heavy ion and laser!, Plasmaphysik, Darmstadt, Germany 2 Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt

  15. An Analysis of the Distribution of the Perpendicular Momentum in Heavy Ion Jets.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    An Analysis of the Distribution of the Perpendicular Momentum in Heavy Ion Jets. Armin Pourshafeie of matter is also produced in LHC collisions[3]. High transverse momentum jets are well understood jets can be extrapolated from that of the elementery collisions. Such high momentum jets

  16. Probing anharmonic properties of nuclear surface vibration by heavy-ion fusion reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Takigawa; K. Hagino; S. Kuyucak

    1997-06-28

    Describing fusion reactions between ^{16}O and ^{154}Dy and, between ^{16}O and ^{144}Sm by the $sd-$ and $sdf-$ interacting boson model, we show that heavy-ion fusion reactions are strongly affected by anharmonic properties of nuclear surface vibrations and nuclear shape, and thus provide a powerful method to study details of nuclear structure and dynamics.

  17. Data Analysis of Tracks of Heavy Ion Particles in Timepix , R Vilalta1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilalta, Ricardo

    developed by the Medipix2 Collaboration at CERN. Measurement of the Linear Energy Transfer (LET), the source compensation method for heavy ion tracks suffering from saturation and plasma effects. Finally, we identify, Japan and NSRL (NASA Space Radiation Laboratory) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York, USA

  18. Physics perspectives of heavy-ion collisions at very high energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Ning-bo; Chen, Bao-yi; Chen, Shi-yong; Chen, Zhen-yu; Ding, Heng-Tong; He, Min; Liu, Zhi-quan; Pang, Long-gang; Qin, Guang-you; Rapp, Ralf; Schenke, Björn; Shen, Chun; Song, Huichao; Xu, Hao-jie; Wang, Qun; Wang, Xin-Nian; Zhang, Ben-wei; Zhang, Han-zhong; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zhuang, Peng-fei

    2015-01-01

    Heavy-ion collisions at very high colliding energies are expected to produce a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) at the highest temperature obtainable in a laboratory setting. Experimental studies of these reactions can provide an unprecedented range of information on properties of the QGP at high temperatures. We report theoretical investigations of the physics perspectives of heavy-ion collisions at a future high-energy collider. These include initial parton production, collective expansion of the dense medium, jet quenching, heavy-quark transport, dissociation and regeneration of quarkonia, photon and dilepton production. We illustrate the potential of future experimental studies of the initial particle production and formation of QGP at the highest temperature to provide constraints on properties of strongly interaction matter.

  19. {gamma} spectroscopy around doubly magic {sup 48}Ca by heavy-ion transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leoni, Silvia

    2012-10-20

    {gamma} spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei around {sup 48}Ca is performed by the heavy-ion transfer reaction {sup 48}Ca on {sup 64}Ni at 282 MeV, with the PRISMA-CLARA setup at Legnaro Laboratory. Angular distributions, polarizations and lifetimes analysis probe spin and parities of several excited states, shading lights on their configuration. In the one neutron transfer channels, {sup 49}Ca and {sup 47}Ca, states arising by coupling a single particle to the 3{sup -} phonon of {sup 48}Ca are observed, showing the robustness of nuclear collectivity in rather light systems. The work demonstrates the feasibility of complete in-beam {gamma}-spectroscopy with heavy-ion transfer reactions and provides a method that can be further exploited in the future with heavy targets and radioactive beams.

  20. Proceedings of the 8th high energy heavy ion study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, J.W.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    This was the eighth in a series of conferences jointly sponsored by the Nuclear Science Division of LBL and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in West Germany. Sixty papers on current research at both relativistic and intermediate energies are included in this report. Topics covered consisted of: Equation of State of Nuclear Matter, Pion and High Energy Gamma Emission, Theory of Multifragmentation, Intermediate Energies, Fragmentation, Atomic Physics, Nuclear Structure, Electromagnetic Processes, and New Facilities planned for SIS-ESR. The latest design parameters of the Bevalac Upgrade Proposal were reviewed for the user community. Also, the design of a new electronic 4..pi.. detector, a time projection chamber which would be placed at the HISS facility, was presented.

  1. Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares and Enrichment of 3He and Heavy Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vahe' Petrosian

    2008-08-13

    We discuss possible mechanisms of acceleration of particles in solar flares and show that turbulence plays an important role in all the mechanism. It is also argued that stochastic particle acceleration by turbulent plasma waves is the most likely mechanism for production of the high energy electrons and ions responsible for observed radiative signatures of solar flares and for solar energetic particle or SEPs, and that the predictions of this model agrees well with many past and recent high spectral and temporal observations of solar flares. It is shown that, in addition, the model explains many features of SEPs that accompany flares. In particular we show that it can successfully explain the observed extreme enhancement, relative to photospheric values, of $^3$He ions and the relative spectra of $^3$He and $^4$He. It has also the potential of explaining the relative abundances of most ions including the increasing enhancements of heavy ions with ion mass or mass-to-charge ratio.

  2. Reorientation of the crystalline planes in confined single crystal nickel nanorods induced by heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, Abha; Tyagi, Pawan K.; Rai, Padmnabh; Misra, D. S.; Ghatak, Jay; Satyam, P. V.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2006-08-28

    In a recent letter Tyagi et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 86, 253110 (2005)] have reported the special orientation of nickel planes inside multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with respect to the tube axis. Heavy ion irradiation has been performed with 1.5 MeV Au{sup 2+} and 100 MeV Au{sup 7+} ions on these nickel filled MWCNTs at fluences ranging from 10{sup 12} to 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. Ion-induced modifications have been studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The diffraction pattern and the lattice imaging showed the presence of ion-induced planar defects on the tube walls and completely amorphized encapsulated nickel nanorods. The results are discussed in terms of thermal spike model.

  3. Heavy-ion transfer reactions at large internuclear distance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montanari, D.; Corradi, L.; Szilner, S.; Pollarolo, G.; Fioretto, E.; Stefanini, A. M.; Farnea, E.; Michelagnoli, C.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Ur, C. A.; Courtin, S.; Goasduff, A.; Haas, F.; Mijatovic, T.; Soic, N.; Grebosz, J.

    2012-10-20

    The transfer reaction for the {sup 116}Sn+{sup 60}Ni system has been studied using the PRISMA magnetic spectrometer at different bombarding energies from above to well below the Coulomb barrier. The experiment has been done in inverse kinematics and light target-like ions have been detected with PRISMA placed at very forward angles. Good mass, nuclear charge and kinetic energy resolutions have been achieved. Sufficient statistics has been accumulated to extract angular distributions for different bombarding energies have been extracted and the response function of the spectrometer has been studied to correct for the aberration due to the transport of the ions in PRISMA. The comparison between the present case and the previously measured {sup 96}Zr+{sup 40}Ca system, superfluid and near closed shells nuclei, respectively, should significantly improve our understanding of nucleon-nucleon correlation properties in multinucleon transfer processes.

  4. Open heavy flavor production at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. P. Suaide

    2007-02-16

    The study of heavy flavor production in relativistic heavy ion collisions is an extreme experimental challenge but provides important information on the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) created in Au+Au collisions at RHIC. Heavy-quarks are believed to be produced in the initial stages of the collision, and are essential on the understanding of parton energy loss in the dense medium created in such environment. Moreover, heavy-quarks can help to investigate fundamental properties of QCD in elementary p+p collisions. In this work we review recent results on heavy flavor production and their interaction with the hot and dense medium at RHIC.

  5. OPTIMIZATION OF THE PARAMETERS IN THE RHIC SINGLE CRYSTAL HEAVY ION COLLIMATION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BIRYUKOV,V.M.; CHESNOKOV,Y.A.; KOTOV,V.I.; TRBOJEVIC,D.; STEVENS,A.

    1999-03-29

    In the framework of the project to design and test a collimation system prototype using bent channeling crystal for cleaning of the RHIC heavy ion beam halo, we have studied the optimal length and bending angle of a silicon (110) single crystal proposed to be a primary element situated upstream of the traditional heavy amorphous collimator. Besides the matters of the channeling and collimation efficiency, we also looked into the impact the crystal may have on the non-channeled particles that go on circulating in the ring, so as to reduce the momentum offset of the particles scattered of the crystal.

  6. Systematics of heavy-ion fusion hindrance at extreme sub-barrier energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. L. Jiang; B. B. Back; H. Esbensen; R. V. F. Janssens; abd K. E. Rehm

    2005-08-01

    The recent discovery of hindrance in heavy-ion induced fusion reactions at extreme sub-barrier energies represents a challenge for theoretical models. Previously, it has been shown that in medium-heavy systems, the onset of fusion hindrance depends strongly on the "stiffness" of the nuclei in the entrance channel. In this work, we explore its dependence on the total mass and the $Q$-value of the fusing systems and find that the fusion hindrance depends in a systematic way on the entrance channel properties over a wide range of systems.

  7. The domain of validity of fluid dynamics and the onset of cavitation in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denicol, Gabriel S; Jeon, Sangyong

    2015-01-01

    If the bulk viscosity of QCD matter is large, the effective pressure of the hot and dense matter created in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions can become negative, leading to instabilities in the evolution of the plasma. In the context of heavy ion collisions, this effect is sometimes referred to as cavitation. In this contribution we discuss the onset of cavitation in event-by-event hydrodynamic simulations of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions at LHC energies. We estimate how large the bulk viscosity of the QGP has to be in the QCD (pseudo) phase transition region in order for the effective pressure of the system to actually become negative.

  8. The domain of validity of fluid dynamics and the onset of cavitation in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriel S. Denicol; Charles Gale; Sangyong Jeon

    2015-03-02

    If the bulk viscosity of QCD matter is large, the effective pressure of the hot and dense matter created in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions can become negative, leading to instabilities in the evolution of the plasma. In the context of heavy ion collisions, this effect is sometimes referred to as cavitation. In this contribution we discuss the onset of cavitation in event-by-event hydrodynamic simulations of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions at LHC energies. We estimate how large the bulk viscosity of the QGP has to be in the QCD (pseudo) phase transition region in order for the effective pressure of the system to actually become negative.

  9. Electrical conductivity of the quark-gluon plasma and soft photon spectrum in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Yi

    2014-10-01

    I extract the electrical conductivity ?0 of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) and study the effects of magnetic field and chiral anomaly on soft photon azimuthal anisotropy, v?, based on the thermal photon spectrum at 0.4GeVRelativistic Heavy Ion Collider energy. As a basis for my analysis, I derive the behavior of retarded photon self-energy of a strongly interacting neutral plasma in hydrodynamic regime in the presence of magnetic field and chiral anomaly. By evolving the resulting soft thermal photon production rate over the realistic hydrodynamic background and comparing the results with the data from the PHENIX Collaboration, I found that the electrical conductivity at QGP temperature is in the range: 0.4

  10. Systematic Investigation of Negative Cooper-Frye Contributions in Heavy Ion Collisions Using Coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Oliinychenko; P. Huovinen; H. Petersen

    2015-03-18

    In most heavy ion collision simulations involving relativistic hydrodynamics, the Cooper-Frye formula is applied to transform the hydrodynamical fields to particles. In this article the so-called negative contributions in the Cooper-Frye formula are studied using a coarse-grained transport approach. The magnitude of negative contributions is investigated as a function of hadron mass, collision energy in the range of $E_{\\rm lab} = 5$--$160A$ GeV, collision centrality and the energy density transition criterion defining the hypersurface. The microscopic results are compared to negative contributions expected from hydrodynamical treatment assuming local thermal equilibrium. The main conclusion is that the number of actual microscopic particles flying inward is smaller than the negative contribution one would expect in an equilibrated scenario. The largest impact of negative contributions is found to be on the pion rapidity distribution at midrapidity in central collisions. For this case negative contributions in equilibrium constitute 8--13\\% of positive contributions depending on collision energy, but only 0.5--4\\% in cascade calculation. The dependence on the collision energy itself is found to be non-monotonous with a maximum at 10-20$A$ GeV.

  11. Heavy ion fusion year-end report, April 1, 1981-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    A beam propagation experiment is being prepared to test theoretical predictions about transverse instabilities in a heavy ion beam with large space-charge effects in a long quadrupole transport system. The 200 keV injector which has the features of variable current density and variable emittance has been constructed. The Cs/sup +/ pulsed drift tube injector model continues to operate for studies of beam optics, component testing in an intense ion-beam environment, and diagnostics development. The electron-beam probe has now yielded successful results on the time-resolved charge density of the Cs/sup +/ ion-beam. It has revealed the existence of a significant number of electrons surrounding the ion-beam. The theory of longitudinal instabilities has been advanced. Improvements to the EGUN and other beam-dynamics codes continue and have yielded valuable results. Transport of high-intensity beams in an A.G. octupole system is under active study.

  12. Intercombination and forbidden transition rates in C-and N-like ions ,,O2 measured at a heavy-ion storage ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chantler, Christopher T.

    ¿ ... measured at a heavy-ion storage ring E. Tra¨bert,1, * A. G. Calamai,2 J. D. Gillaspy,3 G. Gwinner,4 X of S have been measured optically at a heavy-ion storage ring. The lifetime results, 1.250 13 ms for the 2s2 identified the famous coronal lines in the visible spectrum of the solar corona with precisely

  13. Dynamics of strangeness production in heavy-ion collisions near threshold energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao-Qing Feng; Gen-Ming Jin

    2010-10-13

    Within the framework of the improved isospin dependent quantum molecular dynamics (ImIQMD) model, the dynamics of strangeness (K$^{0,+}$, $\\Lambda$ and $\\Sigma^{-,0,+}$) production in heavy-ion collisions near threshold energies is investigated systematically, in which the strange particles are considered to be mainly produced by the inelastic collisions of baryon-baryon and pion-baryon. The collisions in the region of supra-saturation densities of the dense baryonic matter formed in heavy-ion collisions dominate the yields of strangeness production. The total multiplicities as functions of incident energies and collision centralities are calculated with the Skyrme parameter SLy6. The excitation function of strangeness production is analyzed and also compared with the KaoS data for the K$^{+}$ production in the reactions $^{12}$C+$^{12}$C and $^{197}$Au+$^{197}$Au.

  14. Universal Behavior of Charged Particle Production in Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Steinberg; PHOBOS Collaboration

    2002-10-17

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two kinds of universal behavior are observed in charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/pbar-p and e+e- data. N_tot/(N_part/2) in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with sqrt(s) in a similar way as N_tot in e+e- collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. This feature may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  15. Turbulent thermalization process in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jürgen Berges; Björn Schenke; Sören Schlichting; Raju Venugopalan

    2014-09-05

    We discuss the onset of the thermalization process in high-energy heavy-ion collisions from a weak coupling perspective, using classical-statistical real-time lattice simulations as a first principles tool to study the pre-equilibrium dynamics. Most remarkably, we find that the thermalization process is governed by a universal attractor, where the space-time evolution of the plasma becomes independent of the initial conditions and exhibits the self-similar dynamics characteristic of wave turbulence. We discuss the consequences of our weak coupling results for the thermalization process in heavy-ion experiments and briefly comment on the use of weak coupling techniques at larger values of the coupling.

  16. Exploring the QCD Phase Structure with Beam Energy Scan in Heavy-ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Beam energy scan programs in heavy-ion collisions aim to explore the QCD phase structure at high baryon density. Sensitive observables are applied to probe the signatures of the QCD phase transition and critical point in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and SPS. Intriguing structures, such as dip, peak and oscillation, have been observed in the energy dependence of various observables. In this paper, an overview is given and corresponding physics implications will be discussed for the experimental highlights from the beam energy scan programs at the STAR, PHENIX and NA61/SHINE experiments. Furthermore, the beam energy scan phase II at RHIC (2019-2020) and other future experimental facilities for studying the physics at low energies will be also discussed.

  17. Exact Dirac equation calculation of ionization and pair production induced by ultrarelativistic heavy ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. Baltz

    1997-01-10

    An exact solution of the time-dependent Dirac equation for ionization and pair production induced by ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions is presented. Exact transition probabilities, equivalent to those that would be obtained in an untruncated basis coupled channels calculation, are presented. Exact bound-electron positron pair production probabilities are calculated to be mostly smaller than those calculated with the same potential in perturbation theory at impact parameters small enough for differences to occur.

  18. Status and Promise of Particle Interferometry in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selemon Bekele; Fabio Braghin; Zbigniew Chajecki; Paul Chung; John G. Cramer; Tamas Csorgo; Hans Eggers; Sean Gavin; Frederique Grassi; Yogiro Hama; Adam Kisiel; Che-Ming Ko; Tomoi Koide; Gastao Krein; Roy Lacey; Richard Lednicky; Michael A. Lisa; Wesley Metzger; Dariusz Miskowiec; Kenji Morita; Sandra S. Padula; Scott Pratt; Wei-Liang Qian; Vladislav Simak; Yuri Sinyukov; Michal Sumbera; Bernardo M. Tavares; Giuseppe Verde; Detlef Zschiesche

    2007-06-06

    After five years of running at RHIC, and on the eve of the LHC heavy-ion program, we highlight the status of femtoscopic measurements. We emphasize the role interferometry plays in addressing fundamental questions about the state of matter created in such collisions, and present an enumerated list of measurements, analyses and calculations that are needed to advance the field in the coming years.

  19. Sound Wave in Hot Dense Matter Created in Heavy Ion Collision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Sun; Z. Yang

    2005-12-14

    A model to study the sound wave in hot dense matter created in heavy ion collisions by jet is proposed.The preliminary data of jet shape analysis of PHENIX Collaboration for all centralities and two directions is well explained in this model. Then the wavelength of the sound wave, the natural frequency of the hot dense matter and the speed of sound wave are estimated from the fit.

  20. Implications of CP-violating transitions in hot quark matter on heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmen J. Warringa

    2008-05-09

    Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) predicts that topological charge changing transitions will take place in hot quark matter. Such transitions induce P- and CP-violating effects. We will show that in the presence of a magnetic field these transitions can separate quarks according to their electric charge along the direction of the magnetic field. This is the so-called Chiral Magnetic Effect. We will argue that it might be possible to observe the Chiral Magnetic Effect in heavy ion collisions.

  1. Searching for P- and CP-odd effects in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Andrianov; V. A. Andrianov; D. Espriu; X. Planells

    2015-02-11

    In this talk we will summarize the main results from our recent work concerning the possibility that a new metastable phase occurs in some heavy ion collisions (HIC). This phase would be characterized by the breaking of two characteristic symmetries of strong interactions; namely P and CP. We investigate the experimental consequences of parity breaking in such a situation and propose suitable observables to elucidate the presence this phenomenon.

  2. Heavy ion fusion accelerator research (HIFAR) year-end report, April 1, 1987-September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    The basic objective of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program is to access the suitabilty of heavy ion accelerators as iginiters for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A specific accerelator techonolgy, the induction linac, has been studied at the Lawerence Berkeley Laboratory and has reached the point at which its viability for ICF applications can be assessed over the next few years. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high-power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the vadidation of new accelerator strategies, to cut costs. The papers in this report that address these goals are: MBE-4 mechanical progress, alignment of MBE-4, a compact energy analyzer for MBE-4, Cs/sup +/ injector modeling with the EGUN code, an improved emittance scanning system for HIFAR, 2-MV injector, carbon arc source development, beam combining in ILSE, emittance growth due to transverse beam combining in ILSE - particle simulation results, achromatic beam combiner for ILSE, additional elements for beam merging, quadrupole magnet design for ILSE, and waveforms and longitudinal beam-parameters for ILSE.

  3. Effect of swift heavy ion irradiation on bare and coated ZnS quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, S. Hussain, A.M.P.; Ahmed, G.A.; Singh, F.; Avasthi, D.K.; Choudhury, A.

    2008-12-01

    The present study compares structural and optical modifications of bare and silica (SiO{sub 2}) coated ZnS quantum dots under swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. Bare and silica coated ZnS quantum dots were prepared following an inexpensive chemical route using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as the dielectric host matrix. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of the samples show the formation of almost spherical ZnS quantum dots. The UV-Vis absorption spectra reveal blue shift relative to bulk material in absorption energy while photoluminescence (PL) spectra suggests that surface state and near band edge emissions are dominating in case of bare and coated samples, respectively. Swift heavy ion irradiation of the samples was carried out with 160 MeV Ni{sup 12+} ion beam with fluences 10{sup 12} to 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. Size enhancement of bare quantum dots after irradiation has been indicated in XRD and TEM analysis of the samples which has also been supported by optical absorption spectra. However similar investigations on irradiated coated quantum dots revealed little change in quantum dot size and emission. The present study thus shows that the coated ZnS quantum dots are stable upon SHI irradiation compared to the bare one.

  4. Energy losses of fast heavy-ion projectiles in dense hydrogen plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballester, D

    2008-01-01

    It has been recently shown that the Bethe-Larkin formula for the energy losses of fast heavy-ion projectiles in dense hydrogen plasmas is corrected by the electron-ion correlations [Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{101}, 075002 (2008)]. We report numerical estimates of this correction based on the values of $g_{ei}(0)$ obtained by numerical simulations in [Phys. Rev. E \\textbf{61}, 3470 (2000)]. We also extend this result to the case of projectiles with dicluster charge distribution. We show that the experimental visibility of the electron-ion correlation correction is enhanced in the case of dicluster projectiles with randomly orientated charge centers. Although we consider here the hydrogen plasmas to make the effect physically more clear, the generalization to multispecies plasmas is straightforward.

  5. Design study of electron cyclotron resonance-ion plasma accelerator for heavy ion cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inoue, T. Sugimoto, S.; Sasai, K.; Hattori, T.

    2014-02-15

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance-Ion Plasma Accelerator (ECR-IPAC) device, which theoretically can accelerate multiple charged ions to several hundred MeV with short acceleration length, has been proposed. The acceleration mechanism is based on the combination of two physical principles, plasma electron ion adiabatic ejection (PLEIADE) and Gyromagnetic Autoresonance (GYRAC). In this study, we have designed the proof of principle machine ECR-IPAC device and simulated the electromagnetic field distribution generating in the resonance cavity. ECR-IPAC device consisted of three parts, ECR ion source section, GYRAC section, and PLEIADE section. ECR ion source section and PLEIADE section were designed using several multi-turn solenoid coils and sextupole magnets, and GYRAC section was designed using 10 turns coil. The structure of ECR-IPAC device was the cylindrical shape, and the total length was 1024 mm and the maximum diameter was 580 mm. The magnetic field distribution, which maintains the stable acceleration of plasma, was generated on the acceleration center axis throughout three sections. In addition, the electric field for efficient acceleration of electrons was generated in the resonance cavity by supplying microwave of 2.45 GHz.

  6. Radiation damage by light- and heavy-ion bombardment of single-crystal LiNbO?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Hsu-Cheng [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Zhang, Lihua [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Malladi, Girish [SUNY Polytechnic Inst., Albany, NY (United States); Dadap, Jerry I. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Manandhar, Sandeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kisslinger, Kim [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Vemuri, Rama Sesha R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bakhru, Hassaram [SUNY Polytechnic Inst., Albany, NY (United States); Osgood, Jr., Richard M. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a battery of analytical methods including in situ RBS/C, confocal micro-Raman, TEM/STEM, EDS, AFM, and optical microscopy were used to provide a comparative investigation of light- and heavy-ion radiation damage in single-crystal LiNbO?. High (~MeV) and low (~100s keV) ion energies, corresponding to different stopping power mechanisms, were used and their associated damage events were observed. In addition, sequential irradiation of both ion species was also performed and their cumulative depth-dependent damage was determined. It was found that the contribution from electronic stopping by high-energy heavy ions gave rise to a lower critical fluence for damage formation than for the case of low-energy irradiation. Such energy-dependent critical fluence of heavy-ion irradiation is two to three orders of magnitude smaller than that for the case of light-ion damage. In addition, materials amorphization and collision cascades were seen for heavy-ion irradiation, while for light ion, crystallinity remained at the highest fluence used in the experiment. The irradiation-induced damage is characterized by the formation of defect clusters, elastic strain, surface deformation, as well as change in elemental composition. In particular, the presence of nanometric-scale damage pockets results in increased RBS/C backscattered signal and the appearance of normally forbidden Raman phonon modes. The location of the highest density of damage is in good agreement with SRIM calculations. (author)

  7. Measurements of Heavy Flavor and Di-electron Production at STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gang Wang

    2012-01-20

    Heavy quarks are produced early in the relativistic heavy ion collisions, and provide an excellent probe into the hot and dense nuclear matter created at RHIC. In these proceedings, we will discuss recent STAR measurements of heavy flavor production, to investigate the heavy quark interaction with the medium. Electromagnetic probes, such as electrons, provide information on the various stages of the medium evolution without modification by final stage interactions. Di-electron production measurements by STAR will also be discussed.

  8. Observables from a relativistic hydro solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csanad, Mate

    2009-01-01

    In the last several years it has been revealed that the matter produced in the collisions of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a nearly perfect fluid, i.e. it can be described with perfect fluid hydrodynamics. There was a long search for exact hydrodynamic models (solutions of the partial differential equations of hydrodynamics) and several models proved to be applicable. There are 1+3 dimensional models, as well as relativistic models - but no 1+3 dimensional and relativistic model has been tested yet. In this paper we extract observables from the relativistic, ellipsoidally symmetric model of Csorgo et al. We calculate momentum distribution, elliptic flow and correlation radii and compare them to RHIC data.

  9. Review of QCD, Quark-Gluon Plasma, Heavy Quark Hybrids, and Heavy Quark State production in p-p and A-A collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard S. Kisslinger; Debasish Das

    2015-05-12

    This is a review of the Quantum Chrodynamics Cosmological Phase Transition, the Quark-Gluon Plasma, and the detection of the Quark-Gluon Plasma via RHIC(Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions) production of heavy quark states using the mixed hybrid theory for the $\\Psi(2S)$ and $\\Upsilon(3S)$ states.

  10. Benchmarking Heavy Ion Transport Codes FLUKA, HETC-HEDS MARS15, MCNPX, and PHITS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronningen, Reginald Martin [Michigan State University; Remec, Igor [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Heilbronn, Lawrence H. [University of Tennessee-Knoxville

    2013-06-07

    Powerful accelerators such as spallation neutron sources, muon-collider/neutrino facilities, and rare isotope beam facilities must be designed with the consideration that they handle the beam power reliably and safely, and they must be optimized to yield maximum performance relative to their design requirements. The simulation codes used for design purposes must produce reliable results. If not, component and facility designs can become costly, have limited lifetime and usefulness, and could even be unsafe. The objective of this proposal is to assess the performance of the currently available codes � PHITS, FLUKA, MARS15, MCNPX, and HETC-HEDS � that could be used for design simulations involving heavy ion transport. We plan to access their performance by performing simulations and comparing results against experimental data of benchmark quality. Quantitative knowledge of the biases and the uncertainties of the simulations is essential as this potentially impacts the safe, reliable and cost effective design of any future radioactive ion beam facility. Further benchmarking of heavy-ion transport codes was one of the actions recommended in the �Report of the 2003 RIA R&D Workshop".

  11. J/psi production and elliptic flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Taesoo; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Xu, Jun.

    2011-01-01

    Using the two-component model for charmonium production, which includes contributions from both initial hard nucleon-nucleon scattering and from regeneration in the quark-gluon plasma, we study the nuclear modification ...

  12. Anisotropic flow fluctuations in hydro-inspired freeze-out model for relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. V. Bravina; E. S. Fotina; V. L. Korotkikh; I. P. Lokhtin; L. V. Malinina; E. N. Nazarova; S. V. Petrushanko; A. M. Snigirev; E. E. Zabrodin

    2015-11-06

    The LHC data on event-by-event harmonic flow coefficients measured in PbPb collisions at center-of-mass energy 2.76 TeV per nucleon pair are analyzed and interpreted within the HYDJET++ model. To compare the model results with the experimental data the unfolding procedure is employed. The essentially dynamical origin of the flow fluctuations in hydro-inspired freeze-out approach has been established. It is shown that the simple modification of the model via introducing the distribution over spatial anisotropy parameters permits HYDJET++ to reproduce both elliptic and triangular flow fluctuations and related to it eccentricity fluctuations of the initial state at the LHC energy.

  13. Freeze-out in hydrodynamical models in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magas, V K; Csernai, László P; Grassi, Frédérique; Greiner, W; Hama, Y; Kodama, T; Lázár, Z I; Stöcker, H; Lazar, Zs.I.

    1999-01-01

    Freeze-out of particles across 3-dimensional space-time hypersurface with space-like normal is discussed in a simple kinetic model. The final momentum distribution of emitted particles shows a non-exponential transverse momentum spectrum, which is in quantitative agreement with recently measured SPS pion and $h^-$ spectra.

  14. Contribution of the Reaction Ny-]Nnk to Antikaon Production in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Che Ming.

    1984-01-01

    implies that more than one projectile nucleon must be involved in converting their kinetic energies into the mass of K . This experi- ment provides, therefore, the possibility of studying nu- clear collective effects, such as Fermi motions, coherent... of the initial nu- cleon in the c.m. system while p' and E' are the momen- tum and energy of the same nucleon in the final state, i.e., p'=[U ?(W+MN) ]' [U (W MN)?]' l2U?, (6) and E'=(p' +MN)' . The quantity op(W;b, ) is the isospin-averaged cross section...

  15. Applications of the LAHET simulation code to relativistic heavy ion detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, L.S.; Gavron, A.

    1991-01-01

    The Los Alamos High Energy Transport (LAHET) simulation code has been applied to test beam data from the lead/scintillator Participant Calorimeter of BNL AGS experiment E814. The LAHET code treats hadronic interactions with the LANL version of the Oak Ridge code HETC. LAHET has now been expanded to handle hadrons with kinetic energies greater than 5 GeV with the FLUKA code, while HETC is used exclusively below 2.0 GeV. FLUKA is phased in linearly between 2.0 and 5.0 GeV. Transport of electrons and photons is done with EGS4, and an interface to the Los Alamos HMCNP3B library based code is provided to analyze neutrons with kinetic energies less than 20 MeV. Excellent agreement is found between the test data and simulation, and results for 2.46 GeV/c protons and pions are illustrated in this article.

  16. Applications of the LAHET simulation code to relativistic heavy ion detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, L.S.; Gavron, A.

    1991-12-31

    The Los Alamos High Energy Transport (LAHET) simulation code has been applied to test beam data from the lead/scintillator Participant Calorimeter of BNL AGS experiment E814. The LAHET code treats hadronic interactions with the LANL version of the Oak Ridge code HETC. LAHET has now been expanded to handle hadrons with kinetic energies greater than 5 GeV with the FLUKA code, while HETC is used exclusively below 2.0 GeV. FLUKA is phased in linearly between 2.0 and 5.0 GeV. Transport of electrons and photons is done with EGS4, and an interface to the Los Alamos HMCNP3B library based code is provided to analyze neutrons with kinetic energies less than 20 MeV. Excellent agreement is found between the test data and simulation, and results for 2.46 GeV/c protons and pions are illustrated in this article.

  17. Indications of Conical Emission of Charged Hadrons at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, M.

    Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at ?s[subscript NN]=200??GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are ...

  18. Scaling properties at freeze-out in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balewski, Jan T.

    Identified charged pion, kaon, and proton spectra are used to explore the system size dependence of bulk freeze-out properties in Cu+Cu collisions at [sqrt]sNN=200 and 62.4 GeV. The data are studied with hydrodynamically ...

  19. PHYSICAL REVIEW C 80, 064902 (2009) Deuteron production and elliptic flow in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zi-wei

    2009-01-01

    V and also with those obtained from the coalescence model based on freeze-out nucleons in the transport model Carolina 27858, USA (Received 13 October 2009; published 3 December 2009) The hadronic transport model ART in the hadronic matter. This new hadronic transport model is used to study the transverse momentum spectrum

  20. Centrality dependence of two-particle correlations in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Youngsoo

    2009-01-01

    Results on the centrality dependence of two-particle correlations in Au+Au collisions at ... 200GeV are presented. A particular focus is devoted to investigating any anomalous behavior in the centrality dependence of ...

  1. Final Report for Project ``Theory of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) |production at aSciTech ConnectW49BPrecipitation

  2. Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D-Nicholas

  3. Final Report for Project ``Theory of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) |Final Report Document Number(Technical Report) |

  4. A relativistic self-consistent model for studying enhancement of space charge limited field emission due to counter-streaming ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, M. C., E-mail: mingchiehlin@gmail.com; Lu, P. S. [NanoScience Simulation Laboratory, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City 24205, Taiwan (China) [NanoScience Simulation Laboratory, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City 24205, Taiwan (China); Plasma Theory and Simulation Group, Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chang, P. C. [NanoScience Simulation Laboratory, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City 24205, Taiwan (China) [NanoScience Simulation Laboratory, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City 24205, Taiwan (China); Plasma Theory and Simulation Group, Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Ragan-Kelley, B. [Plasma Theory and Simulation Group, Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Plasma Theory and Simulation Group, Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Applied Science and Technology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Verboncoeur, J. P. [Plasma Theory and Simulation Group, Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) [Plasma Theory and Simulation Group, Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Recently, field emission has attracted increasing attention despite the practical limitation that field emitters operate below the Child-Langmuir space charge limit. By introducing counter-streaming ion flow to neutralize the electron charge density, the space charge limited field emission (SCLFE) current can be dramatically enhanced. In this work, we have developed a relativistic self-consistent model for studying the enhancement of SCLFE by a counter-streaming ion current. The maximum enhancement is found when the ion effect is saturated, as shown analytically. The solutions in non-relativistic, intermediate, and ultra-relativistic regimes are obtained and verified with 1-D particle-in-cell simulations. This self-consistent model is general and can also serve as a benchmark or comparison for verification of simulation codes, as well as extension to higher dimensions.

  5. “Ripples” on a relativistically expanding fluid

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shi, Shuzhe; Liao, Jinfeng; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2014-12-29

    Recent studies have shown that fluctuations of various types play important roles in the evolution of the fireball created in relativistic heavy ion collisions and bear many phenomenological consequences for experimental observables. In addition, the bulk dynamics of the fireball is well described by relativistic hydrodynamic expansion and the fluctuations on top of such expanding background can be studied within the linearized hydrodynamic framework. In this paper we present complete and analytic sound wave solutions on top of both Bjorken flow and Hubble flow backgrounds.

  6. Probing Shadowed Nuclear Sea with Massive Gauge Bosons in the Future Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng Ru; Ben-Wei Zhang; Enke Wang; Wei-Ning Zhang

    2015-10-14

    The production of the massive bosons $Z^0$ and $W^{\\pm}$ could provide an excellent tool to study cold nuclear matter effects and the modifications of nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFs) relative to parton distribution functions (PDFs) of a free proton in high energy nuclear reactions at the LHC as well as in heavy-ion collisions (HIC) with much higher center-of mass energies available in the future colliders. In this paper we calculate the rapidity and transverse momentum distributions of the vector boson and their nuclear modification factors in p+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=63$TeV and in Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=39$TeV in the framework of perturbative QCD by utilizing three parametrization sets of nPDFs: EPS09, DSSZ and nCTEQ. It is found that in heavy-ion collisions at such high colliding energies, both the rapidity distribution and the transverse momentum spectrum of vector bosons are considerably suppressed in wide kinematic regions with respect to p+p reactions due to large nuclear shadowing effect. We demonstrate that in the massive vector boson productions processes with sea quarks in the initial-state may give more contributions than those with valence quarks in the initial-state, therefore in future heavy-ion collisions the isospin effect is less pronounced and the charge asymmetry of W boson will be reduced significantly as compared to that at the LHC. Large difference between results with nCTEQ and results with EPS09 and DSSZ is observed in nuclear modifications of both rapidity and $p_T$ distributions of $Z^0$ and $W$ in the future HIC.

  7. Probing Shadowed Nuclear Sea with Massive Gauge Bosons in the Future Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng Ru; Ben-Wei Zhang; Enke Wang; Wei-Ning Zhang

    2015-05-29

    The production of the massive bosons $Z^0$ and $W^{\\pm}$ could provide an excellent tool to study cold nuclear matter effects and the modifications of nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFs) relative to parton distribution functions (PDFs) of a free proton in high energy nuclear reactions at the LHC as well as in heavy-ion collisions (HIC) with much higher center-of mass energies available in the future colliders. In this paper we calculate the rapidity and transverse momentum distributions of the vector boson and their nuclear modification factors in p+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=63$TeV and in Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=39$TeV in the framework of perturbative QCD by utilizing three parametrization sets of nPDFs: EPS09, DSSZ and nCTEQ. It is found that in heavy-ion collisions at such high colliding energies, both the rapidity distribution and the transverse momentum spectrum of vector bosons are considerably suppressed in wide kinematic regions with respect to p+p reactions due to large nuclear shadowing effect. We demonstrate that in the massive vector boson productions processes with sea quarks in the initial-state may give more contributions than those with valence quarks in the initial-state, therefore in future heavy-ion collisions the isospin effect is less pronounced and the charge asymmetry of W boson will be reduced significantly as compared to that at the LHC. Large difference between results with nCTEQ and results with EPS09 and DSSZ is observed in nuclear modifications of both rapidity and $p_T$ distributions of $Z^0$ and $W$ in the future HIC.

  8. A Ghoshal-like Test of Equilibration in Near-Fermi-Energy Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Wang; T. Keutgen; R. Wada; K. Hagel; Y. G. Ma; M. Murray; L. Qin; P. Smith; J. B. Natowitz; R. Alfaro; J. Cibor; A. Botvina; M. Cinausero; Y. El Masri; D. Fabris; A. Keksis; S. Kowalski; M. Lunardon; A. Makeev; N. Marie; E. Martin; Z. Majka; A. Martinez-Davalos; A. Menchaca-Rocha; G. Nebbia; S. Moretto; G. Prete; V. Rizzi; A. Ruangma; D. V. Shetty; G. Souliotis; P. Staszel; M. Veselsky; G. Viesti; E. M. Winchester; S. J. Yennello; W. Zipper; A. Ono

    2004-12-22

    Calorimetric and coalescence techniques have been employed to probe equilibration for hot nuclei produced in heavy ion collisions of 35 to 55 MeV/u projectiles with medium mass targets. Entrance channel mass asymmetries and energies were selected in order that very hot composite nuclei of similar mass and excitation would remain after early stage pre-equilibrium particle emission. Inter-comparison of the properties and de-excitation patterns for these different systems provides evidence for the production of hot nuclei with decay patterns relatively independent of the specific entrance channel.

  9. Present status of coupled-channels calculations for heavy-ion subbarrier fusion reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagino, K

    2015-01-01

    The coupled-channels method has been a standard tool in analyzing heavy-ion fusion reactions at energies around the Coulomb barrier. We investigate three simplifications usually adopted in the coupled-channels calculations. These are i) the exclusion of non-collective excitations, ii) the assumption of coordinate independent coupling strengths, and iii) the harmonic oscillator approximation for multi-phonon excitations. In connection to the last point, we propose a novel microscopic method based on the beyond-mean-field approach in order to take into account the anharmonic effects of collective vibrations.

  10. Time-Depentent Hartree-Fock description of heavy ions fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cédric Simenel; Benoît Avez

    2007-11-06

    A microscopic mean-field description of heavy ions fusion is performed in the framework of the Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory using a Skyrme interaction with the SLy4d parametrization. A good agreement with experiments is obtained on the position of the fusion barriers for various total masses, mass asymmetries and deformations. The excitation function of the 16O+208Pb is overestimated by about 16% above the barrier. The restriction to an independent particles state in the mean-field dynamics prevents the description of sub-barrier fusion. Effect of transfer on fusion is discussed.

  11. Glauber model for heavy ion collisions from low energies to high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Shukla

    2001-12-13

    The Glauber model is extensively applied to heavy ion collision for describing a number of interaction processes over a wide range of energies from near the Coulomb barrier to higher energies. The model gives the nucleus-nucleus interaction in terms of interaction between the constituent nucleons with a given density distribution. The model is a semiclassical model picturing the nuclear collision in the impact parameter representation where the nuclei move along the collision direction in a straight path. In these lectures we derive this model and discuss its applications in variety of problems in nuclear and high energy physics.

  12. Event-by-event fluctuations of magnetic and electric fields in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam Bzdak; Vladimir Skokov

    2012-03-06

    We show that fluctuating proton positions in the colliding nuclei generate, on the event-by-event basis, very strong magnetic and electric fields in the direction both parallel and perpendicular to the reaction plane. The magnitude of E and B fields in each event is of the order of m_pi^2 \\approx 10^18 Gauss. Implications on the observation of electric dipole in heavy ion collisions is discussed, and the possibility of measuring the electric conductivity of the hot medium is pointed out.

  13. Anomalous transport effects and possible environmental symmetry "violation" in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinfeng Liao

    2015-02-27

    The heavy ion collision provides a unique many-body environment where local domains of strongly interacting chiral medium may occur and in a sense allow environmental symmetry "violation" phenomena. For example certain anomalous transport processes, forbidden in usual medium, become possible in such domains. We briefly review recent progress in both the theoretical understanding and experimental search of various anomalous transport effects (such as the Chiral Magnetic Effect, Chiral Separation Effect, Chiral Electric Separation Effect, Chiral Electric/Magnetic Waves, etc) in the hot QCD fluid created by such collisions.

  14. ZPC 1.0.1: a parton cascade for ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bin Zhang

    1997-09-05

    A Monte Carlo program solving Boltzmann equation for partons via cascade method is presented. At presented, only gluon-gluon elastic scattering is included. The scattering cross section is regulated by a medium generated screening mass. Three different geometric modes (3 dimension expansion, 1-d expansion, and scattering inside a box) are provided for theoretical study of the parton transport and the applicability of the cascade method. Space cell division is available to save the number of computer operations. This improves the speed of the calculation by a large factor and makes the code best optimized for simulation of parton cascade in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions.

  15. Ultra-peripheral collisions of heavy ions at RHIC and the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joakim Nystrand

    2006-11-03

    This paper deals with so-called Ultra-Peripheral Collisions (UPCs) of heavy ions. These can be defined as collisions in which no hadronic interactions occur because of the large spatial separation between the projectile and target. The interactions are instead mediated by the electromagnetic field. Two types of ultra-peripheral collisions can be distinguished: purely electro-magnetic interactions (two-photon interactions) and photonuclear interactions, in which a photon from the projectile interacts with the hadronic component of the target.

  16. Scaling of flow in heavy ion collisions and the low-energy frontier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torrieri, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    The common interpretation of elliptic flow $v_2$ in heavy ion collisions is that it is produced by hydrodynamic flow at low transverse momentum and by parton energy loss at high transverse momentum. Here, we discuss this interpretation in view of the dependence of $v_2$ with energy, rapidity and system size, and show that it is far from clear how the relevant properties necessary for this interpretation, low viscosity and high opacity, turn on. A low energy collider such as NICA is essential for this interpretation to be verified, understood and related to the fundamental properties of hadronic matter

  17. Rapidity losses in heavy-ion collisions from AGS to RHIC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. C. Zhou; Z. B. Yin; D. C. Zhou

    2009-09-28

    We study the rapidity losses in central heavy-ion collisions from AGS to RHIC energies with the mean rapidity determined from the projectile net-baryon distribution after collisions. The projectile net-baryon distribution in the full rapidity range was obtained by removing the target contribution phenomenologically at forward rapidity region from the experimental net-baryon measurements and taking into account the projectile contribution at backward rapidity region. Based on the full projectile net-baryon distributions, calculation results show that the rapidity loss stops increasing from the SPS top energy to RHIC energies, indicating that baryon transport does not depend strongly on energy at high energies.

  18. Thermalization of color gauge fields in high energy heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwazaki, Aiichi [International Politics Economics, Nishogakusha University, Ohi Kashiwa Chiba 277-8585 (Japan)

    2008-03-15

    We discuss the quantum mechanical decay of the color magnetic field generated initially during high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The decay is caused by Nielsen-Olesen unstable modes and is accomplished possibly in a period <1 fm/c. We show that the decay products (i.e., incoherent gluons) may be thermalized in a sufficiently short period (<1 fm/c). The precise determination of the period is made by calculating the two-point function of the color magnetic field in a color glass condensate model.

  19. Parity-odd effects in heavy-ion collisions in the HSD model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Teryaev; R. Usubov

    2015-01-04

    Helicity separation effect in non-central heavy ion collisions is investigated using the Hadron-String Dynamics (HSD) model. Computer simulations are done to calculate velocity and hydrodynamic helicity on a mesh in a small volume around the center of the reaction. The time dependence of hydrodynamic helicity is observed for various impact parameters and different calculation methods. Comparison with a similar earlier work is carried out. A new quantity is used to ananlyze particles in the final state. It is used to probe for p-odd effects in the final state.

  20. Production of e(+)e(-) pairs accompanied by nuclear dissociation in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhatia, VS; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCD; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopdhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, MM; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Mazumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Foley, KJ; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, VY; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kunz, CL; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Mora-Corral, MJ; Morozov, DA; Morozov, V.; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Norman, B.; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rai, G.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, LS; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Szarwas, P.; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, TA; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Urkinbaev, A.; Buren, GV; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, AM; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, VP; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, SA; Vznuzdaev, M.; Waggoner, B.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Wells, R.; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zanevsky, YV; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, ZP; Zolnierczuk, PA; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, AN; STAR Collaboration.

    2004-01-01

    of e+e? pairs accompanied by nuclear dissociation in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions J. Adams,2 M. M. Aggarwal,28 Z. Ahammed,42 J. Amonett,19 B. D. Anderson,19 D. Arkhipkin,12 G. S. Averichev,11 Y. Bai,26 J. Balewski,16 O. Barannikova,31 L. S.... Barnby,2 J. Baudot,17 S. Bekele,27 V. V. Belaga,11 R. Bellwied,45 J. Berger,13 B. I. Bezverkhny,47 S. Bharadwaj,32 V. S. Bhatia,28 H. Bichsel,44 A. Billmeier,45 L. C. Bland,3 C. O. Blyth,2 B. E. Bonner,33 M. Botje,26 A. Boucham,37 A. Brandin,24 A...

  1. Production Cross Section of Neutron-Rich Calcium Isotopes in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donghong Zhang; Wenjie Xie; Jun Su; Fengshou Zhang

    2015-03-27

    Based on the isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model along with the GEMINI model, heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies are studied. We calculate the production cross sections of different fragments for reactions of 112Sn+112Sn and 124Sn+124Sn at different beam energies. The species and production cross sections of neutron-rich isotopes are generally dependent on the isospin of the system and the incident energies. The nucleon 48Ca and 54Ca are more productive for the neutron-rich system at 30 to 150 MeV/nucleon.

  2. Design Requirements and Options for Final Focusing Superconducting Magnets of Heavy Ion Drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bromberg, L. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center (United States)

    2004-11-15

    The environment close to the chamber of heavy ion inertial fusion energy reactors imposes severe constraints on magnets used for final focusing magnets. Space is at a premium, requiring close proximity of adjacent magnets, making magnet integration imperative. In addition, the high radiation flux imposes stringent shielding requirements. In this paper, the options for final focusing magnet topologies are described. Implications of using both high-temperature superconductors and conventional low-temperature superconductors are investigated. The use of high-temperature superconducting materials may offer an attractive, although speculative, opportunity for a fundamentally different approach to magnet construction, leading to either lower cost or reduced maintenance.

  3. Initial energy density and gluon distribution from the Glasma in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirotsugu Fujii; Kenji Fukushima; Yoshimasa Hidaka

    2008-11-04

    We estimate the energy density and the gluon distribution associated with the classical fields describing the early-time dynamics of the heavy-ion collisions. We first decompose the energy density into the momentum components exactly in the McLerran-Venugopalan model, with the use of the Wilson line correlators. Then we evolve the energy density with the free-field equation, which is justified by the dominance of the ultraviolet modes near the collision point. We also discuss the improvement with inclusion of nonlinear terms into the time evolution. Our numerical results at RHIC energy are fairly consistent with the empirical values.

  4. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Quarkonium Production in Elementary and Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dumitru, A.; Lourenco, C.; Petreczky, P.; Qiu, J., Ruan, L.

    2011-08-03

    Understanding the structure of the hadron is of fundamental importance in subatomic physics. Production of heavy quarkonia is arguably one of the most fascinating subjects in strong interaction physics. It offers unique perspectives into the formation of QCD bound states. Heavy quarkonia are among the most studied particles both theoretically and experimentally. They have been, and continue to be, the focus of measurements in all high energy colliders around the world. Because of their distinct multiple mass scales, heavy quarkonia were suggested as a probe of the hot quark-gluon matter produced in heavy-ion collisions; and their production has been one of the main subjects of the experimental heavy-ion programs at the SPS and RHIC. However, since the discovery of J/psi at Brookhaven National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory over 36 years ago, theorists still have not been able to fully understand the production mechanism of heavy quarkonia, although major progresses have been made in recent years. With this in mind, a two-week program on quarkonium production was organized at BNL on June 6-17, 2011. Many new experimental data from LHC and from RHIC were presented during the program, including results from the LHC heavy ion run. To analyze and correctly interpret these measurements, and in order to quantify properties of the hot matter produced in heavy-ion collisions, it is necessary to improve our theoretical understanding of quarkonium production. Therefore, a wide range of theoretical aspects on the production mechanism in the vacuum as well as in cold nuclear and hot quark-gluon medium were discussed during the program from the controlled calculations in QCD and its effective theories such as NRQCD to various models, and to the first principle lattice calculation. The scientific program was divided into three major scientific parts: basic production mechanism for heavy quarkonium in vacuum or in high energy elementary collisions; the formation of quarkonium in nuclear medium as well as the strong interacting quark-gluon matter produced in heavy ion collisions; and heavy quarkonium properties from the first principle lattice calculations. The heavy quarkonium production at a future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) was also discussed at the meeting. The highlight of the meeting was the apparent success of the NRQCD approach at next-to-leading order in the description of the quarkonium production in proton-proton, electron-proton and electron positron collisions. Still many questions remain open in lattice calculations of in-medium quarkonium properties and in the area of cold nuclear matter effects.

  5. B-meson decay constants from 2+1-flavor lattice QCD with domain-wall light quarks and relativistic heavy quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norman H. Christ; Jonathan M. Flynn; Taku Izubuchi; Taichi Kawanai; Christoph Lehner; Amarjit Soni; Ruth S. Van de Water; Oliver Witzel

    2015-02-02

    We calculate the B-meson decay constants f_B, f_Bs, and their ratio in unquenched lattice QCD using domain-wall light quarks and relativistic b-quarks. We use gauge-field ensembles generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations using the domain-wall fermion action and Iwasaki gauge action with three flavors of light dynamical quarks. We analyze data at two lattice spacings of a ~ 0.11, 0.086 fm with unitary pion masses as light as M_pi ~ 290 MeV; this enables us to control the extrapolation to the physical light-quark masses and continuum. For the b-quarks we use the anisotropic clover action with the relativistic heavy-quark interpretation, such that discretization errors from the heavy-quark action are of the same size as from the light-quark sector. We renormalize the lattice heavy-light axial-vector current using a mostly nonperturbative method in which we compute the bulk of the matching factor nonperturbatively, with a small correction, that is close to unity, in lattice perturbation theory. We also improve the lattice heavy-light current through O(alpha_s a). We extrapolate our results to the physical light-quark masses and continuum using SU(2) heavy-meson chiral perturbation theory, and provide a complete systematic error budget. We obtain f_B0 = 199.5(12.6) MeV, f_B+ = 195.6(14.9) MeV, f_Bs = 235.4(12.2) MeV, f_Bs/f_B0 = 1.197(50), and f_Bs/f_B+ = 1.223(71), where the errors are statistical and total systematic added in quadrature. These results are in good agreement with other published results and provide an important independent cross check of other three-flavor determinations of $B$-meson decay constants using staggered light quarks.

  6. Relativistic electron precipitation events driven by electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khazanov, G., E-mail: george.v.khazanov@nasa.gov; Sibeck, D. [NASA Goddard Space FlightCenter, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Tel'nikhin, A.; Kronberg, T. [Department of Physics and Technology, Altai State University, Barnaul (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-15

    We adopt a canonical approach to describe the stochastic motion of relativistic belt electrons and their scattering into the loss cone by nonlinear EMIC waves. The estimated rate of scattering is sufficient to account for the rate and intensity of bursty electron precipitation. This interaction is shown to result in particle scattering into the loss cone, forming ?10?s microbursts of precipitating electrons. These dynamics can account for the statistical correlations between processes of energization, pitch angle scattering, and relativistic electron precipitation events, that are manifested on large temporal scales of the order of the diffusion time ?tens of minutes.

  7. HIGH-POWER FFAG-BASED HEAVY-ION AND PROTON DRIVERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RUGGIERO,A.

    2007-10-01

    Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (FFAG) accelerators are being proposed as an alternative to Super-conducting Linacs (SCL), Rapid-Cycling Synchrotrons (RCS) and Cyclotrons for the acceleration of very intense Heavy-Ion and Proton beams in the medium energy range. One application is the acceleration of ions of Uranium-238 to an energy of 400 MeV/u, and the average power of 400 kWatt, and the other a 1-GeV Proton Driver with an average beam power of 10 MWatt. One or two FFAG rings are needed for acceleration of both beams. They adopt a Non-Scaling Lattice (NSL) to reduce the size and the cost of the accelerator. The continuous wave (CW) mode of operation is achieved with the method of Harmonic Number Jump (HNJ).

  8. Off-momentum dynamic aperture for lattices in the RHIC heavy ion runs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo Y.; Bai, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Gu, X.; Fischer, W.; Marusic, A.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Zhang, S.

    2012-05-20

    To reduce transverse emittance growth rates from intrabeam scattering in the RHIC heavy ion runs, a lattice with an increased phase advance in the arc FODO cells was adopted in 2008-2011. During these runs, a large beam loss due to limited off-momentum dynamic aperture was observed during longitudinal RF re-bucketing and with transverse cooling. Based on the beam loss observations in the previous ion runs and the calculated off-momentum apertures, we decided to adopt the lattice used before 2008 for the 2012 U-U and Cu-Au runs. The observed beam decay and the measured momentum aperture in the 2012 U-U run are presented.

  9. Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2002-12-01

    In heavy ion inertial fusion energy systems, intense beams of ions must be transported from the exit of the final focus magnet system through the target chamber to hit millimeter spot sizes on the target. In this paper, we examine three different modes of beam propagation: neutralized ballistic transport, assisted pinched transport, and self-pinched transport. The status of our understanding of these three modes is summarized, and the constraints imposed by beam propagation upon the chamber environment, as well as their compatibility with various chamber and target concepts, are considered. We conclude that, on the basis of our present understanding, there is a reasonable range of parameter space where beams can propagate in thick-liquid wall, wetted-wall, and dry-wall chambers.

  10. Response of nanostructured ferritic alloys to high-dose heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parish, Chad M.; White, Ryan M.; LeBeau, James M.; Miller, Michael K.

    2014-02-01

    A latest-generation aberration-corrected scanning/transmission electron microscope (STEM) is used to study heavy-ion-irradiated nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). Results are presented for STEM X-ray mapping of NFA 14YWT irradiated with 10 MeV Pt to 16 or 160 dpa at -100°C and 750°C, as well as pre-irradiation reference material. Irradiation at -100°C results in ballistic destruction of the beneficial microstructural features present in the pre-irradiated reference material, such as Ti-Y-O nanoclusters (NCs) and grain boundary (GB) segregation. Irradiation at 750°C retains these beneficial features, but indicates some coarsening of the NCs, diffusion of Al to the NCs, and a reduction of the Cr-W GB segregation (or solute excess) content. Ion irradiation combined with the latest-generation STEM hardware allows for rapid screening of fusion candidate materials and improved understanding of irradiation-induced microstructural changes in NFAs.

  11. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwan, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    ion drivers for inertial confinement fusion, was achieved.ion driver beams for inertial confinement fusion, they weredriver beams for inertial confinement fusion were successful

  12. Angular anisotropy of characteristic x-radiation and auger electrons during the resonance coherent excitation of relativistic ions under planar channeling conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balashov, V. V. Sokolik, A. A.; Stysin, A. V.

    2008-07-15

    The results of new experiments on the resonance coherent excitation of relativistic highly charged ions under planar channeling conditions are analyzed by a method of the generalized master equation for the density matrix of ions. The results of calculations pertaining to the angular anisotropy of characteristic electromagnetic radiation, to the survival fraction of ions as a function of the trajectory of their motion in the channel, and to the excitation of autoionizing states of helium-like ions under the double resonance coherent excitation are in close agreement with measurement data. New experiments are proposed.

  13. Early Time Dynamics in Heavy Ion Collisions from CGC and from AdS/CFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuri V. Kovchegov

    2009-09-11

    We review two different theoretical approaches to the strong interaction dynamics at the early times immediately following heavy ion collisions. One approach is based on small-coupling physics of the Color Glass Condensate (CGC). The other approach is based on Anti-de Sitter space/Conformal Field Theory (AdS/CFT) correspondence and may be applicable to describing large-coupling QCD interactions. We point out that in terms of theoretical tools the two approaches are somewhat similar: in CGC one deals with classical gluon fields produced in a nuclear shock wave collision, while in AdS/CFT one studies classical gravity in a gravitational shock wave collision. We stress, however, that the resulting physics is different: the classical gluon fields in CGC lead to a free-streaming medium produced in heavy ion collisions, while the classical gravity in the 5-dimensional AdS bulk is likely to lead to ideal hydrodynamics description of the produced medium. Also, the valence quarks in colliding nuclei in CGC continue along their light cone trajectories after the collision with very little recoil, while we show that in AdS the colliding nuclei are likely to lose most of their energy in the collision and stop.

  14. Freeze-out Conditions in Heavy Ion Collisions from QCD Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bazavov; H. -T. Ding; P. Hegde; O. Kaczmarek; F. Karsch; E. Laermann; Swagato Mukherjee; P. Petreczky; C. Schmidt; D. Smith; W. Soeldner; M. Wagner

    2012-08-06

    We present a determination of chemical freeze-out conditions in heavy ion collisions based on ratios of cumulants of net electric charge fluctuations. These ratios can reliably be calculated in lattice QCD for a wide range of chemical potential values by using a next-to-leading order Taylor series expansion around the limit of vanishing baryon, electric charge and strangeness chemical potentials. From a computation of up to fourth order cumulants and charge correlations we first determine the strangeness and electric charge chemical potentials that characterize freeze-out conditions in a heavy ion collision and confirm that in the temperature range 150 MeV < T < 170 MeV the hadron resonance gas model provides good approximations for these parameters that agree with QCD calculations on the (5-15)% level. We then show that a comparison of lattice QCD results for ratios of up to third order cumulants of electric charge fluctuations with experimental results allows to extract the freeze-out baryon chemical potential and the freeze-out temperature.

  15. A Cone Jet-Finding Algorithm for Heavy-Ion Collisions at LHC Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S-L Blyth; M J Horner; T Awes; T Cormier; H Gray; J L Klay; S R Klein; M van Leeuwen; A Morsch; G Odyniec; A Pavlinov

    2006-09-15

    Standard jet finding techniques used in elementary particle collisions have not been successful in the high track density of heavy-ion collisions. This paper describes a modified cone-type jet finding algorithm developed for the complex environment of heavy-ion collisions. The primary modification to the algorithm is the evaluation and subtraction of the large background energy, arising from uncorrelated soft hadrons, in each collision. A detailed analysis of the background energy and its event-by-event fluctuations has been performed on simulated data, and a method developed to estimate the background energy inside the jet cone from the measured energy outside the cone on an event-by-event basis. The algorithm has been tested using Monte-Carlo simulations of Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=5.5$ TeV for the ALICE detector at the LHC. The algorithm can reconstruct jets with a transverse energy of 50 GeV and above with an energy resolution of $\\sim30%$.

  16. Relativistic configuration-interaction calculation of energy levels of core-excited states in lithium-like ions: argon through krypton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yerokhin, V A

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale relativistic configuration-interaction calculation of energy levels of core-excited states of lithium-like ions is presented. Quantum electrodynamic, nuclear recoil, and frequency-dependent Breit corrections are included in the calculation. The approach is consistently applied for calculating all $n=2$ core-excited states for all lithium-like ions starting from argon ($Z = 18$) and ending with krypton ($Z = 36$). The results obtained are supplemented with systematical estimations of calculation errors and omitted effects.

  17. Stress influenced trapping processes in Si based multi-quantum well structures and heavy ions implanted Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciurea, Magdalena Lidia Lazanu, Sorina

    2014-10-06

    Multi-quantum well structures and Si wafers implanted with heavy iodine and bismuth ions are studied in order to evaluate the influence of stress on the parameters of trapping centers. The experimental method of thermostimullatedcurrents without applied bias is used, and the trapping centers are filled by illumination. By modeling the discharge curves, we found in multilayered structures the parameters of both 'normal' traps and 'stress-induced' ones, the last having a Gaussian-shaped temperature dependence of the cross section. The stress field due to the presence of stopped heavy ions implanted into Si was modeled by a permanent electric field. The increase of the strain from the neighborhood of I ions to the neighborhood of Bi ions produces the broadening of some energy levels and also a temperature dependence of the cross sections for all levels.

  18. Radiation damage by light- and heavy-ion bombardment of single-crystal LiNbO?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Hsu-Cheng; Zhang, Lihua; Malladi, Girish; Dadap, Jerry I.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Kisslinger, Kim; Vemuri, Rama Sesha R.; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Bakhru, Hassaram; Osgood, Jr., Richard M.

    2015-04-14

    In this work, a battery of analytical methods including in situ RBS/C, confocal micro-Raman, TEM/STEM, EDS, AFM, and optical microscopy were used to provide a comparative investigation of light- and heavy-ion radiation damage in single-crystal LiNbO?. High (~MeV) and low (~100s keV) ion energies, corresponding to different stopping power mechanisms, were used and their associated damage events were observed. In addition, sequential irradiation of both ion species was also performed and their cumulative depth-dependent damage was determined. It was found that the contribution from electronic stopping by high-energy heavy ions gave rise to a lower critical fluence for damage formationmore »than for the case of low-energy irradiation. Such energy-dependent critical fluence of heavy-ion irradiation is two to three orders of magnitude smaller than that for the case of light-ion damage. In addition, materials amorphization and collision cascades were seen for heavy-ion irradiation, while for light ion, crystallinity remained at the highest fluence used in the experiment. The irradiation-induced damage is characterized by the formation of defect clusters, elastic strain, surface deformation, as well as change in elemental composition. In particular, the presence of nanometric-scale damage pockets results in increased RBS/C backscattered signal and the appearance of normally forbidden Raman phonon modes. The location of the highest density of damage is in good agreement with SRIM calculations. (author)« less

  19. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwan, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    and beam diagnostics to an argon beam would then allow an experimental determination of how ion-ion sheaths differ from electron-electrons. Thus, somewhat serendipitously, measuring the parameters of the extracted beams provides a novel diagnostic

  20. AN ENGINEERING TEST FACILITY FOR HEAVY ION FUSION OPTIONS AND SCALING W.R. Meier, D.A. Callahan-Miller, J.F. Latkowski,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and driver to investigate integrated system scaling and possible operating windows for a heavy-ion driven ETF integrated system scaling and operating scenarios for an ETF for heavy ion fusion. I. INTRODUCTION The ETF, and accelerator design and technology. For example, integrated 2D target physics calculations have been completed

  1. Isotope Shifts in Beryllium-, Boron-, Carbon-, and Nitrogen-like Ions from Relativistic Configuration Interaction Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nazé, C; Rynkun, P; Gaigalas, G; Godefroid, M; Jönsson, P

    2014-01-01

    Energy levels, normal and specific mass shift parameters as well as electronic densities at the nucleus are reported for numerous states along the beryllium, boron, carbon, and nitrogen isoelectronic sequences. Combined with nuclear data, these electronic parameters can be used to determine values of level and transition isotope shifts. The calculation of the electronic parameters is done using first-order perturbation theory with relativistic configuration interaction wave functions that account for valence, core-valence and core-core correlation effects as zero-order functions. Results are compared with experimental and other theoretical values, when available.

  2. Chemical freeze-out in heavy ion collisions at large baryon densities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Floerchinger; Christof Wetterich

    2012-08-17

    We argue that the chemical freeze-out in heavy ion collisions at high baryon density is not associated to a phase transition or rapid crossover. We employ the linear nucleon-meson model with parameters fixed by the zero-temperature properties of nuclear matter close to the liquid-gas quantum phase transition. For the parameter region of interest this yields a reliable picture of the thermodynamic and chiral properties at non-zero temperature. The chemical freeze-out observed in low-energy experiments occurs when baryon densities fall below a critical value of about 15 percent of nuclear density. This region in the phase diagram is far away from any phase transition or rapid crossover.

  3. QGP time formation in holographic shock waves model of heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aref'eva, Irina Ya

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the thermalization time in two colliding shock waves holographic model of heavy-ion collisions. For this purpose we model the process by the Vaidya metric with a horizon defined by the trapped surface location. We consider two bottom-up AdS/QCD models that give, within the colliding shock waves approach, the dependence of multiplicity on the energy compatible with RHIC and LHC results. One model is a bottom-up AdS/QCD confining model and the other is related to an anisotropic thermalization. We estimate the thermalization time and show that increasing the confining potential decreases the thermalization time as well as an anisotropy accelerates the thermalization.

  4. Turbulent thermalization process in heavy-ion collisions at ultrarelativistic energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Berges; K. Boguslavski; S. Schlichting; R. Venugopalan

    2014-03-02

    The non-equilibrium evolution of heavy-ion collisions is studied in the limit of weak coupling at very high energy employing lattice simulations of the classical Yang-Mills equations. Performing the largest classical-statistical simulations to date, we find that the dynamics of the longitudinally expanding plasma becomes independent of the details of the initial conditions. After a transient regime dominated by plasma instabilities and free streaming, the subsequent space-time evolution is governed by a nonthermal fixed point, where the system exhibits the self-similar dynamics characteristic of wave turbulence. This allows us to distinguish between different kinetic scenarios in the classical regime. Within the accuracy of our simulations, the scaling behavior found is consistent with the ``bottom-up" thermalization scenario.

  5. QGP time formation in holographic shock waves model of heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irina Ya. Aref'eva

    2015-03-07

    We estimate the thermalization time in two colliding shock waves holographic model of heavy-ion collisions. For this purpose we model the process by the Vaidya metric with a horizon defined by the trapped surface location. We consider two bottom-up AdS/QCD models that give, within the colliding shock waves approach, the dependence of multiplicity on the energy compatible with RHIC and LHC results. One model is a bottom-up AdS/QCD confining model and the other is related to an anisotropic thermalization. We estimate the thermalization time and show that increasing the confining potential decreases the thermalization time as well as an anisotropy accelerates the thermalization.

  6. Heavy Ion Beam in Resolution of the Critical Point Problem for Uranium and Uranium Dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iosilevskiy, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Important advantages of heavy ion beam (HIB) irradiation of matter are discussed in comparison with traditional sources - laser heating, electron beam, electrical discharge etc. High penetration length (~ 10 mm) is of primary importance for investigation of dense matter properties. This gives an extraordinary chance to reach the uniform heating regime when HIB irradiation is being used for thermophysical property measurements. Advantages of HIB heating of highly-dispersive samples are claimed for providing free and relatively slow quasi-isobaric heating without fast hydrodynamic expansion of heated sample. Perspective of such HIB application are revised for resolution of long-time thermophysical problems for uranium and uranium-bearing compounds (UO2). The priorities in such HIB development are stressed: preferable energy levels, beam-time duration, beam focusing, deposition of the sample etc.

  7. Heavy Ion Beam in Resolution of the Critical Point Problem for Uranium and Uranium Dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor Iosilevskiy; Victor Gryaznov

    2010-05-23

    Important advantages of heavy ion beam (HIB) irradiation of matter are discussed in comparison with traditional sources - laser heating, electron beam, electrical discharge etc. High penetration length (~ 10 mm) is of primary importance for investigation of dense matter properties. This gives an extraordinary chance to reach the uniform heating regime when HIB irradiation is being used for thermophysical property measurements. Advantages of HIB heating of highly-dispersive samples are claimed for providing free and relatively slow quasi-isobaric heating without fast hydrodynamic expansion of heated sample. Perspective of such HIB application are revised for resolution of long-time thermophysical problems for uranium and uranium-bearing compounds (UO2). The priorities in such HIB development are stressed: preferable energy levels, beam-time duration, beam focusing, deposition of the sample etc.

  8. Irradiation of Nuclear Track Emulsions with Thermal Neutrons, Heavy Ions, and Muons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A. Artemenkov; V. Bradnova; A. A. Zaitsev; P. I. Zarubin; I. G. Zarubina; R. R. Kattabekov; K. Z. Mamatkulov; V. V. Rusakova

    2015-08-11

    Exposures of test samples of nuclear track emulsion were analyzed. Angular and energy correlations of products originating from the thermal-neutron-induced reaction n$_{th} + ^{10}$B $\\rightarrow ^{7}$Li $+ (\\gamma) + \\alpha$ were studied in nuclear tack emulsions enriched in boron. Nuclear track emulsions were also irradiated with $^{86}$Kr$^{+17}$ and $^{132}$Xe$^{+26}$ of energy about 1.2 MeV per nucleon. Measurements of ranges of heavy ions in nuclear track emulsions made it possible to determine their energies on the basis of the SRIM model. The formation of high-multiplicity nuclear stars was observed upon irradiating nuclear track emulsions with ultrarelativistic muons. Kinematical features studied in this exposure of nuclear track emulsions for events of the muon-induced splitting of carbon nuclei to three alpha particles are indicative of the nuclear-diffraction interaction mechanism.

  9. Swift heavy ion irradiation of Pt nanocrystals: II. Structural changes and H desorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giulian, R.; Araujo, L.L.; Kluth, P.; Sprouster, D.J.; Schnohr, C.S.; Byrne, A.P.; Ridgway, M.C. (ANU)

    2014-09-24

    The structural properties and H desorption from embedded Pt nanocrystals (NCs) following irradiation with swift heavy ions were investigated as a function of energy and fluence. From x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy analysis, Pt-H bonding was identified in NCs annealed in a forming gas (95% N{sub 2} + 5% H{sub 2}) ambient. The H content decreased upon irradiation and the desorption process was NC-size dependent such that larger NCs required a higher fluence to achieve a H-free state. Pt-H bonding and NC dissolution both perturbed the NC structural parameters (coordination number, bond-length and mean-square relative displacement) as determined with extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements.

  10. Operation of a multiple cell array detector in plasma experiments with a heavy ion beam diagnostic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goncalves, B.; Malaquias, A.; Nedzelskiy, I. S.; Pereira, L.; Silva, C.; Varandas, C.A.F.; Cabral, J.A.C.; Khrebtov, S.M.; Dreval, N.B.; Krupnik, L.I.; Hidalgo, C.; Depablos, J.

    2004-10-01

    A multiple cell array detector (MCAD) has been developed to investigate the spatial structure of plasma turbulence in fusion plasmas. This system is expected to provide simultaneous measurements of edge and core density fluctuations with both temporal and spatial resolution, extending the range and number of the sample volumes simultaneously recorded by a heavy ion beam diagnostic (HIBD). Since the detector (usually located close to the vessel wall of a plasma device) operates in a strong plasma radiation environment, the effective shielding of the detector presents a special problem. This article describes and compares the MCAD operation conditions on ISTTOK tokamak and TJ-II stellarator. Experimental results of the detector performance are presented together with the first measurements of n{sub e}{sigma}{sub eff} in the TJ-II plasmas.

  11. Dynamical approach to heavy-ion induced fusion using actinide target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aritomo, Y.; Hagino, K.; Chiba, S.; Nishio, K.

    2012-10-20

    To treat heavy-ion reactions using actinide target nucleus, we propose a model which takes into account the coupling to the collective states of interacting nuclei in the penetration of the Coulomb barrier and the dynamical evolution of nuclear shape from the contact configuration. A fluctuation-dissipation model (Langevin equation) was applied in the dynamical calculation, where effect of nuclear orientation at the initial impact on the prolately deformed target nucleus was considered. Using this model, we analyzed the experimental data for the mass distribution of fission fragments (MDFF) in the reaction of {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U at several incident energies. Fusion-fission, quasifission and deep-quasi-fission are separated as different trajectories on the potential energy surface. We estimated the fusion cross section of the reaction.

  12. Excitation of nuclear anharmonic vibrations in heavy-ion fusion reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Hagino; S. Kuyucak; N. Takigawa

    1997-11-05

    We discuss the effects of multi-phonon excitations on heavy-ion fusion reactions at energies near and below the Coulomb barrier, focusing especially on the role of anharmonicities. We carry out a systematic study of those effects on the excitation function of the fusion cross section and on the fusion barrier distribution, by using the vibrational limit of the interacting boson model. We also analyze the recently measured high-precision data of the $^{16}$O + $^{148}$Sm fusion reaction with this model and discuss the anharmonic properties of the quadrupole as well as the octupole vibrations in $^{148}$Sm. Negative and positive static quadrupole moments are deduced for the first 2$^+$ and 3$^-$ states in $^{148}$Sm, respectively. It is shown that the fusion barrier distribution strongly depends on the sign of the quadrupole moments, suggesting that subbarrier fusion reactions offer an alternative method to extract the static quadrupole moments of phonon states in spherical nuclei.

  13. Design and characterization of a neutralized-transport experiment for heavy-ion fusion Enrique Henestroza, Shmuel Eylon, Prabir K. Roy, Simon S. Yu, Andre Anders, Frank M. Bieniosek,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    to hit spots on the target with radii of about 2 mm. For the heavy-ion-fusion power-plant scenarios comparisons of these theoretical predictions with experiment, the Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy Ion

  14. Long plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization Philip C. Efthimion a,, Erik P. Gilson a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    ]. In this longitudinal compression experiment, plasma was transported from a cathodic arc source to a meter distanceLong plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization Philip C. Efthimion a,Ã, Erik P. Gilson a Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543, USA b Lawrence Berkeley National

  15. Damages induced by heavy ions in titanium silicon carbide: effects of nuclear and electronic interactions at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Thanks to their refractoriness, carbides are sensed as fuel coating for the IVth generation of reactorsDamages induced by heavy ions in titanium silicon carbide: effects of nuclear and electronic than other classical carbides such as SiC or TiC. However, under irradiation, its behaviour is still

  16. Validity of the linear coupling approximation in heavy-ion fusion reactions at sub barrier energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Hagino; N. Takigawa; M. Dasgupta; D. J. Hinde; J. R. Leigh

    1996-07-26

    The role of higher order coupling of surface vibrations to the relative motion in heavy-ion fusion reactions at near-barrier energies is investigated. The coupled channels equations are solved to all orders, and also in the linear and the quadratic coupling approximations. Taking $^{64}$Ni + $^{92,96}$Zr reactions as examples, it is shown that all order couplings lead to considerably improved agreement with the experimentally measured fusion cross sections and average angular momenta of the compound nucleus for such heavy nearly symmetric systems. The importance of higher order coupling is also examined for asymmetric systems like $^{16}$O + $^{112}$Cd, $^{144}$Sm, for which previous calculations of the fusion cross section seemed to indicate that the linear coupling approximation was adequate. It is shown that the shape of the barrier distributions and the energy dependence of the average angular momentum can change significantly when the higher order couplings are included, even for systems where measured fusion cross sections may seem to be well reproduced by the linear coupling approximation.

  17. The Next Generation of Heavy Ion Sources (447th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okamura, Masahiro

    2009-03-04

    Imagine if, by staying in your lane when driving on the expressway, you could help fight cancer or provide a new, clean energy source. You would clench the steering wheel with both hands and stay in your lane, right? Unlike driving on the expressway where you intentionally avoid hitting other cars, scientists sometimes work to steer particle beams into head-on collisions with other oncoming particle beams. However, the particles must be kept "in their lanes" for cleaner, more frequent collisions. Some scientists propose starting the whole process by using lasers to heat a fixed target as a way to get particles with higher charge, which are more steerable. These scientists believe the new methods could be used to develop particle beams for killing cancer cells or creating usable energy from fusion. Join Masahiro Okamura of Brookhaven's Collider-Accelerator Department for the 447th Brookhaven Lecture, titled "The Next Generation of Heavy Ion Sources." Okamura will explain how lasers can be used to create plasma, neutral mixtures of positive ions and negative electrons, from different materials, and how using this plasma leads to beams with higher charge states and currents. He will also discuss how this efficient, simpler method of producing particle beams might be used for cancer therapy, to develop new energy sources, or in synchrotrons.

  18. Future directions in intermediate energy heavy ion physics. A proposed expansion of the Holifield Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-02-01

    A proposal is presented for a major accelerator addition to the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility. The expanded facility will provide ion beams of mass 1 to 238 amu with a combination of energy, intensity, momentum resolution, and beam quality not currently available at any other facility in North America. The physics motivation for such an addition is discussed, and involves physics dominated by meson-exchange forces, Coulomb-force dominated physics, and possibly a regime where the quark and gluon degrees of freedom are significant. The physics research would include topics in atomic and interdisciplinary areas as well as nuclear physics. Some remarks are made on the merits of Oak Ridge as a site for this facility, placing the proposal in some historical perspective. The accelerator system is then described, giving the required beam properties, and the parameters of the synchrotron ring components, injection, ring magnets, RF systems, vacuum system, and electron cooling system and stochastic cooling system requirements. Also described are such facilities as buildings, beam transport and shielding, and experimental facilities, including target areas. (LEW)

  19. Heavy ion beam probe operation in time varying equilibria of improved confinement reversed field pinch discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demers, D. R.; Chen, X.; Schoch, P. M. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Fimognari, P. J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Operation of a heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) on a reversed field pinch is unique from other toroidal applications because the magnetic field is more temporal and largely produced by plasma current. Improved confinement, produced through the transient application of a poloidal electric field which leads to a reduction of dynamo activity, exhibits gradual changes in equilibrium plasma quantities. A consequence of this is sweeping of the HIBP trajectories by the dynamic magnetic field, resulting in motion of the sample volume. In addition, the plasma potential evolves with the magnetic equilibrium. Measurement of the potential as a function of time is thus a combination of temporal changes of the equilibrium and motion of the sample volume. A frequent additional complication is a nonideal balance of ion current on the detectors resulting from changes in the beam trajectory (magnetic field) and energy (plasma potential). This necessitates use of data selection criteria. Nevertheless, the HIBP on the Madison Symmetric Torus has acquired measurements as a function of time throughout improved confinement. A technique developed to infer the potential in the improved confinement reversed field pinch from HIBP data in light of the time varying plasma equilibrium will be discussed.

  20. Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion Summary Report of the Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seidl, P.A.

    2013-01-01

    ion inertial fusion," Nuclear Fusion, Vol. 33, No. 4 (1993)ion inertial fusion energy,” Nuclear Fusion 45 (2005) S291–

  1. Relativistic effects on plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benkhelifa, El-Amine; Djebli, Mourad, E-mail: mdjebli@usthb.dz [USTHB, Faculty of Physics, Theoretical Physics Laboratory, B.P. 32 Bab-Ezzouar, 16079 Algiers (Algeria)

    2014-07-15

    The expansion of electron-ion plasma is studied through a fully relativistic multi-fluids plasma model which includes thermal pressure, ambipolar electrostatic potential, and internal energy conversion. Numerical investigation, based on quasi-neutral assumption, is performed for three different regimes: nonrelativistic, weakly relativistic, and relativistic. Ions' front in weakly relativistic regime exhibits spiky structure associated with a break-down of quasi-neutrality at the expanding front. In the relativistic regime, ion velocity is found to reach a saturation limit which occurs at earlier stages of the expansion. This limit is enhanced by higher electron velocity.

  2. Plasma channel and Z-pinch dynamics for heavy ion transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ponce-Marquez, David

    2002-07-09

    A self stabilized, free standing, z-pinch plasma channel has been proposed to deliver the high intensity heavy ion beam from the end of a driver to the fuel target in a heavy ion inertial fusion power plant. The z-pinch relaxes emittance and energy spread requirements requiring a lower cost driver. A z-pinch transport would reduce the number of beam entry port holes to the target chamber from over a hundred to four as compared to neutralized ballistic focusing thus reducing the driver hardware exposure to neutron flux. Experiments where a double pulse discharge technique is used, z-pinch plasma channels with enhanced stability are achieved. Typical parameters are 7 kV pre-pulse discharge and 30 kV main bank discharge with 50 kA of channel current in a 7 torr background gas atmosphere. This work is an experimental study of these plasma channels examining the relevant physics necessary to understand and model such plasmas. Laser diagnostics measured the dynamical properties of neutrals and plasma. Schlieren and phase contrast techniques probe the pre-pulse gas dynamics and infrared interferometry and faraday effect polarimetry are used on the z-pinch to study its electron density and current distribution. Stability and repeatability of the z-pinch depend on the initial conditions set by the pre-pulse. Results show that the z-pinch channel is wall stabilized by an on-axis gas density depression created by the pre-pulse through hydrodynamic expansion where the ratio of the initial gas density to the final gas density is > 10/1. The low on-axis density favors avalanching along the desired path for the main bank discharge. Pinch time is around 2 s from the main bank discharge initiation with a FWHM of {approx} 2 cm. Results also show that typical main bank discharge plasma densities reach 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} peak on axis for a 30 kV, 7 torr gas nitrogen discharge. Current rise time is limited by the circuit-channel inductance with the highest contribution to the impedance due to the plasma. There is no direct evidence of surface currents due to high frequency skin effects and magnetic field experiments indicate that > 70% of the current carried by the channel is enclosed within FWHM of the channel. Code-experiment benchmark comparisons show that simulations capture the main mechanisms of the channel evolution, but complete atomic models need to be incorporated.

  3. Swift heavy ion irradiation of ZnO nanoparticles embedded in silica: Radiation-induced deoxidation and shape elongation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amekura, H.; Tsuya, D.; Mitsuishi, K.; Nakayama, Y. [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0003 (Japan)] [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0003 (Japan); Okubo, N.; Ishikawa, N. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Singh, U. B.; Khan, S. A.; Avasthi, D. K. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi (India)] [Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi (India); Mohapatra, S. [Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, New Delhi (India)] [Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, New Delhi (India)

    2013-11-11

    ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in amorphous SiO{sub 2} were irradiated with 200 MeV Xe{sup 14+} swift heavy ions (SHIs) to a fluence of 5.0 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. Optical linear dichroism was induced in the samples by the irradiation, indicating shape transformation of the NPs from spheres to anisotropic ones. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed that some NPs were elongated to prolate shapes; the elongated NPs consisted not of ZnO but of Zn metal. The SHI irradiation induced deoxidation of small ZnO NPs and successive shape elongation of the deoxidized metal NPs.

  4. K+ and K- production in heavy-ion collisions at SIS-energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Foerster

    2003-07-23

    The production and the propagation of K+ and of K- mesons in heavy-ion collisions at beam energies of 1 to 2 AGeV have systematically been investigated with the Kaon Spectrometer KaoS at the SIS at the GSI. The ratio of the K+ production excitation function for Au+Au and for C+C reactions increases with decreasing beam energy, which is expected for a soft nuclear equation-of-state. At 1.5 AGeV a comprehensive study of the K+ and of the K- emission as a function of the size of the collision system, of the collision centrality, of the kaon energy, and of the polar emission angle has been performed. The K-/K+ ratio is found to be nearly constant as a function of the collision centrality. The spectral slopes and the polar emission patterns are different for K- and for K+. These observations indicate that K+ mesons decouple earlier from the reaction zone than K- mesons.

  5. Formation of charmonium states in heavy ion collisions and thermalization of charm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. L. Thews

    2006-04-06

    We examine the possibility to utilize in-medium charmonium formation in heavy ion interactions at collider energy as a probe of the properties of the medium. This is possible because the formation process involves recombination of charm quarks which imprints a signal on the resulting normalized transverse momentum distribution containing information about the momentum distribution of the quarks. We have contrasted the transverse momentum spectra of J/Psi, characterized by , which result from the formation process in which the charm quark distributions are taken at opposite limits with regard to thermalization in the medium. The first uses charm quark distributions unchanged from their initial production in a pQCD process, appropriate if their interaction with the medium is negligible. The second uses charm quark distributions which are in complete thermal equilibrium with the transversely expanding medium, appropriate if a very strong interaction between charm quarks and medium exists. We find that the resulting of the formed J/Psi should allow one to differentiate between these extremes, and that this differentiation is not sensitive to variations in the detailed dynamics of in-medium formation. We include a comparison of predictions of this model with preliminary PHENIX measurements, which indicates compatibility with a substantial fraction of in-medium formation.

  6. Time evolution of gluon coherent state and its von Neumann entropy in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hideaki Iida; Teiji Kunihiro; Akira Ohnishi; Toru T. Takahashi

    2014-10-27

    We propose a new prescription for evaluating a von Neumann entropy in the initial stage of high-energy heavy-ion collisions utilizing the time evolution of classical Yang-Mills (CYM) field: The von Neumann entropy is computed for the quantum coherent states constructed so as to give the classical gluon fields as the expectation values. The entropy is to be liberated when the complete decoherence is achieved. As a demonstration, the time evolution of the CYM dynamics is solved with an initial condition which mimics the Glasma state, though in a non-expanding geometry; the Glasma state is characterized by the longitudinal color-electric and -magnetic fields with gluon fields' fluctuations around it. We find that the initial longitudinal fluctuations of the fields play essential roles for the entropy production in two ways: First, the field fluctuations at $t=0$ themselves act as a source of the von Neumann entropy prepared before the time evolution. Second, the initial fluctuations triggers field instabilities, and hence the larger the strength of them, the more the entropy production at later time.

  7. Elliptic flow fluctuations in heavy ion collisions at RHIC and the perfect liquid hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, S; Bleicher, M; Vogel, Sascha; Torrieri, Giorgio; Bleicher, Marcus

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the recently measured $v_2$ fluctuation in the context of establishing the degree of fluidity of the matter produced in heavy ion collisions. We argue that flow observables within systems with a non-negligible mean free path should acquire a ``dynamical'' fluctuation, due to the random nature of each collision between the system's degrees of freedom. Because of this, $v_2$ fluctuations can be used to estimate the Knudsen number of the system produced at RHIC. To illustrate this quantitatively, we apply the UrQMD model, with scaled cross sections, to show that collisions at RHIC have a Knudsen number at least one order of magnitude above the expected value for an interacting hadron gas. Furthermore, we argue that the Knudsen number is also bound from above by the $v_2$ fluctuation data, because too large a Knudsen number would break the observed scaling of $v_2$ fluctuations due to the onset of turbulent flow. We propose, therefore that $v_2$ fluctuation measurements, together with an understanding ...

  8. Dynamical and statistical description of multifragmentation in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lihua Mao; Ning Wang; Li Ou

    2015-09-11

    To explore the roles of dynamical model and statistical model in the description of multifragmentation in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies, the fragments charge distributions of $^{197}$Au+$^{197}$Au at 35 MeV/u are analyzed by using the hybrid model of improved quantum molecular dynamics (ImQMD) model plus the statistical model GEMINI. We find that, the ImQMD model can well describe the charge distributions of fragments produced in central and semi-central collisions. But for the peripheral collisions of Au+Au at 35 MeV/u, the statistical model is required at the end of the ImQMD simulations for the better description of the charge distribution of fragments. By using the hybrid model of ImQMD+GEMINI, the fragment charge distribution of Au+Au at 35 MeV/u can be reproduced reasonably well. The time evolution of the excitation energies of primary fragments is simultaneously investigated.

  9. Hard Probes of the Quark Gluon Plasma in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salgado, Carlos A

    2011-01-01

    The medium-modifications of processes characterized by the presence of a hard scale provide the most diverse tools to characterize the properties of the matter created in high-energy nuclear collisions. Indeed, jet quenching, the suppression of particles produced at high transverse momentum, has been established at RHIC almost a decade ago as one of the main tools in heavy-ion collisions. The melting of quarkonia is expected to provide also information about the temperature and the properties of the produced medium. The beginning of the LHC era for hot QCD studies starts with the first nuclear beams in 2010. The amount of information produced by this first run is overwhelming: The three experiments with nuclear program (ALICE, ATLAS and CMS) have provide new results in basically all subjects considered in previous experiments and have also shown the potential to make nuclear collisions at the TeV scale for the first time. I will review what the results from both RHIC and LHC imply for our understanding of hot...

  10. RHIC PERFORMANCE DURING THE FY10 200 GeV Au+Au HEAVY ION RUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.; Bruno, D.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; de Maria, R.; D’Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.; Gassner, D.; Glenn, J.W.; Hao, Y.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Satogata, T.; Severino, F.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Theisen, C.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2010-05-23

    Since the last successful RHIC Au+Au run in 2007 (Run-7), the RHIC experiments have made numerous detector improvements and upgrades. In order to benefit from the enhanced detector capabilities and to increase the yield of rare events in the acquired heavy ion data a significant increase in luminosity is essential. In Run-7 RHIC achieved an average store luminosity of = 12 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} by operating with 103 bunches (out of 111 possible), and by squeezing to {beta}* = 0.85 m. This year, Run-10, we achieved = 20 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which put us an order of magnitude above the RHIC design luminosity. To reach these luminosity levels we decreased {beta}* to 0.75 m, operated with 111 bunches per ring, and reduced longitudinal and transverse emittances by means of bunched-beam stochastic cooling. In addition we introduced a lattice to suppress intra-beam scattering (IBS) in both RHIC rings, upgraded the RF control system, and separated transition crossing times in the two rings. We present an overview of the changes and the results of Run-10 performance.

  11. Adiabatic Heavy Ion Fusion Potentials for Fusion at Deep Sub-barrier Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. S. Sastry; S. Kailas; A. K. Mohanty; A. Saxena

    2003-11-12

    The fusion cross sections from well above barrier to extreme sub-barrier energies have been analysed using the energy (E) and angular momentum (L) dependent barrier penetration model ({\\small{ELDBPM}}). From this analysis, the adiabatic limits of fusion barriers have been determined for a wide range of heavy ion systems. The empirical prescription of Wilzynska and Wilzynski has been used with modified radius parameter and surface tension coefficient values consistent with the parameterization of the nuclear masses. The adiabatic fusion barriers calculated from this prescription are in good agreement with the adiabatic barriers deduced from {\\small{ELDBPM}} fits to fusion data. The nuclear potential diffuseness is larger at adiabatic limit, resulting in a lower $\\hbar\\omega$ leading to increase of "logarithmic slope" observed at energies well below the barrier. The effective fusion barrier radius and curvature values are anomalously smaller than the predictions of known empirical prescriptions. A detailed comparison of the systematics of fusion barrier with and without L-dependence has been presented.

  12. Repulsive nature of optical potentials for high-energy heavy-ion scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Furumoto; Y. Sakuragi; Y. Yamamoto

    2010-10-08

    The recent works by the present authors predicted that the real part of heavy-ion optical potentials changes its character from attraction to repulsion around the incident energy per nucleon E/A = 200 - 300 MeV on the basis of the complex G-matrix interaction and the double-folding model (DFM) and revealed that the three-body force plays an important role there. In the present paper, we have precisely analyzed the energy dependence of the calculated DFM potentials and its relation to the elastic-scattering angular distributions in detail in the case of the $^{12}$C + $^{12}$C system in the energy range of E/A = 100 - 400 MeV. The tensor force contributes substantially to the energy dependence of the real part of the DFM potentials and plays an important role to lower the attractive-to-repulsive transition energy. The nearside and farside (N/F) decomposition of the elastic-scattering amplitudes clarifies the close relation between the attractive-to-repulsive transition of the potentials and the characteristic evolution of the calculated angular distributions with the increase of the incident energy. Based on the present analysis, we propose experimental measurements of the predicted strong diffraction phenomena of the elastic-scattering angular distribution caused by the N/F interference around the attractive-to-repulsive transition energy together with the reduced diffractions below and above the transition energy.

  13. Feasibility study of heavy ion beams and compound target materials for muon production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaebum Son; Ju Hahn Lee; Gi Dong Kim; Yong Kyun Kim

    2015-07-15

    We have investigated the feasibility of using compound materials as target for muon production by virtue of simulations using a GEANT4 toolkit. A graphite and two thermostable compound materials, beryllium oxide (BeO) and boron carbide (B4C) were considered as muon production targets and their muon production rates for 600-MeV proton beam were calculated and compared. For thermal analysis, total heat deposited on the targets by the proton beams and the secondary particles was calculated with a MCNPX code, and then the temperature distribution of target was derived from the calculated heat by using an ANSYS code with consideration for heat transfer mechanisms, such as thermal conduction and thermal radiation. In addition, we have investigated whether the heavy ion beams can be utilized for muon production. For various beam species such as 3He2, 4He, 7Li, 10B and 12C, their muon production rates were calculated and compared with that obtained for a proton beam.

  14. Feasibility study of heavy ion beams and compound target materials for muon production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Jaebum; Kim, Gi Dong; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the feasibility of using compound materials as target for muon production by virtue of simulations using a GEANT4 toolkit. A graphite and two thermostable compound materials, beryllium oxide (BeO) and boron carbide (B4C) were considered as muon production targets and their muon production rates for 600-MeV proton beam were calculated and compared. For thermal analysis, total heat deposited on the targets by the proton beams and the secondary particles was calculated with a MCNPX code, and then the temperature distribution of target was derived from the calculated heat by using an ANSYS code with consideration for heat transfer mechanisms, such as thermal conduction and thermal radiation. In addition, we have investigated whether the heavy ion beams can be utilized for muon production. For various beam species such as 3He2, 4He, 7Li, 10B and 12C, their muon production rates were calculated and compared with that obtained for a proton beam.

  15. Gas Transport and Density Control in the HYLIFE Heavy-Ion Beam Lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debonnel, Christophe S.; Welch, Dale R.; Rose, David V.; Lawrence, Simon S.Yu; Peterson, Per F

    2003-05-15

    The effective propagation and focusing of heavy-ion beams in the final-focus magnet region of inertial fusion target chambers require controlling the background gas density and pressure in the beam tubes. Liquid vortexes will coat the inside of the tubes next to the beam ports and will help eliminate the need for mechanical shutters to mitigate the venting of target chamber background gas into the final-focus magnet region. Before the neutralizing region, the beam space charge is high, and ablation and target debris deposition in the final-focus magnet region may cause voltage breakdown. Previous studies focused on evaluating the amount of target chamber debris reaching the entrance of the beam ports. The TSUNAMI code has now been used to assess the density, temperature, and velocity of the vortex debris transported {approx}3 m up the beam tubes and reaching the final-focus magnet region, assuming that the liquid vortexes are perfectly absorbing surfaces. To further mitigate debris deposition in the final-focus magnet region, and prevent voltage breakdown, a 'magnetic shutter' has been envisaged to divert the debris out of the final-focus region. This shutter will prevent the hot ablation debris from reaching the magnet region and, coupled to some ionizing scheme, will conveniently suppress early ingression of debris into the final-focus magnet region.

  16. SETUP AND PERFORMANCE OF THE RHIC INJECTOR ACCELERATORS FOR THE 2005 RUN WITH COPPER IONS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AHRENS, L.; ALESSI, J.; GARDNER, C.J.

    2005-05-16

    Copper ions for the 2005 run [1] of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are accelerated in the Tandem, Booster and AGS prior to injection into RHIC. The setup and performance of these accelerators with copper are reviewed in this paper.

  17. High-energy high-luminosity electron-ion collider eRHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litvinenko, Vladimir N; Belomestnykh, Sergei; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Blaskiewicz, Michael M; Calaga, Rama; Chang, Xiangyun; Fedotov, Alexei; Gassner, David; Hammons, Lee; Hahn, Harald; Hao, Yue; He, Ping; Jackson, William; Jain, Animesh; Johnson, Elliott C; Kayran, Dmitry; Kewisch, Jrg; Luo, Yun; Mahler, George; McIntyre, Gary; Meng, Wuzheng; Minty, Michiko; Parker, Brett; Pikin, Alexander; Pozdeyev, Eduard; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Rao, Triveni; Roser, Thomas; Skaritka, John; Sheehy, Brian; Tepikian, Steven; Than, Yatming; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsentalovich, Evgeni; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Wang, Gang; Webb, Stephen; Wu, Qiong; Xu, Wencan; Zelenski, Anatoly

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a future electron-ion collider (EIC), based on the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) hadron facility, with two intersecting superconducting rings, each 3.8 km in circumference. A new ERL accelerator, which provide 5-30 GeV electron beam, will ensure 10^33 to 10^34 cm^-2 s^-1 level luminosity.

  18. Simulation studies of the HADES first level trigger PART I: Performance in heavy-ion induced reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Schicker; H. Tsertos

    1996-10-03

    The first level trigger of the HADES spectrometer is studied for the heavy-ion collision systems Au+Au and Ne+Ne. The trigger efficiency for central events is given in dependence of the imposed charged particle multiplicity condition. The timing properties of the trigger signal are described. The losses due to deadtime are specified. Finally, the first level trigger rate is reported.

  19. Time-of-flight energy analyzer for the plasma potential measurements by a heavy ion beam diagnostic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nedzelskiy, I.S.; Malaquias, A.; Goncalves, B.; Silva, C.; Varandas, C.A.F.; Cabral, J.A.C.

    2004-10-01

    A time-of-flight (TOF) technique for the plasma potential measurements by a heavy ion beam diagnostic (HIBD) with a multiple cell array detector has been elaborated on tokamak ISTTOK as an alternative to the traditional electrostatic energy analyzer. This article describes the design and operation of a four-channel TOF energy analyzer (TOFEA). First results of plasma potential measurements by TOFEA are presented proving the feasibility of this technique in experiments with HIBD.

  20. The role of surface energy coefficients and nuclear surface diffuseness in the fusion of heavy-ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishwar Dutt; Rajeev K. Puri

    2010-05-06

    We discuss the effect of surface energy coefficients as well as nuclear surface diffuseness in the proximity potential and ultimately in the fusion of heavy-ions. Here we employ different versions of surface energy coefficients. Our analysis reveals that these technical parameters can influence the fusion barriers by a significant amount. A best set of these parameters is also given that explains the experimental data nicely.

  1. Isospin effects on two-nucleon correlation functions in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies RID A-2398-2009 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, LW; Greco, V.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba.

    2003-01-01

    Using an isospin-dependent transport model, we study isospin effects on two-nucleon correlation functions in heavy-ion collisions induced by neutron-rich nuclei at intermediate energies. We find that these correlation ...

  2. Cavity morphology in a Ni based superalloy under heavy ion irradiation with hot pre-injected helium. II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, He; Yao, Zhongwen, E-mail: yaoz@me.queensu.ca; Daymond, Mark R. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen's University Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Kirk, Marquis A. [Material Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-03-14

    In the current investigation, TEM in-situ heavy ion (1?MeV Kr{sup 2+}) irradiation with helium pre-injected at elevated temperature (400?°C) was conducted to simulate in-reactor neutron irradiation induced damage in CANDU spacer material Inconel X-750, in an effort to understand the effects of helium on irradiation induced cavity microstructures. Three different quantities of helium, 400 appm, 1000 appm, and 5000 appm, were pre-injected directly into TEM foils at 400?°C. The samples containing helium were then irradiated in-situ with 1?MeV Kr{sup 2+} at 400?°C to a final dose of 5.4 dpa (displacement per atom). Cavities were formed from the helium injection solely and the cavity density and size increased with increasing helium dosage. In contrast to previous heavy ion irradiations with cold pre-injected helium, heterogeneous nucleation of cavities was observed. During the ensuing heavy ion irradiation, dynamical observation showed noticeable size increase in cavities which nucleated close to the grain boundaries. A “bubble-void” transformation was observed after Kr{sup 2+} irradiation to high dose (5.4?dpa) in samples containing 1000 appm and 5000 appm helium. Cavity distribution was found to be consistent with in-reactor neutron irradiation induced cavity microstructures. This implies that the distribution of helium is greatly dependent on the injection temperature, and helium pre-injection at high temperature is preferred for simulating the migration of the transmutation produced helium.

  3. Baryon Number Fluctuations from a Crossover Equation of State Compared to Heavy-Ion Collision Measurements in the Beam Energy Range $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 7.7 to 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Albright; J. Kapusta; C. Young

    2015-06-10

    Fluctuations of the proton number distribution in central Au-Au collisions have been measured by the STAR collaboration in a beam energy scan at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The motivation is a search for evidence of a critical point in the equation of state. It was found that the skewness and kurtosis display an interesting energy dependence. We compare these measurements to an equation of state which smoothly interpolates between an excluded volume hadron resonance gas at low energy density to a perturbative plasma of quarks and gluons at high energy density. This crossover equation of state agrees very well with the lattice QCD equation of state. The crossover equation of state can reproduce the data if the fluctuations are frozen at a temperature significantly lower than the average chemical freeze-out.

  4. Jet quenching in heavy-ion collisions at LHC with CMS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yilmaz, Yetkin

    2013-01-01

    The collision of highly relativistic nuclei can produce a volume of high energy density which can be used to learn about the behavior of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) at extreme conditions, such as those of the universe at ...

  5. An optical technique for measuring divergence, beam profile, and aiming direction, of relativistic negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1988-02-01

    A novel, nonobstructive diagnostic technique for high energy H/sup minus/D/sup minus/ ion beams is described. This scheme employs spectroscopic techniques designed to measure beam profile, perpendicular velocity spread (i.e., divergence), and orientation of multiMeV H/sup minus/ beams. The basic principle of this method is to photoneutralize a small portion of the H/sup minus/ beam in a way such that the photodetachment process results in the formation of excited hydrogen atoms in the n = 2 levels. Observation of fluorescence from spontaneous decay of H(sp) andor induced deacy of H(2s) can be readily used to determine beam profile. Doppler broadening measurements can be used to determine velocity spread from which beam emittance is calculated. With off-the-shelf instruments resolutions of 1 mm for beam profile and 2 x 10/sup minus/2) ..pi.. cm-mrad are possible. For photodetachment, the best commercially available laser is found to be ArF eximer laser. The analysis is performed for the 200 MEV BNL Linac. The laser, which has a pulse duration which has a pulse duration which is of 10/sup minus/5) of the linac can produce sufficient signal at a negligible beam loss. In addition, measurements of minute Doppler shifts of this Lyman-Alpha radiation by a spectrograph could in principle resolve beam direction to within 1.57 ..mu..rad. The process under consideration has a resonance known as the shape resonance. As the following literature review indicates, the total cross section is known and there is a reasonable agreement between theory and experiment. There are no experimental measurements of partical cross sections. nevertheless, there are theoretical estimates which agree within 15%. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Progress in heavy ion driven inertial fusion energy: From scaled experiments to the integrated research experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01

    The promise of inertia! fusion energy driven by heavy ionleading to an inertial fusion energy power plant. The focusIRE. 1 INTRODUCTION Inertial fusion energy targets require

  7. ACCELERATION SYSTEMS FOR HEAVY-ION BEAMS FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faltens, A.

    2010-01-01

    ION BEAMS FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION A. Fa1tens, D. L.ION BEAMS FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION A. Faltens, D.L.generation through inertial confinement fusion have been set

  8. Aspects of the physics, chemistry, and technology of high intensity heavy ion sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alton, G.D.

    1980-01-01

    Particular emphasis is placed on the technology of plasma discharge ion sources which utilize solid elemental or molecular compounds to produce vapor for the ionization process. A brief discussion is made of the elementary concepts underlying the formation and extraction of ion beams from plasma discharge sources. A limited review of low charge state positive ion sources suitable for accelerator use is also given.

  9. Solenoid transport of a heavy ion beam for warm dense matterstudies and inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armijo, Julien

    2006-10-01

    From February to July 2006, I have been doing research as a guest at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in the Heavy Ion Fusion group. This internship, which counts as one semester in my master's program in France, I was very pleased to do it in a field that I consider has the beauty of fundamental physics, and at the same time the special appeal of a quest for a long-term and environmentally-respectful energy source. During my stay at LBNL, I have been involved in three projects, all of them related to Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). The first one, experimental and analytical, has consisted in measuring the effects of the eddy currents induced by the pulsed magnets in the conducting plates of the source and diagnostic chambers of the Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX, which is a subset of NDCX). We have modeled the effect and run finite-element simulations that have reproduced the perturbation to the field. Then, we have modified WARP, the Particle-In-Cell code used to model the whole experiment, in order to import realistic fields including the eddy current effects and some details of each magnet. The second project has been to take part in a campaign of WARP simulations of the same experiment to understand the leakage of electrons that was observed in the experiment as a consequence to some diagnostics and the failure of the electrostatic electron trap. The simulations have shown qualitative agreement with the measured phenomena, but are still in progress. The third project, rather theoretical, has been related to the upcoming target experiment of a thin aluminum foil heated by a beam to the 1-eV range. At the beginning I helped by analyzing simulations of the hydrodynamic expansion and cooling of the heated material. But, progressively, my work turned into making estimates for the nature of the liquid/vapor two-phase flow. In particular, I have been working on criteria and models to predict the formation of droplets, their size, and their partial or total evaporation in the expanding flow.

  10. Effects of short-range correlation reduced kinetic symmetry energy in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao-An Li; Wen-Jun Guo; Zhaozhong Shi

    2015-03-20

    Besides earlier predictions based on both phenomenological models and modern microscopic many-body theories, circumstantial evidence was recently found for a reduced kinetic symmetry energy of isospin-asymmetric nucleonic matter compared to the free Fermi gas model prediction due to the short-range correlation of high-momentum neutron-proton pairs. While keeping the total symmetry energy near the saturation density of nuclear matter consistent with existing experimental constraints, we examine the correspondingly enhanced role of the isospin degree of freedom in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies due to the reduced (enhanced) kinetic (potential) symmetry energy. Important observable consequences are investigated.

  11. Experimental plan for investigating building-earth heat transfer at the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, K.W.

    1980-11-01

    An experimental plan is presented for investigating heat transfer between below-grade portions of building envelopes and the surrounding soil. Included is a detailing of data to be collected at an earth-sheltered structure (Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research Building) to be constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The attributes of the required data collection instrumentation are defined and a program to assure the accuracy of the collected data is discussed. The experimental plan is intended to be used as a guide to selection, installation, and maintenance of instrumentation as well as in data collection and verification.

  12. Signature of smooth transition from diabatic to adiabatic states in heavy-ion fusion reactions at deep subbarrier energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takatoshi Ichikawa; Kouichi Hagino; Akira Iwamoto

    2009-09-12

    We propose a novel extension of the standard coupled-channels framework for heavy-ion reactions in order to analyze fusion reactions at deep subbarrier incident energies. This extension simulates a smooth transition between the diabatic two-body and the adiabatic one-body states. To this end, we damp gradually the off-diagonal part of the coupling potential, for which the position of the onset of the damping varies for each eigen channel. We show that this model accounts well for the steep falloff of the fusion cross sections for the $^{16}$O+$^{208}$Pb, $^{64}$Ni+$^{64}$Ni, and $^{58}$Ni+$^{58}$Ni reactions.

  13. Observation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations and possible local strong parity violation in heavy-ion collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Semertzidis, Y.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; Van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.

    2010-01-01

    REVIEW C 81, 054908 (2010) Observation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations and possible local strong parity violation in heavy-ion collisions B. I. Abelev,8 M. M. Aggarwal,29 Z. Ahammed,46 A. V. Alakhverdyants,16 B. D. Anderson,17 D. Arkhipkin,3... G. S. Averichev,16 J. Balewski,21 O. Barannikova,8 L. S. Barnby,2 S. Baumgart,51 D. R. Beavis,3 R. Bellwied,49 F. Benedosso,26 M. J. Betancourt,21 R. R. Betts,8 A. Bhasin,15 A. K. Bhati,29 H. Bichsel,48 J. Bielcik,10 J. Bielcikova,11 B. Biritz,6 L...

  14. Parton energy loss in heavy-ion collisions via direct-photon and charged-particle azimuthal correlations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, L. C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.

    2010-01-01

    REVIEW C 82, 034909 (2010) Parton energy loss in heavy-ion collisions via direct-photon and charged-particle azimuthal correlations B. I. Abelev,8 M. M. Aggarwal,30 Z. Ahammed,47 A. V. Alakhverdyants,17 B. D. Anderson,18 D. Arkhipkin,3 G. S. Averichev...,17 J. Balewski,22 O. Barannikova,8 L. S. Barnby,2 J. Baudot,15 S. Baumgart,52 D. R. Beavis,3 R. Bellwied,50 F. Benedosso,27 M. J. Betancourt,22 R. R. Betts,8 A. Bhasin,16 A. K. Bhati,30 H. Bichsel,49 J. Bielcik,10 J. Bielcikova,11 B. Biritz,6 L. C...

  15. Universality far from equilibrium: From superfluid Bose gases to heavy-ion collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schlichting, S.; Venugopalan, R.; Berges, J.; Boguslavski, K.

    2015-02-10

    Isolated quantum systems in extreme conditions can exhibit unusually large occupancies per mode. In addition, this over-population gives rise to new universality classes of many-body systems far from equilibrium. We present theoretical evidence that important aspects of non-Abelian plasmas in the ultra-relativistic limit admit a dual description in terms of a Bose condensed scalar field theory.

  16. Medium Effects on Subthreshold Kaon Production in Heavy-Ion Collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, X. S.; Ko, Che Ming; LI, GQ; Zheng, Y. M.

    1994-01-01

    The relativistic transport model is extended to include the kaon degree of freedom. We also take into account the density dependence of the kaon effective mass in nuclear matter and the rescattering of kaons by nucleons. We find that the inclusion...

  17. Direct nucleonemission from hot and dense regions described in the hydrodynamical model of relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barz, H.W.; Csernai, L.P.; Greiner, W.

    1982-08-01

    The collision process is described by hydrodynamical equations. The escape of nucleons which do not take part in the thermal equilibrium are considered by including drain terms in these equations. The energy spectra of the escaped nucleons and of nucleons evaporated after the break up of the fluid are compared.

  18. Robustness of the Baryon-Stopping Signal for the Onset of Deconfinement in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. B. Ivanov; D. Blaschke

    2015-05-28

    The impact of the experimental acceptance, i.e. transverse-momentum ($p_T$) cut-off and limited rapidity region, on the earlier predicted irregularity in the excitation function of the baryon stopping is studied. This irregularity is a consequence of the onset of deconfinement occurring in the compression stage of a nuclear collision and manifests itself as a wiggle in the excitation function of the reduced curvature ($C_y$) of the net-proton rapidity distribution at midrapidity. It is demonstrated that the wiggle is a very robust signal of a first-order phase transition that survives even under conditions of a very limited acceptance. At the same time the $C_y$ for pure hadronic and crossover transition scenarios become hardly distinguishable, if the acceptance cuts off too much of the low-$p_T$ proton spectrum and/or puts too narrow rapidity window around midrapidity. It is found that the shape of the net-proton rapidity distribution near midrapidity depends on the $p_T$ cut-off. This implies that the measurements should be taken at the same acceptance for all collision energies in order to reliably conclude on the presence or absence of the irregularity.

  19. Robustness of the Baryon-Stopping Signal for the Onset of Deconfinement in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Yu B

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the experimental acceptance, i.e. transverse-momentum ($p_T$) cut-off and limited rapidity region, on the earlier predicted irregularity in the excitation function of the baryon stopping is studied. This irregularity is a consequence of the onset of deconfinement occurring in the compression stage of a nuclear collision and manifests itself as a wiggle in the excitation function of the reduced curvature ($C_y$) of the net-proton rapidity distribution at midrapidity. It is demonstrated that the wiggle is a very robust signal of a first-order phase transition that survives even under conditions of a very limited acceptance. At the same time the $C_y$ for pure hadronic and crossover transition scenarios become hardly distinguishable, if the acceptance cuts off too much of the low-$p_T$ proton spectrum and/or puts too narrow rapidity window around midrapidity. It is found that the shape of the net-proton rapidity distribution near midrapidity depends on the $p_T$ cut-off. This implies that the measu...

  20. System Size, Energy and Centrality Dependence of Pseudorapidity Distributions of Charged Particles in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Alver; B. B. Back; M. D. Baker; M. Ballintijn; D. S. Barton; R. R. Betts; R. Bindel; W. Busza; Z. Chai; V. Chetluru; E. García; T. Gburek; K. Gulbrandsen; J. Hamblen; I. Harnarine; C. Henderson; D. J. Hofman; R. S. Hollis; R. Ho?y?ski; B. Holzman; A. Iordanova; J. L. Kane; P. Kulinich; C. M. Kuo; W. Li; W. T. Lin; C. Loizides; S. Manly; A. C. Mignerey; R. Nouicer; A. Olszewski; R. Pak; C. Reed; E. Richardson; C. Roland; G. Roland; J. Sagerer; I. Sedykh; C. E. Smith; M. A. Stankiewicz; P. Steinberg; G. S. F. Stephans; A. Sukhanov; A. Szostak; M. B. Tonjes; A. Trzupek; G. J. van Nieuwenhuizen; S. S. Vaurynovich; R. Verdier; G. I. Veres; P. Walters; E. Wenger; D. Willhelm; F. L. H. Wolfs; B. Wosiek; K. Wo?niak; S. Wyngaardt; B. Wys?ouch

    2007-09-25

    We present the first measurements of the pseudorapidity distribution of primary charged particles in Cu+Cu collisions as a function of collision centrality and energy, \\sqrtsnn = 22.4, 62.4 and 200 GeV, over a wide range of pseudorapidity, using the PHOBOS detector. Making a global comparison of Cu+Cu and Au+Au results, we find that the total number of produced charged particles and the rough shape (height and width) of the pseudorapidity distributions are determined by the number of nucleon participants. More detailed studies reveal that a more precise matching of the shape of the Cu+Cu and Au+Au pseudorapidity distributions over the full range of pseudorapidity occurs for the same Npart/2A value rather than the same Npart value. In other words, it is the collision geometry rather than just the number of nucleon participants that drives the detailed shape of the pseudorapidity distribution and its centrality dependence at RHIC energies.

  1. PHENIX CDR update: An experiment to be performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory relativistic heavy ion collider. Revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The PHENIX Conceptual Design Report Update (CDR Update) is intended for use together with the Conceptual Design Report (CDR). The CDR Update is a companion document to the CDR, and it describes the collaboration`s progress since the CDR was submitted in January 1993. Therefore, this document concentrates on changes, refinements, and decisions that have been made over the past year. These documents together define the baseline PHENIX detector that the collaboration intends to build for operation at RHIC startup. In this chapter the current status of the detector and its motivation are briefly described. In Chapters 2 and 3 the detector and the physics performance are more fully developed. In Chapters 4 through 13 the details of the present design status, the technology choices, and the construction costs and schedules are presented. The physics goals of PHENIX collaboration have remained exactly as they were described in the CDR. Primary among these is the detection of a new phase of matter, the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), and the measurement of its properties. The PHENIX experiment will measure many of the best potential QGP signatures to see if any or all of these physics variables show anomalies simultaneously due to the formation of the QGP.

  2. Elliptic flow of resonances in relativistic heavy ion collisions: Probing final state interactions and the structure of resonances 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonaka, C.; Muller, B.; Asakawa, M.; Bass, SA; Fries, Rainer J.

    2004-01-01

    Multifragmentation, following the formation of toroidal and bubble nuclei, is observed with an improved Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck model for central Mo-92 + Mo-92 collisions. With a stiff equation of state, simultaneous ...

  3. Reactor Chamber and Balance-of-Plant Characteristics for a Fast-Ignition Heavy-Ion Fusion Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medin, Stanislav; Churazov, Mikhail; Koshkarev, Dmitri; Sharkov, Boris; Orlov, Yurii; Suslin, Viktor; Zemskov, Eugeni

    2003-05-15

    The concept of a fast-ignition heavy-ion fusion (FIHIF) power plant involves a cylindrical target and superhigh energy ion beams. The driver produces one plus/minus charge state multimass platinum ions with energy of 100 GeV. The driver efficiency and the target gain are taken as 0.25 and 100, respectively. The preliminary data on the energy fluxes delivered to the reactor chamber wall by the 500-MJ fusion yield are presented. The reactor chamber designed has two sections. In the first section, the microexplosions occur, and in the second section of bigger volume the expansion and condensation of vapors take place. The response of the blanket and the thin liquid film at the first-wall surface is evaluated. Lithium-lead eutectic is taken as a coolant. The evaporated mass and the condensation time are estimated, taking into account major thermophysical effects. The estimated neutron spectrum from the FIHIF target gives an average neutron energy of 11.9 MeV. The mechanical stresses in the construction material due to neutron energy release are evaluated. The outlet coolant chamber temperature is taken as 550 deg. C. The heat conversion system consisting of three coolant loops provides a net efficiency of the FIHIF power plant of 0.37.

  4. EBIT spectroscopy of highly charged heavy ions relevant to hot plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki [Institute for Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ding Xiaobin; Dong Chenzhong [North West Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Hara, Hirohisa; Watanabe, Tetsuya [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Koike, Fumihiro [School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Kanagawa 252-0373 (Japan); Nakano, Tomohide [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Ohashi, Hayato [Institute for Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); Watanabe, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Norimasa [Chubu University, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan)

    2013-07-11

    We present spectra of highly charged iron, gadolinium, and tungsten ions obtained with electron beam ion traps. Spectroscopic studies of these ions are important to diagnose and control hot plasmas in several areas. For iron ions, the electron density dependence of the line intensity ratio in extreme ultraviolet spectra is investigated for testing the model calculation used in solar corona diagnostics. Soft x-ray spectra of gadolinium are studied to obtain atomic data required in light source development for future lithography. Tungsten is considered to be the main impurity in the ITER plasma, and thus visible and soft x-ray spectra of tungsten have been observed to explore the emission lines useful for the spectroscopic diagnostics of the ITER plasma.

  5. U.S. Heavy Ion Beam Science towards inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01

    Science towards Inertial Fusion Energy B.G. Logan 1), D.Ion Fusion in the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program [25].activities for inertial fusion energy at Lawrence Livermore

  6. $?/s$ of a Relativistic Hadron Gas at RHIC: Approaching the AdS/CFT bound?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Demir; S. A. Bass

    2009-09-18

    Ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are thought to have produced a state of matter called the quark-gluon plasma, characterized by a very small shear-viscosity to entropy-density ratio $\\eta/s$, near the lower bound predicted for that quantity by AdS/CFT methods. As the produced matter expands and cools, it evolves through a phase described by a hadron gas with rapidly increasing $\\eta/s$. We calculate $\\eta/s$ as a function of temperature in this phase both in and out of chemical equilibrium and find that its value poses a challenge for viscous relativistic hydrodynamics, which requires small values of $\\eta/s$ in order to successfully describe the collective flow observables at RHIC. We therefore conclude that the origin of the low viscosity matter at the RHIC must be in the partonic phase of the reaction.

  7. A study of the early-stage evolution of relativistic electron-ion shock using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, E. J.; Min, K.; Choi, C. R.; Nishikawa, K.-I.

    2014-07-15

    We report the results of a 3D particle-in-cell simulation carried out to study the early-stage evolution of the shock formed when an unmagnetized relativistic jet interacts with an ambient electron-ion plasma. Full-shock structures associated with the interaction are observed in the ambient frame. When open boundaries are employed in the direction of the jet, the forward shock is seen as a hybrid structure consisting of an electrostatic shock combined with a double layer, while the reverse shock is seen as a double layer. The ambient ions show two distinct features across the forward shock: a population penetrating into the shocked region from the precursor region and an accelerated population escaping from the shocked region into the precursor region. This behavior is a signature of a combination of an electrostatic shock and a double layer. Jet electrons are seen to be electrostatically trapped between the forward and reverse shock structures showing a ring-like distribution in a phase-space plot, while ambient electrons are thermalized and become essentially isotropic in the shocked region. The magnetic energy density grows to a few percent of the jet kinetic energy density at both the forward and the reverse shock transition layers in a rather short time scale. We see little disturbance of the jet ions over this time scale.

  8. The effects of topological charge change in heavy ion collisions: "Event by event P and CP violation"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitri E. Kharzeev; Larry D. McLerran; Harmen J. Warringa

    2007-11-06

    Quantum chromodynamics (QCD) contains field configurations which can be characterized by a topological invariant, the winding number Q_w. Configurations with nonzero Q_w break the charge-parity CP symmetry of QCD. We consider a novel mechanism by which these configurations can separate charge in the presence of a background magnetic field - the "Chiral Magnetic Effect". We argue that sufficiently large magnetic fields are created in heavy ion collisions so that the Chiral Magnetic Effect causes preferential emission of charged particles along the direction of angular momentum. Since separation of charge is CP-odd, any observation of the Chiral Magnetic Effect could provide a clear demonstration of the topological nature of the QCD vacuum. We give an estimate of the effect and conclude that it might be observed experimentally.

  9. Semi-microscopic modeling of heavy-ion fusion reactions with multi-reference covariant density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Hagino; J. M. Yao

    2015-04-15

    We describe low-lying collective excitations of atomic nuclei with the multi-reference covariant density functional theory, and combine them with coupled-channels calculations for heavy-ion fusion reactions at energies around the Coulomb barrier. To this end, we use the calculated transition strengths among several collective states as inputs to the coupled-channels calculations. This approach provides a natural way to describe anharmonic multi-phonon excitations as well as a deviation of rotational excitations from a simple rigid rotor. We apply this method to subbarrier fusion reactions of $^{58}$Ni+$^{58}$Ni, $^{58}$Ni+$^{60}$Ni and $^{40}$Ca+$^{58}$Ni systems. We find that the effect of anharmonicity tends to smear the fusion barrier distributions, better reproducing the experimental data compared to the calculations in the harmonic oscillator limit.

  10. Towards a new quark-nuclear matter EoS for applications in astrophysics and heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastian, N -U

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our work is to develop a unified equation of state (EoS) for nuclear and quark matter for a wide range in temperature, density and isospin so that it becomes applicable for heavy-ion collisions as well as for the astrophysics of neutron stars, their mergers and supernova explosions. As a first step, we use improved EoS for the hadronic and quark matter phases and join them via Maxwell construction. We discuss the limitations of a 2-phase description and outline steps beyond it, towards the formulation of a unified quark-nuclear matter EoS on a more fundamental level by a cluster virial expansion.

  11. Microstructural evolution in NF616 (P92) and Fee9Cre0.1C-model alloy under heavy ion irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    .V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction High chromium (9e12 wt.%) ferritic-martensitic (FeM) steels]. Normalized and tempered 9e12 wt.% FeM steels typically exhibit the tempered martensite structure reactor Heavy ion irradiation In situ technique Transmission electron microscopy Ferritic-martensitic

  12. Nucleon transfer in heavy ion collisions with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory using a particle number projection technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nucleon transfer in heavy ion collisions with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory using of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200-transfers are discussed. Binary collisions of many-body systems are of funda- mental interest to test dynamical approaches

  13. On the common solution within a framework of single matrix algorithm for radical suppression of background products in heavy-ion induced reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. S. Tsyganov

    2015-06-05

    Application of real-time matrix algorithm in heavy ion induced complete fusion nuclear reactions of superheavy elements synthesis is reviewed in brief. An extended algorithm, for the case of the recoil detection efficiency is not close to 100% has been proposed.

  14. arXiv:nucl-th/0412037v110Dec2004 Transport Theories for Heavy Ion Collisions in the 1 AGeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolomeitsev, Evgeni E.

    for meson production at energies well below the threshold in an elementary reaction. Finally, nucleons can The Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100, Copenhagen, Denmark, School of Physics and Astronomy Heavy ion collisions in the energy range from 50 AMeV to several AGeV are quite complex. The single

  15. PH Y S ICAL RE VIE W C VOLUME 18, NUMBER 3 SEPTEMBER 1978 Heavy ion co&sions at intermediate energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertsch George F.

    energy G. Bertsch Physics Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 A. A of energy of 20-200 MeV/A. First, measurement of the longitudinal component of the kinetic energy is small. NUCLEAH REACTIONS Heavy ion collisions. Energy loss and angular distribu- tions discussed

  16. On the common solution within a framework of single matrix algorithm for radical suppression of background products in heavy-ion induced reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsyganov, Y S

    2015-01-01

    Application of real-time matrix algorithm in heavy ion induced complete fusion nuclear reactions of superheavy elements synthesis is reviewed in brief. An extended algorithm, for the case of the recoil detection efficiency is not close to 100% has been proposed.

  17. Heavy ion fusion science research for high energy density physics and fusion applications*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    . Two Filtered Cathodic Arc Plasma Sources (FCAPS) streamed aluminum metal plasma upstream toward, CA, 94551, USA 3 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543, USA 4 Gesellschaft fur and longitudinal compression of intense ion beams propagating through background plasma resulted in on-axis beam

  18. Kinetic And Potential Sputtering Of Lunar Regolith: The Contribution Of The Heavy (Minority) Solar Wind Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind Ions F.W. Meyera1 , P.R. Harrisa2 , H.M. Meyer IIIb , H. Hijazia , A.F. Barghoutyc a Physics, Huntsville, AL 35812, USA Abstract. In this paper the sputtering of lunar regolith by protons and solar wind of JSC-1A AGGL lunar regolith simulant at solar wind velocities, and TRIM simulations of kinetic

  19. Thermalization of heavy quarks in the quark-gluon plasma 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Hees, H.; Rapp, Ralf.

    2005-01-01

    the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) indicate the possibility that the D-meson v2 could be similar in magnitude to the one of light hadrons [10,11]. Since the c quark is rather heavy, this would be quite remarkable and could provide important... temperature) has been suggested as a mechanism to enhance partonic cross sections [12?14] to facilitate rapid thermalization of the bulk matter at RHIC as required in hy- drodynamical models. The notion of charmonium resonances in the QGP [15,16] has been...

  20. Heavy ion fusion year-end report, April 1, 1983-September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-11-01

    Some highlights of the program during this reporting period are as follows: (1) First results with the completed apparatus of the Single Beam Transport Experiment (SBTE) have shown the stable propagation of a space-charge-dominated cesium-ion beam through 41 periods of an AG focussing lattice. The space-charge effects were large enough to depress the betatron phase advance per cell from sigma/sub 0/ = 60/sup 0/ to sigma = 12/sup 0/. (2) Understanding of the reflection stabilization of longitudinal instability in a high-current beam bunch has been improved by analytical and computational studies. (3) Conceptual design studies of a multiple-beam ion induction linac suitable for the High Temperature Experiment have progressed to the stage where a first reference design (sodium, 125 MeV, 30 ..mu..C, 16 beams) is available. (4) The Long-Pulse Induction Accelerating Unit, first used to accelerate a cesium-ion beam in February 1983, has been undergoing modification in the low-level trigger circuitry to allow more precisely controlled waveform synthesis.

  1. Stress Tensor and Bulk Viscosity in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer J. Fries; Berndt Müller; Andreas Schäfer

    2008-08-30

    We discuss the influence of different initial conditions for the stress tensor and the effect of bulk viscosity on the expansion and cooling of the fireball created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. In particular, we explore the evolution of longitudinal and transverse components of the pressure and the extent of dissipative entropy production in the one-dimensional, boost-invariant hydrodynamic model. We find that a bulk viscosity consistent with recent estimates from lattice QCD further slows the equilibration of the system, however it does not significantly increase the entropy produced.

  2. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) year-end report, April 1, 1986-September 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    Activities are reported on MBE-4, the four-beam proof-of-principle ion induction linear accelerator with the capability of beam-current amplification. Mechanical aspects of MBE-4, quadrupole insulator performance, and pulsers are discussed. The computer code, SLID, has been used to help understand the longitudinal beam dynamics in MBE-4. A computer-controlled emittance scanning system is in use in MBE-4. A systematic effort is under way to discover and correct all the defects peculiar to the low energy part of the linac design code. (LEW)

  3. HISTRAP: Proposal for a Heavy Ion Storage Ring for Atomic Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the physics capabilities of HISTRAP together with a brief description of the facility and a sampling of the beams which will be available for experimentation, and surveys some of the lines of investigation in the physics of multicharged ions, molecular ion spectroscopy, condensed beams, and nuclear physics that will become possible with the advent of HISTRAP. Details of the accelerator design are discussed, including computer studies of beam tracking in the HISTRAP lattice, a discussion of the HHIRF tandem and ECR/RFQ injectors, and a description of the electron beam cooling system. In the past three years, HISTRAP has received substantial support from Oak Ridge National Laboratory management and staff. The project has used discretionary funds to develop hardware prototypes and carry out design studies. Construction has been completed on a vacuum test stand which models 1/16 of the storage ring and has attained a pressure of 4 x 10/sup -12/ Torr; a prototype rf cavity capable of accelerating beams up to 90 MeV/nucleon and decelerating to 20 keV/nucleon; and a prototype dipole magnet, one of the eight required for the HISTRAP lattice. This paper also contains a summary of the work on electron cooling carried out by one of our staff members at CERN. Building structures and services are described. Details of cost and schedule are also discussed. 77 refs.

  4. Heavy ion fusion half-year report, October 1, 1983-March 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-04-01

    Results from the Single Beam Transport Experiment (SBTE) showed that stable beam transport in a 41-period AG lattice with single-particle phase advance per period, sigma/sub 0/ + 60/sup 0/, was possible with space-charge forces large enough to depress the phase-advance to sigma = 12/sup 0/. We have since extended that result and have shown that depression from sigma/sub 0/ = 60/sup 0/ to sigma = 8/sup 0/ is still stable. Measurements of the Cs/sup +/ ion beam attenuation in the SBTE at different gas pressures, taken together with the different lattice acceptances for singly and doubly-charged ions, have allowed us to measure both the electron pick-up and electron cross-sections for Cs/sup +/ on nitrogen at 160 keV. A large effort is under way to arrive at a conceptual reference design for the Multiple Beam Experiment (MBE), so that final engineering design and prototyping can begin as soon as possible. The MBE design process has stimulated many detailed questions for the theory group and several important results have ensued. For instance, on the question of what magnitude of sextupole component could be tolerated in the lenses, computer simulation showed that, for a space-charge-dominated beam, a significant sextupole term had essentially no effect if the beam remained on axis, but led to intolerable emittance growth for the practical case of an off-axis beam.

  5. Effects of ion-neutral collisions on Alfven waves: The presence of forbidden zone and heavy damping zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng, C. J. [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China); Lee, L. C. [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China); Institute of Earth Science, Academia Sinica, Nankang 115, Taiwan (China); Kuo, C. L. [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China); Wang, C. B. [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China)

    2013-03-15

    Alfven waves are low-frequency transverse waves propagating in a magnetized plasma. We define the Alfven frequency {omega}{sub 0} as {omega}{sub 0}=kV{sub A}cos{theta}, where k is the wave number, V{sub A} is the Alfven speed, and {theta} is the angle between the wave vector and the ambient magnetic field. There are partially ionized plasmas in laboratory, space, and astrophysical plasma systems, such as in the solar chromosphere, interstellar clouds, and the earth ionosphere. The presence of neutral particles may modify the wave frequency and cause damping of Alfven waves. The effects on Alfven waves depend on two parameters: (1) {alpha}=n{sub n}/n{sub i}, the ratio of neutral density (n{sub n}), and ion density (n{sub i}); (2) {beta}={nu}{sub ni}/{omega}{sub 0}, the ratio of neutral collisional frequency by ions {nu}{sub ni} to the Alfven frequency {omega}{sub 0}. Most of the previous studies examined only the limiting case with a relatively large neutral collisional frequency or {beta} Much-Greater-Than 1. In the present paper, the dispersion relation for Alfven waves is solved for all values of {alpha} and {beta}. Approximate solutions in the limit {beta} Much-Greater-Than 1 as well as {beta} Much-Less-Than 1 are obtained. It is found for the first time that there is a 'forbidden zone (FZ)' in the {alpha}-{beta} parameter space, where the real frequency of Alfven waves becomes zero. We also solve the wavenumber k from the dispersion equation for a fixed frequency and find the existence of a 'heavy damping zone (HDZ).' We then examine the presence of FZ and HDZ for Alfven waves in the ionosphere and in the solar chromosphere.

  6. Burnout thresholds and cross section of power MOS transistors with heavy ions. Technical report, 1 May 1986-30 April 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waskiewicz, A.E.; Groninger, J.W.

    1990-02-01

    Power MOSFET heavy ion-induced Single Event Burnout tests were performed jointly by representatives of the Aerospace Corporation, NASA Goddard, NWSC Crane and Rockwell International. For the most part, presented are the results of the burnout threshold and cross section characterizations performed on n-channel power MOSFETs, however a small amount of p-channel data is also included. In addition, data on the effect of temperature, gate bias, total dose and inductive loading on MOSFET Single Event Burnout sensitivity is preferred. At the time of the test effort, radiation hardened devices were being developed by International Rectifier and RCA/GE. The heavy-ion-induced burnout test results on available samples of these devices are also incorporated for comparison to the commercial and JEDEC versions tested.

  7. Dynamical effects of spin-dependent interactions in low- and intermediate-energy heavy-ion reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jun; Shen, Wen-Qing; Xia, Yin

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that non-central nuclear forces, such as the spin-orbital coupling and the tensor force, play important roles in understanding many interesting features of nuclear structures. However, their dynamical effects in nuclear reactions are poorly known since only the spin-averaged observables are normally studied both experimentally and theoretically. Realizing that spin-sensitive observables in nuclear reactions may carry useful information about the in-medium properties of non-central nuclear interactions, besides earlier studies using the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach to understand effects of spin-orbital coupling on the threshold energy and spin polarization in fusion reactions, some efforts have been made recently to explore dynamical effects of non-central nuclear forces in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions using transport models. The focuses of these studies have been on investigating signatures of the density and isospin dependence of the form factor in the spin-dependent sing...

  8. Experimental investigation and thermodynamic modeling of extraction of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions by chelation in supercritical carbon dioxide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uyansoy, Hakki

    1995-01-01

    Wastewater streams containing heavy metals are common in industry. To prevent the contamination of clean water sources, the Clean Water Act specifies limits on the heavy metal concentrations of industrial waste water. This ...

  9. Compositional analysis and depth profiling of thin film CrO{sub 2} by heavy ion ERDA and standard RBS: a comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khamlich, S.; Msimanga, M.; Pineda-Vargas, C.A.; Nuru, Z.Y.; McCrindle, R.; Maaza, M.

    2012-08-15

    Chromium dioxide (CrO{sub 2}) thin film has generated considerable interest in applied research due to the wide variety of its technological applications. It has been extensively investigated in recent years, attracting the attention of researchers working on spintronic heterostructures and in the magnetic recording industry. However, its synthesis is usually a difficult task due to its metastable nature and various synthesis techniques are being investigated. In this work a polycrystalline thin film of CrO{sub 2} was prepared by electron beam vaporization of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} onto a Si substrate. The polycrystalline structure was confirmed through XRD analysis. The stoichiometry and elemental depth distribution of the deposited film were measured by ion beam nuclear analytical techniques heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), which both have relative advantage over non-nuclear spectrometries in that they can readily provide quantitative information about the concentration and distribution of different atomic species in a layer. Moreover, the analysis carried out highlights the importance of complementary usage of the two techniques to obtain a more complete description of elemental content and depth distribution in thin films. - Graphical abstract: Heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) both have relative advantage over non-nuclear spectrometries in that they can readily provide quantitative information about the concentration and distribution of different atomic species in a layer. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin films of CrO{sub 2} have been grown by e-beam evaporation of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} target in vacuum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composition was determined by heavy ion-ERDA and RBS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HI-ERDA and RBS provided information on the light and heavy elements, respectively.

  10. Probing hot and dense matter production in heavy ion collisions via neutral mesons and photons with the ALICE detector at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Astrid Morreale; for the ALICE collaboration

    2014-10-22

    One of the key signatures of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) is the modification of hadron and direct photon spectra in heavy-ion collisions as compared to proton-proton (pp) collisions. Suppression of hadron production at high transverse momenta in heavy-ion collisions can be explained by the energy loss of the partons produced in the hard scattering processes which traverse the hot and dense QCD matter. The dependence of the observed suppression on the transverse momentum (pT) of the measured hadron towards higher pT is an important input for the theoretical understanding of jet quenching effects in the QGP and the nature of energy loss. Another key observable which has helped establish the energy loss picture, is high pT direct photon production for which no suppression is expected. For low pT photon production, it is expected that thermal sources will lead to enhancement of direct photons. We report an overview of photon and neutral meson production measurements by the ALICE experiment at the LHC in heavy-ion and pp collisions.

  11. The longitudinal dependence of heavy-ion composition in the 2013 April 11 solar energetic particle event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, C. M. S.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Mason, G. M.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2014-09-20

    On 2013 April 11 active region 11719 was centered just west of the central meridian; at 06:55 UT, it erupted with an M6.5 X-ray flare and a moderately fast (?800 km s{sup –1}) coronal mass ejection. This solar activity resulted in the acceleration of energetic ions to produce a solar energetic particle (SEP) event that was subsequently observed in energetic protons by both ACE and the two STEREO spacecraft. Heavy ions at energies ?10 MeV nucleon{sup –1} were well measured by SEP sensors on ACE and STEREO-B, allowing the longitudinal dependence of the event composition to be studied. Both spacecraft observed significant enhancements in the Fe/O ratio at 12-33 MeV nucleon{sup –1}, with the STEREO-B abundance ratio (Fe/O = 0.69) being similar to that of the large, Fe-rich SEP events observed in solar cycle 23. The footpoint of the magnetic field line connected to the ACE spacecraft was longitudinally farther from the flare site (77° versus 58°), and the measured Fe/O ratio at ACE was 0.48, 44% lower than at STEREO-B but still enhanced by more than a factor of 3.5 over average SEP abundances. Only upper limits were obtained for the {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He abundance ratio at both spacecraft. Low upper limits of 0.07% and 1% were obtained from the ACE sensors at 0.5-2 and 6.5-11.3 MeV nucleon{sup –1}, respectively, whereas the STEREO-B sensor provided an upper limit of 4%. These characteristics of high, but longitudinally variable, Fe/O ratios and low {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios are not expected from either the direct flare contribution scenario or the remnant flare suprathermal material theory put forth to explain the Fe-rich SEP events of cycle 23.

  12. Cavity morphology in a Ni based superalloy under heavy ion irradiation with cold pre-injected helium. I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, He; Yao, Zhongwen Daymond, Mark R.; Kirk, Marquis A.

    2014-03-14

    In order to understand radiation damage in the nickel based superalloy Inconel X-750 in thermal reactors, where (n, ?) transmutation reaction also occurred in addition to fast neutron induced atomic displacement, heavy ion (1?MeV Kr{sup 2+}) irradiation with pre-injected helium was performed under in-situ observations of an intermediate voltage electron microscope at Argonne National Laboratory. By comparing to our previous studies using 1?MeV Kr{sup 2+} irradiation solely, the pre-injected helium was found to be essential in cavity nucleation. Cavities started to be visible after Kr{sup 2+} irradiation to 2.7 dpa at ?200?°C in samples containing 200 appm, 1000 appm, and 5000 appm helium, respectively, but not at lower temperatures. The cavity growth was observed during the continuous irradiation. Cavity formation appeared along with a reduced number density of stacking fault tetrahedra, vacancy type defects. With higher pre-injected helium amount, a higher density of smaller cavities was observed. This is considered to be the result of local trapping effect of helium which disperses vacancies. The average cavity size increases with increasing irradiation temperatures; the density reduced; and the distribution of cavities became heterogeneous at elevated temperatures. In contrast to previous characterization of in-reactor neutron irradiated Inconel X-750, no obvious cavity sink to grain boundaries and phase boundaries was found even at high doses and elevated temperatures. MC-type carbides were observed as strong sources for agglomeration of cavities due to their enhanced trapping strength of helium and vacancies.

  13. Nuclear modification factor of nonphotonic electrons in heavy-ion collisions, and the heavy-flavor baryon-to-meson ratio 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Yongseok; Ko, Che Ming.

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear modification factor R(AA) of nonphotonic electrons in Au + Au collisions at root(S)NN = 200 GeV is studied by considering the decays of heavy-flavor hadrons produced in a quark coalescence model. Although an enhanced Lambda(c)/D(0) ratio...

  14. VOLUME 79, NUMBER 11 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 15 SEPTEMBER 1997 Charge State Dependent Energy Loss of Slow Heavy Ions in Solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Universität, Frankfurt, Germany (Received 5 May 1997) The loss of kinetic energy of slow y 0.3yBohr ions Dependent Energy Loss of Slow Heavy Ions in Solids T. Schenkel,1,2 M. A. Briere,1, * A. V. Barnes,1 A. V from q 31 for oxygen to q 691 for gold ions. For the first time, charge state dependent energy loss

  15. HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keefe, D.

    2008-01-01

    from present practice. Inertial Confinement Fusion While forReactors for Inertial Confinement Fusion, K.A. Brueckner (

  16. HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keefe, D.

    2008-01-01

    along the road to useful energy is "scientific-breakeven"then the promise of useful energy from inertial fusionstill farther from useful net energy production). Scientific

  17. HEAVY ION COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siemens, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    contribution to the Eighth International Conference on High Energy Physics and Nuclearenergy in dense nuclear matter, as mentioned by Ray Sawyer in his contribution—

  18. Characterizing Heavy Ion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene Network ShapingDate:Characterization ofArctic

  19. Systematics of the charged-hadron P_T spectrum and the nuclear suppression factor in heavy-ion collisions from sqrt{s}=200 GeV to sqrt{s} =2.76 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorsten Renk; Hannu Holopainen; Risto Paatelainen; Kari J. Eskola

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, our goal is to make a simultaneous analysis of the high- and low-P_T parts of the charged-hadron P_T spectrum measured by the ALICE collaboration in central Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt{s}=2.76 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), based on models which have been successfully applied and constrained in Au-Au collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). For the hydrodynamical modeling with which we obtain the low-P_T spectrum, we have computed the initial conditions based on perturbative QCD (pQCD) minijet production and saturation. The sensitivity of the obtained charged-hadron P_T spectrum on the hydrodynamic model parameters is studied. For the high-P_T part, we apply a number of parton-medium interaction models, which are tuned to describe the nuclear suppression factor R_AA measured at the RHIC in central Au-Au collisions at sqrt{s}=200 GeV. We find that the higher kinematic reach of the LHC, manifest in the hardening of the pQCD parton spectral slope, is in principle very efficient in discriminating the various models. However, due to the uncertainties in the p-p baseline, none of the tested models can be firmly ruled out with the present ALICE data. Comparison with the LHC data in this approach also shows that the matching of the hydrodynamic and pQCD+jet quenching components leaves fairly little room for other hadron production mechanisms in the cross-over region P_T=4-5 GeV.

  20. Influence of vibrational excitation on surface diffuseness of inter-nuclear potential: study through heavy-ion quasi-elastic scattering at deep subbarrier energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Jhingan, A; Sugathan, P; Hagino, K

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the role of channel coupling in the surface properties of an inter-nuclear potential for heavy-ion reactions. To this end, we analyze the experimental quasi-elastic cross sections for the $^{12}$C + $^{105,106}$Pd and $^{13}$C + $^{105,106}$Pd systems using the coupled-channels approach by including the vibrational excitations in the target nuclei. While earlier studies have reported a negligible influence of vibrational excitation on the surface diffuseness parameter for spherical systems, we find a significant effect for the C+Pd systems. Our systematic study also reveals influence of transfer couplings on the surface diffuseness parameter.

  1. Dynamical simulation of heavy-ion collisions in the energy range from a few tens MeV/A to a few hundreds MeV/A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. V. Garzelli

    2008-10-13

    The overlapping stage of heavy-ion reactions can be simulated by dynamical microscopical models, such as those built on the basis of the Molecular Dynamics (MD) approaches, allowing to study the fragment formation process. The present performances of the Quantum MD (QMD) code developed at the University of Milano are discussed, showing results concerning fragment and particle production at bombarding energies up to $\\lsim$ 700 MeV/A, as well as a preliminary analysis on the isoscaling behaviour of isotopic yield ratios for reactions with isospin composition N/Z in the (1 - 1.2) range, at a 45 MeV/A bombarding energy.

  2. Observation of pi(+)pi(-)pi(+)pi(-) photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV at the STAR detector 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Leyva, A. Davila; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Han, L. -X; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Rehberg, J. M.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.

    2010-01-01

    REVIEW C 81, 044901 (2010) Observation of pi+pi?pi+pi? photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at ? sN N = 200 GeV at the STAR detector B. I. Abelev,8 M. M. Aggarwal,30 Z. Ahammed,47 A. V. Alakhverdyants,17 B. D. Anderson,18 D.... Arkhipkin,3 G. S. Averichev,17 J. Balewski,22 L. S. Barnby,2 S. Baumgart,52 D. R. Beavis,3 R. Bellwied,50 F. Benedosso,27 M. J. Betancourt,22 R. R. Betts,8 A. Bhasin,16 A. K. Bhati,30 H. Bichsel,49 J. Bielcik,10 J. Bielcikova,11 B. Biritz,6 L. C. Bland,3 B...

  3. Relativistic distribution function for particles with spin at local thermodynamical equilibrium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becattini, F., E-mail: becattini@fi.infn.it [Università di Firenze, Florence (Italy); INFN Sezione di Firenze, Florence (Italy); Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); FIAS, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)] [Germany; Chandra, V., E-mail: vinod.chandra@fi.infn.it [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Florence (Italy); Del Zanna, L., E-mail: ldz@arcetri.astro.it [Università di Firenze, Florence (Italy); INFN Sezione di Firenze, Florence (Italy); Grossi, E., E-mail: grossi@fi.infn.it [Università di Firenze, Florence (Italy); INFN Sezione di Firenze, Florence (Italy)

    2013-11-15

    We present an extension of relativistic single-particle distribution function for weakly interacting particles at local thermodynamical equilibrium including spin degrees of freedom, for massive spin 1/2 particles. We infer, on the basis of the global equilibrium case, that at local thermodynamical equilibrium particles acquire a net polarization proportional to the vorticity of the inverse temperature four-vector field. The obtained formula for polarization also implies that a steady gradient of temperature entails a polarization orthogonal to particle momentum. The single-particle distribution function in momentum space extends the so-called Cooper–Frye formula to particles with spin 1/2 and allows us to predict their polarization in relativistic heavy ion collisions at the freeze-out. -- Highlights: •Single-particle distribution function in local thermodynamical equilibrium with spin. •Polarization of spin 1/2 particles in a fluid at local thermodynamical equilibrium. •Prediction of a new effect: a steady gradient of temperature induces a polarization. •Application to the calculation of polarization in relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  4. Studies of heavy ion reactions and transuranic nuclei. Progress report, August 1, 1979-July 31, 1980. [Univ. of Rochester, New York, 8/1/79-7/31/80

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huizenga, J.R.

    1980-07-01

    The study of heavy-ion reaction mechanisms at the SuperHILAC and LAMPF is reported. Preprints of five articles and manuscripts of four recent conference papers are given, along with complete citations of publications and a list of personnel. Significant work was performed in the following areas: the bombarding energy dependence of the /sup 209/Bi + /sup 136/Xe reaction; the fragment yields for specific Z and A for projectile-like fragments produced in the reaction of 8.3-MeV/u /sup 56/Fe ions with targets of /sup 56/Fe, /sup 165/Ho, /sup 209/Bi, and /sup 238/U; and time distributions of fragments from delayed fission after muon capture for muonic /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 237/Np, /sup 239/Pu, and /sup 242/Pu. (RWR)

  5. What product might a renewal of Heavy Ion Fusion development offer that competes with methane microbes and hydrogen HTGRs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Ion Fusion development offer that competes with methanethe modular linac approach offers the possibility to reducenow, solenoids appear to offer a more likely way to manage

  6. ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faltens, A.

    2010-01-01

    and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Brussels, Belgium,of the Heavy Ion Fusion Workshop held at Brookhaven NationalReport, Hearthfire Heavy Ion Fusion, October 1, 1979 - March

  7. Charged Particle Multiplicities in Ultra-relativistic Au+Au and Cu+Cu Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Back

    2006-04-26

    The PHOBOS collaboration has carried out a systematic study of charged particle multiplicities in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A unique feature of the PHOBOS detector is its ability to measure charged particles over a very wide angular range from 0.5 to 179.5 deg. corresponding to |eta|<5.4. The general features of the charged particle multiplicity distributions as a function of pseudo-rapidity, collision energy and centrality, as well as system size, are discussed.

  8. Correlations of electrons from heavy flavor decay in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anne Sickles; for the PHENIX Collaboration

    2010-07-14

    In relativistic heavy ion collisions heavy flavor probes are crucial to understand the interactions between partons and the produced hot nuclear matter. Measurements in p+p collisions provide information about how the heavy quarks are produced and fragment and in d+Au collisions are sensitive to possible effects from cold nuclear matter. Azimuthal correlation measurements involving heavy flavor probes are complementary to single particle spectra measurements and provide additional information about production and interactions of heavy quarks. Measurements of electrons with heavy flavor decay with other hadrons from the event can provide information about how the heavy quark interacts with the produced matter and can be compared to similar measurements from light hadron correlations. Correlations between electrons from heavy flavor decay with muons, also from heavy flavor decay, can provide further information about heavy flavor production and cold nuclear matter effects in d+Au collisions with a very clean signal. We present PHENIX results for electron-hadron correlations in p+p and Au+Au collisions and electron-muon correlations in p+p and d+Au collisions and discuss the implications of these measurements.

  9. Computer Simulation and Comparison of Proton and Carbon Ion Treatment of Tumor Cells Using Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis, Keel Brandon

    2011-02-22

    particles with greater mass and higher charge than protons have an even sharper Bragg peak and a higher Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE), allowing a greater dose to be delivered to the tumor and sparing healthy tissue. Since carbon ions are being...

  10. Complete relativistic second-order dissipative hydrodynamics from the entropy principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaiswal, Amaresh; Pal, Subrata

    2013-01-01

    We present a new derivation of relativistic dissipative hydrodynamic equations, which invokes the second law of thermodynamics for the entropy four-current expressed in terms of the single-particle phase-space distribution function obtained from Grad's 14-moment approximation. This derivation is complete in the sense that all the second-order transport coefficients are uniquely determined within a single theoretical framework. In particular, this removes the long-standing ambiguity in the relaxation time for bulk viscosity thereby eliminating one of the uncertainties in the extraction of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio from confrontation with the anisotropic flow data in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We find that in the one-dimensional scaling expansion, these transport coefficients prevent the occurrence of cavitation even for rather large values of the bulk viscosity estimated in lattice QCD.

  11. Complete relativistic second-order dissipative hydrodynamics from the entropy principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amaresh Jaiswal; Rajeev S. Bhalerao; Subrata Pal

    2013-02-04

    We present a new derivation of relativistic dissipative hydrodynamic equations, which invokes the second law of thermodynamics for the entropy four-current expressed in terms of the single-particle phase-space distribution function obtained from Grad's 14-moment approximation. This derivation is complete in the sense that all the second-order transport coefficients are uniquely determined within a single theoretical framework. In particular, this removes the long-standing ambiguity in the relaxation time for bulk viscosity thereby eliminating one of the uncertainties in the extraction of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio from confrontation with the anisotropic flow data in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We find that in the one-dimensional scaling expansion, these transport coefficients prevent the occurrence of cavitation even for rather large values of the bulk viscosity estimated in lattice QCD.

  12. Toward the Limits of Matter: Ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurgen Schukraft; Reinhard Stock

    2015-05-26

    Strongly interacting matter as described by the thermodynamics of QCD undergoes a phase transition, from a low temperature hadronic medium to a high temperature quark-gluon plasma state. In the early universe this transition occurred during the early microsecond era. It can be investigated in the laboratory, in collisions of nuclei at relativistic energy, which create "fireballs" of sufficient energy density to cross the QCD Phase boundary. We describe 3 decades of work at CERN, devoted to the study of the QCD plasma and the phase transition. From modest beginnings at the SPS, ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics has evolved today into a central pillar of contemporary nuclear physics and forms a significant part of the LHC program.

  13. Transport model study of nuclear stopping in heavy ion collisions over an energy range from 0.09A GeV to 160A GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ying Yuan; Qingfeng Li; Zhuxia Li; Fu-Hu Liu

    2010-02-26

    Nuclear stopping in the heavy ion collisions over a beam energy range from SIS, AGS up to SPS is studied in the framework of the modified UrQMD transport model, in which mean field potentials of both formed and "pre-formed" hadrons (from string fragmentation) and medium modified nucleon-nucleon elastic cross sections are considered. It is found that the nuclear stopping is influenced by both the stiffness of the equation of state and the medium modifications of nucleon-nucleon cross sections at SIS energies. At the high SPS energies, the two-bump structure is shown in the experimental rapidity distribution of free protons, which can be understood with the consideration of the "pre-formed" hadron potentials.

  14. Semi-classical Characters and Optical Model Description of Heavy Ion Scattering, Direct Reactions, and Fusion at Near-barrier Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. T. Kim; W. Y. So; S. W. Hong; T. Udagawa

    2001-11-02

    An approach is proposed to calculate the direct reaction (DR) and fusion probabilities for heavy ion collisions at near-Coulomb-barrier energies as functions of the distance of closest approach D within the framework of the optical model that introduces two types of imaginary potentials, DR and fusion. The probabilities are calculated by using partial DR and fusion cross sections, together with the classical relations associated with the Coulomb trajectory. Such an approach makes it possible to analyze the data for angular distributions of the inclusive DR cross section, facilitating the determination of the radius parameters of the imaginary DR potential in a less ambiguous manner. Simultaneous $\\chi^{2}$-analyses are performed of relevant data for the $^{16}$O+$^{208}$Pb system near the Coulomb-barrier energy.

  15. Chiral magnetic wave at finite baryon density and the electric quadrupole moment of quark-gluon plasma in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yannis Burnier; Dmitri E. Kharzeev; Jinfeng Liao; Ho-Ung Yee

    2011-03-07

    Chiral Magnetic Wave (CMW) is a gapless collective excitation of quark-gluon plasma in the presence of external magnetic field that stems from the interplay of Chiral Magnetic (CME) and Chiral Separation Effects (CSE); it is composed by the waves of the electric and chiral charge densities coupled by the axial anomaly. We consider CMW at finite baryon density and find that it induces the electric quadrupole moment of the quark-gluon plasma produced in heavy ion collisions: the "poles" of the produced fireball (pointing outside of the reaction plane) acquire additional positive electric charge, and the "equator" acquires additional negative charge. We point out that this electric quadrupole deformation lifts the degeneracy between the elliptic flows of positive and negative pions leading to $v_2(\\pi^+) < v_2(\\pi^-)$, and estimate the magnitude of the effect.

  16. Event-by-event fluctuations in perturbative QCD + saturation + hydro model: pinning down QCD matter shear viscosity in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niemi, H; Paatelainen, R

    2015-01-01

    We introduce an event-by-event perturbative-QCD + saturation + hydro ("EKRT") framework for ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions, where we compute the produced fluctuating QCD-matter energy densities from next-to-leading order perturbative QCD using a saturation conjecture to control soft particle production, and describe the space-time evolution of the QCD matter with dissipative fluid dynamics, event by event. We perform a simultaneous comparison of the centrality dependence of hadronic multiplicities, transverse momentum spectra, and flow coefficients of the azimuth-angle asymmetries, against the LHC and RHIC measurements. We compare also the computed event-by-event probability distributions of relative fluctuations of elliptic flow, and event-plane angle correlations, with the experimental data from Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC. We show how such a systematic multi-energy and multi-observable analysis tests the initial state calculation and the applicability region of hydrodynamics, and in particular how ...

  17. Spin alignment measurements of the K*(0)(892) and phi(1020) vector mesons in heavy ion collisions at root S(NN)=200 GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M. M.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; LaPointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C-H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qattan, I. A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; Van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.

    2008-01-01

    COMMUNICATIONS PHYSICAL REVIEW C 77, 061902(R) (2008) Spin alignment measurements of the K ?0(892) and ?(1020) vector mesons in heavy ion collisions at? sNN = 200 GeV B. I. Abelev,10 M. M. Aggarwal,32 Z. Ahammed,47 B. D. Anderson,21 D. Arkhipkin,14 G. S.... Biritz,7 L. C. Bland,3 M. Bombara,2 B. E. Bonner,38 M. Botje,30 J. Bouchet,21 E. Braidot,30 A. V. Brandin,28 S. Bueltmann,3 T. P. Burton,2 M. Bystersky,12 X. Z. Cai,41 H. Caines,52 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,6 J. Callner,10 O. Catu,52 D. Cebra,6...

  18. VOLUME 4$, NUMBER 10 PHYSICAL RKVI K%V LKTTKRS $ SEPTEMBER 1979 Low-Energy Pion Production at 0' with Heavy Ions from 125 to 400 MeV/Nucleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertsch George F.

    VOLUME 4$, NUMBER 10 PHYSICAL RKVI K%V LKTTKRS $ SEPTEMBER 1979 Low-Energy Pion Production at 0 studies of pion production in such collisions with beam energies below 1 GeV/ nucleon are currently being meas- urements of pion-production cross sections at heavy-ion-beam energies much lower than pre

  19. SHIPS: A new setup for the investigation of swift heavy ion induced particle emission and surface modifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meinerzhagen, Florian; Bukowska, Hanna; Bender, Markus; Severin, Daniel; Herder, Matthias; Lebius, Henning; Schleberger, Marika; Wucher, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The irradiation with fast ions with kinetic energies of > 10 MeV leads to the deposition of a high amount of energy along their trajectory (up to several ten keV/nm). The energy is mainly transferred to the electronic subsystem and induces different secondary processes of excitations which result in significant material modifications. A new setup to study these ion induced effects on surfaces will be described in this paper. The setup combines a variable irradiation chamber with different techniques of surface characterizations like scanning probe microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion and neutral mass spectrometry, as well as low energy electron diffraction under ultra high vacuum conditions, and is mounted at a beamline of the universal linear accelerator (UNILAC) of the GSI facility in Darmstadt, Germany. Here, samples can be irradiated with high-energy ions with a total kinetic energy up to several GeVs under different angles of incidence. Our setup enables the preparation and in-situ analysis of differ...

  20. phi and Omega production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions in a dynamical quark coalescence model RID A-2398-2009 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, LW; Ko, Che Ming.

    2006-01-01

    Based on the phase-space information obtained from a multiphase transport model within the string-melting scenario for strange and antistrange quarks, we study the yields and transverse-momentum spectra of phi mesons and ...