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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Variable Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences Percent of Projections Over- Estimated Gross Domestic Product Real Gross Domestic Product (Average Cumulative Growth)* (Table 2) 1.0 42.6 Petroleum Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Constant $) (Table 3a) 35.2 18.6 Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Nominal $) (Table 3b) 34.7 19.7 Total Petroleum Consumption (Table 4) 6.2 66.5 Crude Oil Production (Table 5) 6.0 59.6 Petroleum Net Imports (Table 6) 13.3 67.0 Natural Gas Natural Gas Wellhead Prices (Constant $) (Table 7a) 30.7 26.1 Natural Gas Wellhead Prices (Nominal $) (Table 7b) 30.0 27.1 Total Natural Gas Consumption (Table 8) 7.8 70.2 Natural Gas Production (Table 9) 7.1 66.0 Natural Gas Net Imports (Table 10) 29.3 69.7 Coal Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants (Constant $)** (Table 11a)

2

Percent Distribution  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Percent Distribution of Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 1996 Table State Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) Marketed Production Total Consumption Alabama................................................................... 3.02 2.69 1.48 Alaska ...................................................................... 5.58 2.43 2.04 Arizona..................................................................... NA 0 0.55 Arkansas.................................................................. 0.88 1.12 1.23 California.................................................................. 1.25 1.45 8.23 Colorado .................................................................. 4.63 2.90 1.40 Connecticut.............................................................. 0 0 0.58 D.C...........................................................................

3

"Table 1. Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" "Variable","Average Absolute Percent Differences","Percent of Projections Over- Estimated"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" "Variable","Average Absolute Percent Differences","Percent of Projections Over- Estimated" "Gross Domestic Product" "Real Gross Domestic Product (Average Cumulative Growth)* (Table 2)",0.9772689079,42.55319149 "Petroleum" "Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Constant $) (Table 3a)",35.19047501,18.61702128 "Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Nominal $) (Table 3b)",34.68652106,19.68085106 "Total Petroleum Consumption (Table 4)",6.150682783,66.4893617 "Crude Oil Production (Table 5)",5.99969572,59.57446809 "Petroleum Net Imports (Table 6)",13.27260615,67.0212766 "Natural Gas"

4

Percent Distribution  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Percent Distribution of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers by State, 1996 Table State Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Alabama..................................... 1.08 0.92 2.27 0.08 0.23 Alaska ........................................ 0.31 0.87 0.85 - 1.16 Arizona....................................... 0.53 0.92 0.30 3.91 0.70 Arkansas.................................... 0.88 0.98 1.59 0.11 1.24 California.................................... 9.03 7.44 7.82 43.11 11.64 Colorado .................................... 2.12 2.18 0.94 0.58 0.20 Connecticut................................ 0.84 1.26 0.37 1.08 0.38 D.C............................................. 0.33 0.52 - 0.21 - Delaware.................................... 0.19 0.21 0.16 0.04 0.86 Florida........................................

5

Using LiDAR and normalized difference vegetation index to remotely determine LAI and percent canopy cover at varying scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: (1) Develop scanning LiDAR and multispectral imagery methods to estimate PCC and LAI over both hardwood and coniferous forests; (2) investigate whether a LiDAR and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data fusion through linear regression...

Griffin, Alicia Marie Rutledge

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2009" 0. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2009" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin State","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Alabama","Alabama"," W"," $13.59",," W",," $63.63"," 21.4%"," 3,612"," W"," 100.0%"

7

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2008" 1. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2008" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin Basin","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Northern Appalachian Basin","Delaware"," W"," $28.49",," W",," $131.87"," 21.6%", 59," W"," 100.0%"

8

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2008" 9. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2008" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin State","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Alabama","Alabama"," W"," $14.43",," W",," $65.38"," 22.1%"," 4,509"," W"," 81.8%"

9

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2009" 2. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2009" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin Basin","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Northern Appalachian Basin","Florida"," W"," $38.51",," W",," $140.84"," 27.3%", 134," W"," 100.0%"

10

Individual differences and relative advantage: the case of GSS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Studies of the effect of individual differences on usage of information systems have yielded mixed results. This study examines the effect of individual differences on the perceived relative advantage (a concept akin to perceived usefulness) of using ... Keywords: computer anxiety, group support systems, oral communication apprehension, personal innovativeness, relative advantage, writing communication apprehension

Elena Karahanna; Manju Ahuja; Mark Srite; John Galvin

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Exposing Behavioral Differences in Cross-Language API Mapping Relations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exposing Behavioral Differences in Cross-Language API Mapping Relations Hao Zhong1 , Suresh translation of many call sites of API elements (i.e., classes, methods, and fields of API libraries). API source API elements and their equiv- alent target API elements. However, in an API mapping relation

Xie, Tao

12

Formaldehyde emissions from ventilation filters under different relative  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Formaldehyde emissions from ventilation filters under different relative Formaldehyde emissions from ventilation filters under different relative humidity conditions Title Formaldehyde emissions from ventilation filters under different relative humidity conditions Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed Year of Publication 2013 Authors Sidheswaran, Meera A., Wenhao Chen, Agatha Chang, Robert Miller, Sebastian Cohn, Douglas P. Sullivan, William J. Fisk, Kazukiyo Kumagai, and Hugo Destaillats Journal Environmental Science and Technology Date Published 04/18/2013 Abstract A method combining life cycle assessment (LCA) and real options analyses is developed to predict project environmental and financial performance over time, under market uncertainties and decision-making flexibility. The method is applied to examine alternative uses for oil sands coke, a carbonaceous byproduct of processing the unconventional petroleum found in northern Alberta, Canada. Under uncertainties in natural gas price and the imposition of a carbon price, our method identifies that selling the coke to China for electricity generation by integrated gasification combined cycle is

13

Relative permeabilities of gas and water for different rank coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Characteristics of gas–water two-phase flow through coal seams play crucial roles in water depletion and gas production associated with coalbed methane (CBM) recovery. One of the most important characteristic is the relative permeability of gas and water which is largely dependent on gas/water saturations in coal, varying with coal ranks. For better understanding of the seepage mechanism of the gas–water flow in coal, the relative permeabilities of gas and water in different rank coals selected from south Qinshui Basin have been investigated under various gas/water saturations through water replacement with methane using an unsteady-state method. The results have shown that the ratio of effective methane permeability and absolute permeability is obviously increasing with rank, implying that the gas slippage of high rank coal has more significant effect than the low rank coal. A series of relative permeability curves for selected coals have been obtained. All of these curves show that the selected coals are featured by smaller methane permeabilities and narrow spans of two-phase flow regions and lower relative permeability, and have low methane permeabilities under irreducible water condition as well. The experiments also revealed that the selected coals exhibit high residual water saturation with low relative permeabilities of gas and water. With increasing of the maximal vitrinite reflectance, the irreducible water saturation exhibits a U-shaped tendency whereas the methane permeability under the irreducible water condition generally increases. The irreducible water saturation slightly increases with increasing of vitrinite and weakly decreases as inertinite increases, while the methane permeability under irreducible water condition is negatively related with vitrinite and positively related to inertinite to some extent. The experimental data were further parameterized to correlate the relative permeabilities of methane and water to gas saturation, showing that a correlation of power function can fit the experiments well. As a result, a permeability model incorporated with coal rank and maceral compositions with gas saturation was developed to predict the relative permeabilities of gas (methane) and water in coals.

Jian Shen; Yong Qin; Geoff X. Wang; Xuehai Fu; Chongtao Wei; Bo Lei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Quantifying Stove Emissions Related to Different Use Patterns for the  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stove Emissions Related to Different Use Patterns for the Stove Emissions Related to Different Use Patterns for the Silver-mini (Small Turkish) Space Heating Stove Title Quantifying Stove Emissions Related to Different Use Patterns for the Silver-mini (Small Turkish) Space Heating Stove Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6319E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Maddalena, Randy L., Melissa M. Lunden, Daniel Wilson, Cristina Ceballos, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Jonathan L. Slack, and Larry L. Dale Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Air pollution levels in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia's capital, are among the highest in the world. A primary source of this pollution is emissions from traditional coal-burning space heating stoves used in the Ger (tent) regions around Ulaanbaatar. Significant investment has been made to replace traditional heating stoves with improved low-emission high-efficiency stoves. Testing performed to support selection of replacement stoves or for optimizing performance may not be representative of true field performance of the improved stoves. Field observations and lab measurements indicate that performance is impacted, often adversely, by how stoves are actually being used in the field. The objective of this project is to identify factors that influence stove emissions under typical field operating conditions and to quantify the impact of these factors. A highly-instrumented stove testing facility was constructed to allow for rapid and precise adjustment of factors influencing stove performance. Tests were performed using one of the improved stove models currently available in Ulaanbaatar. Complete burn cycles were conducted with Nailakh coal from the Ulaanbaatar region

15

Percent Yield and Mass of Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Percent Yield and Mass of Water Percent Yield and Mass of Water Name: Lisa Status: educator Grade: 9-12 Location: CA Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: When doing a percent yield activity in lab, we use MgCl hexahydrate and CaSO4. How do we factor the mass of the water that is released during the reaction? Replies: Lisa, Based on your question, I am not quite sure what the experiment is. Are you heating the hydrates and looking at the percent-yield of water removed during the heating? If so, then you would calculate the theoretical yield (using stoichiometry and the balanced chemical equation: MgCl2.6H2O --> MgCl2 + 6H2O) of water released, and compare it to the actual yield of water released in the experiment to get percent yield. Greg (Roberto Gregorius) Canisius College

16

27. 5-percent silicon concentrator solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advances in silicon solar cells using the backside point-contact configuration have been extended resulting in 27.5-percent efficiencies at 10 W/sq cm (100 suns, 24 C), making these the most efficient solar cells reported to date. The one-sun efficiencies under an AM1.5 spectrum normalized to 100 mW/sq cm are 22 percent at 24 C based on the design area of the concentrator cell. The improvements reported here are largely due to the incorportation of optical light trapping to enhance the absorption of weakly absorbed near bandgap light. These results approach the projected efficiencies for a mature technology which are 23-24 percent at one sun and 29 percent in the 100-350-sun (10-35 W/sq cm) range. 10 references.

Sinton, R.A.; Kwark, Y.; Gan, J.Y.; Swanson, R.M.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

18

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

19

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

20

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

22

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

23

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

24

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

25

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

26

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

27

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

28

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

29

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

30

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

31

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

32

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

33

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

34

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

35

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

36

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 305 285 310 230 210 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells NA 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 From Oil Wells 3,942 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

37

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 186 322 285 276 322 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

38

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

39

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

40

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

42

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

43

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

44

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

45

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Florida - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 17,129 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

46

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

47

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

48

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

49

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

50

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

51

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

52

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

53

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 525 563 620 914 819 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

54

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Illinois - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 45 51 50 40 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells E 1,188 E 1,438 E 1,697 2,114 2,125 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 7 0 From Coalbed Wells E 0 E 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

55

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 194 196 188 239 211 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 13,738 11,263 10,501 14,287 22,261 From Oil Wells 54,896 45,776 38,306 27,739 17,434 From Coalbed Wells 0

56

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 1,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,673 337,168 387,026 429,829 404,457 From Oil Wells 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 43,421 From Coalbed Wells 7,250

57

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,735 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 6,681 R 7,419 R 16,046 R 23,086 20,375 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells R 86,275 R 101,567

58

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Michigan - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,712 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 80,090 R 16,959 R 20,867 R 7,345 18,470 From Oil Wells 54,114 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 From Coalbed Wells 0

59

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Montana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S28. Summary statistics for natural gas - Montana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,925 7,095 7,031 6,059 6,477 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 69,741 R 67,399 R 57,396 R 51,117 37,937 From Oil Wells 23,092 22,995 21,522 19,292 21,777 From Coalbed Wells

60

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,315 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 259,001 R 331,673 R 337,168 R 387,026 429,829 From Oil Wells 6,203 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 From Coalbed Wells

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Indiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,350 525 563 620 914 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

62

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 New York - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,680 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 54,232 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 From Oil Wells 710 714 576 650 629 From Coalbed Wells 0

63

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Texas - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 76,436 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 4,992,042 R 5,285,458 R 4,860,377 R 4,441,188 3,794,952 From Oil Wells 704,092 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301

64

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Ohio - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 35,104 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 79,769 83,511 73,459 30,655 65,025 From Oil Wells 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 6,684 From Coalbed Wells 0

65

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Colorado - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 496,374 459,509 526,077 563,750 1,036,572 From Oil Wells 199,725 327,619 338,565

66

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 71 89 102 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 422 R 1,098 R 1,561 1,300 933 From Oil Wells 11,458 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 From Coalbed Wells 0 0

67

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Illinois - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 43 45 51 50 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells RE 1,389 RE 1,188 RE 1,438 RE 1,697 2,114 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 7 From Coalbed Wells RE 0 RE

68

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Colorado - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 436,330 R 496,374 R 459,509 R 526,077 563,750 From Oil Wells 160,833 199,725 327,619

69

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Alaska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 239 261 261 269 277 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 From Oil Wells 3,313,666 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654

70

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Ohio - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 82,812 R 79,769 R 83,511 R 73,459 30,655 From Oil Wells 5,268 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 From Coalbed Wells

71

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,563 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 95,437 R 112,587 R 111,782 133,521 122,578 From Oil Wells 0 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 From Coalbed Wells 0

72

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Utah - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,197 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 271,890 R 331,143 R 340,224 R 328,135 351,168 From Oil Wells 35,104 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 From Coalbed Wells

73

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 California - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 93,249 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 From Oil Wells R 116,652 R 122,345 R 121,949 R 151,369 120,880

74

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Utah - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 6,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,143 340,224 328,135 351,168 402,899 From Oil Wells 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 31,440 From Coalbed Wells 74,399

75

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18,145 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,261,539 R 1,288,559 R 1,100,007 R 911,967 883,712 From Oil Wells 106,303 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505

76

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 38,364 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,583,356 R 1,452,148 R 1,413,759 R 1,140,111 1,281,794 From Oil Wells 35,186 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703

77

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 New Mexico - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S33. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Mexico, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 42,644 44,241 44,784 44,748 32,302 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 657,593 R 732,483 R 682,334 R 616,134 556,024 From Oil Wells 227,352 211,496 223,493 238,580 252,326

78

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 48,215 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 189,968 R 191,444 R 192,896 R 151,401 167,113 From Oil Wells 701 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells

79

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Michigan - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 10,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 16,959 20,867 7,345 18,470 17,041 From Oil Wells 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 4,470 From Coalbed Wells 0

80

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 50,700 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 191,444 192,896 151,401 167,113 397,313 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 1,477 From Coalbed Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 80 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 27,350 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,649,284 R 1,764,084 R 1,806,807 R 1,787,599 1,709,218 From Oil Wells 159,039 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589

82

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 New York - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 7,176 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 25,985 From Oil Wells 714 576 650 629 439 From Coalbed Wells 0

83

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 22,171 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,764,084 1,806,807 1,787,599 1,709,218 1,762,095 From Oil Wells 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589 24,544

84

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 7,843 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 7,419 16,046 23,086 20,375 21,802 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 9 From Coalbed Wells 101,567 106,408

85

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 17,936 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 112,587 111,782 133,521 122,578 106,122 From Oil Wells 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

86

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Pennsylvania - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S40. Summary statistics for natural gas - Pennsylvania, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 52,700 55,631 57,356 44,500 54,347 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 182,277 R 188,538 R 184,795 R 173,450 242,305 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

87

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Texas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 96,617 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 5,285,458 4,860,377 4,441,188 3,794,952 3,619,901 From Oil Wells 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301 860,675

88

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Alabama - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S1. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alabama, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 158,964 142,509 131,448 116,872 114,407 From Oil Wells 6,368 5,758 6,195 5,975 10,978

89

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 19,792 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,288,559 1,100,007 911,967 883,712 775,506 From Oil Wells 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505 49,380

90

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 89 102 100 95 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,098 1,561 1,300 933 14,396 From Oil Wells 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 689 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0

91

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Kansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S18. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 17,862 21,243 22,145 25,758 24,697 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 286,210 269,086 247,651 236,834 264,610 From Oil Wells 45,038 42,647 39,071 37,194 0 From Coalbed Wells 44,066

92

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Arkansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S4. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arkansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 173,975 164,316 152,108 132,230 121,684 From Oil Wells 7,378 5,743 5,691 9,291 3,000

93

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 California - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 120,579 From Oil Wells 122,345 121,949 151,369 120,880 70,900

94

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 40,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,452,148 1,413,759 1,140,111 1,281,794 1,394,859 From Oil Wells 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703 53,720

95

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Alaska - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 261 261 269 277 185 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 107,873 From Oil Wells 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654 3,056,918

96

E-Print Network 3.0 - age related differences Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: age related differences Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Biogerontology 4: 119120, 2003. 2003 Kluwer Academic...

97

Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

98

Connecticut Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Connecticut Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

99

Sex-biased immunity is driven by relative differences in reproductive investment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...driven by relative differences in reproductive investment Crystal M. Vincent 1 Darryl T. Gwynne 2...response to sex-specific fitness returns of investment in traits such as parental investment and longevity, but the scarcity of data...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Rank-Related Fitness Differences and Their Demographic Pathways in Semi-Free-Ranging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rank-Related Fitness Differences and Their Demographic Pathways in Semi-Free-Ranging Rhesus survival. We use resampling techniques and van Tienderen's (2000) elasticity path analysis to identify rank-free-ranging rhesus macaque population. Higher-ranking population segments grew at greater rates for some portions

Blomquist, Greg

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Age-related differences in the initial usability of mobile device icons Rock Leunga  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Age-related differences in the initial usability of mobile device icons Rock Leunga *, Joanna Mc usability problems to address this issue, little work has looked at whether existing graphical icons study and a follow-up experimental study to determine which icon characteristics help initial icon

McGrenere, Joanna

102

Quantifying Stove Emissions Related to Different Use Patterns for the Silver-mini  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quantifying Stove Emissions Related to Quantifying Stove Emissions Related to Different Use Patterns for the Silver-mini (Small Turkish) Space Heating Stove Randy Maddalena, Melissa Lunden, Daniel Wilson, Cristina Ceballos, Thomas Kirchstetter, Jonathan Slack, Larry Dale Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 August 2012 This work was supported by the Millennium Challenge Corporation, USA and by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. LBNL-6319E Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither

103

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal November 3, 2005 - 12:35pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that the federal government has exceeded its goal of obtaining 2.5 percent of its electricity needs from renewable energy sources by September 30, 2005. The largest energy consumer in the nation, the federal government now uses 2375 Gigawatt hours (GWh) of renewable energy -- enough to power 225,000 homes or a city the size of El Paso, Texas, for a year. "Particularly in light of tight oil and gas supplies caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, it is important that all Americans - including the

104

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal November 3, 2005 - 12:35pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that the federal government has exceeded its goal of obtaining 2.5 percent of its electricity needs from renewable energy sources by September 30, 2005. The largest energy consumer in the nation, the federal government now uses 2375 Gigawatt hours (GWh) of renewable energy -- enough to power 225,000 homes or a city the size of El Paso, Texas, for a year. "Particularly in light of tight oil and gas supplies caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, it is important that all Americans - including the

105

Ninety - Two Percent Minimum Heater Efficiency By 1980  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology is now available to increase heater efficiencies to 92 percent and more. By 1980, this technology will be field proven and corrosion and reliability problems identified and resolved. Recent studies have shown that a minimum efficiency...

Mieth, H. C.; Hardie, J. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

BOSS Measures the Universe to One-Percent Accuracy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This and future measures at this precision are the key to determining the nature of dark energy. "One-percent accuracy in the scale of the universe is the most precise such...

107

NETL: News Release - President's Initiative to Seek 90 Percent Mercury  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

April 21, 2004 April 21, 2004 President's Initiative to Seek 90 Percent Mercury Removal We Energies to Test TOXECON(tm) Process in Michigan Coal-fired Power Plant WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) and We Energies today initiated a joint venture to demonstrate technology that will remove an unprecedented 90 percent of mercury emissions from coal-based power plants. Presque Isle Power Plant - We Energies' Presque Isle Power Plant located on the shores of Lake Superior in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. As part of the President's Clean Coal Power Initiative of technology development and demonstration, the new project supports current proposals to reduce mercury emissions in the range of 70 percent through a proposed regulation pending before the Environmental Protection Agency or, in the

108

DO QUIESCENT AND ACTIVE GALAXIES HAVE DIFFERENT M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} RELATIONS?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To investigate the validity of the assumption that quiescent galaxies and active galaxies follow the same black hole mass (M{sub BH})-stellar velocity dispersion ({sigma}{sub *}) relation, as required for the calibration of M{sub BH} estimators for broad line active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we determine and compare the M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relations, respectively, for quiescent and active galaxies. For the quiescent galaxy sample, composed of 72 dynamical M{sub BH} measurements, we update {sigma}{sub *} for 28 galaxies using homogeneous H-band measurements that are corrected for galaxy rotation. For active galaxies, we collect 25 reverberation-mapped AGNs and improve {sigma}{sub *} measurement for two objects. Combining the two samples, we determine the virial factor f, first by scaling the active galaxy sample to the M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation of quiescent galaxies, and second by simultaneously fitting the quiescent and active galaxy samples, as f=5.1{sub -1.1}{sup +1.5} and f=5.9{sub -1.5}{sup +2.1}, respectively. The M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation of active galaxies appears to be shallower than that of quiescent galaxies. However, the discrepancy is caused by a difference in the accessible M{sub BH} distribution at given {sigma}{sub *}, primarily due to the difficulty of measuring reliable stellar velocity dispersion for the host galaxies of luminous AGNs. Accounting for the selection effects, we find that active and quiescent galaxies are consistent with following intrinsically the same M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation.

Woo, Jong-Hak; Park, Daeseong; Kang, Wol-Rang [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Schulze, Andreas [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China); Kim, Sang Chul [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Riechers, Dominik A., E-mail: woo@astro.snu.ac.kr [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, 220 Space Science Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

109

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test August 21, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The successful bench-scale test of a novel carbon dioxide (CO2) capturing sorbent promises to further advance the process as a possible technological option for reducing CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. The new sorbent, BrightBlack™, was originally developed for a different application by Advanced Technology Materials Inc. (ATMI) , a subcontractor to SRI for the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored test at the University of Toledo. Through partnering with the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and others, SRI developed a method to

110

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test August 21, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The successful bench-scale test of a novel carbon dioxide (CO2) capturing sorbent promises to further advance the process as a possible technological option for reducing CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. The new sorbent, BrightBlack™, was originally developed for a different application by Advanced Technology Materials Inc. (ATMI) , a subcontractor to SRI for the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored test at the University of Toledo. Through partnering with the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and others, SRI developed a method to

111

Table 2. Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years " Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years " ,"Survey Years" ,1983,1985,1988,1991,1994,2001 "Total",85.5450237,89.00343643,88.75545852,89.42917548,87.25590956,92.08566108 "Household Characteristics" "Census Region and Division" " Northeast",77.22222222,"NA",79.16666667,82.9015544,75.38461538,85.09615385 " New England",88.37209302,"NA",81.81818182,82.9787234,82,88.52459016 " Middle Atlantic ",73.72262774,"NA",78.37837838,82.31292517,74.30555556,83.67346939 " Midwest ",85.51401869,"NA",90.66666667,90.17094017,92.30769231,91.47286822 " East North Central",82,"NA",88.81987578,89.88095238,91.51515152,90.55555556

112

Upper bounds on the relative energy difference of pure and mixed Gaussian states with a fixed fidelity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exact and approximate formulas for the upper bound of the relative energy difference of two Gaussian states with the fixed fidelity between them are derived. The reciprocal formulas for the upper bound of the fidelity for the fixed value of the relative energy difference are obtained as well. The bounds appear higher for pure states than for mixed ones, and their maximal values correspond to squeezed vacuum states. In particular, to guarantee the relative energy difference less than 10%, for quite arbitrary Gaussian states, the fidelity between them must exceed the level 0.998866.

V. V. Dodonov

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

113

Relationalism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article contributes to the debate of the meaning of relationalism and background independence, which has remained of interest in theoretical physics from Newton versus Leibniz through to foundational issues for today's leading candidate theories of quantum gravity. I contrast and compose the substantially different Leibniz--Mach--Barbour (LMB) and Rovelli--Crane (RC) uses of the word `relational'. Leibniz advocated primary timelessness and Mach that `time is to be abstracted from change'. I consider 3 distinct viewpoints on Machian time: Barbour's, Rovelli's and my own. I provide four expansions on Barbour's taking configuration space to be primary: to (perhaps a weakened notion of) phase space, categorizing, perspecting and propositioning. Categorizing means considering not only object spaces but also the corresponding morphisms and then functors between such pairs. Perspecting means considering the set of subsystem perspectives; this is an arena in which the LMB and Rovelli approaches make contact. By propositioning, I mean considering the set of propositions about a physical (sub)system. I argue against categorization being more than a formal pre-requisite for quantization in general; however, perspecting is a categorical operation, and propositioning leads one to considering topoi, with Isham and Doering's work represents one possibility for a mathematically sharp implementation of propositioning. Further applications of this article are arguing for Ashtekar variables as being relational in LMB as well as just the usually-ascribed RC sense, relationalism versus supersymmetry, string theory and M-theory. The question of whether scale is relational is also considered, with quantum cosmology in mind.

Edward Anderson

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Habitat related differences in age structure and reproductive parameters of red foxes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied the age-structure and the reproductive parameters in two samples of red foxesVulpes vulpes (Linnaeus, 1758) from two contiguous areas in the Ebro valley (NE Spain) differing in the level of deliberate ...

Christian Gortázar; Pablo Ferreras; Rafael Villafuerte; María Martín…

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Different Removal of Ultraviolet Photoproducts in Genetically Related Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Trichothiodystrophy Diseases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research. United States Department of Energy Contract DE-ACO3-SF01012 and the Associa...irradiated with a germicidal UV lamp (General Electric) at a fluency rate of 4 J/m2/s for...genetically-related cancer prone Xeroderma pigmentosum. Car- mutation spectrum in the />.\\f gene...

Eric Eveno; François Bourre; Xavier Quilliet; Odile Chevallier-Lagente; Len Roza; André P. M. Eker; Wim J. Kleijer; Osamu Nikaido; Miria Stefanini; Jan H. J. Hoeijmakers; Dirk Bootsma; James E. Cleaver; Alain Sarasin; and Mauro Mezzina

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Differences in relative fitness among alternative mating tactics might be more apparent than real  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

each framework's predictions into question, but reveal a common truth. Debate might be resolved of the striped mouse can follow alternative reproductive tactics, the fitness consequences of which might differ fuel for this debate. They describe the fitness consequences of three behaviourally flexible

Shuster, Stephen M.

117

Table B29. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 9. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled","All Buildings","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled" "All Buildings ................",4657,1097,1012,751,1796,67338,8864,16846,16966,24662 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,668,352,294,1034,6774,1895,1084,838,2957 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,282,292,188,348,8238,2026,2233,1435,2544

118

Table B30. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspa  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 0. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Lita","1 to 50 Percent Lit","51 to 99 Percent Lit","100 Percent Lit","All Buildings","Not Lita","1 to 50 Percent Lit","51 to 99 Percent Lit","100 Percent Lit" "All Buildings ................",4657,498,835,1228,2096,67338,3253,9187,20665,34233 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,323,351,517,1156,6774,915,1061,1499,3299 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,114,279,351,367,8238,818,2014,2614,2793

119

U.S. Utility-Scale Solar 60 Percent Towards Cost-Competition...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

U.S. Utility-Scale Solar 60 Percent Towards Cost-Competition Goal U.S. Utility-Scale Solar 60 Percent Towards Cost-Competition Goal February 12, 2014 - 11:05am Addthis News Media...

120

Table B28. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 8. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated","All Buildings","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated" "All Buildings ................",4657,641,576,627,2813,67338,5736,7593,10745,43264 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,366,230,272,1479,6774,1091,707,750,4227 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,164,194,149,603,8238,1148,1504,1177,4409

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Bloom, fruit development, and embryo development of peaches in a mild-winter region, and use of percent dry weight of ovule as a maturity index  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

persica (L.) Batsch] were examined, and percent dry weight of ovule (PDO) was studied as an embryo maturity index for stratification-germination in the breeding program. Differences in bloom times of 5 bloom period (BP) reference cultisms resulted...

Bacon, Terry A

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

122

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0: March 26, 0: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Digg

123

Spatial and temporal differences in traffic-related air pollution in three urban neighborhoods near an interstate highway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Relatively few studies have characterized differences in intra- and inter-neighborhood traffic-related air pollutant (TRAP) concentrations and distance-decay gradients in neighborhoods along an urban highway for the purposes of exposure assessment. The goal of this work was to determine the extent to which intra- and inter-neighborhood differences in TRAP concentrations can be explained by traffic and meteorology in three pairs of neighborhoods along Interstate 93 (I-93) in the metropolitan Boston area (USA). We measured distance-decay gradients of seven \\{TRAPs\\} (PNC, pPAH, NO, NOX, BC, CO, PM2.5) in near-highway (1 km) in Somerville, Dorchester/South Boston, Chinatown and Malden to determine whether (1) spatial patterns in concentrations and inter-pollutant correlations differ between neighborhoods, and (2) variation within and between neighborhoods can be explained by traffic and meteorology. The neighborhoods ranged in area from 0.5 to 2.3 km2. Mobile monitoring was performed over the course of one year in each pair of neighborhoods (one pair of neighborhoods per year in three successive years; 35–47 days of monitoring in each neighborhood). Pollutant levels generally increased with highway proximity, consistent with I-93 being a major source of TRAP; however, the slope and extent of the distance-decay gradients varied by neighborhood as well as by pollutant, season and time of day. Spearman correlations among pollutants differed between neighborhoods (e.g., ? = 0.35–0.80 between PNC and NOX and ? = 0.11–0.60 between PNC and BC) and were generally lower in Dorchester/South Boston than in the other neighborhoods. We found that the generalizability of near-road gradients and near-highway/urban background contrasts was limited for near-highway neighborhoods in a metropolitan area with substantial local street traffic. Our findings illustrate the importance of measuring gradients of multiple pollutants under different ambient conditions in individual near-highway neighborhoods for health studies involving inter-neighborhood comparisons.

Allison P. Patton; Jessica Perkins; Wig Zamore; Jonathan I. Levy; Doug Brugge; John L. Durant

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Relative phase interactions of two copropagating laser beams in underdense plasmas at different intensities and spot sizes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mutual interactions of two copropagating laser beams at a relative phase are studied using a two-dimensional fluid code. The interactions are investigated in underdense plasma at selected beam configurations and beam parameters for two separate nonlinearities, i.e., the ponderomotive and the relativistic nonlinearity. The selected beam configurations are introduced by different initial transverse spot size perturbations (finite and infinite) and different initial transversal intensity distributions (nonuniform and uniform) over those spot sizes and the selected beam parameters are given by different initial beam intensities relevant to each nonlinearity. In the ponderomotive nonlinearity, simulation results show that no mutual interactions are demonstrated between the copropagating beams regardless of the initial beam configurations and parameters. In nonlinear relativistic simulations, the mutual interactions between the beams are clearly observed, a mutual repulsion is formed in the presence of initial intensities that are nonuniformly distributed over finite spot sizes, and an effective strongly modulated mutual attraction takes places in the presence of initial intensities that are uniformly distributed over infinite spot sizes. Moreover, it is found in these simulations that increasing the initial beam intensities improves the attraction properties between the copropagationg beams.

Mahdy, A. I. [Department of Plasma and Nuclear Fusion, Nuclear Research Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, 13759 Cairo (Egypt)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Comparison of the percent recoveries of activated charcoal and Spherocarb after storage utilizing thermal desorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between the two adsorbents. The parameters of storage in- cluded various durations of time, temperatures, and concentrations. Rather than the present conventional solvent desorption methods, thermal desorption was used in the analysis of samples... Duncan's Multiple Range Test For Variable Percent. 32 6 Mean Percent Recoveries For The Interaction Between Type Of Adsorbent And Storage Time . 7 Mean Percent Recoveries For The Interaction Between Sample Concentration And Storage Time. 39 40 8...

Stidham, Paul Emery

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

126

INTRACRANIAL INJURY AND MORTALITY ASSOCIATED WITH MOTORCYCLE-RELATED HOSPITALIZATIONS: DIFFERENCES IN INCIDENCE AND COSTS ON THE BASIS OF UNIVERSAL MOTORCYCLE HELMET USE LEGISLATION IN THE UNITED STATES.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Intracranial Injury and Mortality Associated with Motorcycle-related Hospitalizations: Differences in Incidence and Costs on the Basis of Universal Motorcycle Helmet Use Legislation in the United… (more)

Parker, Brenda Marie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

EECBG 11-002 Clarification of Ten Percent Limitation on Use of...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program (EECBG), ten percent limitation, administrative expenses, the Energy...

128

Policy ForumSeries "Beyond 33 Percent: California's Renewable Energy Future,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policy ForumSeries "Beyond 33 Percent: California's Renewable Energy Future, From Near with the UC Davis Policy Institute is the UC Davis Energy Institute. Renewables Beyond 33 Percent October 17 as it transitions to a renewable energy future. Featuring panelists from government, industry and academia

California at Davis, University of

129

PRESS RELEASES OF SENATOR PETE DOMENICI Domenici Supports 12 Percent Increase for Nuclear Energy, Disputes Fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRESS RELEASES OF SENATOR PETE DOMENICI Domenici Supports 12 Percent Increase for Nuclear Energy his support for a 12 percent increase in federal funding for nuclear energy research, but challenged of modern nuclear power plants. Domenici is chairman of the Energy and Water Development Appropriations

130

Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 May 12, 2008 - 11:30am Addthis DOE Report Analyzes U.S. Wind Resources, Technology Requirements, and Manufacturing, Siting and Transmission Hurdles to Increasing the Use of Clean and Sustainable Wind Power WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) today released a first-of-its kind report that examines the technical feasibility of harnessing wind power to provide up to 20 percent of the nation's total electricity needs by 2030. Entitled "20 Percent Wind Energy by 2030", the report identifies requirements to achieve this goal including reducing the cost of wind technologies, citing new transmission infrastructure, and

131

Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 May 12, 2008 - 11:30am Addthis DOE Report Analyzes U.S. Wind Resources, Technology Requirements, and Manufacturing, Siting and Transmission Hurdles to Increasing the Use of Clean and Sustainable Wind Power WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) today released a first-of-its kind report that examines the technical feasibility of harnessing wind power to provide up to 20 percent of the nation's total electricity needs by 2030. Entitled "20 Percent Wind Energy by 2030", the report identifies requirements to achieve this goal including reducing the cost of wind technologies, citing new transmission infrastructure, and

132

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently achieved 74 percent footprint reduction, exceeding the originally established goal of 40 percent. EM has reduced its pre-Recovery Act footprint of 931 square miles, established in 2009, by 688 square miles. Reducing its contaminated footprint to 243 square miles has proven to be a monumental task, and a challenge the EM team was ready to take on from the beginning. Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated More Documents & Publications 2011 ARRA Newsletters

133

Coal deposit characterization by gamma-gamma density/percent dry ash relationships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: pb = C + Va(pa) Equation 3 where C is a constant. Ash content can therefore be geophysically determined as variations In log-derived bulk density measurements are in direct response to variations in ash content. However, when any of the above... by applying the relationships between geophysi cally-derived gamma-gamma density and laboratory-derived percent dry ash. The linear gamma-gamma density/percent dry ash relationship is dependent upon a constant fuel ratio (percent fixed carbon...

Wright, David Scott

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - what does it do to my GDP and Trade Balance ? Home I think that the economics of fossil fuesl are well...

135

EECBG 11-002 Clarification of Ten Percent Limitation on Use of Funds for Administrative Expenses  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program (EECBG), ten percent limitation, administrative expenses, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.

136

Skills, education, and the rise of earnings inequality among the “other 99 percent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...disaster assistance, food assistance) that buffer...executives and financial professionals...evidence of rents in top 1 percent...macro-micro-minnesota/2012/02...attractive financial proposition on average...research assistance. Supported...

David H. Autor

2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

137

Fact #727: May 14, 2012 Nearly Twenty Percent of Households Own Three or More Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Household vehicle ownership has changed over the last six decades. In 1960, over twenty percent of households did not own a vehicle, but by 2010, that number fell to less than 10%. The number of...

138

97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried ... 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL Posted By Office of Public Affairs

139

Effects of time constraint and percent defective on visual inspection performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF TIME CONSTRAINT AND PERCENT DEFECTIVE ON VISUAL INSPECTION PERFORMANCE A Thesis by WALTER EDGAR GILMORE II Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ABM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1982 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering EFFECTS OF TIME CONSTRAINT AND PERCENT DEFECTIVE ON VISUAL INSPECTION PERFORMANCE A Thesis by WALTER EDGAR GILMORE II Approved as to sty1e and content by: Chairman of Committ e) (Memb r...

Gilmore, Walter Edgar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

140

Developmental differences in relations among parental protectiveness, attachment, social skills, social anxiety and social competence in juveniles with asthma or diabetes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of social competence by teaching young people how to initiate and maintain satisfying and warm relationships. The current study examined developmental differences in relations among parent-child relationship variables (parental protectiveness), peer...

Grizzle, Jonhenry C.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop By 2020 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop By 2020 Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop By 2020 November 9, 2011 - 10:00am Addthis This is the Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge Breakout Session Panel with representatives from the City of Atlanta Office of Sustainability, Southface, the U.S. General Services Administration, and two Atlanta BBC partner organizations. | Photo courtesy of Fred Perry Photography This is the Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge Breakout Session Panel with representatives from the City of Atlanta Office of Sustainability, Southface, the U.S. General Services Administration, and two Atlanta BBC partner organizations. | Photo courtesy of Fred Perry Photography Maria Tikoff Vargas

142

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - what does it do to my GDP and Trade Balance ? Home > Groups > DOE Wind Vision Community I think that the economics of fossil fuesl are well understood. Some gets to find the fuel and sell it. The fuel and all associated activities factor into the economic equation of the nation and the wrold. What is the economics of generating 20 percent of my total capacity from say wind? And all of it replaces coal powered electricty ? What happended to GDP ? Is the economy a net gain or net loss ? The value of the electricity came into the system, but no coal is bought or sold. Submitted by Jamespr on 6 May, 2013 - 17:46 0 answers Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group.

143

Moab Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches Significant Milestone Moab Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches Significant Milestone June 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler Moab Federal Project Director (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager (970) 257-2145 Grand Junction, CO - One quarter of the uranium mill tailings pile located in Moab, Utah, has been relocated to the Crescent Junction, Utah, site for permanent disposal. Four million tons of the 16 million tons total has been relocated under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). A little over 2 years ago, Remedial Action Contractor EnergySolutions began

144

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

November 2, 2012 November 2, 2012 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently achieved 74 percent footprint reduction, exceeding the originally established goal of 40 percent. EM has reduced its pre-Recovery Act footprint of 931 square miles, established in 2009, by 688 square miles. Reducing its contaminated footprint to 243 square miles has proven to be a monu- mental task, and a challenge the EM team was ready to take on from the beginning. In 2009, EM identified a goal of 40 percent footprint reduction by September 2011 as its High Priority Performance Goal. EM achieved that goal in April 2011, five months ahead of schedule, and continues to achieve footprint reduction, primarily at Savannah River Site and Hanford. Once

145

26-percent efficient point-junction concentrator solar cells with a front metal grid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on silicon concentrator cells with point diffusions and metal contacts on both the front and back sides. The design minimizes reflection losses by forming an inverted pyramid topography on the front surface and by shaping the metal grid lines in the form of a triangular ridge. A short-circuit current density of 39.6 mA/cm{sup 2} has been achieved even though the front grid covers 16 percent of the cell's active area of 1.56 cm{sup 2}. This, together with an open-circuit voltage of 700 mV, has led to an efficiency of 22 percent at one sun, AM1.5 global spectrum. Under direct-spectrum, 8.8-W/cm{sup 2}, concentrated light, the efficiency is 26 percent. This is the highest ever reported for a silicon cell having a front metal grid.

Cuevas, A.; Sinton, R.A.; Midkiff, N.E.; Swanson, R.M. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A haul truck carrying a container is loaded with mill tailings at the Moab site. Once loaded and lidded, the container will be placed on a railcar for shipment by train to the Crescent Junction disposal site. A haul truck carrying a container is loaded with mill tailings at the Moab site. Once loaded and lidded, the container will be placed on a railcar for shipment by train to the Crescent Junction disposal site. MOAB, Utah - The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project had a productive year, despite continued budget constraints and a first-ever, three-month curtailment of shipping operations last winter. On June 18, the project reached a significant milestone of having shipped 6

147

The nature of the relative bias between galaxies of different spectral type in 2dFGRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analysis of the relative bias between early- and late-type galaxies in the Two-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS). Our analysis examines the joint counts in cells between early- and late-type galaxies, using approximately cubical cells with sides ranging from 7h^{-1}Mpc to 42h^{-1}Mpc. We measure the variance of the counts in cells using the method of Efstathiou et al. (1990), which we find requires a correction for a finite volume effect. We fit lognormal models to the one-point density distribution and develop methods of dealing with biases in the recovered variances resulting from this technique. We directly fit deterministic models for the joint density distribution function, f(delta_E,delta_L), to the joint counts in cells using a maximum likelihood technique. Our results are consistent with a scale invariant relative bias factor on all scales studied. Linear bias is ruled out on scales less than l=28h^{-1}Mpc. A power-law bias model is a significantly better fit to the data on all but the largest scales studied; the relative goodness of fit of this model as compared to that of the linear bias model suggests that any nonlinearity is negligible for l>~40h^{-1}Mpc, consistent with the expectation from theory that the bias should become linear on large scales. (abridged)

E. Conway; S. Maddox; V. Wild; J. A. Peacock; E. Hawkins; P. Norberg; D. S. Madgwick; I. K. Baldry; C. M. Baugh; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; S. Cole; M. Colless; C. Collins; W. Couch; G. Dalton; R. De Propris; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; C. S. Frenk; K. Glazebrook; C. Jackson; B. Jones; O. Lahav; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; W. Percival; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor

2004-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

148

Achieving a ten percent greenhouse gas reduction by 2020 Response to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's environmental and economic goals are to ensure ... (e) greenhouse gas emissions will be at least ten per cent). The Nova Scotia Department of Energy also assumes this level of emissions by 2020 in its background paper of carbon dioxide. #12;Energy Research Group: Achieving a ten percent greenhouse gas reduction 2 shows NRCan

Hughes, Larry

149

What is the problem? Buildings account for 40 percent of U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What is the problem? Buildings account for 40 percent of U.S. energy use and a similar percentage with buildings and appliances are projected to grow faster than those from any other sector. In order to ensure that building energy consumption be significantly reduced. One way this can be achieved is through

150

On the Relative Speed of the Electric Wave through Submarine Cables of Different Lengths, and a Unit of Speed for Comparing Electric Cables by Bisecting the Electric Wave.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1862-1863 research-article On the Relative Speed of the Electric Wave through Submarine Cables of Different Lengths, and a Unit of Speed for Comparing Electric Cables by Bisecting the Electric Wave. Cromwell F. Varley The Royal Society is collaborating...

1862-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

An investigation of the effects of cultural differences on physicians’ perceptions of information technology acceptance as they relate to knowledge management systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The purpose of this study is to explore the impact of national cultural differences on physicians’ perceptions of knowledge management systems acceptance. Data is collected from 106 physicians in the United States and 255 physicians in Taiwan who agreed to participate in the investigation, and a t-test is used to compare the path coefficients for each moderator. Cultural differences were found to impact knowledge management system acceptance. The results reveal that individualism/collectivism, power distance, and high-context/low-context cultural characteristics account for the significant differences between the U.S. and Taiwan in this regard. Theoretical issues related to technology acceptance which lay beyond the scope of this investigation and other issues related to cultural differences may have had an impact on the research findings. This study can assist in the management of healthcare organizations by adding to the knowledge regarding the acceptance and development of management systems. The findings provide insight into the cultural differences which influence physicians’ perceptions about knowledge management systems acceptance, and have implications for improving the knowledge relating to management systems acceptance in healthcare organizations.

Hsien-Cheng Lin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

A combined cycle designed to achieve greater than 60 percent efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In cooperation with the US Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Westinghouse is working on Phase 2 of an 8-year Advanced Turbine Systems Program to develop the technologies required to provide a significant increase in natural gas-fired combined cycle power generation plant efficiency. In this paper, the technologies required to yield an energy conversion efficiency greater than the Advanced Turbine Systems Program target value of 60 percent are discussed. The goal of 60 percent efficiency is achievable through an improvement in operating process parameters for both the combustion turbine and steam turbine, raising the rotor inlet temperature to 2,600 F (1,427 C), incorporation of advanced cooling techniques in the combustion turbine expander, and utilization of other cycle enhancements obtainable through greater integration between the combustion turbine and steam turbine.

Briesch, M.S.; Bannister, R.L.; Diakunchak, I.S.; Huber, D.J. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

Ultrasonic methods for measuring liquid viscosity and volume percent of solids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes two ultrasonic techniques under development at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in support of the tank-waste transport effort undertaken by the U.S. Department of Energy in treating low-level nuclear waste. The techniques are intended to provide continuous on-line measurements of waste viscosity and volume percent of solids in a waste transport line. The ultrasonic technique being developed for waste-viscosity measurement is based on the patented ANL viscometer. Focus of the viscometer development in this project is on improving measurement accuracy, stability, and range, particularly in the low-viscosity range (<30 cP). A prototype instrument has been designed and tested in the laboratory. Better than 1% accuracy in liquid density measurement can be obtained by using either a polyetherimide or polystyrene wedge. To measure low viscosities, a thin-wedge design has been developed and shows good sensitivity down to 5 cP. The technique for measuring volume percent of solids is based on ultrasonic wave scattering and phase velocity variation. This report covers a survey of multiple scattering theories and other phenomenological approaches. A theoretical model leading to development of an ultrasonic instrument for measuring volume percent of solids is proposed, and preliminary measurement data are presented.

Sheen, S.H.; Chien, H.T.; Raptis, A.C.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

New Water Booster Pump System Reduces Energy Consumption by 80 Percent and Increases Reliability  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This case study outlines how General Motors (GM) developed a highly efficient pumping system for their Pontiac Operations Complex in Pontiac, Michigan. In short, GM was able to replace five original 60- to 100-hp pumps with three 15-hp pumps whose speed could be adjusted to meet plant requirements. As a result, the company reduced pumping system energy consumption by 80 percent (225,100 kWh per year), saving an annual $11,255 in pumping costs. With a capital investment of $44,966 in the energy efficiency portion of their new system, GM projected a simple payback of 4 years.

155

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Detailed Energy-Related Carbon Emissions All Industry Groups 1994 emissions Selected Industries Petroleum refining Chemicals Iron & Steel Paper Food Stone, clay and glass Methodological Details Estimation methods Glossary Return to: Energy and GHG Analysis Efficiency Page Energy Use in Manufacturing Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing Manufacturing, which accounts for about 80 percent of industrial energy consumption, also accounts for about 80 percent of industrial energy-related carbon emissions. (Agriculture, mining, forestry, and fisheries account for the remaining 20 percent.) In 1994, three industries, petroleum, chemicals, and primary metals, emitted almost 60 percent of the energy-related carbon in manufacturing. The next three largest emitters (paper, food, and the stone, glass, and clay products industry) produced an additional 22 percent of the energy-related manufacturing emissions (Figure 1).

156

Extraction of Plutonium into 30 Percent Tri-Butyl Phosphate from Nitric Acid Solution Containing Fluoride, Aluminum, and Boron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work consists of experimental batch extraction data for plutonium into 30 volume-percent tri-butyl phosphate at ambient temperature from such a solution matrix and a model of this data using complexation constants from the literature.

Kyser, E.A.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

157

"EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent" EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent" "Areas",38353,38384,38412,38443,38473,38504,38534,38565,38596,38626,38657,38687,38718,38749,38777,"application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

158

A correlation of water solubility in jet fuels with API gravity: aniline point percent aromatics, and temperature.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A CORRELATION OF WATER SOLUBILITY IN JET FUELS WITH API GRAVITY, ANILINE POINT PERCENT AROMATICS, AND TEMPERATURE A Thesis By ALONZO B YINGTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January, 1964 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering A CORRELATION OF MATER SOLUBILITT IH JET FUELS WITS API GEAVITT, ANILINE POINT, PERCENT ARONATICS, AND TENPERATURE A Thesis By ALOHZO BYIHGTOH Approved...

Byington, Alonzo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

159

ITER: Japan to assign 20 percent of construction work to EU firms; Proposal for EU official to assume chief executive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ITER: Japan to assign 20 percent of construction work to EU firms; Proposal for EU official to assume chief executive position MAINICHI (Top Play) (Lead para.) December 7, 2004 Japan and the European Experimental Reactor (ITER). Japan yesterday revealed the details of a proposal to host the project. Tokyo has

160

Castra J. & Clment P., 2009b. A gender effect related to teachers' conceptions on biological gender differences. A survey in 14 countries. In M. Hammann, A.J. Waarlo & K.Th. Boersma (eds.), The Nature of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the questionnaire to six different samples : pre-service and in-service primary schools teachers , and biology- service teachers from 14 countries (most in Europe, but also in Africa and Middle East) filled in a questionnaire containing 16 questions mainly related to the existence and to the origins of differences between

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Sex-Related Differences in Alkaloid Chemical Defenses of the Dendrobatid Frog Oophaga pumilio from Cayo Nancy, Bocas del Toro, Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Poison frogs contain an alkaloid-based chemical defense that is sequestered directly from a diet of alkaloid-containing arthropods. Geographic and temporal variation in alkaloid defense is common in poison frogs and is generally attributed to differences ...

Ralph A. Saporito; Maureen A. Donnelly; Anne A. Madden; H. Martin Garraffo; Thomas F. Spande

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

162

Sixty Percent Conceptual Design Report: Enterprise Accountability System for Classified Removable Electronic Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Classified removable electronic media (CREM) are tracked in several different ways at the Laboratory. To ensure greater security for CREM, we are creating a single, Laboratory-wide system to track CREM. We are researching technology that can be used to electronically tag and detect CREM, designing a database to track the movement of CREM, and planning to test the system at several locations around the Laboratory. We focus on affixing ''smart tags'' to items we want to track and installing gates at pedestrian portals to detect the entry or exit of tagged items. By means of an enterprise database, the system will track the entry and exit of tagged items into and from CREM storage vaults, vault-type rooms, access corridors, or boundaries of secure areas, as well as the identity of the person carrying an item. We are considering several options for tracking items that can give greater security, but at greater expense.

B. Gardiner; L.Graton; J.Longo; T.Marks, Jr.; B.Martinez; R. Strittmatter; C.Woods; J. Joshua

2003-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

163

Validity and limitations of gas-drive relative permeability measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of natural porous media. Calculations were xnade of the total pressure drop across the test specixnen necessary to xnaintain an error of less than 5 percent in uncorrected K /K and K values from gas-drive g 0 Qo 42 40 FIGURE I6- TYPICAL CAPILLARY... to be in error by g 0 po some factor different from R. 4. Gas relative perxneabilities calculated from gas-drive data and Bossier's method, were found to be correct within 3 per- cent of the true values under all conditions. 5. Welge's xnethod...

Gupta, Anand Kumar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

164

RSE Table 7.5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.5  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.5;" " Unit: Percents." " ",," "," ",," "," " "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and" "Characteristic(a)","Electricity","Fuel...

165

RSE Table 10.12 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.12  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.12;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"LPG",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural...

166

7 September 2011 Despite the lagging U.S. economy, salaries for aggregated geoscience-related occupations increased by 1.1 percent between  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. See AGI's 2011 Status of the Geoscience Workforce report, Appendix A for full explanation,320), petroleum engineers ($127,970), and engineering managers ($125,900), and geoscientists ($93,380). Mean Petroleum Engineers Geoscientists Atmospheric and Space Scientists Mining and Geological Engineers

Kammer, Thomas

167

fig5_VqP_polar_co2_50Hz_relation_15-1_10percent_sat_color.eps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.0. 2.0. 3.0. 4.0. 30. 60. 90. 0. qP Waves. Vex (m/s). Vez (m/s). 1. Brine saturated medium with fractures. 2. Patchy saturated medium without fractures. 3. Patchy ...

168

Different approximations of shallow fluid flow over an obstacle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three different sets of shallow water equations, representing different levels of approximation are considered. The numerical solutions of these different equations for flow past bottom topography in several different flow regimes are compared. For several cases the full Euler solutions are computed as a reference, allowing the assessment of the relative accuracies of the different approximations. Further, the differences between the dispersive shallow water (DSW) solutions and those of the highly simplified, hyperbolic shallow water (SW) equations is studied as a guide to determining what level of approximation is required for a particular flow. First, the Green-Naghdi (GN) equations are derived as a vertically-integrated rational approximation of the Euler equations, and then the generalized Boussinesq (gB) equations are obtained under the further assumption of weak nonlinearity. A series of calculations, each assuming different values of a set of parameters{emdash}undisturbed upstream Froude number, and the height and width of the obstacle, are then presented and discussed. In almost all regions of the parameter space, the SW and DSW theories yield different results; it is only when the flows are entirely subcritical or entirely supercritical and when the obstacles are very wide compared to the depth of the fluid that the SW and DSW theories are in qualitative and quantitative agreement. It is also found that while the gB solutions are accurate only for small bottom topographies (less than 20{percent} of the undisturbed fluid depth), the GN solutions are accurate for much larger topographies (up to 65{percent} of the undisturbed fluid depth). The limitation of the gB approximation to small topographies is primarily due to the generation of large amplitude upstream propagating solitary waves at transcritical Froude numbers, and is consistent with previous analysis. (Abstract Truncated)

Nadiga, B.T.; Margolin, L.G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Smolarkiewicz, P.K. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado 80307 (United States)] [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado 80307 (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Algorithm for Screening Phasor Measurement Unit Data for Power System Events and Categories and Common Characteristics for Events Seen in Phasor Measurement Unit Relative Phase-Angle Differences and Frequency Signals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A network of multiple phasor measurement units (PMU) was created, set up, and maintained at the University of Texas at Austin to obtain actual power system measurements for power system analysis. Power system analysis in this report covers a variety of time ranges, such as short- term analysis for power system disturbances and their effects on power system behavior and long- term power system behavior using modal analysis. The first objective of this report is to screen the PMU data for events. The second objective of the report is to identify and describe common characteristics extracted from power system events as measured by PMUs. The numerical characteristics for each category and how these characteristics are used to create selection rules for the algorithm are also described. Trends in PMU data related to different levels and fluctuations in wind power output are also examined.

Allen, A.; Santoso, S.; Muljadi, E.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Organizations around the world lose an estimated five percent of their annual revenues to fraud, according to a survey of fraud experts conducted by the Association of Certified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organizations around the world lose an estimated five percent of their annual revenues to fraud, according to a survey of fraud experts conducted by the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE, the University's total expense for scholarships and fellowships was $110,067,000. Fraud cost includes reported

Sanders, Seth

171

www.global.unam.mx www.unam.mx UNAM is home to more than 45 research institutes, centers and university programs; 50 percent of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and university programs; 50 percent of the research carried out in Mexico is generated by our institution. Our researchers cover the spectrum of disciplines, including energy, engineering, environmental sciences, genomic sciences, medicine, nanotechnologies, sustainable development, and water. Nationwide, one out of every 3

Petriu, Emil M.

172

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 7 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2005, non-OECD emissions of carbon dioxide exceeded OECD emissions by 7 percent. In 2030, carbon dioxide emissions from the non-OECD countries are projected to exceed those from the OECD countries by 72 percent. Figure 75. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2005-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 76. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 77. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the OECD Economies, 2005-2030 (Percent per Year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

173

EIA - AEO2011 Early Release Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Early Release Overview 1 Early Release Overview Release Date: December 16, 2011 | Next Release Date: January 2012 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383ER(2011) Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure DataAfter falling by 3 percent in 2008 and nearly 7 percent in 2009, largely driven by the economic downturn, total U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions do not return to 2005 levels (5,980 million metric tons) until 2027, and then rise by an additional 5 percent from 2027 to 2035, reaching 6,315 million metric tons in 2035 (Figure 13). Energy-related CO2 emissions grow by 0.2 percent per year from 2005 to 2035. Emissions per capita fall by an average of 0.8 percent per year from 2005 to 2035, as growth in demand for electricity and transportation fuels is moderated by higher energy prices, effi ciency standards, State RPS requirements, and Federal

174

Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis: Influence of CO Conversion on Selectivities H2/CO Usage Ratios and Catalyst Stability for a 0.27 percent Ru 25 percent Co/Al2O3 using a Slurry Phase Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of CO conversion on hydrocarbon selectivities (i.e., CH{sub 4}, C{sub 5+}, olefin and paraffin), H{sub 2}/CO usage ratios, CO{sub 2} selectivity, and catalyst stability over a wide range of CO conversion (12-94%) on 0.27%Ru-25%Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was studied under the conditions of 220 C, 1.5 MPa, H{sub 2}/CO feed ratio of 2.1 and gas space velocities of 0.3-15 NL/g-cat/h in a 1-L continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Catalyst samples were withdrawn from the CSTR at different CO conversion levels, and Co phases (Co, CoO) in the slurry samples were characterized by XANES, and in the case of the fresh catalysts, EXAFS as well. Ru was responsible for increasing the extent of Co reduction, thus boosting the active site density. At 1%Ru loading, EXAFS indicates that coordination of Ru at the atomic level was virtually solely with Co. It was found that the selectivities to CH{sub 4}, C{sub 5+}, and CO{sub 2} on the Co catalyst are functions of CO conversion. At high CO conversions, i.e. above 80%, CH{sub 4} selectivity experienced a change in the trend, and began to increase, and CO{sub 2} selectivity experienced a rapid increase. H{sub 2}/CO usage ratio and olefin content were found to decrease with increasing CO conversion in the range of 12-94%. The observed results are consistent with water reoxidation of Co during FTS at high conversion. XANES spectroscopy of used catalyst samples displayed spectra consistent with the presence of more CoO at higher CO conversion levels.

W Ma; G Jacobs; Y Ji; T Bhatelia; D Bukur; S Khalid; B Davis

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

175

The effects of storage time, storage temperature, and concentration on percent recoveries of thermally desorbed diffusive dosimeter samples contaminated with chloroform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the Analabs Thermal Desorber. 4. The Programmed Thermal Desorber on the left and linear chart recorder on the far right. 5. Gas Chromatograph Peak, Integrator Counting, and GC Conditions for Chloroform. 10 17 19 21 24 6. Photograph Illustrating.... A 2 x 3 x 3 Factorial Treatment Design . 13. Analysis of Variance Table for the Experimental Data 14. Mean Percent Recovery vs. Storage Temperature for 7 Days and 14 Days Storage Time At Concentration I (5 ppm - 8 hours). 26 27 28 29 30 31...

Gallucci, Joseph Matthew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

176

A Comparative Evaluation of Three Situational Judgment Test Response Formats: Additional Assessment of Construct-related Validity, Subgroup Differences, Susceptibility to Response Distortion, Test-taker Reactions, and Internal Psychometric Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary objective of the present study was to investigate the construct-related validity of three situational judgment test (SJT) response formats. The present study addressed a potential common method bias threat arising from a shared...

White, Craig Douglas

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

177

Relational EPR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the EPR-type correlations from the perspective of the relational interpretation of quantum mechanics. We argue that these correlations do not entail any form of 'non-locality', when viewed in the context of this interpretation. The abandonment of strict Einstein realism implied by the relational stance permits to reconcile quantum mechanics, completeness, (operationally defined) separability, and locality.

Matteo Smerlak; Carlo Rovelli

2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

178

Differing Professional Opinions (DPO) Process  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Order establishes the Department of Energy (DOE) Differing Professional Opinion (DPO) process for employees to raise technical concerns related to environment, safety, and health (ES&H) which cannot be resolved using routine processes. DOE O 442.2

179

The relative effects of crude oil price and exchange rate on petroleum product prices: Evidence from a set of Northern Mediterranean countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper provides a set of empirical evidence from five Northern Mediterranean countries that are subject to similar refinery reference prices regarding the relative sensitivity of crude oil prices and exchange rate on (pre-tax) petroleum product prices. The empirical evidence reveals that a one percent increase in exchange rate (depreciation) increases petroleum product prices less than a one percent increase in crude oil prices does in the long run. In the short run, however, a one percent increase in exchange rate increases petroleum product prices more than a one percent increase in crude oil prices does.

M. Hakan Berument; Afsin Sahin; Serkan Sahin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

On the Relative Strength of Different Generalizations of Split Cuts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 7, 2012 ... Cook, Kannan and Schrijver [CKS90] presented a simple .... it follows that PI ? SC(P), namely split cuts do not cut off any point in the set PI.

Author

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Optimization of a finite system of related differences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the constraints a a 0 and o a =K / 0 V where K is a posit-'ve constant A)though some oi' the v for a e F may depend 0' upon our'choice of a;V, we shall assume for the pr sent o that sine ' ~o(a) av' + e v K(a) attai. ns its maximum value when the second... agnorqand leta=h ? tenda=-h+t, n where t = min(a , a ). t'low ii follows from P G (2. 10) nd the indenendence of our choice of a 's that a m c3Eia) 2 ~- dv (2 Iy) (v) +2) av 8 s. a -) aa 3a a a==1 a But our set U is bounded by u = 1 and u = 0, n 1...

Lackmann, John

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

182

Insurance-Related Differences in the Risk of Ruptured Appendix  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...living in poverty, the percentage of households receiving public assistance, and median household income. Information about poverty or income was missing for 5244 records. Race or Ethnic Group. Race or ethnic group was categorized as black, Asian, white, or Hispanic. We excluded 1428 records of subjects... The present direction of health care reform in the United States is uncertain. With multiple insurers or tiers of coverage, even universal coverage would not necessarily guarantee equal coverage or care. Moreover, questions have been raised about access ...

Braveman P.Schaaf V.M.Egerter S.Bennett T.Schecter W.

1994-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

183

Relative radiological risks derived from different TENORM wastes in Malaysia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......materials. (2002) Australian Petroleum Production Exploration Association...Changing food consumption and imports in Malaysia: opportunities for Australian agricultural exports. (2008) Department of Agriculture...radiation and radioactivity in China. Radiat. Prot. Dosim (1988......

B. Ismail; I. L. Teng; Y. Muhammad Samudi

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Reduction relations for monoid semirings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we study rewriting techniques for monoid semirings. Based on disjoint and non-disjoint representations of the elements of monoid semirings we define two different reduction relations. We prove that in both cases the reduction relation describes ... Keywords: Confluence, Congruence, Critical pair, Reduction relation, Rewriting system, Semiring, Termination

Friedrich Otto; Olga Sokratova

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

de Sitter special relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A special relativity based on the de Sitter group is introduced, which is the theory that might hold up in the presence of a non-vanishing cosmological constant. Like ordinary special relativity, it retains the quotient character of spacetime, and a notion of homogeneity. As a consequence, the underlying spacetime will be a de Sitter spacetime, whose associated kinematics will differ from that of ordinary special relativity. The corresponding modified notions of energy and momentum are obtained, and the exact relationship between them, which is invariant under a re-scaling of the involved quantities, explicitly exhibited. Since the de Sitter group can be considered a particular deformation of the Poincar\\'e group, this theory turns out to be a specific kind of deformed (or doubly) special relativity. Some experimental consequences, as well as the causal structure of spacetime--modified by the presence of the de Sitter horizon--are briefly discussed.

R. Aldrovandi; J. P. Beltran Almeida; J. G. Pereira

2007-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

186

RSE Table 3.5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5;" 5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke","Waste","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Oven Gases","Gas","Coke","Black Liquor","Bark","Materials"

187

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has inventoried over 30000 major hazardous waste sites in the US of which about 80 percent present some threat to groundwater supplies. The remediation of each of these  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the US of which about 80 percent present some threat to groundwater supplies. The remediation of each new and innovative strategies are developed. Much of the problem and initial cost of subsurface remediation concerns site characterization. A three-dimensional picture of the heterogeneous subsurface

Rubin, Yoram

188

Vibration intensity difference thresholds.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The intensity difference threshold is defined as ‘the difference in the intensity of two stimuli which is just sufficient for their difference to be detected’.… (more)

Forta, Nazim Gizem

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Capture Efficiency of Cooking-Related Fine and Ultrafine Particles by Residential Exhaust Hoods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effective exhaust hoods can mitigate the indoor air quality impacts of pollutant emissions from residential cooking. This study reports capture efficiencies (CE) measured for cooking generated particles for scripted cooking procedures in a 121-m3 chamber with kitchenette. CEs also were measured for burner produced CO2 during cooking and separately for pots and pans containing water. The study used four exhaust hoods previously tested by Delp and Singer (Environ. Sci. Technol., 2012, 46, 6167-6173). For pan-frying a hamburger over medium heat on the back burner, CEs for particles were similar to those for burner produced CO2 and mostly above 80percent. For stir-frying green beans in a wok (high heat, front burner), CEs for burner CO2 during cooking varied by hood and airflow: CEs were 34-38percent for low (51?68 L s-1) and 54?72percent for high (109?138 L s-1) settings. CEs for 0.3?2.0 ?m particles during front burner stir-frying were 3?11percent on low and 16?70percent on high settings. Results indicate that CEs measured for burner CO2 are not predictive of CEs of cooking-generated particles under all conditions, but they may be suitable to identify devices with CEs above 80percent both for burner combustion products and for cooking-related particles.

Lunden, Melissa M.; Delp, William W.

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

190

Relational Database SQL: Querying the Relational DB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: auto-completion and command history Weigang Qiu Relational Database & SQL #12;Relational Database SQLRelational Database SQL: Querying the Relational DB Workshop: the "genome" Database Relational Database & SQL Weigang Qiu Department of Biological Sciences Hunter College BIOL 425 Computational

Qiu, Weigang

191

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 8 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2006, non-OECD energy-related emissions of carbon dioxide exceeded OECD emissions by 14 percent. In 2030, energy-related carbon dioxide emissions from the non-OECD countries are projected to exceed those from the OECD countries by 77 percent. Figure 80. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2006-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 81. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 82. U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel in IEO2008 and IEO2009, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (billion metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

192

Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and by the Department of Petroleum Engineering, Stanford University Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford, California #12;#12;v Abstract fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study

Stanford University

193

Risks and Benefits of Screening for Intracranial Aneurysms in First-Degree Relatives of Patients with Sporadic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

.... Methods. Index Patients and First-Degree Relatives. After approval by the ethics committees, the study was conducted at the University Hospital Utrecht and the Academic Medical Centre of the University of Amsterdam. We included the first-degree relatives of consecutive patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage... The outcome of subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured aneurysm remains poor, with a case fatality rate of 50 percent and a rate of functional dependence of 20 percent.1 The risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage among first-degree relatives (parents, siblings, ...

The Magnetic Resonance Angiography in Relatives of Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Study Group

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

194

Mass ejection from neutron star mergers: different components and expected radio signals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In addition to producing a strong gravitational signal, a short gamma-ray burst (GRB), and a compact remnant, neutron star mergers eject significant masses at significant kinetic energies. This mass ejection takes place via dynamical mass ejection and a GRB jet but other processes have also been suggested: a shock-breakout material, a cocoon resulting from the interaction of the jet with other ejecta, and viscous and neutrino driven winds from the central remnant or the accretion disk. The different components of the ejected masses include up to a few percent of a solar mass, some of which is ejected at relativistic velocities. The interaction of these ejecta with the surrounding interstellar medium will produce a long lasting radio flare, in a similar way to GRB afterglows or to radio supernovae. The relative strength of the different signals depends strongly on the viewing angle. An observer along the jet axis or close to it will detect a strong signal at a few dozen days from the radio afterglow (or the or...

Hotokezaka, Kenta

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

"RSE Table N5.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.1;" 1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Oven Gases","Waste Gas","Coke","Black Liquor","Bark","Materials"

196

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2010 Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2007, non-OECD energy-related emissions of carbon dioxide exceeded OECD emissions by 17 percent. In the IEO2010 Reference case, energy-related carbon dioxide emissions from non-OECD countries in 2035 are about double those from OECD countries. Overview Because anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels, world energy use continues to be at the center of the climate change debate. In the IEO2010 Reference case, world energy-related carbon dioxide emissions29 grow from 29.7 billion metric tons in 2007 to 33.8 billion metric tons in 2020 and 42.4 billion metric tons in 2035 (Table 18).30

197

ACHIEVING CALIFORNIA'S 33 PERCENT RENEWABLE PORTFOLIO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. To remedy this limitation, the report presents a new feed-in tariff approach that is modelled on successful as the basis for feed-in tariff rates that do not achieve the renewable goal, or do so at a higher cost than and risks because of their diversification effects. KEYWORDS Feed-in tariffs, portfolio analysis, generation

198

EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES WELDON SPRING SITE February 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management FINAL: ESD Weldon Spring Site February 2005 1 EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES WELDON SPRING SITE I Introduction This document is an Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) for three Records of Decision (RODs) for the Weldon Spring site located in St. Charles County, Missouri. These RODs were signed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The RODs addressed by this ESD are the following: * Chemical Plant Operable Unit (CPOU) ROD, signed in September 1993. This ROD

199

RSE Table 3.2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",4,5,25,20,5,27,6,0,10

200

RSE Table 5.2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

RSE Table 7.3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.3;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",," " " "," ",,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources" " "," ","Electricity","from Local","Other than","Natural Gas","from Local","Other than","Steam","from Local","Other than"

202

RSE Table 5.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,3,6,2,3,9

203

RSE Table 7.9 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.9  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.9;" 9 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.9;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",4,4,24,21,5,23,7,0,20

204

RSE Table 1.2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "NAICS"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

205

RSE Table 7.7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.7  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.7;" 7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.7;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,," " " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam" " "," ",,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources" "NAICS"," ","Electricity","from Local","Other than","Natural Gas","from Local","Other than","Steam","from Local","Other than"

206

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)-Energy-Related Carbon  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure 8. U.S. carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 1980-2030 (million metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Absent the application of CCS technology (which is not expected to come into use without changes in current policies that are not included in the reference case), CO2 emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are proportional to fuel consumption and carbon content, with coal having the highest carbon content, natural gas the lowest, and liquid fuels in between. In the AEO2008 reference case, the coal share of total energy use increases from 23 percent in 2006 to 26 percent in 2030, while the share of

207

Understanding Causal Coherence Relations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The research reported in this dissertation focuses on the cognitive processes and representations involved in understanding causal coherence relations in text. Coherence relations are the… (more)

Mulder, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Gamma-ray spectrometric determination of UF/sub 6/ assay with 1 percent precision for international safeguards. Part 1: product and feed in 1S and 2S sample cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The method is based on counting the 186-keV gamma rays emitted by /sup 235/U using a Pb-collimated Ge(Li) detector. Measurements of fifty UF/sub 6/ product and feed cylinders reveal the following precisions and counting times: Product - 2S, 0.98% (600 s); Feed - 2S, 0.48% (2500 s); Product - 1S, 0.62% (1000 s); Feed - 1S, 0.73% (3000 s). A 1% precision is desired for variables - attributes verification measurements of /sup 235/U assay in UF/sub 6/ sample cylinders for safeguards inspections by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Statistically, these measurements stand between fine, high-precision (or variables) measurements and gross, low-precision (or attributes) ones. Because of their intermediate precisions, the variables-attributes measurements may not require analysis of all samples, and this could result in significant savings of IAEA inspector time. Although the precision of the above results is satisfactory, the average relative differences between gamma-ray and mass-spectrometric determinations for the last two sets of measurements (1S cylinders) have positive biases.

Ricci, E.

1981-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

NREL: News Feature - Small Improvements to Make Big Difference  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Small Improvements to Make Big Difference Small Improvements to Make Big Difference January 26, 2011 Photo rendering of the fully built Research Support Facility. Enlarge image This artist's rendering shows how the Research Support Facility will look once the ARRA funded expansion project is complete at the end of 2011. Courtesy of RNL Old memo from the boss: Your goal for 2010 - build one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world on the campus of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). New memo from the boss: Your goal for 2011 - repeat 2010 goal and increase energy efficiency by 17 percent. Fortunately for NREL, these goals are being achieved thanks to $39 million in funding for the new RSF wing from the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The ARRA funding allowed a planned 138,000 square

210

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Relaated Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Relaated Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 7 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2004, non-OECD emissions of carbon dioxide were greater than OECD emissions for the first time. In 2030, carbon dioxide emissions from the non-OECD countries are projected to exceed those from the OECD countries by 57 percent. Figure 77. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Region, 2003-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center on 202-585-8800. Figure Data Figure 78. World energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Carbon dioxide is the most abundant anthropogenic (human-caused) greenhouse

211

Face recognition with disparity corrected gabor phase differences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We analyze the relative relevance of Gabor amplitudes and phases for face recognition. We propose an algorithm to reliably estimate offset point disparities from phase differences and show that disparity-corrected Gabor phase differences are well suited ...

Manuel Günther; Dennis Haufe; Rolf P. Würtz

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Laterality and age-level differences between young women and elderly women in controlled force exertion (CFE)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study aimed to examine laterality and age-level differences in maximal handgrip strength and CFE using women as subjects. The subjects were 50 young women (mean age 20.9 ± 1.9 years) and 50 elderly women (mean age 72.9 ± 6.6 years). The maximal handgrip strength was measured twice with a 1-min interval, and the larger value was used in this study. In the CFE test, the subjects matched their submaximal grip strengths to the demand values changing at a constant frequency (range = 5–25% of the maximal grip strength). The CFE test was performed twice after one practice trial (one trial was 40 s). The sum of the percent of differences between the demand value and the grip exertion value was used as an estimate of CFE. CFE was estimated using a mean from two trials, excluding the first 15 s of each trial. The elderly were significantly inferior in maximal handgrip strength of the dominant and non-dominant hands to young adults (about 70%), and the non-dominant hand was significantly inferior to the dominant hand. The elderly were significantly inferior in CFE of both hands to young adults (about 50%), and the non-dominant hand was significantly inferior. In conclusion, the age-level differences in maximal handgrip strength and CFE are found in the dominant and non-dominant hands, and laterality is also found in both young adults and the elderly. The CFE relating closely to nerve function may have a larger age-level difference than maximal handgrip strength.

Hiroshi Kubota; Shinichi Demura; Haruka Kawabata

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Fire Protection Related Sites  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fire Protection related sites for Department of Energy, Non-DOE Government and Non-Government information.

214

"RSE Table C11.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table C11.3;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table C11.3;" 1.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table C11.3;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,,"Natural","Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,"Electricity","Electricity",,,"Natural Gas","Natural Gas",,,"Steam","Steam" " "," ",,,"from Only","from Both",,,"from Only","from Both",,,"from Only","from Both",," " " "," ",,"Electricity","Sources","Local Utility",,"Natural Gas","Sources","Local Utility",,"Steam","Sources","Local Utility"

215

"RSE Table C2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C2.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C2.1;" C2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C2.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any Combustible" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",4,0,3,0,1,0,2,6

216

"RSE Table N11.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.3;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.3;" 3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.3;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",," " " "," ",,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources" "NAICS"," ","Electricity","from Local","Other than","Natural Gas","from Local","Other than","Steam","from Local","Other than"

217

"RSE Table C3.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C3.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C3.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C3.1;" C3.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C3.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)" ,,"Total United States"

218

"RSE Table N8.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N8.3;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N8.3;" 3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N8.3;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",," " " "," ",,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources" "NAICS"," ","Electricity","from Local","Other than","Natural Gas","from Local","Other than","Steam","from Local","Other than"

219

"RSE Table C10.2. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.2;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.2;" 2. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Establishments" " "," ",,"with Any"," Steam Turbines","Supplied","by Either","Conventional","Combustion","Turbines"," "," "," ","Internal","Combustion","Engines"," Steam Turbines","Supplied","by Heat",," " " "," ",,"Cogeneration","Conventional","or Fluidized","Bed Boilers","with","Heat","Recovery","Combined-Cycle","Combustion","Turbines","with","Heat","Recovery","Recovered from","High-Temperature","Processes"

220

"RSE Table N11.4. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.4;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.4;" 4. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.4;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",," " " "," ",,"Electricity","from Sources",,"Natural Gas","from Sources",,"Steam","from Sources" "NAICS"," ","Electricity","from Local","Other than","Natural Gas","from Local","Other than","Steam","from Local","Other than"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

"RSE Table E1.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E1.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E1.1;" .1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E1.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Characteristic(a)","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

222

"RSE Table C4.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C4.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C4.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C4.1;" C4.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C4.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ","Any" "NAICS"," ","Energy",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(g)" ,,"Total United States" ,

223

"RSE Table C1.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C1.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C1.1;" .1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C1.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ","Any",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "NAICS"," ","Energy","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Source(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

224

A NOTE ON THE RELATIVE INDEX THEOREM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......defined the relative analytic index to be the difference of the ordinary Fredholm indices, Ind Do -- Ind Dx. 370...where the top row is the completion of the exact sequence 1...a-b. The relative analytic index is r(Ind F), where F......

JOHN ROE

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

NREL: News - Related Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Related Links The U.S. Department of Energy provides news online: EERE Network News News and Blog Science News Science and Technology Highlights from the National Laboratories...

226

Thermodynamics and scale relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown how the fractal paths of scale relativity (following Nottale) can be introduced into a thermodynamical context (following Asadov-Kechkin).

Robert Carroll

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

227

Feasibility of the correlation curves method in calorimeters of different types  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The simulation of the development of cascade processes in calorimeters of different types for the implementation of energy measurement by correlation curves method, is carried out. Heterogeneous calorimeter has a significant transient effects, associated with the difference of the critical energy in the absorber and the detector. The best option is a mixed calorimeter, which has a target block, leading to the rapid development of the cascade, and homogeneous measuring unit. Uncertainties of energy reconstruction by presented mixed calorimeter on the base of the correlation curves methodology, is less than 10 percent.

Grushevskaya, E A; Fedosimova, A I

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Physical measurements of the mohair fleece as related to age, location and season  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indicated variation of these factors among dif- ferent ages of goats and among different portions of the fleece. The South African Wool Textile Research Institute (196~) reported the average fiber length is only 60 percent of the length of the staple... fleece was divided into 32 equal portions by volume. Approximately equal amounts were taken from each portion to make up two replicate samples weighing 300 grams each. These samples were scoured to determine clean yield under standard conditions...

Davis, Howard Orrell

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

229

RSE Table N8.1 and N8.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N8.1 and N8.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 and N8.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N8.1 and N8.2;" 1 and N8.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N8.1 and N8.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected","Wood and Other","Biomass","Components" ,,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,"Electricity","Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues" " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related",,," "

230

PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RELATED PROCESSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;#12;#12;PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RELATED PROCESSES VOLUME II Part 2 #12;� '�;- py as- b^ Section Research, 7, 288, 1954). #12;PHOTOSYNTHESIS nnd Related Processes By EUGENE I. RABINOWITCH Research Professor, Photosynthesis Research Labora- tory, Department of Botany, University of Illinois. Formerly

Govindjee

231

Analysis of the genetic differences between Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae: two closely related bacteria expressing two different pathogenicities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...identified in Nm have a counterpart in Ng, i.e., pilin, PilC proteins, porins, opacity proteins, and the lactofer- rin...labeled "frp" are the frpA and frpC genes, those labeled "pilC" are the two genes pilC1 and pilC2; both of these are pairs...

C R Tinsley; X Nassif

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Accelerator experiments contradicting general relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The deflection of gamma-rays in Earth's gravitational field is tested in laser Compton scattering at high energy accelerators. Within a formalism connecting the bending angle to the photon's momentum it follows that detected gamma-ray spectra are inconsistent with a deflection magnitude of 2.78 nrad, predicted by Einstein's gravity theory. Moreover, preliminary results for 13-28 GeV photons from two different laboratories show opposite - away from the Earth - deflection, amounting to 33.8-0.8 prad. I conclude that general relativity, which describes gravity at low energies precisely, break down at high energies.

Vahagn Gharibyan

2014-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

233

General relativity and experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The confrontation between Einstein's theory of gravitation and experiment is summarized. Although all current experimental data are compatible with general relativity, the importance of pursuing the quest for possible deviations from Einstein's theory is emphasized.

T. Damour

1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

234

Recursive relational urban design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis proposes a methodology for the act of urban design that is recursive and centered around explicit relational operations, enabled by taking advantage of computation and parametric techniques. It contains iterative ...

Hillman, Dessen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Relation of Soil Nitrogen, Nitrification and Ammonification to Pot Experiments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................ 6 Relation of the Crops to the Total Nitrogen of the Soil ........... 7 Relation of the Different Crops ................................. 8 Relation of Surface Soil to Subsoil ............................. 13 Acid Soils Compared with Non-Acid... of Production of Nitrates to the Results of the Pot Ex- periments ................................................ 21 Extensive Work ............................................ 24 Relation of Nitric Nitrogen to Nitrogen Removed by First Crop .... 24...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1921-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

RSE Table 2.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.1;" 2.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",31,0,91,35,0,0,0,47 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 31131," Sugar ",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 311421," Fruit and Vegetable Canning",1,0,0,0,0,0,0,8

237

RSE Table 10.10 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.10;" 0 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.10;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Coal",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",6,18,5,0,20,85,29,20,0 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 31131," Sugar ",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0

238

RSE Table 10.13 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.13  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.13;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.13;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"LPG(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",8,17,8,20,21,43,34,35,37,29 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0

239

Table 4. 2010 State energy-related carbon dioxide emission shares by sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2010 State energy-related carbon dioxide emission shares by sector " 2010 State energy-related carbon dioxide emission shares by sector " "percent of total" ,"Shares" "State","Commercial","Electric Power","Residential","Industrial","Transportation" "Alabama",0.01584875241,0.5778871607,0.02136328943,0.1334667239,0.2514340736 "Alaska",0.06448385239,0.0785744956,0.0462016929,0.4291084798,0.3816314793 "Arizona",0.02474932909,0.5668758159,0.02425067581,0.04966758421,0.334456595 "Arkansas",0.03882032779,0.4886410984,0.03509200153,0.1307772146,0.3066693577 "California",0.04308920353,0.1176161395,0.07822332929,0.1824277392,0.5786435885 "Colorado",0.04301641968,0.4131279202,0.08115394032,0.1545280216,0.3081736982

240

RSE Table 5.7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.7  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.7;" 7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.7;" " Unit: Percents." " ",,,"Distillate" " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)" ,"Total United States" "TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,3,6,2,4,9 "Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel",6,4,10,2,10,13 " Conventional Boiler Use",12,5,14,2,10,8 " CHP and/or Cogeneration Process",4,2,6,3,2,19

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

RSE Table 4.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",4,5,25,20,5,27,6,0,17 311221," Wet Corn Milling",1,0,0,1,3,0,0,0,0 31131," Sugar ",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 311421," Fruit and Vegetable Canning",8,11,46,45,8,57,0,0,3

242

RSE Table 5.8 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.8  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.8;" 8 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.8;" " Unit: Percents." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)" ,"Total United States" "TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,3,6,2,3,9 "Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel",6,4,14,2,9,13 " Conventional Boiler Use",12,5,14,2,10,8 " CHP and/or Cogeneration Process",4,2,6,3,2,18

243

RSE Table 5.6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.6  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.6;" 6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.6;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)" ,"Total United States" "TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,2,3,6,2,3,9,2 "Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel",0,11,4,14,2,9,13,0

244

RSE Table 7.6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6;" 6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",4,5,25,20,5,27,6,0,20 311221," Wet Corn Milling",1,0,0,1,3,0,0,0,0 31131," Sugar ",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 311421," Fruit and Vegetable Canning",8,11,42,45,8,57,0,0,4

245

RSE Table 10.11 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.11  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.11;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.11;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"Coal(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed(d)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(e)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",20,32,21,0,16,68,65,73,0 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 31131," Sugar ",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0

246

Transatlantic relations and NATO  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uncertainty among the European allies, on the other hand, is linked to a growing awareness of Europe’s differences with the US, which are the result of a lack of ambition and a reluctance to assume responsibility...

Eugeniusz Smolar

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Looking beyond special relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity was proposed a little over a hundred years back. It remained a bedrock of twentieth century physics right up to Quantum Field Theory. However, the failure over several decades to provide a unified description of Electromagnetism and Gravitation or alternatively, Quantum Theory and General Relativity has finally lead researchers to abandon the differentiable spacetime manifold on which all of the above was based. In the most recent approaches we consider a spacetime that is discretized or is noncommutative. This immediately leads to corrections to the Special Theory of Relativity, more specifically to Lorentz Symmetry. It is quite significant that there are observational indicators, particularly in ultra high energy cosmic rays which suggest that such corrections are indeed there. We examine the whole issue in this paper.

B. G. Sidharth

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

248

Issues related to wind energy conversion systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is growing interest in the development of more sustainable electricity systems employing renewable, low-emission resources. In this context, the number of wind power generators installed in the world is increasing, and there are strong indicators that such growth should continue in the next decades. The intensity of wind power expansion depends on different factors related to technical, economic, environmental, governmental, and regulatory issues. This paper presents an overview on various issues related to wind energy conversion systems.

Walmir Freitas; Ahmed Faheem Zobaa; Jose C.M. Vieira; James S. McConnach

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Related Federal Climate Efforts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Related Federal Climate Efforts Print E-mail Related Federal Climate Efforts Print E-mail Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage The Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a group of technologies for capturing, compressing, transporting and permanently storing power plant and industrial source emissions of carbon dioxide. Rapid development and deployment of clean coal technologies, particularly CCS, will help position the United States as a leader in the global clean energy race. Climate Change Adaptation Task Force The Task Force's work has been guided by a strategic vision of a resilient, healthy, and prosperous Nation in the face of a changing climate. To achieve this vision, the Task Force identified a set of guiding principles that public and private decision-makers should consider in designing and implementing adaptation strategies.

250

Related Data Sites  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Related Data Sites Related Data Sites CDIAC has listed the following Web sites because these sites offer high-quality data sets (not available through CDIAC) from a variety of global-change themes. These links will take you outside of CDIAC, therefore, we are not responsible for the content or intent of these outside links. This list is not intended to be comprehensive, but we do hope you find it useful if you cannot find what you are looking for here at CDIAC. Multi-Agency Sites Global Change Data and Information System (GCDIS) GCDIS is a collection of distributed information systems operated by government agencies involved in global change research. GCDIS provides global change data to scientists and researchers, policy makers, educators, industry, and the public at large and includes multidisciplinary data from

251

Community Relations Plan Update  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

8-TAR 8-TAR MAC-MRAP 1.9.1 Monticello Mill Tailings Superfund Site and Monticello Vicinity Properties Superfund Site Monticello, Utah Community Relations Plan Update FY 2001 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office Prepared by MACTEC Environmental Restoration Services, LLC Grand Junction, Colorado Work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy For more information or to request additional copies of this document, please call (800) 269-7145 (Utah only) or Monticello Repository Office Complex (435) 587-4000 DOE Grand Junction Office Community Relations Plan Update FY 2001 Page v Table of Contents Terms and Abbreviations........................................................................................................... vii

252

Related Frog Web Pages  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Related Web Pages on Frogs Related Web Pages on Frogs The images of the frog in this kit are computer-generated. For another approach, in which photos and movies are used to follow an actual frog dissection, see the University of Virginia's pages here. For a lot of kid-oriented information about frogs, see Frogland. For live frog lovers .... Sounds of North American Frogs (a CD from Smithsonian Folkways). The Exploratorium in San Francisco maintains an on-line exhibit on frogs. Don't Dissect a Frog, Build it is a section in Nicholas Negroponte's online version of Being Digital. For veterinary and conservation issues, see Association of Reptilian and Amphibian Veterinarians. And of course, The FROGGY Page Berkeley Lab | ACS | Notice to Users | Whole Frog Project | Virtual Frog Page last modified: 01/26/05

253

Fermilab Today - Related Content  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Related Content Related Content Subscribe | Contact Fermilab Today | Archive | Classifieds Search GO Classifieds Director's Corner Physics in a Nutshell Frontier Science Result Tip of the Week Archive User University Profiles Experiment Profiles Current Archive Current Fermilab Today Archive of 2014 Archive of 2013 Archive of 2012 Archive of 2011 Archive of 2010 Archive of 2009 Archive of 2008 Archive of 2007 Archive of 2006 Archive of 2005 Archive of 2004 Archive of 2003 CERN Courier Published by CERN Contact: cern.courier@cern.ch Computing Bits Published by Fermilab's Computing Sector Contact: http://computing.fnal.gov/news/feedback/feedback.html DPF Newsletter Published by the APS Division of Particles and Fields Contact: mcbride@fnal.gov Fermilab Friends of Science Published by Fermilab's Office of Education

254

Aerosol Effects on Idealized Supercell Thunderstorms in Different Environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Idealized supercell thunderstorms are simulated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model at 15 cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations (100–10 000 cm?3) using four environmental soundings with different low-level relative ...

Evan A. Kalina; Katja Friedrich; Hugh Morrison; George H. Bryan

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Hauptmann's Relation To Christianity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KU ScholarWorks | The University of Kansas Pre-1923 Dissertations and Theses Collection Hauptmann’s Relation To Christianity 1914 by Irene May Garrett This work was digitized by the Scholarly Communications program staff in the KU Libraries... S T I A N I T Y . »y Irene May Garrett, A thesis submitted to the department of German of the University of Kansas in partial fullfilment of the requirements for the Master's Degree. May 15, 1914. Bibliography. Biography. Schlenther, Paul...

Garrett, Irene May

1914-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Clean Cities: Related Financial Opportunities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Financial Opportunities Financial Opportunities Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Clean Cities: Related Financial Opportunities to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Related Financial Opportunities on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Related Financial Opportunities on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Related Financial Opportunities on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Related Financial Opportunities on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Related Financial Opportunities on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Related Financial Opportunities on AddThis.com... Current Opportunities Related Opportunities Funded Projects Related Financial Opportunities Transportation-related financial opportunities from organizations and federal agencies outside Clean Cities are listed below. Some of the

257

Different bounds on the different Betti numbers of semialgebraic sets #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Different bounds on the different Betti numbers of semi­algebraic sets # Saugata Basu School­ plexity (the sum of the Betti numbers) of basic semi­algebraic sets. This bound is tight as one can were known on the individual higher Betti numbers. In this paper we prove separate bounds on the di

Basu, Saugata

258

Building a World of Difference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Waste?to?Energy Roadmapping Workshop Building a World of Difference Presentation by Patricia Scanlan, Director of Residuals Treatment Technologies, Black & Veatch

259

Gender Differences in Seeking Help.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Gender differences in willingness to seek help were examined in this study. Males often appear to not seek help from others, especially from a professional,… (more)

Jackson, Jeff

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

DDI and Relational Databases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will use Access for modelling some examples during the workshop It is not an ideal solution for DDI as the database engine is quite limited as it is not fully ANSI-SQL compliant In reality you should use a ‘real’ SQL engine like e.g. MySQL Postgre... versions of DDI (e.g. DDI-L 3.0, 3.1, 3.2) and ensuring application compatibility with the original standard DDI Applications Pros of relational databases in regards to DDI Structure is very good for rectangular files (e.g. SPSS or Stata) Easier...

Amin, Alerk; Barkow, Ingo

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

SECTION G (BOTANICAL SCIENCES) AND RELATED ORGANIZATIONS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cell walls in the seed coats of alfalfa...reports on the nitrogen metabolism of squash under different...able to introduce starch suspensions into...rest period of seeds and buds as related...classified as follows: cereal diseases, twenty-five...investigations and corn seed treatments were noteworthy...

Sam F. Trelease; Arthur J. Eames; A. S. Foster; F. E. Denny; G. W. Martin; W. A. Whitney; W. H. Horr

1930-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

262

Degenerate Extensions of General Relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

General relativity has previously been extended to incorporate degenerate metrics using Ashtekar's hamiltonian formulation of the theory. In this letter, we show that a natural alternative choice for the form of the hamiltonian constraints leads to a theory which agrees with GR for non-degenerate metrics, but differs in the degenerate sector from Ashtekar's original degenerate extension. The Poisson bracket algebra of the alternative constraints closes in the non-degenerate sector, with structure functions that involve the {\\it inverse} of the spatial triad. Thus, the algebra does {\\it not} close in the degenerate sector. We find that it must be supplemented by an infinite number ofsecondary constraints, which are shown to be first class (although their explicit form is not worked out in detail). All of the constraints taken together are implied by, but do not imply, Ashtekar's original form of constraints. Thus, the alternative constraints give rise to a different degenerate extension of GR. In the corresponding quantum theory, the single loop and intersecting loop holonomy states found in the connection representation satisfy {\\it all} of the constraints. These states are therefore exact (formal) solutions to this alternative degenerate extension of quantum gravity, even though they are {\\it not} solutions to the usual vector constraint.

Ted Jacobson; Joseph D. Romano

1992-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

263

DOE/RL-96-68  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

100114 Vol. 4: ix RPD Relative Percent Difference RSD Relative Standard Deviation TIC Tentatively Identified Compound TPU Total Propagated Uncertainty VOC Volatile Organic...

264

CONTENTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Operations Office RPD relative percent difference RSD relative standard deviation TIC tentatively identified compound DOERL-96-68, HASQARD Table of Contents, Rev. 3 Volume...

265

LTS Related Links - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Information Management LTS Fact Sheets Briefings LTS Related Links LTS Contact Us 2015 Vision LTS Related Links Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size...

266

Related Links | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Algal Biofuels Related Links Related Links The links below provide useful algae resources and are organized by categories. Beyond this page, learn more about BETO's Algae...

267

Related Opportunities | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Financial Opportunities Related Opportunities Related Opportunities Funding for wind power projects may be available through other offices in the U.S. Department of Energy or...

268

Individual Differences in Fish Behaviour  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

But they do! In ethology individual differences in behaviour have traditionally been ignored, treated as white noise (Ringler 1983) or, as Arak (1984) points out, considered to be maladaptive deviations from o...

Anne E. Magurran

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Differences in gasification behaviors and related properties between entrained gasifier fly ash and coal char  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the study, two fly ash samples from Texaco gasifiers were compared to coal char and the physical and chemical properties and reactivity of samples were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM-energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption method, and isothermal thermogravimetric analysis. The main results were obtained. The carbon content of gasified fly ashes exhibited 31-37%, which was less than the carbon content of 58-59% in the feed coal. The fly ashes exhibited higher Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, richer meso- and micropores, more disordered carbon crystalline structure, and better CO{sub 2} gasification reactivity than coal char. Ashes in fly ashes occurred to agglomerate into larger spherical grains, while those in coal char do not agglomerate. The minerals in fly ashes, especial alkali and alkaline-earth metals, had a catalytic effect on gasification reactivity of fly ash carbon. In the low-temperature range, the gasification process of fly ashes is mainly in chemical control, while in the high-temperature range, it is mainly in gas diffusion control, which was similar to coal char. In addition, the carbon in fly ashes was partially gasified and activated by water vapor and exhibited higher BET surface area and better gasification activity. Consequently, the fact that these carbons in fly ashes from entrained flow gasifiers are reclaimed and reused will be considered to be feasible. 15 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

Jing Gu; Shiyong Wu; Youqing Wu; Ye Li; Jinsheng Gao [East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China). Department of Chemical Engineering for Energy Resources and Key Laboratory of Coal Gasification of Ministry of Education

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Gender differences in mathematics anxiety and the relation to mathematics performance while controlling for test anxiety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

]. Importantly, MA has several negative effects on children’s and adult’s mathematics education. For ex- ample, people who experience high levels of MA are likely to develop negative attitudes toward tasks involv- ing mathematics, drop out of elective mathematics... pressure is not expected to have a differential effect on the performance of individuals with low and high maths anxiety [26].(male vs. female) and school year (Year 7 vs. Year 8 vs. Year 10). Then univariate Analyses of Variance (ANO- VAs) were run on each...

Devine, Amy; Fawcett, Kayleigh; Sz?cs, Dénes; Dowker, Ann

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

271

Depth-Related Differences in Organic Substrate Utilization by Major Microbial Groups in Intertidal Marine Sediment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bacterial populations in coastal sands. ISME J. 6 :542-553. 3. Kemp...and community structure in subtidal sands. ISME J. 3 :780-791. 5. Canfield...community structure in Gulf of Mexico gas hydrates: comparative analysis of DNA- and...

Tetsuro Miyatake; Barbara J. MacGregor; Henricus T. S. Boschker

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

272

SEX DIFFERENCES IN GENE EXPRESSION AND PAIN-RELATED BEHAVIORS IN A PRECLINICAL MODEL OF MIGRAINE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

receptor called calcitonin-like receptor (CLR), a receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP1), and a coupling protein, receptor component protein (RCP). Thus, the availability and sensitivity of this receptor is subject to regulation at numerous levels...

Stucky, Nicholas Ling

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Evolution of cultural traits occurs at similar relative rates in different world regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Whiten, A , RA Hinde, and CB Stringer. 2011 Culture evolves. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. 13 McElreath, R , M Lubell, PJ Richerson, TM Waring, W Baum, E Edsten, C Efferson, and B Paciotti. 2005 Applying evolutionary models to the laboratory...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

secondary purpose was to alert people to the relative size of the different resources avail  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transmission lines have been demonstrated, as have large electric storage facilities using compressed air pieces of the Solar Plan that together provide a solution to energy and environmental problems for the 21 Energy 4/2008112 S o l a r E n E r g y The US Solar Grand Plan (as published in Scientific American

275

Difference Thresholds for Timbre Related to Amplitude Spectra of Complex Sounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Demonstration and Data Collection Programs 206 iv LIST OF TABLES Table Page 1. Amplitude Values for Pilot Study #1 99 2. Amplitude Values for Pilot Study #2 101 3. Amplitude Values for Pilot Study #3. 102 4. Amplitude Values for Pilot Study #4 104 5... as input variables; the output is the recorded behavior of the system. These important questions are: 1. What general types of energy is the system capable of receiving? 2. For a given type of energy, what is the least amount of energy required...

Kendall, Roger A.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Relations between composition, digestibility and nutritive value of different feedstuffs in the rabbit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

composition were determined. ADF and ADI, figures were found to be more valuable pre- dictors than crude fibre in northern Mexico E. MORALES ZUÃ?IGA Escuela Superior de Zootecnia, Universidad autonoma de Chihuahua, Apartodo postal F 28 (Mexico) The Buffalo Gourd, (Cucuvbita foetidissima, H. B. K.), is a plant which has

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

277

Evolution of cultural traits occurs at similar relative rates in different world regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...agents in the historical process, culture does indeed evolve in ways that can be predicted...mating and marriage systems. In The Oxford handbook of evolutionary psychology (eds RIM Dunbar...Greenhill, SJ , TE Currie, and RD Gray. 2009 Does horizontal transmission invalidate cultural...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Measurable Experimental Difference between Relativity and FitzGeraldLorentz length contraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of reference where light's speed is isotropic and equal to `c'. The setup consists of a one-way interferometer-way speed of light, leaving questions on the constancy of the speed of light in one direction [5]. Also test to the existence of a preferred reference frame in which light's speed is isotropic and equal

Boyer, Edmond

279

Relational reasoning via SMT solving  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper explores the idea of using a SAT Modulo Theories (SMT) solver for proving properties of relational specifications. The goal is to automatically establish or refute consistency of a set of constraints expressed in a first-order relational logic, ... Keywords: Alloy, SAT modulo theories, Z3, constraint solving, first-order relational logic, relational specification

Aboubakr Achraf El Ghazi; Mana Taghdiri

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

PERIAMPULLARY CANCERS: Are There Differences?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By definition, periampullary cancers arise within 2 cm of the major papilla in the duodenum. They encompass four different types of cancers: ampullary (ampulla of Vater), biliary (intrapancreatic distal bile duct), pancreatic (head–uncinate process), and duodenal (mainly from the second portion). Although these tumors have different origins, the complex regional anatomy and their proximation within that confined region generally dictate a common operative approach. Radical resections, such as the Whipple procedure 62 or its variant with preservation of the pylorus with or without extended regional lymphadenectomy,58 have been the main treatments for these cancers, especially with the currently low morbidity and mortality rates.67 Although the perioperative outcomes for these different cancers are similar, the long-term survival has traditionally varied. Consequently, because exact tumor origin is often difficult to clinically ascertain, surgeons have favored an aggressive approach toward resection to benefit those patients harboring cancers with a better prognosis. This observation has intrigued physicians managing patients with these cancers. It is unknown why outcome should vary for adenocarcinomas arising from different anatomic sites in such close proximity. Indeed, if survival does vary significantly for these cancers as clinical impression suggests, clearly, factors other than anatomy alone must be involved. This article explores whether there are differences in the clinical behavior of the periampullary cancers and defines which of these factors, if any, affect outcome. Moreover, it is important to determine which factors are valuable clinically so that they can be used to improve overall survival rates.

Juan M. Sarmiento; David M. Nagorney; Michael G. Sarr; Michael B. Farnell

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

"RSE Table E13.2. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.2;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.2;" 2. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.2;" " Unit: Percents." " ",,,"Renewable Energy" ,,,"(excluding Wood" "Economic","Total Onsite",,"and" "Characteristic(a)","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",15,15,58,37 " 20-49",17,19,27,7 " 50-99",6,6,5,9 " 100-249",7,7,25,4 " 250-499",2,2,0,0 " 500 and Over",1,1,0,1 "Total",2,2,15,1 "Employment Size" " Under 50",16,16,90,35

282

"RSE Table C9.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C9.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C9.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C9.1;" C9.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C9.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," " " "," ",,,"General","Amount of ","Establishment-Paid","Activity Cost" "NAICS"," "," " "Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","All","Some","None","Don't Know" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Activities",1,2,0,0,0,0 ," Energy Audits",1,3,5,6,5,7 ," Electricity Load Control",1,3,4,7,6,7

283

"RSE Table N13.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.1;" 1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," ",,,,"Sales and","Net Demand" "NAICS"," ",,,"Total Onsite","Transfers","for" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Purchases","Transfers In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",1,1,1,8,1 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",4,0,1,0,4 313,"Textile Mills",2,8,7,0,2 313210," Broadwoven Fabric Mills",3,0,22,0,3 314,"Textile Product Mills",11,73,8,90,11

284

"RSE Table E7.2. Relative Standard Errors for Table E7.2;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Relative Standard Errors for Table E7.2;" 2. Relative Standard Errors for Table E7.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" "NAICS",,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Value of Shipments and Receipts" ,"(million dollars)" ," Under 20",2,2,2 ," 20-49",2,3,2 ," 50-99",3,3,2 ," 100-249",2,3,2 ," 250-499",3,3,3

285

"RSE Table E2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E2.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E2.1;" E2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E2.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," ",," "," ",," " "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," " "Characteristic(a)","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","Breeze","Other(e)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",9,87,48,26,1,85,16,25 " 20-49",11,32,28,5,63,20,3,21 " 50-99",8,23,38,2,22,49,42,4

286

"RSE Table N1.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N1.3;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N1.3;" .3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N1.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " ,"Total" "Energy Source","First Use" ,"Total United States" "Coal ",3 "Natural Gas",1 "Net Electricity",1 " Purchases",1 " Transfers In",9 " Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy",15 " Sales and Transfers Offsite",3 "Coke and Breeze",2 "Residual Fuel Oil",4 "Distillate Fuel Oil",5 "Liquefied Petroleum Gases and Natural Gas Liquids",1 "Other",2 " Asphalt and Road Oil (a)",0 " Lubricants (a)",0 " Naphtha < 401 Degrees (a)",0

287

"RSE Table N13.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.3;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.3;" 3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ","Total of" "NAICS"," ","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",8,9,0 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",0,0,0 313,"Textile Mills",0,0,0 313210," Broadwoven Fabric Mills",0,0,0 314,"Textile Product Mills",90,90,0 315,"Apparel",0,0,0 316,"Leather and Allied Products",0,0,0

288

"RSE Table C10.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.1;" 1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",,,"Computer","Control of","Processes"," "," "," ",,,,," " " "," ","Computer Control","of Building-Wide","Environment(b)","or Major","Energy-Using","Equipment(c)","Waste","Heat","Recovery","Adjustable -","Speed","Motors" "NAICS"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know"

289

"RSE Table E13.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.1;" 1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.1;" " Unit: Percents." " ",," "," ",," " ,,,,"Sales and","Net Demand" "Economic",,,"Total Onsite","Transfers","for" "Characteristic(a)","Purchases","Transfers In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",4,52,15,4,4 " 20-49",2,14,17,33,2 " 50-99",2,31,6,10,2 " 100-249",1,13,7,9,1 " 250-499",2,2,2,1,2 " 500 and Over",1,2,1,1,1

290

"RSE Table N7.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N7.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N7.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N7.1;" N7.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N7.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" "NAICS"," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",1,1,1 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",8,4,5 313,"Textile Mills",3,2,3 313210," Broadwoven Fabric Mills",3,4,3 314,"Textile Product Mills",7,5,5

291

"RSE Table C12.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C12.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C12.1;" 2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C12.1;" " Units: Percents." ,,"Approximate",,,"Approximate","Average" ,,"Enclosed Floorspace",,"Average","Number","Number" "NAICS"," ","of All Buildings",,"Enclosed Floorspace","of All Buildings","of Buildings Onsite" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Onsite","Establishments(b)","per Establishment","Onsite","per Establishment" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",2,0,2,1,1 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",11,0,15,14,14

292

The train/embankment thought experiment, Einstein's second postulate of special relativity and relativity of simultaneity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relativistic time dilatation effect and Einstein's second postulate of special relativity are used to analyse train/embankment thought expriments, both Einstein's original one, and an extension where observers on two trains moving at different speeds, as well as on the embankment, are considered. Whereas the relativistic analysis of Einstein's experiment shows, in contradiction to Einstein's interpretation, no `relativity of simultaneity' effect, the latter is apparent for certain events in the two-train experiment. The importance of relativistic kinematics --embodied for photons in Einstein's second postulate-- for the correct interpretation of the experiments is pointed out and demonstrated by detailed calculation of a related example.

J. H. Field

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

293

Self-adjointness and conservation laws of difference equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A general theorem on conservation laws for arbitrary difference equations is proved. The theorem is based on an introduction of an adjoint system related with a given difference system, and it does not require the existence of a difference Lagrangian. It is proved that the system, combined by the original system and its adjoint system, is governed by a variational principle, which inherits all symmetries of the original system. Noether's theorem can then be applied. With some special techniques, e.g. self-adjointness properties, this allows us to obtain conservation laws for difference equations, which are not necessary governed by Lagrangian formalisms.

Linyu Peng

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

294

Bilateral political relations and sovereign wealth fund investment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine the role of bilateral political relations in sovereign wealth fund (SWF) investment decisions. Our empirical results suggest that political relations play a role in SWF decision making. Contrary to predictions based on the FDI and political relations literature, we find that relative to nations in which they do not invest, \\{SWFs\\} prefer to invest in nations with which they have weaker political relations. Using a two-stage Cragg model, we find that political relations are an important factor in where \\{SWFs\\} invest but matter less in determining how much to invest. Inconsistent with the FDI and political relations literature, these results suggest that \\{SWFs\\} behave differently than rational investors who maximize return while minimizing risk. Consistent with the trade and political relations literature, we find that SWF investment has a positive (negative) impact for relatively closed (open) countries. Our results suggest that \\{SWFs\\} use—at least partially—non-financial motives in investment decisions.

April Knill; Bong-Soo Lee; Nathan Mauck

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Phenomenological hadron form factors: shape and relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of relativistic quark models with simple parametric wave functions for the understanding of the electromagnetic structure of nucleons together with their electromagnetic transition to resonances is discussed. The implications of relativity in the different ways it can be implemented in a simple model are studied together with the role played by mixed symmetry s-state and D-state deformations of the rest frame wave functions of the nucleon and Delta resonance.

B. Julia-Diaz

2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

Clean Cities: Related Financial Opportunities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Related Financial Opportunities Related Financial Opportunities Transportation-related financial opportunities from organizations and federal agencies outside Clean Cities are listed below. Some of the government agencies listed have ongoing funding available; others issue funding notices periodically or assist in forming partnerships that can provide funding opportunities for transportation-related projects. U.S. Department of Transportation Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement (CMAQ) Program: Administered by the Federal Highway Administration and the Federal Transit Administration, CMAQ funds projects and programs that reduce transportation-related emissions and relieve traffic congestion. Funds are distributed locally through metropolitan planning organizations.

297

Brain organization mirrors caste differences, colony founding and nest architecture in paper wasps (Hymenoptera: Vespidae)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Research articles 1001 42 14 133 Brain organization mirrors caste differences...social organization and may affect mosaic brain evolution. We asked whether the relative size of functionally distinct brain regions corresponds to species differences...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

District of Columbia Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 76.0 76.2 75.3 73.4 81.1 82.2 72.9 80.3 74.6 72.2 72.3 71.0 2003 70.4 71.0 69.3 63.9 64.8 75.9 55.6 69.6 77.6 71.8 73.7 74.8 2004 76.1 74.9 74.1 72.9 71.1 70.5 74.3 74.9 74.5 72.5 77.7 78.4 2005 81.0 79.1 78.9 74.5 76.2 85.2 80.8 74.1 80.3 78.0 81.0 81.0 2006 78.2 77.9 77.1 70.3 69.8 67.8 70.1 76.8 73.8 78.1 78.2 78.7 2007 77.0 80.1 73.9 74.4 62.5 77.4 68.0 77.1 67.8 74.0 75.2 78.5 2008 78.0 78.1 78.2 67.8 69.9 70.3 72.2 71.4 73.2 68.0 79.2 78.9 2009 78.8 78.7 76.5 71.7 70.4 67.9 64.8 77.2 68.5 72.4 72.6 78.2 2010 77.6 78.6 75.3 64.5 61.1 68.0 66.9 66.1 72.7 69.1 77.7 77.3 2011 79.4 75.3 74.8 72.3 54.3 60.9 70.6 78.8 70.9 77.6 78.7 71.5

299

Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

300

Connecticut Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 99.3 99.3 99.2 99.3 99.1 99.2 99.0 99.0 86.9 99.5 99.1 99.2 2003 100.0 98.7 98.7 98.4 98.2 98.4 98.2 98.0 97.6 97.9 98.2 98.5 2004 98.7 98.7 98.7 98.5 97.8 98.7 98.0 98.8 98.7 97.8 98.8 98.9 2005 99.0 99.0 98.9 98.7 98.6 98.5 98.5 98.5 98.5 98.3 98.3 98.6 2006 98.7 98.6 98.7 98.4 98.3 98.4 98.4 98.5 98.3 97.9 98.2 98.3 2007 98.4 98.6 98.6 98.3 98.3 97.3 98.4 97.6 95.5 97.9 97.5 98.2 2008 98.2 98.0 98.1 97.9 97.3 95.8 97.8 97.4 97.4 96.8 97.2 97.8 2009 97.8 98.0 97.9 97.4 97.3 97.2 97.3 97.4 97.1 96.5 96.9 97.3 2010 97.8 97.7 97.6 97.0 96.9 97.3 97.1 97.1 96.8 95.9 96.7 97.0 2011 97.0 97.4 97.0 96.3 96.6 96.5 96.4 96.6 97.0 95.6 96.3 96.5

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Massachusetts Represented  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 1990 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.7 99.7 1991 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.8 99.7 99.6 99.6 99.8 99.9 99.9 1992 99.9 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.7 99.8 99.7 99.6 99.6 99.6 99.7 99.8 1993 98.9 98.7 98.5 97.7 96.5 97.7 96.8 89.2 97.5 96.7 96.9 97.8 1994 75.2 78.4 72.5 69.8 69.8 61.2 67.0 86.0 79.7 90.6 81.2 87.1 1995 87.9 89.4 92.0 88.3 88.0 82.7 74.6 77.3 77.5 81.0 81.6 79.5 1996 84.7 83.5 82.4 80.2 79.2 71.3 68.1 61.3 55.4 69.5 62.5 68.9 1997 68.0 69.0 72.9 74.1 69.9 48.5 46.0 41.3 43.8 48.7 62.9 68.6

302

Massachusetts Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.8 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.8 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.8 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 2007 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 2008 89.7 89.7 89.3 86.2 78.4 70.7 68.4 68.3 68.1 77.4 83.6 89.3 2009 90.8 93.1 87.5 86.3 84.5 64.9 72.9 66.1 67.2 78.4 83.0 87.7 2010 91.5 89.7 88.6 82.6 77.8 68.7 65.0 61.5 67.4 75.8 84.1 93.4

303

Missouri Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

304

Mississippi Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

305

Pennsylvania Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

306

Vermont Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

307

Maryland Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

308

Hawaii Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

309

Louisiana Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

310

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Wisconsin Represented by  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 94.1 94.2 94.5 94.0 92.6 87.7 86.1 84.2 84.2 84.3 91.1 95.0 1990 91.6 91.5 91.9 91.9 90.3 86.5 83.1 82.4 82.6 87.5 90.1 93.3 1991 93.8 92.3 92.9 91.2 88.8 83.8 80.7 84.7 83.6 86.7 91.5 92.1 1992 92.7 92.1 91.6 90.0 85.8 82.3 83.3 84.1 85.2 90.7 93.4 95.1 1993 95.2 96.0 95.3 93.5 92.1 90.8 89.2 88.5 90.0 92.6 95.2 96.0 1994 97.1 97.6 97.4 96.6 91.8 89.9 83.5 87.1 87.8 90.8 94.4 84.4 1995 93.5 94.0 93.2 92.4 90.0 81.8 82.3 84.8 87.3 88.9 93.4 93.6 1996 93.9 94.8 94.0 92.0 89.9 86.1 82.1 83.8 82.4 87.1 90.9 91.8 1997 89.7 88.2 88.5 83.3 77.4 60.6 67.8 55.4 62.9 69.3 85.9 83.2 1998 87.0 81.6 79.8 75.5 55.6 55.5 47.6 48.5 45.5 71.1 74.9 79.2

311

Arkansas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

312

Kentucky Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 92.9 92.8 93.1 92.8 91.4 93.2 94.3 94.4 95.3 91.9 93.4 94.2 2003 93.8 94.2 93.1 93.4 96.9 95.2 94.6 94.5 95.7 92.2 93.9 94.0 2004 94.0 93.9 92.9 92.7 96.0 94.9 95.0 95.3 95.6 93.7 93.7 95.1 2005 94.5 94.5 94.6 94.0 95.7 95.3 95.9 95.8 96.1 93.8 95.3 95.7 2006 96.2 95.5 95.8 98.0 95.5 97.7 96.8 97.3 97.2 95.6 96.4 96.2 2007 96.2 95.9 96.2 95.8 96.4 96.6 96.7 96.9 97.0 95.7 95.8 96.3 2008 96.4 95.9 96.1 96.1 96.0 96.8 97.0 96.5 96.4 95.4 95.7 95.8 2009 95.8 95.3 95.2 94.9 95.3 95.6 95.1 95.6 95.5 94.8 94.9 95.6 2010 95.4 95.7 95.9 95.7 96.0 96.7 96.5 96.3 96.1 94.8 95.3 95.8 2011 95.1 95.0 95.2 95.4 94.9 94.5 95.9 96.5 96.1 97.2 96.3 96.1

313

Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

314

Indiana Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 98.9 98.5 98.7 99.1 92.8 99.4 98.8 98.8 99.1 99.0 98.8 97.8 2003 97.0 97.0 97.0 96.3 96.6 97.7 96.1 100.0 97.2 96.4 97.1 96.9 2004 97.0 96.7 96.7 96.3 97.3 96.3 97.8 96.5 96.0 96.1 96.7 96.7 2005 96.8 96.7 96.2 95.7 96.4 96.0 96.3 96.3 96.2 96.1 96.4 96.5 2006 96.2 96.3 96.2 96.3 95.8 96.4 95.5 96.1 96.5 97.0 96.2 96.3 2007 96.4 97.0 95.9 96.6 96.1 95.2 95.0 95.6 95.0 94.8 95.9 95.9 2008 95.9 95.8 95.8 94.2 94.1 94.1 93.9 93.9 93.4 93.1 94.4 94.3 2009 94.0 94.9 93.2 92.8 91.7 93.2 92.8 92.1 91.7 93.1 93.3 93.7 2010 94.1 94.5 94.2 93.1 94.1 92.8 93.0 92.9 92.6 93.1 94.0 94.8 2011 95.2 94.7 94.6 94.4 94.4 94.5 93.9 94.7 93.8 94.2 94.2 94.6

315

North Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

316

West Virginia Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

317

Utah Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

318

New Hampshire Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

319

Wisconsin Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

320

South Carolina Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Arizona Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 98.9 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

322

Rhode Island Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

323

Nebraska Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 71.4 90.5 87.4 84.8 95.4 86.8 82.7 90.4 81.3 75.5 79.7 78.6 2003 80.3 93.4 87.6 91.1 95.3 94.9 87.9 80.0 95.4 69.4 78.6 80.7 2004 81.5 91.9 86.8 94.5 88.7 84.8 89.1 89.1 88.2 83.7 83.7 88.7 2005 86.1 87.2 86.3 83.0 84.5 86.5 85.0 84.4 85.5 83.9 84.3 84.1 2006 87.1 85.9 86.7 85.8 85.0 86.2 87.0 86.2 85.9 83.3 84.2 85.1 2007 84.9 87.4 89.4 86.1 87.5 86.9 88.7 85.5 83.3 77.5 76.6 83.9 2008 86.6 89.0 90.3 89.6 90.1 89.0 87.7 87.3 85.6 75.2 77.2 85.0 2009 90.2 89.1 89.1 86.8 85.8 88.1 86.7 88.8 86.4 83.6 84.6 85.4 2010 87.0 88.8 89.5 86.2 82.5 87.3 86.5 87.8 87.6 87.1 84.0 86.8 2011 87.2 88.9 89.2 86.3 86.1 86.1 87.8 89.1 86.7 86.3 83.3 86.1

324

Virginia Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 88.0 91.4 90.8 89.2 91.0 91.3 88.4 91.6 88.4 88.0 89.0 89.1 2003 88.6 88.6 87.7 87.7 85.5 91.4 80.6 86.1 83.9 86.4 88.3 89.1 2004 88.5 88.5 88.0 87.2 84.7 86.1 87.7 85.7 87.7 88.3 88.4 89.3 2005 90.9 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 91.2 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

325

Nevada Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

326

Montana Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.9 99.9 2007 99.9 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.7 100.0 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.9 2008 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.9 99.9 2009 99.8 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.9 99.9 2010 99.8 99.9 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.9 99.9

327

Ohio Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

328

Delaware Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

329

Oklahoma Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.2 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

330

Maine Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.9 99.8 99.8

331

New Jersey Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 98.0 97.8 97.7 97.9 92.7 97.0 98.1 97.2 97.2 95.4 96.1 95.6 2003 94.9 95.0 95.5 95.0 95.1 95.2 95.3 95.1 96.7 94.4 94.9 94.7 2004 94.5 95.4 95.0 95.4 95.8 95.2 95.2 94.4 95.0 94.2 94.4 94.7 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

332

Iowa Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

333

Alaska Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

334

Oregon Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

335

Kansas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.5 2005 99.5 99.5 99.5 99.2 99.5 99.5 99.6 99.6 99.6 99.7 99.7 99.9 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2010 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

336

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Carolina Represented  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 98.5 98.5 98.6 98.3 98.1 98.2 98.1 97.7 97.7 97.8 98.0 97.3 1990 98.6 98.4 98.3 98.1 92.2 97.6 97.6 97.5 97.9 97.3 98.0 98.6 1991 98.7 98.9 98.7 96.9 97.4 97.5 97.3 97.7 97.7 97.4 98.9 98.9 1992 99.1 99.1 98.9 98.6 98.5 95.8 95.5 95.8 97.0 99.7 100.0 100.0 1993 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 95.1 94.6 100.0 95.3 100.0 100.0 1994 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.7 97.8 98.3 97.0 95.7 95.2 95.6 96.2 99.9 1995 97.8 97.5 96.7 95.0 95.6 88.4 95.0 95.1 95.3 95.3 95.9 100.0 1996 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 97.5 96.9 100.0 97.3 97.3 96.4 97.4 100.0 1997 100.0 98.3 97.8 96.0 100.0 100.0 99.9 97.1 98.8 99.9 100.0 98.0

337

New York Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

338

Washington Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

339

Texas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 99.9 100.0 100.0 99.9 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.9 100.0 100.0 100.0

340

Georgia Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NNSA hits 21 percent of CFC goal | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

represent such diverse fields as medical research, education, environment, recreation and sports, civil rights and science and technology. By working collectively, the...

342

Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 99.8 99.6 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 100.0 100.0...

343

Number Percent Official Lawrence HC 26,934 100%  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lawrence Free State 134 Blue Valley Northwest 117 Blue Valley North 109 Lawrence 94 Saint Thomas Aquinas 90 Olathe East 80 Shawnee Mission Northwest 78 Shawnee Mission South 75 Shawnee Mission West 71 Total 990

344

Sandia National Laboratories: Voltage Increases Up to 25 Percent...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Exhibition (EU PVSC) EC Top Publications Reference Model 5 (RM5): Oscillating Surge Wave Energy Converter Experimental Wave Tank Test for Reference Model 3 Floating- Point...

345

Conditions for collection efficiencies greater than one hundred percent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An account is given for the conditions under which the collection efficiency is hydrogenated amorphous silicon pin-diodes increases to values larger than 100%. By specific bias illumination through the p-side bias generated photocarriers are collected under certain probe beam conditions of the collection efficiency measurement, leading to apparent large collection efficiencies. By numerical modeling they investigated the influence of the diode thickness, bias photon flux and probe absorption coefficient as well as applied voltage for possible sensor applications which may utilize this optical amplifying principle. The alternative with bias light through the n-side and probe light through the p-side is also explored. Collection efficiency values determined by the photogating of bias generated holes become only slightly larger than 100% in contrast to the electron case where values in excess of 3,000% are presented.

Brueggemann, R.; Zollondz, J.H.; Main, C.; Gao, W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

State and National Wind Resource Potential 30 Percent Capacity...  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Note - 50% exclusions are not cumulative. If an area is non-ridgecrest forest on FS land, it is just excluded at the 50% level one time. 1) Exclude areas of slope > 20% Derived...

347

Transcending Portland Cement with 100 percent fly ash concrete  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of concrete, made with 100% fly ash and no Portland cement, in buildings at the Transportation Institute in Bozeman, MT, USA, is described. 3 refs., 7 figs.

Cross, D.; Akin, M.; Stephens, J.; Cuelh, E. [Montana State University, MT (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

PERCENT FEDERAL LAND FOR OIL/GAS FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Federalland as your second layer. Copy the code into a VBA module in ArcMap. Inputs: Data frame in ArcMap named "Task 2" Layer (0) is a reference layer of your choice Layer...

349

RESEARCH ARTICLE Forty percent revenue increase by combining organic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uganda. Cabbage was grown on eight replicate farms in close association with a farmer field school-Saharan Africa indicate the need for effective strategies to restore soils, while improving smallholder incomes an eco- nomic perspective and none have explored its potential in intensively managed, market vegetable

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

350

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Connecticut Represente...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 66.4 55.8 55.8 2000's 47.3 54.0 48.9 45.3 44.0 46.4 48.5 50.0 47.3 37.5 2010's 31.1 31.0 32.3...

351

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Connecticut Represente...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 96.0 93.0 96.5 98.1 80.9 82.0 87.0 81.9 68.7 62.8 2000's 78.3 77.6 72.4 68.1 69.0 70.3 71.0 71.5...

352

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Connecticut Represente...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 100.0 100.0 98.4 90.0 81.6 76.5 74.5 80.4 74.8 85.5 90.8 99.5 1990 100.0 100.0 98.7 95.9 92.3 89.9 87.5 86.9 87.2 91.3...

353

Connecticut Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 100.0 1990's 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 100.0 2000's 100.0 99.0 99.0...

354

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Connecticut Represente...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 66.1 48.5 50.9 50.2 58.7 44.3 34.1 58.5 55.7 73.8 58.9 51.8 2002 45.0 47.4 53.0 41.3 52.5 50.1 38.1 49.3 53.9 52.2 49.1...

355

Table 2. Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

or More","NA","NA",93.75,96.42857143,91.27516779,97.46835443 "Race of Householder1" " White",88.61111111,"NA",91.54929577,91.68704156,90.27093596,92.77845777 " Black...

356

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

to power 225,000 homes or a city the size of El Paso, Texas, for a year. "Particularly in light of tight oil and gas supplies caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, it is important...

357

Minnesota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

358

Michigan Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 97.9 97.7 97.9 97.7 95.5 94.0 95.6 94.1 91.2 91.7 92.6 92.9 2003 93.8 93.4 92.3 96.3 95.8 95.0 95.8 95.5 94.0 93.6 95.9 94.7 2004 95.1 95.6 95.3 95.7 90.9 95.6 95.7 95.6 95.1 95.0 95.3 95.7 2005 95.9 96.1 96.0 95.9 95.9 95.6 95.1 95.1 94.4 93.3 94.2 95.1 2006 94.6 94.4 94.6 95.4 94.6 95.0 94.2 93.8 92.6 92.1 93.4 93.6 2007 94.6 95.1 95.5 95.3 95.5 95.5 94.8 94.5 93.8 92.7 92.1 93.5 2008 93.6 93.5 94.1 95.5 94.2 95.6 95.1 94.3 94.2 91.9 93.1 94.0 2009 93.9 94.6 94.4 94.5 94.3 94.5 93.2 93.8 92.3 91.6 92.7 92.2 2010 93.6 93.5 93.8 80.9 93.6 93.1 93.1 92.7 91.5 90.4 91.6 92.1 2011 92.3 92.7 92.1 93.0 93.1 92.7 91.9 91.5 90.2 89.8 91.0 91.7

359

New Mexico Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2003 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2004 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2005 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2006 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2007 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2008 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2009 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

360

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Hampshire Represented  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 13.5 16.2 17.9 15.4 9.9 5.0 3.7 8.5 13.7 14.1 17.5 16.5 2002 16.4 11.2 14.6 9.0 8.3 9.0 5.2 10.1 7.7 29.4 32.3 17.4 2003 6.7 7.2 19.4 17.0 10.6 13.5 13.0 12.3 13.4 15.5 21.1 26.3 2004 30.3 9.1 10.7 10.4 7.1 5.5 3.9 4.3 5.6 8.7 9.7 17.0 2005 17.6 17.5 12.0 6.5 6.9 6.6 3.3 10.0 5.5 6.4 13.7 13.0 2006 16.3 24.3 18.2 18.2 17.7 12.9 4.8 9.1 8.0 12.8 8.8 15.6 2007 11.7 16.6 12.0 8.4 15.3 8.9 5.4 7.0 6.0 8.5 10.7 45.8 2008 23.0 22.9 22.0 15.0 16.4 16.2 14.6 12.3 11.2 13.6 16.1 20.0 2009 30.5 28.1 25.0 16.7 15.5 16.3 14.5 13.7 13.3 16.5 18.7 23.1 2010 18.0 16.4 15.4 12.2 10.3 8.8 8.6 10.9 8.0 10.7 13.6 14.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Characteristics of Astronomy-Related Organizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geographical distributions, ages and sizes of astronomy-related organizations have been investigated from comprehensive and up-to-date samples extracted from the master files for StarGuides/StarWorlds. Results for professional institutions, associations, planetariums, and public observatories are commented, as well as specific distributions for astronomy-related publishers and commercial-software producers. The highly uneven general pattern displayed by geographical distributions is still very much the same as it was at the beginning of the XXth century, even if the densities are higher -- another illustration of the well-known socio-economic effect of self-reinforcement. Other geographical peculiarities (local concentrations, national cultures and policies, electronic astronomy, ..) are discussed in the paper, as well as the uneasy separation between amateur and professional astronomers in associations. Some events had a clear impact on the rate of foundation of astronomy-related organizations, such as World Wars I and II, the beginning of space exploration, the landing of man on the Moon, the end of the Cold War, spectacular comets, and so on. However, as detailed in the paper, not all of them affected in the same way Western Europe and North America, nor the various types of organizations. The size of the vast majority of astronomy-related organizations is relatively small, with again some differences between Western Europe and North America.

A. Heck

2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

Simultaneous acquisition of differing image types  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system in one embodiment includes an image forming device for forming an image from an area of interest containing different image components; an illumination device for illuminating the area of interest with light containing multiple components; at least one light source coupled to the illumination device, the at least one light source providing light to the illumination device containing different components, each component having distinct spectral characteristics and relative intensity; an image analyzer coupled to the image forming device, the image analyzer decomposing the image formed by the image forming device into multiple component parts based on type of imaging; and multiple image capture devices, each image capture device receiving one of the component parts of the image. A method in one embodiment includes receiving an image from an image forming device; decomposing the image formed by the image forming device into multiple component parts based on type of imaging; receiving the component parts of the image; and outputting image information based on the component parts of the image. Additional systems and methods are presented.

Demos, Stavros G

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

363

A Night and Day Difference  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

11 11 PNNL-SA-80423 A Night-and-Day Difference "Grand Challenge" demonstrates team-based science approach; provides new systems-level understanding of microbes important for biofuels and carbon sequestration. In late 2004, when Dr. Himadri Pakrasi walked into the crowded EMSL Auditorium, he recognized only one scientist he knew. In the hours that followed, discussions circled around a single challenge: designing a multi- disciplinary, multi-institutional effort to understand the ways unique cyanobacteria harness energy from sunlight by day and generate their own fertilizer at night. The ultimate goal? To make discoveries that support engineering of such microbes for energy and environmental purposes. The day was the original scoping meeting

364

Gasoline Price Differences Caused by:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: While my agency cannot be expert in every local gasoline market in the United States, we are familiar with a number of factors that can account for significant differences in prices between markets: Proximity of supply - distance from the refineries supplying the local market. Additionally, the proximity of those refineries to crude oil supplies can be a factor, as well as shipping logistics, including pipeline or waterborne, from refinery to market. Cost of supply - including crude oil, refinery operating, and transportation costs. Supply/demand balance - some regions are typically in excess or short supply, while others may vary seasonally, or when supply interruptions (such as refinery shutdowns) occur. Competitive environment - including the number of suppliers, and the

365

Public Relations for Energy Sustainability  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This presentation covers the public relations aspect of industrial energy efficiency projects and provides a framework for engaging stakeholders productively around new projects.

366

The Public Relations of Science*  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Let me start by recalling certain changes in the relations of science to society that may help us see our present problems in historical perspective.

WESLEY C. MITCHELL

1940-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

367

Table 1. State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000 - 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000 - 2010)" State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000 - 2010)" "million metric tons carbon dioxide" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Change" ,,,,,,,,,,,," 2000 to 2010 " "State",2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percent","Absolute" "Alabama",140.4264977,131.9521389,136.7103146,137.2323195,139.6896437,141.493798,143.9716001,146.076107,139.2224128,119.7962734,132.7462762,-0.05469211069,-7.680221558 "Alaska",44.32104312,43.40375114,43.56121812,43.5078746,46.76217106,48.06229125,45.79367017,44.11576503,39.46205329,37.91867389,38.72718369,-0.1262122693,-5.593859429 "Arizona",85.96984024,88.33838336,87.66914741,89.29026566,96.58329461,96.7032775,100.0087541,102.1950438,103.1458188,94.63481918,95.91303514,0.1156591064,9.943194897

368

RSE Table 7.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.4;" " Unit: Percents." " ",," "," ",," "," " "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and" "Characteristic(a)","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",8,21,14,7,9,13 " 20-49",4,6,15,4,13,4 " 50-99",3,6,4,3,6,8 " 100-249",3,8,17,2,5,7 " 250-499",4,1,9,7,1,37 " 500 and Over",1,7,4,1,1,1 "Total",2,3,7,2,1,11

369

Table 5. Per capita energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by state (2000 - 201  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Per capita energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by state (2000 - 2010)" Per capita energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by state (2000 - 2010)" "metric tons carbon dioxide per person" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Change" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"2000 to 2010" "State",2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percent","Absolute" "Alabama",31.54590416,29.56352198,30.5739632,30.56483509,30.96927578,31.14605742,31.33283758,31.52225314,29.78727412,25.44798199,28.06679306,-0.1102872527,-3.479111105 "Alaska",70.60324067,68.51009907,67.8551127,67.17588806,70.92646205,72.04509462,67.81012638,64.8863351,57.56413017,54.58358965,54.63289567,-0.2261984697,-15.97034499 "Arizona",16.64049197,16.65546102,16.08173855,15.97087112,16.77174168,16.18743942,16.15392734,16.06780183,15.87052371,14.3654833,14.36549251,-0.1367146759,-2.274999466

370

"RSE Table N5.2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.2;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.2;" 2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Black Liquor","Total(b)","Waste(c)","from Trees(d)","Processing(e)","Refuse(f)"

371

relative humidity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

relative humidity relative humidity Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Relative Humidity at 10 m Above The Surface Of The Earth (%)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Relative Humidity at 10 m Above The Surface Of The Earth (%)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords climate GIS NASA relative humidity SWERA UNEP

372

Human Radiation Experiments: Related Sites  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Experiment Experiment Related Sites Related Links Home Roadmap What's New Search HREX Multimedia Related Sites Federal DOE DOE Sites & National Laboratories Federal Other The following are organizations which provide related information and links to databases, electronic documents, and servers. FEDERAL - DOE U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) homepage (http://www.doe.gov/)contains information on DOE's Departmental Resources, Programs, Offices, National Labs and other DOE related topics. DOE's Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Technical Information Services (TIS) homepage (http://nattie.eh.doe.gov/) is a collection of information services designed to provide safety and health professionals with reliable, accurate and current information to assist them in performing their jobs.

373

The Galactic thick and thin disks: differences in evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent observations demonstrate that the thin and thick disks of the Galaxy have different chemical abundance trends and evolution timescales. The relative abundances of $\\alpha$-elements in the thick Galactic disk are increased relative to the thin disk. Our goal is to investigate the cause of such differences in thick and thin disk abundances. We investigate the chemical evolution of the Galactic disk in the framework of the open two-zone model with gas inflow. The Galactic abundance trends for $\\alpha$-elements (Mg, Si, O) and Fe are predicted for the thin and thick Galactic disks. The star formation histories of the thin and thick disks must have been different and the gas infall must have been more intense during the thick disk evolution that the thin disk evolution.

T. V. Nykytyuk; T. V. Mishenina

2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

374

Relative outcomes of climate change mitigation related to global  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Relative outcomes of climate change mitigation related to global Relative outcomes of climate change mitigation related to global temperature versus sea-level rise Submitted by mkaczmar on February 8, 2013 - 15:19 Authors: Gerald A. Meehl, Aixue Hu, Claudia Tebaldi, Julie M. Arblaster, Warren M. Washington, Haiyan Teng, Benjamin M. Sanderson, Toby Ault, Warren G. Strand & James B. White III There is a common perception that, if human societies make the significant adjustments necessary to substantively cut emissions of greenhouse gases, global temperature increases could be stabilized, and the most dangerous consequences of climate change could be avoided. Here we show results from global coupled climate model simulations with the new representative concentration pathway mitigation scenarios to 2300 to illustrate that, with

375

Some Dependence Relations of Empirical Belief  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that two apples should differ only in this respect, that one is a good apple and the other not good, but goodness is not reducible to a set of natural properties. We might say, as a working definition of a dependence relation, that if realm B, a set... of states b j . n with properties BP describable in vocabulary BV, is necessary for the instantiation of a realm D, where D = (s:s has properties DP describable in DV], then the elements of D depend on those of B. BP and DP, BV and DV, may be completely...

Malherbe, Jeanette

376

EPR Steering Inequalities from Entropic Uncertainty Relations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use entropic uncertainty relations to formulate inequalities that witness Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering correlations in diverse quantum systems. We then use these inequalities to formulate symmetric EPR-steering inequalities using the mutual information. We explore the differing natures of the correlations captured by one-way and symmetric steering inequalities, and examine the possibility of exclusive one-way steerability in two-qubit states. Furthermore, we show that steering inequalities can be extended to generalized positive operator valued measures (POVMs), and we also derive hybrid-steering inequalities between alternate degrees of freedom.

James Schneeloch; Curtis J. Broadbent; Stephen P. Walborn; Eric G. Cavalcanti; John C. Howell

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

377

Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#99942-v1-4_5_Acre_Quarterly_October...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Turbidity Units RPD relative percent difference STAR Center Young - Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center TCE trichloroethene TCOPC total contaminants of...

378

Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#345141-v1-4_5_Quarterly_Oct_Dec_2005...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Turbidity Units RPD relative percent difference STAR Center Young - Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center TCE trichloroethene TCOPC total contaminants of...

379

Microsoft Word - N01687_4_5Acre June - Nov 2011  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Corrective Action RPD relative percent difference STAR Center Young - Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center TCE trichloroethene TCOPCs total contaminants of...

380

Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#101993-v1-4_5_Acre_Quarterly_Jan...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Turbidity Units RPD relative percent difference STAR Center Young - Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center TCE trichloroethene TCOPC total contaminants of...

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#103356-v1-4_5_Acre_Quarterly_Apr...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Turbidity Units RPD relative percent difference STAR Center Young - Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center TCE trichloroethene TCOPC total contaminants of...

382

Microsoft Word - N01440_4 5Acre Jun-Nov09.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Corrective Action RPD relative percent difference STAR Center Young - Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center TCE trichloroethene TCOPC total contaminants of...

383

Quarterly Progress Report, 4.5 Acre Site April through June 2003  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

RAP Remedial Action Plan RPD relative percent difference STAR Center Young - Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center STL Severn Trent Laboratories TCE trichloroethene...

384

Pinellas County, Florida, Site Environmental Restoration Project  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

mgL milligrams per liter RPD relative percent difference STAR Center Young - Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center TCE trichloroethene TCOPCs total contaminants of...

385

Microsoft Word - N01629_4_5Acre_Dec-May 2011  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Corrective Action RPD relative percent difference STAR Center Young - Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center TCE trichloroethene TCOPCs total contaminants of...

386

Microsoft Word - N01844_4_5Acre Semiannual june_nov13.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

mgL milligrams per liter RPD relative percent difference STAR Center Young - Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center TCE trichloroethene TCOPCs total contaminants of...

387

Related Links | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Related Links Related Links Related Links November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis Need additional help or more information? DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) provide local, individualized solutions to customers on specific combined heat and power (CHP) projects. Partners of DOE's CHP Program include federal and state agencies, non-governmental organizations, international entities, private clean energy companies, technology developers, and commercial builders and developers. Partners American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) CHP Association International District Energy Association (IDEA) International Energy Agency (IEA) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA)

388

NREL: Energy Analysis - Related Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Related Links Related Links Here you'll find links to other programs, organizations, and information resources concerning other analysis capabilities, energy-modeling, and technology expertise related to renewable energy. International Applications NREL's International Program in its effort to promote the use of renewable energy as a tool for sustainable development, applies world-class expertise in technology development and deployment, economic analysis, resource assessment, project design and implementation, and policy formulation. Assisting State and Local Governments Using renewable energy and being energy efficient is smart. Not only does it protect the environment, it benefits the economy. Many mayors, governors, city/county commissioners, state legislators, state energy

389

A visitation reporting system for Utah state parks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

100 percent. Possible reasons for the large percent difference in some of the parks may be related to poor traffic counter placement or inordinately large numbers of non-recreation vehicles tripping the meter. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This professional... of the estimation model Excerpt from Forest Service Handbook Comparison of Parks: Percent of Recreating Vehicles vs percent Difference between PPV and "b" 73 75 80 84 VITA 87 LIST OF TABLES Table 1 Time periods sampled Page 12 2 Visitor use survey...

Burns, Dennis C.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

390

Employee Relations | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Employee Relations Employee Relations Employee Relations Addressing Poor Performance What happens if an Employee's Performance is Below the Meets Expectations (ME) level? Any time during the appraisal period an employee demonstrates that he/she is performing below the ME level in at least one critical element, the Rating Official should contact his/her Human Resources Office for guidance and: If performance is at the Needs Improvement (NI) level; issue the employee a Performance Assistance Plan (PAP); or If performance is at the Fails to Meet Expectations (FME) level; issue the employee a Performance Improvement Plan (PIP). Workforce Discipline The Headquarters Employee and Labor Relations Division provides guidance and assistance to Management on Work Force Discipline. The DOE Order

391

Related Links | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Related Links Related Links Related Links Private, public, and nonprofit organizations around the country offer a wide range of courses and other services to help you either improve your current skills or learn new ones. The sites featured here can help you find courses of specific interest as well as other information about training requirements for certain energy jobs. DOE Related Advanced Manufacturing Office: Training Find training sessions in your area and learn how to save energy in your manufacturing plant or commercial building. American Museum of Science & Energy Learn more about the American Museum of Science & Energy (AMSE), a DOE-sponsored museum in Oak Ridge, TN, that provides cultural, educational, and scientific programs and exhibits, as well as summer camps for kids.

392

NEPA-Related Public Involvement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Loan Programs Office’s NEPA-related hearings, public meetings, and public notices (e.g. public scoping meeting, public hearing, notice of proposed floodplain or wetland action) are presented...

393

International Relations and Development Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Anthropology and Languages (choice of French, Arabic, German, Italian or Spanish) The International Relations Economy, Languages (French, Spanish, Arabic, German, Italian), International Trade, Middle East Politics experience a broad range of opportunities outside the classroom: - Explore exchange opportunities with dozens

394

Labor Relations | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Labor Relations Labor Relations Labor Relations Department of Energy Headquarters and The National Treasury Employees Union (NTEU) Collective Bargaining Agreement The National Treasury Employees Union (NTEU) is the exclusive representative of bargaining unit employees at the Department of Energy Headquarters offices in the Washington DC metropolitan area. The terms and conditions of this agreement have been negotiated by DOE and NTEU, and prescribe their respective rights and obligations in matters related to conditions of employment. Headquarters 1187 Request For Payroll Deductions For Labor Organization Dues The Request for Payroll Deduction for Labor Organization Dues (SF-1187) permits eligible employees, who are members of the National Treasury Employees Union (NTEU), to authorize voluntary allotments from their

395

Commutation Relations and Conservation Laws  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The response of a physical system to external electromagnetic and gravitational fields, as embodied in the electric current and stress tensor conservation laws, is used to derive the equal-time commutation relations for charge density and energy density.

Julian Schwinger

1963-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

The Baryonic Tully Fisher Relation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We validate the baryonic Tully Fisher (BTF) relation by exploring the Tully Fish er (TF) and BTF properties of optically and HI-selected disk galaxies. The data includes galaxies from: Sakai et al. (2000) calibrator sample; McGaugh et al. (2000: MC2000) I-band sample; and 18 newly acquired HI-selected field dwarf galaxies observed with the ANU 2.3m telescope and the ATNF Parkes telescope from Gurovich's thesis sample (2005). As in MC2000, we re-cast the TF and BTF relations as relationships between baryo n mass and W_{20}. First we report some numerical errors in MC2000. Then, we c alculate weighted bi-variate linear fits to the data, and finally we compare the fits of the intrinsically fainter dwarfs with the brighter galaxies of Sakai et al. (2000). With regards to the local calibrator disk galaxies of Sakai et al. (2000), our results suggest that the BTF relation is indeed tighter than the T F relation and that the slopes of the BTF relations are statistically flatter th an the equivalent TF relations. Further, for the fainter galaxies which include the I-band MCG2000 and HI-selected galaxies of Gurovich's thesis sample, we calc ulate a break from a simple power law model because of what appears to be real c osmic scatter. Not withstanding this point, the BTF models are marginally better models than the equivalent TF ones with slightly smaller reduced chi^2.

Sebastian Gurovich; Stacy S. McGaugh; Ken C. Freeman; Helmut Jerjen; Lister Staveley-Smith; W. J. G. De Blok

2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

397

Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program - Making A Difference...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program - Making A Difference Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program - Making A Difference Overview of TEPP presentated by Tom Clawson....

398

Reciprocal cross differences in Brahman-Hereford F2 cows: reproductive and maternal traits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.09 higher percent calf crop weaned than F2 BH cows (P < 0.01) and a 0.22 �± 0.11 higher percent calf crop weaned than BH x HB cows (P < 0.05). HB x BH cows had a 0.25 �± 0.08 higher percent calf crop weaned than F2 BH (P < 0.01) and a 0.20 �± 0...

Wright, Bradley Allen

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

399

RSE Table N3.1 and N3.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N3.1 and N3.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N3.1 and N3.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N3.1 and N3.2;" N3.1 and N3.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N3.1 and N3.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",1,1,2,3,1,1,0,0,1

400

RSE Table S1.1 and S1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables S1.1 and S1.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S1.1 and S1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables S1.1 and S1.2;" S1.1 and S1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables S1.1 and S1.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Major Group and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

RSE Table N4.1 and N4.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N4.1 and N4.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N4.1 and N4.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N4.1 and N4.2;" N4.1 and N4.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N4.1 and N4.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",1,1,2,3,1,1,0,0,1

402

RSE Table N1.1 and N1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N1.1 and N1.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 and N1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N1.1 and N1.2;" 1 and N1.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N1.1 and N1.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "NAICS"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","NGL(f)","Coal","Breeze","Other(g)","Produced Onsite(h)"

403

RSE Table N6.1 and N6.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N6.1 and N6.2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 and N6.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N6.1 and N6.2;" 1 and N6.2. Relative Standard Errors for Tables N6.1 and N6.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

404

Does the Effect of Pollution on Infant Mortality Differ Between Developing and Developed Countries? Evidence from Mexico City  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gained access to the birth certificate registry, which0.03 percent of the births certificates have missing month

Arceo, Eva; Hanna, Rema; Oliva, Paulina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

E-Print Network 3.0 - altered dispersion relations Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in mean dispersal distances were not linearly related to the degree of plant... (Westcott and Graham 2000). Although different behaviors can alter seed ... Source: Carlo,...

406

PARTICLES OF DIFFERENCE Stephen E. Schwartz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deposition, and climate modification. #12;Locations of Coal-Fired and Heavy Oil-Fired Plants Relative

Schwartz, Stephen E.

407

EIA - Related Links for Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation Related Links Transportation Related Links Transportation Related Links government reports, data, and web sites (sorted alphabetically by primary agency) Date Last Updated/Reviewed: December 2006 Next Update/Review: April 2007 Federal and International Agencies and Institutes International Energy Agency (IEA) Dealing with Climate Change The International Energy Agency's »Dealing with Climate Change« database of policies and measures now features 2005 revisions and developments. The database has expanded to include more than 1400 records of the climate policy process in the IEA's 26 Member Countries since 1999. Member country governments have reviewed and endorsed the policies listed, reinforcing the informative value and authority of the database. The database is freely accessible online.

408

Stakeholder Relations | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Stakeholder Relations Stakeholder Relations Stakeholder Relations Site tours, like this one near Rifle, Colorado, allow stakeholders to learn more about LM projects. Site tours, like this one near Rifle, Colorado, allow stakeholders to learn more about LM projects. Public meetings give stakeholders an opportunity to gain information about DOE and LM activities. This public meeting was held in Riverton, Wyoming. Public meetings give stakeholders an opportunity to gain information about DOE and LM activities. This public meeting was held in Riverton, Wyoming. Site tours, like this one near Rifle, Colorado, allow stakeholders to learn more about LM projects. Public meetings give stakeholders an opportunity to gain information about DOE and LM activities. This public meeting was held in Riverton, Wyoming.

409

Fehler et al. Improved Relative Locations of Clustered Earthquakes 1/26/00 Improved Relative Locations of Clustered Earthquakes Using Constrained Multiple Event  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fehler et al. Improved Relative Locations of Clustered Earthquakes 1/26/00 page 1 Improved Relative techniques. Our method differs in that it is #12;Fehler et al. Improved Relative Locations of Clustered that are similar to those obtained by Phillips et al. (1997), from time-consuming precise manual re

410

Reciprocal Relations Between Kinetic Curves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study coupled irreversible processes. For linear or linearized kinetics with microreversibility, $\\dot{x}=Kx$, the kinetic operator $K$ is symmetric in the entropic inner product. This form of Onsager's reciprocal relations implies that the shift in time, $\\exp (Kt)$, is also a symmetric operator. This generates reciprocity relations between kinetic curves. For example, for the Master equation, if we start the process from the $i$th pure state and measure the probability $p_j(t)$ of the $j$th state ($j\

Yablonsky, G S; Constales, D; Galvita, V; Marin, G B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Rice Supply, Demand and Related Government Programs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1930-55 Year Weighted Year Weighted beginning average price beginning average price August per cwt. August per cwt. Dollars Dollars 'Includes an allowance for unredeemed loans. response to the strengthening of foreign demand, rice prices by 1952... 91 percent of the average parity price during 1935-54, with !he 4 years of World War I1 omitted. The elasticity of demand was assumed to be about -.2. The annually derived price based on the assumed elasticity and the percentage change in price...

Kincannon, John A.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Cotton Planting Seed and Related Fiber Qualities.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

obtained from ginners and retail seed dealers in the Blackland Prairie area, the Lower Rio Grande Valley, the Upper Gulf Coast and the Rolling Plains areas. Quality data on length, fineness, strength and spinning are from the 1951,1954 and 1955 crops... in the other areas. More than 90 percent of the seed sold by the dealers contacted in the Upper Gulf Coast was of Deltapine types. Prices paid by growers in this area were higher than for similar types and qualit!. of planting seed sold in the Lower Rio...

Paulson, W. E.; Ward, J. M.

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Mercury-Related Materials Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury-Related Materials Studies Van Graves IDS NF Ph M tiIDS-NF Phone Meeting Jan 26, 2010 #12 Evaluation of Cavitation Resistance of Type 316LN Stainless Steel in Mercury Using a Vibratory Horn," J. Nucl Pump Impeller Materials for Mercury Service at the Spallation Neutron Source," Oak Ridge National

McDonald, Kirk

414

Nicole Slevin Marketing & Public Relations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nicole Slevin Marketing & Public Relations nas96@cornell.edu 64 Ferndale-Loomis Rd Liberty, NY Project Opportunity CALLICOON, NY--Sullivan County families, youth, and land owners are invited to explore in Callicoon, NY. Youth interested in becoming involved in a livestock educational project or families

Keinan, Alon

415

Mercury-Related Materials Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Pawel, "Assessment of Cavitation-Erosion Resistance of Potential Pump Impeller Materials for MercuryMercury-Related Materials Studies Van Graves IDS NF Ph M tiIDS-NF Phone Meeting Jan 26, 2010 ­ updated Feb 3, 2010 #12;ORNL Material Reports Reviewed · IDS-NF requested ORNL research any past SNS

McDonald, Kirk

416

General Relativity Today Thibault DAMOUR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relativity. For Newton's law of gravitation, this task was begun (before Einstein had even supplied his) the post-Newtonian limit and weak-field tests in the solar system, (ii) strong gravitational fields and black holes, (iii) strong-field and radiative tests in binary pulsar observations, (iv) gravitational

Damour, Thibault

417

RELATED LINKS Green Technology for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have been certified to the National Green Building Standard, which was approved earlier this year by the American National Standards Institute. Preferences for specific green building techniques are decidedlyRELATED LINKS Green Technology for 2009: See the Photos Green Building: Getting Past the Media Hype

418

PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RELATED PROCESSES, I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Related Processes By EUGENE I. RABINOWITCH Research Associate, Solar Energy Conversion Research Project by a particular sensitivity to all factors which interfere with the normal life processes in the plant by an extraordinarily large con- sumption of energy, and the consequent necessity for a mechanism which would permit

Govindjee

419

A Note on Online Load Balancing for Related Machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(j) that will execute it. We define the load of a machine i and the load of entire schedule s as follows: load(s; i) = 1A Note on On­line Load Balancing for Related Machines Piotr Berman \\Lambda Marek Karpinski y that differ in speed but are related in the following sence: a job of size p requires time p=v on a machine

Eckmiller, Rolf

420

RELATIONS BETWEEN NEUTRON-STAR PARAMETERS IN THE HARTLE-THORNE APPROXIMATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using stellar structure calculations in the Hartle-Thorne approximation, we derive analytic expressions connecting the ellipticity of the stellar surface to the compactness, the spin angular momentum, and the quadrupole moment of the spacetime. We also obtain empirical relations between the compactness, the spin angular momentum, and the spacetime quadrupole. Our formulae reproduce the results of numerical calculations to within a few percent and help reduce the number of parameters necessary to model the observational appearance of moderately spinning neutron stars. This is sufficient for comparing theoretical spectroscopic and timing models to observations that aim to measure the masses and radii of neutron stars and to determine the equation of state prevailing in their interiors.

Bauböck, Michi; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Özel, Feryal [Astronomy Department, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Berti, Emanuele, E-mail: mbaubock@email.arizona.edu, E-mail: dpsaltis@email.arizona.edu, E-mail: fozel@email.arizona.edu, E-mail: berti@phy.olemiss.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677 (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Universal relation between thermal entropy and entanglement entropy in CFT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inspired by the holographic computation of large interval entanglement entropy of two dimensional conformal field theory at high temperature, it was proposed that the thermal entropy is related to the entanglement entropy as $S_{th}=\\displaystyle{\\lim_{l \\to 0}(S_{EE}(R-l)-S_{EE}(l))}$. In this letter, we prove this relation for 2D CFT with discrete spectrum in two different ways. Moreover we show that this relation could break down for 2D noncompact free scalar, which is a CFT with continuous spectrum.

Chen, Bin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Institutions Related to Berkeley Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Institutions Related to Berkeley Laboratory Institutions Related to Berkeley Laboratory DOE logo Office of Science logo UC seal Berkeley Lab logo University of California Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE National Laboratories NERSC (National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center) ESnet Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory High Energy Physics Information Center U.S. Government University of California UC Berkeley UC Berkeley colleges, schools, and teaching units The Daily Cal independent student newspaper at UC Berkeley. University of California campuses and labs UC Office of the President UC National Laboratories provides news and information on UC's management of three DOE laboratories -- Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National

423

Relative Ages of Globular Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ages of extragalactic globular clusters can provide valuable insights into the formation and evolution of galaxies. In this contribution the photometric methods of age dating old globular cluster systems are summarised. The spectroscopic approach is reviewed with an emphasis of the right choice of age diagnostics. We present a new method of quantifying the relatively best age-sensitive spectroscopic index given the quality of a data set and a certain theoretical stellar synthesis model. The relatively best diagnostic plot is constructed from the set of Lick indices and used to age date globular clusters in several early-type galaxies which are part of a large spectroscopic survey of extragalactic globular cluster systems. We find that, independently of host galaxy, metal-poor ([Fe/H] 8 Gyr) and coeval. Metal-rich clusters show a wide range of ages from ~15 down to a few Gyr.

Thomas H. Puzia

2002-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

424

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About About Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on AddThis.com... Our History Related Federal Programs Why Energy Efficiency Upgrades Contacts Related Federal Programs Related Links

425

A Collaborative Study to Evaluate Quantitation Utilizing Different Injection Modes for Capillary GC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......in tralab RSD for on-column injection for ppm and percent level components to be less than 3%, and in some cases not to ex ceed 1%. In the present study, the interlab precision for the on-column injector in the percent hydrocarbons analysis was found......

D.H. McMahon

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Cancer incidences in Europe related to mortalities, and ethnohistoric, genetic, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cancer incidences in Europe related to mortalities, and ethnohistoric, genetic, and geographic We have previously shown that geographic differences in cancer mortalities in Europe are related of 45 male and 47 female cancers. Differences in cancer incidences are correlated moder- ately, first

Rosenberg, Michael S.

427

Seebeck and Peltier coefficients of hydrogen electrodes related to the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Technology #12;#12;Thermopower of concentration cell with hydrogen electrodes related to PEMFC Papy Mutuwa for clean energy started when I first heard about the advantages of sustainable energy at the Uni- versity with a specialization in Energy and gas Technology. This was a little bit different from Physical Chemistry. I

Kjelstrup, Signe

428

SHRP School of Health Related Professions Department of Health Informatics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

different schools, all with the mission of providing excellence in health care research, education, and patient care. What is SHRP? SHRP stands for the School of Health Related Professions, one of eight schools-level health care careers. � Educating health professionals for career advancement. When are the courses in HIM

Cheng, Mei-Fang

429

CLEAVAGE FRACTURE MICROMECHANISMS RELATED TO WPS EFFECT IN RPV STEEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLEAVAGE FRACTURE MICROMECHANISMS RELATED TO WPS EFFECT IN RPV STEEL S. R. Bordet1 , B. Tanguy1 , S by warm pre-stress (WPS) on the cleavage fracture micromechanisms of a 18MND5 (A533B) reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel. In this purpose, different WPS fracture test results obtained on compact tensile (CT

Boyer, Edmond

430

Deformed dispersion relations and the degree of coherence function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The analysis of the modifications that the presence of a deformed dispersion relation entails in the roots of the so--called degree of coherence function, for a beam embodying two different frequencies and moving in a Michelson interferometer, is carried out. The conditions to be satisfied, in order to detect this kind of quantum gravity effect, are also obtained.

A. Camacho; A. Macias

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

431

Office of Parent Relations UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO BOULDER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this afternoon and aerial photography showed that a lot of the flooding has receded and Boulder Creek isn). · Boulder and the campus are still under a flood warning (less serious and different than a Flash FloodOffice of Parent Relations UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO BOULDER Parent Update (13 September 2013 at 01930

Stowell, Michael

432

Professional-led versus family-led support groups: Exploring the differences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Support groups often help families cope more effectively with relatives' mental illnesses. This study examines the differences between support groups led by professionals and those led by family members, focusing...

Susan A. Pickett Ph.D.; Tamar Heller Ph.D.…

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

"RSE Table N11.2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.2;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.2;" 2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.2;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",1,1,3,3,1,1,0,0,1 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",4,4,16,41,4,22,3,0,15 313,"Textile Mills",2,2,5,14,3,5,1,0,5

434

"RSE Table C10.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.3;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.3;" 3. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.3;" " Unit: Percents." "NAICS"," " "Code(a)","Industry-Specific Technology","In Use(b)","Not in Use","Don't Know" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"FOOD" ," Infrared Heating",3,1,2 ," Microwave Drying",5,1,3 ," Closed-Cycle Heat Pump System Used to Recover Heat",7,1,3 ," Open-Cycle Heat Pump System Used to Produce Steam",7,1,3 ," Gas-Driven Rotary Engines and/or Turbines",20,1,3 ," Membrane Separation",3,1,2 ," Irradiation",23,1,2 ," Freeze Concentration",9,1,3 ," Membrane Hyperfiltration to Separate Water from Food Products",4,1,3

435

"RSE Table E7.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E7.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E7.1;" 1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E7.1;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" "Economic","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Characteristic(a)","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",2,2,2 " 20-49",2,3,2 " 50-99",3,3,2 " 100-249",2,3,2 " 250-499",3,3,3 " 500 and Over",1,2,2 "Total",1,1,1 "Employment Size" " Under 50",2,3,3 " 50-99",3,3,3

436

"RSE Table E13.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.3;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.3;" 3. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.3;" " Unit: Percents." ,"Total of" "Economic","Sales and","Utility","Nonutility" "Characteristic(a)","Transfers Offsite","Purchaser(b)","Purchaser(c)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",4,4,10 " 20-49",33,35,70 " 50-99",10,12,10 " 100-249",9,14,1 " 250-499",1,1,3 " 500 and Over",1,1,2 "Total",3,4,5 "Employment Size" " Under 50",42,44,21 " 50-99",20,21,73 " 100-249",16,16,38 " 250-499",1,2,1

437

Differences Between Monthly and Weekly Working Gas In Storage  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

December 19, 2013 December 19, 2013 Note: The weekly storage estimates are based on a survey sample that does not include all companies that operate underground storage facilities. The sample was selected from the list of storage operators to achieve a target standard error of the estimate of working gas in storage which was no greater than 5 percent for each region. Based on a comparison of weekly estimates and monthly data from May 2002 through September 2013, estimated total working gas stocks have exhibited an average absolute error of 16 billion cubic feet, or 0.6 percent. Background The Energy Information Administration (EIA) provides weekly estimates of working gas volumes held in underground storage facilities at the national and regional levels. These are estimated from volume data provided by a

438

Differences Between Monthly and Weekly Working Gas In Storage  

Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

November 7, 2013 November 7, 2013 Note: The weekly storage estimates are based on a survey sample that does not include all companies that operate underground storage facilities. The sample was selected from the list of storage operators to achieve a target standard error of the estimate of working gas in storage which was no greater than 5 percent for each region. Based on a comparison of weekly estimates and monthly data from May 2002 through August 2013, estimated total working gas stocks have exhibited an average absolute error of 16 billion cubic feet, or 0.6 percent. Background The Energy Information Administration (EIA) provides weekly estimates of working gas volumes held in underground storage facilities at the national and regional levels. These are estimated from volume data provided by a

439

When Does a Difference Make a Difference? A Snapshot on Global Icon Comprehensibility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Global markets require global solutions, especially in user interface design. There are differences between cultures – but do those differences call for different icon designs? This paper provides a snapshot on icon

Sonja Auer; Ester Dick

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

CO2 Flux Estimated from Air-Sea Difference in CO2 Partial Pressure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO2 Flux Estimated from Air-Sea Difference in CO2 Partial Pressure (Revised October 2009) CO2 Flux Estimated from Air-Sea Difference in CO2 Partial Pressure (Revised October 2009) The files in this site contain a revised (October 2009) version of the climatological mean values in 4° Latitude X 5° Longitude box areas and the distribution maps. These were originally published in: Takahashi, et al. (2009), DSR II, 56, 554-577. The data file containing annual flux data for each 4° X 5° box is located here. The data file from which this map was created, including all 12 months of data is here. This data file, in ASCII form, also contains the flux data and the intermediate values used to calculate that flux for each month. In December 2010 our colleague, R. Wanninkhof pointed out a problem with the flux data for the month of December. The file of ice coverage for December was corrupted and showed zero ice for the entire month, worldwide. This has been corrected with the estimated percent of ice and the flux recalculated. Version "c" of the data files contain this correction.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Two Permanently Congruent Rods May Have Different Proper Lengths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We scrutinize congruence as one of the basic definitions of equality in geometry and pit it against physics of Special Relativity. We show that two non-rigid rods permanently kept congruent during their common expansion or compression may have different instantaneous proper lengths (when measured at the same time of their respective reference clocks) if they have different mass distributions over their lengths. Alternatively, their proper lengths can come out equal only when measured at different but strictly correlated moments of time of their respective clocks. The derived expression for the ratio of instantaneous proper lengths of two permanently congruent changing objects explicitly contains information about the objects mass distribution. The same is true for the ratio of readings of the two reference clocks, for which the instantaneous measurements of respective proper lengths produce the same result. In either case the characteristics usually considered as purely kinematic depend on mass distribution, which is a dynamic property. This is a spectacular demonstration of dynamic aspect of geometry already in the framework of Special Relativity.

Moses Fayngold

2008-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

442

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Related Links  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Electricity Electricity Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Related Links to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Related Links on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Related Links on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Related Links on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Related Links on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Related Links on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Related Links on AddThis.com... More in this section... Electricity Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations

443

Classifying Agent Behaviour through Relational Sequential Patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Classifying Agent Behaviour through Relational Sequential Patterns Grazia Bombini, Nicola Di Mauro. Di Mauro, S. Ferilli, F. Esposito frequent patterns, among the relational sequences useful

Di Mauro, Nicola

444

8.962 General Relativity, Spring 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This course covers the basic principles of Einstein's general theory of relativity. Also discussed are differential geometry, experimental tests of general relativity, black holes, and cosmology.

Bertschinger, Edmund W.

445

Related Financial Opportunities | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

for hydrogen-related technologies. The Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Interagency Working Group Web site lists some of these related financial opportunities. In addition, federal and...

446

Related Links | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

About Us Our Programs Defense Programs Future Science & Technology Programs Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs Related Links Related Links...

447

Voluntary Protection Program - Related Links | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Related Links Voluntary Protection Program - Related Links VPPPA - The Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association, a non- profit organization is leading the way in...

448

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Related Links  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Biodiesel Biodiesel Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Related Links to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Related Links on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Related Links on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Related Links on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Related Links on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Related Links on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Related Links on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Blends Production & Distribution Specifications Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives

449

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Hydrogen Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Related Links on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives

450

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Ethanol Ethanol Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Blends Specifications Production & Distribution Feedstocks Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives

451

EIA Energy Efficiency-Energy Related Greenhouse Gas Emissions Links for the  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Related Greenhouse Gas Emissions Links Related Greenhouse Gas Emissions Links Energy Related Greenhouse Gas Emissions Links Posted Date: May 2007 Page Last Modified: September 2010 EIA Links Disclaimer: These pages contain hypertext links to information created and maintained by other public and private organizations. These links provide additional information that may be useful or interesting and are being provided consistent with the intended purpose of the EIA website. EIA does not control or guarantee the accuracy, relevance, timeliness, or completeness of this outside information. EIA does not endorse the organizations sponsoring linked websites, the views they express, or the products and services they offer. Government Agencies / Associations Energy Information Administration - Annual Energy Outlook: Carbon Dioxide Emissions, CO2 emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are proportional to fuel consumption. Among fossil fuel types, coal has the highest carbon content, natural gas the lowest, and petroleum in between. In the AEO2006 reference case, the shares of these fuels change slightly from 2004 to 2030, with more coal and less petroleum and natural gas. The combined share of carbon-neutral renewable and nuclear energy is stable from 2004 to 2030 at 14 percent

452

Factors related to high school student behavior toward marijuana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 20 This school, chosen because it had a large number of Mexican- American students, was middle or lower-middle in socio-economic status. Slightly over 21 percent of the sample attended the predominantly Anglo school which was lower-middle... in the prescriptiveness of school norms. Whether or not a student, was classified as a marijuana "user" or abstainer" was determined by his response to the question, "Have you ever used marijuana?" Over 23 percent of the students answered "yes" to this question...

Fry, Patricia Ann Mumford

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

453

Preliminary relative permeability estimates of methanehydrate-bearing sand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relative permeability to fluids in hydrate-bearing sediments is an important parameter for predicting natural gas production from gas hydrate reservoirs. We estimated the relative permeability parameters (van Genuchten alpha and m) in a hydrate-bearing sand by means of inverse modeling, which involved matching water saturation predictions with observations from a controlled waterflood experiment. We used x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning to determine both the porosity and the hydrate and aqueous phase saturation distributions in the samples. X-ray CT images showed that hydrate and aqueous phase saturations are non-uniform, and that water flow focuses in regions of lower hydrate saturation. The relative permeability parameters were estimated at two locations in each sample. Differences between the estimated parameter sets at the two locations were attributed to heterogeneity in the hydrate saturation. Better estimates of the relative permeability parameters require further refinement of the experimental design, and better description of heterogeneity in the numerical inversions.

Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis,George J.

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

454

Preliminary relative permeability estimates of methanehydrate-bearing sand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relative permeability to fluids in hydrate-bearingsediments is an important parameter for predicting natural gas productionfrom gas hydrate reservoirs. We estimated the relative permeabilityparameters (van Genuchten alpha and m) in a hydrate-bearing sand by meansof inverse modeling, which involved matching water saturation predictionswith observations from a controlled waterflood experiment. We used x-raycomputed tomography (CT) scanning to determine both the porosity and thehydrate and aqueous phase saturation distributions in the samples. X-rayCT images showed that hydrate and aqueous phase saturations arenon-uniform, and that water flow focuses in regions of lower hydratesaturation. The relative permeability parameters were estimated at twolocations in each sample. Differences between the estimated parametersets at the two locations were attributed to heterogeneity in the hydratesaturation. Better estimates of the relative permeability parametersrequire further refinement of the experimental design, and betterdescription of heterogeneity in the numerical inversions.

Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis,George J.

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

455

Reducing Pumping Related Electricity Costs - A Case Study of Three Water Utility Companies in Zambia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Electric pumps are extensively used in many industrial and commercial applications worldwide and account for about twenty percent of the world’s electrical energy demand.… (more)

Siyingwa, Bennet

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Metabolic Differences in Microbial Cell Populations Revealed by Nanophotonic Ionization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ellular differences are linked to cell differentiation, the proliferation of cancer and to the development of drug resistance in microbial infections. Due to sensitivity limitations, however, large- scale metabolic analysis at the single cell level is only available for cells significantly larger in volume than Saccharomyces cerevisiae (~30 fL). Here we demonstrate that by a nanophotonic ionization platform and mass spectrometry, over one hundred up to 108 metabolites, or up to 18% of the known S. cerevisiae metabolome, can be identified in very small cell populations (n < 100). Under ideal conditions, r Relative quantitation of up to 4% of the metabolites is achieved at the single cell level.

Walker, Bennett [George Washington University] [George Washington University; Antonakos, Cory [George Washington University] [George Washington University; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL] [ORNL; Vertes, Akos [George Washington University] [George Washington University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Direct tests of measurement uncertainty relations: what it takes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The uncertainty principle being a cornerstone of quantum mechanics, it is surprising that in nearly 90 years there have been no direct tests of measurement uncertainty relations. This lacuna was due to the absence of two essential ingredients: appropriate measures of measurement error (and disturbance), and precise formulations of such relations that are {\\em universally valid}and {\\em directly testable}. We formulate two distinct forms of direct tests, based on different measures of error. We present a prototype protocol for a direct test of measurement uncertainty relations in terms of {\\em value deviation errors} (hitherto considered nonfeasible), highlighting the lack of universality of these relations. This shows that the formulation of universal, directly testable measurement uncertainty relations for {\\em state-dependent} error measures remains an important open problem. Recent experiments that were claimed to constitute invalidations of Heisenberg's error-disturbance relation are shown to conform with the spirit of Heisenberg's principle if interpreted as direct tests of measurement uncertainty relations for error measures that quantify {\\em distances between observables}.

Paul Busch; Neil Stevens

2015-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

458

Individual Differences in Human Reliability Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While human reliability analysis (HRA) methods include uncertainty in quantification, the nominal model of human error in HRA typically assumes that operator performance does not vary significantly when they are given the same initiating event, indicators, procedures, and training, and that any differences in operator performance are simply aleatory (i.e., random). While this assumption generally holds true when performing routine actions, variability in operator response has been observed in multiple studies, especially in complex situations that go beyond training and procedures. As such, complexity can lead to differences in operator performance (e.g., operator understanding and decision-making). Furthermore, psychological research has shown that there are a number of known antecedents (i.e., attributable causes) that consistently contribute to observable and systematically measurable (i.e., not random) differences in behavior. This paper reviews examples of individual differences taken from operational experience and the psychological literature. The impact of these differences in human behavior and their implications for HRA are then discussed. We propose that individual differences should not be treated as aleatory, but rather as epistemic. Ultimately, by understanding the sources of individual differences, it is possible to remove some epistemic uncertainty from analyses.

Jeffrey C. Joe; Ronald L. Boring

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

A Case for Lorentzian Relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Lorentz transformation (LT) is explained by changes occurring in the wave characteristics of matter as it changes inertial frame. This explanation is akin to that favoured by Lorentz, but informed by later insights, due primarily to de Broglie, regarding the underlying unity of matter and radiation. To show the nature of these changes, a massive particle is modelled as a standing wave in three dimensions. As the particle moves, the standing wave becomes a travelling wave having two factors. One is a carrier wave displaying the dilated frequency and contracted ellipsoidal form described by the LT, while the other (identified as the de Broglie wave) is a modulation defining the dephasing of the carrier wave (and thus the failure of simultaneity) in the direction of travel. The superluminality of the de Broglie wave is thus explained, as are several other mysterious features of the optical behaviour of matter, including the physical meaning of the Schr\\"odinger Eqn. and the relevance to scattering processes of the de Broglie wave number. Consideration is given to what this Lorentzian approach to relativity might mean for the possible existence of a preferred frame and the origin of the observed Minkowski metric.

Daniel Shanahan

2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

460

Comparative study of social economic differences in relation to technology competency expectations as perceived by business and educational leaders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the selected schools in San Antonio by participating in curriculum development or as partnerships within the schools. All teachers had a high level of understanding about the importance of technology competencies for students. Furthermore, they believed...

Reyna, Janice Mae

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "relative percent differences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Quantifying Stove Emissions Related to Different Use Patterns for the Silver mini (Small Turkish) Space Heating Stove  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distinct components: dry ash-free coal, ash, and water.the case of our dry and ash-free coal, ?=5.46, ?=4.49, and ?formula for moisture and ash-free (MAF) coal (ignoring the

Maddalena, Randy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Security of supply secured by market forces: Different stages and welfare prospects in relation to Danish and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that market prices are not sufficiently high to secure new generation capacity. In particular the peak power resources do not seem to be attractive without some capacity payments. Construction of such markets to capacity constraints is questioned. Would an integrated market for security services transfer resources

463

PHYSICAL REVIEW E 84, 041928 (2011) Different mechanics of snap-trapping in the two closely related carnivorous plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water content resulting from osmotic pressure, which may reach 1 MPa. Turgor pressure variations in so-called motor cells can actuate organ movement, as single motor cells may undergo a 25% volume change within 1 s and hence can effect cell stiffness in a short time [5]. Groups of antagonistic motor cells in "hinges

464

The flowering and growth response of peanut plants (Arachis hypogaea L. var. Starr) at two different levels of relative humidity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-type peanut seeds. Plant Physiol, 4. 5: 268-272. 26. Lyon, C. J. 1965. Auxin transport in geotropic curvalutss of a branched plant. Plant Physiol. 4. 0z 18-24. . 27. Marais, J, Pe y J. L. DeWit and G. V. Quicke. 1966. A critical examination of the Nelson...

Lee, Thomas Alonzo

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Quantifying Stove Emissions Related to Different Use Patterns for the Silver mini (Small Turkish) Space Heating Stove  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

24 (1333-1340) Appendix 1: Results of Coal Analysis 1A.Geochemical Testing, Coal Analysis Report: Nailakh 1B.Geochemical Testing, Coal Analysis Report: Utah

Maddalena, Randy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

DO STRATEGIC PRIMING PROCESSES DIFFER FOR CATEGORY VS. ASSOCIATIVE PRIMING? AN EVENT-RELATED POTENTIALS STUDY OF PROACTIVE EXPECTANCY STRATEGIES.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

suggest that the dPC is involved inhibition (Brown et al., 2006) (Booth et al., 2003) (Rubia et al., 2008). An fMRI study conducted by de Zubicaray et al. (2000) visualy presented participants with category exemplars and they were instructed to either... matched with each other on al the same parameters. The orthographic neighborhood, concretenes and imagery ratings were found 23 using the MRC Psycholinguistic Database (Wilson, 1988). The orthographic neighborhood ratings of the highly...

Gibson, Linzi Marie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups confer differences in risk for age-related macular degeneration: a case control study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are critical for energy production, the haplogroup-relatedbioenergetics and energy production levels causing a)the mitochondrial energy production efficiency [8]. Sperm

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Do Heritable Differences in an  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Do Heritable Differences in an Individual's Immune System Predict Do Heritable Differences in an Individual's Immune System Predict Differential Sensitivity to Low Dose Radiation Exposure? Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping Enlarge Image Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping identifies two strong candidate genes, Ptprk (Chr 10) and Acp1 (Chr 12) that are linked to genetic variation in the relative abundance of peripheral Th and Tc cells, two cell populations that are sensitive to radiation exposure at low doses. Expression of each gene is significantly altered by exposure to low dose radiation in vivo. Genome-wide scans for the ratio of %CD4+ (Th) to %CD8+ (Tc) lymphocytes were performed using genenetwork.org. The solid horizontal line represents genome-wide significance at P < 0.05, based on 1,000 permutations. LOD indicates logarithm of odds scores.

469

Terrorism and Islamism: differences, dynamics and dilemmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper points out the increasing and erroneous conflation of Islamism with terrorism in mass media and policy-oriented conversations. It argues for a nuanced understanding of the differences between the different groups that are broadly categorised as 'Muslim fundamentalists' and suggests instead a finer reading of the context in which the various and vastly different groups operate. Focusing on the Islamists (amongst the various other kinds of Muslim groups) and building upon 13 months of intensive fieldwork in urban Lahore, the paper then attempts to point out the context, potential and limitations of a particular group, the Jama'at-e-Islami Pakistan.

Humeira Iqtidar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Related Links  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Propane Propane Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Related Links to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Related Links on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Related Links on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Related Links on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Related Links on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Related Links on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Related Links on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Production & Distribution Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Propane Related Links This list includes links related to propane. The Alternative Fuels Data

471

City Hall plazas : they're different  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This essay explores the form, goals, and ideals behind city hall plazas by asking the questions: What is the difference between a city hall plaza and any other urban plaza? What are the uses intended by the city in the ...

Hall, Kristen E. (Kristen Elizabeth)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Muon Yield Comparisons for Different ICOOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Muon Yield Comparisons for Different ICOOL Versions and Lattices X. Ding Front End, Nov. 23, 2010 parameters of 11 and 13GeV from interpolation) � Take the muon/pion/kaons at z=0 m from MARS output (Field of Running MARS #12;4 Muon Yield from Different Versions of ICOOL with ST2a-BNL Input Deck #12;5 Muon Yield

McDonald, Kirk

473

Interlaboratory comparison of different analytical techniques for the determination of oxygen-18 abundance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of six artificially enriched waters, containing between 2,500 and 6,500 ppm oxygen-18, was prepared by adding weighed portions of distilled water and highly enriched H{sub 2}{sup 18}O. These waters were analyzed by radio activation analysis (proton activation PAA) and by gas isotope ratio mass spectrometry (gIRMS) with CO{sub 2} as the analysis gas. Carbon dioxide was prepared from water samples either by using the guanidine reaction, with 3-, 5- and 10-{mu}L samples, or by isotopic equilibration, using small (10 {mu}L) and large (1.5 mL) samples. The large samples were diluted to the natural abundance range prior to analysis as were the 3-{mu}L guanidine samples. Precision was greatest with large sample CO{sub 2} equilibration (mean relative standard deviation (RSD) = 0.108%). The other gIRMS gas preparation techniques had lower precision (3 {mu}L guanidine, RSD = 0.529%, 5 {mu}L guanidine, RSD = 0.364%, 10 {mu}L guanidine, RSD = 0.48%; 10 {mu}L equilibration, RSD = 0.43%) and the lowest precision occurred with PAA (RSD = 0.58%). For all the techniques except small sample equilibration, accuracy (percent deviation of mean evaluation from expected gravimetric mean) was worse than precision (RSD).

Speakman, J.R.; Poppitt, S.D.; Racey, P.A. (Univ. of Aberdeen (Scotland)); Nagy, K.A.; Strathearn, G.E. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA)); Masman, D.; Mook, W.G. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Relative Stopping Power of Various Metals for 20-Mev Protons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The stopping powers of Ni, Cu, Cb, Pd, Ag, Cd, In, Ta, Pt, Au, and Th, relative to Al were measured using the 20.6-Mev external proton beam of the University of California at Los Angeles cyclotron. The measurements were made with sufficient precision so that a graph of lnZ vs stopping power/electron relative to Al showed some fluctuations from a linear relationship. For Th the value differs by 2.6% in the direction found by Kelly and by Teasdale. The results are compared with the data compiled by Lindhard and Scharff.

C. P. Sonett and K. R. MacKenzie

1955-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

475

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Related Links  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Related Links to Related Links to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Related Links on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Related Links on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Related Links on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Related Links on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Related Links on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Related Links on AddThis.com... Related Links For a list of additional resources about alternative fuels and advanced vehicles, select one or more categories below. All organizations are provided as suggested resources. The Alternative Fuels Data Center does not endorse these companies or the products and services listed on their websites (see disclaimer).

476

Solid-State Lighting: Related Opportunities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Financial Financial Opportunities Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: Related Opportunities to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Related Opportunities on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Related Opportunities on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Related Opportunities on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Related Opportunities on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Related Opportunities on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Related Opportunities on AddThis.com... Current Opportunities DOE Selections Related Opportunities Related Opportunities The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has created this resource to help researchers, manufacturers, and distributors of solid-state lighting products locate funding opportunities to help them advance and deploy

477

Do You Trust Derivatives or Differences??  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Our computational results use a basic component in scientific simulations: the iterative ... ADiMat [1] Matlab-based automatic differentiation tools and the relative error ... solution of a system of linear equations by an iterative process. ... not happen if m is not large enough or if the properties of the matrix A do not guarantee.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Preliminary Differences Between CPOL and CRM  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

differences between TWP-ICE data differences between TWP-ICE data from the CPOL radar and the CRM: Should we point fingers at convective intensity, microphysics, or both? Adam Varble 1 , Ed Zipser 1 , and Ann Fridland 2 1 University of Utah 2 NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Outline * CRM vs. CPOL - Constant altitude radar reflectivity histograms * Active Period Examples * Suppressed Period Example - Horizontal and vertical radar reflectivity cross sections * Active Period Examples * Suppressed Period Example * Preliminary Conclusions Histograms (Active) Cross-Sections - Active (Baseline) 6 Hours Later... Cross-Sections - Active (Sensitivity) 6 Hours Later... Stratiform Differences Histograms (Suppressed) Cross-Sections - Suppressed Preliminary Conclusions * Active Period - Both CRM runs produce too much convective area

479

An Analytical Model for Tropical Relative Humidity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An analytical model is derived for tropical relative humidity using only the Clausius–Clapeyron relation, hydrostatic balance, and a bulk-plume water budget. This theory is constructed for radiative–convective equilibrium and compared against a ...

David M. Romps

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Dark spot formation relative to ITO surface roughness for polyfluorene  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dark spot formation relative to ITO surface roughness for polyfluorene Dark spot formation relative to ITO surface roughness for polyfluorene devices Title Dark spot formation relative to ITO surface roughness for polyfluorene devices Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2004 Authors Liu, Gao, John B. Kerr, and Stephen G. Johnson Journal Synthetic Metals Volume 144 Pagination 1-6 Keywords dark spot, failure mechanism, interface, ito surface, oled Abstract The failure behaviors of ITO/PEDOT;PSS/polyfluorene/Al devices are different depending on the surface roughness of the sputtered ITO anode film. The spikes on ITO surface are responsible for the initial local shorts of the device, which develop into dark spots very quickly. Indium adsorption is observed on the polymer and Al cathode interface. A chemical etching procedure is used to smoothen the ITO surface without changing the ITO thickness and the sheet resistance. Devices made out of smooth ITO show minimum changes at polymer-cathode interface during operation.

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481

RPP Environmental Permits and Related Documentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the current list of environmental permits and related documentation for TWRS facilities and activities.

DEXTER, M.L.

2000-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

482

Query optimization in nested relational databases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

optimization in nested relational systems and does not make any assumptions on the physical implementation of the system. C. Contributions of this research This research could be divided into three phases: 1. Study of query languages and algebras... does so by treating both relation-valued attributes and relations uniformly. Let name be the set of valid names to be used for naming relations and their attributes. 1. Descriptions: A description 6 is an ordered pair (n, s), where n C name...

Rathakrishnan, Balaji

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

483

Differences in Mexican-American and Anglo-American Women's Response to a Modified Clothing TAT.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

precise conclusions in the statistical sense, could be drawn. For the Mexican-American women studied, there was a direct relationship between cloth- ing awareness and social status scores (P. = 75-90 per- ' cent), occupational rating (no statistical....5 percent). Area of ma jnr socialization did not affect Mexican-American ~z-omen'( cognizance of clothing. Anglo-Americans were more likely to have Iliqher clothing awareness scores (P. = 95 percent) than werr the Mexico-born women. Although...

Bathke, Carol Sander

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Are Scalar and Tensor Deviations Related in Modified Gravity?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modified gravity theories on cosmic scales have three key deviations from general relativity. They can cause cosmic acceleration without a physical, highly negative pressure fluid, can cause a gravitational slip between the two metric potentials, and can cause gravitational waves to propagate differently, e.g. with a speed different from the speed of light. We examine whether the deviations in the metric potentials as observable through modified Poisson equations for scalar density perturbations are related to or independent from deviations in the tensor gravitational waves. We show analytically they are independent instantaneously in covariant Galileon gravity -- e.g. at some time one of them can have the general relativity value while the other deviates -- though related globally -- if one deviates over a finite period, the other at some point shows a deviation. We present expressions for the early time and late time de Sitter limits, and numerically illustrate their full evolution. This in(ter)dependence of the scalar and tensor deviations highlights complementarity between cosmic structure surveys and future gravitational wave measurements.

Eric V. Linder

2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

485

Making a difference... A National Cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Making a difference... A National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Accredited Trials Unit Contacts Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit School of Cancer Sciences University of Birmingham Edgbaston. Funding The CRCTU receives core funding from Cancer Research UK and has successfully obtained project

Birmingham, University of

486

Original article Comparative abilities of different herbivorous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, as it influences digestive function and ingestive behaviour, is the most im- portant factor influencing animal products, such as meat, milk, cheese or wool, that has determined which spe- cies have grazed in particular resources differing spa- tially in species composition, structure and digestibility. The current state

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

487

The design and implementation of the buffer manager for an experimental relational database management system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Buffer management is an essential component of database management. This thesis presents a design and implementation of the buffer manager for an experimental relational database management system. The relationship and difference between database...

Li, Zaichun

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

488

Orthogonality Relations and Cherednik Identities for Multivariable Baker-Akhiezer Functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We establish orthogonality relations for the Baker–Akhiezer (BA) eigenfunctions of the Macdonald difference operators. We also obtain a version of Cherednik–Macdonald–Mehta integral for these functions. As a corollary, we ...

Chalykh, Oleg

489

Employee and Labor Relations | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Employee and Labor Relations Employee and Labor Relations Employee and Labor Relations The Headquarters Employee/Labor Relations Division provides labor/employee management relations advisory services to Headquarters staff, including union negotiations, adverse actions, grievances, and performance management. The Division staff represents management in third-party situations or union negotiations. Provides work life information, referral and support services to Headquarters employees covering such areas as child care, elder care, employee assistance programs, health and wellness, career transition and programs for the accessibility of Departmental services for people with disabilities. Click the "Contacts" Link to find a list of HR Specialist by the organization's they service.

490

Corporate/Foundation Relations CORPORATE AND FOUNDATION RELATIONS The Offices of Corporate and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corporate/Foundation Relations - 1 - CORPORATE AND FOUNDATION RELATIONS The Offices of Corporate and Foundation Relations (CR, FR) are responsible for coordinating with OSP on applications to key University development and institutional advancement prospects. Applying to Foundations or Corporations. Faculty

Mather, Patrick T.

491

Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Different Fuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Different Fuels Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Different Fuels This calculator currently focuses on electricity for a number of reasons. The public's interest in vehicles fueled by electricity is high, and as a result consumers are interested in better understanding the emissions created when electricity is produced. For vehicles that are fueled solely by electricity, tailpipe emissions are zero, so electricity production accounts for all GHG emissions associated with such vehicles. Finally, GHG emissions from electricity production vary significantly by region, which makes a calculator like this one-which uses regional data instead of national averages-particularly useful. If you want to compare total tailpipe plus fuel production GHG emissions for an electric or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle to those for a gasoline

492

1995 Reformulated Gasoline Market Affected Refiners Differently  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 Reformulated Gasoline Market Affected 5 Reformulated Gasoline Market Affected Refiners Differently by John Zyren, Charles Dale and Charles Riner Introduction The United States has completed its first summer driving season using reformulated gasoline (RFG). Motorists noticed price increases at the retail level, resulting from the increased cost to produce and deliver the product, as well as from the tight sup- ply/demand balance during the summer. This arti- cle focuses on the costs of producing RFG as experienced by different types of refiners and on how these refiners fared this past summer, given the prices for RFG at the refinery gate. RFG Regulatory Requirements The use of RFG is a result of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA). The CAAA cover a wide range of programs aimed at improving air qual-

493

Skewness in individual stocks at different investment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines the (a)symmetry of several individual stock returns at different investment horizons: daily, weekly and monthly. While some asymmetries are observed in daily returns, they disappear almost completely in weekly and monthly returns. The explanation for this fact lies in the convergence to normality that takes place when the investment horizon increases. These features allow one to question several financial models; in particular, they question the preference for positive skewness as a factor for investments in stock markets.

Amado Peiró

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Environmental and morphological differences within Icteridae: Icterus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World bird #0;? 27 species of Icterus #0;? Distribute from N. Alaska to S. Chile GIS Methods 1. Imported breeding areas from NatureServepg 2. Determined Species Richness 3 Imported data from WorldClim Global. from – Climate Data #0;? Temperature #0... Ei tl d Environmen al and morphological differences within IcteridaeIcteridae: : Icterus Jessica L Rodriguez – Haskell Indian Nations University, Haskell Indian BRIDGE Program AdéLi Ni KUiitOithlAndrés Lirara--Noriega – Kansas Un versity rnitho...

Rodriquez, Jessica

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

495

POSITIVE EVOLUTION FAMILIES SOLVING NONAUTONOMOUS DIFFERENCE EQUATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction Our starting point are systems of nonautonomous difference equations of the form (nDE) (t, ft) = 0 equations of type (nDE) have been developed by various authors, see for example [Coo70], [Hal71], [BW81], [Kat70]) were also applied, e.g., by S. Boulite et al. [BMM06] or N. Lan [Lan99]. In order to solve (nDE

496

Comparison of Different Methods of Harvesting Cotton.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- - TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS, Director College Station. Texas BULLETIN NO. 683 OCTOBER, 1946 COMPARISON OF DIFFERENT METHODS OF HARVESTING COTTON Division of Agricultural Engineering . and Division of Agronomy... on the rougher methods of harvesting cotton, such as hand-snapping and machine harvesting both with the picker type and the stripper type mechanical harvesters. This n-as largely because the lint from the roughly harvested cottons contained more foreign...

Smith, H. P. (Harris Pearson)

1946-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

An Improved Method to Test the Distance-Duality Relation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many researchers have performed cosmological-model-independent tests for the distance-duality (DD) relation. Theoretical work has been conducted based on the results of these tests. However, we find that almost all of these tests were perhaps not cosmological-model-independent after all, because the distance moduli taken from a given type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) compilation are dependent on a given cosmological model and Hubble constant. In this Letter, we overcome these defects and by creating a new cosmological-model-independent test for the DD relation. We use the original data from the Union2 SNe Ia compilation and the angular diameter distances from two galaxy cluster samples compiled by De Filippis et al. and Bonamente et al. to test the DD relation. Our results suggest that the DD relation is compatible with observations, and the spherical model is slightly better than the elliptical model at describing the intrinsic shape of galaxy clusters if the DD relation is valid. However, these results are different from those of previous work.

Xi Yang; Hao-Ran Yu; Zhi-Song Zhang; Tong-Jie Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Modeling Different Failure Mechanisms in Metals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be expressed in the Voigt notation as (2.4) The effective plastic strain increment, , can be expressed as [86] (2.5) 16 where denotes the formal inverse of . is related to by [86] (2.6) Eqs. (2.3) and (2.5) provide an appropriate measure....10) Eq. (2.10) can be formally inverted to (2.11) Eq. (2.11) can be rewritten in terms of the principal components as (2.12) Assume the out-of-plane stresses to vanish. This implies that and , where denotes the mean stress. Eq. (2.12) can...

Zhang, Liang

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

499

Colouring: execution, debug and analysis of QVT-relations transformations through coloured Petri nets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

QVT is the standard language sponsored by the OMG to specify model-to-model transformations. It includes three different languages, being QVT-relations (QVT-R) the one with higher-level of abstraction. Unfortunately, there is scarce tool support for ... Keywords: Coloured Petri nets, Model-driven engineering, Model-to-model transformations, QVT-relations, Validation and verification

Esther Guerra, Juan Lara

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Linear dispersion relation for the mirror instability in context of the gyrokinetic theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The linear dispersion relation for the mirror instability is discussed in context of the gyrokinetic theory. The objective is to provide a coherent view of different kinetic approaches used to derive the dispersion relation. The method based on gyrocenter phase space transformations is adopted in order to display the origin and ordering of various terms.

Porazik, Peter; Johnson, Jay R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08542 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08542 (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z