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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative risk ranking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Environmental restoration risk-based prioritization work package planning and risk ranking methodology. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the risk-based prioritization methodology developed to evaluate and rank Environmental Restoration (ER) work packages at the five US Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-ORO) sites [i.e., Oak Ridge K-25 Site (K-25), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12)], the ER Off-site Program, and Central ER. This prioritization methodology was developed to support the increased rigor and formality of work planning in the overall conduct of operations within the DOE-ORO ER Program. Prioritization is conducted as an integral component of the fiscal ER funding cycle to establish program budget priorities. The purpose of the ER risk-based prioritization methodology is to provide ER management with the tools and processes needed to evaluate, compare, prioritize, and justify fiscal budget decisions for a diverse set of remedial action, decontamination and decommissioning, and waste management activities. The methodology provides the ER Program with a framework for (1) organizing information about identified DOE-ORO environmental problems, (2) generating qualitative assessments of the long- and short-term risks posed by DOE-ORO environmental problems, and (3) evaluating the benefits associated with candidate work packages designed to reduce those risks. Prioritization is conducted to rank ER work packages on the basis of the overall value (e.g., risk reduction, stakeholder confidence) each package provides to the ER Program. Application of the methodology yields individual work package ``scores`` and rankings that are used to develop fiscal budget requests. This document presents the technical basis for the decision support tools and process.

Dail, J.L.; Nanstad, L.D.; White, R.K.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Partition identity bijections related to sign-balance and rank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we present bijections proving partitions identities. In the first part, we generalize Dyson's definition of rank to partitions with successive Durfee squares. We then present two symmetries for this new ...

Boulet, Cilanne Emily

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Quantum groups and functional relations for higher rank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed construction of the universal integrability objects related to the integrable systems associated with the quantum group $\\mathrm U_q(\\mathcal L(\\mathfrak{sl}_3))$ is given. The full proof of the functional relations in the form independent of the representation of the quantum group in the quantum space is presented. The case of the general gradation and general twisting is treated. The specialization of the universal functional relations to the case when the quantum space is the state space of a discrete spin chain is described.

H. Boos; F. Göhmann; A. Klümper; Kh. S. Nirov; A. V. Razumov

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

4

Relative risks of energy sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares the risks associated with various energy sources in an attempt to demonstrate the relative safety of nuclear energy. (JEF)

Haire, M.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Risk ranking of bioaccessible metals from fly ash dissolved in simulated lung and gut fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plant fly ash from two fuels, coal and a mixture of coal and shredded tires were evaluated for trace metal solubility in simulated human lung and gut fluids (SLF and SGF, respectively) to estimate bioaccessibility. The proportion of bioaccessible to total metal ranged from zero (V) to 80% (Zn) for coal-derived ash in SLF and from 2 (Th) to 100% (Cu) for tire-derived fly ash in SGF. The tire-derived ash contained much more Zn. However, Zn ranked only 5th of the various toxic metals in SGF compared with international regulations for ingestion. On the basis of total concentrations, the metals closest to exceeding limits based on international regulations for inhalation were Cr, Pb, and Al. On dissolution in SLF, the most limiting metals were Pb, Cu, and Zn. For metals exposed to SGF there was no relative change in the top metal, Al, before and after dissolution but the second-ranked metal shifted from Pb to Ni. In most cases only a proportion of the total metal concentrations in either fly ash was soluble, and hence bioaccessible, in either biofluid. When considering the regulatory limits for inhalation of particulates, none of the metal concentrations measured were as hazardous as the fly ash particulates themselves. However, on the basis of the international ingestion regulations for Al, the maximum mass of fly ash that could be ingested is only 1 mg per day (10 mg based on bioaccessibility). It is possible that such a small mass could be consumed by exposed individuals or groups. 39 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

John Twining; Peter McGlinn; Elaine Loi; Kath Smith; Reto Giere [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai, NSW (Australia)

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Risk-Related research at LBNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk-Related Research at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Risk-Related Research at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Table of Contents Human Exposure Assessment Cancer Risk Assessment Extrapolation of Cancer Risks from Animals to Humans Biodosimetry to Assess Human Genotoxicity from Mutagenic or Clastogenic Agents Transgenic Mouse Models Biological Effects of Complex Chemical Mixtures Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and Cancer Models Electromagnetic Fields Risks of Ionizing Radiation in Space Risk-Based Remediation Strategy for Kesterson Reservoir Wetland Restoration and Sediment Quality Integrated, Risk-Based Environmental Clean-up SELECT: Environmental Decision-Making Software Introduction The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) conducts research to improve the scientific basis of risk assessment.

7

Feasibility of developing risk-based rankings of pressure boundary systems for inservice inspection  

SciTech Connect

The goals of the Evaluation and Improvement of Non-destructive Examination Reliability for the In-service Inspection of Light Water Reactors Program sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to (1) assess current ISI techniques and requirements for all pressure boundary systems and components, (2) determine if improvements to the requirements are needed, and (3) if necessary, develop recommendations for revising the applicable ASME Codes and regulatory requirements. In evaluating approaches that could be used to provide a technical basis for improved inservice inspection plans, PNL has developed and applied a method that uses results of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) to establish piping system ISI requirements. In the PNL program, the feasibility of generic ISI requirements is being addressed in two phases. Phase I involves identifying and prioritizing the systems most relevant to plant safety. The results of these evaluations will be later consolidated into requirements for comprehensive inservice inspection of nuclear power plant components that will be developed in Phase II. This report presents Phase I evaluations for eight selected plants and attempts to compare these PRA-based inspection priorities with current ASME Section XI requirements for Class 1, 2 and 3 systems. These results show that there are generic insights that can be extrapolated from the selected plants to specific classes of light water reactors.

Vo, T.V.; Smith, B.W.; Simonen, F.A.; Gore, B.F.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Inside PageRank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the interest of a Web page is strictly related to its content and to the subjective readers' cultural background, a measure of the page authority can be provided that only depends on the topological structure of the Web. PageRank is a noticeable ... Keywords: Information retrieval, Markov chains, PageRank, Web page scoring, search engines, searching the Web

Monica Bianchini; Marco Gori; Franco Scarselli

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Rank three bipartite entangled states are distillable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that the bipartite entangled state of rank three is distillable. So there is no rank three bipartite bound entangled state. By using this fact, We present some families of rank four states that are distillable. We also analyze the relation between the low rank state and the Werner state.

Lin Chen; Yi-Xin Chen

2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

10

Depth estimation for ranking query optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A relational ranking query uses a scoring function to limit the results of a conventional query to a small number of the most relevant answers. The increasing popularity of this query paradigm has led to the introduction of specialized rank join operators ... Keywords: DEEP, Data statistics, Depth estimation, Query optimization, Relational ranking query, Top-k

Karl Schnaitter; Joshua Spiegel; Neoklis Polyzotis

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Procedure for determining the distribution ranking index  

SciTech Connect

The Distribution Ranking Index (DRI) has been developed as a simple but effective means to indicate the inherent, acute hazards of a material that might be released in a transportation accident. Utilizing existing Dow resources and procedures, it is one of the methods used for prioritization of chemicals in Dow`s distribution related process risk management effort. Seven individual hazard indexes are considered for a material. The values range from 1 to 4 with 4 representing the most severe hazard. The highest value from any hazard index determines the overall DRI. 3 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

Latino, M.A. [Dow Chemical Co., Freeport, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

Depth estimation for ranking query optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A relational ranking query uses a scoring function to limit the results of a conventional query to a small number of the most relevant answers. The increasing popularity of this query paradigm has led to the introduction of specialized rank join operators ...

Karl Schnaitter; Joshua Spiegel; Neoklis Polyzotis

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Ranking distributed probabilistic data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ranking queries are essential tools to process large amounts of probabilistic data that encode exponentially many possible deterministic instances. In many applications where uncertainty and fuzzy information arise, data are collected from multiple sources ... Keywords: distributed query processing, probabilistic data, ranking queries, top-k, uncertain databases

Feifei Li; Ke Yi; Jeffrey Jestes

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Re-ranking algorithms for name tagging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrating information from different stages of an NLP processing pipeline can yield significant error reduction. We demonstrate how re-ranking can improve name tagging in a Chinese information extraction system by incorporating information from relation ...

Heng Ji; Cynthia Rudin; Ralph Grishman

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

An empirical assessment of ranking accuracy in ranked set sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ranked set sampling (RSS) involves ranking of potential sampling units on the variable of interest using judgment or an auxiliary variable to aid in sample selection. Its effectiveness depends on the success in this ranking. We provide an empirical assessment ... Keywords: Concomitant ranking, Logistic regression, Simple random sampling, Simulation study

Haiying Chen; Elizabeth A. Stasny; Douglas A. Wolfe

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Medical & Risk-related Research Archive of Science Articles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search News Archive Search News Archive Advanced Search Search Tips Medical & Risk-related Research Computer Simulations Point Way to New Finding About the Immune System Secrets Of Drug Resistance Revealed New Breast Cancer Gene Found That Can Affect Cell Growth Controls New Bioactive Metal Coating Allows Metal Implants To Bond With Bone Online National Health Survey Seeks to Sign Up Millions Heading Off Terrorism, Scientists Model Airflow Transport Faster, Better Way to Compute Medical Models from Noisy Images Promising New Treatment for Brain Cancer on the Horizon New Sensor Provides First Instant Test for Toxic E. Coli Organism History of Nuclear Medicine: From Radioisotopes to Medical Imaging Water Purification System Has Vast Potential to Save Lives in Third World Exercise and Not Genetics Is Major Determinant of Weight, Study

17

Homecare risk management: nursing issues related to technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional risk management may not address the needs of technology being introduced into homecare situations for nurses. We propose to augment traditional risk management with insights from Prevention through Design and The 8 Rights giving a more technology ...

Juliana J. Brixey, James P. Turley

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Optimizing ranked retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ranked retrieval plays an important role in explorative querying, where the user is interested in the top k results of complex ad-hoc queries. In such a scenario, response times are very important, but at the same time, tuning techniques, such ...

Thomas Neumann

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Relative risk site evaluations for Yakima Training Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All 20 U.S. Army Yakima Training Center (YTC) sites evaluated were given a `low` relative risk. At Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 22, a `minimum` soils contaminant hazard factor was assigned even though 6,700 mg/kg TPH-diesel was found in surface soil. SWMU 22 is physically located on top of and with the fence surrounding Area of Concern (AOC) 4. Because the diesel is most likely associated with AOC 4, and plans are to clean up AOC 4, any further actions regarding these contaminated soils should be addressed as part of the planned actions for AOC 4. Contaminant hazard factors of `moderate` were assigned to the soil pathway for SWMUs 4 and 7 because dieldrin and arsenic, respectively, were found in surface soil samples at concentrations exceeding standards. A `moderate` contaminant hazard factor was also assigned to the sediment pathway for AOC 1 because arsenic detected in sediments in `Larry`s Swimming Pool` exceeded the standard. All other contaminant hazard factors were rated as minimal. The receptor factor for all sites and pathways was rated `limited,` except for SWMU 54 in which the groundwater receptor factor was rated `potential.` A `potential` rating was assigned to the groundwater pathway at this site to be conservative. The site is located on the south side of the syncline axis where the unconfined aquifer may be present and there are no monitoring wells at the site to confirm or deny the presence of groundwater contamination.

Smith, R.M.; Whelan, G.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Risks to the public in computers and related systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edited by Peter G. Neumann (Risks Forum Moderator and Chairman of the ACM Committee on Computers and Public Policy), plus personal contributions by others, as indicated. Opinions expressed are individual rather than organizational, and all of the usual ...

Peter G. Neumann

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative risk ranking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Risks to the public in computers and related systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edited by Peter G. Neumann (Risks Forum Moderator and Chairman of the ACM Committee on Computers and Public Policy), plus personal contributions by others, as indicated. Opinions expressed are individual rather than organizational, and all of the usual ...

Peter G. Neumann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Relative Risk Model for Transmission and Distribution Electric Infrastructure (General RRM) Version 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The General Relative Risk Model (RRM) is a decision support tool that provides a platform for the assessment of relative risks (human, ecological, and financial) associated with releases of dielectric fluids from a wide range of transmission and distribution (T&D) electrical equipment.  The General RRM is designed to model the relative risk of a given equipment portfolio (i.e., a user-defined grouping of T&D equipment) owned and operated by a utility.  The General RRM evaluates the ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

23

Low Rank Coal Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Rank Coal Optimization Low Rank Coal Optimization NETL Office of Research and Development Project Number: FWP-2012.03.03 Task 4 Project Description NETL's in-house research team is using an integrated approach to combine theory, computational modeling, experiment, and industrial input to develop physics-based methods, models, and tools to support the development and deployment of advanced gasification based devices and systems. The activities in this effort include developing and applying computational and modeling tools to simulate complex flows in applications such as transport or entrained flow gasifiers. TRIG Model Development - The primary objective of this work is to develop a hierarchy of models for numerical simulations of TRIG co-feed conditions that span fast running reduced order models (ROM's) to high fidelity multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. Each model will have uncertainty quantification associated with its predictions to allow a user to choose a model based on the trade-offs between computational speed and uncertainty in the predictions.

24

Low-rank coal research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Probabilistic information retrieval approach for ranking of database query results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the problem of ranking the answers to a database query when many tuples are returned. In particular, we present methodologies to tackle the problem for conjunctive and range queries, by adapting and applying principles of probabilistic ... Keywords: Probabilistic information retrieval, automatic ranking, experimentation, indexing, relational queries, user survey, workload

Surajit Chaudhuri; Gautam Das; Vagelis Hristidis; Gerhard Weikum

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Improving Ranking Using Quantum Probability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper shows that ranking information units by quantum probability differs from ranking them by classical probability provided the same data used for parameter estimation. As probability of detection (also known as recall or power) and probability of false alarm (also known as fallout or size) measure the quality of ranking, we point out and show that ranking by quantum probability yields higher probability of detection than ranking by classical probability provided a given probability of false alarm and the same parameter estimation data. As quantum probability provided more effective detectors than classical probability within other domains that data management, we conjecture that, the system that can implement subspace-based detectors shall be more effective than a system which implements a set-based detectors, the effectiveness being calculated as expected recall estimated over the probability of detection and expected fallout estimated over the probability of false alarm.

Melucci, Massimo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Inequalities for the Ranks of Quantum States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate relations between the ranks of marginals of multipartite quantum states. These are the Schmidt ranks across all possible bipartitions and constitute a natural quantification of multipartite entanglement dimensionality. We show that there exist inequalities constraining the possible distribution of ranks. This is analogous to the case of von Neumann entropy (\\alpha-R\\'enyi entropy for \\alpha=1), where nontrivial inequalities constraining the distribution of entropies (such as e.g. strong subadditivity) are known. It was also recently discovered that all other \\alpha-R\\'enyi entropies for $\\alpha\\in(0,1)\\cup(1,\\infty)$ satisfy only one trivial linear inequality (non-negativity) and the distribution of entropies for $\\alpha\\in(0,1)$ is completely unconstrained beyond non-negativity. Our result resolves an important open question by showing that also the case of \\alpha=0 (logarithm of the rank) is restricted by nontrivial linear relations and thus the cases of von Neumann entropy (i.e., \\alpha=1) and 0-R\\'enyi entropy are exceptionally interesting measures of entanglement in the multipartite setting.

Josh Cadney; Marcus Huber; Noah Linden; Andreas Winter

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

28

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant: Relative Risk Ranking Sites Plant: Relative Risk Ranking Sites These rankings are based on the EM-40 Release Site Methodology. Select a release site to receive information concerning that site. Please note that not all of the listed sites are linked to further information. Abandoned Nitric Acid Pipeline ACN Drum Yard Bear Creek Burial Grounds Bear Creek Contaminated Floodplain Soils Beta-4 Security Pits Building 81-10 Area Mercury Contaminated Soils Building 9201-2 Transformer and Capacitor Storage Area Building 9201-3 Coolant Salt Technology Facility Building 9201-4 Building 9201-4 External Pipes Building 9201-5E Northeast Yard Waste Storage Area Building 9202 East Pad Waste Storage Area Building 9204-2 West Yard Waste Storage Area Building 9206 Underground Tank Building 9215 West Pad Waste Storage Area

29

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ETTP: Relative Risk Ranking Sites ETTP: Relative Risk Ranking Sites These rankings are based on the EM-40 Release Site Methodology. Select a release site to receive information concerning that site. Please note that not all of the listed sites are linked to further information. 518 Main Substation 600 Series Oil Storage Area 695/687 Oil Storage Operations Building 523 Grease {Burial Site} Building 526 Heavy Equipment Shop Building 569 Heavy Equipment Shop Building 665 Steam Shed Building F-29 Gasoline Station Demolition Materials Placement Area Duct Island Road F-05 Laboratory Burial Ground F-07 Material Warehouse F-08 Laboratory Flannagans Loop Road Groundwater Plume Centered Under North Side of K-1070-C/D Groundwater Plume Emanating from K-1401 Acid Line Groundwater Plume near Mitchell Branch Groundwater Plume Originating from K-1420 Building

30

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORR Offsite: Relative Risk Ranking Sites ORR Offsite: Relative Risk Ranking Sites These rankings are based on the EM-40 Release Site Methodology. Select a release site to receive information concering that site. Please note that not all of the listed sites are linked to further information. Animal Burial Site I Animal Burial Site II Animal Burial Site III Atomic City Auto Parts - Contaminated Creek Sediments Atomic City Auto Parts - Contaminated Soils Atomic City Auto Parts - Surface Debris Clinch River/Poplar Creek CSX Railroad David Witherspoon, Inc., 1630 Site David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site Low Dose Rate Irradiation Facility (LDRIF) Lower East Fork Poplar Creek - Bruner Site Lower East Fork Poplar Creek - NOAA Site Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Oak Ridge Tool Engineering, Inc. Solway Drums Site Swine Waste Lagoons

31

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL: Relative Risk Ranking Sites ORNL: Relative Risk Ranking Sites These rankings are based on the EM-40 Release Site Methodology. Select a release site to receive information concerning that site. Please note that not all of the listed sites are linked to further information. 3001 Storage Canal (OGR) 3517 Filter Pit (Fission Product Development Laboratory) Abandoned Burn Pit Abandoned Sanitary Waste Pipeline and Septic Tank N of 7917 Abandoned Underground Waste Oil Storage Tank 7002A Above-ground Demineralized-water Holding Tanks Aircraft Reactor Experiment Contaminated Tool Storage Aircraft Reactor Experiment Surface Impoundment Buried Scrap Metal Area C-14 Allocation in White Oak Trees C-14 Allocation in White Pine Trees C-14 Allocation in Woody Biomass Plantation Species C-14 Efflux in Yellow Poplar Stand

32

Malaria in Africa: Vector Species' Niche Models and Relative Risk Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shackelford, Sahotra Sarkar* Section of Integrative Biology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, Shackelford N, Sarkar S (2007) Malaria in Africa: Vector Species' Niche Models and Relative Risk Maps. PLo

Sarkar, Sahotra

33

Robust Rankings for College Football  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 11, 2011 ... At the end of the regular season, multiple human-poll and computer ... State are so close in the overall BCS rankings (.0063) that this one error.

34

A similarity measure for indefinite rankings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ranked lists are encountered in research and daily life and it is often of interest to compare these lists even when they are incomplete or have only some members in common. An example is document rankings returned for the same query by different search ... Keywords: Rank correlation, probabilistic models, ranking

William Webber; Alistair Moffat; Justin Zobel

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Table Search (or Ranking Tables)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table Search (or Ranking Tables) Alon Halevy Google DBRank @ ICDE March 1, 2010 #12;Structured Data organizations Requires infrastructure, concerns about losing control Hard to find structured data via search Search #1 store locations used cars radio stations patents recipes · Deep = not accessible through

Halevy, Alon

36

Snowmelt-Related Flood Risk in Appalachia: First Estimates from a Historical Snow Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A first attempt has been made toward quantifying the risk of snowmelt-related flooding in the central and southern Appalachian Mountains of the United States (from 35° to 42°N). In the last decade, two major events occurred within the region, ...

Daniel Y. Graybeal; Daniel J. Leathers

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Analysis of cancer risk related to longitudinal information on smoking habits  

SciTech Connect

Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) has followed the RERF Life Span Study (LSS) cohort consisting of atomic bomb survivors and unexposed subjects for more than 40 years. The information on their lifestyles, including smoking habits, has been collected in the past 25 years through two mail surveys of the entire LSS cohort and three interview surveys of a subcohort for the biennial medical examination program. In the present study an attempt was made to consolidate the information on smoking habits obtained from the five serial surveys, and then a risk analysis was conducted to evaluate the effect of updating the smoking information on the smoking-related risk estimates for lung cancer. The estimates of smoking-related risk became larger and estimates of dose response became sharper by updating smoking information using all of the data obtained from the five serial surveys. Analyses were also conducted for cancer sites other than lung. The differences in risk estimates between the two approaches were not as evident for the other cancer sites as for lung. 13 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

Akiba, Suminori [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Energy Policy Options in Relation to the Public's Attitudes and Risk  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Policy Options in Relation to the Public's Attitudes and Risk Energy Policy Options in Relation to the Public's Attitudes and Risk Perceptions in Sweden Speaker(s): Mattias Viklund Date: February 7, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mithra Moezzi The Swedish electricity market and energy policy is particularly interesting from a social science perspective at present. In Sweden, citizens have had a strong influence on energy policy. For example, the destiny of nuclear power as a major energy production system (now 45% nuclear) was decided by the people in a 1980 national referendum which specified that nuclear power would successively be replaced by other energy sources and be completely phased out by 2010. However, opinion has not been stable in this regard and the governmental decisions have reflected

39

Probability Ranking in Vector Spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Probability Ranking Principle states that the document set with the highest values of probability of relevance optimizes information retrieval effectiveness given the probabilities are estimated as accurately as possible. The key point of the principle is the separation of the document set into two subsets with a given level of fallout and with the highest recall. The paper introduces the separation between two vector subspaces and shows that the separation yields a more effective performance than the optimal separation into subsets with the same available evidence, the performance being measured with recall and fallout. The result is proved mathematically and exemplified experimentally.

Melucci, Massimo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Lame (IsotropicRank4TensorLame)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OOF2: The Manual. Lame (IsotropicRank4TensorLame). ... Lame ( IsotropicRank4TensorLame) — Isotropic rank 4 tensor in terms of Lame ...

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative risk ranking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Method of assessing a lipid-related health risk based on ion mobility analysis of lipoproteins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA); Krauss, Ronald M. (Berkeley, CA); Blanche, Patricia J. (Berkeley, CA)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

42

Relative Investment Risks and Returns of Energy Management and Production Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering managers must routinely make decisions on how to allocate limited resources to achieve the most benefit. Energy conservation and increased or new productivity are two areas which compete for operating and capital budgets. This paper will describe how these objectives can be compared and properly addressed to result in a more satisfactory and reliable decision when allocating budget monies. Comparisons are made using a model to evaluate risk vs. return. The model numerically expresses alternatives in terms of confidence ratios or relative payouts modified by achievement probability.

Gaffney, B. J.; Inyard, F. H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

The Infrastructure of a Global Field of Arbitrary Unit Rank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past, the infrastructure of a number or (global) function field has been used for computation of units. In the case of a one-dimensional infrastructure, i.e. in the case of unit rank one, one has a binary operation which is similar to multiplication, called a giant step, which was introduced by D. Shanks. In this paper, we show a general way to interpret infrastructure in the case of arbitrary unit rank, which gives a giant step. Moreover, we relate the infrastructure and the giant step to the arithmetic in the divisor class group. Finally, we give explicit algorithms in the function field case for computing, and show how the baby step-giant step method for unit computation generalizes to the case of arbitrary unit rank.

Fontein, Felix

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Risk time-window specification and its impact on the assessment of medication-related adverse events.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Post-marketing studies using medical administrative databases are often conducted to assess medication-related adverse events (AE). The determination of the risk time-window, defined as the period… (more)

Cournoyer, Daniel.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

A PECULIARITY OF THE WILCOXON-MANN-WHITNEY RANK-SUM TEST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A PECULIARITY OF THE WILCOXON-MANN-WHITNEY RANK-SUM TEST Scotia Canada B3H 3C3 Keywords: intransitivity, rank-sum test, Behrens-Mann-Whitney test is a test of relative location whenever the two distributions are symmetric. By con- trast

46

PRIME VALUE METHOD TO PRIORITIZE RISK HANDLING STRATEGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Funding for implementing risk handling strategies typically is allocated according to either the risk-averse approach (the worst risk first) or the cost-effective approach (the greatest risk reduction per implementation dollar first). This paper introduces a prime value approach in which risk handling strategies are prioritized according to how nearly they meet the goals of the organization that disburses funds for risk handling. The prime value approach factors in the importance of the project in which the risk has been identified, elements of both risk-averse and cost-effective approaches, and the time period in which the risk could happen. This paper also presents a prioritizer spreadsheet, which employs weighted criteria to calculate a relative rank for the handling strategy of each risk evaluated.

Noller, D

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Pairwise ranking aggregation in a crowdsourced setting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inferring rankings over elements of a set of objects, such as documents or images, is a key learning problem for such important applications as Web search and recommender systems. Crowdsourcing services provide an inexpensive and efficient means to acquire ... Keywords: crowdsourcing, pairwise preference, ranking

Xi Chen; Paul N. Bennett; Kevyn Collins-Thompson; Eric Horvitz

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Query weighting for ranking model adaptation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose to directly measure the importance of queries in the source domain to the target domain where no rank labels of documents are available, which is referred to as query weighting. Query weighting is a key step in ranking model adaptation. As ...

Peng Cai; Wei Gao; Aoying Zhou; Kam-Fai Wong

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Presidential Rank Awards Announced | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Presidential Rank Awards Announced Presidential Rank Awards Announced Presidential Rank Awards Announced November 4, 2011 - 10:45am Addthis Senior level executives and the 2010 Presidential Rank Award winners. First Row: Melvin Williams; Neile Miller for James B. Lambert and Theodore D. Sherry; Daniel Poneman, Patricia R. Worthington, Sandra Waisley for David A. Brockman, Secretary Chu, Frank B. Russo, and Steven Aoki. Second Row: William Barker for Andrew Lawrence, Raymond V. Furstenau, Charles McConnell for Victor A. Der, Michael Weis, and Michael C. Kane | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Senior level executives and the 2010 Presidential Rank Award winners. First Row: Melvin Williams; Neile Miller for James B. Lambert and Theodore D. Sherry; Daniel Poneman, Patricia R. Worthington, Sandra Waisley for David

50

Zero forcing parameters and minimum rank problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The zero forcing number Z(G), which is the minimum number of vertices in a zero forcing set of a graph G, is used to study the maximum nullity / minimum rank of the family of symmetric matrices described by G. It is shown that for a connected graph of order at least two, no vertex is in every zero forcing set. The positive semidefinite zero forcing number Z_+(G) is introduced, and shown to be equal to |G|-OS(G), where OS(G) is the recently defined ordered set number that is a lower bound for minimum positive semidefinite rank. The positive semidefinite zero forcing number is applied to the computation of positive semidefinite minimum rank of certain graphs. An example of a graph for which the real positive symmetric semidefinite minimum rank is greater than the complex Hermitian positive semidefinite minimum rank is presented.

Barioli, Francesco; Fallat, Shaun M; Hall, H Tracy; Hogben, Leslie; Shader, Bryan; Driessche, P van den; van der Holst, Hein

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

On the Classification of Low-Rank Braided Fusion Categories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A physical system is said to be in topological phase if at low energies and long wavelengths the observable quantities are invariant under diffeomorphisms. Such physical systems are of great interest in condensed matter physics and computer science where they can be applied to form topological insulators and fault–tolerant quantum computers. Physical systems in topological phase may be rigorously studied through their algebraic manifestations, (pre)modular categories. A complete classification of these categories would lead to a taxonomy of the topological phases of matter. Beyond their ties to physical systems, premodular categories are of general mathematical interest as they govern the representation theories of quasi–Hopf algebras, lead to manifold and link invariants, and provide insights into the braid group. In the course of this work, we study the classification problem for (pre)modular categories with particular attention paid to their arithmetic properties. Central to our analysis is the question of rank finiteness for modular categories, also known as Wang’s Conjecture. In this work, we lay this problem to rest by exploiting certain arithmetic properties of modular categories. While the rank finiteness problem for premodular categories is still open, we provide new methods for approaching this problem. The arithmetic techniques suggested by the rank finiteness analysis are particularly pronounced in the (weakly) integral setting. There, we use Diophantine techniques to classify all weakly integral modular categories through rank 6 up to Grothendieck equivalence. In the case that the category is not only weakly integral, but actually integral, the analysis is further extended to produce a classification of integral modular categories up to Grothendieck equivalence through rank 7. It is observed that such classification can be extended provided some mild assumptions are made. For instance, if we further assume that the category is also odd–dimensional, then the classification up to Grothendieck equivalence is completed through rank 11. Moving beyond modular categories has historically been difficult. We suggest new methods for doing this inspired by our work on (weakly) integral modular categories and related problems in algebraic number theory. The allows us to produce a Grothendieck classification of rank 4 premodular categories thereby extending the previously known rank 3 classification.

Bruillard, Paul Joseph

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Risk factors for work-related symptoms in northern California office workers  

SciTech Connect

In most episodes of health complaints reported in office buildings in the last-twenty years, causal factors have not been identified. In order to assess risk factors for work-related symptoms in office workers, a reanalysis was performed of previous studies, and an epidemiologic study was conducted. The reanalysis of data, showed remarkable agreement among studies. Air-conditioned buildings were consistently associated with higher prevalence of headache, lethargy, and eye, nose, or throat problems. Humidification was not a necessary factor for this higher prevalence. Mechanical ventilation without air-conditioning was not associated with higher symptom prevalence. A study was conducted among 880 office workers, within 12 office buildings selected without regard to worker complaints, in northern California. A number of factors were found associated with prevalence of work-related symptoms, after adjustment in a logistic regression model for personal, psychosocial, job, workspace, and building factors. Two different ventilation types were associated with increases Ln symptom prevalence, relative to workers in naturally ventilated buildings: mechanical supply and exhaust ventilation, without air conditioning and with operable windows; and air-conditioning with sealed windows. No study buildings were humidified. In both these ventilation types, the highest odds ratios (ORs) found were for skin symptoms (ORs-5.0, 5.6) and for tight chest or difficulty breathing (ORs-3.6, 4.3). Use of carbonless copies or photocopiers, sharing a workspace, carpets, new carpets, new walls, and distance from a window were associated with symptom increases. Cloth partitions and new paint were associated with symptom decreases.

Mendell, M.J.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Using population risk assessment as a basis for administrative decisions related to storage of irradiated nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Optimization of safety related decisions by local authorities could be improved using information on potential risks to a regional population. A joint Russia-US effort in 2001-2002 modeled potential population health risks for a proposed nuclear waste storage facility in northern Russia. Conducting such an assessment in addition to the standard PRA is proposed as an innovation in Russia aimed at better meeting the needs of local decision makers. This case-study analysis was conducted for the proposed facility to provide insights into potential population health risks. In the case study results, the background population risks from radiation accident exposures were very low compared to risks from chemical background exposures - an unexpected outcome for those that perceive any nuclear facility as very hazardous to the local population. The paper notes that rather than requiring a proposed low-risk facility for hazardous materials be made even safer, these results give the local authority the option of proposing a trade-off of having a major unrelated regional risks mitigated. The results show the value of conducting a population risk assessment in addition to a facility-oriented PRA as a means of better defining the potential impacts. (authors)

Droppo, James G. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland WA 99352 (United States); Eremenko, V.A. [International Knowledge Bridge LLC (Russian Federation); Linde, J. [Association on Computer Technology and Informational Systems - ACTIS (Russian Federation); Shilova, E. [Moscow Institute of International Economic Relations, 76, Vernadsky av. 119454 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Nuclear fuel cycle risk assessment: survey and computer compilation of risk-related literature. [Once-through Cycle and Plutonium Recycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated the Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. Both the once-through cycle and plutonium recycle are being considered. A previous report generated by this program defines and describes fuel cycle facilities, or elements, considered in the program. This report, the second from the program, describes the survey and computer compilation of fuel cycle risk-related literature. Sources of available information on the design, safety, and risk associated with the defined set of fuel cycle elements were searched and documents obtained were catalogued and characterized with respect to fuel cycle elements and specific risk/safety information. Both US and foreign surveys were conducted. Battelle's computer-based BASIS information management system was used to facilitate the establishment of the literature compilation. A complete listing of the literature compilation and several useful indexes are included. Future updates of the literature compilation will be published periodically. 760 annotated citations are included.

Yates, K.R.; Schreiber, A.M.; Rudolph, A.W.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Probabilistic ranking of database query results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the problem of ranking answers to a database query when many tuples are returned. We adapt and apply principles of probabilistic models from Information Retrieval for structured data. Our proposed solution is domain independent. It leverages ...

Surajit Chaudhuri; Gautam Das; Vagelis Hristidis; Gerhard Weikum

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

NETL: Gasification Systems - Low Rank Coal Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Area Low Rank Coal Optimization Project No.: Adv Gas-FY131415 Task 4 NETL's in-house research team is using an integrated approach to combine theory, computational modeling,...

57

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and usually coal derived.

Knudson, Curtis L. (Grand Forks, ND); Timpe, Ronald C. (Grand Forks, ND)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Let your users do the ranking.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ranking search results is a thorny issue for enterprise search. Search engines rank results using a variety of sophisticated algorithms, but users still complain that search can't ever seem to find anything useful or relevant! The challenge is to provide results that are ranked according to the users' definition of relevancy. Sandia National Laboratories has enhanced its commercial search engine to discover user preferences, re-ranking results accordingly. Immediate positive impact was achieved by modeling historical data consisting of user queries and subsequent result clicks. New data is incorporated into the model daily. An important benefit is that results improve naturally and automatically over time as a function of user actions. This session presents the method employed, how it was integrated with the search engine,metrics illustrating the subsequent improvement to the users' search experience, and plans for implementation with Sandia's FAST for SharePoint 2010 search engine.

Spomer, Judith E.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

NNSA's Sequoia supercomputer ranked as world's fastest  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| NR-12-06-07 NNSA's Sequoia supercomputer ranked as world's fastest Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov Printer-friendly From left to right in front of...

60

Lame (CubicRank4TensorLame)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OOF2: The Manual. Lame (CubicRank4TensorLame). ... Name. Lame (CubicRank4TensorLame) — Cubic rank 4 tensor in terms of Lame coefficients. ...

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative risk ranking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Interpretation of Rank Histograms for Verifying Ensemble Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rank histograms are a tool for evaluating ensemble forecasts. They are useful for determining the reliability of ensemble forecasts and for diagnosing errors in its mean and spread. Rank histograms are generated by repeatedly tallying the rank of ...

Thomas M. Hamill

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Free Malcev algebra of rank three  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We find a basis of the free Malcev algebra on three free generators over a field of characteristic zero. The specialty and semiprimity of this algebra are proved. In addition, we prove the decomposability of this algebra into subdirect sum of the free Lie algebra rank three and the free algebra of rank three of variety of Malcev algebras generated by a simple seven-dimensional Malcev algebra.

Kornev, Alexandr

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Ranking significant phenomena in physical systems  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of any physical system requires a thorough understanding of the principal phenomena affecting the behavior of that system. In a complex application such as a nuclear reactor, identifying the principal phenomena in an accident transient can be a formidable task. This paper describes the use of the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) to assimilate engineering judgments that relate and rank the thermal-hydraulic phenomena affecting the response of a nuclear reactor. The AHP is described in this paper to acquaint the reader with the methodology. It is used to structure and simplify the decision-making process used to identify the most important phenomena affecting a reactor transient. The methodology is applied to a loss-of-feedwater transient in a nuclear reactor as an example, the objective of the example being to determine the most significant processes and phenomena in the reactor plant based on their impact on the ability of a primary system feed-and-bleed recovery to maintain a liquid level above the core.

Dimenna, R.A. (Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (USA)); Larson, T.K. (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Sustainability of the top ranked restaurants in France  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 1973, the Gault-Millau Guide (GM) is publishing each year a ranking of the best restaurants based on “toques”. During more than 25 years, on a scale of 20, the best restaurants were awarded 19 or 20 (4 toques), followed by restaurants graded 17 or 18 (3 toques). Out of 1600 restaurants listed in GM in 1974, only 27 (less than 2%) had at least 3 toques. The notation was changed in 2010 to allow 5 and 4 toques to the best restaurants but basically the scale remains equivalent to the previous one. In 2010, out of the 5140 restaurants listed in GM, only 64 were ranked in the top categories (less than 1.3%) (Table 1). The objective of this short note is to review the list of the top ranked restaurants from 1974 to 2010 and examine the sustainability of the grades of these restaurants over time. The migration and default rates are presented for selected years over the period under study. It is shown that these rates are relatively stable over time. 1 Past research on sustainability of restaurants has focused mostly on quantitative factors and bankruptcy rates. Restaurant failures have been attributed to economic and social factors, financial performance, competition and legal restrictions, or even government intervention. 2 Bankruptcy rates are relatively easy to get but are narrow by nature since they do not include change-of-ownership or they do not take into account the organizational life cycle of restaurants.

J. François Outreville

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Ranked bandits in metric spaces: learning diverse rankings over large document collections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most learning to rank research has assumed that the utility of different documents is independent, which results in learned ranking functions that return redundant results. The few approaches that avoid this have rather unsatisfyingly lacked theoretical ... Keywords: clickthrough data, contextual bandits, diversity, metric spaces, multi-armed bandits, online learning, regret

Aleksandrs Slivkins, Filip Radlinski, Sreenivas Gollapudi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Google's PageRank and Beyond: The Science of Search Engine Rankings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

term easily spammed #12;1998: enter Link Analysis · uses hyperlink structure to focus the relevant set #12;Ranking with a Random Surfer · Rank each page corresponding to a search term by number and quality page corresponding to a search term by number and quality of votes cast for that page. Hyperlink

Kunkle, Tom

67

Web Page Rank Prediction with Markov Models Michalis Vazirgiannis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Web Page Rank Prediction with Markov Models Michalis Vazirgiannis INRIA Futurs Orsay, France a method for predicting the rank- ing position of a Web page. Assuming a set of successive past top-k rankings, we study the evolution of Web pages in terms of ranking trend sequences used for Markov Models

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

68

Knowledge transfer for cross domain learning to rank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, learning to rank technology is attracting increasing attention from both academia and industry in the areas of machine learning and information retrieval. A number of algorithms have been proposed to rank documents according to the user-given ... Keywords: Information retrieval, Knowledge transfer, Learning to rank, Ranking SVM

Depin Chen; Yan Xiong; Jun Yan; Gui-Rong Xue; Gang Wang; Zheng Chen

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Combining prestige and relevance ranking for personalized recommendation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present an adaptive graph-based personalized recommendation method based on combining prestige and relevance ranking. By utilizing the unique network structure of n-partite heterogeneous graph, we attempt to address the problem of personalized ... Keywords: graph-based ranking, heterogeneous data, personalized recommendation, prestige ranking, query-based relevance ranking

Xiao Yang, Zhaoxin Zhang

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Alternatives for reducing the environmental risks associated with natural disasters and their effects on pipelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Past pipeline failure reports have typically focused on corrosion and third party related events. However, natural disasters pose a substantial risk to pipeline integrity as well. Therefore, it was the objective of this thesis to analyze the risks and consequences of pipelines being seriously affected by natural disasters and propose potential measures to prevent leaks or spills and to mitigate the consequences of leaks and spills resulting from natural disasters. A risk assessment method has been developed for ranking the risks associated with pipelines in natural disaster areas and prevention and mitigation concepts have been recommended and discussed for reducing the risks.

Wellborn, Michael Wayne

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-degradable, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.; Potas, T.A.; DeWall, R.A.; Musich, M.A.

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

72

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-decrepitating, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

Knudson, Curtis L. (Grand Forks, ND); Timpe, Ronald C. (Grand Forks, ND); Potas, Todd A. (Plymouth, MN); DeWall, Raymond A. (Grand Forks, ND); Musich, Mark A. (Grand Forks, ND)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Search structures and algorithms for personalized ranking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As data of an unprecedented scale are becoming accessible on the Web, personalization, of narrowing down the retrieval to meet the user-specific information needs, is becoming more and more critical. For instance, while web search engines traditionally ... Keywords: Context-awareness, Personalization, Ranking, Top-k query, User context

Gae-won You; Seung-won Hwang

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Ranking class labels using query sessions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of search queries, as available within query sessions or in isolation from one another, in examined in the context of ranking the class labels (e.g., brazilian cities, business centers, hilly sites) extracted from Web documents for various ...

Marius Pa?ca

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process is described. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and is usually coal-derived.

Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

76

Mining User Dwell Time for Personalized Web Search Re-Ranking  

SciTech Connect

We propose a personalized re-ranking algorithm through mining user dwell times derived from a user's previously online reading or browsing activities. We acquire document level user dwell times via a customized web browser, from which we then infer conceptword level user dwell times in order to understand a user's personal interest. According to the estimated concept word level user dwell times, our algorithm can estimate a user's potential dwell time over a new document, based on which personalized webpage re-ranking can be carried out. We compare the rankings produced by our algorithm with rankings generated by popular commercial search engines and a recently proposed personalized ranking algorithm. The results clearly show the superiority of our method. In this paper, we propose a new personalized webpage ranking algorithmthrough mining dwell times of a user. We introduce a quantitative model to derive concept word level user dwell times from the observed document level user dwell times. Once we have inferred a user's interest over the set of concept words the user has encountered in previous readings, we can then predict the user's potential dwell time over a new document. Such predicted user dwell time allows us to carry out personalized webpage re-ranking. To explore the effectiveness of our algorithm, we measured the performance of our algorithm under two conditions - one with a relatively limited amount of user dwell time data and the other with a doubled amount. Both evaluation cases put our algorithm for generating personalized webpage rankings to satisfy a user's personal preference ahead of those by Google, Yahoo!, and Bing, as well as a recent personalized webpage ranking algorithm.

Xu, Songhua [ORNL; Jiang, Hao [University of Hong Kong, The; Lau, Francis [University of Hong Kong, The

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

On conformal Jordan cells of finite and infinite rank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work concerns in part the construction of conformal Jordan cells of infinite rank and their reductions to conformal Jordan cells of finite rank. It is also discussed how a procedure similar to Lie algebra contractions may reduce a conformal Jordan cell of finite rank to one of lower rank. A conformal Jordan cell of rank one corresponds to a primary field. This offers a picture in which any finite conformal Jordan cell of a given conformal weight may be obtained from a universal covering cell of the same weight but infinite rank.

Jorgen Rasmussen

2004-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

78

Learning to rank for spatiotemporal search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article we consider the problem of mapping a noisy estimate of a user's current location to a semantically meaningful point of interest, such as a home, restaurant, or store. Despite the poor accuracy of GPS on current mobile devices and the ... Keywords: data mining, geocoding, foursquare, human mobility, information retrieval, learn to rank, spatiotemporal models, location data, machine learning, mobile devices, spatial search

Blake Shaw; Jon Shea; Siddhartha Sinha; Andrew Hogue

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Anaerobic bioprocessing of low-rank coals  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project is to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low-rank coals and to assess the properties of the modified coal towards coal liquefaction. The main objectives for this quarter were: (1) continuation of microbial consortia development and maintenance, (2) crude enzyme study using best decarboxylating organisms, (3) decarboxylation of lignite, demineralized Wyodak coal and model polymers, and (4) characterization of biotreated coals.

Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

1992-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Exploiting contextual information for image re-ranking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel re-ranking approach based on contextual information used to improve the effectiveness of Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) tasks. In our approach, image processing techniques are applied to ranked lists defined by CBIR ...

Daniel Carlos Guimarăes Pedronette; Ricardo Da S. Torres

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative risk ranking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Solid-State Lighting: Related Articles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Related Articles on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Related Articles on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Related Articles on Delicious Rank Solid-State...

82

An improved ranking method for fuzzy numbers with integral values  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ranking fuzzy numbers is a very important decision-making procedure in decision analysis and applications. The last few decades have seen a large number of approaches investigated for ranking fuzzy numbers, yet some of these approaches are non-intuitive ... Keywords: Index of optimism, Integral value, Ranking fuzzy numbers

Vincent F. Yu, Luu Quoc Dat

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Variable selection and ranking for analyzing automobile traffic accident data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variable ranking and feature selection are important concepts in data mining and machine learning. This paper introduces a new variable ranking technique named Sum Max Gain Ratio (SMGR). The new technique is evaluated within the domain of traffic accident ... Keywords: decision tree, traffic accident data, variable and feature selection, variable ranking

Huanjing Wang; Allen Parrish; Randy K. Smith; Susan Vrbsky

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

A linear combination of classifiers via rank margin maximization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The method we present aims at building a weighted linear combination of already trained dichotomizers, where the weights are determined to maximize the minimum rank margin of the resulting ranking system. This is particularly suited for real applications ... Keywords: combination of classifiers, margin, ranking

Claudio Marrocco; Paolo Simeone; Francesco Tortorella

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Accuracy estimate and optimization techniques for SimRank computation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The measure of similarity between objects is a very useful tool in many areas of computer science, including information retrieval. SimRank is a simple and intuitive measure of this kind, based on a graph-theoretic model. SimRank is typically computed ... Keywords: Algorithm, Computational complexity, Graph theory, SimRank, Similarity measure

Dmitry Lizorkin; Pavel Velikhov; Maxim Grinev; Denis Turdakov

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Simulating option prices and sensitivities by higher rank lattice rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce the intermediate rank or higher rank lattice rule for the general case when the number of quadrature points is ntm, where m is a composite integer, t is the rank of the rule, n is an integer ... Keywords: Monte Carlo and Quasi-Monte Carlo methods, lattice rules, option pricing, simulation of multivariate integrations

Yongzeng Lai

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Reduced-rank adaptive filtering using Krylov subspace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A unified view of several recently introduced reduced-rank adaptive filters is presented. As all considered methods use Krylov subspace for rank reduction, the approach taken in this work is inspired from Krylov subspace methods for iterative solutions ... Keywords: Krylov subspace methods, adaptive filters, array processing, multiuser detection, reduced-rank adaptive filters

Sergueď Burykh; Karim Abed-Meraim

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

An extreme-distance approach to multiple criteria ranking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A distance approach based on extreme points, or predefined ideal and anti-ideal points, is proposed to improve on the TOPSIS (Technique for Order Performance [or Ordered Preference] by Similarity to Ideal Solution) method of multiple criteria ranking. ... Keywords: Comparative study, Distance-based ranking, Multiple criteria decision analysis, Multiple criteria ranking, TOPSIS

Ye Chen; D. Marc Kilgour; Keith W. Hipel

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Accounting for uncertainty in systematic bias in exposure estimates used in relative risk regression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many epidemiologic studies addressing exposure-response relationships, sources of error that lead to systematic bias in exposure measurements are known to be present, but there is uncertainty in the magnitude and nature of the bias. Two approaches that allow this uncertainty to be reflected in confidence limits and other statistical inferences were developed, and are applicable to both cohort and case-control studies. The first approach is based on a numerical approximation to the likelihood ratio statistic, and the second uses computer simulations based on the score statistic. These approaches were applied to data from a cohort study of workers at the Hanford site (1944-86) exposed occupationally to external radiation; to combined data on workers exposed at Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Rocky Flats Weapons plant; and to artificial data sets created to examine the effects of varying sample size and the magnitude of the risk estimate. For the worker data, sampling uncertainty dominated and accounting for uncertainty in systematic bias did not greatly modify confidence limits. However, with increased sample size, accounting for these uncertainties became more important, and is recommended when there is interest in comparing or combining results from different studies.

Gilbert, E.S.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Anaerobic bioprocessing of low rank coals  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project is to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low rank coals under ambient conditions and to assess the properties of these modified coals towards coal liquefaction. The main objectives for this quarter were: (1) enrichment of anaerobic microbial consortia in a coal fed chemostat, (2) characterization of biocoal products and examination of liquefaction potential, (3) isolation of decarboxylating organisms and evaluation of the isolated organisms for decarboxylation. The project began on September 12, 1990. 3 figs., 7 tabs.

Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Proposed framework for the Western Area Power Administration Environmental Risk Management Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) views environmental protection and compliance as a top priority as it manages the construction, operation, and maintenance of its vast network of transmission lines, substations, and other facilities. A recent Department of Energy audit of Western`s environmental management activities recommends that Western adopt a formal environmental risk program. To accomplish this goal, Western, in conjunction with Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is in the process of developing a centrally coordinated environmental risk program. This report presents the results of this design effort, and indicates the direction in which Western`s environmental risk program is heading. Western`s environmental risk program will consist of three main components: risk communication, risk assessment, and risk management/decision making. Risk communication is defined as an exchange of information on the potential for threats to human health, public safety, or the environment. This information exchange provides a mechanism for public involvement, and also for the participation in the risk assessment and management process by diverse groups or offices within Western. The objective of risk assessment is to evaluate and rank the relative magnitude of risks associated with specific environmental issues that are facing Western. The evaluation and ranking is based on the best available scientific information and judgment and serves as input to the risk management process. Risk management takes risk information and combines it with relevant non-risk factors (e.g., legal mandates, public opinion, costs) to generate risk management options. A risk management tool, such as decision analysis, can be used to help make risk management choices.

Glantz, C.S.; DiMassa, F.V.; Pelto, P.J.; Brothers, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Roybal, A.L. [Western Area Power Administration, Golden, CO (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Volume II.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains appendices on: (1) resource assessment - electrical generation computer results; (2) resource assessment summary - direct use computer results; (3) electrical generation (high temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (4) direct utilization (low temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (5) electrical generation computer program CENTPLANT and related documentation; (6) electrical generation computer program WELLHEAD and related documentation; (7) direct utilization computer program HEATPLAN and related documentation; (8) electrical generation ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; (9) direct utilization ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; and (10) life cycle cost analysis computer program and related documentation. (ACR)

Bloomquist, R. Gordon

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Platts top 250 global energy company rankings  

SciTech Connect

Revenues and profits for many firms surged last year over previous years. The turnaround from last year's global survey is dramatic. Asset- and revenue-rich integrated oil and gas companies dominate the top rungs of the 2005 Platts Top 250 Global Energy Company Rankings. The following industry segments were analyzed: diversified utilities; exploration and production; electric utilities; gas utilities; integrated oil and gas companies; refining and marketing; independent power producers; coal and consumable fuel companies and storage and transfer companies; The total combined revenue for the coal and consumable fuels sector was $74.7 billion. Leaders in this sector were: Yanzhou Coal Mining Co., CONSOl Energy Inc., Peabody Energy Corp., PT Bumi Resources Tbk, Cameco Corp., and Arch Coal. 14 tabs.

Mullen, T.; Leonard, M.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Anaerobic processing of low-rank coals  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project is to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low-rank coals and to assess the properties of the modified coal towards coal liquefaction. The main objectives for this quarter were: (i) continuation of microbial consortia maintenance and completion of coal decarboxylation using batch reactor system, (ii) decarboxylation of model polymer, (iii) characterization of biotreated coals, and (iv) microautoclave liquefaction of the botreated coal. Progress is reported on the thermogravimetric analysis of coal biotreated in the absence of methanogens and under 5% hydrogen gas exhibits increased volatile carbon to fixed carbon ratio; that the microbial consortia developed on coal are being adapted to two different model polymers containing free carboxylic groups to examine decarboxylation ability of consortium; completion of experiments to decarboxylate two model polymers, polyacrylic acid and polymethyl methacrylate, have been completed; that the biotreated coal showed increase in THF-solubles.

Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

EM's Huizenga Receives Presidential Rank Award | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM's Huizenga Receives Presidential Rank Award EM's Huizenga Receives Presidential Rank Award EM's Huizenga Receives Presidential Rank Award May 9, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga, left, receives the Presidential Rank of Distinguished Executive award from Eric Coulter, treasurer of the board of directors for the Senior Executives Association, which sponsors the awards program. EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga, left, receives the Presidential Rank of Distinguished Executive award from Eric Coulter, treasurer of the board of directors for the Senior Executives Association, which sponsors the awards program. WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga recently received the nation's highest civil service recognition, the Presidential Rank of Distinguished Executive award. The Senior Executives Association sponsored the annual awards event. In

96

EM's Huizenga Receives Presidential Rank Award | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Huizenga Receives Presidential Rank Award Huizenga Receives Presidential Rank Award EM's Huizenga Receives Presidential Rank Award May 9, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga, left, receives the Presidential Rank of Distinguished Executive award from Eric Coulter, treasurer of the board of directors for the Senior Executives Association, which sponsors the awards program. EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga, left, receives the Presidential Rank of Distinguished Executive award from Eric Coulter, treasurer of the board of directors for the Senior Executives Association, which sponsors the awards program. WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga recently received the nation's highest civil service recognition, the Presidential Rank of Distinguished Executive award. The Senior Executives Association sponsored the annual awards event. In

97

Comparison of Brazilian researchers in clinical medicine: are criteria for ranking well-adjusted?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantifying the relative performance of individual scholars has become an integral part of decision-making in research policy. The objective of the present study was to evaluate if the scholarship rank of Brazilian Council for Scientific and Technological ... Keywords: Clinical medicine, H index, Health postgraduate programs, Health sciences, I23, Scientific publication indicators, Scopus

Eduardo A. Oliveira; Enrico A. Colosimo; Daniella R. Martelli; Isabel G. Quirino; Maria Christina Oliveira; Leonardo S. Lima; Ana Cristina Simőes E Silva; Hercílio Martelli-Júnior

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Low-rank coal study: national needs for resource development. Volume 3. Technology evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Technologies applicable to the development and use of low-rank coals are analyzed in order to identify specific needs for research, development, and demonstration (RD and D). Major sections of the report address the following technologies: extraction; transportation; preparation, handling and storage; conventional combustion and environmental control technology; gasification; liquefaction; and pyrolysis. Each of these sections contains an introduction and summary of the key issues with regard to subbituminous coal and lignite; description of all relevant technology, both existing and under development; a description of related environmental control technology; an evaluation of the effects of low-rank coal properties on the technology; and summaries of current commercial status of the technology and/or current RD and D projects relevant to low-rank coals.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Generalized triangle inequalities in thick Euclidean buildings of rank 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give the generalized triangle inequalities which determine the possible vector valued side lengths of n-gons in thick Euclidean buildings of rank 2.

Ramos-Cuevas, Carlos

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Stabilized thermally beneficiated low rank coal and method of ...  

A process for reducing the spontaneous combustion tendencies of thermally beneficiated low rank coals employing heat, air or an oxygen containing gas ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative risk ranking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Finding approximately rank-one submatrices with the nuclear norm ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 8, 2010 ... Abstract: We propose a convex optimization formulation with the nuclear norm and $\\ell_1$-norm to find a large approximately rank-one ...

102

Wyoming - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

are based on the full source data values. Additional State Rankings Consumption Total Energy per Capita Prices Natural Gas Electricity Production Total Energy Crude Oil Natural...

103

Proceedings of the sixteenth biennial low-rank fuels symposium  

SciTech Connect

Low-rank coals represent a major energy resource for the world. The Low-Rank Fuels Symposium, building on the traditions established by the Lignite Symposium, focuses on the key opportunities for this resource. This conference offers a forum for leaders from industry, government, and academia to gather to share current information on the opportunities represented by low-rank coals. In the United States and throughout the world, the utility industry is the primary user of low-rank coals. As such, current experiences and future opportunities for new technologies in this industry were the primary focuses of the symposium.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Optimization Online - Sufficient Conditions for Low-rank Matrix ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 15, 2011 ... This class of optimization problems is $NP$-hard and a popular approach replaces the rank function with the nuclear norm of the matrix ...

105

RECOVERING LOW-RANK AND SPARSE COMPONENTS OF ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 31, 2009 ... a convex relaxation problem where the widely-acknowledged nuclear norm and l1 norm are utilized to induce low-rank and sparsity.

106

SUFFICIENT CONDITIONS FOR LOW-RANK MATRIX RECOVERY ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 15, 2011 ... but also provide sufficient conditions for exact and stable s-rank matrix recovery via the nuclear norm minimization under mild assumptions.

107

Optimization Online - Guaranteed Minimum-Rank Solutions of ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 28, 2007 ... Guaranteed Minimum-Rank Solutions of Linear Matrix Equations via Nuclear Norm Minimization. Benjamin Recht(brecht ***at*** caltech.edu)

108

Olson's Major World Ecosystem Complexes Ranked by Carbon in Live...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ecosystem complexes ranked by carbon in live vegetation: A Database. NDP-017, Carbon Dioxide Information Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This NDP was...

109

West Virginia - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy per Capita Prices Natural Gas Electricity Production Total Energy Crude Oil Natural Gas Coal Electricity Environment Carbon Dioxide Emissions More State Ranking...

110

Chemical comminution and deashing of low-rank coals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of chemically comminuting a low-rank coal while at the same time increasing the heating value of the coal. A strong alkali solution is added to a low-rank coal to solubilize the carbonaceous portion of the coal, leaving behind the noncarbonaceous mineral matter portion. The solubilized coal is precipitated from solution by a multivalent cation, preferably calcium.

Quigley, David R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Query-Independent learning to rank for RDF entity search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The amount of structured data is growing rapidly. Given a structured query that asks for some entities, the number of matching candidate results is often very high. The problem of ranking these results has gained attention. Because results in ... Keywords: information retrieval, learning to rank, semantic search

Lorand Dali; Blaž Fortuna; Thanh Tran Duc; Dunja Mladeni?

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Research on Improving Low Rank Coal Caking Ability by Hydrogenation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experiment of improving low rank coal caking ability was carried out in an autoclave within a temperature of (623 to 673)K and a initial pressure of (3 to 6) MPa, the heat time range is 30-50min, the results indicated that: according to moderate ... Keywords: low rank coal, caking ability, maceral specification, coal blending

Huang Peng; Li Wenbo; Zhao Yuan; Ai Jun

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

An adaptive learning to rank algorithm: Learning automata approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent years have witnessed the birth and explosive growth of the web. It is obvious that the exponential growth of the web has made it into a huge interconnected source of information wherein finding a document without a searching tool is unimaginable. ... Keywords: Learning automata, Learning to rank, Ranking function, Search engine

Javad Akbari Torkestani

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Distribution of ranks of ?-decay half-lives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I studied the distribution of ranks of values of 2949 {\\beta}-decay half-lives according to an empirical beta law with two exponents. {\\beta}-decay half-life ranks showed good fit to a beta function with two exponents.

Juan Miguel Campanario

2010-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

115

Bayesian Inference of Natural Rankings in Incomplete Competition Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Competition between a complex system's constituents and a corresponding reward mechanism based on it have profound influence on the functioning, stability, and evolution of the system. But determining the dominance hierarchy or ranking among the constituent parts from the strongest to the weakest -- essential in determining reward or penalty -- is almost always an ambiguous task due to the incomplete nature of competition networks. Here we introduce ``Natural Ranking," a desirably unambiguous ranking method applicable to a complete (full) competition network, and formulate an analytical model based on the Bayesian formula inferring the expected mean and error of the natural ranking of nodes from an incomplete network. We investigate its potential and uses in solving issues in ranking by applying to a real-world competition network of economic and social importance.

Park, Juyong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Distillability and PPT entanglement of low-rank quantum states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is known that he bipartite quantum states, with rank strictly smaller than the maximum of the ranks of its two reduced states, are distillable by local operations and classical communication. Our first main result is that this is also true for NPT states with rank equal to this maximum. (A state is PPT if the partial transpose of its density matrix is positive semidefinite, and otherwise it is NPT.) This was conjectured first in 1999 in the special case when the two local ranks are equal. Our second main result provides a complete solution of the separability problem for bipartite states of rank 4. Namely, we show that such a state is separable if and only if it is PPT and its range contains at least one product state. We also prove that the so called checkerboard states are distillable if and only if they are NPT.

Lin Chen; Dragomir Z. Djokovic

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

117

PageRank, HITS and a unified framework for link analysis  

SciTech Connect

Two popular webpage ranking algorithms are HITS and PageRank. HITS emphasizes mutual reinforcement between authority and hub webpages, while PageRank emphasizes hyperlink weight normalization and web surfing based on random walk models. We systematically generalize/combine these concepts into a unified framework. The ranking framework contains a large algorithm space; HITS and PageRank are two extreme ends in this space. We study several normalized ranking algorithms which are intermediate between HITS and PageRank, and obtain closed-form solutions. We show that, to first order approximation, all ranking algorithms in this framework, including PageRank and HITS, lead to same ranking which is highly correlated with ranking by indegree. These results support the notion that in web resource ranking indegree and outdegree are of fundamental importance. Rankings of webgraphs of different sizes and queries are presented to illustrate our analysis.

Ding, Chris; He, Xiaofeng; Husbands, Parry; Zha, Hongyuan; Simon, Horst

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Coal rank trends in western Kentucky coal field and relationship to hydrocarbon occurrence  

SciTech Connect

Extensive oil and gas development has occurred in the high volatile C bituminous region north of the Rough Creek fault zone, but few pools are known within the Webster syncline south of the fault zone. The rank of the Middle Pennsylvanian coals can be used to estimate the level of maturation of the Devonian New Albany Shale, a likely source rock for much of the oil and gas in the coal field. Based on relatively few data points, previous studies on the maturation of the New Albany Shale, which lies about 1 km below the Springfield coal, indicate an equivalent medium volatile bituminous (1.0-1.2% R{sub max}) rank in the Fluorspar district. New Albany rank decreases to an equivalent high volatile B/C (0.6% R{sub max}) north of the Rough Creek fault zone. Whereas the shale in the latter region is situated within the oil generation window, the higher rank region is past the peak of the level of maturation of the New Albany Shale. The significance of the New Albany reflectancy is dependent on the suppression of vitrinite reflectance in organic-rich shales. The possibility of reflectance suppression would imply that the shales could be more mature than studies have indicated.

Hower, J.C.; Rimmer, S.M.; Williams, D.A.; Beard, J.G. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Thyroid cancer in the Marshallese: relative risk of short-lived internal emitters and external radiation exposure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a study of the comparative effects of internal versus external irradiation of the thyroid in young people, we determined that the dose from internal irradiation of the thyroid with short-lived internal emitters produced several times less thyroid cancer than did the same dose of radiation given externally. We determined this finding for a group of 85 Marshall Islands children, who were less than 10 years of age at the time of exposure and who were accidentially exposed to internal and external thyroid radiation at an average level of 1400 rad. The external risk coefficient ranged between 2.5 and 4.9 cancers per million person-rad-years at risk, and thus, from our computations, the internal risk coefficient for the Marshallese children was estimated to range between 1.0 and 1.4 cancers per million person-rad-years at risk. In contrast, for individual more than 10 years of age at the time of exposure, the dose from internal irradiation of the thyroid with short-lived internal emitters produced several times more thyroid cancer than did the same dose of radiation given externally. The external risk coefficients for the older age groups were reported in the literature to be in the range of 1.0 to 3.3 cancers per million person-rad-years-at risk. We computed internal risk coefficients of 3.3 to 8.1 cancers per million person-rad-years at risk for adolescent and adult groups. This higher sensitivity to cancer induction in the exposed adolescents and adults, is different from that seen in other exposed groups. 14 refs., 8 tabs.

Lessard, E.T.; Brill, A.B.; Adams, W.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

The Discrete Brier and Ranked Probability Skill Scores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Brier skill score (BSS) and the ranked probability skill score (RPSS) are widely used measures to describe the quality of categorical probabilistic forecasts. They quantify the extent to which a forecast strategy improves predictions with ...

Andreas P. Weigel; Mark A. Liniger; Christof Appenzeller

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative risk ranking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Theory and Applications of the Minimum Spanning Tree Rank Histogram  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A minimum spanning tree (MST) rank histogram (RH) is a multidimensional ensemble reliability verification tool. The construction of debiased, decorrelated, and covariance-homogenized MST RHs is described. Experiments using Euclidean L2, variance, ...

Daniel Gombos; James A. Hansen; Jun Du; Jeff McQueen

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

United States - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rankings Rankings Additional State Rankings Consumption Total Energy per Capita Prices Natural Gas Electricity Environment Carbon Dioxide Emissions Expenditures Total Energy per Capita Production Total Energy Crude Oil Natural Gas Coal Electricity More State Ranking Tables › Notes & Sources Consumption Total Energy per Capita: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Consumption Per Capita Expenditures Total Energy per Capita: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Expenditures Per Capita Production Total Energy: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Energy Production Crude Oil: EIA, Petroleum Supply Annual, Crude Oil Production Natural Gas: EIA, Natural Gas Annual, Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Coal: EIA, Annual Coal Report, Coal Production and Number of Mines by State

123

Factors affecting quality of dried low-rank coals  

SciTech Connect

The chemical and physical properties of coal are strongly affected by the upgrading process employed. For high-moisture coals, upgrading involves thermal dehydration to improve the calorific value of the coal on mass basis. This study evaluates the feasibility of upgrading a low-rank/grade coal using the oven drying method. The objective of this research work is to study the drying characteristics of low-rank coals and to understand the factors affecting the quality of dried low-rank coals. This article describes laboratory experiments conducted on the characterization of the low-rank coals before and after the drying process. The results on drying kinetics, re-absorption of coal samples, and proximate analysis of coal samples before and after drying are discussed. It was found that the upgrading process produced coal with better heating value and combustion characteristics than those of the raw coal samples.

Karthikeyan, M.; Kuma, J.V.M.; Hoe, C.S.; Ngo, D.L.Y. [National University of Singapore, (Singapore)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Rank and inertia optimizations of two Hermitian quadratic matrix ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cCollege of Mathematics Science, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng, Shandong ... equations, have been two classes of fundamental object of study in matrix ...... rank formulas and their applications were collected in some recent handbooks for .

125

NNSA's Sequoia Ranks as Fastest Supercomputer in World | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Sequoia Ranks as Fastest Supercomputer in World | National Nuclear Sequoia Ranks as Fastest Supercomputer in World | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA's Sequoia Ranks as Fastest Supercomputer in World NNSA's Sequoia Ranks as Fastest Supercomputer in World Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA Sequoia, a supercomputer built for NNSA, has been named the fastest in the

126

Chemical comminution and deashing of low-rank coals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described of chemically comminuting a low-rank coal while at the same time increasing the heating value of the coal. A strong alkali solution is added to a low-rank coal to solubilize the carbonaceous portion of the coal, leaving behind the noncarbonaceous mineral matter portion. The solubilized coal is precipitated from solution by a multivalent cation, preferably calcium. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Quigley, D.R.

1989-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

127

Investigation of the rank dependence of tar evolution  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study are to develop an improved understanding of the process of coal tar evolution, its relationship to the structural characteristics of the parent coal, and the dependence of the chemical and physical properties of the tar products on the conditions of devolatilization. Data from this study are expected to allow hypothesis testing and refinements of coal devolatilization models relevant to the pulverized coal combustion process. A range of coal ranks, from a Texas lignite to a Pennsylvania anthracite, are employed in the investigation. In addition, a high temperature polymer, a polyimide, is utilized as an additional reference case. The polyimide serves as a truly polymeric reference material for examining the nitrogen evolution behavior of coal. The samples are subjected to elemental composition determination, infrared absorbance characterization, calorific value measurement, high temperature ash analysis, and maceral composition. Potential tar yields are determined by long hold time heated grid investigations of each coal at a final temperature and heating rate observed to maximize tar yields for the reference coal. Relative tar evolution kinetic behavior is determined by zero hold time heated grid investigations of each coal. 4 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

On the kernelization of ranking r-CSP in tournaments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Ranking r-Constraint Satisfaction Problem (ranking r-CSP) consists of a ground set of vertices V, an arity r > 2, a parameter k and a constraint system c, where c is a function which maps rankings of r-sized subsets of V to {0,1}. The objective is to decide if there exists a ranking ? of the vertices satisfying all but at most k constraints. Famous ranking r-CSP include the Feedback Arc Set in Tournaments and Betweenness in Tournaments problems. We consider these problems from the kernelization viewpoint. We first prove that Feedback Arc Set in Bipartite Tournaments admits a kernel with O(k^2) vertices, improving the previous bound of O(k^3) vertices. Next, we prove that so-called l_r-simply characterized ranking r-CSP admit linear vertex-kernels whenever they admit constant-factor approximation algorithms. This implies that r-Betweenness in Tournaments and r-Transitive Feedback Arc Set In Tournaments admit linear vertex-kernels. Finally, we consider another generalization of Feedback Arc Set in Tournaments...

Perez, Anthony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Risk Management System (RMS) is a database used to maintain the project risk register. The RMS also maps risk reduction activities to specific identified risks. Further functionality of the RMS includes mapping reactor suppliers Design Data Needs (DDNs) to risk reduction tasks and mapping Phenomena Identification Ranking Table (PIRTs) to associated risks. This document outlines the basic instructions on how to use the RMS. This document constitutes Revision 1 of the NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk. It incorporates the latest enhancements to the RMS. The enhancements include six new custom views of risk data - Impact/Consequence, Tasks by Project Phase, Tasks by Status, Tasks by Project Phase/Status, Tasks by Impact/WBS, and Tasks by Phase/Impact/WBS.

John Collins; John M. Beck

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Screening and Ranking of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs for CO2 Storage in the Alberta Basin, Canada  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Screening and Ranking of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs for CO Screening and Ranking of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs for CO 2 Storage in the Alberta Basin, Canada Stefan Bachu (Stefan.Bachu@gov.ab.ca; 780-427-1517) Alberta Energy and Utilities Board 4999-98 Avenue Edmonton, AB, T6B 2X3, Canada Introduction Human activity since the industrial revolution has had the effect of increasing atmospheric concentrations of gases with a greenhouse effect, such as carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and methane (CH 4 ), leading to climate warming and weather changes (Bryant, 1997; Jepma and Munasinghe, 1998). Because of its relative abundance compared with the other greenhouse gases, CO 2 is by far the most important, being responsible for about 64% of the enhanced "greenhouse effect" (Bryant, 1997). Given their inherent advantages, such as availability, competitive cost, ease of

131

Thirteenth biennial lignite symposium: technology and utilization of low-rank coals proceedings. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings are the collected manuscripts from the 1985 Lignite Symposium held at Bismarck, North Dakota on May 21-23, 1985. Sponsorship of the thirteenth biennial meeting was by the United States Department of Energy, the University of North Dakota Energy Research Center, and the Texas University Coal Research Consortium. Seven technical sessions plus two luncheons and a banquet were held during the two and a half day meeting. The final half day included tours of the Great Plains Gasification Plant; Basin Electric's Antelope Valley Power Station; and the Freedom Mine. Sessions covered diverse topics related to the technology and use of low-rank coals including coal development and public policy, combustion, gasification, environmental systems for low-rank coal utilization, liquefaction, beneficiation and coal mining and coal inorganics. All the papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA.

Jones, M.L. (ed.)

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Hanford Treatment Facility Achieves First Gold Ranking for Sustainable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treatment Facility Achieves First Gold Ranking for Treatment Facility Achieves First Gold Ranking for Sustainable Design in EM Complex: New groundwater treatment facility will be Hanford's largest, greenest pump-and-treat system Hanford Treatment Facility Achieves First Gold Ranking for Sustainable Design in EM Complex: New groundwater treatment facility will be Hanford's largest, greenest pump-and-treat system May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers use a lift to access part of the 200 West Groundwater Treatment Facility. Workers use a lift to access part of the 200 West Groundwater Treatment Facility. Pump-and-treat construction managers David Fink (left) and Delise Pargmann (right) review information for the LEED gold certification of the main process building for the 200 West Groundwater Treatment Facility.

133

Modified Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) for Uncertainty Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a methodology of characterizing important phenomena, which is also part of a broader research by the authors called 'Modified PIRT'. The methodology provides robust process of phenomena identification and ranking process for more precise quantification of uncertainty. It is a two-step process of identifying and ranking methodology based on thermal-hydraulics (TH) importance as well as uncertainty importance. Analytical Hierarchical Process (AHP) has been used for as a formal approach for TH identification and ranking. Formal uncertainty importance technique is used to estimate the degree of credibility of the TH model(s) used to represent the important phenomena. This part uses subjective justification by evaluating available information and data from experiments, and code predictions. The proposed methodology was demonstrated by developing a PIRT for large break loss of coolant accident LBLOCA for the LOFT integral facility with highest core power (test LB-1). (authors)

Gol-Mohamad, Mohammad P.; Modarres, Mohammad; Mosleh, Ali [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Phenomena Identification and Ranking Technique (PIRT) Panel Meeting Summary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phenomena Identification and Ranking Technique (PIRT) is a systematic way of gathering information from experts on a specific subject and ranking the importance of the information. NRC, in collaboration with DOE and the working group, conducted the PIRT exercises to identify safety-relevant phenomena for NGNP, and to assess and rank the importance and knowledge base for each phenomenon. The overall objective was to provide NRC with an expert assessment of the safety-relevant NGNP phenomena, and an overall assessment of R and D needs for NGNP licensing. The PIRT process was applied to five major topical areas relevant to NGNP safety and licensing: (1) thermofluids and accident analysis (including neutronics), (2) fission product transport, (3) high temperature materials, (4) graphite, and (5) process heat for hydrogen cogeneration.

Mark Holbrook

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Co Co 2 SequeStration Potential of texaS low-rank CoalS Background Fossil fuel combustion is the primary source of emissions of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a major greenhouse gas. Sequestration of CO 2 by injecting it into geologic formations, such as coal seams, may offer a viable method for reducing atmospheric CO 2 emissions. Injection into coal seams has the potential added benefit of enhanced coalbed methane recovery. The potential for CO 2 sequestration in low-rank coals, while as yet undetermined, is believed to differ significantly from that for bituminous coals. To evaluate the feasibility and the environmental, technical, and economic impacts of CO 2 sequestration in Texas low-rank coal beds, the Texas Engineering Experimental Station is conducting a four-year study

136

A total risk assessment methodology for security assessment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories performed a two-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project to develop a new collaborative risk assessment method to enable decision makers to fully consider the interrelationships between threat, vulnerability, and consequence. A five-step Total Risk Assessment Methodology was developed to enable interdisciplinary collaborative risk assessment by experts from these disciplines. The objective of this process is promote effective risk management by enabling analysts to identify scenarios that are simultaneously achievable by an adversary, desirable to the adversary, and of concern to the system owner or to society. The basic steps are risk identification, collaborative scenario refinement and evaluation, scenario cohort identification and risk ranking, threat chain mitigation analysis, and residual risk assessment. The method is highly iterative, especially with regard to scenario refinement and evaluation. The Total Risk Assessment Methodology includes objective consideration of relative attack likelihood instead of subjective expert judgment. The 'probability of attack' is not computed, but the relative likelihood for each scenario is assessed through identifying and analyzing scenario cohort groups, which are groups of scenarios with comparable qualities to the scenario being analyzed at both this and other targets. Scenarios for the target under consideration and other targets are placed into cohort groups under an established ranking process that reflects the following three factors: known targeting, achievable consequences, and the resources required for an adversary to have a high likelihood of success. The development of these target cohort groups implements, mathematically, the idea that adversaries are actively choosing among possible attack scenarios and avoiding scenarios that would be significantly suboptimal to their objectives. An adversary who can choose among only a few comparable targets and scenarios (a small comparable target cohort group) is more likely to choose to attack the specific target under analysis because he perceives it to be a relatively unique attack opportunity. The opposite is also true. Thus, total risk is related to the number of targets that exist in each scenario cohort group. This paper describes the Total Risk Assessment Methodology and illustrates it through an example.

Aguilar, Richard; Pless, Daniel J.; Kaplan, Paul Garry; Silva, Consuelo Juanita; Rhea, Ronald Edward; Wyss, Gregory Dane; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

NE-Rank: A Novel Graph-Based Keyphrase Extraction in Twitter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The massive growth of the micro-blogging service Twitter has shed the light on the challenging problem of summarizing a collection of large number of tweets. This paper attempts to extract topical key phrases that would represent topics in tweets. Due ... Keywords: Keyphrase Extraction, Graph-based Ranking, Hashtag, Twitter, PageRank, TextRank, NE-Rank

Abdelghani Bellaachia; Mohammed Al-Dhelaan

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Combustion and gasification characteristics of chars from four commercially significant coals of different rank. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combustion and gasification kinetics of four size graded coal chars were investigated experimentally in Combustion Engineering's Drop Tube Furnace System (DTFS). The chars were prepared in the DTFS from commercially significant coals representing a wide range of rank; these included a Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam hvAb coal, an Illinois No. 6 Seam hvCb coal, a Wyoming Sub C, and a Texas Lignite A. Additionally, a number of standard ASTM and special bench scale tests were performed on the coals and chars to characterize their physicochemical properties. Results showed that the lower rank coal chars were more reactive than the higher rank coal chars and that combustion reactions of chars were much faster than the corresponding gasification reactions. Fuel properties, temperature, and reactant gas partial pressure had a significant influence on both combustion and gasification, and particle size had a mild but discernible influence on gasification. Fuel reactivities were closely related to pore structure. Computer simulation of the combustion and gasification performances of the subject samples in the DTFS supported the experimental findings.

Nsakala, N.Y.; Patel, R.L.; Lao, T.C.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Retrieving and Ranking Unannotated Images through Collaboratively Mining Online Search Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new image search and ranking algorithm for retrieving unannotated images by collaboratively mining online search results, which consist of online image and text search results. The online image search results are leveraged as reference examples to perform content-based image search over unannotated images. The online text search results are utilized to estimate individual reference images relevance to the search query as not all the online image search results are closely related to the query. Overall, the key contribution of our method lies in its capability to deal with unreliable online image search results through jointly mining visual and textual aspects of online search results. Through such collaborative mining, our algorithm infers the relevance of an online search result image to a text query. Once we estimate a query relevance score for each online image search result, we can selectively use query specific online search result images as reference examples for retrieving and ranking unannotated images. To explore the performance of our algorithm, we tested our algorithm both on the standard public image datasets and several modest sized personal photo collections. We also compared the performance of our method with that of two peer methods. The results are very positive, indicating that our algorithm is superior to existing content-based image search algorithms for retrieving and ranking unannotated images. Overall, the main advantage of our algorithm comes from its collaborative mining over online search results both in the visual and textual domains.

Xu, Songhua [ORNL; Jiang, Hao [University of Hong Kong, The; Lau, Francis [University of Hong Kong, The

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Typicality ranking via semi-supervised multiple-instance learning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the existing methods for natural scene categorization only consider whether a sample is relevant or irrelevant to a particular concept. However, for the samples relevant to a certain concept, their typicalities or relevancy scores to the concept ... Keywords: multiple-instance learning, natural scene categorization, semi-supervised learning, typicality ranking

Jinhui Tang; Xian-Sheng Hua; Guo-Jun Qi; Xiuqing Wu

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative risk ranking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Cross community news event summary generation based on collaborative ranking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to make the users to access their interested news content conveniently, news analysis has been a hot research topic for a long time. However, most of the previous works only focus on news event detection, tracking, etc. Little attention has ... Keywords: co-ranking, event analysis, news summarization

Chunxi Liu; Weigang Zhang; Shuqiang Jiang; Qingming Huang

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Cumulative % of topics that retrieve homepage by given rank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... bXcTdWYef @&' aE&6 F261ECRV RVVcXdWVef @&'6 E1aE&6 F261ECRVV RRc`WXef 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90100 Rank 0 10 20 30 40 50 ...

2002-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

143

Google's PageRank: The Math Behind the Search Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Google's PageRank: The Math Behind the Search Engine Rebecca S. Wills Department of Mathematics on a given day. Even though there are many internet search engines, Google, Yahoo!, and MSN receive over 81 equals that of Google [11], Google continues to thrive as the search engine of choice receiving over 46

Lakoba, Taras I.

144

Lignites and Low Rank Coals Conference: Proceedings 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI and the Technische Vereinigung des Grosskraftswerkbetreiber (Technical Association of Large Power Plant Operators) (VGB) jointly held a Conference on Lignites and Low Rank Coals in Wiesbaden, Germany, May 16-18, 2001. These Proceedings include the plenary papers, technical session papers, and rapporteurs' summaries from the conference.

2002-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

145

Ranking and selection for steady-state simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present and evaluate two ranking-and-selection procedures for use in steady-state simulation experiments when the goal is to find which among a finite number of alternative systems has the largest or smallest long-run average performance. Both procedures ...

David Goldsman; William S. Marshall; Seong-Hee Kim; Barry L. Nelson

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Object Recognition by Sequential Figure-Ground Ranking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an approach to visual object-class segmentation and recognition based on a pipeline that combines multiple figure-ground hypotheses with large object spatial support, generated by bottom-up computational processes that do not exploit knowledge ... Keywords: Learning and ranking, Object recognition, Semantic segmentation

Joăo Carreira; Fuxin Li; Cristian Sminchisescu

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Technology achievement index 2009: ranking and comparative study of nations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ranking of 91 countries based on the Technology Achievement Index 2009 (TAI-09) (2009 refers to the year in which most of data collection was carried out.) is reported. Originally proposed in 2002, the TAI is a composite indicator which aggregates national ... Keywords: Human skills, Technology achievement index, Technology capability, Technology capability spread, Technology creation, Technology development, Technology diffusion

Anthony Nasir; Tariq Mahmood Ali; Sheikh Shahdin; Tariq Ur Rahman

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Local Equivalence of Rank-Two Quantum Mixed States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the equivalence of quantum mixed states under local unitary transformations. For a class of rank-two mixed states, a sufficient and necessary condition of local equivalence is obtained by giving a complete set of invariants under local unitary transformations, such that two states in this class are locally equivalent if and only if all these invariants have equal values for them.

Sergio Albeverio; Shao-Ming Fei; Debashish Goswami

2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

149

Screening Risk Evaluation methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Screening Risk Evaluation (SRE) Guidance document is a set of guidelines provided for the uniform implementation of SREs performed on D&D facilities. These guidelines are designed specifically for the completion of the second (semi-quantitative screening) phase of the D&D Risk-Based Process. The SRE Guidance produces screening risk scores reflecting levels of risk through the use of risk ranking indices. Five types of possible risk are calculated from the SRE: current releases, worker exposures, future releases, physical hazards, and criticality. The Current Release Index (CRI) calculates the risk to human health and the environment from ongoing or probable releases within a one year time period. The Worker Exposure Index (WEI) calculates the risk to workers, occupants, and visitors in D&D facilities of contaminant exposure. The Future Release Index (FRI) calculates the risk of future releases of contaminants, after one year, to human health and the environment. The Physical Hazards Index (PHI) calculates the risk-to human health due to factors other than that of contaminants. The index of Criticality is approached as a modifying factor to the entire SRE, due to the fact that criticality issues are strictly regulated under DOE. Screening risk results will be tabulated in matrix form and Total Risk will be calculated (weighted equation) to produce a score on which to base early action recommendations. Other recommendations from the screening risk scores will be made based either on individual index scores or from reweighted Total Risk calculations. All recommendations based on the SRE will be made based on a combination of screening risk scores, decision drivers, and other considerations, determined on a project by project basis. The SRE is the first and most important step in the overall D&D project level decision making process.

Hopper, K.M. [Midwest Technical, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

ranking of utilities by demand charge? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ranking of utilities by demand charge? ranking of utilities by demand charge? Home > Groups > Utility Rate Sorry..simple question because i am a bit dumb. How do I download the utility rate data in CSV so i can sort by demand charge? Or can i sort by demand charge in the API? New to this API stuff. Many thanks/ Submitted by Apin101 on 26 November, 2013 - 07:12 1 answer Points: 0 There is currently no way to sort the responses, but since you are downloading in a CSV format you can sort most responses in Excel (or a spreadsheet editor). Another option is to run direct Ask queries and specify a property to sort on (see massive URL below). To do any sorting on an element of a packed array like DemandWeekdaySchedule would require custom logic in the result spreadsheet, or custom scripting of some kind. The new utility rate custom

151

ranking of utilities by demand charge? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ranking of utilities by demand charge? ranking of utilities by demand charge? Home > Groups > Utility Rate Sorry..simple question because i am a bit dumb. How do I download the utility rate data in CSV so i can sort by demand charge? Or can i sort by demand charge in the API? New to this API stuff. Many thanks/ Submitted by Apin101 on 26 November, 2013 - 07:12 1 answer Points: 0 There is currently no way to sort the responses, but since you are downloading in a CSV format you can sort most responses in Excel (or a spreadsheet editor). Another option is to run direct Ask queries and specify a property to sort on (see massive URL below). To do any sorting on an element of a packed array like DemandWeekdaySchedule would require custom logic in the result spreadsheet, or custom scripting of some kind. The new utility rate custom

152

Weighted order statistic classifiers with large rank-order margin.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe how Stack Filters and Weighted Order Statistic function classes can be used for classification problems. This leads to a new design criteria for linear classifiers when inputs are binary-valued and weights are positive . We present a rank-based measure of margin that can be directly optimized as a standard linear program and investigate its effect on generalization error with experiment. Our approach can robustly combine large numbers of base hypothesis and easily implement known priors through regularization.

Porter, R. B. (Reid B.); Hush, D. R. (Donald R.); Theiler, J. P. (James P.); Gokhale, M. (Maya)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Low-rank coal research: Volume 3, Combustion research: Final report. [Great Plains  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume III, Combustion Research, contains articles on fluidized bed combustion, advanced processes for low-rank coal slurry production, low-rank coal slurry combustion, heat engine utilization of low-rank coals, and Great Plains Gasification Plant. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

Mann, M. D.; Hajicek, D. R.; Zobeck, B. J.; Kalmanovitch, D. P.; Potas, T. A.; Maas, D. J.; Malterer, T. J.; DeWall, R. A.; Miller, B. G.; Johnson, M. D.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Graph-based ranking algorithms for e-mail expertise analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we study graph--based ranking measures for the purpose of using them to rank email correspondents according to their degree of expertise on subjects of interest. While this complete expertise analysis consists of several steps, in this ... Keywords: digraph node ranking, expert finding, ordered list distance, social network analysis

Byron Dom; Iris Eiron; Alex Cozzi; Yi Zhang

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Beyond Travel & Tourism competitiveness ranking using DEA, GST, ANN and Borda count  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Travel & Tourism competitiveness rankings are helpful when we wish to consider the issue of how to enrich the global competitiveness of tourism destinations. However, even if a ranking is obtained from a highly reputed institute, it is important to evaluate ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Borda count, Data envelopment analysis, Grey system theory, Ranking trustworthiness

Wei-Wen Wu

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidance for Conducting Risk Assessments and Related Risk Activities for the DOE-ORO Environmental Management Program. BJCOR-271 Guidance for Treatment of Variability and...

157

Bayesian Joint Modeling of Binomial and Rank Response Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present techniques for joint modeling of binomial and rank response data using the Bayesian paradigm for inference. The motivating application consists of results from a series of assessments on several primate species. Among 20 assessments representing 6 paradigms, 6 assessments are considered to produce a rank response and the remaining 14 are considered to have a binomial response. In order to model each of the 20 assessments simultaneously, we use the popular technique of data augmentation so that the observed responses are based on latent variables. The modeling uses Bayesian techniques for modeling the latent variables using random effects models. Competing models are specified in a consistent fashion which easily allows comparisons across assessments and across models. Non-local priors are readily admitted to enable more effective testing of random effects should Bayes factors be used for model comparison. The model is also extended to allow assessment-specific conditional error variances for the latent variables. Due to potential difficulties in calculating Bayes factors, discrepancy measures based on pivotal quantities are adapted to test for the presence of random effects and for the need to allow assessment-specific conditional error variances. In order to facilitate implementation, we describe in detail the joint prior distribution and a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm for posterior sampling. Results from the primate intelligence data are presented to illustrate the methodology. The results indicate substantial paradigm-specific differences between species. These differences are supported by the discrepancy measures as well as model posterior summaries. Furthermore, the results suggest that meaningful and parsimonious inferences can be made using the proposed techniques and that the discrepancy measures can effectively differentiate between necessary and unnecessary random effects. The contributions should be particularly useful when binomial and rank data are to be jointly analyzed in a parsimonious fashion.

Barney, Bradley

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Toward a new metric for ranking high performance computing systems.  

SciTech Connect

The High Performance Linpack (HPL), or Top 500, benchmark [1] is the most widely recognized and discussed metric for ranking high performance computing systems. However, HPL is increasingly unreliable as a true measure of system performance for a growing collection of important science and engineering applications. In this paper we describe a new high performance conjugate gradient (HPCG) benchmark. HPCG is composed of computations and data access patterns more commonly found in applications. Using HPCG we strive for a better correlation to real scientific application performance and expect to drive computer system design and implementation in directions that will better impact performance improvement.

Heroux, Michael Allen; Dongarra, Jack. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Rankings and the Reshaping of Higher Education The Battle for World-Class Excellence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University rankings have gained popularity worldwide because they appear to fulfil demands by students, parents, policymakers, employers, and other stakeholders for information and transparency. They are often equated with quality, and are now a significant factor shaping institutional reputation. Today, there are eleven global rankings, experiencing varying degrees of popularity, reliability and trustworthiness, and national rankings in over 40 countries. Despite their popularity, how much do we really know and understand about the influence and impact of rankings? This book is the first comprehensive study of rankings from a global perspective. Based on original international surveys and interviews with universities and stakeholders, Ellen Hazelkorn draws together a wealth of international experience to chronicle how rankings are helping reshape higher education in the age of globalization. Written in an easy but authoritative style, the book makes an important contribution to our understanding of the rankings phenomenon. It is essential reading for policy makers, institutional leaders, managers, advisors, and scholars.

Ellen Hazelkorn; Ellen Hazelkorn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Comparative Inter-Species Pharmacokinetics of Phenoxyacetic Acid Herbicides and Related Organic Acids. Evidence that the Dog is Not a Relevant Species for Evaluation of Human Health Risk.  

SciTech Connect

Phenoxyacetic acids including 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) are widely utilized organic acid herbicides that have undergone extensive toxicity and pharmacokinetic analyses. The dog is particularly susceptible to the toxicity of phenoxyacetic acids and related organic acids relative to other species. Active renal clearance mechanisms for organic acids are ubiquitous in mammalian species, and thus a likely mechanism responsible for the increased sensitivity of the dog to these agents is linked to a lower capacity to secrete organic acids from the kidney. Using published data describing the pharmacokinetics of phenoxyacetic and structurally related organic acids in a variety of species including humans, inter-species comparative pharmacokinetics were evaluated using allometic parameter scaling. For both 2,4-D and MCPA the dog plasma half-life (t1/2) and renal clearance (Clr; ml hr-1) rates did not scale as a function of body weight across species; whereas for all other species evaluated, including humans, these pharmacokinetic parameters reasonably scaled. This exceptional response in the dog is clearly illustrated by comparing the plasma t1/2 at comparable doses of 2,4-D and MCPA, across several species. At a dosage of 5 mg/kg, in dogs the plasma t1/2 for 2,4-D and MCPA were {approx}92 - 106 hr and 63 hr, respectively, which is substantially longer than in the rat ({approx}1 and 6 hr, respectively) or in humans (12 and 11 hr, respectively). This longer t1/2, and slower elimination in the dog, results in substantially higher body burdens of these organic acids, at comparable doses, relative to other species. Although these results indicate the important role of renal transport clearance mechanisms as determinants of the clearance and potential toxicity outcomes of phenoxyacetic acid herbicides across several species, other contributing mechanisms such as reabsorption from the renal tubules is highly likely. These findings suggest that for new structurally similar organic acids, a limited comparative species (rat vs. dog) pharmacokinetic analysis early in the toxicology evaluation process may provide important insight into the relevance of the dog. In summary, the substantial difference between the pharmacokinetics of phenoxyacetic acids and related organic acids in dogs relative to other species, including humans, questions the relevance of using dog toxicity data for the extrapolation of human health risk.

Timchalk, Chuck

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative risk ranking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals  

SciTech Connect

Injection of CO{sub 2} in coalbeds is a plausible method of reducing atmospheric emissions of CO{sub 2}, and it can have the additional benefit of enhancing methane recovery from coal. Most previous studies have evaluated the merits of CO{sub 2} disposal in high-rank coals. The objective of this research was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in, and enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery from, low-rank coals in the Texas Gulf Coast area. Our research included an extensive coal characterization program, including acquisition and analysis of coal core samples and well transient test data. We conducted deterministic and probabilistic reservoir simulation and economic studies to evaluate the effects of injectant fluid composition (pure CO{sub 2} and flue gas), well spacing, injection rate, and dewatering on CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM recovery in low-rank coals of the Calvert Bluff formation of the Texas Wilcox Group. Shallow and deep Calvert Bluff coals occur in two, distinct, coalbed gas petroleum systems that are separated by a transition zone. Calvert Bluff coals < 3,500 ft deep are part of a biogenic coalbed gas system. They have low gas content and are part of a freshwater aquifer. In contrast, Wilcox coals deeper than 3,500 ft are part of a thermogenic coalbed gas system. They have high gas content and are part of a saline aquifer. CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM projects in Calvert Bluff low-rank coals of East-Central Texas must be located in the deeper, unmineable coals, because shallow Wilcox coals are part of a protected freshwater aquifer. Probabilistic simulation of 100% CO{sub 2} injection into 20 feet of Calvert Bluff coal in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern indicates that these coals can store 1.27 to 2.25 Bcf of CO{sub 2} at depths of 6,200 ft, with an ECBM recovery of 0.48 to 0.85 Bcf. Simulation results of flue gas injection (87% N{sub 2}-13% CO{sub 2}) indicate that these same coals can store 0.34 to 0.59 Bcf of CO{sub 2} with an ECBM recovery of 0.68 to 1.20 Bcf. Economic modeling of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM recovery indicates predominantly negative economic indicators for the reservoir depths (4,000 to 6,200 ft) and well spacings investigated, using natural gas prices ranging from $2 to $12 per Mscf and CO{sub 2} credits based on carbon market prices ranging from $0.05 to $1.58 per Mscf CO{sub 2} ($1.00 to $30.00 per ton CO{sub 2}). Injection of flue gas (87% N{sub 2} - 13% CO{sub 2}) results in better economic performance than injection of 100% CO{sub 2}. CO{sub 2} sequestration potential and methane resources in low-rank coals of the Lower Calvert Bluff formation in East-Central Texas are significant. The potential CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity of the coals ranges between 27.2 and 49.2 Tcf (1.57 and 2.69 billion tons), with a mean value of 38 Tcf (2.2 billion tons), assuming a 72.4% injection efficiency. Estimates of recoverable methane resources range between 6.3 and 13.6 Tcf, with a mean of 9.8 Tcf, assuming a 71.3% recovery factor. Moderate increases in gas prices and/or carbon credits could generate attractive economic conditions that, combined with the close proximity of many CO{sub 2} point sources near unmineable coalbeds, could enable commercial CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM projects in Texas low-rank coals. Additional studies are needed to characterize Wilcox regional methane coalbed gas systems and their boundaries, and to assess potential of other low-rank coal beds. Results from this study may be transferable to other low-rank coal formations and regions.

Duane McVay; Walter Ayers, Jr.; Jerry Jensen; Jorge Garduno; Gonzola Hernandez; Rasheed Bello; Rahila Ramazanova

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Injection of CO{sub 2} in coalbeds is a plausible method of reducing atmospheric emissions of CO{sub 2}, and it can have the additional benefit of enhancing methane recovery from coal. Most previous studies have evaluated the merits of CO{sub 2} disposal in high-rank coals. The objective of this research was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in, and enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery from, low-rank coals in the Texas Gulf Coast area. Our research included an extensive coal characterization program, including acquisition and analysis of coal core samples and well transient test data. We conducted deterministic and probabilistic reservoir simulation and economic studies to evaluate the effects of injectant fluid composition (pure CO{sub 2} and flue gas), well spacing, injection rate, and dewatering on CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM recovery in low-rank coals of the Calvert Bluff formation of the Texas Wilcox Group. Shallow and deep Calvert Bluff coals occur in two, distinct, coalbed gas petroleum systems that are separated by a transition zone. Calvert Bluff coals coals deeper than 3,500 ft are part of a thermogenic coalbed gas system. They have high gas content and are part of a saline aquifer. CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM projects in Calvert Bluff low-rank coals of East-Central Texas must be located in the deeper, unmineable coals, because shallow Wilcox coals are part of a protected freshwater aquifer. Probabilistic simulation of 100% CO{sub 2} injection into 20 feet of Calvert Bluff coal in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern indicates that these coals can store 1.27 to 2.25 Bcf of CO{sub 2} at depths of 6,200 ft, with an ECBM recovery of 0.48 to 0.85 Bcf. Simulation results of flue gas injection (87% N{sub 2}-13% CO{sub 2}) indicate that these same coals can store 0.34 to 0.59 Bcf of CO{sub 2} with an ECBM recovery of 0.68 to 1.20 Bcf. Economic modeling of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM recovery indicates predominantly negative economic indicators for the reservoir depths (4,000 to 6,200 ft) and well spacings investigated, using natural gas prices ranging from $2 to $12 per Mscf and CO{sub 2} credits based on carbon market prices ranging from $0.05 to $1.58 per Mscf CO{sub 2} ($1.00 to $30.00 per ton CO{sub 2}). Injection of flue gas (87% N{sub 2} - 13% CO{sub 2}) results in better economic performance than injection of 100% CO{sub 2}. CO{sub 2} sequestration potential and methane resources in low-rank coals of the Lower Calvert Bluff formation in East-Central Texas are significant. The potential CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity of the coals ranges between 27.2 and 49.2 Tcf (1.57 and 2.69 billion tons), with a mean value of 38 Tcf (2.2 billion tons), assuming a 72.4% injection efficiency. Estimates of recoverable methane resources range between 6.3 and 13.6 Tcf, with a mean of 9.8 Tcf, assuming a 71.3% recovery factor. Moderate increases in gas prices and/or carbon credits could generate attractive economic conditions that, combined with the close proximity of many CO{sub 2} point sources near unmineable coalbeds, could enable commercial CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM projects in Texas low-rank coals. Additional studies are needed to characterize Wilcox regional methane coalbed gas systems and their boundaries, and to assess potential of other low-rank coal beds. Results from this study may be transferable to other low-rank coal formations and regions.

Duane McVay; Walter Ayers, Jr.; Jerry Jensen; Jorge Garduno; Gonzola Hernandez; Rasheed Bello; Rahila Ramazanova

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

163

Low-Rank Coal Grinding Performance Versus Power Plant Performance  

SciTech Connect

The intent of this project was to demonstrate that Alaskan low-rank coal, which is high in volatile content, need not be ground as fine as bituminous coal (typically low in volatile content) for optimum combustion in power plants. The grind or particle size distribution (PSD), which is quantified by percentage of pulverized coal passing 74 microns (200 mesh), affects the pulverizer throughput in power plants. The finer the grind, the lower the throughput. For a power plant to maintain combustion levels, throughput needs to be high. The problem of particle size is compounded for Alaskan coal since it has a low Hardgrove grindability index (HGI); that is, it is difficult to grind. If the thesis of this project is demonstrated, then Alaskan coal need not be ground to the industry standard, thereby alleviating somewhat the low HGI issue (and, hopefully, furthering the salability of Alaskan coal). This project studied the relationship between PSD and power plant efficiency, emissions, and mill power consumption for low-rank high-volatile-content Alaskan coal. The emissions studied were CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, and Hg (only two tests). The tested PSD range was 42 to 81 percent passing 76 microns. Within the tested range, there was very little correlation between PSD and power plant efficiency, CO, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2}. Hg emissions were very low and, therefore, did not allow comparison between grind sizes. Mill power consumption was lower for coarser grinds.

Rajive Ganguli; Sukumar Bandopadhyay

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Supervised Rank Aggregation for Predicting Influence in Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

focused on the identification of the most important actors in a social network. This has resulted in several measures of influence and authority. While most of such sociometrics (e.g., PageRank) are driven by intuitions based on an actors location in a network, asking for the “most influential ” actors in itself is an ill-posed question, unless it is put in context with a specific measurable task. Constructing a predictive task of interest in a given domain provides a mechanism to quantitatively compare different measures of influence. Furthermore, when we know what type of actionable insight to gather, we need not rely on a single network centrality measure. A combination of measures is more likely to capture various aspects of the social network that are predictive and beneficial for the task. Towards this end, we propose an approach to supervised rank aggregation, driven by techniques from Social Choice Theory. We illustrate the effectiveness of this method through experiments on Twitter and citation networks. I.

Karthik Subbian; Prem Melville

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Correction to “Intersection Cuts with Infinite Split Rank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We point out that the statement of Lemma 2.2 (ii) in [1] is incorrect. We fix the statement and show that this error does not impact the other results of the paper. 1 Correction to Lemma 2.2 The following is a corected version of Lemma 2.2 in [1]. The correction is in bold. Lemma 2.2. Let Q be the linear relaxation of X = {(x, y) |Ax + By ? b, x ? Z p, y ? R q}. (ii) Let y ? be a subset of the y variables and let Q(x, y ? ) be the orthogonal projection of Q onto the variables (x, y ?). Consider a valid inequality I for conv(X) whose coefficients for the y variables not in y ? are all 0. The split rank of inequality I with respect to Q(x, y ? ) is greater than or equal to its split rank with respect to Q. The original statement had “identical ” instead of “greater than or equal”. The proof of the modified statement is below (modification in bold). Proof. (ii) Let proj be the operation of projecting orthogonally onto the variables (x, y ?). It follows from the definitions of projection and convex hull that the operations of taking the projection and taking the convex hull commute. Therefore we have, for any split (?, ?0) on the x variables, proj conv(Q ?

Amitabh Basu; Gérard Cornuéjols; François Margot

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Debra Stewart at (865)482-2657 or dthomas3@utk.edu. Risk assessments conducted for the DOE-ORO should implement Guidance for Conducting Risk Assessments and Related Risk...

167

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 6: Process Heat and Hydrogen Co-Generation PIRTs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) exercise was conducted to identify potential safety-0-related physical phenomena for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) when coupled to a hydrogen production or similar chemical plant. The NGNP is a very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) with the design goal to produce high-temperature heat and electricity for nearby chemical plants. Because high-temperature heat can only be transported limited distances, the two plants will be close to each other. One of the primary applications for the VHTR would be to supply heat and electricity for the production of hydrogen. There was no assessment of chemical plant safety challenges. The primary application of this PIRT is to support the safety analysis of the NGNP coupled one or more small hydrogen production pilot plants. However, the chemical plant processes to be coupled to the NGNP have not yet been chosen; thus, a broad PIRT assessment was conducted to scope alternative potential applications and test facilities associated with the NGNP. The hazards associated with various chemicals and methods to minimize risks from those hazards are well understood within the chemical industry. Much but not all of the information required to assure safe conditions (separation distance, relative elevation, berms) is known for a reactor coupled to a chemical plant. There is also some experience with nuclear plants in several countries that have produced steam for industrial applications. The specific characteristics of the chemical plant, site layout, and the maximum stored inventories of chemicals can provide the starting point for the safety assessments. While the panel identified events and phenomena of safety significance, there is one added caveat. Multiple high-temperature reactors provide safety-related experience and understanding of reactor safety. In contrast, there have been only limited safety studies of coupled chemical and nuclear plants. The work herein provides a starting point for those studies; but, the general level of understanding of safety in coupling nuclear and chemical plants is less than in other areas of high-temperature reactor safety.

Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL; Gorensek, M. B. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Herring, S. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Pickard, P. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

A multi-attribute method for ranking the risks from multiple hazards in a small community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural hazards, human-induced accidents, and malicious acts have caused great losses and disruptions to society. After September 11, 2001, critical infrastructure protection has become a national focus in the United States ...

Li, Hua, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Eliciting fuzzy distributions from experts for ranking conceptual risk model components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An expert elicitation methodology was developed to integrate scientific knowledge from many studies at different spatial and temporal scales. The methodology utilised a structured one-to-one interview to elicit scale-dependent conceptual models and expert-weightings ... Keywords: Elicitation, Expert opinion, Fuzzy number, Phosphorus, Uncertainty, Water framework directive

T. Page; A. L. Heathwaite; L. J. Thompson; L. Pope; R. Willows

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Coordination of EPRI Risk Ranking Methodologies for Nuclear Power Plant Groundwater Protection & Underground Piping Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear power industry committed to the Groundwater Protection Initiative (GPI) and the Underground Piping and Tanks Initiative (UPTI) to improve the management of soil and groundwater contamination, and the management of underground piping and tanks. These two Initiatives, while they have different objectives, are closely aligned in the area of preventing leaks and spills of licensed materials. The results of this Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) work will provide nuclear power plant sites w...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

171

CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objectives for this reporting period were to (1) estimate the potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration in, and methane production from, low-rank coals of the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group in the east-central Texas region, (2) quantify uncertainty associated with these estimates, (3) conduct reservoir and economic analyses of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM production using horizontal wells, and (4) compare the results with those obtained from previous studies of vertical wells. To estimate the total volumes of CO{sub 2} that may be sequestered in, and total volumes of methane that can be produced from, the Wilcox Group low-rank coals in east-central Texas, we used data provided by Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, data obtained during this research, and results of probabilistic simulation modeling studies we conducted. For the analysis, we applied our base-case coal seam characteristics to a 2,930-mi{sup 2} (1,875,200-ac) area where Calvert Bluff coal seams range between 4,000 and 6,200 ft deep. Results of the probabilistic analysis indicate that potential CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity of the coals ranges between 27.2 and 49.2 Tcf (1.57 and 2.69 billion tons), with a mean value of 38 Tcf (2.2 billion tons), assuming a 72.4% injection efficiency. Estimates of recoverable methane resources, assuming a 71.3% recovery factor, range between 6.3 and 13.6 Tcf, with a mean of 9.8 Tcf. As part of the technology transfer for this project, we presented the paper SPE 100584 at the 2006 SPE Gas Technology Symposium held in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, on May 15-18, 2006. Also, we submitted an abstract to be considered for inclusion in a special volume dedicated to CO{sub 2} sequestration in geologic media, which is planned for publication by the American Association of Petroleum Geologists.

Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

lattice of rank 8. Then L ? = E8.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yet another proof: We construct an odd “2-neighbor ” L ? of L, identify L ? with Z 8 using our characterization of Z n by its minimal characteristic norm [1], and use this to identify L with E8. A “2-neighbor ” of L is a self-dual lattice L ? ? L ? Q such that L0 = L ? L ? is a sublattice of index 2 in each of L and L ?. To obtain L0 and L ? , first fix a lattice vector v0 / ? 2L such that 4|(v0, v0). (Such a vector exists in every even lattice of rank at least 3.) We may assume that (v0, v0) ? 4 mod 8, since if 8|(v0, v0) we may replace v0 by v0 + 2w with (v0, w) odd. Set L0 = {v ? L: 2|(v, v0)}, L ? = L0 ? (L0 + v0 2). We claim that L ? is an odd self-dual lattice. That it is a lattice is clear since certainly v0 ? L0. It is contained in its dual by construction. Since [L ? : L0] = [L: L0] = 2, we have disc(L ? ) = disc(L) = 1, so L ? ? L ? ? implies L ? = L ? ?. Finally L ? is odd because it contains the vector v0/2 of odd norm. Recall (see for instance [1]) that every unimodular lattice M has characteristic vectors: lattice vectors c ? M such that (c, v) ? (v, v) mod 2 for all v ? M. These constitute a coset of 2M in M, and if M is positive definite of rank n then (c, c) ? n mod 8 for all characteristic c ? M. Since L ? is odd, 0 is not a characteristic vector of L ?. Hence for every characteristic vector c of L ? we have (c, c) ? 8 = rank(L ?). By [1] it follows that L ? ? = Z 8. Therefore L0, being an even lattice contained with index 2 in L ? , is a D8 lattice. Thus L is one of the three lattices intermediate between D8 and D ? 8. One of these lattices is L ? = Z 8. The other two are isomorphic to E8, Q.E.D. Acknowledgements. This work was supported in part by the the National Science Foundation (grant DMS-0200687), and took place during a workshop at

Noam D. Elkies

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Initial Decision and Risk Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Decision and Risk Analysis capabilities will be developed for industry consideration and possible adoption within Year 1. These tools will provide a methodology for merging qualitative ranking of technology maturity and acknowledged risk contributors with quantitative metrics that drive investment decision processes. Methods and tools will be initially introduced as applications to the A650.1 case study, but modular spreadsheets and analysis routines will be offered to industry collaborators as soon as possible to stimulate user feedback and co-development opportunities.

Engel, David W.

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

174

Astronomical Site Ranking Based on Tropospheric Wind Statistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present comprehensive and reliable statistics of high altitude wind speeds and the tropospheric flows at the location of five important astronomical observatories. Statistical analysis exclusively of high altitude winds point to La Palma as the most suitable site for adaptive optics, with a mean value of 22.13 m/s at the 200 mbar pressure level. La Silla is at the bottom of the ranking, with the largest average value 200 mbar wind speed(33.35 m/s). We have found a clear annual periodicity of high altitude winds for the five sites in study. We have also explored the connection of high to low altitude atmospheric winds as a first approach of the linear relationship between the average velocity of the turbulence and high altitude winds (Sarazin & Tokovinin 2001). We may conclude that high and low altitude winds show good linear relationships at the five selected sites. The highest correlation coefficients correspond to Paranal and San Pedro Martir, while La Palma and La Silla show similar high to low altitude wind connection. Mauna Kea shows the smallest degree of correlation, which suggests a weaker linear relationship. Our results support the idea of high altitude winds as a parameter for rank astronomical sites in terms of their suitability for adaptive optics, although we have no evidence for adopting the same linear coefficient at different sites. The final value of this linear coefficient at a particular site could drastically change the interpretation of high altitude wind speeds as a direct parameter for site characterization.

B. Garcia-Lorenzo; J. J. Fuensalida; C. Munoz-Tunon; E. Mendizabal

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

175

CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The primary objectives for this reporting period were to construct a coal geological model for reservoir analysis and to continue modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration performance in coalbed methane reservoirs under various operational conditions. Detailed correlation of coal zones is important for reservoir analysis and modeling. Therefore, we interpreted and created isopleth maps of coal occurrences, and correlated individual coal seams within the coal bearing subdivisions of the Wilcox Group--the Hooper, Simsboro and Calvert Bluff formations. Preliminary modeling studies were run to determine if gravity effects would affect the performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration in coalbed methane reservoirs. Results indicated that gravity could adversely affect sweep efficiency and, thus, volumes of CO{sub 2} sequestered and methane produced in thick, vertically continuous coals. Preliminary modeling studies were also run to determine the effect of injection gas composition on sequestration in low-rank coalbeds. Injected gas composition was varied from pure CO{sub 2} to pure N{sub 2}, and results show that increasing N{sub 2} content degrades CO{sub 2} sequestration and methane production performance. We have reached a Data Exchange Agreement with Anadarko Petroleum Corporation. We are currently incorporating the Anadarko data into our work, and expect these data to greatly enhance the accuracy and value of our studies.

Duane A. Mcvay; Walter B. Ayers, Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Supplemental information related to risk assessment for the off-site transportation of low-level waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents supplemental information to support the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of low-level waste (LLW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Detailed descriptions of the transportation health risk assessment method and results of the assessment are presented in Appendix E of the WM PEIS and are not repeated in this report. This report presents additional information that is not presented in Appendix E but that was needed to conduct the transportation risk assessment for Waste Management (WM) LLW. Included are definition of the LLW alternatives considered in the WM PEIS, data related to the inventory and to the physical and radiological characteristics of WM LLW, an overview of the risk assessment method, and detailed results of the assessment for each WM LLW alternative considered.

Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Supplemental information related to risk assessment for the off-site transportation of low-level mixed waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

This report provides supplemental information to support the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of low-level mixed waste (LLMW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The assessment considers both the radioactive and chemical hazards associated with LLMW transportation. Detailed descriptions of the transportation health risk assessment methods and results of the assessment are presented in Appendix E of the WM PEIS. This report presents additional information that is not included in Appendix E but that was needed to conduct the transportation risk assessment for Waste Management (WM) LLMW. Included are definitions of the LLMW alternatives considered in the WM PEIS; data related to the inventory and to the physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics of WM LLMW; an overview of the risk assessment methods; and detailed results of the assessment for each WM LLMW case considered.

Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Lazaro, M.A.; Antonopoulos, A.A.; Hartmann, H.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Low-rank coal research. Quarterly report, January--March 1990  

SciTech Connect

This document contains several quarterly progress reports for low-rank coal research that was performed from January-March 1990. Reports in Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research are in Flue Gas Cleanup, Waste Management, and Regional Energy Policy Program for the Northern Great Plains. Reports in Advanced Research and Technology Development are presented in Turbine Combustion Phenomena, Combustion Inorganic Transformation (two sections), Liquefaction Reactivity of Low-Rank Coals, Gasification Ash and Slag Characterization, and Coal Science. Reports in Combustion Research cover Fluidized-Bed Combustion, Beneficiation of Low-Rank Coals, Combustion Characterization of Low-Rank Coal Fuels, Diesel Utilization of Low-Rank Coals, and Produce and Characterize HWD (hot-water drying) Fuels for Heat Engine Applications. Liquefaction Research is reported in Low-Rank Coal Direct Liquefaction. Gasification Research progress is discussed for Production of Hydrogen and By-Products from Coal and for Chemistry of Sulfur Removal in Mild Gas.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Making the business case for process safety using value-at-risk concepts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An increasing emphasis on chemical process safety over the last two decades has led to the development and application of powerful risk assessment tools. Hazard analysis and risk evaluation techniques have developed to the point where quantitatively meaningful risks can be calculated for processes and plants. However, the results are typically presented in semi-quantitative �ranked list� or �categorical matrix� formats, which are certainly useful but not optimal for making business decisions. A relatively new technique for performing valuation under uncertainty, Value at Risk (VaR), has been developed in the financial world. VaR is a method of evaluating the probability of a gain or loss by a complex venture, by examining the stochastic behavior of its components. We believe that combining quantitative risk assessment techniques with VaR concepts will bridge the gap between engineers and scientists who determine process risk and business leaders and policy makers who evaluate, manage, or regulate risk. We present a few basic examples of the application of VaR to hazard analysis in the chemical process industry. We discover that by using the VaR tool we are able to present data that allows management to make better informed decisions.

Fang, Jayming Sha

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Demonstrate Ames Laboratory capability in Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to the damage which occurred during the Three Mile Island nuclear accident, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has implemented a Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) program to evaluate the safety of nuclear power facilities during events with a low probability of occurrence. The PRA can be defined as a mathematical technique to identify and rank the importance of event sequences that can lead to a severe nuclear accident. Another PRA application is the evaluation of nuclear containment buildings due to earthquakes. In order to perform a seismic PRA, the two conditional probabilities of ground motion and of structural failure of the different components given a specific earthquake are first studied. The first of these is termed probability of exceedance and the second as seismic fragility analysis. The seismic fragility analysis is then related to the ground motion measured in terms of ``g`` to obtain a plant level fragility curve.

Bluhm, D.; Greimann, L.; Fanous, F.; Challa, R.; Gupta, S.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative risk ranking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Investigation of the rank dependence of tar evolution  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this study are to develop an improved understanding of the process of coal tar evolution, its relationship to the structural characteristics of the parent coal, and the dependence of the chemical and physical properties of the tar products on the conditions of devolatilization. Data from this study are expected to allow hypothesis testing and refinements of coal devolatilization models relevant to the pulverized coal combustion process. The program is divided into seven major technical areas: tar evolution rates in rapid heating conditions; molecular weight and vapor pressure characteristics of tars; chemical structure and calorific values of tars; influence of interphase mass transport phenomena; gas phase secondary reactions of primary'' tars; parent coal nitrogen evolution during devolatilization; and model hypothesis testing. A range of coal ranks, from a Texas lignite to a Pennsylvania anthracite, are employed in the investigation. In addition, a high temperature polymer, a polyimide, is utilized as an additional reference case. The polyimide serves as a truly polymeric reference material for examining the nitrogen evolution behavior of coal. The samples are subjected to elemental composition determination, infrared absorbance characteristics, calorific value, high temperature ash analysis, and maceral composition. Consideration is being given to NMR analysis as well as tetrahydrofuran (THF) solubility. Results are discussed. 4 refs., 27 figs., 4 tabs.

Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Clean Cities: Related Financial Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Financial Opportunities Financial Opportunities Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Clean Cities: Related Financial Opportunities to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Related Financial Opportunities on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Related Financial Opportunities on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Related Financial Opportunities on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Related Financial Opportunities on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Related Financial Opportunities on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Related Financial Opportunities on AddThis.com... Current Opportunities Related Opportunities Funded Projects Related Financial Opportunities Transportation-related financial opportunities from organizations and federal agencies outside Clean Cities are listed below. Some of the

183

Tracking the random surfer: empirically measured teleportation parameters in PageRank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PageRank computes the importance of each node in a directed graph under a random surfer model governed by a teleportation parameter. Commonly denoted alpha, this parameter models the probability of following an edge inside the graph or, when the graph ... Keywords: PageRank, Wikipedia, click trail analysis, empirical click probability, teleportation parameter, toolbar data

David F. Gleich; Paul G. Constantine; Abraham D. Flaxman; Asela Gunawardana

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The 2006 e-readiness rankings A white paper from the Economist Intelligence Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.03 2.93 68 65 Azerbaijan 2.92 2.72 * New to the annual rankings in 2006. Source: Economist Intelligence the poorest performer in the regional--and global-- rankings, Azerbaijan (68th), and the difference between 3.62 13 13 Kazakhstan 64 3.22 14 14 Azerbaijan 68 2.92 Source: Economist Intelligence Unit, 2006

185

Review: The RASC and CASC programs for ranking, scaling and correlation of biostratigraphic events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RASC is an acronym for RAnking and SCcaling of biostratigraphic events. Code of the RASC computer program was originally published in Computers & Geosciences. During the past 30 years this program has been continuously maintained and updated. Its purpose ... Keywords: Biostratigraphic events, CASC, Quantitative stratigraphy, RASC, Ranking and scaling, Stratigraphic section correlation

F. P. Agterberg, F. M. Gradstein, Q. Cheng, G. Liu

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Adding smarter systems instead of human annotators: re-ranking for system combination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a Knowledge Base Population (KBP) slot filling task as a case study, we describe a re-ranking framework in the context of two experimental settings: (1) high transparency; a few pipelines share similar resources that can be used to provide ... Keywords: information extraction, knowledge base population, supervised re-ranking, text analysis

Suzanne Tamang; Heng Ji

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Evaluating Rank Histograms Using Decompositions of the Chi-Square Test Statistic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rank histograms are often plotted to evaluate the forecasts produced by an ensemble forecasting system—an ideal rank histogram is “flat” or uniform. It has been noted previously that the obvious test of “flatness,” the well-known ?2 goodness-of-...

Ian T. Jolliffe; Cristina Primo

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Alternatives to the Chi-Square Test for Evaluating Rank Histograms from Ensemble Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rank histograms are a commonly used tool for evaluating an ensemble forecasting system’s performance. Because the sample size is finite, the rank histogram is subject to statistical fluctuations, so a goodness-of-fit (GOF) test is employed to ...

Kimberly L. Elmore

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A bayesian learning approach to promoting diversity in ranking for biomedical information retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a Bayesian learning approach to promoting diversity for information retrieval in biomedicine and a re-ranking model to improve retrieval performance in the biomedical domain. First, the re-ranking model computes the maximum ... Keywords: beyesian learning, biomedical IR, promoting diversity

Xiangji Huang; Qinmin Hu

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Rank Sites by Building Type and Location for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rank Sites by Building Type and Location for Greenhouse Gas Rank Sites by Building Type and Location for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Rank Sites by Building Type and Location for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation October 7, 2013 - 10:57am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 2 After establishing building locations for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation analysis, the next step is to rank sites using the additional factors of eGRID region and climate region. In the Table 1 example below, because Site C and Site D represent the same proportion of Program B's office space (22% each), evaluating eGRID region and climate region will help to prioritize which sites may have a greater potential for GHG reductions. Table 1. Example: Program B Office Location Evaluation Site Name Percent of total Program SF by building type (%) eGRID Climate Region eGRID-Climate Weight1 Location Rank

191

CO{sub 2} SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. There were three main objectives for this reporting period, which related to obtaining accurate parameters for reservoir model description and modeling reservoir performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. The first objective was to collect and desorb gas from 10 sidewall core coal samples from an Anadarko Petroleum Corporation well (APCL2 well) at approximately 6,200-ft depth in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group in east-central Texas. The second objective was to measure sorptive capacities of these Wilcox coal samples for CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}. The final objective was to contract a service company to perform pressure transient testing in Wilcox coal beds in a shut-in well, to determine permeability of deep Wilcox coal. Bulk density of the APCL2 well sidewall core samples averaged 1.332 g/cc. The 10 sidewall core samples were placed in 4 sidewall core canisters and desorbed. Total gas content of the coal (including lost gas and projected residual gas) averaged 395 scf/ton on an as-received basis. The average lost gas estimations were approximately 45% of the bulk sample total gas. Projected residual gas was 5% of in-situ gas content. Six gas samples desorbed from the sidewall cores were analyzed to determine gas composition. Average gas composition was approximately 94.3% methane, 3.0% ethane, and 0.7% propane, with traces of heavier hydrocarbon gases. Carbon dioxide averaged 1.7%. Coal from the 4 canisters was mixed to form one composite sample that was used for pure CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2} isotherm analyses. The composite sample was 4.53% moisture, 37.48% volatile matter, 9.86% ash, and 48.12% fixed carbon. Mean vitrinite reflectance was 0.54%. Coal rank was high-volatile C to B bituminous. Comparison of the desorbed gas content (395 scf/ton, as received) at reservoir pressure (2,697 psi) with the sorption isotherm indicates that Lower Calvert Bluff coal at this well site is oversaturated, but lost gas may have been overestimated. This high gas content suggests that little or no depressurization would be required to initiate methane production. Sorption isotherms results indicate that the sorptive capacity of CO{sub 2} is about 2.5 times that of CH{sub 4} at 1,000 psia. This ratio is similar to that of higher rank bituminous coals from other basins (e.g., Carroll, and Pashin, 2003), and it is very low in comparison to results of other low-rank coals and to the values that we used in our preliminary reservoir modeling. If this value from the APCL2 well is representative, Wilcox coals in this area will sequester less CO{sub 2} on a per ton basis than we had earlier inferred. However, because measured methane contents are higher, enhanced coalbed methane production potential is greater than we earlier inferred. Pressure transient testing for determining coal fracture permeability will be conducted soon by Pinnacle Technologies. The data from these analyses will be used to finalize our coal model for the reservoir simulation phase of the project.

Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main tasks for this reporting period were to correlate well logs and refine coal property maps, evaluate methane content and gas composition of Wilcox Group coals, and initiate discussions concerning collection of additional, essential data with Anadarko. To assess the volume of CO{sub 2} that may be sequestered and volume of methane that can be produced in the vicinity of the proposed Sam Seymour sequestration site, we used approximately 200 additional wells logs from Anadarko Petroleum Corp. to correlate and map coal properties of the 3 coal-bearing intervals of Wilcox group. Among the maps we are making are maps of the number of coal beds, number of coal beds greater than 5 ft thick, and cumulative coal thickness for each coal interval. This stratigraphic analysis validates the presence of abundant coal for CO{sub 2} sequestration in the Wilcox Group in the vicinity of Sam Seymour power plant. A typical wellbore in this region may penetrate 20 to 40 coal beds with cumulative coal thickness between 80 and 110 ft. Gas desorption analyses of approximately 75 coal samples from the 3 Wilcox coal intervals indicate that average methane content of Wilcox coals in this area ranges between 216 and 276 scf/t, basinward of the freshwater boundary indicated on a regional hydrologic map. Vitrinite reflectance data indicate that Wilcox coals are thermally immature for gas generation in this area. Minor amounts of biogenic gas may be present, basinward of the freshwater line, but we infer that most of the Wilcox coalbed gas in the deep coal beds is migrated thermogenic gas. Analysis based on limited data suggest that sites for CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed gas recovery should be located basinward of the Wilcox freshwater contour, where methane content is high and the freshwater aquifer can be avoided.

Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers, Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Methodology for ranking geothermal reservoirs in non-electric industrial applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A large number of geothermal reservoirs exist and to perform a thorough study of each of these reservoirs to determine those most desirable for demonstration projects can be costly and time consuming. A methodology for assigning rankings to these reservoirs, given a limited amount of data, is presented. The top ranked reservoirs would then be studied more thoroughly. In addition, a methodology for ranking the large number of industries that could possibly utilize geothermal energy in nonelectric applications is given to determine those industries which will have the most impact on national energy demand if converted to geothermal use.

Farah, O.G.; Williams, F.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Risk Prioritization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality Managers Quality Managers Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee Reference Document SQAS21.01.00 - 1999 Software Risk Management A Practical Guide February, 2000 Abstract This document is a practical guide for integrating software risk management into a software project. The purpose of Risk Management is to identify, assess and control project risks. Identified risks are analyzed to determine their potential impact and likelihood of occurrence. Risk Management Plans are developed to document the project's approach to risk management, risks, and decisions made about what should be done with each risk. Risks and risk actions are then tracked to closure. Software Risk Management: A Practical Guide SQAS21.01.00 Acknowledgments This document was prepared for the Department of Energy (DOE) by a Working Group of the DOE

195

Cross evaluation using weight restrictions in unitary input DEA models: theoretical aspects and application to olympic games ranking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is no official method to establish a final ranking for the Olympic Games. The usual ranking is based on the Lexicographic Multicriteria Method, the main drawback of which is to overvalue gold medals. Furthermore, it does not take into account the ... Keywords: cross evaluation, data envelopment analysis, ranking, unitary input, weights restrictions

Joăo Carlos Correia Baptista Soares De Mello; Eliane Gonçalves Gomes; Lidia Angulo Meza; Luiz Biondi Neto

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Disambiguated query suggestions and personalized content-similarity and novelty ranking of clustered results to optimize web searches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we face the so called ''ranked list problem'' of Web searches, that occurs when users submit short requests to search engines. Generally, as a consequence of terms' ambiguity and polysemy, users engage long cycles of query reformulation ... Keywords: Novelty ranking, Personalized Web results ranking, Query disambiguation, Results clustering, Web meta-searching

Gloria Bordogna; Alessandro Campi; Giuseppe Psaila; Stefania Ronchi

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

the university of chicago rankings of derivatives for ... - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not be obtained by taking some derivative (possibly the trivial derivative) of the ..... we require such a large stock of order relations in various contexts (in addition  ...

198

On Using “Climatology” as a Reference Strategy in the Brier and Ranked Probability Skill Scores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Brier and ranked probability skill scores are widely used as skill metrics of probabilistic forecasts of weather and climate. As skill scores, they compare the extent to which a forecast strategy outperforms a (usually simpler) reference ...

Simon J. Mason

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

NETL's New Supercomputer Ranks Among the World's Top 100 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NETL's New Supercomputer Ranks Among the World's Top 100 NETL's New Supercomputer Ranks Among the World's Top 100 NETL's New Supercomputer Ranks Among the World's Top 100 January 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - One of the world's fastest, most energy-efficient supercomputers - expected to help energy researchers discover new materials, optimize designs and better predict operational characteristics - is up and running at the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) in Morgantown, W.Va. NETL's new supercomputer, installed at the Simulation-Based Engineering User Center, is a powerful and energy-efficient modeling tool. The High-Performance Computer for Energy and the Environment (HPCEE) is not only on the TOP500 list as one of the top 100 supercomputers in the world--currently ranked at 55--but it is also one of the most energy

200

U.S. States - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Rankings Rankings Additional State Rankings Consumption Total Energy per Capita Prices Natural Gas Electricity Environment Carbon Dioxide Emissions Expenditures Total Energy per Capita Production Total Energy Crude Oil Natural Gas Coal Electricity More State Ranking Tables › Notes & Sources Consumption Total Energy per Capita: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Consumption Per Capita Expenditures Total Energy per Capita: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Expenditures Per Capita Production Total Energy: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Energy Production Crude Oil: EIA, Petroleum Supply Annual, Crude Oil Production Natural Gas: EIA, Natural Gas Annual, Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Coal: EIA, Annual Coal Report, Coal Production and Number of Mines by State

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative risk ranking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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201

Learning to rank answers to non-factoid questions from web collections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work investigates the use of linguistically motivated features to improve search, in particular for ranking answers to non-factoid questions. We show that it is possible to exploit existing large collections of question-answer pairs (from online ...

Mihai Surdeanu; Massimiliano Ciaramita; Hugo Zaragoza

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Decomposition of the Continuous Ranked Probability Score for Ensemble Prediction Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some time ago, the continuous ranked probability score (CRPS) was proposed as a new verification tool for (probabilistic) forecast systems. Its focus is on the entire permissible range of a certain (weather) parameter. The CRPS can be seen as a ...

Hans Hersbach

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Summaries, ranked retrieval and sessions: a unified framework for information access evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce a general information access evaluation framework that can potentially handle summaries, ranked document lists and even multi query sessions seamlessly. Our framework first builds a trailtext which represents a concatenation of all ... Keywords: evaluation, metrics, sessions, test collections

Tetsuya Sakai; Zhicheng Dou

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Views from the River Front: Rio Grande Decision Makers Rank Water Conservation Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication details the results of a survey of elected city officials and water managers in the Rio Grande River Basin of Texas and New Mexico. The participants ranked water conservation strategies for their communities.

Silvy, Valeen; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

205

Consequence assessment for the high-level waste tanks probabilistic risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

At the US DOE Hanford Site, there are 177 underground tanks in 18 separate tank farms containing accumulated liquid radioactive wastes from 50 yr of weapons materials production activities. The total volume is about 60 million gallons containing approximately 120 Curies of radioactivity. The radioactive material consists primarily of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, and transuranics. Risk concerns with the tanks are associated with possible energy releases because of the presence of flammable gases, organic liquids, reactive chemical compounds, and radioactive decay heat. Because of the high concentration of radioactivity in the wastes and because a large number of the older single-shell tanks have some history or evidence of leaking, there is a public perception that they pose a serious risk to the onsite workers and the offsite public. The tank farm probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) was performed for two reasons: (1) to develop a baseline estimate of the risks these wastes pose to the workers and the public for the present tank contents and configurations and (2) to provide a relative ranking of the risks associated with individual groups of tanks. The latter information would be helpful in planning the order of the tank remediation work by indicating which tanks pose the greatest risk; the former could help allay concerns.

MacFarlane, D.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kindinger, J.; Deremer, R.K. [PLG, Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. there were two main objectives for this reporting period. first, they wanted to collect wilcox coal samples from depths similar to those of probable sequestration sites, with the objective of determining accurate parameters for reservoir model description and for reservoir simulation. The second objective was to pursue opportunities for determining permeability of deep Wilcox coal to use as additional, necessary data for modeling reservoir performance during CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. In mid-summer, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation agreed to allow the authors to collect Wilcox Group coal samples from a well that was to be drilled to the Austin Chalk, which is several thousand feet below the Wilcox. In addition, they agreed to allow them to perform permeability tests in coal beds in an existing shut-in well. Both wells are in the region of the Sam K. Seymour power station, a site that they earlier identified as a major point source of CO{sub 2}. They negotiated contracts for sidewall core collection and core analyses, and they began discussions with a service company to perform permeability testing. To collect sidewall core samples of the Wilcox coals, they made structure and isopach maps and cross sections to select coal beds and to determine their depths for coring. On September 29, 10 sidewall core samples were obtained from 3 coal beds of the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group. The samples were desorbed in 4 sidewall core canisters. Desorbed gas samples were sent to a laboratory for gas compositional analyses, and the coal samples were sent to another laboratory to measure CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2} sorption isotherms. All analyses should be finished by the end of December. A preliminary report shows methane content values for the desorbed coal samples ranged between 330 and 388 scf/t., on ''as received'' basis. Residual gas content of the coals was not included in the analyses, which results in an approximate 5-10% underestimation of in-situ gas content. Coal maps indicate that total coal thickness is 40-70 ft in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group in the vicinity of the Sam K. Seymour power plant. A conservative estimate indicates that methane in place for a well on 160-acre spacing is approximately 3.5 Bcf in Lower Calvert Bluff coal beds. When they receive sorption isotherm data from the laboratory, they will determine the amount of CO{sub 2} that it may be possible to sequester in Wilcox coals. In December, when the final laboratory and field test data are available, they will complete the reservoir model and begin to simulate CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced CH{sub 4} production.

Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Low-rank coal study. Volume 4. Regulatory, environmental, and market analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The regulatory, environmental, and market constraints to development of US low-rank coal resources are analyzed. Government-imposed environmental and regulatory requirements are among the most important factors that determine the markets for low-rank coal and the technology used in the extraction, delivery, and utilization systems. Both state and federal controls are examined, in light of available data on impacts and effluents associated with major low-rank coal development efforts. The market analysis examines both the penetration of existing markets by low-rank coal and the evolution of potential markets in the future. The electric utility industry consumes about 99 percent of the total low-rank coal production. This use in utility boilers rose dramatically in the 1970's and is expected to continue to grow rapidly. In the late 1980's and 1990's, industrial direct use of low-rank coal and the production of synthetic fuels are expected to start growing as major new markets.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Low-rank coal research, Task 5.1. Topical report, April 1986--December 1992  

SciTech Connect

This document is a topical progress report for Low-Rank Coal Research performed April 1986 - December 1992. Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research is described for Flue Gas Cleanup, Waste Management, Regional Energy Policy Program for the Northern Great Plains, and Hot-Gas Cleanup. Advanced Research and Technology Development was conducted on Turbine Combustion Phenomena, Combustion Inorganic Transformation (two sections), Liquefaction Reactivity of Low-Rank Coals, Gasification Ash and Slag Characterization, and Coal Science. Combustion Research is described for Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Combustion, Beneficiation of Low-Rank Coals, Combustion Characterization of Low-Rank Fuels (completed 10/31/90), Diesel Utilization of Low-Rank Coals (completed 12/31/90), Produce and Characterize HWD (hot-water drying) Fuels for Heat Engine Applications (completed 10/31/90), Nitrous Oxide Emission, and Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustion. Liquefaction Research in Low-Rank Coal Direct Liquefaction is discussed. Gasification Research was conducted in Production of Hydrogen and By-Products from Coals and in Sulfur Forms in Coal.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Qualitative methods for assessing risk  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) non-nuclear facilities generally require only a qualitative accident analysis to assess facility risks in accordance with DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System. Achieving a meaningful qualitative assessment of risk necessarily requires the use of suitable non-numerical assessment criteria. Typically, the methods and criteria for assigning facility-specific accident scenarios to the qualitative severity and likelihood classification system in the DOE order requires significant judgment in many applications. Systematic methods for more consistently assigning the total accident scenario frequency and associated consequences are required to substantiate and enhance future risk ranking between various activities at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). SNL`s Risk Management and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Department has developed an improved methodology for performing qualitative risk assessments in accordance wi the DOE order requirements. Products of this effort are an improved set of qualitative description that permit (1) definition of the severity for both technical and programmatic consequences that may result from a variety of accident scenarios, and (2) qualitative representation of the likelihood of occurrence. These sets of descriptions are intended to facilitate proper application of DOE criteria for assessing facility risks.

Mahn, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hannaman, G.W. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States); Kryska, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

United States - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Privacy/Security Copyright & Reuse Accessibility. Related Sites U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov FedStats. Stay Connected Facebook Twitter YouTube Email Updates

211

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Here we report the outcome of the application of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) process to the issue of nuclear-grade graphite for the moderator and structural components of a next generation nuclear plant (NGNP), considering both routine (normal operation) and postulated accident conditions for the NGNP. The NGNP is assumed to be a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), either a gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GTMHR) version [a prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR)] or a pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) version [a pebble bed reactor (PBR)] design, with either a direct- or indirect-cycle gas turbine (Brayton cycle) system for electric power production, and an indirect-cycle component for hydrogen production. NGNP design options with a high-pressure steam generator (Rankine cycle) in the primary loop are not considered in this PIRT. This graphite PIRT was conducted in parallel with four other NRC PIRT activities, taking advantage of the relationships and overlaps in subject matter. The graphite PIRT panel identified numerous phenomena, five of which were ranked high importance-low knowledge. A further nine were ranked with high importance and medium knowledge rank. Two phenomena were ranked with medium importance and low knowledge, and a further 14 were ranked medium importance and medium knowledge rank. The last 12 phenomena were ranked with low importance and high knowledge rank (or similar combinations suggesting they have low priority). The ranking/scoring rationale for the reported graphite phenomena is discussed. Much has been learned about the behavior of graphite in reactor environments in the 60-plus years since the first graphite rectors went into service. The extensive list of references in the Bibliography is plainly testament to this fact. Our current knowledge base is well developed. Although data are lacking for the specific grades being considered for Generation IV (Gen IV) concepts, such as the NGNP, it is fully expected that the behavior of these graphites will conform to the recognized trends for near isotropic nuclear graphite. Thus, much of the data needed is confirmatory in nature. Theories that can explain graphite behavior have been postulated and, in many cases, shown to represent experimental data well. However, these theories need to be tested against data for the new graphites and extended to higher neutron doses and temperatures pertinent to the new Gen IV reactor concepts. It is anticipated that current and planned future graphite irradiation experiments will provide the data needed to validate many of the currently accepted models, as well as providing the needed data for design confirmation.

Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Bratton, Rob [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Marsden, Barry [University of Manchester, UK; Srinivasan, Makuteswara [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Penfield, Scott [Technology Insights; Mitchell, Mark [PBMR (Pty) Ltd.; Windes, Will [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Risk decision analysis in emergency response: A method based on cumulative prospect theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergency response of a disaster is generally a risk decision-making problem with multiple states. In emergency response analysis, it is necessary to consider decision-maker's (DM's) psychological behavior such as reference dependence, loss aversion ... Keywords: Cumulative prospect theory (CPT), Emergency response, Ranking, Risk decision-making

Yang Liu, Zhi-Ping Fan, Yao Zhang

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Health risks in perspective: Judging health risks of energy technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Almost daily, Americans receive reports from the mass news media about some new and frightening risk to health and welfare. Most such reports emphasize the newsworthiness of the risks -- the possibility of a crisis, disagreements among experts, how things happened, who is responsible for fixing them, how much will it cost, conflict among parties involved, etc. As a rule, the magnitudes of the risks, or the difficulty of estimating those magnitudes, have limited newsworthiness, and so they are not mentioned. Because of this emphasis in the news media, most people outside the risk assessment community must judge the relative significance of the various risks to which we all are exposed with only that information deemed newsworthy by reporters. This information is biased and shows risks in isolation. There is no basis for understanding and comparing the relative importance of risks among themselves, or for comparing one risk, perhaps a new or newly-discovered one, in the field of all risks. The purpose of this report is to provide perspective on the various risks to which we are routinely exposed. It serves as a basis for understanding the meaning of quantitative risk estimates and for comparing new or newly-discovered risks with other, better-understood risks. Specific emphasis is placed on health risks of energy technologies.

Rowe, M.D.

1992-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

214

Low rank approach to computing first and higher order derivatives using automatic differentiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manuscript outlines a new approach for increasing the efficiency of applying automatic differentiation (AD) to large scale computational models. By using the principles of the Efficient Subspace Method (ESM), low rank approximations of the derivatives for first and higher orders can be calculated using minimized computational resources. The output obtained from nuclear reactor calculations typically has a much smaller numerical rank compared to the number of inputs and outputs. This rank deficiency can be exploited to reduce the number of derivatives that need to be calculated using AD. The effective rank can be determined according to ESM by computing derivatives with AD at random inputs. Reduced or pseudo variables are then defined and new derivatives are calculated with respect to the pseudo variables. Two different AD packages are used: OpenAD and Rapsodia. OpenAD is used to determine the effective rank and the subspace that contains the derivatives. Rapsodia is then used to calculate derivatives with respect to the pseudo variables for the desired order. The overall approach is applied to two simple problems and to MATWS, a safety code for sodium cooled reactors. (authors)

Reed, J. A.; Abdel-Khalik, H. S. [North Carolina State Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Raleigh, NC 27695-7909 (United States); Utke, J. [Mathematics and Computer Science Div., Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Google scholar's ranking algorithm: The impact of citation counts (an empirical study).” to be published  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Google Scholar is one of the major academic search engines but its ranking algorithm for academic articles is unknown. In recent studies we partly reverse-engineered the algorithm. This paper presents the results of our third study. While the first study provided a broad overview and the second study focused on researching the impact of citation counts, the current study focused on analyzing the correlation of an article’s age and its ranking in Google Scholar. In other words, it was analyzed if older/recent published articles are more/less likely to appear in a top position in Google Scholar’s result lists. For our study, age and rankings of 1,099,749 articles retrieved via 2,100 search queries were analyzed. The analysis revealed that an article’s age seems to play no significant role in Google Scholar’s ranking algorithm. It is also discussed why this might lead to a suboptimal ranking. 1.

Jöran Beel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Investigation of the rank dependence of tar evolution  

SciTech Connect

Despite its high nitrogen concentration levels relative to the parent coal samples, 7.2% vs. 1.4 - 2.0%, little volatile nitrogen evolution is observed until decomposition temperatures of 600[degree]C or greater are obtained. Due to the lack of decomposition via tar evolution and as contrasted to parent coals, no significant bound nitrogen is evolved with heavy hydrocarbons at particle temperatures less than 600[degree]C. Similar to virgin'' chars and tars formed during rapid devolatilization, the polyimide samples begin to evolve significant fractions of bound nitrogen as IR-active light gases at particle temperatures between 650 and 750[degree]C. Unlike coal samples, however, relatively large fractions of the light gases are observed to be ammonia. The IR-active, nitrogen-containing light gas evolution rapidly declines at polyimide char temperatures greater than 750[degree]C, again in contrast to observed behavior in virgin coal char samples. It is not certain if the nitrogen evolution kinetics changes from selectively forming ammonia and hydrogen cyanide to benzonitriles or free nitrogen at these temperatures. The light gas evolution pattern with decomposition temperature of polymide could contribute to our understanding of the low conversion efficiencies observed for bound nitrogen to NO[sub x] conversion in the char combustion phase of pfc combustion.

Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Sequoia retains top ranking on Graph 500 for third year running  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12113_sequoia 12113_sequoia 11/21/2013 High Resolution Image Lawrence Livermore's Sequoia supercomputer again retained its No. 1 ranking on the Graph 500 list. Sequoia retains top ranking on Graph 500 for third year running Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov High Resolution Image From left: LLNL's Adam Bertsch, Dona Crawford and Scott Futral with the certificate for No. 1 on the Graph 500 in the SC13 DOE booth. LLNL's 20 petaflops Sequoia supercomputer again retained its No. 1 ranking on the Graph 500 list, a measure of a system's ability to conduct analytic calculations -- finding the proverbial needle in the haystack. An IBM Blue Gene Q system, Sequoia was able to traverse 15,363 giga edges per second on a scale of 40 graph (a graph with 2^40 vertices). The new

218

High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids Production High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids Production Southern Research Institute (SRI) Project Number: FE0012054 Project Description The focus of the project will be to develop, test, and optimize steam-reforming catalysts for converting tars, C2+ hydrocarbons, NH3, and CH4 in high-temperature and sulfur environments, increasing the ratio of hydrogen in syngas, as part of a modified, advanced gasification platform for the conversion of low-rank coals to syngas for coal-to-liquid and integrated gasification combined cycle applications. Project Details Program Background and Project Benefits Project Scope and Technology Readiness Level Accomplishments Contacts, Duration, and Cost Project Images Abstract Performer website: Southern Research Institute

219

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This is the third Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, the second set of mercury measurements was made after the catalysts had been exposed to flue gas for about 2,000 hours. There was good agreement between the Ontario Hydro measurements and the SCEM measurements. Carbon trap measurements of total mercury agreed fairly well with the SCEM. There did appear to be some loss of mercury in the sampling system toward the end of the sampling campaign. NO{sub x} reductions across the catalysts ranged from 60% to 88%. Loss of total mercury across the commercial catalysts was not observed, as it had been in the March/April test series. It is not clear whether this was due to aging of the catalyst or to changes in the sampling system made between March/April and August. In the presence of ammonia, the blank monolith showed no oxidation. Two of the commercial catalysts showed mercury oxidation that was comparable to that in the March/April series. The other three commercial catalysts showed a decrease in mercury oxidation relative to the March/April series. Oxidation of mercury increased without ammonia present. Transient experiments showed that when ammonia was turned on, mercury appeared to desorb from the catalyst, suggesting displacement of adsorbed mercury by the ammonia.

Constance Senior; Temi Linjewile

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Recommended Distribution Coefficients, Kd Values, for Special Analysis Risk Calculations Related to Waste Disposal and Tank Closure on the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide a technically defensible list of distribution coefficients, or Kd values, for use in performance assessment (PA) and special analysis (SA) calculations on the SRS. Only Kd values for radionuclides that have new information related to them or that have recently been recognized as being important are discussed in this report. Some 150 Kd values are provided in this report for various waste-disposal or tank-closure environments: soil, corrosion in grout, oxidizing grout waste, gravel, clay, and reducing concrete environments. Documentation and justification for the selection of each Kd value is provided.

Kaplan, D

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative risk ranking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Process to improve boiler operation by supplemental firing with thermally beneficiated low rank coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention described is a process for improving the performance of a commercial coal or lignite fired boiler system by supplementing its normal coal supply with a controlled quantity of thermally beneficiated low rank coal, (TBLRC). This supplemental TBLRC can be delivered either to the solid fuel mill (pulverizer) or directly to the coal burner feed pipe. Specific benefits are supplied based on knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process. The thermally beneficiated low rank coal can be delivered along with regular coal or intermittently with regular coal as the needs require.

Sheldon, Ray W. (Huntley, MT)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Transportation costs for new fuel forms produced from low rank US coals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transportation costs are examined for four types of new fuel forms (solid, syncrude, methanol, and slurry) produced from low rank coals found in the lower 48 states of the USA. Nine low rank coal deposits are considered as possible feedstocks for mine mouth processing plants. Transportation modes analyzed include ship/barge, pipelines, rail, and truck. The largest potential market for the new fuel forms is coal-fired utility boilers without emission controls. Lowest cost routes from each of the nine source regions to supply this market are determined. 12 figs.

Newcombe, R.J.; McKelvey, D.G. (TMS, Inc., Germantown, MD (USA)); Ruether, J.A. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Concepts in Slurry-Fed Low-Rank Coal Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a Technology Innovation screening study of concepts for improving the performance of slurry-fed gasification combined cycle power plants on low rank coals by using two innovative coal preparation technologies: coal slurries with liquid CO2 as the fluid, and hot water drying. Slurry-fed gasification technologies have a cost advantage over dry-fed systems, but they suffer a large performance penalty when used on low rank coals because of the large fraction of water and ...

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on AddThis.com... Our History Related Federal Programs Why Energy Efficiency Upgrades Contacts Related Federal Programs Related Links

225

D & D screening risk evaluation guidance  

SciTech Connect

The Screening Risk Evaluation (SRE) guidance document is a set of guidelines provided for the uniform implementation of SREs performed on decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) facilities. Although this method has been developed for D&D facilities, it can be used for transition (EM-60) facilities as well. The SRE guidance produces screening risk scores reflecting levels of risk through the use of risk ranking indices. Five types of possible risk are calculated from the SRE: current releases, worker exposures, future releases, physical hazards, and criticality. The Current Release Index (CRI) calculates the current risk to human health and the environment, exterior to the building, from ongoing or probable releases within a one-year time period. The Worker Exposure Index (WEI) calculates the current risk to workers, occupants and visitors inside contaminated D&D facilities due to contaminant exposure. The Future Release Index (FRI) calculates the hypothetical risk of future releases of contaminants, after one year, to human health and the environment. The Physical Hazards Index (PHI) calculates the risks to human health due to factors other than that of contaminants. Criticality is approached as a modifying factor to the entire SRE, due to the fact that criticality issues are strictly regulated under DOE. Screening risk results will be tabulated in matrix form, and Total Risk will be calculated (weighted equation) to produce a score on which to base early action recommendations. Other recommendations from the screening risk scores will be made based either on individual index scores or from reweighted Total Risk calculations. All recommendations based on the SRE will be made based on a combination of screening risk scores, decision drivers, and other considerations, as determined on a project-by-project basis.

Robers, S.K.; Golden, K.M.; Wollert, D.A.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Carbon Sequestration Risks and Risk Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Risks and Risk Management Title Carbon Sequestration Risks and Risk Management Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2008 Authors Price, Phillip N.,...

227

Using Normalized Climatological Anomalies to Rank Synoptic-Scale Events Objectively  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for ranking synoptic-scale events objectively is presented. NCEP 12-h reanalysis fields from 1948 to 2000 are compared to a 30-yr (1961–90) reanalysis climatology. The rarity of an event is the number of standard deviations 1000–200-hPa ...

Robert E. Hart; Richard H. Grumm

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Combining the priority rankings of DEA and AHP methodologies: a case study on an ICT industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents a case study on how data envelopment analysis DEA and analytic hierarchy process AHP could be combined to produce priority rankings for a set of companies. The shortcomings of each method, when exclusively used to deal with multiple ...

Emmanouil Stiakakis; Angelo Sifaleras

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Identifying, Indexing, and Ranking Chemical Formulae and Chemical Names in Digital Documents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

End-users utilize chemical search engines to search for chemical formulae and chemical names. Chemical search engines identify and index chemical formulae and chemical names appearing in text documents to support efficient search and retrieval in the ... Keywords: Chemical name, chemical formula, conditional random fields, entity extraction, hierarchical text segmentation, independent frequent subsequence, index pruning, query models, ranking, similarity search, support vector machines

Bingjun Sun; Prasenjit Mitra; C. Lee Giles; Karl T. Mueller

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Carrot Production Texas ranks 5th in U.S. production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carrot Production · Texas ranks 5th in U.S. production. · 9,400 acres are grown in Texas; annual or alternativesfordichloropropeneandoxamylfornematodecontrol. Carrots in Texas Crop Brief on Production, Pests, & Pesticides TheAgricultureProgram The Texas A by The Agriculture Program of the Texas A&M University System on critical pest problems and pesticide needs for Texas

Wilkins, Neal

231

Citrus Production Texas ranks 3rd in U.S. production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Citrus Production · Texas ranks 3rd in U.S. production. · Cash receipts for farmers exceed $29 million annually. · Total impact in the Texas economy exceeds $93 million. · Over 32,000 acres are grown for citrus production in Texas. · Key problems include mites, scales, leaf cutting ants and fire ants. Citrus

Wilkins, Neal

232

Peanut Production Texas ranks 2nd in U.S. peanut production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peanut Production · Texas ranks 2nd in U.S. peanut production. · Peanuts generate $560 million for farmers. The state impact exceeds $1.8 billion. · Over 70% of the state's production is in the west Texas/ foliarfeeders. · Organophosphates are important in Texas and are applied on 10% of the acres. These include

Wilkins, Neal

233

Evaluation of a Dow-Based Gasification-Combined-Cycle Plant Using Low-Rank Coals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This feasibility study developed performance and cost data for two different Dow-based gasification-combined-cycle (GCC) power plants, designed to fire either Texas lignite or Wyoming subbituminous coals at a Gulf Coast location. It demonstrated the cost-effectiveness and efficiency of these plants for generating power from low-rank coals.

1989-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

234

Semiparametrically efficient inference based on signed ranks in symmetric independent component models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider semiparametric location-scatter models for which the $p$-variate observation is obtained as $X=\\Lambda Z+\\mu$, where $\\mu$ is a $p$-vector, $\\Lambda$ is a full-rank $p\\times p$ matrix and the (unobserved) random $p$-vector $Z$ has marginals that are centered and mutually independent but are otherwise unspecified. As in blind source separation and independent component analysis (ICA), the parameter of interest throughout the paper is $\\Lambda$. On the basis of $n$ i.i.d. copies of $X$, we develop, under a symmetry assumption on $Z$, signed-rank one-sample testing and estimation procedures for $\\Lambda$. We exploit the uniform local and asymptotic normality (ULAN) of the model to define signed-rank procedures that are semiparametrically efficient under correctly specified densities. Yet, as is usual in rank-based inference, the proposed procedures remain valid (correct asymptotic size under the null, for hypothesis testing, and root-$n$ consistency, for point estimation) under a very broad range of ...

Ilmonen, Pauliina; 10.1214/11-AOS906

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Where to stop reading a ranked list?: threshold optimization using truncated score distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ranked retrieval has a particular disadvantage in comparison with traditional Boolean retrieval: there is no clear cut-off point where to stop consulting results. This is a serious problem in some setups. We investigate and further develop methods to ... Keywords: distributed retrieval, effectiveness measure optimization, expectation maximization, filtering, fusion, meta-search, probability of relevance, score distribution, score normalization, threshold optimization, truncated distribution

Avi Arampatzis; Jaap Kamps; Stephen Robertson

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Project Ranking Method for Nuclear Power Plants: Prioritizing Proposed Capital and O&M Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, it becomes ever more important to invest limited budgets only in projects that increase or protect a plant's value and profitability over its remaining operating term. This report describes a robust method that plants can customize to evaluate, rank, and select their operating and maintenance (O&M) and capital projects.

2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

237

Combining relevancy and methodological quality into a single ranking for evidence-based medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence-based medicine has recently received a large amount of attention in medical research. To help clinical practices use evidence-based medicine, it should be easy to find the best current evidence that is relevant to the clinical question and has ... Keywords: Classification, Document quality, Evidence-based medicine, Ranking

Sungbin Choi; Borim Ryu; Sooyoung Yoo; Jinwook Choi

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Low-rank coal research: Volume 2, Advanced research and technology development: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume II contains articles on advanced combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation; coal/char reactivity; liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, and fine particulate emissions. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

Mann, M.D.; Swanson, M.L.; Benson, S.A.; Radonovich, L.; Steadman, E.N.; Sweeny, P.G.; McCollor, D.P.; Kleesattel, D.; Grow, D.; Falcone, S.K.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Contingency ranking based on combination of severity indices in dynamic security analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel severity index to analyze power system dynamic stability. Application of severity indices in dynamic stability assessment is very complex and this paper proposes severity indices for dynamic contingency ranking. These indices ... Keywords: combination of indices, dynamic security, severity indices, transient stability

S. Jadid; S. Jalilzadeh

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this program were to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel and to develop a greater understanding of mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts in the form of a simple model. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH provided co-funding for this program. REI used a multicatalyst slipstream reactor to determine oxidation of mercury across five commercial SCR catalysts at a power plant that burned a blend of 87% subbituminous coal and 13% bituminous coal. The chlorine content of the blend was 100 to 240 {micro}g/g on a dry basis. Mercury measurements were carried out when the catalysts were relatively new, corresponding to about 300 hours of operation and again after 2,200 hours of operation. NO{sub x}, O{sub 2} and gaseous mercury speciation at the inlet and at the outlet of each catalyst chamber were measured. In general, the catalysts all appeared capable of achieving about 90% NO{sub x} reduction at a space velocity of 3,000 hr{sup -1} when new, which is typical of full-scale installations; after 2,200 hours exposure to flue gas, some of the catalysts appeared to lose NO{sub x} activity. For the fresh commercial catalysts, oxidation of mercury was in the range of 25% to 65% at typical full-scale space velocities. A blank monolith showed no oxidation of mercury under any conditions. All catalysts showed higher mercury oxidation without ammonia, consistent with full-scale measurements. After exposure to flue gas for 2,200 hours, some of the catalysts showed reduced levels of mercury oxidation relative to the initial levels of oxidation. A model of Hg oxidation across SCRs was formulated based on full-scale data. The model took into account the effects of temperature, space velocity, catalyst type and HCl concentration in the flue gas.

Constance Senior

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative risk ranking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Catalyzed steam gasification of low-rank coals to produce hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced coal gasification technologies using low-rank coal is a promising alternative for meeting future demand for hydrogen. Steam gasification tests conducted at temperatures between 700/sup 0/ and 800/sup 0/C and atmospheric pressure resulted in product gas compositions matching those predicted by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, 63-65 mol% hydrogen and less than 1 mol% methane. Steam gasification tests with four low-rank coals and a single bituminous coal were performed in a laboratory-scale thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at temperatures of 700/sup 0/, 750/sup 0/, and 800/sup 0/C to evaluate process kinetics with and without catalyst addition. Catalysts screened included K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, trona, nahcolite, sunflower hull ash, and recycled lignite ash. Uncatalyzed lignites and a subbituminous coal were found to be eight to ten times more reactive with steam at 700/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C than an Illinois bituminous coal. This relationship, within this narrow temperature range, is important as this is the range that thermodynamically favors the production of hydrogen from steam gasification at atmospheric pressure. The reactivity of the uncatalyzed coals increased 3 to 4 times with an increase in steam gasification temperature from 700/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C. For the catalyzed coals during steam gasification: Reactivity increased approximately 2 times over the 700/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C temperature range for low-rank coals catalyzed with potassium carbonate. Sodium carbonate was found to be as effective a catalyst as potassium carbonate for the steam gasification of low-rank coal chars on a mass loading basis; and naturally occurring mineral sources of sodium carbonates/bicarbonates, trona and nahcolite, are as effective in catalyzing low-rank coal steam gasification as the pure carbonates. 18 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Sears, R.E.; Timpe, R.C.; Galegher, S.J.; Willson, W.G.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 4: High-Temperature Materials PIRTs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) technique was used to identify safety-relevant/safety-significant phenomena and assess the importance and related knowledge base of high-temperature structural materials issues for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR). The major aspects of materials degradation phenomena that may give rise to regulatory safety concern for the NGNP were evaluated for major structural components and the materials comprising them, including metallic and nonmetallic materials for control rods, other reactor internals, and primary circuit components; metallic alloys for very high-temperature service for heat exchangers and turbomachinery, metallic alloys for high-temperature service for the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), other pressure vessels and components in the primary and secondary circuits; and metallic alloys for secondary heat transfer circuits and the balance of plant. These materials phenomena were primarily evaluated with regard to their potential for contributing to fission product release at the site boundary under a variety of event scenarios covering normal operation, anticipated transients, and accidents. Of all the high-temperature metallic components, the one most likely to be heavily challenged in the NGNP will be the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). Its thin, internal sections must be able to withstand the stresses associated with thermal loading and pressure drops between the primary and secondary loops under the environments and temperatures of interest. Several important materials-related phenomena related to the IHX were identified, including crack initiation and propagation; the lack of experience of primary boundary design methodology limitations for new IHX structures; and manufacturing phenomena for new designs. Specific issues were also identified for RPVs that will likely be too large for shop fabrication and transportation. Validated procedures for on-site welding, post-weld heat treatment (PWHT), and inspections will be required for the materials of construction. High-importance phenomena related to the RPV include crack initiation and subcritical crack growth; field fabrication process control; property control in heavy sections; and the maintenance of high emissivity of the RPV materials over their service lifetime to enable passive heat rejection from the reactor core. All identified phenomena related to the materials of construction for the IHX, RPV, and other components were evaluated and ranked for their potential impact on reactor safety.

Corwin, William R [ORNL; Ballinger, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Majumdar, S. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Weaver, K. D. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Risk identification and assessment for build-operate-transfer projects: A fuzzy multi attribute decision making model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, BOT approach has provided an increasingly popular project financing to move toward infrastructure development in Asian countries such as Iran. There are many complexities in projects because of the variety of factors in project's trend ... Keywords: BOT projects, FMADM, Risk identification, Risk ranking

Sadoullah Ebrahimnejad; Seyed Meysam Mousavi; Hamed Seyrafianpour

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A transduction-based approach to fuzzy clustering, relevance ranking and cluster label generation on web search results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper details a modular, self-contained web search results clustering system that enhances search results by (i) performing clustering on lists of web documents returned by queries to search engines, and (ii) ranking the results and labeling the ... Keywords: Fuzzy clustering, Label generation, Relevance transduction, Web search ranking

Takazumi Matsumoto; Edward Hung

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

On the performance of a new symmetric rank-one method with restart for solving unconstrained optimization problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quasi-Newton (QN) methods are generally held to be the most efficient minimization methods for solving unconstrained optimization problems. Among the QN methods, symmetric rank-one (SR1) is one of the very competitive formulas. In the present paper, ... Keywords: Hessian approximation, Symmetric rank-one update, Unconstrained optimization

Farzin Modarres Khiyabani; Wah June Leong

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Related Links  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electricity Electricity Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Related Links to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Related Links on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Related Links on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Related Links on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Related Links on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Related Links on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Related Links on AddThis.com... More in this section... Electricity Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations

247

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Related Links  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Biodiesel Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Related Links to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Related Links on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Related Links on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Related Links on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Related Links on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Related Links on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Related Links on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Blends Production & Distribution Specifications Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives

248

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives

249

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Ethanol Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Blends Specifications Production & Distribution Feedstocks Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives

250

Screening and ranking framework (SRF) for geologic CO2 storage site selection on the basis of HSE risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EA, editors. Atlas of oil and gas fields, Structural TrapsPetroleum Geology, Atlas of Oil and Gas Fields, AAPG, Tulsaof Conservation, Division of Oil and Gas 53(2)-Part2: 25-33.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To facilitate the implementation of the Risk Management Plan, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project has developed and employed an analytical software tool called the NGNP Risk Management System (RMS). A relational database developed in Microsoft® Access, the RMS provides conventional database utility including data maintenance, archiving, configuration control, and query ability. Additionally, the tool’s design provides a number of unique capabilities specifically designed to facilitate the development and execution of activities outlined in the Risk Management Plan. Specifically, the RMS provides the capability to establish the risk baseline, document and analyze the risk reduction plan, track the current risk reduction status, organize risks by reference configuration system, subsystem, and component (SSC) and Area, and increase the level of NGNP decision making.

John Collins

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Almost All Webs With Odd Clique Number ? 5 Are Not Rank-Perfect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graphs with circular symmetry, called webs, are relevant w.r.t. describing the stable set polytopes of two larger graph classes, quasi-line graphs [7,11] and claw-free graphs [6,7]. Providing a decent linear description of the stable set polytopes of claw-free graphs is a long-standing problem [8]. However, even the problem of finding all facets of stable set polytopes of webs is open. So far, it is only known that stable set polytopes of webs with clique number 3 have rank facets only [4,15] while there are examples with clique number 4 having non-rank facets [9--11,13].

Arnaud Pecher; Arnaud P Echer; Annegret K. Wagler; Annegret K. Wagler

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Major World Ecosystem Complexes Ranked by Carbon in Live Vegetation: A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Major World Ecosystem Complexes Ranked by Carbon in Live Vegetation: A Major World Ecosystem Complexes Ranked by Carbon in Live Vegetation: A Database (NDP-017) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.ndp017 data Data Contributed Jerry S. Olson1, Julia A. Watts1, and Linda J. Allison1 1Work completed while a member of the Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Prepared by R.M. Cushman, D.P. Kaiser, S.B. Jones and L.M. Olsen. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290 Managed by University of Tennessee-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 Date Published: September, 1985 (Revised for the web: 2001) Please note that updated versions of this database are available. An updated database using the GLC2000 land cover product (ndp107b) is now

254

The Honorable Barbara Boxer The Honorable David Vitter Chairman Ranking Member  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2013 9, 2013 The Honorable Barbara Boxer The Honorable David Vitter Chairman Ranking Member Environment and Public Works Committee Environment and Public Works Committee U.S. Senate U.S. Senate Washington, D.C. 20510 Washington, D.C. 20510 RE: S. 601, Water Resources Development Act Dear Chairman Boxer and Ranking Member Vitter: We applaud the Senate for taking up consideration of S. 601, the Water Resources Development Act of 2013. However, we are writing on behalf of our members who receive the benefits of hydropower generated at U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) projects to express our concerns with the language on dam optimization in Section 2014. As currently drafted, we believe that Section 2014 could have a

255

$PU(N)$ monopoles, higher rank instantons, and the monopole invariants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A famous conjecture in gauge theory mathematics, attributed to Witten, suggests that the polynomial invariants of Donaldson are expressible in terms of the Seiberg-Witten invariants if the underlying four-manifold is of simple type. Mathematicians have sought a proof of the conjecture by means of a `cobordism program' involving $PU(2)$ monopoles. A higher rank version of the Donaldson invariants was recently introduced by Kronheimer. Before being defined, the physicists Mari\\~no and Moore had already suggested that there should be a generalisation of Witten's conjecture to this type of invariants. We adopt a generalisation of the cobordism program to the higher rank situation by studying $PU(N)$ monopoles. We analyse the differences to the $PU(2)$ situation, yielding evidence that a generalisation of Witten's conjecture should hold.

Zentner, Raphael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 1: Main Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) process was conducted for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) design. This design (in the conceptual stage) is a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) that generates both electricity and process heat for hydrogen production. Expert panels identified safety-relevant phenomena, ranked their importance, and assessed the knowledge levels in the areas of accidents and thermal fluids, fission-product transport and dose, high-temperature materials, graphite, and process heat for hydrogen production. This main report summarizes and documents the process and scope of the reviews, noting the major activities and conclusions. The identified phenomena, analyses, rationales, and associated ratings of the phenomena, plus a summary of each panel's findings, are presented. Individual panel reports for these areas are provided as attached volumes to this main report and provide considerably more detail about each panel's deliberations as well as a more complete listing of the phenomena that were evaluated.

Ball, Sydney J [ORNL

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Refining structures against reflection rank: An alternative metric for electron crystallography.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1Refining structures against reflection rank: An alternative metric for electron crystallography. Alexander S. Eggeman and Paul A. Midgley * Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, CB2 3QZ... it contains a combination of heavy, medium and light atoms and has a sufficiently complex structure to give a wide range of diffraction intensities and a highly non-monotonic variation of intensity with increasing scattering angle. The material occupies...

Eggeman, Alexander; Migley, Paul

258

Process for clean-burning fuel from low-rank coal  

SciTech Connect

A process for upgrading and stabilizing low-rank coal involving the sequential processing of the coal through three fluidized beds; first a dryer, then a pyrolyzer, and finally a cooler. The fluidizing gas for the cooler is the exit gas from the pyrolyzer with the addition of water for cooling. Overhead gas from pyrolyzing is likely burned to furnish the energy for the process. The product coal exits with a tar-like pitch sealant to enhance its safety during storage.

Merriam, Norman W. (Laramie, WY); Sethi, Vijay (Laramie, WY); Brecher, Lee E. (Laramie, WY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Onion Production Texas ranks 6th in U.S. production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Onion Production · Texas ranks 6th in U.S. production. · Grown on 16,000 acres and generates $90LowerRioGrandeValleyandWinterGardenplantearlyshortdaymild-flavoredwhite and yellow granotype onions for market windows in March to June. · High Plains and Far West Texas produce intermediate day onions for fresh markets and East Texas produces for local sales. · Onion breeding focuses

Wilkins, Neal

260

Production of hydrogen from low-rank coals: (Task 6. 1)  

SciTech Connect

The principal goal of this research project is to establish the feasibility of low-rank coal gasification for low-cost hydrogen production. This research involves a proof-of-concept and the early stages of engineering development using a continuous process unit (CPU). In parallel with this process development work, an evaluation of the relationship between the fundamental properties of low-rank coals and their reactivity under hydrogen-producing conditions is also being conducted. A 20--40 lb/hr fluid-bed gasifier (FBG) CPU was commissioned during this time period and has logged over 400 hours of operation during shakedown and operability testing. Maximum hydrogen production rates from the operability testing were over 17 SCF/lb MAF coal for both Wyodak and Velva test coals with a limestone bed, and for Martin Lake coal using 10 wt % trona, at 800{degree}C and a 2:1 steam:carbon ratio to 2:1 and increased with bed temperature over the range of 700{degree} to 800{degree}C. Agglomeration of the bed material when using trona as the catalyst was an operation problem during the CPU operability testing. The char of the low-rank coals was four to six times more reactive than that of the bituminous coal tested in the laboratory using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Surface analysis of the chars showed that the uniform distribution of K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} catalyst decreased with increasing coal rank. 8 refs., 17 figs., 16 tabs.

Sears, R.E.; Timpe, R.C.; Musich, M.A.; Cisney, S.J.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative risk ranking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Kinetics of catalyzed steam gasification of low-rank coals to produce hydrogen. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal goal of coal char-steam gasification research is to establish the feasibility of low-rank coal gasification for hydrogen production. The program has focused on determining reaction conditions for maximum product gas hydrogen content and on evaluating process kinetics with and without catalyst addition. The high inherent reactivity of lignites and subbituminous coals, compared to coals of higher rank, make them the probable choice for use in steam gasification. An extensive matrix of char-steam gasification tests was performed in a laboratory-scale thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at temperatures of 700/sup 0/, 750/sup 0/, and 800/sup 0/C. Reaction conditions for these tests were based on the results of earlier work at UNDERC in which product gases from fixed-bed, atmospheric pressure, steam gasification at temperatures of 700/sup 0/ to 750/sup 0/C were found to contain 63 to 65 mole % hydrogen, with the remainder being carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and less than 1 mole % methane. Four low-rank coals and one bituminous coal were included in the TGA test matrix. Catalysts screened in the study included K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, trona, nahcolite, sunflower hull ash, and lignite ash. Results of this study showed uncatalyzed North Dakota and Texas lignites to be slightly more reactive than a Wyoming subbituminous coal, and 8 to 10 times more reactive than an Illinois bituminous coal. Several catalysts that substantially improved low-rank coal steam gasification rates included pure and mineral (trona and nahcolite) alkali carbonates. The reactivity observed when using trona and nahcolite to catalyze the steam gasification was the highest, at nearly 3.5 times that without catalysts. The use of these inexpensive, naturally-occurring, alkalis as gasification catalysts may result in elimination of the need for catalyst recovery in the hydrogen-from-coal process. 11 refs., 23 figs., 9 tabs.

Galegher, S.J.; Timpe, R.C.; Willson, W.G.; Farnum, S.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems Background Gasification of coal or other solid feedstocks (wood waste, petroleum coke, etc.) is a clean way to produce electricity and produce or co-produce a variety of commercial products. The major challenge is cost reduction; current integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology is estimated to produce power at a cost higher than that of pulverized coal combustion. However, the Gasification

263

NETL: Gasification Systems - Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank Coal IGCC Systems Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank Coal IGCC Systems Project Number: DE-FE0007966 TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) is demonstrating the technical and economic viability of a new Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant designed to efficiently process low-rank coals. The plant uses an integrated carbon dioxide (CO2) scrubber/water gas shift (WGS) catalyst to capture more than 90 percent of the CO2 emissions, while increasing the cost of electricity by less than 10 percent compared to a plant with no carbon capture. TDA is optimizing the sorbent/catalyst and process design, and assessing the efficacy of the integrated WGS catalyst/CO2 capture system, first in bench-scale experiments and then in a slipstream field demonstration using actual coal-derived synthesis gas. The results will feed into a techno-economic analysis to estimate the impact of the WGS catalyst/CO2 capture system on the thermal efficiency of the plant and the cost of electricity.

264

Catalyzed steam gasification of low-rank coals to produce hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advance coal gasification technologies using low-rank coal is a promising alternative for meeting future demand for hydrogen. Steam gasification tests conducted at temperatures between 700/sup 0/ and 800/sup 0/C and atmospheric pressure resulted in product gas compositions matching those predicted by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, 63-65 mol% hydrogen and less then 1 mol% methane. Steam gasification tests with four low-rank coals and a single bituminous coal were performed in a laboratory-scale thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at temperatures of 700/sup 0/, 750/sup 0/, and 800/sup 0/C to evaluate process kinetics with and without catalyst addition. Catalysts screened included K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, trona, nahcolite, sunflower hull ash, and recycled lignite ash. North Dakota and Texas lignite chars were slightly more reactive than a Wyoming subbituminous coal char and eight to ten times more reactive than an Illinois bituminous coal char. Pure and mineral (trona nd nahcolite) alkali carbonates and recycled ash from K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-catalyzed steam gasification tests substantially improved low-rank coal steam gasification rates. The reactivities obtained using trona and nahcolite to catalyze the steam gasification were the highest, at nearly 3.5 times those without catalysts.

Sears, R.E.; Timpe, R.C.; Galegher, S.J.; Willson, W.G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Fuzzy Approach to Critical Bus Ranking under Normal and Line Outage Contingencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identification of critical or weak buses for a given operating condition is an important task in the load dispatch centre. It has become more vital in view of the threat of voltage instability leading to voltage collapse. This paper presents a fuzzy approach for ranking critical buses in a power system under normal and network contingencies based on Line Flow index and voltage profiles at load buses. The Line Flow index determines the maximum load that is possible to be connected to a bus in order to maintain stability before the system reaches its bifurcation point. Line Flow index (LF index) along with voltage profiles at the load buses are represented in Fuzzy Set notation. Further they are evaluated using fuzzy rules to compute Criticality Index. Based on this index, critical buses are ranked. The bus with highest rank is the weakest bus as it can withstand a small amount of load before causing voltage collapse. The proposed method is tested on Five Bus Test System.

Shankar, Shobha

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Extraction of iron and calcium from low rank coal by supercritical carbon dioxide with entrainers  

SciTech Connect

Iron and calcium were extracted from low rank coal with supercritical carbon dioxide and methanol, ethanol, acetic acid, acetyl acetone, ethanol and acetic acid, or acetyl acetone and water entrainers at 313.2 K and 15.0 MPa. The low rank coal used in this study was Berau coal from Indonesia. The addition of methanol, ethanol, or acetic acid entrainers in supercritical carbon dioxide showed very limited effect on enhancement of the recovery rates of Fe. The recovery rates of Fe from dried coal by supercritical carbon dioxide with acetyl acetone were low however, the addition of acetyl acetone with water in supercritical carbon dioxide remarkably enhanced the recovery rates of Fe. Water seems to play an important role in extracting Fe from coal with supercritical carbon dioxide and acetyl acetone. On the other hand, the extraction rates of Ca with supercritical carbon dioxide and water, methanol, ethanol, and acetyl acetone entrainers were very low. The addition of acetic acid with or without water in supercritical carbon dioxide slightly enhanced the recovery rates of Ca. The addition of acetic acid with ethanol in supercritical carbon dioxide remarkably enhanced the recovery rates of Ca. The effect of carbon dioxide flow rate and coal particle size on the recovery rates of Fe were examined. The recovery rate of Fe increased with increasing carbon dioxide flow rate and with decreasing particle size of the low rank coal.

Iwai, Y.; Okamoto, N.; Ohta, S.; Arai, Y.; Sakanishi, K. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Risk characterization data manual for Category D inactive liquid low-level waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual reports the results of a risk characterization of Category D inactive liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) underground storage tanks (Uses) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The risk characterization is required by the Federal Facility Agreement between the Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office, the Environmental Protection Agency-Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. The intent of the risk characterization is to determine relative priorities for assessment and remediation. A total of 55 FFA Category D inactive LLLW tanks are discussed in this manual. Of the 39 tanks at ORNL that have been accepted into the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program, all have been sampled for preliminary characterization, except for 5 tanks that were found to be empty plus I that was found not to exist. The remaining 16 tanks are in the Waste Management (WM) Program. Twelve were sampled for preliminary characterization, and four were found empty. Each sampled tank was scored on a scale of I to 5 on the basis of three criteria: (1) leak characteristics, (2) location, and (3) toxicological characteristics of residual sludges and liquids. Each criterion was assigned a weighing factor based on perceived importance. The criterion score multiplied by the weighting factor equaled the tank`s total score for that criterion. The three weighted criterion scores for each tank were then summed for a total score for that tank. When the scores for all tanks had been weighted and summed, the tanks were ranked in descending order on the basis of their total scores. The highest possible score for a tank is 30. The descending rank order represents the recommended priorities for evaluation: the higher the score, the higher the priority for evaluation. Of the 54 tanks sampled in the risk characterization, 23 tanks scored 16 or higher, 11 scored between 10 and 15, 5 scored between 4 and 9, and 15 scored 3 or less.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Risk characterization data manual for Category D inactive liquid low-level waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual reports the results of a risk characterization of Category D inactive liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) underground storage tanks (USTs) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The risk characterization is required by the Federal Facility Agreement between the Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office, the Environmental Protection Agency-Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. The intent of the risk characterization is to determine relative priorities for assessment and remediation. A total of 55 FFA Category D inactive LLLW tanks are discussed in this manual. Of the 39 tanks at ORNL that have been accepted into the Environmental Restoration (ER) Pregrain, all have been sampled for preliminary characterization, except for 5 tanks that were found to be empty plus 1 that was found not to exist. The remaining 16 tanks are in the Waste Management (WM) Program. Twelve were sampled for preliminary characterization, and four were found empty. Each sampled tank was scored on a scale of I to 5 on the basis of three criteria: (1) leak characteristics, (2) location, and (3) toxicological characteristics of residual sludges and liquids. Each criterion was assigned a weighing factor based on perceived importance. The criterion score multiplied by the weighting factor equaled the tank`s total score for that criterion. The three weighted criterion scores for each tank were then summed for a total score for that tank. When the scores for all tanks had been weighted and summed, the tanks were ranked in descending order on the basis of their total scores. The highest possible score for a tank is 30. The descending rank order represents the recommended priorities for evaluation: the higher the score, the higher the priority for evaluation. Of the 54 tanks sampled in the risk characterization, 23 tanks scored 16 or higher, 11 scored between 10 and 15, 5 scored between 4 and 9, and 15 scored 3 or less.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Including costs of supply chain risk in strategic sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost evaluations do not always include the costs associated with risks when organizations make strategic sourcing decisions. This research was conducted to establish and quantify the impact of risks and risk-related costs ...

Jain, Avani

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Volume I.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective was to consolidate and evaluate all geologic, environmental, and legal and institutional information in existing records and files, and to apply a uniform methodology to the evaluation and ranking of sites to allow the making of creditable forecasts of the supply of geothermal energy which could be available in the region over a 20 year planning horizon. A total of 1265 potential geothermal resource sites were identified from existing literature. Site selection was based upon the presence of thermal and mineral springs or wells and/or areas of recent volcanic activity and high heat flow. 250 sites were selected for detailed analysis. A methodology to rank the sites by energy potential, degree of developability, and cost of energy was developed. Resource developability was ranked by a method based on a weighted variable evaluation of resource favorability. Sites were ranked using an integration of values determined through the cost and developability analysis. 75 figs., 63 tabs.

Bloomquist, R. Gordon

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Development and Application of a Habitat Suitability Ranking Model for the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus)  

SciTech Connect

The New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus) is currently listed as a state threatened species in New Mexico and has been identified as potentially occurring within the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) boundary. We describe the development of a model to identify and rank habitat at LANL that may be suitable for occupation by this species. The model calculates a habitat suitability ranking (HSR) based on total plant cover, plant species composition, total number of plant species, and plant height. Input data for the model is based on the measurement of these variables at known locations where this species has been found within the Jemez Mountains. Model development included the selection of habitat variables, developing a probability distribution for each variable, and applying weights to each variable based on their overall importance in defining the suitability of the habitat. The habitat variables (HV) include plant cover (HV1), grass/forb cover (HV2), plant height (HV3), number of forbs (HV4), number of grasses (HV5), and sedge/rush cover (HV6). Once the HVs were selected, probability values were calculated for each. Each variable was then assigned a ''weighting factor'' to reflect the variables' importance relative to one another with respect to contribution to quality of habitat. The least important variable, sedge/rush cover, was assigned a weight factor of ''1'' with increasing values assigned to each remaining variable as follows: number of forbs = 3, number of grasses = 3, plant height = 5, grass/forb cover = 6, and total plant cover = 7. Based on the probability values and weighting factors, a HSR is calculated as follows: HSR = (P{sub HV1}(7) + P{sub HV2}(6) + P{sub HV3}(5) + P{sub HV4}(3) + P{sub HV5}(3) + P{sub HV6}(1)). Once calculated, the HSR values are placed into one of four habitat categorical groupings by which management strategies are applied.

James Biggs; Mary Mullen; Kathryn Bennett

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Concepts in Slurry Fed Low Rank Coal Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports on experimental and theoretical analyses of low rank coal/liquid CO2 slurries (LRC/CO2(l)). The results showed that viscosities of LRC/CO2(l) were much lower than for LRC/water slurries of similar coal concentrations and higher coal concentrations could be obtained for liquid CO2 slurries than for water-based slurries at flow conditions typical of industrial scale gasification systems. ASPENplus analyses of a typical integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system showed no del...

2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

273

Process for clean-burning fuel from low-rank coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for upgrading and stabilizing low-rank coal involving the sequential processing of the coal through three fluidized beds; first a dryer, then a pyrolyzer, and finally a cooler. The fluidizing gas for the cooler is the exit gas from the pyrolyzer with the addition of water for cooling. Overhead gas from pyrolyzing is likely burned to furnish the energy for the process. The product coal exits with a tar-like pitch sealant to enhance its safety during storage. 1 fig.

Merriam, N.W.; Sethi, V.; Brecher, L.E.

1994-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

274

Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for the Utilization of Low Rank Coals  

SciTech Connect

Air Products has developed a potentially ground-breaking technology – Sour Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) – to replace the solvent-based acid gas removal (AGR) systems currently employed to separate sulfur containing species, along with CO{sub 2} and other impurities, from gasifier syngas streams. The Sour PSA technology is based on adsorption processes that utilize pressure swing or temperature swing regeneration methods. Sour PSA technology has already been shown with higher rank coals to provide a significant reduction in the cost of CO{sub 2} capture for power generation, which should translate to a reduction in cost of electricity (COE), compared to baseline CO{sub 2} capture plant design. The objective of this project is to test the performance and capability of the adsorbents in handling tar and other impurities using a gaseous mixture generated from the gasification of lower rank, lignite coal. The results of this testing are used to generate a high-level pilot process design, and to prepare a techno-economic assessment evaluating the applicability of the technology to plants utilizing these coals.

Kloosterman, Jeff

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Prioritizing Project Risks Using AHP  

SciTech Connect

This essay introduces the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) as a method by which to rank project risks, in terms of importance as well as likelihood. AHP is way to handle quantifiable and/or intangible criteria in the decision making process. It is a multi-objective multi-criteria decision-making approach that is based on the idea of pair-wise comparisons of alternatives with respect to a given criterion (e.g., which alternative, A or B, is preferred and by how much more is it preferred) or with respect to an objective (e.g., which is more important, A or B, and by how much more is it important). This approach was pioneered by Thomas Saaty in the late 1970's. It has been suggested that a successful project is one that successfully manages risk and that project management is the management of uncertainty. Risk management relies on the quantification of uncertainty which, in turn, is predicated upon the accuracy of probabilistic approaches (in terms of likelihood as well as magnitude). In many cases, the appropriate probability distribution (or probability value) is unknown. And, researchers have shown that probability values are not made very accurately, that the use of verbal expressions is not a suitable alternative, that there is great variability in the use and interpretation of these values and that there is a great reluctance to assign them in the first place. Data from an ongoing project is used to show that AHP can be used to obtain these values, thus overcoming some of the problems associated with the direct assignment of discrete probability values. A novel method by which to calculate the consistency of the data is introduced. The AHP approach is easily implemented and, typically, offers results that are consistent with the decision maker's intuition.

Thibadeau, Barbara M [ORNL

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

DOE SBIR Phase II Final Report: Distributed Relevance Ranking in Heterogeneous Document Collections  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the comprehensive summary of the work performed on the SBIR Phase II project (“Distributed Relevance Ranking in Heterogeneous Document Collections”) at Deep Web Technologies (http://www.deepwebtech.com). We have successfully completed all of the tasks defined in our SBIR Proposal work plan (See Table 1 - Phase II Tasks Status). The project was completed on schedule and we have successfully deployed an initial production release of the software architecture at DOE-OSTI for the Science.gov Alliance's search portal (http://www.science.gov). We have implemented a set of grid services that supports the extraction, filtering, aggregation, and presentation of search results from numerous heterogeneous document collections. Illustration 3 depicts the services required to perform QuickRank™ filtering of content as defined in our architecture documentation. Functionality that has been implemented is indicated by the services highlighted in green. We have successfully tested our implementation in a multi-node grid deployment both within the Deep Web Technologies offices, and in a heterogeneous geographically distributed grid environment. We have performed a series of load tests in which we successfully simulated 100 concurrent users submitting search requests to the system. This testing was performed on deployments of one, two, and three node grids with services distributed in a number of different configurations. The preliminary results from these tests indicate that our architecture will scale well across multi-node grid deployments, but more work will be needed, beyond the scope of this project, to perform testing and experimentation to determine scalability and resiliency requirements. We are pleased to report that a production quality version (1.4) of the science.gov Alliance's search portal based on our grid architecture was released in June of 2006. This demonstration portal is currently available at http://science.gov/search30 . The portal allows the user to select from a number of collections grouped by category and enter a query expression (See Illustration 1 - Science.gov 3.0 Search Page). After the user clicks “search” a results page is displayed that provides a list of results from the selected collections ordered by relevance based on the query expression the user provided. Our grid based solution to deep web search and document ranking has already gained attention within DOE, other Government Agencies and a fortune 50 company. We are committed to the continued development of grid based solutions to large scale data access, filtering, and presentation problems within the domain of Information Retrieval and the more general categories of content management, data mining and data analysis.

Abe Lederman

2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

277

Leak potential index model for use in priority ranking of underground storage tanks at formerly used defense sites. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Abandoned underground storage tanks (USTs) that have not been properly closed at formerlC used defense sites (FUDS) may present potential leaking problems, spilling their hazardous contents into nearby soils, groundwater, and well water. The leaking USTs are potential sources of contaminants generally classified as containerized hazardous, toxic, and radioactive waste (CON/HTRW). CON/IITRW includes petroleum, oil, and lubricants (POL), benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene (BTEX), and radioactive waste products. The risk to the environment and population associated with the leaking USTs depends not only on the source, but on the migration pathway factor (MPF) (i.e., the ability of the medium of transport such as soil or water-to effectively transport the contaminants to the receptor) and finally on the relative vulnerability of the potential receptor. Thus, the assessment of the relative risk begins with the calculation of the potential of the UST to leak. A method of predicting the risk of leakage of these USTs is therefore desirable. presently, however, leak prediction index (LPI) models (which are used to predict the age at which a UST will leak or the probability of a UST leak at any given age) require soil data that are not readily available, or not easily and economically obtained by LPI.model users. The Warren Rogers leak prediction model was developed circa 1981, and has been used for USTs and incorporated into leak prediction models for other types of underground steel structures.

Stephenson, L.D.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Related Links  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Propane Propane Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Related Links to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Related Links on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Related Links on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Related Links on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Related Links on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Related Links on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Related Links on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Production & Distribution Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Propane Related Links This list includes links related to propane. The Alternative Fuels Data

279

Risk Management Tool Attributes:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Tools & SMEs - Tools & SMEs Outline for Breakout Session TOOLS 1. Types of Tools a. Risk Management - Database & Reports, risk register, risk forms, risk tracking & monitoring, basis of estimate, action item tracking, historical record of risks & changes, configuration control, enterprise-wide, metrics, risk performance index, risk checklist, graphical display, management reporting (various levels), risk communications b. Risk Analysis i. Cost, ii. budgets, funding, cash-flow analysis, iii. Schedule iv. tailoring categories v. Integrated Cost & Schedule vi. Project phase analysis; organization ownership & joint planning c. Risk Knowledge and Lessons Learned Database i. Enterprise-wide ii. Job/owner-specific iii. Workshops - project specific, risk management,

280

Second highest-ranking U.S. military officer gets classified briefings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. military officer gets classified briefings U.S. military officer gets classified briefings Second highest-ranking U.S. military officer gets classified briefings Winnefield was at Los Alamos to receive a wide variety of classified briefings that covered the broad spectrum of national security science at the Lab. November 17, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative risk ranking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Liquefaction of calcium-containing subbituminous coals and coals of lower rank  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for the treatment of a calcium-containing subbituminous coal and coals of lower rank to form insoluble, thermally stable calcium salts which remain within the solids portions of the residue on liquefaction of the coal, thereby suppressing the formation of scale, made up largely of calcium carbonate which normally forms within the coal liquefaction reactor (i.e., coal liquefaction zone), e.g., on reactor surfaces, lines, auxiliary equipment and the like. An oxide of sulfur, in liquid phase, is contacted with a coal feed sufficient to impregnate the pores of the coal. The impregnated coal, in particulate form, can thereafter be liquefied in a coal liquefaction reactor (reaction zone) at coal liquefaction conditions without significant formation of scale.

Brunson, Roy J. (Baytown, TX)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This is the fifth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, the available data from laboratory, pilot and full-scale SCR units was reviewed, leading to hypotheses about the mechanism for mercury oxidation by SCR catalysts.

Constance Senior

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

Communication cost of classically simulating a quantum channel with subsequent rank-1 projective measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A process of preparation, transmission and subsequent projective measurement of a qubit can be simulated by a classical model with only two bits of communication and some amount of shared randomness. However no model for n qubits with a finite amount of classical communication is known at present. A lower bound for the communication cost can provide useful hints for a generalization. It is known for example that the amount of communication must be greater than c 2^n, where c~0.01. The proof uses a quite elaborate theorem of communication complexity. Using a mathematical conjecture known as the "double cap conjecture", we strengthen this result by presenting a geometrical and extremely simple derivation of the lower bound 2^n-1. Only rank-1 projective measurements are involved in the derivation.

Alberto Montina

2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

284

Communication cost of classically simulating a quantum channel with subsequent rank-1 projective measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A process of preparation, transmission and subsequent projective measurement of a qubit can be simulated by a classical model with only two bits of communication and some amount of shared randomness. However no model for n qubits with a finite amount of classical communication is known at present. A lower bound for the communication cost can provide useful hints for a generalization. It is known for example that the amount of communication must be greater than c 2^n, where c~0.01. The proof uses a quite elaborate theorem of communication complexity. Using a mathematical conjecture known as the "double cap conjecture", we strengthen this result by presenting a geometrical and extremely simple derivation of the lower bound 2^n-1. Only rank-1 projective measurements are involved in the derivation.

Montina, Alberto

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Anaerobic processing of low-rank coals. Quarterly progress report, July 1--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project is to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low-rank coals and to assess the properties of the modified coal towards coal liquefaction. The main objectives for this quarter were: (i) continuation of microbial consortia maintenance and completion of coal decarboxylation using batch reactor system, (ii) decarboxylation of model polymer, (iii) characterization of biotreated coals, and (iv) microautoclave liquefaction of the botreated coal. Progress is reported on the thermogravimetric analysis of coal biotreated in the absence of methanogens and under 5% hydrogen gas exhibits increased volatile carbon to fixed carbon ratio; that the microbial consortia developed on coal are being adapted to two different model polymers containing free carboxylic groups to examine decarboxylation ability of consortium; completion of experiments to decarboxylate two model polymers, polyacrylic acid and polymethyl methacrylate, have been completed; that the biotreated coal showed increase in THF-solubles.

Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

286

An integrated approach to the utilization of low rank coals and biofuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While suggesting an integrated approach for utilization of inferior low rank coals for power in India, the importance of low temperature carbonization followed by retrieval of all value-based products has been stressed. It is further suggested that tar, obtained in the process, could be hydrogenated and fractionated in a central plant for conversion to hydrocarbons. High ash char, the principal product of pyrolysis, has been experimentally found to be amenable to beneficiation, yielding suitable fractions for power generation, briquetting, or blending. Experimental studies have shown that forest litters and agricultural wastes, containing significant proportions of spore, cuticle, and exine--considered as precursors of hydrocarbon-generating coal macerals--also yield large quantities of tar, ammonical liquor, and the principal product, char, which can be respectively utilized for the production of petroleum substitutes, value-based chemicals, and source material for blending, briquette making, and char-water slurries, opening up new avenues for fuel utilization and conservation.

Sen, S.; Sen, M. [Central Fuel Research Inst., Nagpur (India); Moitra, N. [Nagpur Univ. (India)

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Low-Rank Separated Representation Surrogates of High-Dimensional Stochastic Functions: Application in Bayesian Inference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study introduces a non-intrusive approach in the context of low-rank separated representation to construct a surrogate of high-dimensional stochastic functions, e.g., PDEs/ODEs, in order to decrease the computational cost of Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations in Bayesian inference. The surrogate model is constructed via a regularized alternative least-square regression with Tikhonov regularization using a roughening matrix computing the gradient of the solution, in conjunction with a perturbation-based error indicator to detect optimal model complexities. The model approximates a vector of a continuous solution at discrete values of a physical variable. The required number of random realizations to achieve a successful approximation linearly depends on the function dimensionality. The computational cost of the model construction is quadratic in the number of random inputs, which potentially tackles the curse of dimensionality in high-dimensional stochastic functions. Furthermore, this vector valued sep...

Validi, AbdoulAhad

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Major World Ecosystem Complexes Ranked by Carbon in Live Vegetation: A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

17 17 Major World Ecosystem Complexes Ranked by Carbon in Live Vegetation: A Database (Revised November 2000) J. S. Olson, J. A. Watts, and L. J. Allison DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.ndp017 In 1980, this data base and the corresponding map were completed after more than 20 years of field investigations, consultations, and analyses of published literature. They characterize the use and vegetative cover of the Earth's land surface with a 0.5° × 0.5° grid. This world-ecosystem-complex data set and the accompanying map provide a current reference base for interpreting the role of vegetation in the global cycling of CO2 and other gases and a basis for improved estimates of vegetation and soil carbon, of natural exchanges of CO2, and of net historic shifts of carbon between the biosphere and the atmosphere. The

289

Low-rank coal research. Final technical report, April 1, 1988--June 30, 1989, including quarterly report, April--June 1989  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

Not Available

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

Solid-State Lighting: Related Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Financial Financial Opportunities Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: Related Opportunities to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Related Opportunities on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Related Opportunities on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Related Opportunities on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Related Opportunities on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Related Opportunities on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Related Opportunities on AddThis.com... Current Opportunities DOE Selections Related Opportunities Related Opportunities The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has created this resource to help researchers, manufacturers, and distributors of solid-state lighting products locate funding opportunities to help them advance and deploy

291

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Related Links  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Related Links to Related Links to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Related Links on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Related Links on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Related Links on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Related Links on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Related Links on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Related Links on AddThis.com... Related Links For a list of additional resources about alternative fuels and advanced vehicles, select one or more categories below. All organizations are provided as suggested resources. The Alternative Fuels Data Center does not endorse these companies or the products and services listed on their websites (see disclaimer).

292

Building robust Reputation Systems for travel-related services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a serious robust issue of building Reputation Systems for travel-related services, such as hotel, restaurant, etc. This paper proposes an advanced clustering approach, Suspicion Degree Meter (SDM), to rank suspects with respect to manipulative ... Keywords: Silicon,Indexes,Robustness,Analytical models,Feature extraction,Buildings,Context

Huiying Duan; Peng Yang

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Risk effectiveness evaluation of surveillance testing  

SciTech Connect

In nuclear power plants surveillance tests are required to detect failures in standby safety system components as a means of assuring their availability in case of an accident. However, the performance of surveillance tests at power may have adverse impact on safety as evidenced by the operating experience of the plants. The risk associated with a test includes two different aspects: (1) a positive aspect, i.e., risk contribution detected by the test, that results from the detection of failures which occur between tests and are detected by the test, and (2) a negative aspect, i.e., risk contribution caused by the test, that includes failures and degradations which are caused by the test or are related to the performance of the test. In terms of the two different risk contributions, the risk effectiveness of a test can be simply defined as follows: a test is risk effective if the risk contribution detected by the test is greater than the risk contribution caused by the test; otherwise it is risk ineffective. The methodology presentation will focus on two important kinds of negative test risk impacts, that is, the risk impacts of test-caused transients and equipment wear-out. The evaluation results of the risk effectiveness of the test will be presented in the full paper along with the risk assessment methodology and the insights from the sensitivity analysis. These constitute the core of the NUREG/CR-5775.

Martorell, S.; Kim, I.S. (Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear); Samanta, P.K. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Vesely, W.E. (Science Applications International Corp., Columbus, OH (United States))

1992-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

294

A robust super-efficiency data envelopment analysis model for ranking of provincial gas companies in Iran  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional super-efficiency data envelopment analysis (DEA) models require the exact information of inputs or outputs. However, in many real world applications this simple assumption does not hold. Stochastic super-efficiency is one of recent methods ... Keywords: Data envelopment analysis, Rank, Robust optimization, Uncertainty

S. J. Sadjadi; H. Omrani; S. Abdollahzadeh; M. Alinaghian; H. Mohammadi

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Multistage Gene Normalization and SVM-Based Ranking for Protein Interactor Extraction in Full-Text Articles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interactor normalization task (INT) is to identify genes that play the interactor role in protein-protein interactions (PPIs), to map these genes to unique IDs, and to rank them according to their normalized confidence. INT has two subtasks: gene ... Keywords: Data mining, feature evaluation and selection, mining methods and algorithms, text mining, scientific databases.

Hong-Jie Dai; Po-Ting Lai; Richard Tzong-Han Tsai

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

On the Effect of Correlations on Rank Histograms: Reliability of Temperature and Wind Speed Forecasts from Finescale Ensemble Reforecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rank histogram (RH) is a visual tool for assessing the reliability of ensemble forecasts (i.e., the degree to which the forecasts and the observations have the same distribution). But it is already known that in certain situations it conveys ...

Caren Marzban; Ranran Wang; Fanyou Kong; Stephen Leyton

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Health risks in perspective: Judging health risks of energy technologies. Revision 5/94  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide perspective on the various risks to which man is routinely exposed. It serves as a basis for understanding the meaning of quantitative risk estimates and for comparing new or newly-discovered risks with other, better-understood risks. Specific emphasis is placed on health risks of energy technologies. This report is not a risk assessment; nor does it contain instructions on how to do a risk assessment. Rather, it provides background information on how most of us think about risks and why it is difficult to do it rationally, it provides a philosophy and data with which to do a better job of judging risks more rationally, and it provides an overview of where risks of energy technologies fit within the spectrum of all risks. Much of the quantitative information provided here is on relative risk of dying of various causes. This is not because risk of dying is seen as the most important kind of risk, but because the statistics on mortality rates by cause are the highest quality data available on health risks in the general population.

Rowe, M.D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Photovoltaic Degradation Risk: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The ability to accurately predict power delivery over the course of time is of vital importance to the growth of the photovoltaic (PV) industry. Important cost drivers include the efficiency with which sunlight is converted into power, how this relationship changes over time, and the uncertainty in this prediction. An accurate quantification of power decline over time, also known as degradation rate, is essential to all stakeholders - utility companies, integrators, investors, and researchers alike. In this paper we use a statistical approach based on historical data to quantify degradation rates, discern trends and quantify risks related to measurement uncertainties, number of measurements and methodologies.

Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Liquefaction of calcium-containing subbituminous coals and coals of lower rank  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the treatment of a calcium-containing subbituminous coal and coals of lower rank to form insoluble, thermally stable calcium salts which remain within the solids portions of the residue on liquefaction of the coal, thereby suppressing the formation scale, made up largely of calcium carbonate deposits, e.g., vaterite, which normally forms within the coal liquefaction reactor (i.e., coal liquefaction zone), e.g., on reactor surfaces, lines, auxiliary equipment and the like. A solution of a compound or salt characterized by the formula MX, where M is a Group IA metal of the Periodic Table of the Elements, and X is an anion which is capable of forming water-insoluble, thermally stable calcium compounds, is maintained in contact with a particulate coal feed sufficient to impregnate said salt or compound into the pores of the coal. On separation of the impregnated particulate coal from the solution, the coal can be liquefied in a coal liquefaction reactor (reaction zone) at coal liquefaction conditions without significant formation of vaterite or other forms of calcium carbonate on reactor surfaces, auxiliary equipment and the like; and the Group IA metal which remains within the liquefaction bottoms catalyzes the reaction when the liquefaction bottoms are subjected to a gasification reaction.

Gorbaty, Martin L. (Sanwood, NJ); Taunton, John W. (Seabrook, TX)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, a review of the available data on mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts from small, laboratory-scale experiments, pilot-scale slipstream reactors and full-scale power plants was carried out. Data from small-scale reactors obtained with both simulated flue gas and actual coal combustion flue gas demonstrated the importance of temperature, ammonia, space velocity and chlorine on mercury oxidation across SCR catalyst. SCR catalysts are, under certain circumstances, capable of driving mercury speciation toward the gas-phase equilibrium values at SCR temperatures. Evidence suggests that mercury does not always reach equilibrium at the outlet. There may be other factors that become apparent as more data become available.

Constance Senior

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Anaerobic biprocessing of low rank coals. Final technical report, September 12, 1990--August 10, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Coal solubilization under aerobic conditions results in oxygenated coal product which, in turn, makes the coal poorer fuel than the starting material. A novel approach has been made in this project is to remove oxygen from coal by reductive decarboxylation. In Wyodak subbituminous coal the major oxygen functionality is carboxylic groups which exist predominantly as carboxylate anions strongly chelating metal cations like Ca{sup 2+} and forming strong macromolecular crosslinks which contribute in large measure to network polymer structure. Removal of the carboxylic groups at ambient temperature by anaerobic organisms would unravel the macromoleculer network, resulting in smaller coal macromolecules with increased H/C ratio which has better fuel value and better processing prospects. These studies described here sought to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low rank coals under ambient conditions and to assess the properties of these modified coals towards coal liquefaction. Efforts were made to establish anaerobic microbial consortia having decarboxylating ability, decarboxylate coal with the adapted microbial consortia, isolate the organisms, and characterize the biotreated coal products. Production of CO{sup 2} was used as the primary indicator for possible coal decarboxylation.

Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.

1993-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

302

Ranking of enabling technologies for oxy-fuel based carbon capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The USDOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has begun a process to identify and rank enabling technologies that have significant impacts on pulverized coal oxy-fuel systems. Oxy-fuel combustion has been identified as a potential method for effectively capturing carbon in coal fired power plants. Presently there are a number of approaches for carbon capture via oxy-fuel combustion and it is important to order those approaches so that new research can concentrate on those technologies with high potentials to substantially lower the cost of reduced carbon electricity generation. NETL evaluates these technologies using computer models to determine the energy use of each technology and the potential impact of improvements in the technologies on energy production by a power plant. Near-term sub-critical boiler technologies are targeted for this analysis because: • most of the world continues to build single reheat sub-critical plants; • the overwhelming number of coal fired power plants requiring retrofit for CO2 capture are sub-critical plants. In addition, even in the realm of new construction, subcritical plants are common because they are well understood, easy to operate and maintain, fuel tolerant, and reliable. Following the initial investigation into sub-critical oxy-fuel technology, future investigations will move into the supercritical range.

Ochs, T.L.; Oryshchyn, D.L.; Ciferno, J.P.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Single channel flow blockage accident phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) for the advanced Candu reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Candu Reactor (ACRTM) is an evolutionary advancement of the current Candu 6{sup R} reactor, aimed at producing electrical power for a capital cost and at a unit-energy cost significantly less than that of the current reactor designs. The ACR retains the modular concept of horizontal fuel channels surrounded by a heavy water moderator, as with all Candu reactors. However, ACR uses slightly enriched uranium (SEU) fuel, compared to the natural uranium used in Candu 6. This achieves the twin goals of improved economics (e.g., via reductions in the heavy water requirements and the use of a light water coolant), as well as improved safety. This paper documents the results of Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) results for a very limited frequency, beyond design basis event of the ACR design. This PIRT is developed in a highly structured process of expert elicitation that is well supported by experimental data and analytical results. The single-channel flow blockage event in an ACR reactor assumes a severe flow blockage of one of the reactor fuel channels, which leads to a reduction of the flow in the affected channel, leading to fuel cladding and fuel temperature increase. The paper outlines the design characteristics of the ACR reactor that impact the PIRT process and computer code applicability. It also describes the flow blockage phenomena, lists all components and systems that have an important role during the event, discusses the PIRT process and results, and presents the finalized PIRT tables. (authors)

Popov, N.K.; Abdul-Razzak, A.; Snell, V.G.; Langman, V. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada); Sills, H. [Consultant, Deep River, Ontario (Canada)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Assessment of solar options for small power systems applications. Volume IV. Comparative ranking of concepts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparative analysis of solar thermal conversion concepts that are potentially suitable for development as small electric power systems (1 to 10 MWe) is presented. Cogeneration and total energy systems were beyond the scope of this study. Seven generic type of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces); (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting surfaces; and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors (the Point Focus Central Receiver and the Point Focus Distributed Receiver) were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and the latter of the two also was analyzed with Stirling-cycle engines. With these engine options, 10 systems were formulated for analysis. This is the fourth volume of a five-volume report on the work performed to analyze the alternative concepts, and the results obtained. Included in this volume are descriptions of the methodology used with, and concept ranks obtained from, potential users and R and D fund allocators.

Currie, J.W.; Jannol, M.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Low-Rank Separated Representation Surrogates of High-Dimensional Stochastic Functions: Application in Bayesian Inference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study introduces a non-intrusive approach in the context of low-rank separated representation to construct a surrogate of high-dimensional stochastic functions, e.g., PDEs/ODEs, in order to decrease the computational cost of Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations in Bayesian inference. The surrogate model is constructed via a regularized alternative least-square regression with Tikhonov regularization using a roughening matrix computing the gradient of the solution, in conjunction with a perturbation-based error indicator to detect optimal model complexities. The model approximates a vector of a continuous solution at discrete values of a physical variable. The required number of random realizations to achieve a successful approximation linearly depends on the function dimensionality. The computational cost of the model construction is quadratic in the number of random inputs, which potentially tackles the curse of dimensionality in high-dimensional stochastic functions. Furthermore, this vector valued separated representation-based model, in comparison to the available scalar-valued case, leads to a significant reduction in the cost of approximation by an order of magnitude equal to the vector size. The performance of the method is studied through its application to three numerical examples including a 41-dimensional elliptic PDE and a 21-dimensional cavity flow.

AbdoulAhad Validi

2013-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

306

Predicting HIV transmission risk among HIV-infected patients seen in clinical settings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intervention to reduce HIV transmission risk behavior amongBest- Predicting Transmission Risk Evidence Interventions:use in relation to HIV transmission among gay men. Journal

Morin, Stephen F; Myers, Janet J; Shade, Starley B; Koester, Kimberly; Maiorana, Andre; Rose, Carol Dawson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Risk Management RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This tool is the process of continuous and iterative identification and control of project risks and opportunities. Risks can be technical, financial, or programmatic. The goal for the risk...

308

Risk and robust optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops and explores the connections between risk theory and robust optimization. Specifically, we show that there is a one-to-one correspondence between a class of risk measures known as coherent risk measures ...

Brown, David Benjamin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Cavity degradation risk insurance assessment. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study examined the risks and risk management issues involved with the implementation by electric power utilities of compressed air energy storage and underground pumped hydro storage systems. The results are listed in terms of relative risks for the construction and operation of these systems in different geologic deposits, with varying amounts of pressurization, with natural or man-made disasters in the vicinity of the storage equipment, and with different modes of operating the facilities. (LCL)

Hampson, C.; Neill, P.; de Bivort, L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Introduction to Simplified Generation Risk Assessment Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Life cycle management (LCM) and risk-informed asset management of nuclear power plants can benefit from improved prediction of the effect of equipment failures or degradation on plant productivity. The Generation Risk Assessment (GRA) model described in this report provides a systematic approach to estimating how equipment reliability relates to the risk of future lost generation from trips and derates and to prioritizing components and systems based on their importance to productivity.

2004-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

311

Ranking low cost sorbents for mercury capture from simulated flue gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal fired utility boilers are the largest anthropogenic source of mercury release to the atmosphere, and mercury abatement legislation is already in place in the USA. The present study aimed to rank low cost mercury sorbents (char and activated carbon from the pyrolysis of scrap tire rubber and two coal fly ashes from UK power plants) against Norit Darco HgTM for mercury retention by using a novel bench-scale reactor. In this scheme, a fixed sorbent bed was tested for mercury capture efficiency from a simulated flue gas stream. Experiments with a gas stream of only mercury and nitrogen showed that while the coal ashes were the most effective in mercury capture, char from the pyrolysis of scrap tire rubber was as effective as the commercial sorbent Norit Darco HgTM. Tests conducted at 150{sup o}C, with a simulated flue gas mix that included N{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, SO{sub 2} and HCl, showed that all the sorbents captured approximately 100% of the mercury in the gas stream. The introduction of NO and NO{sub 2} was found to significantly improve the mercury capture, possibly by reactions between NOx and the mercury. Since the sorbents' efficiency decreased with increasing test temperature, physical sorption could be the initial step in the mercury capture process. As the sorbents were only exposed to 64 ng of mercury in the gas stream, the mercury loadings on the samples were significantly less than their equilibrium capacities. The larger capacities of the activated carbons due to their more microporous structure were therefore not utilized. Although the sorbents have been characterized by BET surface area analysis and XRD analysis, further analysis is needed in order to obtain a more conclusive correlation of how the characteristics of the different sorbents correlate with the observed variations in mercury capture ability. 34 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

H. Revata Seneviratne; Cedric Charpenteau; Anthe George; Marcos Millan; Denis R. Dugwell; Rafael Kandiyoti [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom). Department of Chemical Engineering

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System Task 2.1.1.2: Evaluating Effects of Stressors Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

SciTech Connect

Potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. As a first step in developing the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), PNNL scientists conducted a preliminary risk screening analysis on three initial MHK cases. During FY 2011, two additional cases were added: a tidal project in the Gulf of Maine using Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGenTM turbines and a wave project planned for the coast of Oregon using Aquamarine Oyster surge devices. Through an iterative process, the screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in the two FY 2011 cases were the dynamic effects of the device (e.g., strike), accidents/disasters, and effects of the static physical presence of the device (e.g., habitat alteration). Receptor interactions with these stressors at the highest tiers of risk were dominated by threatened and endangered animals. Risk to the physical environment from changes in flow regime also ranked high. Peer review of this process and results will be conducted in early FY 2012. The ERES screening analysis provides an analysis of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations, probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors. “Risk” has two components: (1) The likelihood, or “probability”, of the occurrence of a given interaction or event, and (2) the potential “consequence” if that interaction or event were to occur. During FY 2011, the ERES screening analysis focused primarily on the second component of risk, “consequence”, with focused probability analysis for interactions where data was sufficient for probability modeling. Consequence analysis provides an assessment of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations. Probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors and requires significant data inputs to drive risk models. During FY 2011, two stressor-receptor interactions were examined for the probability of occurrence. The two interactions (spill probability due to an encounter between a surface vessel and an MHK device; and toxicity from anti-biofouling paints on MHK devices) were seen to present relatively low risks to marine and freshwater receptors of greatest concern in siting and permitting MHK devices. A third probability analysis was scoped and initial steps taken to understand the risk of encounter between marine animals and rotating turbine blades. This analysis will be completed in FY 2012.

Copping, Andrea E.; Blake, Kara M.; Anderson, Richard M.; Zdanski, Laura C.; Gill, Gary A.; Ward, Jeffrey A.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Bounds for functions of multivariate risks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Li et al. [Distributions with Fixed Marginals and Related Topics, vol. 28, Institute of Mathematics and Statistics, Hayward, CA, 1996, pp. 198-212] provide bounds on the distribution and on the tail for functions of dependent random vectors having fixed ... Keywords: coupling, dual bounds, multivariate marginals, risk measures, value-at-risk

Paul Embrechts; Giovanni Puccetti

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Community Relations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Students at EnergySmart Schools and people at Rebuilding Together events Community Relations EETD and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's community relations mission and...

315

Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment (SFTRA) Draft NUREG-2125 Overview for National Transportation Stakeholders Forum John Cook Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation 1 SFTRA Overview Contents * Project and review teams * Purpose and goals * Basic methodology * Improvements relative to previous studies * Draft NUREG structure and format * Routine shipment analysis and results * Accident condition analysis and results * Findings and conclusions * Schedule 2 SFTRA Research and Review Teams * Sandia National Laboratory Research Team [$1.8M; 9/06-9/12] - Doug Ammerman - principal investigator - Carlos Lopez - thermal - Ruth Weiner - RADTRAN * NRC's SFTRA Technical Review Team - Gordon Bjorkman - structural

316

Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Executive Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1983, the Bonneville Power Administration contracted for an evaluation and ranking of all geothermal resource sites in the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington which have a potential for electrical generation and/or electrical offset through direct utilization of the resource. The objective of this program was to consolidate and evaluate all geologic, environmental, legal, and institutional information in existing records and files, and to apply a uniform methodology to the evaluation and ranking of all known geothermal sites. This data base would enhance the making of credible forecasts of the supply of geothermal energy which could be available in the region over a 20 year planning horizon. The four states, working together under a cooperative agreement, identified a total of 1,265 potential geothermal sites. The 1,265 sites were screened to eliminate those with little or no chance of providing either electrical generation and/or electrical offset. Two hundred and forty-five of the original 1,265 sites were determined to warrant further study. The Four-State team proceeded to develop a methodology which would rank the sites based upon an estimate of development potential and cost. Development potential was estimated through the use of weighted variables selected to approximate the attributes which a geothermal firm might consider in its selection of a site for exploration and possible development. Resource; engineering; and legal, institutional, and environmental factors were considered. Cost estimates for electrical generation and direct utilization sites were made using the computer programs CENTPLANT, WELLHEAD, and HEATPLAN. Finally, the sites were ranked utilizing a technique which allowed for the integration of development and cost information. On the basis of the developability index, 78 high temperature sites and 120 direct utilization sites were identified as having ''good'' or ''average'' potential for development and should be studied in detail. On the basis of cost, at least 29 of the high temperature sites appear to be technically capable of supporting a minimum total of at least 1,000 MW of electrical generation which could be competitive with the busbar cost of conventional thermal generating technologies. Sixty direct utilization sites have a minimum total energy potential of 900+ MW and can be expected to provide substantial amounts of electrical offset at or below present conventional energy prices. The combined development and economic rankings can be used to assist in determining sites with superior characteristics of both types. Five direct utilization sites and eight high temperature sites were identified with both high development and economic potential. An additional 27 sites were shown to have superior economic characteristics, but development problems. The procedure seems validated by the fact that two of the highest ranking direct utilization sites are ones that have already been developed--Boise, Idaho and Klamath Falls, Oregon. Most of the higher ranking high temperature sites have received serious examination in the past as likely power production candidates.

Bloomquist, R.G.; Black, G.L.; Parker, D.S.; Sifford, A.; Simpson, S.J.; Street, L.V.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment Documents Risk Assessment Documents ORNL RA Graphic Results ORNL Baseline Risk Assessment Results ORNL Screening Risk Assessment Results ORNL Other Risk Assessment Results ORNL RA Graphic Results WAG 2 Residential Landuse Sediment - Total Risk Sediment - Cesium 137 Risk Sediment - Cobalt 60 Risk Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Recreational Landuse Sediment - Total Risk Sediment - Cesium 137 Risk Sediment - Cobalt 60 Risk Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Recreational Landuse (No Fish) Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Industrial Landuse

318

LPP Risk Management Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

History and Process History and Process Slide 2 M E Environmental Management Environmental Management History â—¦ Current Baseline Process Overview â—¦ Identification â—¦ Simulation â—¦ Management Successes & Challenges Slide 3 M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Current Baseline Risks â—¦ 1 Week Risk Summit held week of August 4 th , 2008 Broad representation from all levels of Isotek, DOE, PTC, and outside consultants Focused on risk and opportunity identification Included risk description, assumptions, and triggers No quantification or analysis No restrictions, constraints, or filtering HQ provided facilitator Prescribed format and capture methodology Slide 4 M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Current Baseline Risks â—¦ Risk Summit Results

319

Proliferation Risk Reduction Study of Alternative Spent Fuel Processing  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of an evaluation of the relative proliferation risks of particular reprocessing technologies focusing on COEX, UREX+, and pyroprocessing

Bari,R.A.; Phillips, J.; Pilat, J.; Rochau, G.; Therios, I.; Wigeland, R.; Wonder, E.; Zentner, M.

2009-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

320

Program on Technology Innovation: Drying of Low-Rank Coal with Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study is part of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Technology Innovation Program to assess the potential to achieve increased process efficiency and reduced capital cost by drying low-rank coal with supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2). This study follows the EPRI report Program on Technology Innovation: Assessment of the Applicability of Drying Low-Rank Coal With Supercritical Carbon Dioxide in IGCC Plants (1016216), which concluded that this system has potential benefits with respect to...

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative risk ranking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Risk Assess - updated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Software Development Risk Assessment Software Development Risk Assessment Note: The purpose of this prompt list is to provide project managers with a tool for identifying and planning for potential project risks. It is process-based and supports the framework established by the DOE Software Engineering Methodology. It will be used within the stage exit process as an additional tool to ensure that the project manager has identified and is managing known risk factors. Additional detailed information describes the various risk factors and how to score them. Performing a risk assessment is an important step in being prepared for potential problems that can occur within any software project. During the risk assessment, if a potential risk is identified, a solution or plan of action should be developed. (A problem analyzed and planned

322

Manhole Event Risk Management Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a high-level overview of EPRI research into gas-related explosions in structures in underground distribution systems, and various mitigation approaches considered in the past to reduce the risk of damage resulting from an event. The project team tested some of these approaches at the EPRI-Lenox research facility, and the report summarizes the results of these tests. Utilities have also deployed some of the approaches in the field.

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

323

Preliminary phenomena identification and ranking tables for simplified boiling water reactor Loss-of-Coolant Accident scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For three potential Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenarios in the General Electric Simplified Boiling Water Reactors (SBWR) a set of Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRT) is presented. The selected LOCA scenarios are typical for the class of small and large breaks generally considered in Safety Analysis Reports. The method used to develop the PIRTs is described. Following is a discussion of the transient scenarios, the PIRTs are presented and discussed in detailed and in summarized form. A procedure for future validation of the PIRTs, to enhance their value, is outlined. 26 refs., 25 figs., 44 tabs.

Kroeger, P.G.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Jo, J.H.; Slovik, G.C.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Memorandum , Part II. Screening Level Risk Assessment 92-225-161-49 K-33 Cooling Towers screening risk assessments (2) K-770 sites screening risk assessment (9...

325

Learning to suggest: a machine learning framework for ranking query suggestions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the task of suggesting related queries to users after they issue their initial query to a web search engine. We propose a machine learning approach to learn the probability that a user may find a follow-up query both useful and relevant, ... Keywords: machine learning, query log mining, query suggestion, search assistance

Umut Ozertem; Olivier Chapelle; Pinar Donmez; Emre Velipasaoglu

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

A user-specific and selective multimodal biometric fusion strategy by ranking subjects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recognition performance of a biometric system varies significantly from one enrolled user to another. As a result, there is a need to tailor the system to each user. This study investigates a relatively new fusion strategy that is both user-specific ... Keywords: Biometrics, Client specific fusion, Doddington's Zoo, Fusion, Multibiometrics, User-specific fusion

Norman Poh, Arun Ross, Weifeng Lee, Josef Kittler

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

ICT Supply Chain Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ICT Supply Chain Risk Management Manager's Forum ... ICT Supply Chain Risk Management National Institute of Standards and Technology Page 6. ...

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

328

The Role of the Board in Corporate Risk Oversight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper investigates the role of the board in monitoring corporate risk. Proponents of riskrelated governance structures such risk committees or Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) programs contend that risk monitoring adds value by ensuring that corporate risks are managed. An alternative view is that such governance structures are nothing more than window-dressing in response to regulatory or public pressure. Consistent with the former view, I find that, in the period before the 2007-2008 financial crisis, firms with more observable risk oversight structures exhibit (i) lower idiosyncratic and systematic equity risk, (ii) lower credit risk, and (iii) less extreme performance than firms with fewer or no observable risk oversight structures. I also provide evidence that firms with more observable risk oversight structures experienced higher returns during the worst days of the recent financial crisis and were less susceptible to market fluctuations than firms with fewer or no observable risk oversight structures. Finally, I find that firms without observable risk oversight structures experienced higher abnormal returns to recent legislative events relating to risk management than firms with observable risk oversight structures.

Gaizka Ormazabal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Sociocultural definitions of risk  

SciTech Connect

Public constituencies frequently are criticized by technical experts as being irrational in response to low-probability risks. This presentation argued that most people are concerned with a variety of risk attributes other than probability and that is rather irrational to exclude these from the definition and analysis of technological risk. Risk communication, which is at the heart of the right-to-know concept, is described as the creation of shared meaning rather than the mere transmission of information. A case study of utilities, public utility commissions, and public interest groups illustrates how the diversity of institutional cultures in modern society leads to problems for the creation of shared meanings in establishing trust, distributing liability, and obtaining consent to risk. This holistic approach to risk analysis is most appropriate under conditions of high uncertainty and/or decision stakes. 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Rayner, S.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

DUF6 Environmental Risks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risks A discussion of the potential environmental impacts associated with depleted uranium handling or processing facilities. Impacts Considered in the PEIS Depleted uranium...

331

Risk Management Tool Attributes:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of cost - input cost distribution; expert input on distribution selection g. time-phase input h. scenarios 2. Outputs a. Distributions b. Graphics c. Key risks (tornado) d....

332

Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) Welcome: The Risk Assessment Technical Experts Working Group (RWG) is established to assist DOE in the appropriate and effective use of quantitative risk assessment in nuclear safety related activities. The activities of the group will help DOE ensure that risk assessments supporting nuclear safety decisions are conducted in a consistent manner, of appropriate quality, properly tailored to the needs of the decisions they are intended to support and documented. The RWG will also assist DOE in assessing the adequacy of available risk assessment tools and guidance supporting nuclear safety at its nuclear facilities.

333

Clean Slate transportation and human health risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

Public concern regarding activities involving radioactive material generally focuses on the human health risk associated with exposure to ionizing radiation. This report describes the results of a risk analysis conducted to evaluate risk for excavation, handling, and transport of soil contaminated with transuranics at the Clean Slate sites. Transportation risks were estimated for public transport routes from the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) to the Envirocore disposal facility or to the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for both radiological risk and risk due to traffic accidents. Human health risks were evaluated for occupational and radiation-related health effects to workers. This report was generated to respond to this public concern, to provide an evaluation of the risk, and to assess feasibility of transport of the contaminated soil for disposal.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Petcoke and Low-Rank Coal/Lignite Supply Outlook for IGCC Evaluations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum coke, a by-product of petroleum refining, is used in many industries, with the highest-sulfur forms of petcoke disposed of as fuel for power generation. Because of its high heat content and low moisture, petcoke holds benefits in a fuel blend with lower grade fuels such as lignite for integrated coal gasification. This report reviews the characteristics of petroleum coke, presents its supply and demand outlook, and estimates the relative costs of various coals and petroleum coke at locations in...

2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

335

Criterion validity of a 10-category scale for ranking physical activity in Norwegian women  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of certain types of activities such as cycling and carrying heavy loads. Heart rate monitoring is limited when measuring low-intensity activity due to stronger relative influence of stress and relies more heavily on individual calibration [15]. A combined... , Kerrison N, Langenberg C, Arriola L, Clavel-Chapelon F, Barricart A, Boeing H, Gonzales C, Kaaks R, Key T, Khaw KT, May A, Nilsson P, Norat T, Overvad K, Palli D, Panico S, Quiros R, et al: Validity of a short questionnaire to assess physical activity in 10...

Borch, Kristin B; Ekelund, Ulf; Brage, Soren; Lund, Eiliv

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

336

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Related Links  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Related Links to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Related Links on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Related Links on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Related Links on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Related Links on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Related Links on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Related Links on AddThis.com... More in this section... Natural Gas Basics Production & Distribution Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives

337

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Related Links  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Conserve Fuel Conserve Fuel Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Related Links to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Related Links on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Related Links on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Related Links on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Related Links on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Related Links on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Related Links on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Electricity Ethanol Hydrogen Natural Gas Propane Emerging Fuels Fuel Prices Idle Reduction Related Links

338

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphic Results Graphic Results Baseline Risk Assessment Results Screening Risk Assessment Results Other Risk Assessment Results Graphic Results K-25 Groundwater Residential Landuse Bedrock Wells - Total Hazard (range: 1-30) Bedrock Wells - Total Hazard (range: 0.1 - 1) Bedrock Wells - Total Risk Bedrock Wells - Arsenic Risk Bedrock Wells - Dichloroethene, 1,1- Risk Bedrock Wells - Trichloroethene Risk Unconsolidated Wells - Total Hazard (range: 1-150) Unconsolidated Wells - Total Hazard (range: 0.1 - 1) Unconsolidated Wells - Total Risk (range:10-4 - 1) Unconsolidated Wells - Total Risk (range:10-6 - 10-4) Unconsolidated Wells - Arsenic Risk Unconsolidated Wells - Trichloroethene Risk ORNL WAG 2 Residential Landuse Sediment - Total Risk Sediment - Cesium 137 Risk Sediment - Cobalt 60 Risk

339

Comparative ranking of 0. 1 to 10 MW(e) solar thermal electric power systems. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1 to 10 MW(e), operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW(e), a range that is attractive to industrial and other non-utility applications. This volume summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 10 MW(e). Volume II presents data on performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kowalik, J.S.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Coal rank distribution within the Bluesky-Gething stratigraphic horizon of Northeast B.C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The top of the Gething Formation is one of the more important formational picks routinely performed by the oil and gas industry during their exploratory and development drilling as this horizon is very c:ontinuous through northeastern British Columbia and much of northern Alberta. The name Bluesky is given to the rock unit which occupies this stratigraphic level, namely a sandstone-conglomerate unit of marine origin which separates the continental coal measures of the Gething Formation from thc overlying marine shales of the Moosebar Formation (see Fig. 32). The Bluesky is commonly glauconitic.and has a variable thickness (0 to 50 metres1 over relatively short distances and most likely represents shoreline deposition of the rapidly transgressing Clearwater Sea from the north. The Bluesky-Gething is an important petroleum producer in the Fort St. John area. MOOSEBAR FM

R. H. Karst; G. V. White; Gethlng Fm

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative risk ranking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Risk and risk management in software projects: A reassessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlling risk in software projects is considered to be a major contributor to project success. This paper reconsiders the status of risk and risk management in the literature and practice. The analysis is supported by a study of risk practices in ... Keywords: Project management, Risk management, Software projects, Threat management

Paul L. Bannerman

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Achieving safety/risk goals for less ATR backup power upgrades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor probabilistic risk assessment for internal fire and flood events defined a relatively high risk for a total loss of electric power possibly leading to core damage. Backup power sources were disabled due to fire and flooding in the diesel generator area with propagation of the flooding to a common switchgear room. The ATR risk assessment was employed to define options for relocation of backup power system components to achieve needed risk reduction while minimizing costs. The risk evaluations were performed using sensitivity studies and importance measures. The risk-based evaluations of relocation options for backup power systems saved over $3 million from what might have been otherwise considered {open_quotes}necessary{close_quotes} for safety/risk improvement. The ATR experience shows that the advantages of a good risk assessment are to define risk significance, risk specifics, and risk solutions which enable risk goals to be achieved at the lowest cost.

Atkinson, S.A.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6-related Manufacturing Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and operation of a facility to fabricate representative products containing depleted uranium. Impacts Analyzed in the PEIS The PEIS evaluated the general environmental impacts...

344

Risk management for IT and software projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk management can be defined as a systematic process for identifying, analyzing and controlling risks in projects or organizations. Definitions and illustrations of risks are given; in particular, a list of ten risk factors which occur most frequently ... Keywords: Riskit, analysis of risks, control of risks, identification of risks, monitoring of risks, project risks, quality management, risk definition, risk management, risk management process, risk scenario

E. Wallmüller

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment Documents Risk Assessment Documents Y-12 RA Graphic Results Y-12 Baseline Risk Assessment Results Y-12 Screening Risk Assessment Results Bullet Graphic Risk Results Arrow Bear Creek Valley Maps Residential Landuse Groundwater - Total Hazard (range: 1 - 900) Groundwater - Total Hazard (range: 0.1 - 1) Groundwater - Total Risk (range: 10-4 - 1) Groundwater - Total Risk (range: 10-5 - 10-4) Groundwater - Total Risk (range: 10-6 - 10-5) Groundwater - Dichloroethane, 1,1- Hazard Groundwater - Dichloroethene, 1,1- Hazard Groundwater - Dichloroethene, 1,1- Risk Groundwater - Dichloroethane, 1,2- Risk Groundwater - Dichloroethene, 1,2- Hazard Groundwater - Nitrate Hazard Groundwater - Radium Risk Groundwater - Technetium-99 Risk Groundwater - Tetrachloroethene Hazard Groundwater - Tetrachloroethene Risk

346

Relative Corrosivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Measured atmospheric-corrosion rates for steel and zinc...Relative corrosivity Steel Zinc 1 Normal Wells, Northwest Territory Rural 0.02 0.2 2 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan Rural 0.2 0.2 9 State College, PA (a) Rural 1.0 1.0 17 Pittsburgh, PA (roof) Industrial 1.8 1.5 18 London (Battersea), U.K. Industrial 2.0 1.2 27 Bayonne, NJ Industrial 3.4 3.1 28 Kure...

347

Knowledge based ranking algorithm for comparative assessment of post-closure care needs of closed landfills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Post-closure care (PCC) activities at landfills include cap maintenance; water quality monitoring; maintenance and monitoring of the gas collection/control system, leachate collection system, groundwater monitoring wells, and surface water management system; and general site maintenance. The objective of this study was to develop an integrated data and knowledge based decision making tool for preliminary estimation of PCC needs at closed landfills. To develop the decision making tool, 11 categories of parameters were identified as critical areas which could affect future PCC needs. Each category was further analyzed by detailed questions which could be answered with limited data and knowledge about the site, its history, location, and site specific characteristics. Depending on the existing knowledge base, a score was assigned to each question (on a scale 1-10, as 1 being the best and 10 being the worst). Each category was also assigned a weight based on its relative importance on the site conditions and PCC needs. The overall landfill score was obtained from the total weighted sum attained. Based on the overall score, landfill conditions could be categorized as critical, acceptable, or good. Critical condition indicates that the landfill may be a threat to the human health and the environment and necessary steps should be taken. Acceptable condition indicates that the landfill is currently stable and the monitoring should be continued. Good condition indicates that the landfill is stable and the monitoring activities can be reduced in the future. The knowledge base algorithm was applied to two case study landfills for preliminary assessment of PCC performance.

Sizirici, Banu, E-mail: bsy3@case.edu [Case Western Reserve University, Civil Engineering Department, 2104 Adelbert Road, Bingham Bld. Room: 216, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Tansel, Berrin; Kumar, Vivek [Florida International University, Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Miami, FL (United States)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Generic metrics, irreducible rank-one PU(2) monopoles, and transversality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that the moduli space of solutions to the PU(2) monopole equations is a smooth manifold of the expected dimension for simple, generic parameters such as (and including) the Riemannian metric on the given four-manifold. In a previous article, dg-ga/9710032, we proved transversality using an extension of the holonomy-perturbation methods of Donaldson, Floer, and Taubes, together with the existence of an Uhlenbeck compactification for the perturbed moduli space. However, it remained an important and interesting question to see whether there were simpler, more intrinsic alternatives to the holonomy perturbations and this is the issue we settle here. The idea that PU(2) monopoles might lead to a proof of Witten's conjecture (hep-th/9411102, hep-th/9709193) concerning the relation between the two types of four-manifold invariants was first proposed by Pidstrigach and Tyurin in 1994 (dg-ga/9507004): the space of PU(2) monopoles contains the moduli space of anti-self-dual connections together with copies of the various Seiberg-Witten moduli spaces, these forming singular loci in the higher-dimensional space of PU(2) monopoles. Results in this direction, due to the author and Leness, are surveyed in dg-ga/9709022, with a detailed account appearing in dg-ga/9712005. Our transversality theorem ensures that the anti-self-dual and Seiberg-Witten loci are the only singularities and that the PU(2) monopole moduli space forms a smooth - though non-compact, because of bubbling - cobordism between the links of the singularities.

Paul M. N. Feehan

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Risk And Risk Management In Geothermal Exploration And Development...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Risk And Risk Management In Geothermal Exploration And Development Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

350

Risk in the Weapons Stockpile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When it comes to the nuclear weapons stockpile, risk must be as low as possible. Design and care to keep the stockpile healthy involves all aspects of risk management. Design diversity is a method that helps to mitigate risk.

Noone, Bailey C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

351

Global Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Topics: Finance, Co-benefits assessment, Market analysis Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual Website: www.unepfi.org/fileadmin/documents/global_climate_change_risk.pdf Global Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans Screenshot References: Global Climate Change: Risk to Bank Loans[1] Summary "The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of climate change related risks on bank borrowers, utilizing as much data and analysis as possible. The first section of this report reviews the current climate change policies in place in Canada, Europe, and the US, in order to provide

352

High Risk Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Risk Plan Risk Plan John Bashista Melissa Rider Jeff Davis Timeline to date * OMB memo on Improving Government Acquisition issued July 29, 2009 - Review existing contracts and acquisition practices to save 7% of baseline contract spending (3.5% in FY 2010 and 3.5% in FY 2011) - Reduce high risk contracts by 10% the share of dollars obligated in FY2010 - Final plan was due and submitted on November 2, 2009 - OMB reviewed and requested revision Dec 23, 2009 - Revision submitted April 21, 2010 M&Os are an Issue * With respect to reductions in high risk contracting strategies, the M&O contracts was also a challenge since the opportunity to further influence competition and contract type was highly constrained. The Department had already competed approximately 85 percent of its M&O

353

Risk Management RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Risk Management Review Module Risk Management Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Risk M Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan Managem view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE (SRP) ment e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process, and EM's internal

354

Risks to the public  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edited by Peter G. Neumann (Risks Forum Moderator and Chairman of the ACM Committee on Computers and Public Policy), plus personal contributions by others, as indicated. Opinions expressed are individual rather than organizational, and all of the usual ...

Peter G. Neumann

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Risks to the public  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edited by Peter G. Neumann (Risks Forum Moderator and Chairman of the ACM Committee on Computers and Public Policy), plus personal contributions by others, as indicated. Opinions expressed are individual rather than organizational, and all of the usual ...

Peter G. Neumann

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Risks to the public  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edited by Peter G. Neumann (Risks Forum Moderator and Chairman of the ACM Committee on Computers and Public Policy), plus personal contributions by others, as indicated. Opinions expressed are individual rather than organizational, and all of the usual ...

Peter G. Neumann

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Risks to the public  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edited by Peter G. Neumann (Risks Forum Moderator and Chairman of the ACM Committee on Computers and Public Policy), plus personal contributions by others, as indicated. Opinions expressed are individual rather than organizational, and all of the usual ...

Peter G. Neumann

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Risks to the public  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edited by Peter G. Neumann (Risks Forum Moderator and Chairman of the ACM Committee on Computers and Public Policy), plus personal contributions by others, as indicated. Opinions expressed are individual rather than organizational, and all of the usual ...

Peter G. Neumann

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Risks to the public  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edited by Peter G. Neumann (Risks Forum Moderator and Chairman of the ACM Committee on Computers and Public Policy), plus personal contributions by others, as indicated. Opinions expressed are individual rather than organizational, and all of the usual ...

Peter G. Neumann

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Risks to the public  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edited by Peter G. Neumann (Risks Forum Moderator and Chairman of the ACM Committee on Computers and Public Policy), plus personal contributions by others, as indicated. Opinions expressed are individual rather than organizational, and all of the usual ...

Peter G. Neumann

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative risk ranking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Risk Mitigation Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update builds upon the development of attack/failure and cyber-physical attack scenarios focused on combined cyber-physical attacks. These scenarios include threats and vulnerabilities that may be exploited by well-financed and motivated entities. It also leverages risk assessment processes developed to address combined cyber-physical attack scenarios. The framework in this update supports the further development of risk mitigation strategies focused on combined cyber-physical ...

2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

362

Transmission Price Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is concerned with the financial risks that arise from the uncertain price of transmission service in restructured or competitive electricity markets. These risks are most severe in markets with locational pricing (LMP), but they also exist in more traditionally organized electricity markets. This report has two main purposes. The first is to review the existing mathematical models of electricity price formation in spot and forward markets that may be helpful as the foundations for developing ...

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

363

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

risk assessment information used to evaluate and remediate legacy contamination from the Manhattan Project. The RAIS was designed to provide all risk assessment processes in a...

364

The Weather Risk Management Industry's Climate Forecast and Data Needs: A Workshop Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Risk Prediction Initiative, and the Weather Risk Management Association jointly sponsored a workshop that examined a variety of issues related to climate forecastand data products ...

Richard J. Murnane; Michael Crowe; Allan Eustis; Susan Howard; Judy Koepsell; Robert Leffler; Robert Livezey

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to mitigate fuel price risk (coal-fired generation also2 credit prices on the relative economics of wind, coal, andprice risk has, in some cases, shifted resource choice towards coal-

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Risk Management Process Overview | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cybersecurity Risk Management Process Risk Management Process Overview Risk Management Process Overview figure depicting three tier risk management process The cybersecurity...

367

RISK REDUCTION WITH A FUZZY EXPERT EXPLORATION TOOL  

SciTech Connect

Incomplete or sparse information on geologic or formation characteristics introduces a high level of risk for oil exploration and development projects. Expert systems have been developed and used in several disciplines and industries, including medical diagnostics, with favorable results. A state-of-the-art exploration ''expert'' tool, relying on a computerized data base and computer maps generated by neural networks, is proposed through the use of ''fuzzy'' logic, a relatively new mathematical treatment of imprecise or non-explicit parameters and values. This project will develop an Artificial Intelligence system that will draw upon a wide variety of information to provide realistic estimates of risk. ''Fuzzy logic,'' a system of integrating large amounts of inexact, incomplete information with modern computational methods to derive usable conclusions, has been demonstrated as a cost-effective computational technology in many industrial applications. During project year 1, 90% of geologic, geophysical, production and price data were assimilated for installation into the database. Logs provided geologic data consisting of formation tops of the Brushy Canyon, Lower Brushy Canyon, and Bone Springs zones of 700 wells used to construct regional cross sections. Regional structure and isopach maps were constructed using kriging to interpolate between the measured points. One of the structure derivative maps (azimuth of curvature) visually correlates with Brushy Canyon fields on the maximum change contours. Derivatives of the regional geophysical data also visually correlate with the location of the fields. The azimuth of maximum dip approximately locates fields on the maximum change contours. In a similar manner the second derivative in the x-direction of the gravity map visually correlates with the alignment of the known fields. The visual correlations strongly suggest that neural network architectures will be found to correlate regional attributes with individual well production. On a local scale, given open-hole log information, a neural network was trained to predict the product of porosity and oil saturation as reported in whole core analysis. Thus a direct indicator of an oil show is available from log information. This is important in the thin-bedded Delaware sand reservoirs. Fuzzy ranking was used to prioritize 3D seismic attributes that were then correlated to formation depth with a neural network. The results were superior to those obtained using linear interpolation or low order polynomial interpolation as time-to-depth conversion tools. A radial basis function neural network was developed and used as a log evaluation tool. This new technology gives an additional tool to the more commonly used multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network. An interactive web based MLP, PredictOnline, was coded in Java and made available to consortium members for beta testing. PredictOnline demonstrates the power of Java programming language for web-based applications. A draft design of the Fuzzy Expert Exploration (FEE) Tool system based on readily available software was completed. The recent development of a Java Expert System Shell, JESS, facilitates expert rule development.

William W. Weiss

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

368

Estimating Terrorist Risk with Possibility Theory  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes techniques that use possibility theory to estimate the risk of terrorist acts. These techniques were developed under the sponsorship of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) as part of the National Infrastructure Simulation Analysis Center (NISAC) project. The techniques have been used to estimate the risk of various terrorist scenarios to support NISAC analyses during 2004. The techniques are based on the Logic Evolved Decision (LED) methodology developed over the past few years by Terry Bott and Steve Eisenhawer at LANL. [LED] The LED methodology involves the use of fuzzy sets, possibility theory, and approximate reasoning. LED captures the uncertainty due to vagueness and imprecision that is inherent in the fidelity of the information available for terrorist acts; probability theory cannot capture these uncertainties. This report does not address the philosophy supporting the development of nonprobabilistic approaches, and it does not discuss possibility theory in detail. The references provide a detailed discussion of these subjects. [Shafer] [Klir and Yuan] [Dubois and Prade] Suffice to say that these approaches were developed to address types of uncertainty that cannot be addressed by a probability measure. An earlier report discussed in detail the problems with using a probability measure to evaluate terrorist risk. [Darby Methodology]. Two related techniques are discussed in this report: (1) a numerical technique, and (2) a linguistic technique. The numerical technique uses traditional possibility theory applied to crisp sets, while the linguistic technique applies possibility theory to fuzzy sets. Both of these techniques as applied to terrorist risk for NISAC applications are implemented in software called PossibleRisk. The techniques implemented in PossibleRisk were developed specifically for use in estimating terrorist risk for the NISAC program. The LEDTools code can be used to perform the same linguistic evaluation as performed in PossibleRisk. [LEDTools] LEDTools is a general purpose linguistic evaluation tool and allows user defined universes of discourse and approximate reasoning rules, whereas PossibleRisk uses predefined universes of discourse (risk, attack, success, loss, and consequence) and rules. Also LEDTools has the capability to model a large number of threat scenarios with a graph and to integrate the scenarios (paths from the graph) into the linguistic evaluation. Example uses of PossibleRisk and LEDTools for the possibilistic evaluation of terrorist risk are provided in this report.

J.L. Darby

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

Standard test method for ranking resistance of materials to sliding wear using block-on-ring wear test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers laboratory procedures for determining the resistance of materials to sliding wear. The test utilizes a block-on-ring friction and wear testing machine to rank pairs of materials according to their sliding wear characteristics under various conditions. 1.2 An important attribute of this test is that it is very flexible. Any material that can be fabricated into, or applied to, blocks and rings can be tested. Thus, the potential materials combinations are endless. However, the interlaboratory testing has been limited to metals. In addition, the test can be run with various lubricants, liquids, or gaseous atmospheres, as desired, to simulate service conditions. Rotational speed and load can also be varied to better correspond to service requirements. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. Wear test results are reported as the volume loss in cubic millimetres for both the block and ring. Materials...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

RFID, privacy and the perception of risk: A strategic framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Against the background of the first RFID-Rollouts by large retailers in North America and Europe, this paper concerns itself with the perception of RFID technology as a risk to privacy. The objective of our contribution is to identify, at a relatively ... Keywords: Privacy, RFID, Risk perception, Technology acceptance

Frédéric Thiesse

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

RCDA: Architecting as a risk- and cost management discipline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose to view architecting as a risk- and cost management discipline. This point of view helps architects identify the key concerns to address in their decision making, by providing a simple, relatively objective way to assess architectural significance. ... Keywords: Cost management, Risk Management, Software architecture

Eltjo R. Poort; Hans Van Vliet

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Mercury Risk Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASSESSING THE MERCURY HEALTH RISKS ASSOCIATED ASSESSING THE MERCURY HEALTH RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS: IMPACTS OF LOCAL DEPOSITIONS *T.M. Sullivan 1 , F.D. Lipfert 2 , S.M. Morris 2 , and S. Renninger 3 1 Building 830, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 2 Private Consultants 3 Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV ABSTRACT The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has announced plans to regulate emissions of mercury to the atmosphere from coal-fired power plants. However, there is still debate over whether the limits should be placed on a nationwide or a plant-specific basis. Before a nationwide limit is selected, it must be demonstrated that local deposition of mercury from coal-fired power plants does not impose an excessive local health risk. The principal health

373

Managing the Risks of Climate Change and Terrorism  

SciTech Connect

The article describes challenges to comparative risk assessment, a key approach for managing uncertainty in decision making, across diverse threats such as terrorism and climate change and argues new approaches will be particularly important in addressing decisions related to sustainability.

Rosa, Eugene; Dietz, Tom; Moss, Richard H.; Atran, Scott; Moser, Susanne

2012-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

374

Simulation assessment of CO2 sequestration potential and enhanced methane recovery in low-rank coalbeds of the Wilcox Group, east-central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) from energy consumption is a primary source of greenhouse gases. Injection of CO2 from power plants in coalbed reservoirs is a plausible method for reducing atmospheric emissions, and it can have the additional benefit of enhancing methane recovery from coal. Most previous studies have evaluated the merits of CO2 disposal in high-rank coals. Low-rank coals in the Gulf Coastal plain, specifically in Texas, are possible targets for CO2 sequestration and enhanced methane production. This research determines the technical feasibility of CO2 sequestration in Texas low-rank coals in the Wilcox Group in east-central Texas and the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. It includes deterministic and probabilistic simulation studies and evaluates both CO2 and flue gas injection scenarios. Probabilistic simulation results of 100% CO2 injection in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern indicate that these coals with average net thickness of 20 ft can store 1.27 to 2.25 Bcf of CO2 at depths of 6,200 ft, with an ECBM recovery of 0.48 to 0.85 Bcf. Simulation results of 50% CO2 - 50% N2 injection in the same 80-acre 5-spot pattern indicate that these coals can store 0.86 to 1.52 Bcf of CO2, with an ECBM recovery of 0.62 to 1.10 Bcf. Simulation results of flue gas injection (87% N2 - 13% CO2) indicate that these same coals can store 0.34 to 0.59 Bcf of CO2, with an ECBM recovery of 0.68 to 1.20 Bcf. Methane resources and CO2 sequestration potential of low-rank coals of the Wilcox Group Lower Calvert Bluff (LCB) formation in east-central Texas are significant. Resources from LCB low-rank coals in the Wilcox Group in east-central Texas are estimated to be between 6.3 and 13.6 Tcf of methane, with a potential sequestration capacity of 1,570 to 2,690 million tons of CO2. Sequestration capacity of the LCB lowrank coals in the Wilcox Group in east-central Texas equates to be between 34 and 59 years of emissions from six power plants in this area. These technical results, combined with attractive economic conditions and close proximity of many CO2 point sources near unmineable coalbeds, could generate significant projects for CO2 sequestration and ECBM production in Texas low-rank coals.

Hernandez Arciniegas, Gonzalo

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Effects of metal cations present naturally in coal on the fate of coal-bound nitrogen in the fixed-bed pyrolysis of 25 coals with different ranks: correlation between inherent Fe cations and N{sub 2} formation from low-rank coals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fate of coal-N in the fixed-bed pyrolysis of 25 coals with 62-81 wt % (daf) C has been studied with a quartz reactor at 1000 C under ambient pressure to examine the effects of metal cations present naturally in these coals on the partitioning of coal-N into N{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, HCN, tar-N, and char-N. Nitrogen mass balances for all runs fall within the reasonable range of 100 {+-} 5%, and N{sub 2} is the predominant product for all of the coals. As the N{sub 2} yield increases, the sum of NH{sub 3}, HCN, and tar-N is unchanged significantly, whereas the char-N yield decreases almost linearly, showing that most of N{sub 2} originates from char-N. When eight kinds of inherent metals, such as Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Fe, and Ti, are determined by the conventional method and related with the N{sub 2} yield, there exists a strong, direct correlation between the Fe content and N{sub 2} formation for low-rank coals with less than 75 wt % (daf) C. Transmission electron microscopy coupled with an energy-dispersive analysis of X-rays (TEM-EDAX) measurements after pyrolysis at 1000{sup o}C of a German brown coal, which provides the highest N{sub 2} yield of about 60%, reveal the existence of lamella structures because of graphitized carbon as well as nanoscale Fe particles with different sizes and shapes. The mechanism for conversion reactions of char-N to N{sub 2} is discussed in terms of the catalysis by nanoparticles of metallic Fe formed from inherent Fe cations. 34 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

Yasuo Ohtsuka; Zhiheng Wu [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Research Center of Sustainable Materials Engineering

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Equipment Risk and Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk assessment and management are key elements in a well developed asset management implementation. Consequently an increasing number of utility managers are devoting resources to the task of improving their capabilities for risk-based decision making. Equipment risk models are essential elements in a risk assessment process. However, most proposed power delivery equipment risk models require for their successful application some probabilistic representation describing the chances of equipment ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

377

Equipment Risk and Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk assessment and management are key elements in a well-developed asset management implementation. Consequently, an increasing number of utility managers are devoting resources to the task of improving their capabilities for risk-based decision making. Equipment risk models are essential elements in the risk assessment process. However, for their application, most proposed power delivery equipment risk models require some probabilistic representation describing the chances of equipment failure. This re...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

378

A fuzzy robust evaluation model for selecting and ranking NPD projects using Bayesian belief network and weight-restricted DEA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to brutal business competition, new product development (NPD) has become a key factor for promoting business sustainability. To help a company determine the direction of NPD for the future, this study applies the fuzzy analytical hierarchy procedure ... Keywords: Bayesian belief network, Fuzzy AHP, Fuzzy DEA, NPD risk, New product development project

Tzu-An Chiang; Z. H. Che

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Executive Summary.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective was to consolidate and evaluate all geologic, environmental, legal, and institutional information in existing records and files, and to apply a uniform methodology to the evaluation and ranking of all known geothermal sites. This data base would enhance the making of credible forecasts of the supply of geothermal energy which could be available in the region over a 20 year planning horizon. The four states, working under a cooperative agreement, identified a total of 1265 potential geothermal sites. The 1265 sites were screened to eliminate those with little or no chance of providing either electrical generation and/or electrical offset. Two hundred and forty-five of the original 1265 sites were determined to warrant further study. On the basis of a developability index, 78 high temperature sites and 120 direct utilization sites were identified as having ''good'' or ''average'' potential for development and should be studied in detail. On the basis of cost, at least 29 of the high temperature sites appear to be technically capable of supporting a minimum total of at least 1000 MW of electrical generation which could be competitive with the busbar cost of conventional thermal generating technologies. Sixty direct utilization sites have a minimum total energy potential of 900+ MW and can be expected to provide substantial amounts of electrical offset at or below present conventional energy prices. Five direct utilization sites and eight high temperature sites were identified with both high development and economic potential. An additional 27 sites were shown to have superior economic characteristics, but development problems. 14 refs., 15 figs., 10 tabs.

Bloomquist, R. Gordon

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

The Racial/ Ethnic Distribution of Heat Risk–Related Land Cover in Relation to Residential Segregation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of block groups in the analysis: weight rti  =  ( number ofblock groups × population rti ) /N, [3] where r indexes

Jesdale, Bill; Morello-Frosch, Rachel; Cushing, Lara

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative risk ranking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

RISK ASSESSMENT TECHNICAL EXPERT WORKING GROUP | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RISK ASSESSMENT TECHNICAL EXPERT WORKING GROUP RISK ASSESSMENT TECHNICAL EXPERT WORKING GROUP RISK ASSESSMENT TECHNICAL EXPERT WORKING GROUP The Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG) is established to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) with the appropriate and effective use of quantitative risk assessment in nuclear safety-related activities. The activities of the group will help DOE make sure that risk assessments supporting nuclear safety decisions are: conducted in a consistent manner; of appropriate quality; properly documented; and properly tailored to the needs of the decisions they are intended to support. The RWG will also assist DOE in assessing the adequacy of available tools and guidance necessary to support nuclear safety at its nuclear facilities. RWG_Charter_March_2012.pdf

382

Comparative risk analysis for the Rocky Flats Plant integrated project planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Plant is developing, with active stakeholder a comprehensive planning strategy that will support transition of the Rocky Flats Plant from a nuclear weapons production facility to site cleanup and final disposition. Final disposition of the Rocky Flats Plant materials and contaminants requires consideration of the interrelated nature of sitewide problems, such as material movement and disposition, facility and land use endstates, costs relative risks to workers and the public, and waste disposition. Comparative Risk Analysis employs both incremental risk and cumulative risk evaluations to compare risks from postulated options or endstates. These postulated options or endstates can be various remedial alternatives, or future endstate uses of federal agency land. Currently, there does not exist any approved methodology that aggregates various incremental risk estimates. Comparative Risk Analysis has been developed to aggregate various incremental risk estimates to develop a site cumulative risk estimate. This paper discusses development of the Comparative Risk Analysis methodology, stakeholder participation and lessons learned from these challenges.

Jones, M.E.; Shain, D.I.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Modelling environmental risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As environmental issues have become increasingly important in economic research and policy for sustainable development, firms in the private sector have introduced environmental and social issues in conducting their business activities. Such behaviour ... Keywords: Asymmetry, Conditional volatility, Dow Jones Sustainability Indexes, Environmental risk, Environmental sustainability index, GARCH, GJR, Log-moment condition, Moment condition, Persistence, Shocks

Suhejla Hoti; Michael McAleer; Laurent L. Pauwels

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Results Summary Investigating the Use of Liquid CO2 Coal Slurry for Feeding Low Rank Coal to the E-Gas™ Gasifier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of US Department of Energy (DOE) Award No. DE-FE0007977, Liquid CO2/Coal Slurry for Feeding Low Rank Coal to Gasifiers, which investigates the practicality of using a liquid CO2/coal slurry preparation and feed system for the E-Gas gasifier in an integrated-gasification–combined-cycle (IGCC) electric power generation plant configuration.Liquid CO2 (LCO2) has several property differences from water that ...

2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

385

Kinetics of catalyzed steam gasification of low-rank coals to produce hydrogen. Final report for the period ending March 31, 1986  

SciTech Connect

The principal goal of coal char-steam gasification research at the University of North Dakota Energy Research Center (UNDERC) is to establish the feasibility of low-rank coal gasification for hydrogen production. The program has focused on determining reaction conditions for maximum product gas hydrogen content and on evaluating process kinetics with and without catalyst addition. The high inherent reactivity of lignites and subbituminous coals, compared to coals of higher rank, make them the probable choice for use in steam gasification. An extensive matrix of char-steam gasification tests was performed in a laboratory-scale thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at temperatures of 700/sup 0/, 750/sup 0/, and 800/sup 0/C. Four low-rank coals and one bituminous coal were included in the TGA test matrix. Catalysts screened in the study included K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, trona, nahcolite, sunflower hull ash, and lignite ash. Results showed uncatalyzed North Dakota and Texas lignites to be slightly more reactive than a Wyoming subbituminous coal, and 8 to 10 times more reactive than an Illinois bituminous coal. Several catalysts that substantially improved low-rank coal steam gasification rates included pure and mineral (trona and nahcolite) alkali carbonates. The reactivity observed when using trona and nahcolite to catalyze the steam gasification was the highest, at nearly 3.5 times that without catalysts. The use of these inexpensive, naturally-occurring alkalis as gasification catalysts may result in elimination of the need for catalyst recovery in the hydrogen-from-coal process, thereby simplifying operation and improving process economics. The study included evaluations of temperature and catalyst loading effects, coal and catalyst screening, and determinations of the apparent activation energies of the steam gasification reaction. 11 refs., 23 figs., 9 tabs.

Galegher, S.J.; Timpe, R.C.; Willson, W.G.; Farnum, S.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

An estimate for the rank of the intersection of subgroups in free amalgamated products of two groups with normal finite amalgamated subgroup  

SciTech Connect

We generalize the estimate for the rank of intersection of subgroups in free products of groups, proved earlier by Ivanov and Dicks (which is analogous to the Hanna Neumann inequality in free groups) to the case of free amalgamated products of groups with normal finite amalgamated subgroup. We also prove that the estimate obtained is sharp and cannot be further improved when the amalgamated product contains an involution. Bibliography: 11 titles.

Zakharov, Alexander O [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

387

Comparative ranking of 0. 1-10 MW/sub e/ solar thermal electric power systems. Volume II. Supporting data. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1-10 MW/sub e/, operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW/sub e/, a range that is attractive to industrial and other nonutility applications. Volume I summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/sub e/. Volume II presents data on the performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Investigation of feasibility of injecting power plant waste gases for enhanced coalbed methane recovery from low rank coals in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2) may be to blame for a gradual rise in the average global temperature. The state of Texas emits more CO2 than any other state in the U.S., and a large fraction of emissions are from point sources such as power plants. CO2 emissions can be offset by sequestration of produced CO2 in natural reservoirs such as coal seams, which may initially contain methane. Production of coalbed methane can be enhanced through CO2 injection, providing an opportunity to offset the rather high cost of sequestration. Texas has large coal resources. Although they have been studied there is not enough information available on these coals to reliably predict coalbed methane production and CO2 sequestration potential. The goal of the work was to determine if sequestration of CO2 in low rank coals is an economically feasible option for CO2 emissions reduction. Additionally, reasonable CO2 injection and methane production rates were to be estimated, and the importance of different reservoir parameters investigated. A data set was compiled for use in simulating the injection of CO2 for enhanced coalbed methane production from Texas coals. Simulation showed that Texas coals could potentially produce commercial volumes of methane if production is enhanced by CO2 injection. The efficiency of the CO2 in sweeping the methane from the reservoir is very high, resulting in high recovery factors and CO2 storage. The simulation work also showed that certain reservoir parameters, such as Langmuir volumes for CO2 and methane, coal seam permeability, and Langmuir pressure, need to be determined more accurately. An economic model of Texas coalbed methane operations was built. Production and injection activities were consistent with simulation results. The economic model showed that CO2 sequestration for enhanced coalbed methane recovery is not commercially feasible at this time because of the extremely high cost of separating, capturing, and compressing the CO2. However, should government mandated carbon sequestration credits or a CO2 emissions tax on the order of $10/ton become a reality, CO2 sequestration projects could become economic at gas prices of $4/Mscf.

Saugier, Luke Duncan

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Identifying the Risk-Return Spectrum of the FSU Oil Economies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper quantifies the risk-return spectrum of the FSU' oil economies, which are of high potential as China's major crude oil-importing sources, and explores the influence of introducing the relative risk weights on the changes of the risk-return ...

Xiaolei Sun; Wan He; Gang Li; Jianping Li

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Draft Risk Assessment Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cyber security risk assessment process includes the characterization of assets. A thorough asset characterization process can lead to a more robust threat characterization. One means of enhancing the thoroughness of the asset-and-threat characterization processes is to improve the characterization mechanisms. This technical update supports this approach by providing the results of initial research and developing a framework to support further analysis.This project builds upon the work ...

2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

391

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RAIS Risk Exposure Models for Radionuclides User's Guide RAIS Risk Exposure Models for Radionuclides User's Guide Note The RAIS presents this updated Risk calculator in response to the following: incorporating chemical-specific parameters from the lastest EPI release, addition of air as a media, and conversion to a new database structure. The previous RAIS Risk calculator presented Risks for radionuclides and chemcials together. Recent development of chemical and radionuclide exposure equations has necessitated that the RAIS separate the chemicals and the radionuclides. To calculate risks for chemicals, use the RAIS Risk Exposure Models for Chemicals calculator. Currently the agricultural equations for the RAIS chemical and radionuclide risk calculators are identical. The EPA's Preliminary Remediation Goals for

392

Probabilistic Risk Assessment - A Bibliography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Probabilistic risk analysis is an integration of failure modes and effects analysis (FEMA), fault tree analysis and other techniques to assess the potential for failure and to find ways to reduce risk. This bibliography references 160 documents in the ...

Program NASA Scientific and Technical Information

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Risk assessment handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Probabilistic Risk Assessment Unit at EG G Idaho has developed this handbook to provide guidance to a facility manager exploring the potential benefit to be gained by performance of a risk assessment properly scoped to meet local needs. This document is designed to help the manager control the resources expended commensurate with the risks being managed and to assure that the products can be used programmatically to support future needs in order to derive maximum beneflt from the resources expended. We present a logical and functional mapping scheme between several discrete phases of project definition to ensure that a potential customer, working with an analyst, is able to define the areas of interest and that appropriate methods are employed in the analysis. In addition the handbook is written to provide a high-level perspective for the analyst. Previously, the needed information was either scattered or existed only in the minds of experienced analysts. By compiling this information and exploring the breadth of knowledge which exists within the members of the PRA Unit, the functional relationships between the customers' needs and the product have been established.

Farmer, F.G.; Jones, J.L.; Hunt, R.N.; Roush, M.L.; Wierman, T.E.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Risk assessment handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Probabilistic Risk Assessment Unit at EG&G Idaho has developed this handbook to provide guidance to a facility manager exploring the potential benefit to be gained by performance of a risk assessment properly scoped to meet local needs. This document is designed to help the manager control the resources expended commensurate with the risks being managed and to assure that the products can be used programmatically to support future needs in order to derive maximum beneflt from the resources expended. We present a logical and functional mapping scheme between several discrete phases of project definition to ensure that a potential customer, working with an analyst, is able to define the areas of interest and that appropriate methods are employed in the analysis. In addition the handbook is written to provide a high-level perspective for the analyst. Previously, the needed information was either scattered or existed only in the minds of experienced analysts. By compiling this information and exploring the breadth of knowledge which exists within the members of the PRA Unit, the functional relationships between the customers` needs and the product have been established.

Farmer, F.G.; Jones, J.L.; Hunt, R.N.; Roush, M.L.; Wierman, T.E.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Life cycle cost and risk estimation of environmental management options  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation process is demonstrated in this paper through comparative analysis of two alternative scenarios identified for the management of the alpha-contaminated fixed low-level waste currently stored at INEL. These two scenarios, the Base Case and the Delay Case, are realistic and based on actual data, but are not intended to exactly match actual plans currently being developed at INEL. Life cycle cost estimates were developed for both scenarios using the System Cost Model; resulting costs are presented and compared. Life cycle costs are shown as a function of time and also aggregated by pretreatment, treatment, storage, and disposal activities. Although there are some short-term cost savings for the Delay Case, cumulative life cycle costs eventually become much higher than costs for the Base Case over the same period of time, due mainly to the storage and repackaging necessary to accommodate the longer Delay Case schedule. Life cycle risk estimates were prepared using a new risk analysis method adapted to the System Cost Model architecture for automated, systematic cost/risk applications. Relative risk summaries are presented for both scenarios as a function of time and also aggregated by pretreatment, treatment, storage, and disposal activities. Relative risk of the Delay Case is shown to be higher than that of the Base Case. Finally, risk and cost results are combined to show how the collective information can be used to help identify opportunities for risk or cost reduction and highlight areas where risk reduction can be achieved most economically.

Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RAIS Chemical Risk Calculator RAIS Chemical Soil to Ground Water Calculator Radionuclide Calculators Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs) Radionuclide Calculator RAIS...

397

Enterprise level IT risk management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing IT budget and over-dependence of business on IT infra-structure makes risk management a critical component of enterprise management. The creation and sustenance of an IT risk management framework is one of the crucial and challenging tasks ... Keywords: enterprise level, information technology, risk management

Nadhirah Azizi; Khairuddin Hashim

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, RISK MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

performance within the CSU System. #12;2004 ­ 2005 Risk Management Annual Report Page 3 · Chaired the CSU-04 2004-05 Fullerton System-Wide #12;2004 ­ 2005 Risk Management Annual Report Page 10 University · International travel · Facilities use · Deferred maintenance Working with the University's Risk Management

de Lijser, Peter

399

Belief-based risk analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a method for risk analysis based on the approach used in CRAMM, but instead of using discrete measures for threats and vulnerabilities and look-up tables to derive levels of risk, it uses subjective beliefs about threats and vulnerabilities ... Keywords: belief calculus, risk analysis, security

Audun Jřsang; Daniel Bradley; Svein J. Knapskog

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

New Papers Indicate Climate Change May Intensify Chemical Risks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Papers Indicate Climate Change May Intensify Chemical Risks Print E-mail New Papers Indicate Climate Change May Intensify Chemical Risks Print E-mail Climate Change and Chemical Risks Wednesday, February 27, 2013 Featured by NIEHS a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program Pesticides, air pollutants, and other contaminants could become increasingly harmful to human health due to climate change, according to a new series of papers published in Environmental Toxicology Chemistry (ET&C). The seven publications, which appeared in ET&C's January 2013 issue, present evidence that climate change could affect how chemicals are transported and cause toxicity in both ecosystems and people. These impacts could mean that chemical risk assessment practices will demand swift modification and adaptation. "Risk assessors and public health practitioners need to understand how climate change may alter chemical risks to people in the future," said one of the papers' lead authors John Balbus, M.D., who is leading the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences's (NIEHS) Global Environmental Health and Sustainable Development projects. "Existing data sources and assumptions used in exposure and risk assessment may not apply. Environmental health researchers and risk assessors will need to consider interactions between climate-related stressors and chemical stressors and other ways that future risks may be changing," he added.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative risk ranking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Reference manual for toxicity and exposure assessment and risk characterization. CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 1980) (CERCLA or Superfund) was enacted to provide a program for identifying and responding to releases of hazardous substances into the environment. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA, 1986) was enacted to strengthen CERCLA by requiring that site clean-ups be permanent, and that they use treatments that significantly reduce the volume, toxicity, or mobility of hazardous pollutants. The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) (USEPA, 1985; USEPA, 1990) implements the CERCLA statute, presenting a process for (1) identifying and prioritizing sites requiring remediation and (2) assessing the extent of remedial action required at each site. The process includes performing two studies: a Remedial Investigation (RI) to evaluate the nature, extent, and expected consequences of site contamination, and a Feasibility Study (FS) to select an appropriate remedial alternative adequate to reduce such risks to acceptable levels. An integral part of the RI is the evaluation of human health risks posed by hazardous substance releases. This risk evaluation serves a number of purposes within the overall context of the RI/FS process, the most essential of which is to provide an understanding of ``baseline`` risks posed by a given site. Baseline risks are those risks that would exist if no remediation or institutional controls are applied at a site. This document was written to (1) guide risk assessors through the process of interpreting EPA BRA policy and (2) help risk assessors to discuss EPA policy with regulators, decision makers, and stakeholders as it relates to conditions at a particular DOE site.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

LPP Risk Management Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plan More Documents & Publications Software Development Risk Assessment High Risk Plan SC Introduction to Risk Management Energy.gov Careers & Internships For Staff &...

403

Risk Framework for the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uncertainty can be either an opportunity or a risk. Every construction project begins with the expectation of project performance. To meet the expectation, construction projects need to be managed through sound risk assessment and management beginning with the front-end of the project life cycle to check the feasibility of a project. The Construction Industry Institute’s (CII) International Project Risk Assessment (IPRA) tool has been developed, successfully used for a variety of heavy industry sector projects, and recently elevated to Best Practice status. However, its current format is inadequate to address the unique challenges of constructing the next generation of nuclear power plants (NPP). To understand and determine the risks associated with NPP projects, the goal of this thesis is to develop tailored risk framework for NPP projects that leverages and modifies the existing IPRA process. The IPRA has 82 elements to assess the risks associated with international construction projects. The modified IPRA adds five major issues (elements) to consider the unique risk factors of typical NPP projects based upon a review of the literature and an evaluation of the performance of previous nuclear-related facilities. The modified IPRA considers the sequence of NPP design that ultimately impacts the risks associated with plant safety and operations. Historically, financial risks have been a major chronic problem with the construction of NPPs. This research suggests that unstable regulations and the lack of design controls and oversight are significant risk issues. This thesis includes a consistency test to initially validate whether the asserted risks exist in actual conditions. Also, an overall risk assessment is performed based on the proposed risk framework for NPP and the list of assessed risk is proposed through a possible scenario. After the assessment, possible mitigation strategies are also provided against the major risks as a part of this thesis. This study reports on the preliminary findings for developing a new risk framework for constructing nuclear power plants. Future research is needed for advanced verification of the proposed elements. Follow-on efforts should include verification and validation of the proposed framework by industry experts and methods to quantify and evaluate the performance and risks associated with the multitude of previous NPP projects.

Yeon, Jaeheum 1981-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

EMAB Risk Subcommittee Interim Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FIRST INTERIM REPORT TO THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ADVISORY BOARD Incorporating Risk and Sustainability into Decision Making Submitted by the EMAB Risk Subcommittee December 3, 2012 Background: In December 2011, then Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management David Huizenga, asked the Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB or Board) to establish a Risk Subcommittee. In February 2012, the Subcommittee's Work Plan was approved. Under the Work Plan, the purpose of the Subcommittee is to evaluate "risk-informed decision making," specifically whether the prioritization tool developed by the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP) for use at the Oak Ridge Reservation (Oak Ridge) is one that

405

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Exposure Models for Chemicals User's Guide Risk Exposure Models for Chemicals User's Guide 1. Introduction The purpose of this calculator is to assist Remedial Project Managers (RPMs), On Scene Coordinators (OSC's), risk assessors and others involved in decision-making at hazardous waste sites and to determine whether levels of contamination found at the site may warrant further investigation or site cleanup, or whether no further investigation or action may be required. The risk values presented on this site are chemical-specific values for individual contaminants in air, water, soil and biota that may warrant further investigation or site cleanup. It should be noted that the risks in this calculator are based upon human health risk and do not address potential ecological risk. Some sites in sensitive ecological settings may also need to be evaluated for potential

406

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 3: Fission-Product Transport and Dose PIRTs  

SciTech Connect

This Fission Product Transport (FPT) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Technique (PIRT) report briefly reviews the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) FPT mechanisms and then documents the step-by-step PIRT process for FPT. The panel examined three FPT modes of operation: (1) Normal operation which, for the purposes of the FPT PIRT, established the fission product circuit loading and distribution for the accident phase. (2) Anticipated transients which were of less importance to the panel because a break in the pressure circuit boundary is generally necessary for the release of fission products. The transients can change the fission product distribution within the circuit, however, because temperature changes, flow perturbations, and mechanical vibrations or shocks can result in fission product movement. (3) Postulated accidents drew the majority of the panel's time because a breach in the pressure boundary is necessary to release fission products to the confinement. The accidents of interest involved a vessel or pipe break, a safety valve opening with or without sticking, or leak of some kind. Two generic scenarios were selected as postulated accidents: (1) the pressurized loss-of-forced circulation (P-LOFC) accident, and (2) the depressurized loss-of-forced circulation (D-LOFC) accidents. FPT is not an accident driver; it is the result of an accident, and the PIRT was broken down into a two-part task. First, normal operation was seen as the initial starting point for the analysis. Fission products will be released by the fuel and distributed throughout the reactor circuit in some fashion. Second, a primary circuit breach can then lead to their release. It is the magnitude of the release into and out of the confinement that is of interest. Depending on the design of a confinement or containment, the impact of a pressure boundary breach can be minimized if a modest, but not excessively large, fission product attenuation factor can be introduced into the release path. This exercise has identified a host of material properties, thermofluid states, and physics models that must be collected, defined, and understood to evaluate this attenuation factor. The assembled PIRT table underwent two iterations with extensive reorganization between meetings. Generally, convergence was obtained on most issues, but different approaches to the specific physics and transport paths shade the answers accordingly. The reader should be cautioned that merely selecting phenomena based on high importance and low knowledge may not capture the true uncertainty of the situation. This is because a transport path is composed of several serial linkages, each with its own uncertainty. The propagation of a chain of modest uncertainties can lead to a very large uncertainty at the end of a long path, resulting in a situation that is of little regulatory guidance.

Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Risk Mitigation Plan for  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... can institute direct incentives that reduce the relative price that building ... economic measures are calculated as present-value (PV) amounts: (I) Life ...

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

408

Radiation and Chemical Risk Management [EVS Program Area]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation and Chemical Risk Management Radiation and Chemical Risk Management EVS helps meet the challenge of protecting human health and the environment through the management of risk associated with radiation and chemicals in the environment. Protecting human health, welfare, and the environment in a world affected by energy production and technology is a global challenge. EVS helps to meet this challenge through research and analysis on the management of risk associated with radiation and chemicals in the environment. To improve the management of risk associated with nuclear and chemical materials and wastes at contaminated sites, we develop information and tools that support decision making related to health, safety, environmental, economic, and social-cultural concerns. Nuclear Materials and Waste Disposition

409

Use of the Journal Citation Reports for serials management in research libraries: An investigation of the effect of self-citation on journal rankings in library and information science and genetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article explores the use of the Institute for Scientific Information’s Journal Citation Reports (JCR) for journal management in academic libraries. The advantages and disadvantages to using JCR citation data for journal management are outlined, and a literature review summarizes reported uses of these data by libraries and scholars. This study researches the impact of journal self-citation on JCR rankings of library and information science (LIS) and genetics journals. The 1994 rankings by impact factor and total citations received were recalculated with journal self-citations removed; then the recalculated rankings were compared to the original rankings to analyze the effect of self-citations. It is concluded that librarians can use JCR data without correcting for journal self-citation, although self-citations do exert a major effect on the rankings for a small number of journals. t is unnecessary to state that management of serials has been one of the largest challenges confronting academic libraries in the past decade. A growing number of university libraries are using Journal Citation Reports (JCR) data to help reach difficult serials collection management decisions, whereas scholars use the data for journal ranking and other research purposes. There is an underlying

Thomas E. Nisonger

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

REVIEW Most Effective Colon Cancer Chemopreventive Agents in Rats: A Systematic Review of Aberrant Crypt Foci and Tumor Data, Ranked by Potency.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Potential chemopreventive agents for colorectal cancer are assessed in rodents. We speculated that the magnitude of the effect is meaningful, and ranked all published agents according to their potency. Data were gathered systematically from 137 articles with the aberrant crypt foci (ACF) endpoint, and 146 articles with the tumor endpoint. A table was built containing potency of each agent to reduce the number of ACF. Another table was built with potency of each agent to reduce the tumor incidence. Both tables are shown in the present paper, and on a website with sorting abilities

Denis E. Corpet; Sylviane Taché

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Collateral Risk Analytics for Energy Trading and Portfolio Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the need for a strong collateral risk management function as an integral part of an energy company’s risk management program. It reviews the basics of margining and collateral both in over-the-counter markets and on exchanges. In addition, it details the technology available to measure collateral risk properly. Then it reviews the recent efforts to regulate OTC derivatives, the potential impact that it could have on energy companies’ management of cash collateral, and strategies tha...

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

412

Energy Policy Options in Relation to the Public's Attitudes and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Policy Options in Relation to the Public's Attitudes and Risk Perceptions in Sweden Speaker(s): Mattias Viklund Date: February 7, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar...

413

Development of prototype guidelines for risk management against terror attack in the tourism industry: a Delphi study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the study was to gather strategies and factors from tourism security professionals from which terrorism risk management policies can be developed. This study utilized the Delphi method in order to provide structure for the group process. Twelve tourism security experts made up the panel completing three rounds of questionnaires via the email based Delphi technique. This research identified fifty-four strategies to reduce the propensity of terror attack at a tourism venue. Those strategies were divided into four levels of priority based on criticality and feasibility. The fifty-four strategies were grouped into nine subordinate categories. The subordinate categories were related to Training, Communications/ Liaison, Planning/ Assessment, Background Checks, ID Badges/ Secure Entrance, Specialty Security Units, Architectural Design, Media Cooperation, and Technology Based strategies. Alongside the strategies are a collection of comments by the experts regarding strengths, weaknesses, and any barriers to implementation pertaining to the individual strategy. Tourism risk managers, security personnel, and insurance underwriters can all use the results in reducing the opportunity for a terrorist attack at a tourism venue. Major research findings from this study included: 1. The strategy receiving the highest criticality ranking over all other strategies involves training first responders on their role in circumventing the success of terrorists. 2. The subordinate category Communication/ Liaison contains the largest number of strategies indicating the significance of this category among experts. 3. The subordinate category of Specialty Security Units contains the second highest number of strategies indicating the importance of the topic among experts. 4. All of the technology based strategies fell into the lowest priority level. Based on the findings of this study, researcher recommendations include: 1. The guidelines developed in this study should be used by operators of tourism venues to make the best use of limited resources. 2. National or international conferences should be established to further discuss these issues. 3. A greater number of communications mediums should be established to facilitate the exchange of ideas and experiences between affected professionals. 4. Insurance providers should use this information to establish validated guidelines so that, if prospective clients adhered to the recommendations, a reduction in premiums could be offered. 5. Other entities may benefit from this study, such as public school systems, the energy production industry, hospital systems, and pipeline systems.

Smith, Clifford Keith

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment Documents - ORR Risk Assessment Documents - ORR Bullet Baseline Risk Assessments Bullet Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Environmental Assessment Report South Campus Facility, Oak Ridge Tenn [DOE/OR/02-1274&D] Bullet Baseline Risk Assessment for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek [DOE/OR/1119 & D2 & V2] Bullet Remedial Investigation/ Feasibility Study Report for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Operable Unit [DOE/OR/01 1282 & D1] [ORNL/ER-2] Bullet The Utility of Existing Data Conducting a CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir (draft) [ORNL/ER-?] Bullet East Fork Poplar Creek Sewer Line Beltway Remedial Investigation Report [DOE/OR/02-1119&D2] Bullet Screening Risk Assessments Bullet Preliminary Assessment of Radiation Doses to the Public from Cesium

415

Uncertainties in Cancer Risk Coefficients for Environmental Exposure to Radionuclides. An Uncertainty Analysis for Risk Coefficients Reported in Federal Guidance Report No. 13  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal Guidance Report No. 13 (FGR 13) provides risk coefficients for estimation of the risk of cancer due to low-level exposure to each of more than 800 radionuclides. Uncertainties in risk coefficients were quantified in FGR 13 for 33 cases (exposure to each of 11 radionuclides by each of three exposure pathways) on the basis of sensitivity analyses in which various combinations of plausible biokinetic, dosimetric, and radiation risk models were used to generate alternative risk coefficients. The present report updates the uncertainty analysis in FGR 13 for the cases of inhalation and ingestion of radionuclides and expands the analysis to all radionuclides addressed in that report. The analysis indicates that most risk coefficients for inhalation or ingestion of radionuclides are determined within a factor of 5 or less by current information. That is, application of alternate plausible biokinetic and dosimetric models and radiation risk models (based on the linear, no-threshold hypothesis with an adjustment for the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor) is unlikely to change these coefficients by more than a factor of 5. In this analysis the assessed uncertainty in the radiation risk model was found to be the main determinant of the uncertainty category for most risk coefficients, but conclusions concerning the relative contributions of risk and dose models to the total uncertainty in a risk coefficient may depend strongly on the method of assessing uncertainties in the risk model.

Pawel, David [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; Nelson, Christopher [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Pollutant Exposure and Health Risk  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TEMcKone@lbl.gov (510) 486-6163 Links Exposure and Risk Assessment Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

417

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. EPA, Washington, D.C. 1992. Risk Assessment Forum. Wildlife Exposure Factors Handbook. Vol. I. United Staes Environmental Protection Agency. Office of Research and...

418

ORISE: Crisis and Risk Communication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Risk Communication Because a natural disaster, act of terrorism or other public emergency can happen without notice, having a planned, coordinated communication effort is...

419

Risk assessment methodology applied to counter IED research & development portfolio prioritization  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to protect the United States from the ever increasing threat of domestic terrorism, the Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate (DHS S&T), has significantly increased research activities to counter the terrorist use of explosives. More over, DHS S&T has established a robust Counter-Improvised Explosive Device (C-IED) Program to Deter, Predict, Detect, Defeat, and Mitigate this imminent threat to the Homeland. The DHS S&T portfolio is complicated and changing. In order to provide the ''best answer'' for the available resources, DHS S&T would like some ''risk based'' process for making funding decisions. There is a definite need for a methodology to compare very different types of technologies on a common basis. A methodology was developed that allows users to evaluate a new ''quad chart'' and rank it, compared to all other quad charts across S&T divisions. It couples a logic model with an evidential reasoning model using an Excel spreadsheet containing weights of the subjective merits of different technologies. The methodology produces an Excel spreadsheet containing the aggregate rankings of the different technologies. It uses Extensible Logic Modeling (ELM) for logic models combined with LANL software called INFTree for evidential reasoning.

Shevitz, Daniel W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Brien, David A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zerkle, David K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Key, Brian P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chavez, Gregory M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Development of Science-Based Permitting Guidance for Geological Sequestration of CO2 in Deep Saline Aquifers Based on Modeling and Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Underground carbon storage may become one of the solutions to address global warming. However, to have an impact, carbon storage must be done at a much larger scale than current CO{sub 2} injection operations for enhanced oil recovery. It must also include injection into saline aquifers. An important characteristic of CO{sub 2} is its strong buoyancy--storage must be guaranteed to be sufficiently permanent to satisfy the very reason that CO{sub 2} is injected. This long-term aspect (hundreds to thousands of years) is not currently captured in legislation, even if the U.S. has a relatively well-developed regulatory framework to handle carbon storage, especially in the operational short term. This report proposes a hierarchical approach to permitting in which the State/Federal Government is responsible for developing regional assessments, ranking potential sites (''General Permit'') and lessening the applicant's burden if the general area of the chosen site has been ranked more favorably. The general permit would involve determining in the regional sense structural (closed structures), stratigraphic (heterogeneity), and petrophysical (flow parameters such as residual saturation) controls on the long-term fate of geologically sequestered CO{sub 2}. The state-sponsored regional studies and the subsequent local study performed by the applicant will address the long-term risk of the particular site. It is felt that a performance-based approach rather than a prescriptive approach is the most appropriate framework in which to address public concerns. However, operational issues for each well (equivalent to the current underground injection control-UIC-program) could follow regulations currently in place. Area ranking will include an understanding of trapping modes. Capillary (due to residual saturation) and structural (due to local geological configuration) trappings are two of the four mechanisms (the other two are solubility and mineral trappings), which are the most relevant to the time scale of interest. The most likely pathways for leakage, if any, are wells and faults. We favor a defense-in-depth approach, in which storage permanence does not rely upon a primary seal only but assumes that any leak can be contained by geologic processes before impacting mineral resources, fresh ground water, or ground surface. We examined the Texas Gulf Coast as an example of an attractive target for carbon storage. Stacked sand-shale layers provide large potential storage volumes and defense-in-depth leakage protection. In the Texas Gulf Coast, the best way to achieve this goal is to establish the primary injection level below the total depth of most wells (>2,400 m-8,000 ft). In addition, most faults, particularly growth faults, present at the primary injection level do not reach the surface. A potential methodology, which includes an integrated approach comprising the whole chain of potential events from leakage from the primary site to atmospheric impacts, is also presented. It could be followed by the State/Federal Government, as well as by the operators.

Jean-Philippe Nicot; Renaud Bouroullec; Hugo Castellanos; Susan Hovorka; Srivatsan Lakshminarasimhan; Jeffrey Paine

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative risk ranking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Original article: The dynamics of BRICS's country risk ratings and domestic stock markets, U.S. stock market and oil price  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) are viewed currently as pillars of relative political, economic and financial stability, with the prospect of a major shift in future world power. The paper aims at investigating the relationships ... Keywords: ARDL, Country risk ratings, D81, Economic risk, F23, Financial risk, G22, G31, Political risk

Shawkat Hammoudeh, Ramazan Sari, Mehmet Uzunkaya, Tengdong Liu

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Software products for risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For assessing risks in all environments it is often necessary to use a systematic approach of modeling and simulation with the aim to simplify this process in the framework of designing new technological lines, machines, equipment and processes. Also ... Keywords: crisis management, risk assessment, software products

Jozef Ristvej; Tomas Lovecek

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Equipment Risk and Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report introduces the basis for understanding, developing, and applying a new set of practical, condition-based risk models for substation equipment. Because of the great variety of risks encountered in the power delivery industry and the diversity in utility equipment and business practices, the focus at this stage of the project is at the conceptual level.

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

424

Location of an agribusiness enterprise with respect to economic viability: a risk analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study analyzes the economic and geographic effects of alternative locations on risky investment decisions in a probabilistic framework. Historically, alternative locations for multi-million dollar investments are often evaluated with deterministic models that rely on expected values or best case/worst case scenarios. Stochastic simulation was used to estimate the probability distribution for select key output variables, including net present value (NPV), of a proposed biomass to ethanol production facility in three alternative regions in Texas. The simulated NPV probability distributions were compared using Stochastic Efficiency with Respect to a Function (SERF) to predict the location preference of decision makers with alternative levels of risk aversion. Risk associated with input availability and costs were analyzed for the proposed plant locations so each location resulted in different levels of economic viability and risk that would not have been observed with a traditional deterministic analysis. For all analyzed scenarios, the projected financial feasibility results show a positive NPV over the 16 year planning horizon with a small probability of being negative. The SERF results indicate the Central Region of Texas is preferred for risk averse decision makers compared to the Panhandle and Coastal Bend Regions. Risk premiums were calculated for the alternative locations and are consistent for all risk averse decision makers, indicating the ranking of alternative locations are robust. Positive community impacts and sensitivity elasticities for key variables were estimated in the model. The estimated positive economic gains for the local economy are quite large and indicate locating a production facility in the region could substantially impact the local economy. The calculated sensitivity elasticities show ethanol price, ethanol yield, and hydrogen price are the three variables that have the greatest affect on the feasibility of a biomass to ethanol production facility.

Lau, Michael H.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sites Sites These rankings are based on the EM-40 Release Site Methodology. Select a release site to receive information concerning that site. Please note that not all of the listed sites are linked to further information. Big Bayou Creek Big Bayou Creek Monitoring Station C-100 South Side Berm C-100 Trailer Complex Soil Contamination C-200 Underground Gasoline Tanks (UST) C-304 Bldg/HVAC Piping System (Soil Backfill) C-310 PCB Soil Contamination (West Side) C-331 PCB Soil Contamination (Southeast) C-331 PCB Soil Contamination (West) C-331 RCW Leak East Side C-331 RCW Leak Northwest Side C-333-A Vaporizer C-333 PCB Soil Contamination C-333 Cooling Tower Scrap Wood Pile C-333 PCB Soil Contamination (West) C-333 PCB Waste Storage Area C-333A Sewage Treatment Aeration Tank

426

Spatiotemporal and spatial threshold models for relating UV exposures and skin cancer in the central United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The exact mechanisms relating exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and elevated risk of skin cancer remain the subject of debate. For example, there is disagreement on whether the main risk factor is duration of the exposure, its intensity, or some ...

Laura A. Hatfield; Richard W. Hoffbeck; Bruce H. Alexander; Bradley P. Carlin

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Incorporating the Technology Roadmap Uncertainties into the Project Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes two methods, Technology Roadmapping and Project Risk Assessment, which were used to identify and manage the technical risks relating to the treatment of sodium bearing waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste treatment technology under consideration was Direct Vitrification. The primary objective of the Technology Roadmap is to identify technical data uncertainties for the technologies involved and to prioritize the testing or development studies to fill the data gaps. Similarly, project management's objective for a multi-million dollar construction project includes managing all the key risks in accordance to DOE O 413.3 - "Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets." In the early stages, the Project Risk Assessment is based upon a qualitative analysis for each risk's probability and consequence. In order to clearly prioritize the work to resolve the technical issues identified in the Technology Roadmap, the issues must be cross- referenced to the project's Risk Assessment. This will enable the project to get the best value for the cost to mitigate the risks.

Bonnema, Bruce Edward

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Incorporating the Technology Roadmap Uncertainties into the Project Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes two methods, Technology Roadmapping and Project Risk Assessment, which were used to identify and manage the technical risks relating to the treatment of sodium bearing waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste treatment technology under consideration was Direct Vitrification. The primary objective of the Technology Roadmap is to identify technical data uncertainties for the technologies involved and to prioritize the testing or development studies to fill the data gaps. Similarly, project management's objective for a multi-million dollar construction project includes managing all the key risks in accordance to DOE O 413.3 - ''Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets.'' In the early stages, the Project Risk Assessment is based upon a qualitative analysis for each risk's probability and consequence. In order to clearly prioritize the work to resolve the technical issues identified in the Technology Roadmap, the issues must be cross- referenced to the project's Risk Assessment. This will enable the project to get the best value for the cost to mitigate the risks.

Bonnema, B.E.

2002-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

429

Capital Requirements, Risk Measures and Comonotonicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we examine and summarize properties of several well-known risk measures, with special attention given to the class of distortion risk measures. We investigate the relationship between these risk measures and theories of choice under risk. We also consider the problem of evaluating risk measures for sums of nonindependent random variables and propose approximations based on the concept of comonotonicity.

Jan Dhaene; Steven Vanduffel; Qihe Tang; Marc J. Goovaerts; Rob Kaas; David Vyncke; Robkaas Davidvyncke

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Financial risk measurement with imprecise probabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although financial risk measurement is a largely investigated research area, its relationship with imprecise probabilities has been mostly overlooked. However, risk measures can be viewed as instances of upper (or lower) previsions, thus letting us apply ... Keywords: Coherent and convex risk measures, Dilation, Envelope theorems, Imprecise previsions, Natural extension, Risk measures, Shortfall, Value-at-Risk (VaR)

Paolo Vicig

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Profiling risk sensibility through association rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the last recent years several approaches to risk assessment and risk management have been adopted to reduce the potential for specific risks in working environments. A safety culture has also developed to let workers acquire knowledge and understanding ... Keywords: Association rules, Frequent patterns, Risk perception, Risk propensity

Beatrice Lazzerini; Francesco Pistolesi

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Airport risk assessment: a probabilistic approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk reduction is one of the key objectives pursued by transport safety policies. Particularly, the formulation and implementation of transport safety policies needs the systematic assessment of the risks, the specification of residual risk targets and ... Keywords: risk assessment methodology, risk management, safety civil aviation

L. Guerra; T. Murino; E. Romano

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

OIL PRICES AND LONG-RUN RISK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I show that relative levels of aggregate consumption and personal oil consumption provide an excellent proxy for oil prices, and that high oil prices predict low future aggregate consumption growth. Motivated by these facts, I add an oil consumption good to the long-run risk model of Bansal and Yaron [2004] to study the asset pricing implications of observed changes in the dynamic interaction of consumption and oil prices. Empirically I observe that, compared to the first half of my 1987- 2010 sample, oil consumption growth in the last 10 years is unresponsive to levels of oil prices, creating an decrease in the mean-reversion of oil prices, and an increase in the persistence of oil price shocks. The model implies that the change in the dynamics of oil consumption generates increased systematic risk from oil price shocks due to their increased persistence. However, persistent oil prices also act as a counterweight for shocks to expected consumption growth, with high expected growth creating high expectations of future oil prices which in turn slow down growth. The combined effect is to reduce overall consumption risk and lower the equity premium. The model also predicts that these changes affect the riskiness of of oil futures contracts, and combine to create a hump shaped

Robert Ready; Robert Clayton Ready; Robert Clayton Ready; Amir Yaron

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group Charter, January 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ASSESSMENT TECHNICAL EXPERT WORKING GROUP ASSESSMENT TECHNICAL EXPERT WORKING GROUP CHARTER January 2012 PURPOSE: To support effective and appropriate utilization of risk assessment tools in nuclear safety applications at defense nuclear facilities. OBJECTIVES: The Risk Assessment Technical Expert Working Group (RWG) is established to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) with the appropriate and effective use of quantitative risk assessment in nuclear safety-related activities. The activities of the group will help DOE make sure that risk assessments supporting nuclear safety decisions are: conducted in a consistent manner; of appropriate quality; properly documented; and properly tailored to the needs of the decisions they are intended to support. The RWG will also assist DOE in assessing the adequacy of available tools and

435

An approach to assessing stochastic radiogenic risk in medical imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: This letter suggests a formalism, the medical effective dose (MED), that is suitable for assessing stochastic radiogenic risks in diagnostic medical procedures. Methods: The MED is derived from radiobiological and probabilistic first principals, including: (1) The independence of radiation-induced biological effects in neighboring voxels at low doses; (2) the linear no-threshold assumption for stochastic radiation injury (although other dose-response relationships could be incorporated, instead); (3) the best human radiation dose-response data currently available; and (4) the built-in possibility that the carcinogenic risk to an irradiated organ may depend on its volume. The MED involves a dose-risk summation over irradiated voxels at high spatial resolution; it reduces to the traditional effective dose when every organ is irradiated uniformly and when the dependence of risk on organ volumes is ignored. Standard relative-risk tissue weighting factors can be used with the MED approach until more refined data become available. Results: The MED is intended for clinical and phantom dosimetry, and it provides an estimate of overall relative radiogenic stochastic risk for any given dose distribution. A result of the MED derivation is that the stochastic risk may increase with the volume of tissue (i.e., the number of cells) irradiated, a feature that can be activated when forthcoming radiobiological research warrants it. In this regard, the MED resembles neither the standard effective dose (E) nor the CT dose index (CTDI), but it is somewhat like the CT dose-length product (DLP). Conclusions: The MED is a novel, probabilistically and biologically based means of estimating stochastic-risk-weighted doses associated with medical imaging. Built in, ab initio, is the ability to link radiogenic risk to organ volume and other clinical factors. It is straightforward to implement when medical dose distributions are available, provided that one is content, for the time being, to accept the relative tissue weighting factors published by the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP). It requires no new radiobiological data and avoids major problems encountered by the E, CTDI, and CT-E formalisms. It makes possible relative inter-patient dosimetry, and also realistic intercomparisons of stochastic risks from different protocols that yield images of comparable quality.

Wolbarst, Anthony B.; Hendee, William R. [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine and Division of Radiation Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 (United States); Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55901 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Manhole Event Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update report is an account of continuing research conducted in 2007 on managing and mitigating underground distribution manhole events. Major events that result in collateral damage are rare; but the energy involved in a major event is equivalent to that released by several sticks of dynamite; and it may present significant hazard to the public and result in costly litigation. Research effort in 2007 concentrated mainly on developing a software model of gas-related explosions that can be ...

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

437

Dynamic Operational Risk Assessment with Bayesian Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil/gas and petrochemical plants are complicated and dynamic in nature. Dynamic characteristics include ageing of equipment/components, season changes, stochastic processes, operator response times, inspection and testing time intervals, sequential dependencies of equipment/components and timing of safety system operations, all of which are time dependent criteria that can influence dynamic processes. The conventional risk assessment methodologies can quantify dynamic changes in processes with limited capacity. Therefore, it is important to develop method that can address time-dependent effects. The primary objective of this study is to propose a risk assessment methodology for dynamic systems. In this study, a new technique for dynamic operational risk assessment is developed based on the Bayesian networks, a structure optimal suitable to organize cause-effect relations. The Bayesian network graphically describes the dependencies of variables and the dynamic Bayesian network capture change of variables over time. This study proposes to develop dynamic fault tree for a chemical process system/sub-system and then to map it in Bayesian network so that the developed method can capture dynamic operational changes in process due to sequential dependency of one equipment/component on others. The developed Bayesian network is then extended to the dynamic Bayesian network to demonstrate dynamic operational risk assessment. A case study on a holdup tank problem is provided to illustrate the application of the method. A dryout scenario in the tank is quantified. It has been observed that the developed method is able to provide updated probability different equipment/component failure with time incorporating the sequential dependencies of event occurrence. Another objective of this study is to show parallelism of Bayesian network with other available risk assessment methods such as event tree, HAZOP, FMEA. In this research, an event tree mapping procedure in Bayesian network is described. A case study on a chemical reactor system is provided to illustrate the mapping procedure and to identify factors that have significant influence on an event occurrence. Therefore, this study provides a method for dynamic operational risk assessment capable of providing updated probability of event occurrences considering sequential dependencies with time and a model for mapping event tree in Bayesian network.

Barua, Shubharthi

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Cost and Performance Comparison Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants, Volume 3 Executive Summary: Low Rank Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Baseline Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants Volume 3 Executive Summary: Low Rank Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity September 2011 DOE/NETL-2010/1399 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring

439

Technique for information retrieval using enhanced latent semantic analysis generating rank approximation matrix by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix  

SciTech Connect

A technique for information retrieval includes parsing a corpus to identify a number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. A weighted morpheme-by-document matrix is generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus and based at least in part on a weighting function. The weighted morpheme-by-document matrix separately enumerates instances of stems and affixes. Additionally or alternatively, a term-by-term alignment matrix may be generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. At least one lower rank approximation matrix is generated by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix and/or the term-by-term alignment matrix.

Chew, Peter A; Bader, Brett W

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

440

Security risk assessment: toward a comprehensive practical risk management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a unique approach to a more integrated security risk assessment SRA. This is formalised based on the proven mathematical methods described in various articles in the literature and combined with the work developed by the author. ...

Danilo Valeros Bernardo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative risk ranking" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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441

Investigation of the rank dependence of tar evolution. Quarterly report, 1 July 1990--30 September 1990  

SciTech Connect

Despite its high nitrogen concentration levels relative to the parent coal samples, 7.2% vs. 1.4 - 2.0%, little volatile nitrogen evolution is observed until decomposition temperatures of 600{degree}C or greater are obtained. Due to the lack of decomposition via tar evolution and as contrasted to parent coals, no significant bound nitrogen is evolved with heavy hydrocarbons at particle temperatures less than 600{degree}C. Similar to ``virgin`` chars and tars formed during rapid devolatilization, the polyimide samples begin to evolve significant fractions of bound nitrogen as IR-active light gases at particle temperatures between 650 and 750{degree}C. Unlike coal samples, however, relatively large fractions of the light gases are observed to be ammonia. The IR-active, nitrogen-containing light gas evolution rapidly declines at polyimide char temperatures greater than 750{degree}C, again in contrast to observed behavior in virgin coal char samples. It is not certain if the nitrogen evolution kinetics changes from selectively forming ammonia and hydrogen cyanide to benzonitriles or free nitrogen at these temperatures. The light gas evolution pattern with decomposition temperature of polymide could contribute to our understanding of the low conversion efficiencies observed for bound nitrogen to NO{sub x} conversion in the char combustion phase of pfc combustion.

Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Statistically based uncertainty analysis for ranking of component importance in the thermal-hydraulic safety analysis of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) has been used to help determine the importance of components and phenomena in thermal-hydraulic safety analyses of nuclear reactors. The AHP results are based, in part on expert opinion. Therefore, it is prudent to evaluate the uncertainty of the AHP ranks of importance. Prior applications have addressed uncertainty with experimental data comparisons and bounding sensitivity calculations. These methods work well when a sufficient experimental data base exists to justify the comparisons. However, in the case of limited or no experimental data the size of the uncertainty is normally made conservatively large. Accordingly, the author has taken another approach, that of performing a statistically based uncertainty analysis. The new work is based on prior evaluations of the importance of components and phenomena in the thermal-hydraulic safety analysis of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR), a new facility now in the design phase. The uncertainty during large break loss of coolant, and decay heat removal scenarios is estimated by assigning a probability distribution function (pdf) to the potential error in the initial expert estimates of pair-wise importance between the components. Using a Monte Carlo sampling technique, the error pdfs are propagated through the AHP software solutions to determine a pdf of uncertainty in the system wide importance of each component. To enhance the generality of the results, study of one other problem having different number of elements is reported, as are the effects of a larger assumed pdf error in the expert ranks. Validation of the Monte Carlo sample size and repeatability are also documented.

Wilson, G.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Agricultural Industrial Relations Bibliography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relations Act: Report. Sacramento, CA: Office of the AuditorLabor Relations Law. Sacramento, CA: California Agricultural1975-76 and 1976-77. Sacramento, CA: California Agricultural

Brown, Cheryl L.; Dote, Grace; Edmonds, Christopher M.; Perloff, Jeffrey M.; Rosenberg, Howard R.; Xiong, Nanyan

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Risk-Based Production Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the pilot application of a risk-informed approach to production optimization at fossil power plants. In this project, EPRI worked with a U.S. utility to develop risk profiles for plant components at two of the utilitys coal-fired generating units. The information was then used as a basis for identifying timing strategies for performing outage-based maintenance. The primary objective was to apply a risk-informed approach to identifying an optimal sequence of outage intervals and scop...

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

445

Buying electricity: Bounding the risks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dr. Berry`s article draws upon his review of dozens of electrical contracts while he was with the staff of the Arizona Corporation Commission. He presents risk management strategies for commercial and industrial consumers of power as electric markets become more competitive. Seven risk management tools are discussed: get more information about market prices; seek or make credible commitments; try to retain flexibility; seek to share, transfer, or spread risks; use incentives to help improve or offset poor performance; manage the use of electricity; and build trust with the supplier.

Berry, D. [Resource Management International, Inc., Sacramento, CA (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Capacity Factor Risk At Nuclear Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a model of the dynamic structure of capacity factor risk. It incorporates the risk that the capacity factor may vary widely from year-to-year, and also the risk that the reactor may be permanently shutdown prior ...

Du, Yangbo

447

Risk Aversion in Inventory Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditional inventory models focus on risk-neutral decision makers, i.e., characterizing replenishment strategies that maximize expected total profit, or equivalently, minimize expected total cost over a planning horizon. ...

Chen, Xin

448

Health risks of energy technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume examines occupational, public health, and environmental risks of the coal fuel cycle, the nuclear fuel cycle, and unconventional energy technologies. The 6 chapters explore in detail the relationship between energy economics and risk analysis, assess the problems of applying traditional cost-benefit analysis to long-term environmental problems (such as global carbon dioxide levels), and consider questions about the public's perception and acceptance of risk. Also included is an examination of the global risks associated with current and proposed levels of energy production and comsumption from all major sources. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 6 chapters; all are included in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA) and four in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

Travis, C.C.; Etnier, E.L. (eds.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Risk View Software Functional Specification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report defines the functional requirements for a new Risk View software product to be developed as part of the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Operations and Maintenance Excellence (OMX) initiative. plant information sources.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

450

Relational measures and integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Work in fuzzy modeling has recently made its way from the interval $[0,1]\\subseteq {\\mathord{\\rm I \\! R}}$ to the ordinal or even to the qualitative level. We proceed further and introduce relational measures and relational integration. First ideas of ... Keywords: Choquet integral, evidence and belief, measure, necessity, plausibility, possibility measures, relation algebra, relational, sugeno integral

Gunther Schmidt

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Bayesian-lopa methodology for risk assessment of an LNG importation terminal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) is one of the fastest growing energy sources in the U.S. to fulfill the increasing energy demands. In order to meet the LNG demand, many LNG facilities including LNG importation terminals are operating currently. Therefore, it is important to estimate the potential risks in LNG terminals to ensure their safety. One of the best ways to estimate the risk is LOPA (Layer of Protection Analysis) because it can provide quantified risk results with less time and efforts than other methods. For LOPA application, failure data are essential to compute risk frequencies. However, the failure data from the LNG industry are very sparse. Bayesian estimation is identified as one method to compensate for its weaknesses. It can update the generic data with plant specific data. Based on Bayesian estimation, the frequencies of initiating events were obtained using a conjugate gamma prior distribution such as OREDA (Offshore Reliability Data) database and Poisson likelihood distribution. If there is no prior information, Jeffreys noninformative prior may be used. The LNG plant failure database was used as plant specific likelihood information. The PFDs (Probability of Failure on Demand) of IPLs (Independent Protection Layers) were estimated with the conjugate beta prior such as EIReDA (European Industry Reliability Data Bank) database and binomial likelihood distribution. In some cases EIReDA did not provide failure data, so the newly developed Frequency-PFD conversion method was used instead. By the combination of Bayesian estimation and LOPA procedures, the Bayesian-LOPA methodology was developed and was applied to an LNG importation terminal. The found risk values were compared to the tolerable risk criteria to make risk decisions. Finally, the risk values of seven incident scenarios were compared to each other to make a risk ranking. In conclusion, the newly developed Bayesian-LOPA methodology really does work well in an LNG importation terminal and it can be applied in other industries including refineries and petrochemicals. Moreover, it can be used with other frequency analysis methods such as Fault Tree Analysis (FTA).

Yun, Geun-Woong

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Risk-Informed Asset Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains business requirements for Risk-Informed Asset Management (RIAM) software. The requirements pertain to both a full-blown version of RIAM (including uncertainty analysis of the economic and safety risk of a proposed equipment improvement project) and for RIAM Level 1 project screening software. The RIAM Level 1 analysis is a bounding process intended to estimate the most optimistic effect that the proposed investment would have on plant safety, cost, and revenue. The optimistic assumpt...

2006-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

453

Demand Response and Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For several decades, power companies have deployed various types of demand response (DR), such as interruptible contracts, and there is substantial ongoing research and development on sophisticated mechanisms for triggering DR. In this white paper, EPRI discusses the increasing use of electricity DR in the power industry and how this will affect the practice of energy risk management. This paper outlines 1) characteristics of a common approach to energy risk management, 2) the variety of types of DR impl...

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

454

Breast cancer risk and environmental exposures. Environ Health Perspect 105:891–896  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although environmental contaminants have potential to affect breast cancer risk, explicit environmental links to this disease are limited. The most well-defined environmental risk factors are radiation exposure and alcohol ingestion. Diet is clearly related to the increased incidence of breast cancer in developed countries, but its precise role is not yet established. Recent studies have implicated exposure to organochlorines including DDT as a risk factor for breast cancer in

Mary S. Wolff; Ainsley Weston

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Uncertainties in risk assessment at USDOE facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (USDOE) has embarked on an ambitious program to remediate environmental contamination at its facilities. Decisions concerning cleanup goals, choices among cleanup technologies, and funding prioritization should be largely risk-based. Risk assessments will be used more extensively by the USDOE in the future. USDOE needs to develop and refine risk assessment methods and fund research to reduce major sources of uncertainty in risk assessments at USDOE facilities. The terms{open_quote} risk assessment{close_quote} and{open_quote} risk management{close_quote} are frequently confused. The National Research Council (1983) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA, 1991a) described risk assessment as a scientific process that contributes to risk management. Risk assessment is the process of collecting, analyzing and integrating data and information to identify hazards, assess exposures and dose responses, and characterize risks. Risk characterization must include a clear presentation of {open_quotes}... the most significant data and uncertainties...{close_quotes} in an assessment. Significant data and uncertainties are {open_quotes}...those that define and explain the main risk conclusions{close_quotes}. Risk management integrates risk assessment information with other considerations, such as risk perceptions, socioeconomic and political factors, and statutes, to make and justify decisions. Risk assessments, as scientific processes, should be made independently of the other aspects of risk management (USEPA, 1991a), but current methods for assessing health risks are based on conservative regulatory principles, causing unnecessary public concern and misallocation of funds for remediation.

Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456