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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS.0 NEPA REQUIREMENTS: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF THE ALTERNATIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2.1 Environmental Impacts of the Alternatives

2

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS Amendment and Need The purpose of the non-AFA crab sideboard limits was to prevent vessels with crab QS from paper of all GOA sideboards for non-American Fisheries Act (AFA) crab vessels. In April 2007

3

Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review/Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review/Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis (EA . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.0 NEPA REQUIREMENTS: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF THE ALTERNATIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.1 Environmental Impacts of the Alternatives . . . . . 15 2.2 Whale watching activity in Alaska

4

Regulatory impact analysis of environmental standards for uranium mill tailings at active sites. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency was directed by Congress, under PL 95-604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, to set standards of general application that provide protection from the hazards associated with uranium mill tailings. Title I of the Act pertains to tailings at inactive sites for which the Agency has developed standards as part of a separate rulemaking. Title II of the Act requires standards covering the processing and disposal of byproduct materials at mills which are currently licensed by the appropriate regulatory authorities. This Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA) addresses the standards developed under Title II. There are two major parts of the standards for active mills: standards for control of releases from tailings during processing operations and prior to final disposal, and standards for protection of the public after the disposal of tailings. This report presents a detailed analysis of standards for disposal only, since the analysis required for the operations standards is very limited.

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Regulatory impact analysis of final environmental standards for uranium mill tailings at active sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency was directed by Congress, under PL 95-604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), to set standards of general application that provide protection from the hazards associated with uranium mill tailings. Title II of the Act requires standards covering the processing and disposal of byproduct materials at mills which are currently licensed by the appropriate regulatory authorities. This Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA) addresses the standards promulgated under Title II. There are two major parts of the standards for active mills: standards for control of releases from tailings during processing operations and prior to final disposal, and standards for protection of the public health and environment after the disposal of tailings. This report presents a detailed analysis of standards for disposal only, since the analysis required for the standards during mill operations is very limited.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Synthetic fuels and the environment: an environmental and regulatory impacts analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since July 1979 when DOE/EV-0044 report Environmental Analysis of Synthetic Liquid fuels was published the synthetic fuels program proposals of the Administration have undergone significant modifications. The program year for which the development goal of 1.5 million barrels per day is to be reached has been changed from 1990 to 1995. The program plan is now proposed to have two stages to ensure, among other things, better environmental protection: an initial stage emphasizing applied research and development (R and D), including environmental research, followed by a second stage that would accelerate deployment of those synthetic fuel technologies then judged most ready for rapid deployment and economic operation within the environmental protection requirements. These program changes have significantly expanded the scope of technologies to be considered in this environmental analysis and have increased the likelihood that accelerated environmental R and D efforts will be successful in solving principal environmental and worker safety concerns for most technologies prior to the initiation of the second stage of the accelerated deployment plan. Information is presented under the following section headings: summary; study description; the technologies and their environmental concerns (including, coal liquefaction and gasification, oil shale production, biomass and urban waste conversion); regulatory and institutional analyses; and environmental impacts analysis (including air and water quaility analyses, impacts of carbon dioxide and acid rain, water availability, solid and hazardous wastes, coal mining environmental impacts, transportation issues, community growth and change, and regional impacts). Additional information is presented in seventeen appendixes. (JGB)

None

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The social cost of carbon (SCC) is a monetized metric for evaluating the benefits associated with marginal reductions in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. It represents the expected welfare loss from the future damages caused by the release of one tonne of CO2 in a given year, expressed in consumption equivalent terms. It is intended to be a comprehensive measure, taking into account changes in agricultural productivity, human health risks, loss of ecosystem services and biodiversity, and the frequency and severity of flooding and storms, among other possible impacts. Estimating the SCC requires long-term modeling of global economic activity, the climate system, and the linkages between the two through anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the effects of changing climatic conditions on economic activity and human well-being. The United States government currently uses the SCC in regulatory benefit-cost analyses to assess the welfare effects of changes in CO2 emissions. Consistent application of the SCC to federal rulemaking analyses began in 2009-2010 with the development of a set of global SCC estimates that employed three prominent integrated assessment models (IAMs) -- DICE, FUND, and PAGE. The U.S. government report identified a number of limitations associated with SCC estimates in general and its own assumptions in particular: an incomplete treatment of damages, including potential “catastrophic” impacts; uncertainty regarding the extrapolation of damage functions to high temperatures; incomplete treatment of adaptation and technological change; and the evaluation of uncertain outcomes in a risk-neutral fashion. External experts have identified other potential issues, including how best to model long-term socio-economic and emissions pathways, oversimplified physical climate and carbon cycle modeling within the IAMs, and an inconsistency between non-constant economic growth scenarios and constant discount rates. The U.S. government has committed to updating the estimates regularly as modeling capabilities and scientific and economic knowledge improves. To help foster further improvements in estimating the SCC, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy hosted a pair of workshops on “Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis.” The first focused on conceptual and methodological issues related to integrated assessment modeling and the second brought together natural and social scientists to explore methods for improving damage assessment for multiple sectors. These two workshops provide the basis for the 13 papers in this special issue.

Marten, Alex; Kopp, Robert E.; Shouse, Kate C.; Griffiths, Charles; Hodson, Elke L.; Kopits, Elizabeth; Mignone, Bryan K.; Moore, Chris; Newbold, Steve; Waldhoff, Stephanie T.; Wolverton, Ann

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Technical support document: Energy conservation standards for consumer products: Dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers including: Environmental impacts; regulatory impact analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act as amended (P.L. 94-163), establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of standards on dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers. The economic impact analysis is performed in five major areas: An Engineering Analysis, which establishes technical feasibility and product attributes including costs of design options to improve appliance efficiency. A Consumer Analysis at two levels: national aggregate impacts, and impacts on individuals. The national aggregate impacts include forecasts of appliance sales, efficiencies, energy use, and consumer expenditures. The individual impacts are analyzed by Life-Cycle Cost (LCC), Payback Periods, and Cost of Conserved Energy (CCE), which evaluate the savings in operating expenses relative to increases in purchase price; A Manufacturer Analysis, which provides an estimate of manufacturers' response to the proposed standards. Their response is quantified by changes in several measures of financial performance for a firm. An Industry Impact Analysis shows financial and competitive impacts on the appliance industry. A Utility Analysis that measures the impacts of the altered energy-consumption patterns on electric utilities. A Environmental Effects analysis, which estimates changes in emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur oxides, and nitrogen oxides, due to reduced energy consumption in the home and at the power plant. A Regulatory Impact Analysis collects the results of all the analyses into the net benefits and costs from a national perspective. 47 figs., 171 tabs. (JF)

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Technical support document: Energy conservation standards for consumer products: Refrigerators and furnaces including: environmental impacts regulatory impact analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Appliance Energy Conversation Act (NAECA) of 1987 (P.L. 100-12) establishes energy efficiency standards for 13 types of consumer products. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards on these and other types of products at specified times. DOE is currently selecting standards for two types of products: refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, and freezers; and small gas furnaces. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of the proposed standards. 8 refs., 39 figs., 135 tabs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Regulatory Analysis on Criteria  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST3 AÇORIANONewsRegulatory Analysis on Criteria for

11

Historical perspective, economic analysis, and regulatory analysis of the impacts of waste partitioning-transmutation on the disposal of radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Partitioning-transmutation, sometimes called actinide burning, is an alternative approach to high-level radioactive waste management. It consists of removing long-lived radionuclides from wastes and destroying those radionuclides, thus reducing the long-term hazards of radioactive waste. It was studied in detail in the 1970's. New developments in technology and other factors are resulting in a reexamination of this waste management option. This report consists of three papers which summarize the historical work, update the analysis of the costs of waste disposal, and describe current regulatory requirements which might be impacted by P-T. The papers provide a starting point for future research on P-T. 152 refs., 2 figs., 19 tabs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Croff, A.G.; Kocher, D.C.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW PROPOSAL TO CREATE DISTRICTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW FOR THE PROPOSAL TO CREATE DISTRICTS WITHIN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2.1Environmental Assessment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2.2Regulatory Impact Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.0 ENVIRONMENTAL AND BIOLOGICAL IMPACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.1 Atka Mackerel Biology

13

SECRETARIAL REVIEW DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SECRETARIAL REVIEW DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ INITIAL REGULATORY The purpose of the non-AFA crab sideboard limits was to prevent vessels with crab QS from disadvantaging non for non-American Fisheries Act (AFA) crab vessels. In April 2007, the Council began developing options

14

Regulatory analysis technical evaluation handbook. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance to the regulatory analyst to promote preparation of quality regulatory analysis documents and to implement the policies of the Regulatory Analysis Guidelines of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NUREG/BR-0058 Rev. 2). This Handbook expands upon policy concepts included in the NRC Guidelines and translates the six steps in preparing regulatory analyses into implementable methodologies for the analyst. It provides standardized methods of preparation and presentation of regulatory analyses, with the inclusion of input that will satisfy all backfit requirements and requirements of NRC`s Committee to Review Generic Requirements. Information on the objectives of the safety goal evaluation process and potential data sources for preparing a safety goal evaluation is also included. Consistent application of the methods provided here will result in more directly comparable analyses, thus aiding decision-makers in evaluating and comparing various regulatory actions. The handbook is being issued in loose-leaf format to facilitate revisions. NRC intends to periodically revise the handbook as new and improved guidance, data, and methods become available.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, and freezers including draft environmental assessment, regulatory impact analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (P.L. 94-163), as amended by the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 (P.L. 100-12) and by the National Appliance Energy Conservation Amendments of 1988 (P.L. 100-357), and by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486), provides energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products` covered by the Act, and authorizes the Secretary of Energy to prescribe amended or new energy standards for each type (or class) of covered product. The assessment of the proposed standards for refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, and freezers presented in this document is designed to evaluate their economic impacts according to the criteria in the Act. It includes an engineering analysis of the cost and performance of design options to improve the efficiency of the products; forecasts of the number and average efficiency of products sold, the amount of energy the products will consume, and their prices and operating expenses; a determination of change in investment, revenues, and costs to manufacturers of the products; a calculation of the costs and benefits to consumers, electric utilities, and the nation as a whole; and an assessment of the environmental impacts of the proposed standards.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

"Remedying Undue Discrimination through Open Access Transmission Service and Standard Electricity Market Design." Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory...

17

Cost-benefit considerations in regulatory analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Justification for safety enhancements at nuclear facilities, e.g., a compulsory backfit to nuclear power plants, requires a value-impact analysis of the increase in overall public protection versus the cost of implementation. It has been customary to assess the benefits in terms of radiation dose to the public averted by the introduction of the safety enhancement. Comparison of such benefits with the costs of the enhancement then requires an estimate of the monetary value of averted dose (dollars/person rem). This report reviews available information on a variety of factors that affect this valuation and assesses the continuing validity of the figure of $1000/person-rem averted, which has been widely used as a guideline in performing value-impact analyses. Factors that bear on this valuation include the health risks of radiation doses, especially the higher risk estimates of the BEIR V committee, recent calculations of doses and offsite costs by consequence codes for hypothesized severe accidents at U.S. nuclear power plants under the NUREG-1150 program, and recent information on the economic consequences of the Chernobyl accident in the Soviet Union and estimates of risk avoidance based on the willingness-to-pay criterion. The report analyzes these factors and presents results on the dollars/person-rem ratio arising from different assumptions on the values of these factors.

Mubayi, V.; Sailor, V.; Anandalingam, G.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review AMENDMENT 45 TO THE FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review FOR AMENDMENT 45 TO THE FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLAN it would conflict with the Bering Sea non-roe season. At its January 1996 meeting, the Council considered/C Regulatory Areas must be made. Amendment 19 to the FMP, implemented as a measure to prevent roe stripping

19

Panel Data Analysis of Regulatory Factors Shaping Environmental Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the influence of regulatory factors in general, this paper examines a specific demonstration of environmental perfor- mance: biological oxygen demand (BOD) wastewater dis- charges by large (“major”) municipal wastewater treatment plants in Kansas during... example, limit levels). To analyze the effects of these regulatory factors on envi- ronmental performance, this particular empirical analysis examines the wastewater discharges by large municipal wastewater treatment facilities in the state of Kansas...

Earnhart, Dietrich H.

2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

20

NGNP Project Regulatory Gap Analysis for Modular HTGRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project Regulatory Gap Analysis (RGA) for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR) was conducted to evaluate existing regulatory requirements and guidance against the design characteristics specific to a generic modular HTGR. This final report presents results and identifies regulatory gaps concerning current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing requirements that apply to the modular HTGR design concept. This report contains appendices that highlight important HTGR licensing issues that were found during the RGA study. The information contained in this report will be used to further efforts in reconciling HTGR-related gaps in the NRC licensing structure, which has to date largely focused on light water reactor technology.

Wayne Moe

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Regulatory Impacts on Indian Lands Webinar | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 |RebeccaRegional StandardsExecutiveWatchdog |Regulatory

22

Below regulatory concern owners group: Individual and population impacts from BRC (below regulatory concern) waste treatment and disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the IMPACTS-BRC and PRESTO-EPA-POP codes, researchers calculated potential individual and population doses for routine and unexpected radiation exposures resulting from the transportation and disposal of BRC nuclear power plant wastes. These calculations provided a basis for establishing annual curie and radionuclide concentration limits for BRC treatment and disposal. EPRI has initiated a program to develop a petition for rulemaking to NRC that would allow management of certain very low activity nuclear power plant waste types as below regulatory concern (BRC), thus exempting these wastes from requirements for burial at licensed low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The technical information required to support the BRC petition includes an assessment of radiologic impacts resulting from the proposed exemption, based on estimated individual and population doses that might result from BRC treatment and disposal of nuclear power plant wastes. 13 figs., 31 tabs.

Murphy, E.S.; Rogers, V.C.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Does the management of regulatory compliance and occupational risk have an impact on safety culture?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Does the management of regulatory compliance and occupational risk have an impact on safety culture of safety culture has progressively taken hold in organizations. The idea has numerous benefits and can the nature and strength of relationships between safety culture and two explanatory variables; namely

Boyer, Edmond

24

Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of...

25

Change impact analysis -what, why, how ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis How to perform the change impact analysis Future direction of research Q&A 2 KAIST SE LAB 2008 have unpredictable consequences that often delay their implementation 3 KAIST SE LAB 2008 #12 Implement change #12;What is the change impact analysis (3/3) Results of the change impact analysis 8 KAIST

Bae, Doo-Hwan

26

Draft regulatory analysis: notice of proposed rulemaking motor gasoline allocation revisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Draft Regulatory Analysis is prepared for those proposed regulations which either may have a major impact on the general economy, individual industries, or geographic regions and levels of government, or may be significant in that they affect important DOE policy concerns and are the object of public interest. The problems and proposed solutions for the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking and Public Hearings on the Motor Gasoline Allocation Program are examined. The ERA's mandate for this program is set out in the Emergency Petroleum Allocation Act of 1973. Under this Act, the President is empowered to enforce, at his discretion, price and allocation controls on petroleum and petroleum products, including gasoline, through September 30, 1981. The Act sets the following allocation goals: protect public health; maintain public services and agricultural operations; foster competition in the petroleum industry; distribute petroleum among industry sectors and US regions equitably; and minimize economic disruption and unnecessary interference wth market mechanisms.

None

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Addressing Climate Change in Environmental Impact Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Addressing Climate Change in Environmental Impact Analysis 2010 CTS Research Conference Carissa ­! Environmental impact analysis methods and content ·! Next steps #12;Purpose ·! Explore the use of environmental ·! Federal and state policies govern environmental impact analysis ­!National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA

Minnesota, University of

28

Do Markets Reduce Costs? Assessing the Impact of Regulatory Restructuring on U.S. Electric Generation Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Do Markets Reduce Costs? Assessing the Impact of Regulatory Restructuring on U.S. Electric-of-service regulation to market-oriented environments for many U.S. electric generating plants. Our estimates of input their wholesale electricity markets improved the most. The results suggest modest medium-term efficiency benefits

Kammen, Daniel M.

29

Regulatory analysis for amendments to regulations for the environmental review for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This regulatory analysis provides the supporting information for a proposed rule that will amend the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s environmental review requirements for applications for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses. The objective of the proposed rulemaking is to improve regulatory efficiency by providing for the generic evaluation of certain environmental impacts associated with nuclear plant license renewal. After considering various options, the staff identified and analyzed two major alternatives. With Alternative A, the existing regulations would not be amended. This option requires that environmental reviews be performed under the existing regulations. Alternative B is to assess, on a generic basis, the environmental impacts of renewing the operating license of individual nuclear power plants, and define the issues that will need to be further analyzed on a case-by-case basis. In addition, Alternative B removes from NRC`s review certain economics-related issues. The findings of this assessment are to be codified in 10 CFR 51. The staff has selected Alternative B as the preferred alternative.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Inferring Regulatory Elements from a Whole Genome. An Analysis of Helicobacter pylori sss80  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inferring Regulatory Elements from a Whole Genome. An Analysis of Helicobacter pylori sss80 Family, France Helicobacter pylori is adapted to life in a unique niche, the gastric epi- thelium of primates inference; promoter; Helicobacter pylori; prokaryotes*Corresponding author Introduction Helicobacter pylori

Marsan, Laurent

31

Chapter 16: Environmental Impact Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

or gases a . This analysis also considers carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). a More information on air pollution characteristics and regulations is available on the U.S. Environment...

32

Comparison and Analysis of Regulatory and Derived Requirements for Certain DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipments; Lessons Learned for Future Spent Fuel Transportation Campaigns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive materials transportation is stringently regulated by the Department of Transportation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to protect the public and the environment. As a Federal agency, however, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) must seek State, Tribal and local input on safety issues for certain transportation activities. This interaction has invariably resulted in the imposition of extra-regulatory requirements, greatly increasing transportation costs and delaying schedules while not significantly enhancing the level of safety. This paper discusses the results an analysis of the regulatory and negotiated requirements established for a July 1998 shipment of spent nuclear fuel from foreign countries through the west coast to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Staff from the INEEL Nuclear Materials Engineering and Disposition Department undertook the analysis in partnership with HMTC, to discover if there were instances where requirements derived from stakeholder interactions duplicate, contradict, or otherwise overlap with regulatory requirements. The study exhaustively lists and classifies applicable Department of Transportation (DOT) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. These are then compared with a similarly classified list of requirements from the Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) and those developed during stakeholder negotiations. Comparison and analysis reveals numerous attempts to reduce transportation risk by imposing more stringent safety measures than those required by DOT and NRC. These usually took the form of additional inspection, notification and planning requirements. There are also many instances of overlap with, and duplication of regulations. Participants will gain a greater appreciation for the need to understand the risk-oriented basis of the radioactive materials regulations and their effectiveness in ensuring safety when negotiating extra-regulatory requirements.

Kramer, George L., Ph.D.; Fawcett, Rick L.; Rieke, Philip C.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

33

South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project : Adopted Portions of a 1987 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s Final Environmental Impact Statement.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project that world produce 6.55 average megawatts of firm energy per year and would be sited in the Snohomish River Basin, Washington, was evaluated by the Federal Energy Regulatory commission (FERC) along with six other proposed projects for environmental effects and economic feasibility Based on its economic analysis and environmental evaluation of the project, the FERC staff found that the South Fork Tolt River Project would be economically feasible and would result in insignificant Impacts if sedimentation issues could be resolved. Upon review, the BPA is adopting portions of the 1987 FERC FEIS that concern the South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project and updating specific sections in an Attachment.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the results of the data quality objective (DQO) process undertaken to define data needs for state and federal requirements associated with toxic, hazardous, and/or radiological air emissions under the jurisdiction of the River Protection Project (RPP). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the Air DQO. The primary drivers for characterization under this DQO are the regulatory requirements pursuant to Washington State regulations, that may require sampling and analysis. The federal regulations concerning air emissions are incorporated into the Washington State regulations. Data needs exist for nonradioactive and radioactive waste constituents and characteristics as identified through the DQO process described in this document. The purpose is to identify current data needs for complying with regulatory drivers for the measurement of air emissions from RPP facilities in support of air permitting. These drivers include best management practices; similar analyses may have more than one regulatory driver. This document should not be used for determining overall compliance with regulations because the regulations are in constant change, and this document may not reflect the latest regulatory requirements. Regulatory requirements are also expected to change as various permits are issued. Data needs require samples for both radionuclides and nonradionuclide analytes of air emissions from tanks and stored waste containers. The collection of data is to support environmental permitting and compliance, not for health and safety issues. This document does not address health or safety regulations or requirements (those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration or the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health) or continuous emission monitoring systems. This DQO is applicable to all equipment, facilities, and operations under the jurisdiction of RPP that emit or have the potential to emit regulated air pollutants.

MULKEY, C.H.

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

35

Analysis of the Load Impacts and Economic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Time of Use (TOU) rate plan, called "Analysis of the Load Impacts and Economic Benefits model. The TOU data was rerun through the new spreadsheet model and the results are reported here. · Participation in the TOU rate option also resulted in an average net reduction of 292 kWh/year in annual

36

Report to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data, 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during calendar year 1986. Comments and observations are provided on operating experience at nuclear power plants and other NRC licensees, including results from selected AEOD studies; summaries of abnormal occurrences involving US nuclear plants; reviews of licensee event reports and their quality, reactor scram experience from 1984 to 1986, engineered safety features actuations, and the trends and patterns analysis program; and assessments of nonreactor and medical misadministration events. In addition, the report provides the year-end status of all recommendations included in AEOD studies, and listings of all AEOD reports issued from 1980 through 1986.

none,

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Update of Part 61 Impacts Analysis Methodology. Methodology report. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under contract to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Envirosphere Company has expanded and updated the impacts analysis methodology used during the development of the 10 CFR Part 61 rule to allow improved consideration of the costs and impacts of treatment and disposal of low-level waste that is close to or exceeds Class C concentrations. The modifications described in this report principally include: (1) an update of the low-level radioactive waste source term, (2) consideration of additional alternative disposal technologies, (3) expansion of the methodology used to calculate disposal costs, (4) consideration of an additional exposure pathway involving direct human contact with disposed waste due to a hypothetical drilling scenario, and (5) use of updated health physics analysis procedures (ICRP-30). Volume 1 of this report describes the calculational algorithms of the updated analysis methodology.

Oztunali, O.I.; Roles, G.W.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Energy and Greenhouse Impacts of Biofuels: A Framework for Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels Wang, M. (2001) "Energy & Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels Fuels and MotorLifecycle Analysis of Biofuels." Report UCD-ITS-RR-06-08.

Kammen, Daniel M.; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J.; Jones, Andrew D.; Nemet, Gregory F.; Delucchi, Mark A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Techniques for analyzing the impacts of certain electric-utility ratemaking and regulatory-policy concepts. Regulatory laws and policies. [State by state  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a legal study prepared to provide a review of the substantive and procedural laws of each regulatory jurisdiction that may affect implementation of the PURPA standards, and to summarize the current state of consideration and implementation of policies and rate designs similar or identical to the PURPA standards by state regulatory agencies and nonregulated utilities. This report is divided into three sections. The first section, the Introduction, summarizes the standards promulgated by PURPA and the results of the legal study. The second section, State Regulatory Law and Procedure, summarizes for each state or other ratemaking jurisdiction: (1) general constitutional and statutory provisions affecting utility rates and conditions of service; (2) specific laws or decisions affecting policy or rate design issues covered by PURPA standards; and (3) statutes and decisions governing administrative procedures, including judicial review. A chart showing actions taken on the policy and rate design issues addressed by PURPA is also included for each jurisdiction, and citations to relevant authorities are presented for each standard. State statutes or decisions that specifically define a state standard similar or identical to a PURPA standard, or that refer to one of the three PURPA objectives, are noted. The third section, Nonregulated Electric Utilities, summarizes information available on nonregulated utilities, i.e., publicly or cooperatively owned utilities which are specifically exempted from state regulation by state law.

None

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Impact Analysis...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Impact Analysis: VTO Baseline and Scenario (BaSce) Activities Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Techniques of analyzing the impacts of certain electric-utility ratemaking and regulatory-policy concepts. Bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography provides documentation for use by state public utility commissions and major nonregulated utilities in evaluating the applicability of a wide range of electric utility rate design and regulatory concepts in light of certain regulatory objectives. Part I, Utility Regulatory Objectives, contains 2084 citations on conservation of energy and capital; efficient use of facilities and resources; and equitable rates to electricity consumers. Part II, Rate Design Concepts, contains 1238 citations on time-of-day rates; seasonally-varying rates; cost-of-service rates; interruptible rates (including the accompanying use of load management techniques); declining block rates; and lifeline rates. Part III, Regulatory Concepts, contains 1282 references on restrictions on master metering; procedures for review of automatic adjustment clauses; prohibitions of rate or regulatory discrimination against solar, wind, or other small energy systems; treatment of advertising expenses; and procedures to protect ratepayers from abrupt termination of service.

None

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

A regulatory analysis on emergency preparedness for fuel cycle and other radioactive material licensees: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The question this Regulatory Analysis sought to answer is: should the NRC impose additional emergency preparedness requirements on certain fuel cycle and other radioactive material licensees for dealing with accidents that might have offsite releases of radioactive material. To answer the question, we analyzed potential accidents for 15 types of fuel cycle and other radioactive material licensees. An appropriate plan would: (1) identify accidents for which protective actions should be taken by people offsite; (2) list the licensee's responsibilities for each type of accident, including notification of local authorities (fire and police generally); and (3) give sample messages for local authorities including protective action recommendations. This approach more closely follows the approach used for research reactors than for power reactors. The low potential offsite doses (acute fatalities and injuries not possible except possibly for UF/sub 6/ releases), the small areas where actions would be warranted, the small number of people involved, and the fact that the local police and fire departments would be doing essentially the same things they normally do, are all factors that tend to make a simple plan adequate. This report discusses the potentially hazardous accidents, and the likely effects of these accidents in terms of personnel danger.

McGuire, S.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in the United States. Preliminary background report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of preliminary reports describing the laws and regulatory programs of the United States and each of the 50 states affecting the siting and operation of energy generating facilities likely to be used in Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES. This report describes laws and regulatory programs in the United States. Subsequent reports will (1) describe public utility rate regulatory procedures and practices as they might affect an ICES, (2) analyze each of the aforementioned regulatory programs to identify impediments to the development of ICES, and (3) recommend potential changes in legislation and regulatory practices and procedures to overcome such impediments.

Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

New families of human regulatory RNA structures identified by comparative analysis of vertebrate genomes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regulatory RNA structures are often members of families with multiple paralogous instances across the genome. Family members share functional and structural properties, which allow them to be studied as a whole, facilitating ...

Kellis, Manolis

45

The Michigan regulatory incentives study for electric utilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of Phase I of the Michigan Regulatory Incentives Study for Electric Utilities, a three-phase review of Michigan's regulatory system and its effects on resource selection by electric utilities. The goal of Phase I is to identify and analyze financial incentive mechanisms that encourage selection of resources in accord with the principles of integrated resource planning (IRP) or least-cost planning (LCP). Subsequent study phases will involve further analysis of options and possibly a collaborative formal effort to propose regulatory changes. The Phase I analysis proceeded in three steps: (1) identification and review of existing regulatory practices that affect utilities; selection of resources, particularly DSM; (2) preliminary analysis of ten financial mechanisms, and selection of three for further study; (3) detailed analysis of the three mechanisms, including consideration of how they could be implemented in Michigan and financial modeling of their likely impacts on utilities and ratepayers.

Reid, M.W.; Weaver, E.M. (Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)) [Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

1991-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

46

An environmental impact analysis of grinding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis was intended to investigate the environmental impact of grinding in the United States manufacturing industry. Grinding is an ideal method for producing parts with a fine surface finish and high dimensional ...

Baniszewski, Beth (Beth Ellen)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Project Information Form Project Title Modeling for Local Impact Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Information Form Project Title Modeling for Local Impact Analysis University University Research and Educational Foundation- $48,683.00 Total Project Cost $48,683.00 Agency ID or Contract Number Project We will develop a traffic simulation model for the Los Angeles region that will allow us

California at Davis, University of

48

An Economic Impact Analysis of DC Drinking Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Economic Impact Analysis of DC Drinking Water Quality Annual Progress Report for FY 2005 In January 2004, District of Columbia residents learned the drinking water supplied by the D.C. Water immediately responded by forming the Interagency Task Force on Lead in Drinking Water (The Task Force

District of Columbia, University of the

49

TransNIEMO: ECONOMIC IMPACT ANALYSIS USING A MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TransNIEMO: ECONOMIC IMPACT ANALYSIS USING A MODEL OF CONSISTENT INTERREGIONAL ECONOMIC AND HIGHWAY of Industrial and Systems Engineering; and the School of Policy Planning and Development Qisheng Pan, Associate of Industrial and Systems Engineering JoongKoo Cho Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

Wang, Hai

50

Potential impacts of global climate change on Tijuana River Watershed hydrology - An initial analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Tijuana River Watershed hydrology - An initial analysis Achanges may impact the hydrology of the Tijuana Riverclimate changes might impact hydrology in the Tijuana River

Das, Tapash; Dettinger, Michael D; Cayan, Daniel R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Data quality objective for regulatory requirements for dangerous waste sampling and analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contains requirements for sampling and analysis to meet the dangerous (hazardous) waste regulations.

Mulkey, C.H., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

52

Engineering analysis of the air pollution regulatory process impacts on the agricultural industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

factor is 7 kg/1000 hd-day (16 lb/1000 hd-day) while the AERMOD emission factor is 5 kg/1000 hd-day (11 lb/1000 he-day). The EPA is considering implementing a crustal exclusion for the PM emitted by agricultural sources. Over the next five years...

Lange, Jennifer Marie

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

53

Social Impacts of Gambling in the United States A Comprehensive Analysis of State Regulatory Bodies,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lumbert II Anya Perret For Presentation to the New Hampshire Gaming Study Commission This report)......................................................................... 7 2.6 DEPARTMENTS OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND SOCIAL WELFARE (SEE TABLES 2 AND 6)..... 7 2.7 PROBLEM OF STATE PROBLEM GAMBLING SERVICES ................................... 17 4.2 APPENDIX II. RELEVANT

Lotko, William

54

Report to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on analysis and evaluation of operational data - 1987: Power reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during 1987. The report is published in two volumes. NUREG-1272, Vol. 2, No. 1, covers Power Reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry, with comments regarding the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year, and summarizes information from Licensee Event Reports, the NRC's Operations Center, and Diagnostic Evaluations. NUREG-1272, Vol. 2, No. 2, covers Nonreactors and presents a review of the nonreactors events and misadministration reports that were reported in 1987 and a brief synopsis of AEOD studies published in 1987. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD Reports issued for 1980-1987.

none,

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Dangerous Waste Sampling and Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes sampling and analytical requirements needed to meet state and federal regulations for dangerous waste (DW). The River Protection Project (RPP) is assigned to the task of storage and interim treatment of hazardous waste. Any final treatment or disposal operations, as well as requirements under the land disposal restrictions (LDRs), fall in the jurisdiction of another Hanford organization and are not part of this scope. The requirements for this Data Quality Objective (DQO) Process were developed using the RPP Data Quality Objective Procedure (Banning 1996), which is based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Guidance for the Data Quality Objectives Process (EPA 1994). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the DW DQO. Federal and state laws and regulations pertaining to waste contain requirements that are dependent upon the composition of the waste stream. These regulatory drivers require that pertinent information be obtained. For many requirements, documented process knowledge of a waste composition can be used instead of analytical data to characterize or designate a waste. When process knowledge alone is used to characterize a waste, it is a best management practice to validate the information with analytical measurements.

MULKEY, C.H.

1999-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

56

Cultivating clean energy in Mali: policy analysis and livelihood impacts of Jatropha curcas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cultivating clean energy in Mali: policy analysis and livelihood impacts of Jatropha curcas Nicola;3 Cultivating clean energy in Mali: policy analysis and livelihood impacts of Jatropha curcas © Nicola Favretto politics with Jatropha: national energy policy and stakeholders

Mound, Jon

57

The Climate Impacts of Bioenergy Systems Depend on Market and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Climate Impacts of Bioenergy Systems Depend on Market and Regulatory Policy Contexts D E R E K, and by sequestering atmospheric carbon. Which use mitigates the most emissions depends on market and regulatory the vehicle fleet and bioenergy use are fixed or free parameters constrain the policy questions an analysis

Kammen, Daniel M.

58

The Michigan regulatory incentives study for electric utilities. Phase 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of Phase I of the Michigan Regulatory Incentives Study for Electric Utilities, a three-phase review of Michigan`s regulatory system and its effects on resource selection by electric utilities. The goal of Phase I is to identify and analyze financial incentive mechanisms that encourage selection of resources in accord with the principles of integrated resource planning (IRP) or least-cost planning (LCP). Subsequent study phases will involve further analysis of options and possibly a collaborative formal effort to propose regulatory changes. The Phase I analysis proceeded in three steps: (1) identification and review of existing regulatory practices that affect utilities; selection of resources, particularly DSM; (2) preliminary analysis of ten financial mechanisms, and selection of three for further study; (3) detailed analysis of the three mechanisms, including consideration of how they could be implemented in Michigan and financial modeling of their likely impacts on utilities and ratepayers.

Reid, M.W.; Weaver, E.M. [Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)] [Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

1991-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

59

Regulatory analysis for review and establishment of natural gas curtailment priorities. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall perspective for policy review is in Volume 1. It contains a concise statement of the problem, a list of policy alternatives, all study findings, and an outline of the evaluations which produced the study findings. Volume 2 is a detailed evaluation of each policy alternative, except for the environmental impact assessment in Volume 3. Both Volumes 2 and 3 are designed to add details for the reader who has already studied Volume 1; background in Volume 1 is not repeated in other volumes. Volume 2 should be used to understand the basic causes for the differences in curtailment alternatives presented in Volume 1. It should also be used to gain understanding of how any additional curtailment alternative must be evaluated before it can be safely implemented. This volume also discusses the following basic policy goals which should guide the selection of any policy change: (1) efficiency as measured by shortage costs and supplier costs, (2) equity as measured by fairness among groups, (3) administrative burden as measured by record keeping and implementation problems, and (4) contribution toward special goals such as oil import reduction.

None

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Regulatory Tools  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST3 AÇORIANONewsRegulatoryRegulatory Response

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Issue 143: Availability of chilled water system and room cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the regulatory analysis for Generic Issue (GI-143), {open_quotes}Availability of Chilled Water System and Room Cooling.{close_quotes} The heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and related auxiliaries are required to provide control of environmental conditions in areas in light water reactor (LWR) plants that contain safety-related equipment. In some plants, the HVAC and chilled water systems serve to maintain a suitable environment for both safety and non-safety-related areas. Although some plants have an independent chilled water system for the safety-related areas, the heat removal capability often depends on the operability of other supporting systems such as the service water system or the component cooling water system. The operability of safety-related components depends upon operation of the HVAC and chilled water systems to remove heat from areas containing the equipment. If cooling to dissipate the heat generated is unavailable, the ability of the safety-related equipment to operate as intended cannot be assured. Typical components or areas in the nuclear power plant that could be affected by the failure of cooling from HVAC or chilled water systems include the (1) emergency switchgear and battery rooms, (2) emergency diesel generator room, (3) pump rooms for residual heat removal, reactor core isolation cooling, high-pressure core spray, and low-pressure core spray, and (4) control room. The unavailability of such safety-related equipment or areas could cause the core damage frequency (CDF) to increase significantly.

Leung, V.T.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Regulatory Requirements for Cogeneration Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for cogeneration, therefore, the discussion will be limited to those portions of each act that affect cogenerators. Since the original cogeneration legislation was passed in 1978 and implemented by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in 1980... major pieces of legislation that impact cogeneration as well as an outline of the major provisions obtain ed in the Department of Energy Federal Energy Regulatory Commission final rule implementing Section 201 and Section 210 of PURPA. Public Uti...

Curry, K. A., Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Energy and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels: A Framework for Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels Wang, M. (2001) "Energy & Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels Fuels and MotorLifecycle Analysis of Biofuels." Report UCD-ITS-RR-06-08.

Kammen, Daniel M.; Farrell, Alexander E; Plevin, Richard J; Jones, Andrew; Nemet, Gregory F; Delucchi, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Regulatory Analysis on Criteria  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

to the public compared to Alternative 2 (the status quo), primarily due to increased health care costs associated with more patients remaining in the hospital than under the...

65

Webinar: DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model, originally presented on May 22, 2012.

66

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Impact Analysis: VTO Baseline and Scenario (BaSce) Activities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about impact analysis...

67

Summary and analysis of public comments on NUREG-1317: Regulatory options for nuclear plant license renewal: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On August 29, 1988, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on nuclear plant license renewal and solicited public comments on NUREG-1317, ''Regulatory Options for Nuclear Plant License Renewal.'' NUREG-1317 presents a discussion of fifteen topics involving technical, environmental, and procedural issues and poses a set of related questions. As part of its ongoing task for the NRC, The MITRE Corporation has summarized and analyzed the public comments received. Fifty-three written comments were received. Of these, 83 percent were from nuclear industry representatives; the remaining comments represented federal and state agencies, public interest groups, and a private citizen.

Ligon, D.M.; Seth, S.S.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Impact Analysis of Database Schema Changes Andy Maule, Wolfgang Emmerich and David S. Rosenblum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact Analysis of Database Schema Changes Andy Maule, Wolfgang Emmerich and David S. RosenblumBT, UK {a.maule|w.emmerich|d.rosenblum}@cs.ucl.ac.uk ABSTRACT We propose static program analysis

Emmerich, Wolfgang

69

Regulatory roles of endothelial cells in cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes the biochemical regulatory impact of endothelial cells, the cells that line all blood vessels, in cancer. Our work draws from concepts in vascular repair and tissue engineering and extends the view ...

Franses, Joseph W. (Joseph Wang)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Analysis reveals potential rangeland impacts if Williamson Act eliminated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Act, using a geospatial analysis and a mail question- naireelimination scenario. The geospatial analysis revealed that

Wetzel, William C; Lacher, Iara L; Swezey, Daniel s; Moffitt, Sarah E; Manning, Dale T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

ORNL/TM-2000/147 AN ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORNL/TM-2000/147 AN ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES IN THE UNITED STATES Stacy C An Analysis of SUV Impacts TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES AND FIGURES 4.4 Why Buy a Sport Utility Vehicle

72

ECONOMIC IMPACT ANALYSIS PROGRAMS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ECONOMIC IMPACT ANALYSIS PROGRAMS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS David Mulkey and human resource sectors. As a part of that initiative, the Department of Food and Resource Economics (FRED) is developing a special program emphasis in economic impact analysis focused on Florida

Florida, University of

73

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January/February 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives impacting environmental, health, and safety management responsibilities. the table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Mayer, S.J.; Salk, M.S.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Towards a Framework for Cyber Attack Impact Analysis of the Electric Smart Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards a Framework for Cyber Attack Impact Analysis of the Electric Smart Grid Deepa Kundur analysis of a smart grid. We focus on the model synthesis stage in which both cyber and physical grid-effect relationships can be conveniently expressed for both analysis and extension to large-scale smart grid systems. I

Kundur, Deepa

75

OIL PRICE IMPACT ON FINANCIAL MARKETS: CO-SPECTRAL ANALYSIS FOR EXPORTING VERSUS IMPORTING COUNTRIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OIL PRICE IMPACT ON FINANCIAL MARKETS: CO-SPECTRAL ANALYSIS FOR EXPORTING VERSUS IMPORTING://www.economie.polytechnique.edu/ mailto:chantal.poujouly@polytechnique.edu hal-00822070,version1-14May2013 #12;1 Oil price impact Khaled Guesmi3 Abstract The aim of this paper is to study the degree of interdependence between oil price

Boyer, Edmond

76

Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Analysis How to Link Physical Climate Data and Economic Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Analysis ­ How to Link Physical Climate Data and Economic There are a number of structural and conceptual differences between the information provided by climate change models of economic concepts applied to climate change impact and adaptation policy assessment, and to illustrate how

77

Statistical static timing analysis considering the impact of power supply noise in VLSI circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As semiconductor technology is scaled and voltage level is reduced, the impact of the variation in power supply has become very significant in predicting the realistic worst-case delays in integrated circuits. The analysis of power supply noise...

Kim, Hyun Sung

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

78

Incorporating operational flexibility into electric generation planning : impacts and methods for system design and policy analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation demonstrates how flexibility in hourly electricity operations can impact long-term planning and analysis for future power systems, particularly those with substantial variable renewables (e.g., wind) or ...

Palmintier, Bryan S. (Bryan Stephen)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Analysis of the Impact of Fuel Cell Vehicles on Energy Systems...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Fuel Cell Vehicles on Energy Systems in the Transportation Sector in Japan Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Analysis of the Impact of Fuel Cell...

80

Analysis of Energy Saving Impacts of New Commercial Energy Codes for the Gulf Coast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Report on an analysis of the energy savings and cost impacts associated with the use of newer and more efficiently commercial building energy codes in the states of Louisiana and Mississippi.

Halverson, Mark A.; Gowri, Krishnan; Richman, Eric E.

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Wisconsin. Preliminary background report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wisconsin state legislature has designated the Public Service Commission (PSC) as the agency responsible for regulating public utilities, and has prescribed the manner in which such utilities are to be regulated. The PSC consists of three commissioners appointed to staggered six-year terms by the governor and confirmed by the senate. Municipalities are given certain limited regulatory powers over public utilities. They are allowed to determine the quality and character of each kind of product or service to be rendered by any public utility within the municipality; to determine all other terms and conditions upon which a public utility may be permitted to occupy the streets, highways or other public places within the municipality; and may require such additions and extensions to (a public utility's) physical plant within said municipality as shall be reasonable and necessary in the interest of the public, and to designate the location and nature of all such additions and extensions subject to review by the PSC. However, the PSC has original and concurrent jurisdiction with municipalities to require extensions of service and to regulate service. Municipalities may purchase and own public utilities; however, such utilities are subject to regulation by the PSC. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Ohio. Preliminary background report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Public Utilities Commission (PUCO) is a body created by the Ohio State legislature to administer the provisions of the Ohio Public Utilities Act. It is composed of three commissioners appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate. Once appointed, a commissioner serves for a six-year period. The PUCO is vested with the power and jurisdiction to supervise and regulate public utilities and railroads... . The term public utility includes every corporation, company, co-partnership, person or association, their lessees, trustees, or receivers, as defined in the Ohio Code. Among the various services enumerated in the Code under the definition of public utility are an electric light company; a gas company; a pipeline company transporting gas, oil or coal; a waterworks company; a heating or cooling company. The power to regulate public utilities is shared by the PUCO and municipal governments. The municipal regulatory authority is derived from the Ohio Constitution, statutory provisions, and municipal franchising authority. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Maine. Preliminary background report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Maine Supreme Court holds that the regulation of the operations of public utilities is an exercise of the police powers of the state. The legislature has delegated such regulatory authority to the Maine Public Utilities Commission (PUC). The statutes provide no role for local government in the regulation of public utilities. The PUC consists of three full time members, appointed by the Governor subject to review by the Joint Standing Committee on Public Utilities and to confirmation by the Legislature. They each serve seven year terms. One member is designated by the Governor as chairman. The Commission appoints a secretary, assistant secretary, director of transportation, and, with the approval of the Attorney General, a general counsel. A member of the PUC cannot have any official or professional connection or relation with or hold any stock or securities in any public utility. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in South Carolina. Preliminary background report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pursuant to constitutional South Carolina mandate the General Assembly has created the Public Service Commission. The Commission is composed of seven members elected to four year terms by the General Assembly. One commissioner is elected from each of seven districts corresponding to the congressional districts as they existed as of January 1, 1930. The commissioners elect one of their members as chairman. The South Carolina statutes contain separate chapters dealing with the regulation of public utilities and electric utilities. Public utility includes the furnishing of gas or heat (other than by means of electricity) to the public. While the Commission is granted general supervisory and regulatory powers over public utilities and electric utilities, total governments retain some control over electrical utilities. All municipality's have the power to grant exclusive franchises to such utilities for the furnishing of light to the municipality and its inhabitants. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Florida. Preliminary background report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Florida Public Service Commission. The Commission is comprised of five members appointed by the governor with the approval of the senate. The governor must choose his appointees from a list of persons recommended by the nine-person Florida Public Service Commission Nominating Council. Commissioners serve either three- or four-year terms. They must be free from any employment or pecuniary interests in any utility subject to the jurisdiction of the Commission. Within the purview of its powers, the authority of the Commission supersedes that of local governments. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Natural Gas Regulatory Policy: Current Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL GAS REGULATORY roLICY: CURRENT ISSUES G. GAIL WATKINS Railroad Commission of Texas Austin, Texas ABSTRACT Many changes have occurred in recent months in both federal and state natural gas regulation. Those changes have increased... the options of industrial energy consumers for purchasing and moving natural gas. This panel viII discuss important developments in federal and state regulatory arenas and their impacts on purchasing options. Among the issues discussed viII be: 1...

Watkins, G.

87

An In-depth Analysis of Iron and Pathogenicity Regulatory Pathways in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

perspective, when examined from the microbe vantage, often only a few microns in length, the topography of the leaf surface is more like that of our planet, with mountains, valleys, and plains (43). These topographical variations can have a major impact... of adapting to the rapid changes in their microclimate. Additionally, nutrient availability on the leaf surface is limited, with sufficient nutrition for growth and replication being 11 available in a few phyllospheric “oases” resulting from plant...

Greenwald, Jessica Williams

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

88

1 Energy Markets and Policy Group Energy Analysis Department The Impact of Wind Power Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Energy Markets and Policy Group · Energy Analysis Department The Impact of Wind Power Projects, Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program #12;2 Energy Markets and Policy Group · Energy Analysis Concerns for Wind Energy Fall Into Three Potential Categories 1. Area Stigma: Concern that rural areas

Firestone, Jeremy

89

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT POWER MARKETS The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today ordered its staff to conduct investigators will find out if any technical or operational factors, federal or state regulatory prohibitions

Laughlin, Robert B.

90

Supplement analysis 2 of environmental impacts resulting from modifications in the West Valley Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The West Valley Demonstration Project, located in western New York, has approximately 600,000 gallons of liquid high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in storage in underground tanks. While corrosion analysis has revealed that only limited tank degradation has taken place, the failure of these tanks could release HLW to the environment. Congress requires DOE to demonstrate the technology for removal and solidification of HLW. DOE issued the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) in 1982. The purpose of this second supplement analysis is to re-assess the 1982 Final Environmental Impact Statement's continued adequacy. This report provides the necessary and appropriate data for DOE to determine whether the environmental impacts presented by the ongoing refinements in the design, process, and operations of the Project are considered sufficiently bounded within the envelope of impacts presented in the FEIS and supporting documentation.

NONE

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

91

Socio-economic and Environmental Impact Analysis of Khothagpa Gypsum Mine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impacts which the author of the study is not Impact Analysis of Khothagpa Gypsum Mine 71 familiar with, only obvious ones are reported below. i) Air pollution Dusts generated by various mining activities are of major concern to the people living... in the nearby areas. Dust is generated by blasting, loading and haulage, vehicular movements, open air disposal of waste rocks, drilling, and crushing. These fugitive dusts from mine site as well as from the factory of Druk Plaster and Chemicals Limited...

Galay, Karma

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Air quality impacts analysis for area G. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of fugitive radioactive emissions from the disposal site, Area G, was evaluated in support of site characterization for the Performance Assessment and for the Radioactive Air Emissions Management (RAEM) program. Fugitive emissions of tritiated water and contaminated windblown dust were considered. Data from an extensive field measurement program were used to estimate annual emissions of tritiated water. Fugitive dust models were used to calculate estimates of the annual emissions of windblown dust. These estimates were combined with data on contamination levels in surface soils to develop annual emission rates for specific radionuclides: tritium, uranium-238, cesium-137, plutonium-238, plutonium-239,240, and strontium-90. The CAP-88 atmospheric transport model was used to predict areas potentially affected by long-term dust deposition and atmospheric concentrations. The annual emission rate of tritiated water was estimated from the field data to be 14.0 Ci/yr. The emission rate of soil-borne radionuclides from open areas and from soils handling operations totaled less than 1x10{sup -4} Ci/yr. The CAP-88 results were used to develop effective dose equivalents (EDEs) for receptor locations downwind of Area G. All EDEs were several orders of magnitude below the national standard of 10 mrem/yr. Fugitive air emissions from Area G were found not to pose a health threat to persons living or working downwind of the facility.

Kowalewsky, K.; Eklund, B. [Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States); Vold, E.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

93

Comparative analysis of the life cycle impact assessment of available cement inventories in the EU  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) is one of basic steps in life cycle assessment methodology (LCA). This paper presents a comparative study of the LCIA of different life cycle inventories (LCI) for EU cements. The analysis unit used is the manufacture of 1 kg of cement, from 'cradle to gate'. The impact categories considered are those resulting from the manufacture of cement and include greenhouse effects, acidification, eutrophication and summer and winter smog, amongst others. The results of the study highlighted some inconsistencies in existing inventories. As for the LCIA, the main environmental interventions related to cement manufacture were classified and characterised and their effect on different impact categories analysed. Differences observed in evaluation of the impact of cement type were essentially related to their clinker content.

Josa, Alejandro [Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), School of Civil Engineering (ETSECCPB), C/Jordi Girona 1-3 Modul D2/C1, Barcelona 08034 (Spain)]. E-mail: alejandro.josa@upc.edu; Aguado, Antonio [Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), School of Civil Engineering (ETSECCPB), C/Jordi Girona 1-3 Modul D2/C1, Barcelona 08034 (Spain); Cardim, Arnaldo [Civil Engineering Department, Polytechnic School of Penambuco University, Rua Benfica, 455-Madalena, CEP 50.750-410 (Brazil); Byars, Ewan [Centre for Cement and Concrete, Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sir Frederick Mappin Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Reducing the environmental impacts of intermodal transportation: a multi-criteria analysis based on ELECTRE and AHP methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing the environmental impacts of intermodal transportation: a multi-criteria analysis on a case of freight transport between Paris and Marseille. Keywords: Supply chain, Environmental impacts with lower environmental impacts, such as rail and waterways. The dilemma here is that all motorized modes

Boyer, Edmond

95

Assessing the influence of environmental impact assessments on science and policy: An analysis of the Three Gorges Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessing the influence of environmental impact assessments on science and policy: An analysis Keywords: Environmental impact assessment Dams Three Gorges Project Uncertainty Prioritization a b s t r exist between the scientific interest (via number of publications) in environmental impacts and (a

Tullos, Desiree

96

Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

Myers, D. R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

Myers, D. R.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Strategic Sequencing for State Distributed PV Policies: A Quantitative Analysis of Policy Impacts and Interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

State and local policymakers show increasing interest in spurring the development of customer-sited distributed generation (DG), in particular solar photovoltaic (PV) markets. Prompted by that interest, this analysis examines the use of state policy as a tool to support the development of a robust private investment market. This analysis builds on previous studies that focus on government subsidies to reduce installation costs of individual projects and provides an evaluation of the impacts of policies on stimulating private market development.

Doris, E.; Krasko, V.A.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

PATHS: Analysis of PATH Duration Statistics and their Impact on Reactive MANET Routing Protocols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PATHS: Analysis of PATH Duration Statistics and their Impact on Reactive MANET Routing Protocols Department of Electrical Engineering University of Southern California {narayans,fbai,bkrishna,helmy}@usc.edu ABSTRACT We develop a detailed approach to study how mobility im- pacts the performance of reactive MANET

Krishnamachari, Bhaskar

100

DISSERTATION ANALYSIS OF IMPACT OF NON-UNIFORMITIES ON THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-scale problems such as energy demand, pollution, and environment safety. The cost ($/kWh) is the primaryDISSERTATION ANALYSIS OF IMPACT OF NON-UNIFORMITIES ON THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS AND MODULES WITH 2-D-FILM SOLAR CELLS AND MODULES WITH 2-D SIMULATIONS BE ACCEPTED AS FULFILLING IN PART REQUIREMENTS

Sites, James R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Impact of relief accuracy on flood simulations and road network vulnerability analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

network by forcing users to take detours. In a risk preventive viewpoint, the network administrator has 1 Impact of relief accuracy on flood simulations and road network vulnerability analysis Jean in the water level and its consequences on the road network vulnerability. The first part focuses

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

102

Analysis of Impacts of a Clean Energy Standard as requested by Chairman Hall  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report responds to a request from Chairman Ralph M. Hall for an analysis of the impacts of a Clean Energy Standard (CES). The request, as outlined in the letter included in Appendix A, sets out specific assumptions and scenarios for the study.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Impact of jumps on returns and realised variances: econometric analysis of time-deformed Levy processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of jumps on returns and realised variances: econometric analysis of time-deformed L In order to assess the effect of jumps on realised variance calculations, we study some of the econometric econometric work on realised variance. Keywords: Kalman filter, LŽevy process, Long-memory, Quasi

Wolfe, Patrick J.

104

Analysis of the Impact of Hello Protocol Parameters over a Wireless Network Self-Organization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of the Impact of Hello Protocol Parameters over a Wireless Network Self of the HELLO protocol. This makes this HELLO protocol very important for wireless networks especially for self- organizing the network. Most of layer-3 protocols assume an ideal MAC layer. In such a case, HELLO protocol

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

105

Going Beyond AER: An Extensive Analysis of Word Alignments and Their Impact on MT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Going Beyond AER: An Extensive Analysis of Word Alignments and Their Impact on MT Necip Fazil Ayan (AER)--attempts to balance the precision and recall scores at the level of alignment links (Och and Ney et al., 2002) or METEOR (Banerjee and Lavie, 2005)). However, these studies showed that AER and BLEU

Ayan, Necip Fazil

106

Restoration As Mitigation: Analysis of Stream Mitigation for Coal Mining Impacts in Southern Appalachia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Restoration As Mitigation: Analysis of Stream Mitigation for Coal Mining Impacts in Southern or degraded but little is known about the success of stream mitigation. This article presents a synthesis of information about 434 stream mitigation projects from 117 permits for surface mining in Appalachia. Data from

Palmer, Margaret A.

107

IMPACT ANALYSIS OF SPENT FUEL DRY CASKS UNDER ACCIDENTAL DROP SCENARIOS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of analyses were performed to assess the structural response of spent nuclear fuel dry casks subjected to various handling and on-site transfer events. The results of these analyses are being used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to perform a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). Although the PRA study is being performed for a specific nuclear plant, the PRA study is also intended to provide a framework for a general methodology that could also be applied to other dry cask systems at other nuclear plants. The dry cask system consists of a transfer cask, used for handling and moving the multi-purpose canister (MPC) that contains the fuel, and a storage cask, used to store the MPC and fuel on a concrete pad at the site. This paper describes the analyses of the casks for two loading events. The first loading consists of dropping the transfer cask while it is lowered by a crane to a concrete floor at ground elevation. The second loading consists of dropping the storage cask while it is being transferred to the concrete storage pad outdoors. Three dimensional finite element models of the transfer cask and storage cask, containing the MPC and fuel, were utilized to perform the drop analyses. These models were combined with finite element models of the target structures being impacted. The transfer cask drop analyses considered various drop heights for the cask impacting the reinforced concrete floor at ground level. The finite element model of the target included a section of the concrete floor and concrete wall supporting the floor. The storage cask drop analyses evaluated a 30.5 cm (12 in.) drop of the cask impacting three different surfaces: reinforced concrete, asphalt, and gravel.

BRAVERMAN,J.I.; MORANTE,R.J.; XU,J.; HOFMAYER,C.H.; SHAUKAT,S.K.

2003-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

108

IMPACT ANALYSIS OF SPENT FUEL DRY CASKS UNDER ACCIDENTAL DROP SCENARIOS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of analyses were performed to assess the structural response of spent nuclear fuel dry casks subjected to various handling and on-site transfer events. The results of these analyses are being used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to perform a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). Although the PRA study is being performed for a specific nuclear plant, the PRA study is also intended to provide a framework for a general methodology that could also be applied to other dry cask systems at other nuclear plants. The dry cask system consists of a transfer cask, used for handling and moving the multi-purpose canister OLIIpC that contains the fuel, and a storage cask, used to store the MPC and fuel on a concrete pad at the site. This paper describes the analyses of the casks for two loading events. The first loading consists of dropping the transfer cask while it is lowered by a crane to a concrete floor at ground elevation. The second loading consists of dropping the storage cask while it is being transferred to the concrete storage pad outdoors. Three dimensional finite element models of the transfer cask and storage cask, containing the MPC and fuel, were utilized to perform the drop analyses. These models were combined with finite element models of the target structures being impacted. The transfer cask drop analyses considered various drop heights for the cask impacting the reinforced concrete floor at ground level. The finite element model of the target included a section of the concrete floor and concrete wall supporting the floor. The storage cask drop analyses evaluated a 30.5 cm (12 in.) drop of the cask impacting three different surfaces: reinforced concrete, asphalt, and gravel.

BRAVERMAN,J.I.; MORANTE,R.J.; XU,J.; HOFMAYER,C.H.; SHAUKAT,S.K.

2003-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

109

Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Nevada. Preliminary background report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authority to regulate the operatons of public utilities in Nevada is vested generally in the Public Service Commission. The Commission is comprised of three members appointed by the governor to four year terms. One of the members is designated by the governor to act as chairman and serves in that capacity at the pleasure of the governor. Commissioners must be free from employment or pecuniary interests which are incompatible with the duties of the Commission. Within the purview of its powers, the authority of the Commission supercedes that of local governments. Local governments play a role in regulating public utilities only through the exercise of their zoning and franchising powers. In addition, municipally-owned utilities are totally exempt from Commission control. No specific procedure is provided by which the decisions of local governments regarding utilities may be reviewed by the Commission. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

SYNTHESIS Ecological impacts of invasive alien plants: a meta-analysis of their effects on species, communities and ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW AND SYNTHESIS Ecological impacts of invasive alien plants: a meta-analysis of their effects-analysis of 199 articles reporting 1041 field studies that in total describe the impacts of 135 alien plant taxa on resident species, communities and ecosystems. Across studies, alien plants had a significant effect in 11

KratochvĂ­l, Lukas

111

Economic analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) mandated that minimum energy efficiency standards be established for classes of refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers, freezers, clothes dryers, water heaters, room air conditioners, home heating equipment, kitchen ranges and ovens, central air conditioners, and furnaces. EPCA requires that standards be designed to achieve the maximum improvement in energy efficiency that is technologically feasible and economically justified. Following the introductory chapter, Chapter Two describes the methodology used in the economic analysis and its relationship to legislative criteria for consumer product efficiency assessment; details how the CPES Value Model systematically compared and evaluated the economic impacts of regulation on the consumer, manufacturer and Nation. Chapter Three briefly displays the results of the analysis and lists the proposed performance standards by product class. Chapter Four describes the reasons for developing a baseline forecast, characterizes the baseline scenario from which regulatory impacts were calculated and summarizes the primary models, data sources and assumptions used in the baseline formulations. Chapter Five summarizes the methodology used to calculate regulatory impacts; describes the impacts of energy performance standards relative to the baseline discussed in Chapter Four. Also discussed are regional standards and other program alternatives to performance standards. Chapter Six describes the procedure for balancing consumer, manufacturer, and national impacts to select standard levels. Details of models and data bases used in the analysis are included in Appendices A through K.

None

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT AND FERC STAFF The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today accepted a settlement, valued at nearly $500 stemming from the 2000-2001 energy crisis in California and other Western states. The global settlement

Laughlin, Robert B.

113

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT SETTLEMENT BETWEEN DUKE AND COMMISSION STAFF The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today accepted a settlement between the Commission's enforcement staff and Houston-based units of Duke Energy that resolves

Laughlin, Robert B.

114

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT POWER EXCHANGE MARKET The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today approved a staff settlement calling-2-001 COMMISSION APPROVES $13.8 MILLION SETTLEMENT WITH RELIANT ENERGY OVER PHYSICAL WITHHOLDING IN CALIFORNIA

Laughlin, Robert B.

115

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today accepted an agreement between Nevada Power and Sierra Pacific. AGREEMENT ACCEPTED BETWEEN ENRON AND NEVADA COMPANIES SETTLING MATTERS STEMMING FROM WESTERN ENERGY CRISIS

Laughlin, Robert B.

116

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT FERC APPROVES SETTLEMENT WITH RELIANT IN CALIFORNIA CASES; PROCEEDS COULD TOTAL $50 MILLION The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today approved a settlement between the Commission's enforcement staff

Laughlin, Robert B.

117

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT CRISIS The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today approved a comprehensive settlement among APX Inc. Coral Power LLC, Puget Sound Energy Inc. and Avista are Supporting Parties. R-07-14 (30) #12;

Laughlin, Robert B.

118

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20426 NEWS RELEASE NEWS MEDIA CONTACT-95-191 COMMISSION APPROVES TWO WESTERN POWER SETTLEMENTS The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission today approved two markets during the Western energy crisis of 2000-2001. The first case involves a settlement agreement

Laughlin, Robert B.

119

Phenylpropanoid related regulatory protein-regulatory region associations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Materials and methods for identifying lignin regulatory region-regulatory protein associations are disclosed. Materials and methods for modulating lignin accumulation are also disclosed.

Apuya, Nestor (Culver City, CA); Bobzin, Steven Craig (Malibu, CA); Park, Joon-Hyun (Oak Park, CA); Doukhanina, Elena (Newbury Park, CA)

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

120

Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power: A Comparative Analysis of Impacts within the Western Governors' Association States; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper uses NREL's newest Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI II) model to assess economic impacts from alternative power technologies, with a focus on wind energy, for a variety of states.

Tegen, S.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Analysis of the environmental impact of China based on STIRPAT model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Assuming that energy consumption is the main source of GHG emissions in China, this paper analyses the effect of population, urbanisation level, GDP per capita, industrialisation level and energy intensity on the country's environmental impact using the STIRPAT model with data for 1978-2006. The analysis shows that population has the largest potential effect on environmental impact, followed by urbanisation level, industrialisation level, GDP per capita and energy intensity. Hence, China's One Child Policy, which restrains rapid population growth, has been an effective way of reducing the country's environmental impact. However, due to the difference in growth rates, GDP per capita had a higher effect on the environmental impact, contributing to 38% of its increase (while population's contribution was at 32%). The rapid decrease in energy intensity was the main factor restraining the increase in China's environmental impact but recently it has also been rising. Against this background, the future of the country looks bleak unless a change in human behaviour towards more ecologically sensitive economic choices occurs.

Lin Shoufu, E-mail: linshf2003@126.co [School of Economics, FuJian Normal University, Fuzhou City, 350007, Fujian Province (China) and School of Management, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei City, 230026, Anhui Province (China) and Curtin University Sustainability Policy Institute, Curtin University of Technology, GPO BoxU1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Zhao Dingtao, E-mail: box@ustc.edu.c [School of Management, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei City, 230026, Anhui Province (China); Marinova, Dora, E-mail: D.Marinova@curtin.edu.a [Curtin University Sustainability Policy Institute, Curtin University of Technology, GPO BoxU1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Regulatory guidance document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program Management System Manual requires preparation of the OCRWM Regulatory Guidance Document (RGD) that addresses licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance. The document provides: regulatory compliance policy; guidance to OCRWM organizational elements to ensure a consistent approach when complying with regulatory requirements; strategies to achieve policy objectives; organizational responsibilities for regulatory compliance; guidance with regard to Program compliance oversight; and guidance on the contents of a project-level Regulatory Compliance Plan. The scope of the RGD includes site suitability evaluation, licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance, in accordance with the direction provided by Section 4.6.3 of the PMS Manual. Site suitability evaluation and regulatory compliance during site characterization are significant activities, particularly with regard to the YW MSA. OCRWM`s evaluation of whether the Yucca Mountain site is suitable for repository development must precede its submittal of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Accordingly, site suitability evaluation is discussed in Chapter 4, and the general statements of policy regarding site suitability evaluation are discussed in Section 2.1. Although much of the data and analyses may initially be similar, the licensing process is discussed separately in Chapter 5. Environmental compliance is discussed in Chapter 6. Safety and Health compliance is discussed in Chapter 7.

NONE

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

CONSULTANT REPORT ANALYSIS OF REGULATORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydroelectric projects in British Columbia, Canada, eligible for California's Renewables Portfolio Standard are necessary if California is to allow British Columbia runofriver hydroelectric resources to be RPSeligible. Keywords: British Columbia, runof river, hydroelectric, Renewables Portfolio Standard, RPS, environmental

124

Analysis of Energy Saving Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2004 for New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and New York State Department of State (DOS) requested the help of DOE’s Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) in estimating the annual building energy savings and cost impacts of adopting ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 (ASHRAE 2004) requirements. This report summarizes the analysis methodology and results of energy simulation in response to that request.

Gowri, Krishnan; Halverson, Mark A.; Richman, Eric E.

2007-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

125

An Analysis of the Impact of Flexible Coupling Misalignment on Rotordynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lynn Beason Head of Department, Dennis O?Neal August 2010 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering iii ABSTRACT An Analysis of the Impact of Flexible Coupling Misalignment on Rotordynamics. (August 2010) Raul David Avendano Ovalle, B....S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Dara W. Childs Misalignment in turbomachinery has been commonly known to produce two- times-running-speed (2N) response. This project aimed to investigate the source of the 2N vibration...

Avendano Ovalle, Raul David

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

126

Electron impact and chemical ionization mass spectral analysis of a volatile uranyl derivative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quadrupole mass spectral analysis of the volatile uranium ligand complex bis (1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-pentanedionato) dioxouranium-di-n-butyl sulfoxide is described utilizing electron impact (EI) and methane chemical ionization (CI) ion sources. All major ions are tentatively identified and the potential usefulness of this complex for determining uranium isotope /sup 235/U//sup 238/U abundance is demonstrated.

Reutter, D.J.; Hardy, D.R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

EIS-0509: Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EIS-0509: Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0509: Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission...

128

REGULATORY STATUS: AOC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

184 UNIT NAME: Concrete Rubble pile 129) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside plant security south of C-611 Water Treatment Plant. Estimated to be less than 5 cubic feet....

129

Report Title: The Fossil Fuel Industry in New Mexico: A Comprehensive Impact Analysis Type of Report: Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuels 33 Summary Impacts 40 Works Cited 45 #12;3 List of Tables Table Title Page 1 Tax and Income Data0 Report Title: The Fossil Fuel Industry in New Mexico: A Comprehensive Impact Analysis Type AWARD Number: DE-NT0004397 Name and Address of Submitting Organization: Arrowhead Center New Mexico

Johnson, Eric E.

130

Threat Insight Quarterly Regulatory Compliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the importance of integrating regulatory compliance into an organization's overall strategic IT security planning

131

New analysis techniques for estimating impacts of federal appliance efficiency standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Impacts of U.S. appliance and equipment standards have been described previously. Since 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has updated standards for clothes washers, water heaters, and residential central air conditioners and heat pumps. A revised estimate of the aggregate impacts of all the residential appliance standards in the United States shows that existing standards will reduce residential primary energy consumption and associated carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions by 89 percent in 2020 compared to the levels expected without any standards. Studies of possible new standards are underway for residential furnaces and boilers, as well as a number of products in the commercial (tertiary) sector, such as distribution transformers and unitary air conditioners. The analysis of standards has evolved in response to critiques and in an attempt to develop more precise estimates of costs and benefits of these regulations. The newer analysis elements include: (1) valuing energy savings by using marginal (rather than average) energy prices specific to an end-use; (2) simulating the impacts of energy efficiency increases over a sample population of consumers to quantify the proportion of households having net benefits or net costs over the life of the appliance; and (3) calculating marginal markups in distribution channels to derive the incremental change in retail prices associated with increased manufacturing costs for improving energy efficiency.

McMahon, James E.

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

132

A forced response analysis and application of impact dampers to rotordynamic vibration suppression in a cryogenic environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A FORCED RESPONSE ANALYSIS AND APPLICATION OF IMPACT DAMPERS TO ROTORDYNAMIC VIBRATION SUPPRESSION IN A CRYOGENIC ENVIRONMENT A Thesis by JAMES JEFFREY MOORE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1993 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering A FORCED RESPONSE ANALYSIS AND APPLICATION OF IMPACT DAMPERS TO ROTORDYNAMIC VIBRATION SUPPRESSION IN A CRYOGENIC ENVIRONMENT A Thesis...

Moore, James Jeffrey

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Solar/gas systems impact analysis study. Final report, September 1982-July 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impacts of solar/gas technologies on gas consumers and on gas utilities was measured separately and compared against the impacts of competing gas and electric systems in four climatic regions of the U.S. A methodology was developed for measuring the benefits or penalties of solar/gas systems on a combined basis for consumers and distribution companies. The authors analysis shows that the combined benefits associated with solar/gas systems are generally greatest when the systems are purchased by customers who would have otherwise chosen high-efficiency electric systems (were solar/gas systems not available in the market place). The role of gas utilities in encouraging consumer acceptance of solar/gas systems was also examined in a qualitative fashion. The authors then developed a decision framework for analyzing the type and level of utility involvement in solar/gas technologies.

Hahn, E.F.; Preble, B.; Neill, C.P.; Loose, J.C.; Poe, T.E.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

MIDAS: Software for the detection and analysis of lunar impact flashes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since 2009 we are running a project to identify flashes produced by the impact of meteoroids on the surface of the Moon. For this purpose we are employing small telescopes and high-sensitivity CCD video cameras. To automatically identify these events a software package called MIDAS was developed and tested. This package can also perform the photometric analysis of these flashes and estimate the value of the luminous efficiency. Besides, we have implemented in MIDAS a new method to establish which is the likely source of the meteoroids (known meteoroid stream or sporadic background). The main features of this computer program are analyzed here, and some examples of lunar impact events are presented.

Madiedo, José M; Morales, Nicolás; Cabrera-Cańo, Jesús

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Supplement Analysis for the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 2002, DOE issued the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS) (DOE 2002) that provided an analysis of the potential environmental consequences of alternatives/options for the management and disposition of Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW), High-Level Waste (HL W) calcine, and HLW facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), now known as the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and referred to hereafter as the Idaho Site. Subsequent to the issuance of the Final EIS, DOE included the requirement for treatment of SBW in the Request for Proposals for Environmental Management activities on the Idaho Site. The new Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) Contractor identified Steam Reforming as their proposed method to treat SBW; a method analyzed in the Final EIS as an option to treat SBW. The proposed Steam Reforming process for SBW is the same as in the Final EIS for retrieval, treatment process, waste form and transportation for disposal. In addition, DOE has updated the characterization data for both the HLW Calcine (BBWI 2005a) and SBW (BBWI 2004 and BBWI 2005b) and identified two areas where new calculation methods are being used to determine health and safety impacts. Because of those changes, DOE has prepared this supplement analysis to determine whether there are ''substantial changes in the proposed action that are relevant to environmental concerns'' or ''significant new circumstances or information'' within the meaning of the Council of Environmental Quality and DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Regulations (40 CFR 1502.9 (c) and 10 CFR 1021.314) that would require preparation of a Supplemental EIS. Specifically, this analysis is intended to determine if: (1) the Steam Reforming Option identified in the Final EIS adequately bounds impacts from the Steam Reforming Process proposed by the new ICP Contractor using the new characterization data, (2) the new characterization data is significantly different than the data presented in the Final EIS, (3) the new calculation methods present a significant change to the impacts described in the Final EIS, and (4) would the updated characterization data cause significant changes in the environmental impacts for the action alternatives/options presented in the Final EIS. There are no other aspects of the Final EIS that require additional review because DOE has not identified any additional new significant circumstances or information that would warrant such a review.

N /A

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

136

Impact of hadronic and nuclear corrections on global analysis of spin-dependent parton distributions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the first results of a new global next-to-leading order analysis of spin-dependent parton distribution functions from the most recent world data on inclusive polarized deep-inelastic scattering, focusing in particular on the large-x and low-Q^2 regions. By directly fitting polarization asymmetries we eliminate biases introduced by using polarized structure function data extracted under nonuniform assumptions for the unpolarized structure functions. For analysis of the large-x data we implement nuclear smearing corrections for deuterium and 3He nuclei, and systematically include target mass and higher twist corrections to the g_1 and g_2 structure functions at low Q^2. We also explore the effects of Q^2 and W^2 cuts in the data sets, and the potential impact of future data on the behavior of the spin-dependent parton distributions at large x.

Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Accardi, Alberto [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Melnitchouk, Wally [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Multi-Year Analysis of Renewable Energy Impacts in California: Results from the Renewable Portfolio Standards Integration Cost Analysis; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

California's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS, Senate Bill 1078) requires the state's investor-owned utilities to obtain 20% of their energy mix from renewable generation sources. To facilitate the imminent increase in the penetration of renewables, the California Energy Commission (CEC), in support of the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC), initiated a study of integration costs in the context of RPS implementation. This effort estimated the impact of renewable generation in the regulation and load-following time scales and calculated the capacity value of renewable energy sources using a reliability model. The analysis team, consisting of researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the California Wind Energy Collaborative (CWEC), performed the study in cooperation with the California Independent System Operator (CaISO), the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), and Southern California Edison (SCE). The study was conducted over three phases and was followed by an analysis of a multi-year period. This paper presents results from the multi-year analysis and the Phase III recommendations.

Milligan, M.; Shiu, H.; Kirby, B.; Jackson, K.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Analysis of potential combustion source impacts on acid deposition using an independently derived inventory. Volume I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project had three major objectives. The first objective was to develop a fossil fuel combustion source inventory (NO/sub x/, SO/sub x/, and hydrocarbon emissions) that would be relatively easy to use and update for analyzing the impact of combustion emissions on acid deposition in the eastern United States. The second objective of the project was to use the inventory data as a basis for selection of a number of areas that, by virtue of their importance in the acid rain issue, could be further studied to assess the impact of local and intraregional combustion sources. The third objective was to conduct an analysis of wet deposition monitoring data in the areas under study, along with pertinent physical characteristics, meteorological conditions, and emission patterns of these areas, to investigate probable relationships between local and intraregional combustion sources and the deposition of acidic material. The combustion source emissions inventory has been developed for the eastern United States. It characterizes all important area sources and point sources on a county-by-county basis. Its design provides flexibility and simplicity and makes it uniquely useful in overall analysis of emission patterns in the eastern United States. Three regions with basically different emission patterns have been identified and characterized. The statistical analysis of wet deposition monitoring data in conjunction with emission patterns, wind direction, and topography has produced consistent results for each study area and has demonstrated that the wet deposition in each area reflects the characteristics of the localized area around the monitoring sites (typically 50 to 150 miles). 8 references, 28 figures, 39 tables.

Not Available

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Regulatory Models and the Environment: Practice, Pitfalls, and Prospects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computational models support environmental regulatory activities by providing the regulator an ability to evaluate available knowledge, assess alternative regulations, and provide a framework to assess compliance. But all models face inherent uncertainties, because human and natural systems are always more complex and heterogeneous than can be captured in a model. Here we provide a summary discussion of the activities, findings, and recommendations of the National Research Council's Committee on Regulatory Environmental Models, a committee funded by the US Environmental Protection Agency to provide guidance on the use of computational models in the regulatory process. Modeling is a difficult enterprise even outside of the potentially adversarial regulatory environment. The demands grow when the regulatory requirements for accountability, transparency, public accessibility, and technical rigor are added to the challenges. Moreover, models cannot be validated (declared true) but instead should be evaluated with regard to their suitability as tools to address a specific question. The committee concluded that these characteristics make evaluation of a regulatory model more complex than simply comparing measurement data with model results. Evaluation also must balance the need for a model to be accurate with the need for a model to be reproducible, transparent, and useful for the regulatory decision at hand. Meeting these needs requires model evaluation to be applied over the"life cycle" of a regulatory model with an approach that includes different forms of peer review, uncertainty analysis, and extrapolation methods than for non-regulatory models.

Holmes, K. John; Graham, Judith A.; McKone, Thomas; Whipple, Chris

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

alters fyn regulatory: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

human genome where many TFsRegulatory Analysis for Exploring Human Disease Progression Dustin T. Holloway1 , Mark Kon2 have been built and tested for 153 human TFs. These...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume 3, Appendix A: Public response to revised NOI, Appendix B: Environmental restoration, Appendix C, Environmental impact analysis methods, Appendix D, Risk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume three contains appendices for the following: Public comments do DOE`s proposed revisions to the scope of the waste management programmatic environmental impact statement; Environmental restoration sensitivity analysis; Environmental impacts analysis methods; and Waste management facility human health risk estimates.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Final report for confinement vessel analysis. Task 2, Safety vessel impact analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes two sets of finite element analyses performed under Task 2 of the Confinement Vessel Analysis Program. In each set of analyses, a charge is assumed to have detonated inside the confinement vessel, causing the confinement vessel to fail in either of two ways; locally around the weld line of a nozzle, or catastrophically into two hemispheres. High pressure gases from the internal detonation pressurize the inside of the safety vessel and accelerate the fractured nozzle or hemisphere into the safety vessel. The first set of analyses examines the structural integrity of the safety vessel when impacted by the fractured nozzle. The objective of these calculations is to determine if the high strength bolt heads attached to the nozzle penetrate or fracture the lower strength safety vessel, thus allowing gaseous detonation products to escape to the atmosphere. The two dimensional analyses predict partial penetration of the safety vessel beneath the tip of the penetrator. The analyses also predict maximum principal strains in the safety vessel which exceed the measured ultimate strain of steel. The second set of analyses examines the containment capability of the safety vessel closure when impacted by half a confinement vessel (hemisphere). The predicted response is the formation of a 0.6-inch gap, caused by relative sliding and separation between the two halves of the safety vessel. Additional analyses with closure designs that prevent the gap formation are recommended.

Murray, Y.D. [APTEK, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States)

1994-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

143

Overview of crash and impact analysis at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work provides a brief overview of past and ongoing efforts at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the area of finite-element modeling of crash and impact problems. The process has been one of evolution in several respects. One aspect of the evolution has been the continual upgrading and refinement of the DYNA, NIKE, and TOPAZ family of finite-element codes. The major missions of these codes involve problems where the dominant factors are high-rate dynamics, quasi-statics, and heat transfer, respectively. However, analysis of a total event, whether it be a shipping container drop or an automobile/barrier collision, may require use or coupling or two or more of these codes. Along with refinements in speed, contact capability, and element technology, material model complexity continues to evolve as more detail is demanded from the analyses. A more recent evolution has involved the mix of problems addressed at LLNL and the direction of the technology thrusts. A pronounced increase in collaborative efforts with the civilian and private sector has resulted in a mix of complex problems involving synergism between weapons applications (shipping container, earth penetrator, missile carrier, ship hull damage) and a more broad base of problems such as vehicle impacts as discussed herein.

Logan, R.W.; Tokarz, F.J.

1993-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

144

Regulatory Considerations for Developing Generation Projects...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Generation Projects on Federal Lands Regulatory Considerations for Developing Generation Projects on Federal Lands Presentation covers regulatory considerations for developing...

145

Preliminary Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable Energy Projects Supported by the ..Section..1603 Treasury Grant Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis responds to a request from the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the direct and indirect jobs and economic impacts of projects supported by the Section 1603 Treasury grant program. The analysis employs the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models to estimate the gross jobs, earnings, and economic output supported by the construction and operation of the large wind (greater than 1 MW) and solar photovoltaic (PV) projects funded by the Section 1603 grant program.

Steinberg, D.; Porro, G.; Goldberg, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Houston Low Impact Development Competition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LID without Regs Moving an entrenched engineering community to sustainability without regulatory drivers American Institute of Architects HOUSTON CHAPTER American Society of Civil Engineers HOUSTON CHAPTER American Society of Landscape... the alternative Common Understanding HLWSF Objectives Explore the adaptation & implementation of sustainable development practices. LOW IMPACT DEVELOPMENT (LID) a.k.a., GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE (Can these practices be implemented without a regulatory driver...

Adair, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Results for the Independent Sampling and Analysis of Used Oil Drums at the Impact Services Facility in Oak Ridge, TN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), via the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, perform independent sampling and analysis of used oils contained within eight 55 gallon drums stored at the former IMPACT Services facility, located at the East Tennessee Technology Park in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These drums were originally delivered by LATA Sharp Remediation Services (LSRS) to IMPACT Services on January 11, 2011 as part of the Bldg. K-33 demolition project, and the drums plus contents should have been processed as non-hazardous non-radiological waste by IMPACT Services. LSRS received a certificate of destruction on August 29, 2012 (LSRS 2012a). However, IMPACT Services declared bankruptcy and abandoned the site later in 2012, and eight of the original eleven K-33 drums are currently stored at the facility. The content of these drums is the subject of this investigation. The original drum contents were sampled by LSRS in 2010 and analyzed for gross alpha, gross beta, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), using both compositing and grab sampling techniques. The objective of this 2013 sample and analysis effort was to duplicate, to the extent possible, the 2010 sampling and analysis event to support final disposition decisions. Part of that decision process includes either verifying or refuting the assertion that oils that are currently stored in drums at the IMPACT Services facility originated from Bldg. K-33 equipment.

none,

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

148

Dustbuster: a compact impact-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer for in situ analysis of cosmic dust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a large target area with a reflectron, simultaneously optimizing mass resolution, particle detection. The resulting ions, with broad energy and angular distributions, are accelerated through a modified reflectron remote sensing, collection and analysis of dust grains that have survived impact on the Earth, capture

Stewart, Sarah T.

149

Analysis of the Impact of SR-ARQ on the IP Packet Delay Performance in Mobile Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of the Impact of SR-ARQ on the IP Packet Delay Performance in Mobile Data Networks By in wired enviroment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 3.2.2 TCP in the wireless environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 3.3.1 Scheduling algorithms for wired (error free) enviroment . . 50 3.3.2 Scheduling algorithms

Murphy, John

150

How Beneficial is Tourism? An Analysis of the Economic Impact of Tourism in Il N'gwesi, Kenya  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How Beneficial is Tourism? An Analysis of the Economic Impact of Tourism in Il N'gwesi, Kenya of tourism in Il N'gwesi, Kenya. Il N'gwesi is a Maasai group ranch located near Mt. Kenya which is primarily

151

Perched-Water Analysis Related to Deep Vadose Zone Contaminant Transport and Impact to Groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perched-water conditions have been observed in the vadose zone above a fine-grained zone that is located just a few meters above the water table beneath the B-complex at the Hanford Site. The perched water, containing elevated concentrations of uranium and technetium-99, is important to consider in evaluating the future flux of contaminated water into the groundwater. A study was conducted to examine the perched-water conditions and quantitatively evaluate 1) factors that control perching behavior, 2) contaminant flux toward groundwater, and, 3) associated groundwater impact. Based on the current vertical transport pathways and large areal extent of the perched system, the evaluation was conducted using a one-dimensional (1-D) analysis. Steady-state scoping calculations showed that the perching-layer hydraulic conductivity is likely to be up to two orders of magnitude less than the base case value obtained from Hanford site literature. Numerical flow and transport simulations provided both steady-state and transient system estimates of water and contaminant behavior and were used to further refine the range of conditions consistent with current observations of perched water height and to provide estimates of future water and contaminant flux to groundwater. With a recharge rate of 6 cm/yr, representative of current disturbed surface conditions, contaminant flux from the perched water occurs over a time interval of tens of years. However, if the recharge rate is 0.35 cm/yr, representative of returning recharge to pre-Hanford Site levels, the contaminant flux into the groundwater is spread over hundreds of years. It was also demonstrated that removal of perched water by pumping would reduce the flux of water (and associated contaminants) to the groundwater, thereby impacting the long-term rate of contaminant movement to the groundwater.

Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Carroll, KC; Chronister, Glen B.

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Computable General Equilibrium Models for Eco-nomic Policy Evaluation and Impact Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the assessment of the economic impacts of policies ranging from tax reforms to the mitigation and adaptation

Wing, Ian Sue

153

ELEMENTAL ANALYSIS OF IMPACT RESIDUES IN CRATERS ON THE STARDUST INTERSTELLAR FOILS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ondary impacts from interplanetary dust particles that impacted the solar panels, or direct impact. Leroux, L. R. Nittler, R. C. Ogliore, W. J. Ong, F. Postberg, M. C. Price, S. A. Sandford, J. A. Sans. Solar cell cover glass is primarily silica, but contains wt. % levels of Ce and Zn, which can be used

154

Impacted material placement plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Impacted material placement plans (IMPP) are documents identifying the essential elements in placing remediation wastes into disposal facilities. Remediation wastes or impacted material(s) are those components used in the construction of the disposal facility exclusive of the liners and caps. The components might include soils, concrete, rubble, debris, and other regulatory approved materials. The IMPP provides the details necessary for interested parties to understand the management and construction practices at the disposal facility. The IMPP should identify the regulatory requirements from applicable DOE Orders, the ROD(s) (where a part of a CERCLA remedy), closure plans, or any other relevant agreements or regulations. Also, how the impacted material will be tracked should be described. Finally, detailed descriptions of what will be placed and how it will be placed should be included. The placement of impacted material into approved on-site disposal facilities (OSDF) is an integral part of gaining regulatory approval. To obtain this approval, a detailed plan (Impacted Material Placement Plan [IMPP]) was developed for the Fernald OSDF. The IMPP provides detailed information for the DOE, site generators, the stakeholders, regulatory community, and the construction subcontractor placing various types of impacted material within the disposal facility.

Hickey, M.J.

1997-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

155

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long economic lifetime and development lead-time of many electric infrastructure investments requires that utility resource planning consider potential costs and risks over a lengthy time horizon. One long-term -- and potentially far-reaching -- risk currently facing the electricity industry is the uncertain cost of future carbon dioxide (CO2) regulations. Recognizing the importance of this issue, many utilities (sometimes spurred by state regulatory requirements) are beginning to actively assess carbon regulatory risk within their resource planning processes, and to evaluate options for mitigating that risk. However, given the relatively recent emergence of this issue and the rapidly changing political landscape, methods and assumptions used to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of this analysis on the selection of a preferred resource portfolio, vary considerably across utilities. In this study, we examine the treatment of carbon regulatory risk in utility resource planning, through a comparison of the most-recent resource plans filed by fifteen investor-owned and publicly-owned utilities in the Western U.S. Together, these utilities account for approximately 60percent of retail electricity sales in the West, and cover nine of eleven Western states. This report has two related elements. First, we compare and assess utilities' approaches to addressing key analytical issues that arise when considering the risk of future carbon regulations. Second, we summarize the composition and carbon intensity of the preferred resource portfolios selected by these fifteen utilities and compare them to potential CO2 emission benchmark levels.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge against Carbon Regulatory Risks: Current Resource Planning Practices in the West  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainty surrounding the nature and timing of future carbon regulations poses a fundamental and far-reaching financial risk for electric utilities and their ratepayers. Long-term resource planning provides a potential framework within which utilities can assess carbon regulatory risk and evaluate options for mitigating exposure to this risk through investments in energy efficiency and other low-carbon resources. In this paper, we examine current resource planning practices related to managing carbon regulatory risk, based on a comparative analysis of the most-recent long-term resource plans filed by fifteen major utilities in the Western U.S. First, we compare the assumptions and methods used by utilities to assess carbon regulatory risk and to evaluate energy efficiency as a risk mitigation option. Although most utilities have made important strides in beginning to address carbon regulatory risk within their resource plan, we also identify a number of opportunities for improvement and offer recommendations for resource planners and state regulators to consider. We also summarize the composition and carbon intensity of the preferred resource portfolios selected by the fifteen Western utilities, highlighting the contribution of energy efficiency and its impact on the carbon intensity of utilities' proposed resource strategies. Energy efficiency and renewables are the dominant low-carbon resources included in utilities' preferred portfolios. Across the fifteen utilities, energy efficiency constitutes anywhere from 6percent to almost 50percent of the preferred portfolio energy resources, and represents 22percent of all incremental resources in aggregate.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

157

Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge against Carbon Regulatory Risks: Current Resource Planning Practices in the West  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainty surrounding the nature and timing of future carbon regulations poses a fundamental and far-reaching financial risk for electric utilities and their ratepayers. Long-term resource planning provides a potential framework within which utilities can assess carbon regulatory risk and evaluate options for mitigating exposure to this risk through investments in energy efficiency and other low-carbon resources. In this paper, we examine current resource planning practices related to managing carbon regulatory risk, based on a comparative analysis of the most-recent long-term resource plans filed by fifteen major utilities in the Western U.S. First, we compare the assumptions and methods used by utilities to assess carbon regulatory risk and to evaluate energy efficiency as a risk mitigation option. Although most utilities have made important strides in beginning to address carbon regulatory risk within their resource plan, we also identify a number of opportunities for improvement and offer recommendations for resource planners and state regulators to consider. We also summarize the composition and carbon intensity of the preferred resource portfolios selected by the fifteen Western utilities, highlighting the contribution of energy efficiency and its impact on the carbon intensity of utilities' proposed resource strategies. Energy efficiency and renewables are the dominant low-carbon resources included in utilities' preferred portfolios. Across the fifteen utilities, energy efficiency constitutes anywhere from 6percent to almost 50percent of the preferred portfolio energy resources, and represents 22percent of all incremental resources in aggregate.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Molasses for ethanol: the economic and environmental impacts of a new pathway for the lifecycle greenhouse gas analysis of sugarcane ethanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molasses for ethanol: the economic and environmental impacts of a new pathway for the lifecycle greenhouse gas analysis of sugarcane ethanol This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll for ethanol: the economic and environmental impacts of a new pathway for the lifecycle greenhouse gas analysis

Kammen, Daniel M.

159

Natural Gas: Major Legislative and Regulatory Actions (1935 - 2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This special report Web-based product presents a chronology of some of the key federal legislative and regulatory actions that have helped shape the natural gas market, with particular emphasis on policy directives from 1978 to October 2008. Separate reports provide brief descriptions of specific legislation, regulations, or policies, and their impacts on the natural gas market.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

rail regulatory matrix  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

49 CFR 221 4 4 Carrier 49 CFR 221-Minimum requirements for rear-end marking devices on trains. 49 CFR 223 Carrier 49 CFR 223-Minimum Federal safety standards for impact resistance...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Seattle Regulatory Pathways to Net Zero Water Phase 1 status RePoRt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that re- quire low impact development techniques, provides permitting guidance for rainwater harvesting-site water collection, use, reuse, storage, on-site treatment and release, and identify regulatory authority

162

Ex post analysis of economic impacts from wind power development in U.S. counties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1. Location of Wind Power Development in the UnitedFigure 4: Total Installed Wind Power Capacity (MW): 2000 -development impacts of wind power installations. References

Brown, Jason P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Lifecycle Analysis of Air Quality Impacts of Hydrogen and Gasoline Transportation Fuel Pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hydrogen, methanol and gasoline as fuels for fuel cellon Environmental Quality (TCEQ). Gasoline Vapor Recovery (Quality Impacts of Hydrogen and Gasoline Transportation Fuel

Wang, Guihua

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) engaged in numerous projects outlined under the scope of work discussed in the United States Department of Energy (DOE) grant number DE-FC26-04NT15456 awarded to the IOGCC. Numerous projects were completed that were extremely valuable to state oil and gas agencies as a result of work performed utilizing resources provided by the grant. There are numerous areas in which state agencies still need assistance. This additional assistance will need to be addressed under future scopes of work submitted annually to DOE's Project Officer for this grant. This report discusses the progress of the projects outlined under the grant scope of work for the 2005-2006 areas of interest, which are as follows: Area of Interest No. 1--Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement: This area of interest continues to support IOGCC's regulatory streamlining efforts that include the identification and elimination of unnecessary duplications of efforts between and among state and federal programs dealing with exploration and production on public lands. Area of Interest No. 2--Technology: This area of interest seeks to improve efficiency in states through the identification of technologies that can reduce costs. Area of Interest No. 3--Training and Education: This area of interest is vital to upgrading the skills of regulators and industry alike. Within the National Energy Policy, there are many appropriate training and education opportunities. Education was strongly endorsed by the President's National Energy Policy Development group. Acting through the governors offices, states are very effective conduits for the dissemination of energy education information. While the IOGCC favors the development of a comprehensive, long-term energy education plan, states are also supportive of immediate action on important concerns, such as energy prices, availability and conservation. Area of Interest No. 4--Resource Assessment and Development: This area of interest relates directly to helping maximize production of domestic oil and natural gas resources, including areas that are under explored or have not been adequately defined.

Mark A. Carl

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

165

EIS-0498: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Magnolia Liquefied Natural Gas Project, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission...

166

Papers on the nuclear regulatory dilemma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The four papers contained in this report are titled: (1) From Prescriptive to Performance-Based Regulation of Nuclear Power; (2) Nuclear Regulatory Reform: A Technology-Forcing Approach; (3) Improving the Regulation of Nuclear Power; and (4) Science and Its Limits: The Regulators' Dilemma. These four papers investigate issues relating to the long-term regulation of nuclear energy. They were prepared as part of the Institute for Energy Analysis' project on Nuclear Regulation funded by a grant from the Mellon Foundation and a smaller grant by the MacArthur Foundation. Originally this work was to be supplemented by contributions from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and from the Department of Energy. These contributions were not forthcoming, and as a result the scope of our investigations was more restricted than we had originally planned.

Barkenbus, J.N.; Freeman, S.D.; Weinberg, A.M.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

/, _(_ ,. 2:1 SIMS CHEMICAL AND ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS OF IMPACT FEATURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impacts based on the chemical composition of projectile residues. The same measurement technique has now the origins of projectiles that left deposits too thin to be analyzed by conventional energy-dispersive x of impact deposits on a variety of sample surfaces. SIMS was also used to determine the isotopic

168

Social Impact Management Plans: Innovation in corporate and public policy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Social Impact Assessment (SIA) has traditionally been practiced as a predictive study for the regulatory approval of major projects, however, in recent years the drivers and domain of focus for SIA have shifted. This paper details the emergence of Social Impact Management Plans (SIMPs) and undertakes an analysis of innovations in corporate and public policy that have put in place ongoing processes – assessment, management and monitoring – to better identify the nature and scope of the social impacts that might occur during implementation and to proactively respond to change across the lifecycle of developments. Four leading practice examples are analyzed. The International Finance Corporation (IFC) Performance Standards require the preparation of Environmental and Social Management Plans for all projects financed by the IFC identified as having significant environmental and social risks. Anglo American, a major resources company, has introduced a Socio-Economic Assessment Toolbox, which requires mine sites to undertake regular assessments and link these assessments with their internal management systems, monitoring activities and a Social Management Plan. In South Africa, Social and Labour Plans are submitted with an application for a mining or production right. In Queensland, Australia, Social Impact Management Plans were developed as part of an Environmental Impact Statement, which included assessment of social impacts. Collectively these initiatives, and others, are a practical realization of theoretical conceptions of SIA that include management and monitoring as core components of SIA. The paper concludes with an analysis of the implications for the practice of impact assessment including a summary of key criteria for the design and implementation of effective SIMPs. -- Highlights: • Social impact management plans are effective strategies to manage social issues. • They are developed in partnership with regulatory agencies, investors and community. • SIMPs link assessment to ongoing management and address social and community issues. • SIMPs clarify responsibilities in the management of impacts, opportunities and risks. • SIMPs demonstrate a shift to include management as a core component of SIA practice.

Franks, Daniel M., E-mail: d.franks@uq.edu.au [Centre for Social Responsibility in Mining, The University of Queensland, Sustainable Minerals Institute, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Vanclay, Frank, E-mail: frank.vanclay@rug.nl [Department of Cultural Geography, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, The University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Cultural Geography, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, The University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Distributed Generation Projects Webinar May 23, 2012 Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects Webinar May 23, 2012 Document covers the Regulatory...

170

SELECTION OF MODAL BEA REGIONS FOR URBAN AND COMMUNITY IMPACT ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a gain of nearly coal and oil shale development in areas ofof data on Oil reserves. shale plays oil shale an importantus to examine the impacts of oil shale development on two

Ruderman, Henry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development in U.S. Counties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use requirements of modern wind power plants in the United2002. Economic impacts of wind power in Kittitas County:Renewable energy: Wind power’s contribution to electric

Brown, Jason P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Regulating School Reforms: An Analysis of the Impact of Religious Interests on State Education Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project analyzes the role of religious populations on the restrictiveness of state education policies, and looks into the impact of evangelical Protestants, Catholics, and members of the Church of Jesus Christ of ...

Vieux, Andrea Rieke

2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

Climate Change Impacts on Extreme Events in the United States: An Uncertainty Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extreme weather and climate events, such as heat waves, droughts and severe precipitation events, have substantial impacts on ecosystems and the economy. However, future climate simulations display large uncertainty in ...

Monier, Erwan

174

The climate impacts of high-speed rail and air transportation : a global comparative analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growing concerns about the energy use and climate impacts of the transportation sector have prompted policymakers to consider a variety of options to meet the future mobility needs of the world's population, while ...

Clewlow, Regina Ruby Lee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Analysis Reveals Impact of Road Grade on Vehicle Energy Use (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Findings of study indicate that, on average, road grade could be responsible for 1%-3% of fuel use in light-duty automobiles, with many individual trips impacted by as much as 40%.

Not Available

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

A decadal satellite analysis of the origins and impacts of smoke in Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the record of aerosol optical depth (AOD) measured by the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra satellite in combination with surface PM[subscript 2.5] to investigate the impact ...

Val Martin, M.

177

An analysis of the impact of having uranium dioxide mixed in with plutonium dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment was performed to show the impact on airborne release fraction, respirable fraction, dose conversion factor and dose consequences of postulated accidents at the Plutonium Finishing Plant involving uranium dioxide rather than plutonium dioxide.

MARUSICH, R.M.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

178

SELECTION OF MODAL BEA REGIONS FOR URBAN AND COMMUNITY IMPACT ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil reserves. shale plays oil shale an important role in theus to examine the impacts of oil shale development on twoThere are also extensive oil shale Nebraska, are major grain

Ruderman, Henry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Environmental Analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is volume 1 of the final environmental impact statement of the Bonneville Power Administration Information is included on the following: Purpose of and need for action; alternatives including the proposed action; affected environment; and environmental consequences.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With wind energy expanding rapidly in the U.S. and abroad, and with an increasing number of communities considering wind power development nearby, there is an urgent need to empirically investigate common community concerns about wind project development. The concern that property values will be adversely affected by wind energy facilities is commonly put forth by stakeholders. Although this concern is not unreasonable, given property value impacts that have been found near high voltage transmission lines and other electric generation facilities, the impacts of wind energy facilities on residential property values had not previously been investigated thoroughly. The present research collected data on almost 7,500 sales of singlefamily homes situated within 10 miles of 24 existing wind facilities in nine different U.S. states. The conclusions of the study are drawn from eight different hedonic pricing models, as well as both repeat sales and sales volume models. The various analyses are strongly consistent in that none of the models uncovers conclusive evidence of the existence of any widespread property value impacts that might be present in communities surrounding wind energy facilities. Specifically, neither the view of the wind facilities nor the distance of the home to those facilities is found to have any consistent, measurable, and statistically significant effect on home sales prices. Although the analysis cannot dismiss the possibility that individual homes or small numbers of homes have been or could be negatively impacted, it finds that if these impacts do exist, they are either too small and/or too infrequent to result in any widespread, statistically observable impact.

Hoen, Ben; Wiser, Ryan; Cappers, Peter; Thayer, Mark; Sethi, Gautam

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such concern is the potential impact of wind energy projectshas investigated the potential impact of wind projects onassessment of the potential impact of wind facilities on the

Hoen, Ben

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Regulatory facility guide for Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Regulatory Facility Guide (RFG) has been developed for the DOE and contractor facilities located in the state of Ohio. It provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation-related regulations applicable to shipments originating at destined to Ohio facilities. This RFG was developed as an additional resource tool for use both by traffic managers who must ensure that transportation operations are in full compliance with all applicable regulatory requirements and by oversight personnel who must verify compliance activities.

Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.; Gove, R.M.; Johnson, P.E.; Kovac, F.M.; Mynatt, J.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rymer, A.C. [Transportation Consulting Services, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

183

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards:A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. Collectively, these policies now apply to roughly 40% of U.S. electricity load, and may have substantial impacts on electricity markets, ratepayers, and local economies. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on projecting cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic and environmental effects. This report synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 28 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 18 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the costs and benefits of RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, assess the attributes of different modeling approaches, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analysis.

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

184

Analysis of the Impact of Balancing Area Cooperation on the Operation of the Western Interconnection with Wind and Solar Generation (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation describes the analysis of the impact of balancing area cooperation on the operation of the Western Interconnection with wind and solar generation, including a discussion of operating reserves, ramping, production simulation, and conclusions.

Milligan, M.; Lew, D.; Jordan, G.; Piwko, R.; Kirby, B.; King, J.; Beuning, S.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Environment and energy in Iceland: A comparative analysis of values and impacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within an Icelandic framework plan for energy, environmental values and impacts were estimated in multicriteria analyses for 19 hydroelectric and 22 geothermal developments. Four natural environment classes were defined (geology + hydrology, species, ecosystems + soils, landscape + wilderness) with cultural heritage as the fifth class. Values and impacts were assessed through 6 agglomerated attributes: richness/diversity, rarity, size/continuity/pristineness, information/symbolic value, international responsibility and visual value. The project offers a unique opportunity for comparing environmental values and impacts within a large sample of sites and energy alternatives treated within a common methodological framework. Total values were higher in hydroelectric than in geothermal areas. Hydroelectric areas scored high for cultural heritage (particularly in rarity and information value), landscape and wilderness. Geothermal areas had high bedrock and hydrological diversity and information values, and a high landscape visual value but little cultural heritage. High values were correlated among some classes of the natural environment, all of which are likely to reflect functional relationships. In contrast, cultural heritage values were not related to natural environment values. Overall, landscape and wilderness had the highest mean value and were also most affected by energy development. Over 40% of the hydroelectric development had a predicted mean impact value of > 4 (out of a maximum of 10), compared with 10% of the geothermal projects. Excluding two outsized hydropower options, there was a significant correlation between plant capacity and impact on geology and hydrology but not with other environmental variables.

Thorhallsdottir, Thora Ellen [Institute of Biology (Iceland)]. E-mail: theth@hi.is

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

An Evaluation of Impacts in "Nanoscience & nanotechnology:" Steps towards standards for citation analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One is inclined to conceptualize impact in terms of citations per publication, and thus as an average. However, citation distributions are skewed, and the average has the disadvantage that the number of publications is used in the denominator. Using hundred percentiles, one can integrate the normalized citation curve and develop an indicator that can be compared across document sets because percentile ranks are defined at the article level. I apply this indicator to the set of 58 journals in the ISI Subject Category of "Nanoscience & nanotechnology," and rank journals, countries, cities, and institutes using non-parametric statistics. The significance levels of results can thus be indicated. The results are first compared with the ISI-Impact Factors, but this Integrated Impact Indicator (I3) can be used with any set downloaded from the (Social) Science Citation Index. The software is made publicly available at the Internet. Visualization techniques are also specified for evaluation by positioning institut...

Leydesdorff, Loet

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Analysis: Economic Impacts of Wind Applications in Rural Communities; June 18, 2004 -- January 31, 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to compile completed studies on the economic impact of wind farms in rural communities and then to compare these studies. By summarizing the studies in an Excel spreadsheet, the raw data from a study is easily compared with the data from other studies. In this way, graphs can be made and conclusions drawn. Additionally, the creation of a database in which economic impact studies are summarized allows a greater understanding of the type of information gathered in an economic impact study, the type of information that is most helpful in using these studies to promote wind energy development in rural communities, and the limitations on collecting data for these studies.

Pedden, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Regulatory Drivers | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST3 AÇORIANONewsRegulatory Analysis on

189

Regulatory Framework at LANL.pdf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST3 AÇORIANONewsRegulatory Analysis onEnvironmental

190

Numerical prediction of heat-flux to massive calorimeters engulfed in regulatory fires with the cask analysis fire environment (CAFE) model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent observations show that the thermal boundary conditions within large-scale fires are significantly affected by the presence of thermally massive objects. These objects cool the soot and gas near their surfaces, and these effects reduce the incoming radiant heat-flux to values lower than the levels expected from simple {sigma}T{sub fire}{sup 4} models. They also affect the flow and temperature fields in the fire far from their surfaces. The Cask Analysis Fire Environment (CAFE) code has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to provide an enhanced fire boundary condition for the design of radioactive material packages. CAFE is a set of computer subroutines that use computational fluid mechanics methods to predict convective heat transfer and mixing. It also includes models for fuel and oxygen transport, chemical reaction, and participating-media radiation heat transfer. This code uses two-dimensional computational models so that it has reasonably short turnaround times on standard workstations and is well suited for design and risk studies. In this paper, CAFE is coupled with a commercial finite-element program to model a large cylindrical calorimeter fully engulfed in a pool fire. The time-dependent heat-flux to the calorimeter and the calorimeter surface temperature are determined for several locations around the calorimeter circumference. The variation of heat-flux with location is determined for calorimeters with different diameters and wall thickness, and the observed effects discussed.

KOSKI,JORMAN A.; SUO-ANTITLA,AHTI; KRAMER,M. ALEX; GREINER,MILES

2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

191

Dissecting the regulatory microenvironment of a large animal model of non-Hodgkin lymphoma: evidence of a negative prognostic impact of FOXP3+ T cells in canine B cell lymphoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

–19, URL: http://www.petplantrust.org/. LJD is supported by a Wellcome Trust Veterinary Postdoctoral Fellowship (WT/096398/Z/11/Z). The funders had no role in the study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation...

Pinheiro, Dammy; Chang, Yu-Mei; Bryant, Hannah; Szladovits, Balazs; Dalessandri, Tim; Davison, Lucy J.; Yallop, Elizabeth; Mills, Emily; Leo, Chiara; Lara, Ana; Stell, Anneliese; Polton, Gerry; Garden, Oliver A.

2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

192

An analysis of the impacts of use-value assessment on agricultural and open space land  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for taxation at its value in agriculture production, rather than at its market value. The main purpose of this study was to identify the distribution of benefits under current use-value assessment polimes and analyze the impacts on tax incidence, as well...

Gorman, Tia Dawn

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Potential Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Reflections on the Perryman Group Analysis from Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Reflections on the Perryman Group The exploration and development of the Marcellus Shale natural gas play has significant potential to affect in the Barnett Shale region of north Texas. The Barnett Shale play is very similar in geology to the Marcellus

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

194

Characterizing the interplay betwen mulitple levels of organization within bacterial sigma factor regulatory networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bacteria contain multiple sigma factors, each targeting diverse, but often overlapping sets of promoters, thereby forming a complex network. The layout and deployment of such a sigma factor network directly impacts global transcriptional regulation and ultimately dictates the phenotype. Here we integrate multi-omic data sets to determine the topology, the operational, and functional states of the sigma factor network in Geobacter sulfurreducens, revealing a unique network topology of interacting sigma factors. Analysis of the operational state of the sigma factor network shows a highly modular structure with sN being the major regulator of energy metabolism. Surprisingly, the functional state of the network during the two most divergent growth conditions is nearly static, with sigma factor binding profiles almost invariant to environmental stimuli. This first comprehensive elucidation of the interplay between different levels of the sigma factor network organization is fundamental to characterize transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in bacteria.

Yu, Qiu [University of California, San Diego; Nagarajan, Harish [University of California, San Diego; Embree, Mallory [University of California, San Diego; Shieu, Wendy [University of California, San Diego; Abate, Elisa [University of California, San Diego; Juarez, Katy [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM); Cho, Byung-Kwan [University of California, San Diego; Elkins, James G [ORNL; Nevin, Kelly P. [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Barrett, Christian [University of California, San Diego; Lovley, Derek [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Palsson, Bernhard O. [University of California, San Diego; Zengler, Karsten [University of California, San Diego

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Analysis of Moon impact flashes detected during the 2012 and 2013 Perseids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of our Moon impact flashes detection campaigns performed around the maximum activity period of the Perseid meteor shower in 2012 and 2013. Just one flash produced by a Perseid meteoroid was detected in 2012 because of very unfavourable geometric conditions, but 12 of these were confirmed in 2013. The visual magnitude of the flashes ranged between 6.6 and 9.3. A luminous efficiency of 1.8 $\\times$ 10$^{-3}$ has been estimated for meteoroids from this stream. According to this value, impactor masses would range between 1.9 and 190 g. In addition, we propose a criterion to establish, from a statistical point of view, the likely origin of impact flashes recorded on the lunar surface.

Madiedo, José M; Organero, Faustino; Ana-Hernández, Leonor; Fonseca, Fernando; Morales, Nicolás; Cabrera-Cańo, Jesús

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Analysis of long-term impacts of TRU waste remaining at generator/storage sites for No Action Alternative 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a supplement to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal-Phase Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS-II). Described herein are the underlying information, data, and assumptions used to estimate the long-term human-health impacts from exposure to radionuclides and hazardous chemicals in transuranic (TRU) waste remaining at major generator/storage sites after loss of institutional control under No Action Alternative 2. Under No Action Alternative 2, TRU wastes would not be emplaced at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) but would remain at generator/storage sites in surface or near-surface storage. Waste generated at smaller sites would be consolidated at the major generator/storage sites. Current TRU waste management practices would continue, but newly generated waste would be treated to meet the WIPP waste acceptance criteria. For this alternative, institutional control was assumed to be lost 100 years after the end of the waste generation period, with exposure to radionuclides and hazardous chemicals in the TRU waste possible from direct intrusion and release to the surrounding environment. The potential human-health impacts from exposure to radionuclides and hazardous chemicals in TRU waste were analyzed for two different types of scenarios. Both analyses estimated site-specific, human-health impacts at seven major generator/storage sites: the Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The analysis focused on these seven sites because 99 % of the estimated TRU waste volume and inventory would remain there under the assumptions of No Action Alternative 2.

Buck, J.W.; Bagaasen, L.M.; Bergeron, M.P.; Streile, G.P. [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Identification of lignin genes and regulatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Identification of lignin genes and regulatory sequences involved analysis revealed 18 lignin isoforms for each species. We also identified five contigs homologous to R2R3 wall formation and lignin deposition. We searched the contigs against public microRNA database

198

TITLE: Identification of Possible Interstellar Dust Impact Craters on Stardust Foil I033N,1 P43A. Extraterrestrial Dust: Laboratory Analysis of Mission-Returned Samples and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a particle that impacted the spacecraft's solar panels. TEM/EDS analysis determined the presence of solar on Stardust Foil I033N,1 SESSION TYPE: Poster; SESSION TITLE: P43A. Extraterrestrial Dust: Laboratory Analysis. Contamination was monitored according to the ISPE protocol: four 4 ”m ! 3 ”m areas of C layers of different

199

Implementation impacts of PRL methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report responds to a DOE-SR request to evaluate the impacts from implementation of the proposed Plutonium Recovery Limit (PRL) methodology. The PRL Methodology is based on cost minimization for decisions to discard or recover plutonium contained in scrap, residues, and other plutonium bearing materials. Implementation of the PRL methodology may result in decisions to declare as waste certain plutonium bearing materials originally considered to be a recoverable plutonium product. Such decisions may have regulatory impacts, because any material declared to be waste would immediately be subject to provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The decision to discard these materials will have impacts on waste storage, treatment, and disposal facilities. Current plans for the de-inventory of plutonium processing facilities have identified certain materials as candidates for discard based upon the economic considerations associated with extending the operating schedules for recovery of the contained plutonium versus potential waste disposal costs. This report evaluates the impacts of discarding those materials as proposed by the F Area De-Inventory Plan and compares the De-Inventory Plan assessments with conclusions from application of the PRL. The impact analysis was performed for those materials proposed as potential candidates for discard by the De-Inventory Plan. The De-Inventory Plan identified 433 items, containing approximately 1% of the current SRS Pu-239 inventory, as not appropriate for recovery as the site moves to complete the mission of F-Canyon and FB-Line. The materials were entered into storage awaiting recovery as product under the Department`s previous Economic Discard Limit (EDL) methodology which valued plutonium at its incremental cost of production in reactors. An application of Departmental PRLs to the subject 433 items revealed that approximately 40% of them would continue to be potentially recoverable as product plutonium.

Caudill, J.A.; Krupa, J.F.; Meadors, R.E.; Odum, J.V.; Rodrigues, G.C.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Low-rank coal study. Volume 4. Regulatory, environmental, and market analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The regulatory, environmental, and market constraints to development of US low-rank coal resources are analyzed. Government-imposed environmental and regulatory requirements are among the most important factors that determine the markets for low-rank coal and the technology used in the extraction, delivery, and utilization systems. Both state and federal controls are examined, in light of available data on impacts and effluents associated with major low-rank coal development efforts. The market analysis examines both the penetration of existing markets by low-rank coal and the evolution of potential markets in the future. The electric utility industry consumes about 99 percent of the total low-rank coal production. This use in utility boilers rose dramatically in the 1970's and is expected to continue to grow rapidly. In the late 1980's and 1990's, industrial direct use of low-rank coal and the production of synthetic fuels are expected to start growing as major new markets.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Comparative analysis of environmental impacts of maize-biogas and photovoltaics on a land use basis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study aims to stimulate the discussion on how to optimize a sustainable energy mix from an environmental perspective and how to apply existing renewable energy sources in the most efficient way. Ground-mounted photovoltaics (PV) and the maize-biogas-electricity route are compared with regard to their potential to mitigate environmental pressure, assuming that a given agricultural area is available for energy production. Existing life cycle assessment (LCA) studies are taken as a basis to analyse environmental impacts of those technologies in relation to conventional technology for power and heat generation. The life-cycle-wide mitigation potential per area used is calculated for the impact categories non-renewable energy input, green house gas (GHG) emissions, acidification and eutrophication. The environmental performance of each system depends on the scenario that is assumed for end energy use (electricity and heat supply have been contemplated). In all scenarios under consideration, PV turns out to be superior to biogas in almost all studied impact categories. Even when maize is used for electricity production in connection with very efficient heat usage, and reduced PV performance is assumed to account for intermittence, PV can still mitigate about four times the amount of green house gas emissions and non-renewable energy input compared to maize-biogas. Soil erosion, which can be entirely avoided with PV, exceeds soil renewal rates roughly 20-fold on maize fields. Regarding the overall Eco-indicator 99 (H) score under most favourable assumptions for the maize-biogas route, PV has still a more than 100% higher potential to mitigate environmental burden. At present, the key advantages of biogas are its price and its availability without intermittence. In the long run, and with respect to more efficient land use, biogas might preferably be produced from organic waste or manure, whereas PV should be integrated into buildings and infrastructures. (author)

Graebig, Markus; Fenner, Richard [Centre for Sustainable Development, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bringezu, Stefan [Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy. P.B. 100480, 42004 Wuppertal (Germany)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River estuary. Volume III. An analysis of the validity of the utilities' stock-recruitment curve-fitting exercise and prior estimation of beta technique. Environmental Sciences Division publication No. 1792  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the validity of the utilities' use of the Ricker stock-recruitment model to extrapolate the combined entrainment-impingement losses of young fish to reductions in the equilibrium population size of adult fish. In our testimony, a methodology was developed and applied to address a single fundamental question: if the Ricker model really did apply to the Hudson River striped bass population, could the utilities' estimates, based on curve-fitting, of the parameter alpha (which controls the impact) be considered reliable. In addition, an analysis is included of the efficacy of an alternative means of estimating alpha, termed the technique of prior estimation of beta (used by the utilities in a report prepared for regulatory hearings on the Cornwall Pumped Storage Project). This validation methodology should also be useful in evaluating inferences drawn in the literature from fits of stock-recruitment models to data obtained from other fish stocks.

Christensen, S. W.; Goodyear, C. P.; Kirk, B. L.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

SYNTHESES Does phylogeny matter? Assessing the impact of phylogenetic information in ecological meta-analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in ecological meta-analysis Scott A. Chamberlain,1 * Stephen M. Hovick,1 Christopher J. Dibble,1 Nick L, in these fields this technique has an important limitation: phylogenetic non-independence exists among taxa

Lajeunesse, Marc J.

204

State Regulatory Oversight of Geothermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State Regulatory Oversight of Geothermal Heat Pump Installations: 2012 Kevin McCray Executive of this project was to update previous research accomplished by the Geothermal Heat Pump Consortium (GHPC of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems. The work was to provide insight into existing and anticipated

205

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION OFFICE OF NUCLEAR MATERIAL SAFETY AND SAFEGUARDS ON RADIATION THERAPY OVEREXPOSURES IN PANAMA Addressees All medical licensees. Purpose The U.S. Nuclear times resulted in significant radiation overexposures to patients. The hospital staff did not perform

206

Regulatory cross-cutting topics for fuel cycle facilities.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report overviews crosscutting regulatory topics for nuclear fuel cycle facilities for use in the Fuel Cycle Research&Development Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation and Screening study. In particular, the regulatory infrastructure and analysis capability is assessed for the following topical areas:Fire Regulations (i.e., how applicable are current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and/or International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) fire regulations to advance fuel cycle facilities)Consequence Assessment (i.e., how applicable are current radionuclide transportation tools to support risk-informed regulations and Level 2 and/or 3 PRA) While not addressed in detail, the following regulatory topic is also discussed:Integrated Security, Safeguard and Safety Requirement (i.e., how applicable are current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations to future fuel cycle facilities which will likely be required to balance the sometimes conflicting Material Accountability, Security, and Safety requirements.)

Denman, Matthew R.; Brown, Jason; Goldmann, Andrew Scott; Louie, David

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Safety analysis report for packaging: the ORNL lithium hydroxide fire and impact shield  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ORNL Lithium Hydroxide Fire and Impact Shield and its packaging were designed and fabricated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to permit the transport of Type B quantities of radioactive material and limited quantities of fissionable material. The shield and its packaging were evaluated analytically and experimentally to determine its compliance with the applicable regulations governing containers in which radioactive and fissile materials are transported, and that evaluation is the subject of this report. Computational and test procedures were used to determine the structural integrity and thermal behavior of the shield relative to the general standards for normal conditions of transport and the standards for the hypothetical accident conditions. The results of the evaluation demonstrate that the shield and its packaging are in compliance with the applicable regulations. 16 references, 8 figures, 5 tables.

Evans, J.H.; Eversole, R.E.; Just, R.A.; Schaich, R.W.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Economic analysis: impact of CS/R process on benzene market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contract No. DE-AC01-78ET10159 (formerly ET-78-C-01-3117) between UOP/SDC and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) requires UOP/SDC to provide specific engineering and technical services to the DOE Office of Coal Processing in support of the Coal Gasification Program. This report covers an economic study on the projected price of benzene through the next decade based on the market factors and production costs. The impact of the CS/R process on the benzene market was evaluated. In addition, the cost of gas from the CS/R process was determined as a function of the byproduct credit for benzene.

Spielberger, L.; Klein, J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

An Analysis of the Impact of Sport Utility Vehicles in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It may be labeled sport utility vehicle, SUV, sport-ute, suburban assault vehicle, or a friend of OPEC (Organization for Petroleum Exporting Countries). It has been the subject of comics, the object of high-finance marketing ploys, and the theme of Dateline. Whatever the label or the occasion, this vehicle is in great demand. The popularity of sport utility vehicles (SUVs) has increased dramatically since the late 1970s, and SUVs are currently the fastest growing segment of the motor vehicle industry. Hoping to gain market share due to the popularity of the expanding SUV market, more and more manufacturers are adding SUVs to their vehicle lineup. One purpose of this study is to analyze the world of the SUV to determine why this vehicle has seen such a rapid increase in popularity. Another purpose is to examine the impact of SUVs on energy consumption, emissions, and highway safety.

Davis, S.C.; Truett, L.F.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning:Current Practices in the Western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. Assuch, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

211

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. As such, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

212

An Initial Analysis of the Impact of Overlap and Independent Progress for MPI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. #12 to determine how much of an effect they have on overall performance or to use them to characterize applications software and hardware environment used in this study, and Sec- tion 6 presents an analysis of the data

Brightwell, Ron

213

Value impact analysis of Generic Issue 143, Availability of Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning (HVAC) and Chilled Water Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates the values (benefits) and impacts (costs) associated with potential resolutions to Generic Issue 143, ``Availability of HVAC and Chilled Water Systems.`` The study identifies vulnerabilities related to failures of HVAC, chilled water, and room cooling systems; develops estimates of room heatup rates and safety-related equipment vulnerabilities following losses of HVAC/room cooler systems; develops estimates of the core damage frequencies and public risks associated with failures of these systems; develops three proposed resolution strategies to this generic issue; and performs a value/impact analysis of the proposed resolutions. Existing probabilistic risk assessments for four representative plants, including one plant from each vendor, form the basis for the core damage frequency and public risk calculations. Both internal and external events were considered. It was concluded that all three proposed resolution strategies exceed the $1,000/person-rem cost-effectiveness ratio. Additional evaluations were performed to develop ``generic`` insights on potential design-related and configuration-related vulnerabilities and potential high-frequency ({approximately}1E-04/RY) accident sequences that involve failures of HVAC/room cooling functions. It was concluded that, although high-frequency accident sequences may exist at some plants, these high-frequency sequences are plant-specific in nature or have been resolved through hardware and/or operational changes. The plant-specific Individual Plant Examinations are an effective vehicle for identification and resolution of these plant-specific anomalies and hardware configurations.

Daling, P.M.; Marler, J.E.; Vo, T.V.; Phan, H.; Friley, J.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Accident Conditions versus Regulatory Test for NRC-Approved UF6 Packages  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approves new package designs for shipping fissile quantities of UF{sub 6}. Currently there are three packages approved by the NRC for domestic shipments of fissile quantities of UF{sub 6}: NCI-21PF-1; UX-30; and ESP30X. For approval by the NRC, packages must be subjected to a sequence of physical tests to simulate transportation accident conditions as described in 10 CFR Part 71. The primary objective of this project was to relate the conditions experienced by these packages in the tests described in 10 CFR Part 71 to conditions potentially encountered in actual accidents and to estimate the probabilities of such accidents. Comparison of the effects of actual accident conditions to 10 CFR Part 71 tests was achieved by means of computer modeling of structural effects on the packages due to impacts with actual surfaces, and thermal effects resulting from test and other fire scenarios. In addition, the likelihood of encountering bodies of water or sufficient rainfall to cause complete or partial immersion during transport over representative truck routes was assessed. Modeled effects, and their associated probabilities, were combined with existing event-tree data, plus accident rates and other characteristics gathered from representative routes, to derive generalized probabilities of encountering accident conditions comparable to the 10 CFR Part 71 conditions. This analysis suggests that the regulatory conditions are unlikely to be exceeded in real accidents, i.e. the likelihood of UF{sub 6} being dispersed as a result of accident impact or fire is small. Moreover, given that an accident has occurred, exposure to water by fire-fighting, heavy rain or submersion in a body of water is even less probable by factors ranging from 0.5 to 8E-6.

MILLS, G. SCOTT; AMMERMAN, DOUGLAS J.; LOPEZ, CARLOS

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Identification and Characterization of Prokaryotic Regulatory Networks: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have completed our characterization of both the transcriptional regulatory network and post-transcriptional regulatory motifs in Shewanella.

Gary D Stormo

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

216

Fact Sheet: DOE/National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissione...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

DOENational Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners Natural Gas Infrastructure Modernization Partnership Fact Sheet: DOENational Association of Regulatory Utility...

217

Numerical and probabilistic analysis of asteroid and comet impact hazard mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The possibility of asteroid and comet impacts on Earth has received significant recent media and scientific attention. Still, there are many outstanding questions about the correct response once a potentially hazardous object (PHO) is found. Nuclear munitions are often suggested as a deflection mechanism because they have a high internal energy per unit launch mass. However, major uncertainties remain about the use of nuclear munitions for hazard mitigation. There are large uncertainties in a PHO's physical response to a strong deflection or dispersion impulse like that delivered by nuclear munitions. Objects smaller than 100 m may be solid, and objects at all sizes may be 'rubble piles' with large porosities and little strength. Objects with these different properties would respond very differently, so the effects of object properties must be accounted for. Recent ground-based observations and missions to asteroids and comets have improved the planetary science community's understanding of these objects. Computational power and simulation capabilities have improved such that it is possible to numerically model the hazard mitigation problem from first principles. Before we know that explosive yield Y at height h or depth -h from the target surface will produce a momentum change in or dispersion of a PHO, we must quantify energy deposition into the system of particles that make up the PHO. Here we present the initial results of a parameter study in which we model the efficiency of energy deposition from a stand-off nuclear burst onto targets made of PHO constituent materials.

Plesko, Catherine S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Weaver, Robert P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Huebner, Walter F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

218

Failure Impact Analysis of Key Management in AMI Using Cybernomic Situational Assessment (CSA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In earlier work, we presented a computational framework for quantifying the security of a system in terms of the average loss a stakeholder stands to sustain as a result of threats to the system. We named this system, the Cyberspace Security Econometrics System (CSES). In this paper, we refine the framework and apply it to cryptographic key management within the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) as an example. The stakeholders, requirements, components, and threats are determined. We then populate the matrices with justified values by addressing the AMI at a higher level, rather than trying to consider every piece of hardware and software involved. We accomplish this task by leveraging the recently established NISTR 7628 guideline for smart grid security. This allowed us to choose the stakeholders, requirements, components, and threats realistically. We reviewed the literature and selected an industry technical working group to select three representative threats from a collection of 29 threats. From this subset, we populate the stakes, dependency, and impact matrices, and the threat vector with realistic numbers. Each Stakeholder s Mean Failure Cost is then computed.

Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL] [ORNL; Sheldon, Frederick T [ORNL] [ORNL; Hauser, Katie R [ORNL] [ORNL; Lantz, Margaret W [ORNL] [ORNL; Mili, Ali [New Jersey Insitute of Technology] [New Jersey Insitute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Impact analysis of OSM regulations on highwall mining systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The establishment of the federal surface mining performance standards has placed additional restraints on auger mining. The federal regulations impose barrier pillar and hole sealing requirements on augering, stipulate time frames for hole sealing and discharge treatment, and prohibit auger mining under certain conditions. Barrier pillar requirements between groups of auger holes and between auger holes and underground workings decrease the augerable reserve base on a site by a minimum of ten percent. Barrier requirements may also reduce productivity levels due to increased delay and scheduling problems. Federal auger hole sealing requirements are more stringent than most state regulations, and consequently have increased the cost of augering in almost all auger mining areas. The availability of impervious materials on the site and the extent of backfilling required to form a water-tight seal may have the greatest effect on auger hole reclamation costs. The federal regulations require auger mining to be prohibited: if adverse water quality impacts cannot be prevented; if stability of sealings cannot be achieved; if subsidence resulting from augering may damage powerlines, pipelines, buildings, or other facilities; or if coal reserve recovery is not maximized by augering. As a result, all up dip augering may be restricted on the grounds that seal stability cannot be maintained for long time periods if water pressure builds behind the plug. Also, since tradiational augering techniques have a lower recovery rate than surface or underground methods, augering may be prohibited in many situations by the stipulation that maximum resource recovery will not be achieved.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Regulatory Policy and Markets for Energy Storage in North America  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The last 5 years have been one of the most exciting times for the energy storage industry. We have seen significant advancements in the regulatory process to make accommodations for valuing and monetizing energy storage for what it provides to the grid. The most impactful regulatory decision for the energy storage industry has come from California, where the California Public Utilities Commission issued a decision that mandates procurement requirements of 1.325 GW for energy storage to 3 investor-own utilities in 4 stages: in 2014, 2016, 2018, and 2020. Furthermore, at the Federal level, FERC’s Order 755, requires the transmission operators to develop pay for performance tariffs for ancillary services. This has had direct impact on the market design of US competitive wholesale markets and the monetization of fast responding grid assets. While this order is technology neutral, it clearly plays into the fast-responding capability of energy storage technologies. Today PJM, CAISO, MISO, NYISO, and NE-ISO have implemented Order 755 and offer new tariff for regulation services based on pay-for-performance principles. Furthermore, FERC Order 784, issued in July 2013 requires transmission providers to consider speed and accuracy in determining the requirements for ancillary services. In November 2013, FERC issued Order 972, which revises the small generator interconnection agreement which declares energy storage as a power source. This order puts energy storage on par with existing generators. This paper will discuss the implementation of FERC’s Pay for Performance Regulation order at all ISOs in the U.S. under FERC regulatory authority (this excludes ERCOT). Also discussed will be the market impacts and overall impacts on the NERC regulation performance indexes. The paper will end with a discussion on the California and Ontario, Canada procurement mandates and the opportunity that it may present to the energy storage industry.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Nuclear criticality safety bounding analysis for the in-tank-precipitation (ITP) process, impacted by fissile isotopic weight fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The In-Tank Precipitation process (ITP) receives High Level Waste (HLW) supernatant liquid containing radionuclides in waste processing tank 48H. Sodium tetraphenylborate, NaTPB, and monosodium titanate (MST), NaTi{sub 2}O{sub 5}H, are added for removal of radioactive Cs and Sr, respectively. In addition to removal of radio-strontium, MST will also remove plutonium and uranium. The majority of the feed solutions to ITP will come from the dissolution of supernate that had been concentrated by evaporation to a crystallized salt form, commonly referred to as saltcake. The concern for criticality safety arises from the adsorption of U and Pt onto MST. If sufficient mass and optimum conditions are achieved then criticality is credible. The concentration of u and Pt from solution into the smaller volume of precipitate represents a concern for criticality. This report supplements WSRC-TR-93-171, Nuclear Criticality Safety Bounding Analysis For The In-Tank-Precipitation (ITP) Process. Criticality safety in ITP can be analyzed by two bounding conditions: (1) the minimum safe ratio of MST to fissionable material and (2) the maximum fissionable material adsorption capacity of the MST. Calculations have provided the first bounding condition and experimental analysis has established the second. This report combines these conditions with canyon facility data to evaluate the potential for criticality in the ITP process due to the adsorption of the fissionable material from solution. In addition, this report analyzes the potential impact of increased U loading onto MST. Results of this analysis demonstrate a greater safety margin for ITP operations than the previous analysis. This report further demonstrates that the potential for criticality in the ITP process due to adsorption of fissionable material by MST is not credible.

Bess, C.E.

1994-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

222

Research opportunities to improve DSM impact estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was commissioned by the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE) as part of its research mission to advance the energy efficiency and productivity of all end-use sectors in California. Our specific goal in this effort has been to identify viable research and development (R&D) opportunities that can improve capabilities to determine the energy-use and demand reductions achieved through demand-side management (DSM) programs and measures. We surveyed numerous practitioners in California and elsewhere to identify the major obstacles to effective impact evaluation, drawing on their collective experience. As a separate effort, we have also profiled the status of regulatory practices in leading states with respect to DSM impact evaluation. We have synthesized this information, adding our own perspective and experience to those of our survey-respondent colleagues, to characterize today`s state of the art in impact-evaluation practices. This scoping study takes a comprehensive look at the problems and issues involved in DSM impact estimates at the customer-facility or site level. The major portion of our study investigates three broad topic areas of interest to CIEE: Data analysis issues, field-monitoring issues, issues in evaluating DSM measures. Across these three topic areas, we have identified 22 potential R&D opportunities, to which we have assigned priority levels. These R&D opportunities are listed by topic area and priority.

Misuriello, H.; Hopkins, M.E.F. [Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Analysis of Impacts on Prime or Unique Agricultural Lands in Implementing  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 DocumentationAnalysis of Crossover Points forNEPA |

224

Dose impact in radiographic lung injury following lung SBRT: Statistical analysis and geometric interpretation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To demonstrate a new method of evaluating dose response of treatment-induced lung radiographic injury post-SBRT (stereotactic body radiotherapy) treatment and the discovery of bimodal dose behavior within clinically identified injury volumes. Methods: Follow-up CT scans at 3, 6, and 12 months were acquired from 24 patients treated with SBRT for stage-1 primary lung cancers or oligometastic lesions. Injury regions in these scans were propagated to the planning CT coordinates by performing deformable registration of the follow-ups to the planning CTs. A bimodal behavior was repeatedly observed from the probability distribution for dose values within the deformed injury regions. Based on a mixture-Gaussian assumption, an Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm was used to obtain characteristic parameters for such distribution. Geometric analysis was performed to interpret such parameters and infer the critical dose level that is potentially inductive of post-SBRT lung injury. Results: The Gaussian mixture obtained from the EM algorithm closely approximates the empirical dose histogram within the injury volume with good consistency. The average Kullback-Leibler divergence values between the empirical differential dose volume histogram and the EM-obtained Gaussian mixture distribution were calculated to be 0.069, 0.063, and 0.092 for the 3, 6, and 12 month follow-up groups, respectively. The lower Gaussian component was located at approximately 70% prescription dose (35 Gy) for all three follow-up time points. The higher Gaussian component, contributed by the dose received by planning target volume, was located at around 107% of the prescription dose. Geometrical analysis suggests the mean of the lower Gaussian component, located at 35 Gy, as a possible indicator for a critical dose that induces lung injury after SBRT. Conclusions: An innovative and improved method for analyzing the correspondence between lung radiographic injury and SBRT treatment dose has been demonstrated. Bimodal behavior was observed in the dose distribution of lung injury after SBRT. Novel statistical and geometrical analysis has shown that the systematically quantified low-dose peak at approximately 35 Gy, or 70% prescription dose, is a good indication of a critical dose for injury. The determined critical dose of 35 Gy resembles the critical dose volume limit of 30 Gy for ipsilateral bronchus in RTOG 0618 and results from previous studies. The authors seek to further extend this improved analysis method to a larger cohort to better understand the interpatient variation in radiographic lung injury dose response post-SBRT.

Yu, Victoria; Kishan, Amar U.; Cao, Minsong; Low, Daniel; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan, E-mail: druan@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Analysis of the impacts of energy conservation codes in new single-family homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the 50 states some form of federal code or standard for energy conservation in new building construction is typically incorporated into state and local codes. Two of these codes, the Model Energy Code (MEC) and the proposed ASHRAE standard 90.2P are of special importance to the residential data base developed by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) because they influence thermal requirements and have either been recently updated or will be revised in 1992. In this study, we evaluate the impacts of these two thermal codes on the energy performance and energy consumption of prototypical new single-family buildings. Base case buildings, with characteristics typical of current building practices, are modified to meet the thermal envelope standards and are simulated with the DOE-2.1D building energy simulation program. In addition, we also model the effects of appliance and heating and cooling equipment efficiencies promulgated under the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act (NAECA) of 1987 and of the NAECA Amendments of 1988. We compare heating and cooling loads and energy use for the prototypical house for several cases: the base case, with 1980s vintage thermal envelope and appliance and equipment efficiencies; with ASHRAE 90 thermal requirements; with Model Energy Code thermal requirements; with NAECA appliance and HVAC efficiencies; and with combinations of the ASHRAE 90 Standard or Model Energy Code and the NAECA appliance and equipment efficiency improvements. The results provide a glimpse of how these standards will affect future end-use energy consumption in new single-family buildings.

Ritschard, R.L.; Hanford, J.W.; Sezgen, A.O.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Environmental impacts of lighting technologies - Life cycle assessment and sensitivity analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With two regulations, 244/2009 and 245/2009, the European Commission recently put into practice the EuP Directive in the area of lighting devices, aiming to improve energy efficiency in the domestic lighting sector. This article presents a comprehensive life cycle assessment comparison of four different lighting technologies: the tungsten lamp, the halogen lamp, the conventional fluorescent lamp and the compact fluorescent lamp. Taking advantage of the most up-to-date life cycle inventory database available (ecoinvent data version 2.01), all life cycle phases were assessed and the sensitivity of the results for varying assumptions analysed: different qualities of compact fluorescent lamps (production phase), different electricity mixes (use phase), and end-of-life scenarios for WEEE recycling versus municipal solid waste incineration (disposal phase). A functional unit of 'one hour of lighting' was defined and the environmental burdens for the whole life cycle for all four lamp types were calculated, showing a clearly lower impact for the two gas-discharge lamps, i.e. the fluorescent and the compact fluorescent lamp. Differences in the product quality of the compact fluorescent lamps reveal to have only a very small effect on the overall environmental performance of this lamp type; a decline of the actual life time of this lamp type doesn't result in a change of the rank order of the results of the here examined four lamp types. It was also shown that the environmental break-even point of the gas-discharge lamps is reached long before the end of their expected life-span. All in all, it can be concluded that a change from today's tungsten lamp technology to a low-energy-consuming technology such as the compact fluorescent lamp results in a substantial environmental benefit.

Welz, Tobias; Hischier, Roland, E-mail: Roland.Hischier@empa.ch; Hilty, Lorenz M.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Final report : impacts analysis for cyber attack on electric power systems (national SCADA test bed FY09).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development continues for Finite State Abstraction (FSA) methods to enable Impacts Analysis (IA) for cyber attack against power grid control systems. Building upon previous work, we successfully demonstrated the addition of Bounded Model Checking (BMC) to the FSA method, which constrains grid conditions to reasonable behavior. The new FSA feature was successfully implemented and tested. FSA is an important part of IA for the power grid, complementing steady-state approaches. It enables the simultaneous evaluation of myriad dynamic trajectories for the system, which in turn facilitates IA for whole ranges of system conditions simultaneously. Given the potentially wide range and subtle nature of potential control system attacks, this is a promising research approach. In this report, we will explain the addition of BMC to the previous FSA work and some testing/simulation upon the implemented code using a two-bus test system. The current FSA approach and code allow the calculation of the acceptability of power grid conditions post-cyber attack (over a given time horizon and for a specific grid topology). Future work will enable analysis spanning various topologies (to account for switching events), as well as an understanding of the cyber attack stimuli that can lead to undesirable grid conditions.

Stamp, Jason Edwin; LaViolette, Randall A.; Gardiner, Judith D. (Ohio State University, Columbus, OH)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

A FULLY COUPLED THERMO-HYDRO MECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY VARIATION ON THE STATE OF HISTORICAL STONE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A FULLY COUPLED THERMO-HYDRO MECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY Keywords: Thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling, modelling, inverse problem, tuffeau, monument, in situ measures initiation and growth due to the variation of climate conditions; thermo-hydro-mechanical incompatibility

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

229

AN ANALYSIS OF THE ENERGY IMPACTS OF THE DOE APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM: METHODS AND RESULTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cases, act to increase energy awareness and energy self-impacts of certain energy awareness and education projects

Lucarelli, Bart

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Analysis of the formation, expression, and economic impacts of risk perceptions associated with nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report investigates how communities hosting nuclear facilities form and express perceptions of risk and how these risk perceptions affect local economic development. Information was collected from site visits and interviews with plant personnel, officials of local and state agencies, and community activists in the hosting communities. Six commercial nuclear fuel production facilities and five nuclear facilities operated for the US Department of Energy by private contractors were chosen for analysis. The results presented in the report indicate that the nature of risk perceptions depends on a number of factors. These factors are (1) level of communication by plant officials within the local community, (2) track record of the facility. operator, (3) process through which community and state officials receive information and form opinions, (4) level of economic links each plant has with the local community, and (15) physical characteristics of the facility itself. This report finds that in the communities studied, adverse ask perceptions have not affected business location decisions, employment levels in the local community, tourism, or agricultural development. On the basis of case-study findings, this report recommends that nuclear facility siting programs take the following observations into account when addressing perceptions of risk. First, the quality of a facility`s participation with community activists, interest groups, and state agencies helps to determine the level of perceived risk within a community. Second, the development of strong economic links between nuclear facilities and their host communities will produce a higher level of acceptance of the nuclear facilities.

Allison, T.; Hunter, S.; Calzonetti, F.J.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

How Regulatory Policy Impacts Large Scale Cogeneration Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.e states have set prices to be paid by the utilities to alternative energy suppliers, others have left the deter.ination of prices largely to negotiations between suppliers and the utilities. Until recently California had been an exa.ple of the for...

Smith, A. J. Jr.

232

Regulatory Requirements | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST3 AÇORIANONewsRegulatory

233

Assessing National Employment Impacts of Investment in Residential and Commercial Sector Energy Efficiency: Review and Example Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) modeled the employment impacts of a major national initiative to accelerate energy efficiency trends at one of two levels: • 15 percent savings by 2030. In this scenario, efficiency activities save about 15 percent of the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) Reference Case electricity consumption by 2030. It is assumed that additional energy savings in both the residential and commercial sectors begin in 2015 at zero, and then increase in an S-shaped market penetration curve, with the level of savings equal to about 7.0 percent of the AEO 2014 U.S. national residential and commercial electricity consumption saved by 2020, 14.8 percent by 2025, and 15 percent by 2030. • 10 percent savings by 2030. In this scenario, additional savings begin at zero in 2015, increase to 3.8 percent in 2020, 9.8 percent by 2025, and 10 percent of the AEO reference case value by 2030. The analysis of the 15 percent case indicates that by 2030 more than 300,000 new jobs would likely result from such policies, including an annual average of more than 60,000 jobs directly supporting the installation and maintenance of energy efficiency measures and practices. These are new jobs resulting initially from the investment associated with the construction of more energy-efficient new buildings or the retrofit of existing buildings and would be sustained for as long as the investment continues. Based on what is known about the current level of building-sector energy efficiency jobs, this would represent an increase of more than 10 percent from the current estimated level of over 450,000 such jobs. The more significant and longer-lasting effect comes from the redirection of energy bill savings toward the purchase of other goods and services in the general economy, with its attendant influence on increasing the total number of jobs. This example analysis utilized PNNL’s ImSET model, a modeling framework that PNNL has used over the past two decades to assess the economic impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) energy efficiency programs in the buildings sector.

Anderson, David M.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.; Scott, Michael J.

2014-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

234

Approach of Czech regulatory body to LBB  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At present there are two NPPs equipped with PWR units in Czech Republic. The Dukovany, NPP is about ten years in operation (four units 440 MW - WWBFL model 213) and Tomelin NPP is under construction (two units 1000 MW - WWER model 320). Both NPPs were built to Soviet design and according to Soviet regulations and standards but most of equipment for primary circuits was supplied by home manufacturers. The objective of the Czech LBB program is to prove the LBB status of the primary piping systems of there NPPs and the LBB concept is a part of strategy to meet western style safety standards. The reason for the Czech LBB project is a lack of some standard safety Facilities too. For both Dukovany and Tomelin NPPs a full LBB analysis should be carried out. The application of LBB to the piping system should be also a cost effective means to avoid installations of pipe whip restraints and jet shields. The Czech regulatory body issued non-mandatory requirement, {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} which is in compliance with national legal documents and which is based on the US NRC Regulatory Procedures and US standards (ASMF CODE, ANSI). The requirement has been published in the document {open_quotes}Safety of Nuclear Facilities{close_quotes} No 1/1991 as {open_quotes}Requirements on the Content and Format of Safety Reports and their Supplements{close_quote} and consist of two parts (1) procedure for obtaining proof of evidence {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} (2) leak detection systems for the pressurized reactor primary circuit. At present some changes concerning both parts of the above document will be introduced. The reasons for this modifications will be presented.

Tendera, P.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Approach for Czech regulatory body to LBB  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At present there are two NPPs equipped with PWR units in Czech Republic. The Dukovany NPP is about ten years in operation (four units 440 MW - WWER model 213) and Temelin NPP is under construction (two units 1000 MW-WWER model 320). Both NPPs were built to Soviet design and according to Soviet regulations and standards but most of equipment for primary circuits was supplied by home manufactures. The objective for the Czech LBB programme is to prove the LBB status of the primary piping systems of these NPPs and the LBB concept is a part of strategy to meet western style safety standards. The reason for the Czech LBB project is a lack of some standard safety facilities, too. For both Dukovany and Temolin NPPs a full LBB analysis should be carried out. The application of LBB to the piping system should be also a cost effective means to avoid installations of pipe whip restraints and jet shields. The Czech regulatory body issued non-mandatory requirement {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} which is in compliance with national legal documents and which is based on the US NRC Regulatory Procedures and US standards (ASME, CODE, ANSI). The requirement has been published in the document {open_quotes}Safety of Nuclear Facilities{close_quotes} No. 1/1991 as {open_quotes}Requirements on the Content and Format of Safety Reports and their Supplements{close_quotes} and consists of two parts (1) procedure for obtaining proof of evidence {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} (2) leak detection systems for the pressurized reactor primary circuit. At present some changes concerning both parts of the above document will be introduced. The reasons for this modifications will be presented.

Tendera, P. [State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS), Prague (Czech Republic)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Grand Gulf-prioritization of regulatory requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As cost pressures mount, Grand Gulf nuclear station (GGNS) is relying increasingly on various prioritization approaches to implement, modify, eliminate, or defer regulatory requirements. Regulatory requirements can be prioritized through the use of three measures: (1) safety (or risk) significance; (2) cost; and (3) public policy (or political) significance. This paper summarizes GGNS' efforts to implement solutions to regulatory issues using these three prioritization schemes to preserve a balance between cost and safety benefit.

Meisner, M.J. (Entergy Operations Inc., Port Gibson, MS (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, December 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlbert, L.M.; Langston, M.E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA)); Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Environmental regulatory update table, March 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, April 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, October 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Hawkins, G.T.; Houlberg, L.M.; Noghrei-Nikbakht, P.A.; Salk, M.S.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Environmental regulatory update table, July 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Regulatory Update Table (July 1991) provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, September 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, December 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, August 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Regulatory Update Table (August 1991) provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M., Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Sandia National Laboratories: Federal Electric Regulatory Commission...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Small Generator Interconnection Agreement Dakota Version 5.4 Released Sandia-UC Davis Collaboration Funded by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Federal Electric Regulatory...

248

Mineral Test Hole Regulatory Act (Tennessee)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Mineral Hole Regulatory Act is applicable to any person (individual, corporation, company, association, joint venture, partnership, receiver, trustee, guardian, executor, administrator,...

249

Federal / State Legislative & Regulatory Changes Required for...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Issues Federal and State Blending Restrictions Action by ASTM NCWM to address higher ethanol blends Federal State Legislative & Regulatory Changes Required for Introduction of...

250

EAC Recommendations Regarding Emerging and Alternative Regulatory...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of the continued exploration of initiatives focused on the concepts of regulatoryutility business models. The paper includes a summary of regulatory model initiatives, current and...

251

Interstate Technology & Regulatory Council (ITRC) Remediation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Laboratory December 17, 2014 To view all the P&RA CoP 2014 Technical Exchange Meeting videos click here. Video Presentation Interstate Technology & Regulatory Council (ITRC)...

252

Seamless Transport Policy: Institutional and Regulatory Aspects...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seamless Transport Policy: Institutional and Regulatory Aspects of Inter-Modal Coordination Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Seamless Transport Policy:...

253

Other Regulatory Efforts | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efforts Other Regulatory Efforts In addition to regulating international electricity trade, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability participates in other...

254

Quantifying the Impact of Immediate Reconstruction in Postmastectomy Radiation: A Large, Dose-Volume Histogram-Based Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the impact of immediate breast reconstruction on postmastectomy radiation (PMRT) using dose-volume histogram (DVH) data. Methods and Materials: Two hundred forty-seven women underwent PMRT at our center, 196 with implant reconstruction and 51 without reconstruction. Patients with reconstruction were treated with tangential photons, and patients without reconstruction were treated with en-face electron fields and customized bolus. Twenty percent of patients received internal mammary node (IMN) treatment. The DVH data were compared between groups. Ipsilateral lung parameters included V20 (% volume receiving 20 Gy), V40 (% volume receiving 40 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. Heart parameters included V25 (% volume receiving 25 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. IMN coverage was assessed when applicable. Chest wall coverage was assessed in patients with reconstruction. Propensity-matched analysis adjusted for potential confounders of laterality and IMN treatment. Results: Reconstruction was associated with lower lung V20, mean dose, and maximum dose compared with no reconstruction (all P<.0001). These associations persisted on propensity-matched analysis (all P<.0001). Heart doses were similar between groups (P=NS). Ninety percent of patients with reconstruction had excellent chest wall coverage (D95 >98%). IMN coverage was superior in patients with reconstruction (D95 >92.0 vs 75.7%, P<.001). IMN treatment significantly increased lung and heart parameters in patients with reconstruction (all P<.05) but minimally affected those without reconstruction (all P>.05). Among IMN-treated patients, only lower lung V20 in those without reconstruction persisted (P=.022), and mean and maximum heart doses were higher than in patients without reconstruction (P=.006, P=.015, respectively). Conclusions: Implant reconstruction does not compromise the technical quality of PMRT when the IMNs are untreated. Treatment technique, not reconstruction, is the primary determinant of target coverage and normal tissue doses.

Ohri, Nisha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Cordeiro, Peter G. [Department of Plastic Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Plastic Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Keam, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ballangrud, Ase [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Nerbun, Claire T.; Woch, Katherine M.; Stein, Nicholas F.; Zhou Ying [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); McCormick, Beryl; Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ho, Alice Y., E-mail: HoA1234@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Analysis of drought impacts on electricity production in the Western and Texas interconnections of the United States.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electricity generation relies heavily on water resources and their availability. To examine the interdependence of energy and water in the electricity context, the impacts of a severe drought to assess the risk posed by drought to electricity generation within the western and Texas interconnections has been examined. The historical drought patterns in the western United States were analyzed, and the risk posed by drought to electricity generation within the region was evaluated. The results of this effort will be used to develop scenarios for medium- and long-term transmission modeling and planning efforts by the Western Electricity Coordination Council (WECC) and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT). The study was performed in response to a request developed by the Western Governors Association in conjunction with the transmission modeling teams at the participating interconnections. It is part of a U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored, national laboratory-led research effort to develop tools related to the interdependency of energy and water as part of a larger interconnection-wide transmission planning project funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. This study accomplished three main objectives. It provided a thorough literature review of recent studies of drought and the potential implications for electricity generation. It analyzed historical drought patterns in the western United States and used the results to develop three design drought scenarios. Finally, it quantified the risk to electricity generation for each of eight basins for each of the three drought scenarios and considered the implications for transmission planning. Literature on drought impacts on electricity generation describes a number of examples where hydroelectric generation capacity has been limited because of drought but only a few examples of impact on thermoelectric generation. In all documented cases, shortfalls of generation were met by purchasing power from the market, albeit at higher prices. However, sufficient excess generation and transmission must be available for this strategy to work. Although power purchase was the most commonly discussed drought mitigation strategy, a total of 12 response strategies were identified in the literature, falling into four main categories: electricity supply, electricity demand response, alternative water supplies, and water demand response. Three hydrological drought scenarios were developed based on a literature review and historical data analysis. The literature review helped to identify key drought parameters and data on drought frequency and severity. Historical hydrological drought data were analyzed for the western United States to identify potential drought correlations and estimate drought parameters. The first scenario was a West-wide drought occurring in 1977; it represented a severe drought in five of the eight basins in the study area. A second drought scenario was artificially defined by selecting the conditions from the 10th-percentile drought year for each individual basin; this drought was defined in this way to allow more consistent analysis of risk to electricity generation in each basin. The final scenario was based upon the current low-flow hydro modeling scenario defined by WECC, which uses conditions from the year 2001. These scenarios were then used to quantify the risk to electricity generation in each basin. The risk calculations represent a first-order estimate of the maximum amount of electricity generation that might be lost from both hydroelectric and thermoelectric sources under a worst-case scenario. Even with the conservative methodology used, the majority of basins showed a limited amount of risk under most scenarios. The level of risk in these basins is likely to be amenable to mitigation by known strategies, combined with existing reserve generation and transmission capacity. However, the risks to the Pacific Northwest and Texas Basins require further study. The Pacific Northwest is vulnerable because of its heavy reliance on hydroelectri

Harto, C. B.; Yan, Y. E.; Demissie, Y. K.; Elcock, D.; Tidwell, V. C.; Hallett, K.; Macknick, J.; Wigmosta, M. S.; Tesfa, T. K. (Environmental Science Division); (Sandia National Laboratory); (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

256

The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2002) Economic Impacts of Wind Power in Kittitas County, WA.about Large Offshore Wind Power: Underlying Factors. EnergyOpinion on Offshore Wind Power - Interim Report. University

Hoen, Ben

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

13. Washington, D.C. : Renewable Energy Policy Project. (Commissioners. Renewable Energy Policy Project (REPP). 2001.impacts of RPS policies on renewable energy deployment by

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

Polenske, Karen

259

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

24 Wholesale Energy and Capacity Price Changes Projected byImpacts to Alternative Wholesale Electric Price Scenarios..24 Effect of Wholesale Market Price Reductions on RPS Rate

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

outside of the electricity sector (this potential impact isonly report changes in electricity sector generation (i.e.gas used in the electricity sector; these effects (where

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

Polenske, Karen R.

262

11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

Polenske, Karen R.

263

Design Principles and Case Study Analysis for Low Impact Development Practices - Green Roofs, Rainwater Harvesting and Vegetated Swales.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis on Low Impact Development (LID) Practices provides design guidelines and principles for three important LID practices: green roofs, rainwater harvesting and bioswales. The… (more)

Ramesh, Shalini

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Proceedings of the 1991 Socioeconomic Energy Research and Analysis Conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings analyze US energy policy as it pertains to minority groups. Example topics include: Economic impacts of the National Energy Strategy on minority and majority households, Utility measures to assist payment-troubled customers, Equity impacts of controlling energy usage through market-based versus regulatory approaches, Technical and planning support for the DOE-HUD initiative for energy efficiency in housing, an analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage, and methodical issues in evaluating integrated least cost planning programs.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Environment, safety, and health regulatory implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To identify, document, and maintain the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project`s environment, safety, and health (ES&H) regulatory requirements, the US Department of Energy (DOE) UMTRA Project Office tasked the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to develop a regulatory operating envelope for the UMTRA Project. The system selected for managing the UMTRA regulatory operating envelope data bass is based on the Integrated Project Control/Regulatory Compliance System (IPC/RCS) developed by WASTREN, Inc. (WASTREN, 1993). The IPC/RCS is a tool used for identifying regulatory and institutional requirements and indexing them to hardware, personnel, and program systems on a project. The IPC/RCS will be customized for the UMTRA Project surface remedial action and groundwater restoration programs. The purpose of this plan is to establish the process for implementing and maintaining the UMTRA Project`s regulatory operating envelope, which involves identifying all applicable regulatory and institutional requirements and determining compliance status. The plan describes how the Project will identify ES&H regulatory requirements, analyze applicability to the UMTRA Project, and evaluate UMTRA Project compliance status.

Not Available

1993-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

266

Uranium Watch REGULATORY CONFUSION: FEDERALAND STATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uranium Watch Report REGULATORY CONFUSION: FEDERALAND STATE ENFORCEMENT OF 40 C.F.R. PART 61 SUBPART W INTRODUCTION 1. This Uranium Watch Report, Regulatory Confusion: Federal and State Enforcement at the White Mesa Uranium Mill, San Juan County, Utah. 2. The DAQ, a Division of the Utah Department

267

State Regulatory Oversight of Geothermal Heat Pump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State Regulatory Oversight of Geothermal Heat Pump Installa:ons: 2012 & 2009 Kevin McCray, Execu:ve Director #12;2009 #12;Sponsors ·The Geothermal Hea requested geothermal hea:ng and cooling regulatory data. · An email containing

268

NREL: Innovation Impact - Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | National NuclearoverAcquisition SystemGeothermalHydrogen

269

Analysis of the Texas A&M impact lightning detector to determine detection efficiency and site error corrections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the area 1000 km within the IMPACT detector location. A site error correction curve was used to correct for azimuthal errors in bearings to CG stroke locations. Errors were reduced to less than 4° in most cases. The IMPACT detector uses a crossed...

Leahy, Frank Byron

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Technology's Impact on Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) - entitled Technology's Impact on Production: Developing Environmental Solutions at the State and National Level - the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has been tasked with assisting state governments in the effective, efficient, and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil, specifically in relation to orphaned and abandoned wells and wells nearing the end of productive life. Project goals include: (1) Developing (a) a model framework for prioritization and ranking of orphaned or abandoned well sites; (b) a model framework for disbursement of Energy Policy Act of 2005 funding; and (c) a research study regarding the current status of orphaned wells in the nation. (2) Researching the impact of new technologies on environmental protection from a regulatory perspective. Research will identify and document (a) state reactions to changing technology and knowledge; (b) how those reactions support state environmental conservation and public health; and (c) the impact of those reactions on oil and natural gas production. (3) Assessing emergent technology issues associated with wells nearing the end of productive life. Including: (a) location of orphaned and abandoned well sites; (b) well site remediation; (c) plugging materials; (d) plug placement; (e) the current regulatory environment; and (f) the identification of emergent technologies affecting end of life wells. New Energy Technologies - Regulating Change, is the result of research performed for Tasks 2 and 3.

Rachel Amann; Ellis Deweese; Deborah Shipman

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

271

Regulatory Roadmap Workshop for Federal Bulk Transmission Regulations...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regulatory Roadmapping Pgower's picture Submitted by Pgower(45) Member 7 August, 2014 - 13:19 One-day workshop to review regulatory roadmaps for bulk transmission. Date:...

272

Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the First United States Nuclear Plant Site in Over 30 Years Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the...

273

Comments from The National Association of Regulatory Utility...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

from The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) on the Smart Grid RFI Comments from The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC)...

274

US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart Grid Implementation Input US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart...

275

The Impact of Global Warming on U.S. Agriculture: An Econometric Analysis of Optimal Growing Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. Agriculture: An Econometric Analysis of Optimal GrowingU.S. Agriculture: An Econometric Analysis of Optimal GrowingU.S. Agriculture: An Econometric Analysis of Optimal Growing

Schlenker, Wolfram; Hanemann, W. Michael; Fisher, Anthony C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Recent regulatory experience of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume III. Supporting case studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MITRE Corporation conducted a five-month study for the Office of Resource Applications in the Department of Energy on the regulatory requirements of low-Btu coal gasification. During this study, MITRE interviewed representatives of five current low-Btu coal gasification projects and regulatory agencies in five states. From these interviews, MITRE has sought the experience of current low-Btu coal gasification users in order to recommend actions to improve the regulatory process. This report is the third of three volumes. It contains the results of interviews conducted for each of the case studies. Volume 1 of the report contains the analysis of the case studies and recommendations to potential industrial users of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume 2 contains recommendations to regulatory agencies.

Ackerman, E.; Hart, D.; Lethi, M.; Park, W.; Rifkin, S.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Technical Challenges of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles and Impacts to the US Power System: Distribution System Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE) to address three basic questions concerning how typical existing electrical distribution systems would be impacted by the addition of PHEVs to residential loads.

Gerkensmeyer, Clint; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; DeSteese, John G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chicago, Illinois: Energy Resources Center, University ofImpacts of Clean Energy Development in Illinois.Illinois and Vermont have established voluntary RPS policies. In addition to Xcel’s renewable energy

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Annoyance due to Wind Turbine Noise: A Dose-Responsewind turbine, for example, might also have an impact if various nuisance effects are prominent, such as turbine noise,

Hoen, Ben

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The Impact of Global Warming on U.S. Agriculture: An Econometric Analysis of Optimal Growing Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Really Bene?t From Global Warming? Accounting for IrrigationR. , The Economics of Global Warming, Washington, D.C. :1992. , “The Impact of Global Warming on Agriculture:

Schlenker, Wolfram; Hanemann, W. Michael; Fisher, Anthony C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Exploring the Impact of Growing Up in a Single Parent Family from an Adult Perspective: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study explores the impact that growing up in a single parent family from a young age has on adulthood. Previous quantitative research suggests that children raised in this family structure encounter more difficulties throughout their lives than...

Walsh, Annabel

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

282

Air quality analysis and related risk assessment for the Bonneville Power Administration's Resource Program Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is considering 12 different alternatives for acquiring energy resources over the next 20 years. Each of the alternatives utilizes a full range of energy resources (e.g., coal, cogeneration, conservation, and nuclear); however, individual alternatives place greater emphases on different types of power-producing resources and employ different timetables for implementing these resources. The environmental impacts that would result from the implementation of each alternative and the economic valuations of these impacts, will be an important consideration in the alternative selection process. In this report we discuss the methods used to estimate environmental impacts from the resource alternatives. We focus on pollutant emissions rates, ground-level air concentrations of basic criteria pollutants, the acidity of rain, particulate deposition, ozone concentrations, visibility attenuation, global warming, human health effects, agricultural and forest impacts, and wildlife impacts. For this study, pollutant emission rates are computed by processing BPA data on power production and associated pollutant emissions. The assessment of human health effects from ozone indicated little variation between the resource alternatives. Impacts on plants, crops, and wildlife populations from power plant emissions are projected to be minimal for all resource alternatives.

Glantz, C S; Burk, K W; Driver, C J; Liljegren, J C; Neitzel, D A; Schwartz, M N; Dana, M T; Laws, G L; Mahoney, L A; Rhoads, K

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Socioeconomic effects of DRAFT power marketing options of the Central Valley and Washoe Projects: 2005 regional economic impact analysis using IMPLAN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the methods and conclusions of an economic analysis of the distributional effects of alternative actions that Sierra Nevada could take with its new marketing plan. These alternatives are summarized in the agency`s Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), and this study directly supports the findings in the EIS. The study evaluates the potential economic impacts projected to occur across the northern and central California area currently serviced by Sierra Nevada`s customers. A standard input-output estimation approach was used to calculate impacts on regional output, labor income, and employment. The IMPLAN regional economic modeling system was used to develop regional models for the analysis. Individual regional models were developed for the overall area, the San Francisco Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area, the Sacramento Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area, the Redding Metropolitan Statistical Area, and the Bakersfield Metropolitan Statistical Area. The analysis relies on information about the effect of Sierra Nevada`s alternative actions on overall system power costs for the year 2005 developed by RW Beck and Associates (Beck-1996). This information is used as input to the 2005 benchmarked IMPLAN regional economic models. The resulting economic impact estimates are inextricably linked to this input information about changes in system power costs, and the estimates reported here are of similar relative magnitude to those estimates. The potential economic effects of Sierra Nevada`s actions are extremely small in relation to the size of the economies potentially affected, and, although they are calculable, they are not significant and often difficult to separate from random error present in the models.

Anderson, D.M.; Godoy-Kain, P.; Gu, A.Y.; Ulibarri, C.A.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Reliability and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—covers the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) strategic plan, the Federal Power Act (FPA), current energy security posture, and more.

285

Regulatory status of transgrafted plants is unclear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3. Graff GD, Wright BD, Bennett AB, Zilberman D. 2004. Ac-PIPRA, Davis; and A.B. Bennett is Profes- sor, Department ofL. Chi-Ham and Alan B. Bennett T he regulatory implications

Haroldsen, Victor M; Paulino, Gabriel; Chi-ham, Cecilia; Bennett, Alan B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Evolution and statistics of biological regulatory networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I study the process of evolution of the gene regulatory network in Escherichia coli. First, I characterize the portion of the network that has been documented, and then I simulate growth of the network. In ...

Chandalia, Juhi Kiran, 1979-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Regulatory Burden RFI | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromComments on NBPSiting Guidelines |Regulatory BurdenRegulatory

288

Proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1: Environmental Analysis and Technical Appendices.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA is considering whether to purchase electrical power from a proposed privately-owned combustion-turbine electrical generation plant in Washington. The plant would be fired by natural gas and would use combined-cycle technology to generate 240 average megawatts (aMW) of energy. The plant would be developed, owned, and operated by Tenaska Washington Partners II, L.P. The project would be located about 19 kilometers (12 miles) southeast of downtown Tacoma in the Frederickson Industrial Area, Pierce County. The proposed plant would occupy about half of a 6.4-hectare (16-acre) parcel and would be consistent with the industrial character of its surroundings. The proposed site is currently undeveloped and zoned for industrial use by the county. Main environmental concerns identified in the scoping process and in comments on the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) include: (1) potential air quality impacts, such as emissions and their contribution to the {open_quotes}greenhouse{close_quotes} effect; (2) potential health and safety impacts, such as nuisance odors, plant safety, visibility and heat-emission systems which may affect low-flying planes and potential health effects of electric and magnetic fields; and (3) potential water quality and quantity impacts, such as the amount of wastewater to be discharged, the source and amount of water required for plant operation. These and other issues are discussed in detail in the EIS. The proposed project already includes many features designed to reduce environmental impacts. Based on investigations performed for the EIS, no significant unavoidable adverse environmental impacts associated with the proposed project were identified, and no evidence emerged to suggest that the proposed action is controversial. The EIS is being mailed to numerous agencies, groups, and individuals (see Section 8.0). There will be a 30-day no-action period before any decisions are made and the Record of Decision is signed.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Office of General Counsel ­ Markets, Tariffs & Rates Federal Energy Regulatory Commission 888 FirstUNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION 18 CFR Chapter I (Docket No. RM05 Energy Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of Inquiry (NOI). SUMMARY: The Federal Energy Regulatory

Laughlin, Robert B.

290

Environmental impacts of thermochemical biomass conversion. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermochemical conversion in this study is limited to fast pyrolysis, upgrading of fast pyrolysis oils, and gasification. Environmental impacts of all types were considered within the project, but primary emphasis was on discharges to the land, air, and water during and after the conversion processes. The project discussed here is divided into five task areas: (1) pyrolysis oil analysis; (2) hydrotreating of pyrolysis oil; (3) gas treatment systems for effluent minimization; (4) strategic analysis of regulatory requirements; and (5) support of the IEA Environmental Systems Activity. The pyrolysis oil task was aimed at understanding the oil contaminants and potential means for their removal. The hydrotreating task was undertaken to better define one potential means for both improving the quality of the oil but also removing contaminants from the oil. Within Task 3, analyses were done to evaluate the results of gasification product treatment systems. Task 4 was a review and collection of regulatory requirements which would be applicable to the subject processes. The IEA support task included input to and participation in the IEA Bioenergy activity which directly relates to the project subject. Each of these tasks is described along with the results. Conclusions and recommendations from the overall project are given.

Elliott, D.C.; Hart, T.R.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; McKinney, M.D.; Norton, M.V.; Abrams, C.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Legal, regulatory & institutional issues facing distributed resources development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes legal, regulatory, and institutional considerations likely to shape the development and deployment of distributed resources. It is based on research co-sponsored by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and four investor-owned utilities (Central & South West Services, Cinergy Corp., Florida Power Corporation, and San Diego Gas & Electric Company). The research was performed between August 1995 and March 1996 by a team of four consulting firms experienced in energy and utility law, regulation, and economics. It is the survey phase of a project known as the Distributed Resources Institutional Analysis Project.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Supplement Analysis to the 1999 Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Proposed Disposition of Certain Large Containment Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) (DOE/EIS-0238) (DOE 1999a) adequately addresses the environmental effects of introducing a proposed project for the clean-out and decontamination (DECON) of certain large containment vessels into the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Building located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area (TA) 3, or if the SWEIS needs to be supplemented. After undergoing the clean-out and DECON steps, the subject containment vessels would be disposed of at LANL's TA-54 low-level waste (LLW) disposal site or, as appropriate, at a DOE or commercial offsite permitted LLW-regulated landfill; after actinides were recovered from the DECON solution within the CMR Building, they would be moved to LANL's TA-55 Plutonium Facility and undergo subsequent processing at that facility for reuse. Council on Environmental Quality regulations at Title 40, Section 1502.9(c) of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR 1502.9[c]) require federal agencies to prepare a supplement to an environmental impact statement (EIS) when an agency makes substantial changes in the proposed action that are relevant to environmental concerns, or there are changed circumstances or new or changed information relevant to concerns and bearing on the proposed action or its impacts. This SA is prepared in accordance with Section 10 CFR 10211.314(c) of the DOE's regulations for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementation that states: ''When it is unclear whether or not an EIS supplement is required, DOE shall prepare a Supplement Analysis''. This SA specifically compares key impact assessment parameters of the proposed project action with the LANL operations capabilities evaluated in the 1999 SWEIS in support DOE's long-term hydrodynamic testing program at LANL, as well as the waste disposal capabilities evaluated in the SWEIS in support of LANL operations. It also provides an explanation of any differences between the proposed action and activities described in the SWEIS analysis. The SWEIS analyzed the impacts of performing plutonium (Pu) and actinide activities, including hydrodynamic testing support activity, at the Plutonium Facility and at the CMR Building.

N /A

2004-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

293

FINDING INTERSTELLAR PARTICLE IMPACTS ON STARDUST ALUMINIUM FOILS: THE SAFE HANDLING, IMAGING AND ANALYSIS OF SAMPLES CONTAINING FEMTOGRAM RESIDUES.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Particles (ISP): Impact ioni- sation detectors on a suite of spacecraft have shown the direction, velocity, flux and mass distribution of smaller ISP entering the Solar System [1]. During the aphelion segments of high magnification electron im- ages (whilst avoiding contamination of the foils) and comment

294

Productivity and Efficiency of US Gas Transmission Companies: A European Regulatory Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the long- standing regime of cost-plus regulation was complemented by increasing pipe- to-pipe competition, most European countries moved towards incentive regulation complemented by market integration. We study the impact of US regulatory reform using a... by complementing cost- of-service regulation with institutions fostering competition and market integration (O'Neill, 2005), European regulators treat gas transmission as incentive-regulated franchise monopolies (Makholm, 2007). Both, traditional US cost...

Jamasb, Tooraj; Pollitt, Michael G.; Triebs, T

295

Evaluation of impacts and mitigation assessments for the UMTRA Project: Gunnison and Durango pilot studies. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates the impacts assessment and proposed mitigations provided in environmental documents concerning the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The projected impacts and proposed mitigations identified in UMTRA Project environmental documents were evaluated for two UMTRA Project sites. These sites are Gunnison and Durango, which are representative of currently active and inactive UMTRA Project sites, respectively. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation was prepared for the remedial action at Durango and Gunnison as well as for the provision of an alternate water supply system at Gunnison. Additionally, environmental analysis was completed for mill site demolition Gunnison, and for a new road related to the Durango remedial action. The results in this report pertain only to the impact assessments prepared by the Regulatory Compliance staff as a part of the NEPA compliance requirements. Similarly, the mitigative measures documented are those that were identified during the NEPA process.

Beranich, S.J. [Southwest Environmental, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

296

Accident analysis for the low-level mixed waste ``No-Flame`` option in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper outlines the various steps pursued in performing a generic safety assessment of the various technologies considered for the low-level mixed waste (LLMW) ``No-Flame`` option in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The treatment technologies for the ``No-Flame`` option differ from previous LLMW technologies analyzed in the WM PEIS in that the incineration and thermal desorption technologies are replaced by sludge washing, soil washing, debris washing, and organic destruction. A set of dominant waste treatment processes and accident scenarios were selected for analysis by means of a screening process. A subset of results (release source terms) from this analysis is presented.

Folga, S.; Kohout, E.; Mueller, C.J.; Nabelssi, B.; Wilkins, B. [Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (United States); Mishima, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Supplemental results of the human health risk analysis for the U.S. Department of Energy draft waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended as an information supplement to the human health risk analysis performed for the US Department of Energy`s Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste, hereinafter called the PEIS. This report provides the installation-by-installation human health risk analysis results from which the risk estimate summaries for the PEIS were drawn. Readers should bear in mind that the risk estimates presented here are the result of a program-wide (as opposed to site-specific) study. They are based on best available data; systematically applied assumptions; and professional judgment about DOE waste inventories, waste volumes generated annually, currently available treatment and disposal technologies, technical limitations of treatment, and facility capacities across the numerous installations in the DOE complex.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest, 1991 edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest provides a summary of information about the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRC's regulatory responsibilities, and the areas NRC licenses. This digest is a compilation of NRC-related data and is designed to provide a quick reference to major facts about the agency and the industry it regulates. In general, the data cover 1975 through 1990, with exceptions noted. For operating US commercial nuclear power reactors, information on generating capacity and average capacity factor is obtained from Monthly Operating Reports submitted to the NRC directly by the licensee. This information is reviewed for consistency only. No independent validation and/or verification is performed by the NRC. For detailed and complete information about tables and figures, refer to the source publications. This digest is published annually for the general use of the NRC staff and is available to the public. 30 figs., 12 tabs.

Olive, K L

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Economic impacts study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a progress report on the first phase of a project to measure the economic impacts of a rapidly changing U.S. target base. The purpose of the first phase is to designate and test the macroeconomic impact analysis model. Criteria were established for a decision-support model. Additional criteria were defined for an interactive macroeconomic impact analysis model. After a review of several models, the Economic Impact Forecast System model of the U.S. Army Construction Research Laboratory was selected as the appropriate input-output tool that can address local and regional economic analysis. The model was applied to five test cases to demonstrate its utility and define possible revisions to meet project criteria. A plan for EIFS access was defined at three levels. Objectives and tasks for scenario refinement are proposed.

Brunsen, W.; Worley, W.; Frost, E.

1988-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

300

Economic Impacts of Potential Foot and Mouth Disease Agro-terrorism in the United States: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The foot and mouth disease (FMD) virus has high agro-terrorism potential because it is contagious, can be easily transmitted via inanimate objects and can be spread by wind. An outbreak of FMD in developed countries results in massive slaughtering of animals (for disease control) and disruptions in meat supply chains and trade, with potentially large economic losses. Although the United States has been FMD-free since 1929, the potential of FMD as a deliberate terrorist weapon calls for estimates of the physical and economic damage that could result from an outbreak. This paper estimates the economic impacts of three alternative scenarios of potential FMD attacks using a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model of the US economy. The three scenarios range from a small outbreak successfully contained within a state to a large multi-state attack resulting in slaughtering of 30 percent of the national livestock. Overall, the value of total output losses in our simulations range between $37 billion (0.15% of 2006 baseline economic output) and $228 billion (0.92%). Major impacts stem from the supply constraint on livestock due to massive animal slaughtering. As expected, the economic losses are heavily concentrated in agriculture and food manufacturing sectors, with losses ranging from $23 billion to $61 billion in the two industries.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL] [ORNL; Rose, Adam [University of Southern California, Los Angeles] [University of Southern California, Los Angeles; Bumsoo, Lee [University of Illinois] [University of Illinois

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Trawler: de novo regulatory motif discovery pipeline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trawler: de novo regulatory motif discovery pipeline for chromatin immunoprecipitation Laurence, the fastest computational pipeline to date, to efficiently discover over-represented motifs in chromatin present the Trawler pipeline (Fig. 1a) that attempts the de novo identification of all over

Cai, Long

302

A Comparison of International Regulatory Organizations and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Comparison of International Regulatory Organizations and Licensing Procedures for New Nuclear the safety regulation and the licensing of new nuclear power plants. The paper considers both design safety approval and issues of site licensing. Advice from international organisations is summarised. Nuclear power

Aickelin, Uwe

303

Regulatory Promotion of Emergent CCS Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the growing inevitability of climate change and the attendant need for mitigation strategies, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has yet to gain much traction in the United States. Recent regulatory proposals by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), limited in scope to new-build power plants, represent the only significant policy initiative intended to mandate diffusion of CCS technology. Phase I of this Project assessed barriers to CCS deployment as prioritized by the CCS community. That research concluded that there were four primary barriers: (1) cost, (2) lack of a carbon price, (3) liability, and (4) lack of a comprehensive regulatory regime. Phase II of this Project, as presented in this Report, assesses potential regulatory models for CCS and examines where those models address the hurdles to diffusing CCS technology identified in Phase I. It concludes (1) that a CCS-specific but flexible standard, such as a technology performance standard or a very particular type of market-based regulation, likely will promote CCS diffusion, and (2) that these policies cannot work alone, but rather, should be combined with other measures, such as liability limits and a comprehensive CCS regulatory regime.

Davies, Lincoln; Uchitel, Kirsten; Johnson, David

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Integrative approaches for systematic reconstruction of regulatory circuits in mammals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The reconstruction of regulatory networks is one of the most challenging tasks in systems biology. Although some models for inferring regulatory networks can make useful predictions about the wiring and mechanisms of ...

Santos Botelho Oliveira Leite, Ana Paula

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Assessment of Tidal Energy Removal Impacts on Physical Systems: Development of MHK Module and Analysis of Effects on Hydrodynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report we describe (1) the development, test, and validation of the marine hydrokinetic energy scheme in a three-dimensional coastal ocean model (FVCOM); and (2) the sensitivity analysis of effects of marine hydrokinetic energy configurations on power extraction and volume flux in a coastal bay. Submittal of this report completes the work on Task 2.1.2, Effects of Physical Systems, Subtask 2.1.2.1, Hydrodynamics and Subtask 2.1.2.3, Screening Analysis, for fiscal year 2011 of the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy project.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

3D Hydrodynamical Simulations of Surface Convection in Red Giant Stars. Impact on spectral line formation and abundance analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the impact of 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres of red giant stars at different metallicities on the formation of spectral lines of a number of ions and molecules. We carry out realistic 3D simulations of surface convection in red giant stars with varying stellar parameters. We use the simulations as time-dependent hydrodynamical model stellar atmospheres to compute atomic (Li, O, Na, Mg, Ca, Fe) and molecular (CH, NH, OH) spectral lines under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We compare the line strengths computed in 3D with the results of analogous line formation calculations for 1D, hydrostatic, plane-parallel MARCS model atmospheres in order to estimate the impact of 3D models on the derivation of elemental abundances. The temperature and density inhomogeneities and correlated velocities in 3D models, as well as the differences between the 1D and mean 3D structures significantly affect the predicted line strengths. Under the assumption of LTE, the low atmospheric temperatures of very metal-poor 3D model atmospheres cause the lines from neutral species and molecules to appear stronger than in 1D. Therefore, elemental abundances derived from these lines using 3D models are significantly lower than according to 1D analyses. Differences between 3D and 1D abundances of C, N, and O derived from CH, NH, and OH weak low-excitation lines are found to be in the range -0.5 dex to -1.0 dex for the the red giant stars at [Fe/H]=-3 considered here. At this metallicity, large negative corrections (about -0.8 dex) are also found for weak low-excitation Fe I lines. We caution, however, that departures from LTE might be significant for these and other elements and comparable to the effects due to stellar granulation.

Remo Collet; Martin Asplund; Regner Trampedach

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

307

Impacts of Renewable Generation on Fossil Fuel Unit Cycling: Costs and Emissions (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prepared for the Clean Energy Regulatory Forum III, this presentation looks at the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study and reexamines the cost and emissions impacts of fossil fuel unit cycling.

Brinkman, G.; Lew, D.; Denholm, P.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

US Department of Energys Regulatory Negotiations Convening...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Regulatory Negotiations Convening on Commercial Certification for Heating, Ventilating, Air-Conditioning, and Refrigeration Equipment regnegonacconfidentiality.pdf More...

309

Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination VI: Quantitative elemental analysis by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence nanoimaging of eight impact features in aerogel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-ray fluorescence nanoimaging of eight impact features in aerogel Alexandre S. SIMIONOVICI1* , Laurence LEMELLE2

Nittler, Larry R.

310

Integrated Approach to Reconstruction of Microbial Regulatory Networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project had the goal(s) of development of integrated bioinformatics platform for genome-scale inference and visualization of transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) in bacterial genomes. The work was done in Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (SBMRI, P.I. D.A. Rodionov) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL, co-P.I. P.S. Novichkov). The developed computational resources include: (1) RegPredict web-platform for TRN inference and regulon reconstruction in microbial genomes, and (2) RegPrecise database for collection, visualization and comparative analysis of transcriptional regulons reconstructed by comparative genomics. These analytical resources were selected as key components in the DOE Systems Biology KnowledgeBase (SBKB). The high-quality data accumulated in RegPrecise will provide essential datasets of reference regulons in diverse microbes to enable automatic reconstruction of draft TRNs in newly sequenced genomes. We outline our progress toward the three aims of this grant proposal, which were: Develop integrated platform for genome-scale regulon reconstruction; Infer regulatory annotations in several groups of bacteria and building of reference collections of microbial regulons; and Develop KnowledgeBase on microbial transcriptional regulation.

Rodionov, Dmitry A [Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute] [Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute; Novichkov, Pavel S [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

311

Conservation and Evolution of Cis-Regulatory Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation and Evolution of Cis-Regulatory Systems in Ascomycete Fungi Audrey P. Gasch1€*, Alan M expression regulation evolves. To investigate this, we systematically explored the conservation of regulatory, indicating that those regulatory systems have been conserved in multiple ascomycete species. In addition

Gasch, Audrey P.

312

Quarterly project status report, October-December 1981. [Implementation of PURPA by state regulatory authorities and nonregulated utilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Economic Regulatory Administration (ERA) has a requirement to report to Congress on determinations made by State regulatory authorities and nonregulated utilities regarding their purposes of Title I and III of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act, (PURPA) of 1978. The purposes stated in PURPA are to promote conservation of energy supplied by utilities, efficiency in use of utilities, and equitable rates for utility consumers. ERA is also required to assist State regulatory authorities and nonregulated utilities in carrying out their PURPA responsibilities by implementing information dissemination activities. This report summarizes contractual support to ERA in implementing its information data base to its clientele. Progress is reported on: information acquisition/dissemination; information analysis and retrieval; information storage, and information maintenance. (MCW)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Analysis of potential combustion source impacts on acid deposition using an independently derived inventory. Volume II, appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains 2 appendices. The first documents the methodologies used to calculate production, unit energy consumption, fuel type and emission estimates for 16 industries and 35 types of facilities utilizing direct-fired industrial combustion processes, located in 26 states (and the District of Columbia) east of the Mississippi River. As discussed in the text of this report, a U.S. total of 16 industries and 45 types of facilities utilizing direct-fired combustion processes were identified by an elimination type method that was developed based on evaluation of fuel use in industrial SIC codes 20-39 to identify pollutant sources contributing to acid rain. The final population included only plants that have direct-fired fuel consumption greater than or equal to 100 x 10/sup 9/ Btu/yr of equivalent energy consumption. The goal for this analysis was to provide at least a 1980 base year for the data. This was achieved for all of the industries and in fact, 1981 data were used for a number of the industries evaluated. The second contains an analysis of all consumption of major fossil fuels to: (1) identify all fuel usage categories, and (2) identify the kinds of combustion equipment used within each category. This analysis provides a frame of reference for the balance of the study and permits using an energy accounting methodology to quantify the degree to which the inventoried sources in individual consuming sectors are complete and representative of the total population for the sector.

Not Available

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

@ GW Regulatory Studies Center | www.RegulatoryStudies.gwu.edu | Follow us @RegStudies DOE's Proposed Commercial Refrigeration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

equipment, establishing maximum allowable energy usage standards as a function of either refrigerated volume.RegulatoryStudies.gwu.edu | Follow us @RegStudies Source: Department of Energy's Technical Support Document for the Proposed Rule@ GW Regulatory Studies Center | www.RegulatoryStudies.gwu.edu | Follow us @RegStudies DOE

Schmitt, William R.

315

Implementation impacts of PRL methodology. [PRL (Plutonium Recovery Limit)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report responds to a DOE-SR request to evaluate the impacts from implementation of the proposed Plutonium Recovery Limit (PRL) methodology. The PRL Methodology is based on cost minimization for decisions to discard or recover plutonium contained in scrap, residues, and other plutonium bearing materials. Implementation of the PRL methodology may result in decisions to declare as waste certain plutonium bearing materials originally considered to be a recoverable plutonium product. Such decisions may have regulatory impacts, because any material declared to be waste would immediately be subject to provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The decision to discard these materials will have impacts on waste storage, treatment, and disposal facilities. Current plans for the de-inventory of plutonium processing facilities have identified certain materials as candidates for discard based upon the economic considerations associated with extending the operating schedules for recovery of the contained plutonium versus potential waste disposal costs. This report evaluates the impacts of discarding those materials as proposed by the F Area De-Inventory Plan and compares the De-Inventory Plan assessments with conclusions from application of the PRL. The impact analysis was performed for those materials proposed as potential candidates for discard by the De-Inventory Plan. The De-Inventory Plan identified 433 items, containing approximately 1% of the current SRS Pu-239 inventory, as not appropriate for recovery as the site moves to complete the mission of F-Canyon and FB-Line. The materials were entered into storage awaiting recovery as product under the Department's previous Economic Discard Limit (EDL) methodology which valued plutonium at its incremental cost of production in reactors. An application of Departmental PRLs to the subject 433 items revealed that approximately 40% of them would continue to be potentially recoverable as product plutonium.

Caudill, J.A.; Krupa, J.F.; Meadors, R.E.; Odum, J.V.; Rodrigues, G.C.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

E-Print Network 3.0 - abrogates regulatory function Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

actions that are functionally equivalent... : Regulatory Taking Challenges to Local Environmental Regulation Environmental Practicum Memo: Regulatory... , how should a...

317

Evaluating the relationship between use phase environmental impacts and manufacturing process precision  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between use phase environmental impacts and manufacturingprecision and environmental impacts may be developed forDewulf W (2009) Environmental Impact Analysis of Composite

Helu, Moneer; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Plant nitrogen regulatory P-PII genes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention generally relates to plant nitrogen regulatory PII gene (hereinafter P-PII gene), a gene involved in regulating plant nitrogen metabolism. The invention provides P-PII nucleotide sequences, expression constructs comprising said nucleotide sequences, and host cells and plants having said constructs and, optionally expressing the P-PII gene from said constructs. The invention also provides substantially pure P-PII proteins. The P-PII nucleotide sequences and constructs of the

Coruzzi, Gloria M. (New York, NY); Lam, Hon-Ming (Hong Kong, HK); Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun (Woodside, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Plant nitrogen regulatory P-PII polypeptides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention generally relates to plant nitrogen regulatory PII gene (hereinafter P-PII gene), a gene involved in regulating plant nitrogen metabolism. The invention provides P-PII nucleotide sequences, expression constructs comprising said nucleotide sequences, and host cells and plants having said constructs and, optionally expressing the P-PII gene from said constructs. The invention also provides substantially pure P-PII proteins. The P-PII nucleotide sequences and constructs of the invention may be used to engineer organisms to overexpress wild-type or mutant P-PII regulatory protein. Engineered plants that overexpress or underexpress P-PII regulatory protein may have increased nitrogen assimilation capacity. Engineered organisms may be used to produce P-PII proteins which, in turn, can be used for a variety of purposes including in vitro screening of herbicides. P-PII nucleotide sequences have additional uses as probes for isolating additional genomic clones having the promoters of P-PII gene. P-PII promoters are light- and/or sucrose-inducible and may be advantageously used in genetic engineering of plants.

Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Lam, Hon-Ming; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun

2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

320

Environmental impact report (draft)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The three projects as proposed by Pacific Gas and Electric Company and the environmental analysis of the projects are discussed. Sections on the natural and social environments of the proposed projects and their surrounding areas consist of descriptions of the setting, discussions of the adverse and beneficial consequences of the project, and potential mitigation measures to reduce the effects of adverse impacts. The Environmental Impact Report includes discussions of unavoidable adverse effects, irreversible changes, long-term and cumulative impacts, growth-inducing effects, and feasible alternatives to the project. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Supplement Analysis for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory -- Proposed Horizontal Expansion of the Restricted Airspace up to 5,000 feet at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) (DOE/EIS-0238) adequately addresses the environmental effects of modifying the horizontal restricted airspace boundaries at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to include LANL's Technical Areas (TA)-33 and TA-54, or if the SWEIS needs to be supplemented. Council on Environmental Quality regulations at Title 40, Section 1502.9(c) of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR 1502.9[c]) require federal agencies to prepare a supplement to an EIS when an agency makes substantial changes in the Proposed Action that are relevant to Environmental concerns or when there are new circumstances or information relevant to environmental concerns and bearing on the Proposed Action or its impacts. This SA specifically compares key impact assessment parameters of this proposal to the SWEIS impact analysis, and considers LANL operational accident analyses. The Sa concludes with a finding of fact regarding whether the environmental effects of the Proposed Action are adequately bounded by the analyses of impacts projected by the 1999 Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, or whether a Supplemental EIS is required.

N /A

2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

322

FUEL CASK IMPACT LIMITER VULNERABILITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cylindrical fuel casks often have impact limiters surrounding just the ends of the cask shaft in a typical 'dumbbell' arrangement. The primary purpose of these impact limiters is to absorb energy to reduce loads on the cask structure during impacts associated with a severe accident. Impact limiters are also credited in many packages with protecting closure seals and maintaining lower peak temperatures during fire events. For this credit to be taken in safety analyses, the impact limiter attachment system must be shown to retain the impact limiter following Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) impacts. Large casks are often certified by analysis only because of the costs associated with testing. Therefore, some cask impact limiter attachment systems have not been tested in real impacts. A recent structural analysis of the T-3 Spent Fuel Containment Cask found problems with the design of the impact limiter attachment system. Assumptions in the original Safety Analysis for Packaging (SARP) concerning the loading in the attachment bolts were found to be inaccurate in certain drop orientations. This paper documents the lessons learned and their applicability to impact limiter attachment system designs.

Leduc, D; Jeffery England, J; Roy Rothermel, R

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

323

Regulatory Reform to Promote Clean Energy: The Potential of Output-Based Emissions Standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Barriers to industrial energy-efficient technologies hinder their use. A number of EPA analyses and industrial experts have found that the utilization of input-based emissions standards (measured in parts-per-million or pounds/MMBtu) in the Clean Air Act creates a regulatory barrier to the installation and deployment of technologies that emit fewer criteria pollutants and use energy more efficiently. Changing emission management strategies to an output-based emissions standard (measured in tons of pollutant emitted) is a way to ameliorate some of these barriers. Combined heat and power (CHP) is one of the key technologies that would see increased industrial application if the emissions standards were modified. Many states have made this change since the EPA first approved it in 2000, although direction from the Federal government could speed implementation modifications. To analyze the national impact of accelerated state adoption of output-based standards on CHP technologies, this paper uses detailed National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and spreadsheet analysis illustrating two phased-in adoption scenarios for output-based emissions standards in the industrial sector. Benefit/cost metrics are calculated from a private and public perspective, and also a social perspective that considers the criteria and carbon air pollution emissions. These scenarios are compared to the reference case of AEO 2010 and are quite favorable, with a social benefit-cost ratio of 16.0 for a five-year phase-in scenario. In addition, the appropriateness of the Federal role, applicability, technology readiness, and administrative feasibility are discussed.

Cox, Matthew [Georgia Institute of Technology] [Georgia Institute of Technology; Brown, Dr. Marilyn Ann [Georgia Institute of Technology] [Georgia Institute of Technology; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

EA-0923: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Significant Impact EA-0923: Finding of No Significant Impact Winnett School District Boiler Replacement Project Based on the analysis in the Environmental Assessment, the...

325

EA-0931: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

No Significant Impact EA-0931: Finding of No Significant Impact Center for Molecular Electronics University of Missouri, St. Louis Based on the analysis in the environmental...

326

EA-1178: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1178: Finding of No Significant Impact 300 Area Steam Plant Replacement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Based on the analysis in the EA,...

327

Impact of Interface Recombination on Time Resolved Photoluminescence (TRPL) Decays in CdTe Solar Cells (Numerical Simulation Analysis): Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using Sentaurus Device Software, we analyze how bulk and interface recombination affect time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) decays in CdTe solar cells. This modeling analysis could improve the interpretation of TRPL data and increase the possibility of rapid defect characterization in thin-film solar cells. By illuminating the samples with photons of two different wavelengths, we try to deduce the spatial origin of the dominant recombination loss. Shorter-wavelength photons will be more affected by the interface recombination and drift compared to the longer ones. Using the two-wavelength TRPL characterization method, it may be possible to determine whether a specific change in deposition process has affected the properties of interface or the bulk of the absorber.

Kanevce, A.; Kuciauskas, D.; Gessert, T. A.; Levi, D. H.; Albin, D. S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Impact of Interface Recombination on Time Resolved Photoluminescence Decays (TRPL) in CdTe Solar Cells (Numerical Simulation Analysis) (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using Sentaurus Device Software, we analyze how bulk and interface recombination affect time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) decays in CdTe solar cells. This modeling analysis could improve the interpretation of TRPL data and increase the possibility of rapid defect characterization in thin-film solar cells. By illuminating the samples with photons of two different wavelengths, we try to deduce the spatial origin of the dominant recombination loss. Shorter-wavelength photons will be more affected by the interface recombination and drift compared to the longer ones. Using the two-wavelength TRPL characterization method, it may be possible to determine whether a specific change in deposition process has affected the properties of interface or the bulk of the absorber.

Kanevce, A.; Kuciauskas, D.; Gessert, T. A.; Levi, D. H.; Albin, D. S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Analysis of Global Economic and Environmental Impacts of a Substantial Increase in Bioenergy Wallace E. Tyner (wtyner@purdue.edu), Thomas W. Hertel, Farzad Taheripour*, and Dileep K. Birur  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of Global Economic and Environmental Impacts of a Substantial Increase in Bioenergy much insight into how alternative bioenergy production scenarios could change global agricultural markets and land-use, with repercussions for international trade. As the World Bank reports, nearly 70

330

Rules implementing Sections 201 and 210 of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978: a regulatory history  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis is made of the rules implementing Sections 201 and 210 of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA). The act provides that utilities must purchase power from qualifying producers of electricity at nondiscriminatory rates, and it exempts private generators from virtually all state and Federal utility regulations. Most of the analysis presented is taken from the perspective of photovoltaics (PV) and solar thermal electric point-focusing distributed receivers (pfdr). It is felt, however, that the analysis is applicable both to cogeneration and other emerging technologies. Chapters presented are: The FERC Response to Oral Comments on the Proposed Rules Implementing Sections 201 and 210 of PURPA; Additional Changes Made or Not Made That Were Addressed in Other Than Oral Testimony; View on the Proposed Rules Implementing Sections 201 and 210 of PURPA; Response to Comments on the Proposed 201 and 210 Rules; and Summary Analysis of the Environmental Assessment of the Rules. Pertinent reference material is provided in the Appendices, including the text of the rules. (MCW)

Danziger, R.N.; Caples, P.W.; Huning, J.R.

1980-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Resolving piping analysis issues to minimize impact on installation activities during refueling outage at nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While it is required to maintain piping code compliance for all phases of installation activities during outages at a nuclear plant, it is equally essential to reduce challenges to the installation personnel on how plant modification work should be performed. Plant betterment activities that incorporate proposed design changes are continually implemented during the outages. Supporting analysis are performed to back these activities for operable systems. The goal is to reduce engineering and craft man-hours and minimize outage time. This paper outlines how plant modification process can be streamlined to facilitate construction teams to do their tasks that involve safety related piping. In this manner, installation can proceed by minimizing on the spot analytical effort and reduce downtime to support the proposed modifications. Examples are provided that permit performance of installation work in any sequence. Piping and hangers including the branch lines are prequalified and determined operable. The system is up front analyzed for all possible scenarios. The modification instructions in the work packages is flexible enough to permit any possible installation sequence. The benefit to this approach is large enough in the sense that valuable outage time is not extended and on site analytical work is not required.

Bhavnani, D. [Public Service Electric and Gas Co., Hancocks Bridge, NJ (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Economic Impact of the Florida Apiculture Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Economic Impact of the Florida Apiculture Industry Economics Report 01-1 By Alan Hodges, David and Agricultural Sciences Department of Food & Resource Economics Department of Entomology/ Nematology Gainesville .......................................................................................................................................12 Economic Impact Analysis

Florida, University of

333

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel Cell VehicleEnergy (5 Activities) GeothermalHeatRegulatory

334

Regulatory Burden RFI | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 |RebeccaRegional StandardsExecutive OrderTheRegulatory

335

NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D. C. 20555  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCT 28 1% - :NEW YORIC LedouxREGULATORY

336

Sandia National Laboratories: Pollution Prevention: Regulatory Drivers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik SpoerkeSolar Regional Test Center inInsights forAwards 2010Regulatory

337

Sandia National Laboratories: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS Exhibit at Explora Museum OnFact SheetsEnergy Regulatory

338

Environmental regulatory update table, July/August 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Salk, M.S.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, July--August 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Environmental sciences division: Environmental regulatory update table July 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Environmental regulatory update table, September--October 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January/February 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action. This table is for January/February 1992.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January--February 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November--December 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly wit information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, May--June 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bimonthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Salk, M.S.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Environmental regulatory update table: September/October 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Salk, M.S.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, September/October 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operation and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January--February 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations ad contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November--December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, March/April 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Information resources in state regulatory agencies-a California perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various state regulatory agencies have expressed a need for networking with information gatherers/researchers to produce a concise compilation of primary information so that the basis for regulatory standards can be scientifically referenced. California has instituted several programs to retrieve primary information, generate primary information through research, and generate unique regulatory standards by integrating the primary literature and the products of research. This paper describes these programs.

DiZio, S.M. [California Environmental Protection Agency, Sacramento (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

RESEARCH ARTICLE Environmental impact of greenhouse tomato production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ARTICLE Environmental impact of greenhouse tomato production in France Thierry Boulard Abstract The environmental impact of greenhouse pro- duction in France is poorly documented. Environmental production under polytunnel. Environmental impacts where assessed by life cycle analysis. Analyses were

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

353

Regulatory treatment of allowances and compliance costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) established a national emission allowance trading system, a market-based form of environmental regulation designed to reduce and limit sulfur dioxide emissions. However, the allowance trading system is being applied primarily to an economically regulated electric utility industry. The combining of the new form of environmental regulation and economic regulation of electric utilities has raised a number of questions including what the role should be of the federal and state utility regulating commissions and how those actions will affect the decision making process of the utilities and the allowance market. There are several dimensions to the regulatory problems that commissions face. Allowances and utility compliance expenditures have implications for least-cost/IPR (integrated resource planning), prudence review procedures, holding company and multistate utility regulation and ratemaking treatment. The focus of this paper is on the ratemaking treatment. The following topics are covered: ratemaking treatment of allowances and compliance costs; Traditional cost-recovery mechanisms; limitations to the traditional approach; traditional approach and the allowance trading market; market-based cost recovery mechanisms; methods of determining the benchmark; determining the split between ratepayers and the utility; other regulatory approaches; limitations of incentive mechanisms.

Rose, K. [National Regulatory Research Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Analysis of methods and models for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes in the agricultural sector of the US economy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this research was to assist the US Department of Energy (DOE) in developing methods for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts due to the effects of increases in the ambient concentration of CO/sub 2/ on agricultural production. First, a comprehensive literature search was undertaken to determine what types of models and methods have been developed, which could be effectively used to conduct assessments of the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/ buildup. Specific attention was focused upon models and methods for assessing the physical impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes on crop yields; national and multi-regional agricultural sector models; and macroeconomic models of the US economy. The second task involved a thorough investigation of the research efforts being conducted by other public and private sector organizations in order to determine how more recent analytical methods being developed outside of DOE could be effectively integrated into a more comprehensive analysis of the direct economic impacts of CO/sub 2/ buildup. The third and final task involved synthesizing the information gathered in the first two tasks into a systematic framework for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes originating in the agricultural sector of the US economy. It is concluded that the direct economic impacts of CO/sub 2/ on the agricultural sector and the indirect economic impacts caused by spillover effects from agriculture to other sectors of the economy will be pervasive; however, the direction and magnitude of these impacts on producers and consumers cannot be determined a priori.

Callaway, J.M.; Cronin, F.J.; Currie, J.W.; Tawil, J.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Canada-United States Regulatory Cooperation Council Webinar:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

is a presentation from the January 12, 2015 Canada-United States Regulatory Cooperation Council webinar for Natural Resources Canada and the US Department of Energy regarding a...

356

Comments on Request For Information regarding Reducing Regulatory...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Request For Information regarding Reducing Regulatory Reform issued February 3, 2011 (Federal Register Vol. 76, No. 23 Thursday, February 3, 2011 Notices). Comments on Request...

357

Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommenda...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommendations to the NRC Committee on Research Universities Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy:...

358

Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Overview of DOE's Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop (RAPID) Toolkit project, providing information on where to go to view documents and who to contact to get involved.

Young, K.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) - List of Covered Electric Utilities. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy...

360

activities international regulatory: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

through active, but not inactive, regulatory links1,2. Thus Dunlop, Mary 4 INTERNAL AUDIT ACTIVITY ANNUAL REPORT Engineering Websites Summary: management, control, and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Department of Energy Commends the Nuclear Regulatory Commission...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Commission's Approval of a Second Early Site Permit in Just One Month Department of Energy Commends the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Approval of a Second Early Site Permit...

362

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics:...

363

Sandia National Laboratories: Policy and Regulatory, Codes and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Grid-Tied PV System Energy Smoothing Tagged with: Codes * Energy * photovoltaic * Photovoltaics * Policy * PV * Regulatory * Renewable Energy * SAND2012-2566W * solar * Solar...

364

Panel 4, Grid-Scale Storage Technologies: Regulatory Barriers...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Grid-scale Storage Technologies Regulatory Barriers and Policy Instruments Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services May 15 th , 2014 Sacramento, CA Demand 599...

365

Public Utility Regulatory Act, Alternative Energy Providers (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Chapter 35 of the Public Utility Regulatory Act specifically addresses alternative energy providers, and contains provisions designed to aid such providers in selling power in Texas's competitive...

366

Determinants of effective information transfer in international regulatory standards adoption.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The role of international regulatory standards within the current global environment has become of the most importance. The age of the global system and… (more)

Popescu, Denisa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

TRAINING THE STAFF OF THE REGULATORY BODY FOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES:  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training the staff of the regulatory body for nuclear facilities: A competency framework November 2001The originating Section of this publication in the IAEA was:

Wagramer Strasse; A Competency Framework

368

UNIT NAME C-611 PCB Spill Site REGULATORY STATUS CERCLA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

79 UNIT NAME C-611 PCB Spill Site REGULATORY STATUS CERCLA LOCATION C-611 Transformer area (Map location 79) APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS FUNCTION Spill Site OPERATIONAL STATUS NA DATES...

369

Cost analysis guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies.

Strait, R.S.

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

370

Supplement to the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On May 22, 1997, DOE published a Notice of Intent in the Federal Register (62 Federal Register 28009) announcing its decision to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) that would tier from the analysis and decisions reached in connection with the ''Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic EIS (Storage and Disposition PEIS)''. ''The Surplus Plutonium Disposition Draft Environmental Impact Statement'' (SPD Draft EIS) (DOWEIS-0283-D) was prepared in accordance with NEPA and issued in July 1998. It identified the potential environmental impacts of reasonable alternatives for the proposed siting, construction, and operation of three facilities for plutonium disposition. These three facilities would accomplish pit disassembly and conversion, immobilization, and MOX fuel fabrication. For the alternatives that included MOX fuel fabrication, the draft also described the potential environmental impacts of using from three to eight commercial nuclear reactors to irradiate MOX fuel. The potential impacts were based on a generic reactor analysis that used actual reactor data and a range of potential site conditions. In May 1998, DCE initiated a procurement process to obtain MOX fuel fabrication and reactor irradiation services. The request for proposals defined limited activities that may be performed prior to issuance of the SPD EIS Record of Decision (ROD) including non-site-specific work associated with the development of the initial design for the MOX fuel fabrication facility, and plans (paper studies) for outreach, long lead-time procurements, regulatory management, facility quality assurance, safeguards, security, fuel qualification, and deactivation. No construction on the proposed MOX facility would begin before an SPD EIS ROD is issued. In March 1999, DOE awarded a contract to Duke Engineering & Services; COGEMA, Inc.; and Stone & Webster (known as DCS) to provide the requested services. The procurement process included the environmental review specified in DOE's NEPA regulations in 10 CFR 1021.216. The six reactors selected are Catawba Nuclear Station Units 1 and 2 in South Carolina McGuire Nuclear Station Units 1 and 2 in North Carolina, and North Anna Power Station Units 1 and 2 in Virginia. The Supplement describes the potential environmental impacts of using MOX fuel in these six specific reactors named in the DCS proposal as well as other program changes made since the SPD Draft EIS was published.

N /A

1999-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

371

Preservation and Implementation of Decommissioning Lessons Learned in the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past several years, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has actively worked to capture and preserve lessons learned from the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. More recently, NRC has involved industry groups, the Organization of Agreement States (OAS), and the Department of Energy (DOE) in the effort to develop approaches to capture, preserve and disseminate decommissioning lessons learned. This paper discusses the accomplishments of the working group, some lessons learned by the NRC in the recent past, and how NRC will incorporate these lessons learned into its regulatory framework. This should help ensure that the design and operation of current and future nuclear facilities will result in less environmental impact and more efficient decommissioning. In summary, the NRC will continue capturing today's experience in decommissioning so that future facilities can take advantage of lessons learned from today's decommissioning projects. NRC, both individually and collectively with industry groups, OAS, and DOE, is aggressively working on the preservation and implementation of decommissioning lessons learned. The joint effort has helped to ensure the lessons from the whole spectrum of decommissioning facilities (i.e., reactor, fuel cycle, and material facilities) are better understood, thus maximizing the amount of knowledge and best practices obtained from decommissioning activities. Anticipated regulatory activities at the NRC will make sure that the knowledge gained from today's decommissioning projects is preserved and implemented to benefit the nuclear facilities that will decommission in the future.

Rodriguez, Rafael L. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Federal and State Materials and Environmental Management Programs, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Innovation Impact: Breakthrough Research Results (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Innovation Impact brochure captures key breakthrough results across NREL's primary areas of renewable energy and energy efficiency research: solar, wind, bioenergy, transportation, buildings, analysis, and manufacturing technologies.

Not Available

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Economic Impact & Diversity (WCF) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in the future. Economic Impact & Diversity Responsible Contacts Thomas Wheeler Director, Workforce Analysis & Planning Division E-mail thomas.wheeler@hq.doe.gov Phone (202)...

374

Staff Report to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

affecting competitive pricing of electric energy or reliability of service and (b) report its findingsStaff Report to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the Bulk Power Markets In the United of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, any individual Commissioner, or the Commission itself

Laughlin, Robert B.

375

ERDC/ELTR-10-17 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-10-17 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program A Regional Guidebook for Applying the Hydrogeomorphic Approach to the Functional Assessment of Forested Wetlands in Alluvial Valleys of East Texas Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC

US Army Corps of Engineers

376

ERDC/ELTR-12-5 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-12-5 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Hawai`i and Pacific Islands Region (Version 2.0) EnvironmentalLaboratory U;#12;Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC/EL TR-12-5 February 2012 Regional Supplement to the Corps

US Army Corps of Engineers

377

ERDC/ELTR-11-11 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-11-11 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Guidebook for Applying the Hydrogeomorphic Approach to Assessing the Functions of Headwater Slope Wetlands on the South Carolina Coastal Ainslie September 2011 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands Regulatory

US Army Corps of Engineers

378

ERDC/ELTR-10-1 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-10-1 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Great Plains Region (Version 2.0) U.S. Army Corps of Engineers March 2010 EnvironmentalLaboratory Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands Regulatory

US Army Corps of Engineers

379

ERDC/ELTR-12-9 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-12-9 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Eastern Mountains and Piedmont Region (Version 2.0) EnvironmentalLaboratory U;#12;Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC/EL TR-12-9 April 2012 Regional Supplement to the Corps

US Army Corps of Engineers

380

ERDC/ELTR-10-16 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-10-16 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Midwest Region (Version 2.0) EnvironmentalLaboratory U.S. Army Corps of Engineers August 2010 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands Regulatory

US Army Corps of Engineers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Codes and standards and other guidance cited in regulatory documents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Standard Review Plan Update and Development Program (SRP-UDP), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a listing of industry consensus codes and standards and other government and industry guidance referred to in regulatory documents. The SRP-UDP has been completed and the SRP-Maintenance Program (SRP-MP) is now maintaining this listing. Besides updating previous information, Revision 3 adds approximately 80 citations. This listing identifies the version of the code or standard cited in the regulatory document, the regulatory document, and the current version of the code or standard. It also provides a summary characterization of the nature of the citation. This listing was developed from electronic searches of the Code of Federal Regulations and the NRC`s Bulletins, Information Notices, Circulars, Enforcement Manual, Generic Letters, Inspection Manual, Policy Statements, Regulatory Guides, Standard Technical Specifications and the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800).

Nickolaus, J.R.; Bohlander, K.L.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

4, 40374067, 2007 Impact of Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HESSD 4, 4037­4067, 2007 Impact of Climate Change in Thuringia P. Krause and S. Hanisch Title Page and analysis of the impact of climate change on the hydrological dynamics in Thuringia, Germany P. Krause and S. Krause (p.krause@uni-jena.de) 4037 #12;HESSD 4, 4037­4067, 2007 Impact of Climate Change in Thuringia P

Boyer, Edmond

383

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Handling of Beyond Design Basis Events for Nuclear Power Reactors  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presenter: Bill Reckley, Chief, Policy and Support Branch, Japan Lessons-Learned Project Directorate, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

384

E-Print Network 3.0 - adipor1 regulatory region Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

was lower in mi... regulatory machinery of the cell. Keywords: Dicer; gene regulatory networks; miRNA targets; micro Source: Bartel, David - Whitehead Institute for Biomedical...

385

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, May/June 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a bi-monthly update of environmental regulatory activity that is of interest to the Department of Energy. It is provided to DOE operations and contractor staff to assist and support environmental management programs by tracking regulatory developments. Any proposed regulation that raises significant issues for any DOE operation should be reported to the Office of Environmental Guidance (EH-23) as soon as possible so that the Department can make its concerns known to the appropriate regulatory agency. Items of particular interest to EH-23 are indicated by a shading of the RU{number_sign}.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, May/June 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a bi-monthly update of environmental regulatory activity that is of interest to the Department of Energy. It is provided to DOE operations and contractor staff to assist and support environmental management programs by tracking regulatory developments. Any proposed regulation that raises significant issues for any DOE operation should be reported to the Office of Environmental Guidance (EH-23) as soon as possible so that the Department can make its concerns known to the appropriate regulatory agency. Items of particular interest to EH-23 are indicated by a shading of the RU{number sign}.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

The waste isolation pilot plant regulatory compliance program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The passage of the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act of 1992 (LWA) marked a turning point for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) program. It established a Congressional mandate to open the WIPP in as short a time as possible, thereby initiating the process of addressing this nation`s transuranic (TRU) waste problem. The DOE responded to the LWA by shifting the priority at the WIPP from scientific investigations to regulatory compliance and the completion of prerequisites for the initiation of operations. Regulatory compliance activities have taken four main focuses: (1) preparing regulatory submittals; (2) aggressive schedules; (3) regulator interface; and (4) public interactions

Mewhinney, J.A. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Kehrman, R.F. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis. That growth in renewable energy generation maypurchasing renewable energy or RECs. Load growth: Reflects

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

EIS-0083: Final Northeast Regional Environmental Impact Statement; The Potential Conversion of Forty-Two Powerplants From Oil to Coal or Alternate Fuels  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Economic Regulatory Administration statement assesses the potential for cumulative and interactive environmental impacts resulting from conversion of up to 42 northeastern power plants from oil to coal and from an alternative “Voluntary Conversion” scenario for 27 power plants.

390

Enclosure 3 TECHNICAL AND REGULATORY SUPPORT DOCUMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....................................................................................................30 d. Equivalent QA Program........................................................................................................................25 6. Implementation of Characterization Methodologies to Satisfy DQOs................................................................................................31 III. EPA'S ANALYSIS OF DOE'S PROPOSED RH PROGRAM

391

United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff practice and procedure digest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Revision 9 of the fifth edition of the NRC Staff Practice and Procedure Digest contains a digest of a number of Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board, and Atomic Safety and Licensing Board decisions issued during the period from July 1, 1972 to September 30, 1990 interpreting the NRC's Rules of Practice in 10 CFR Part 2. This Revision 9 replaces in part earlier editions and revisions and includes appropriate changes reflecting the amendments to the Rules of Practice effective through September 30, 1990. This edition of the Digest was prepared by attorneys from Aspen Systems Corporation pursuant to Contract number 18-89-346. Persons using this Digest are placed on notice that it may not be used as an authoritative citation in support of any position before the Commission or any of its adjudicatory tribunals. Persons using this Digest are also placed on notice that it is intended for use only as an initial research tool, that it may, and likely does, contain errors, including errors in analysis and interpretation of decisions, and that the user should not rely on the Digest analyses and interpretations but must read, analyze and rely on the user's own analysis of the actual Commission, Appeal Board and Licensing Board decisions cited. Further, neither the United States, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Aspen Systems Corporation, nor any of their employees makes any expressed or implied warranty or assumes liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any material presented in the Digest. The Digest is roughly structured in accordance with the chronological sequence of the nuclear facility licensing process as set forth in Appendix A to 10 CFR Part 2. Those decisions which did not fit into that structure are dealt with in a section on general matters. Where appropriate, particular decisions are indexed under more than one heading. (JF)

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research: Quarterly progress report, July 1-September 30, 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report will describe current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the Division of Accident Evaluation, Division of Engineering Technology, and Division of Risk Analysis and Operations of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The projects reported are the following: High Temperature Reactor Research, SSC code improvements, Thermal-Hydraulic Reactor Safety Experiments, Thermodynamic Core-Concrete Interaction Experiments and Analysis, Plant Analyzer, Code Assessment and Application, Code Maintenance (RAMONA-3B), MELCOR Verification and Benchmarking, Source Term Code Package Verification and Benchmarking, Uncertainty Analysis of the Source Term; Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing, Soil-Structure Interaction Evaluation and Structural Benchmarks, Identification of Age Related Failure Modes; Application of HRA/PRA Results to Support Resolution of Generic Safety Issues Involving Human Performance, Protective Action Decisionmaking, Rebaseling of Risk for Zion, Containment Performance Design Objective, and Operational Safety Reliability Research.

Bari, R.A.; Bezler, P.; Boccio, J.L.; Ginsberg, T.; Greene, G.A.; Guppy, J.G.; Hall, R.E.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Khatib-Rahbar, H.; Luckas, W.J. Jr.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission fifteenth water reactor safety information meeting: Volume 1, Plenary sessions, reactor licensing topics, NUREG-1150, risk analysis/PRA applications, innovative concepts for increased safety of advanced power reactors, severe accident modeling and analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This six-volume report contains 140 papers out of the 164 that were presented at the Fifteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Maryland, during the week of October 26-29, 1987. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. This report, Volume 1, discusses the following: plenary sessions; reactor licensing; NUREG-1150; risk analysis; innovative concepts for increased safety of advanced power reactors; and severe accident modeling and analysis. Thirty-two reports have been cataloged separately.

Weiss, A.J. (comp.)

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

SEC Confidential Treatment Orders: Balancing Competing Regulatory Objectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study examines how the Securities and Exchange Commission balances competing regulatory objectives in its decisions to approve requests to withhold proprietary information from firms' financial reports. The confidential treatment process...

Thompson, Anne Margaret

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

395

Regulatory guidance for lightning protection in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was engaged by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) to develop the technical basis for regulatory guidance to address design and implementation practices for lightning protection systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Lightning protection is becoming increasingly important with the advent of digital and low-voltage analog systems in NPPs. These systems have the potential to be more vulnerable than older analog systems to the resulting power surges and electromagnetic interference (EMI) when lightning strikes facilities or power lines. This paper discusses the technical basis for guidance to licensees and applicants covered in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.204, Guidelines for Lightning Protection of Nuclear Power Plants, issued August 2005. RG 1.204 describes guidance for practices that are acceptable to the NRC staff for protecting nuclear power structures and systems from direct lightning strikes and the resulting secondary effects. (authors)

Kisner, R. A.; Wilgen, J. B.; Ewing, P. D.; Korsah, K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6007 (United States); Antonescu, C. E. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Regulatory Guidance for Lightning Protection in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract - Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was engaged by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) to develop the technical basis for regulatory guidance to address design and implementation practices for lightning protection systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Lightning protection is becoming increasingly important with the advent of digital and low-voltage analog systems in NPPs. These systems have the potential to be more vulnerable than older analog systems to the resulting power surges and electromagnetic interference (EMI) when lightning strikes facilities or power lines. This paper discusses the technical basis for guidance to licensees and applicants covered in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.204, Guidelines for Lightning Protection of Nuclear Power Plants, issued August 2005. RG 1.204 describes guidance for practices that are acceptable to the NRC staff for protecting nuclear power structures and systems from direct lightning strikes and the resulting secondary effects.

Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Ewing, Paul D [ORNL; Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Antonescu, Christina E [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 Fed. Reg. 75798 (Dec. 5, 2011) Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 75798 (Dec. 5, 2011) The Edison Electric Institute (EEI) is submitting...

398

Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 Fed. Reg. 28518 (May 15, 2012) Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Fed. Reg. 28518 (May 15, 2012) The Edison Electric Institute (EEI) is submitting...

399

Inferring regulatory networks from multiple sources of genomic data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) algorithm to identify the regulatory models from protein-DNA binding and gene expression data. These models to a large extent agree with the knowledge of gene regulation pertaining to the corresponding regulators. ...

Yeang, Chen-Hsiang, 1969-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Regulatory Assistance, Stakeholder Outreach, and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Activities in Support of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Deployment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fiscal year 2011 progress report summarizes activities carried out under DOE Water Power Task 2.1.7, Permitting and Planning. Activities under Task 2.1.7 address the concerns of a wide range of stakeholders with an interest in the development of the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry, including regulatory and resource management agencies, tribes, nongovernmental organizations, and industry. Objectives for Task 2.1.7 are the following: • to work with stakeholders to streamline the MHK regulatory permitting process • to work with stakeholders to gather information on needs and priorities for environmental assessment of MHK development • to communicate research findings and directions to the MHK industry and stakeholders • to engage in spatial planning processes in order to further the development of the MHK industry. These objectives are met through three subtasks, each of which is described in this report: • 2.1.7.1—Regulatory Assistance • 2.1.7.2—Stakeholder Outreach • 2.1.7.3—Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning. As MHK industry partners work with the regulatory community and stakeholders to plan, site, permit, and license MHK technologies, they have an interest in a predictable, efficient, and transparent process. Stakeholders and regulators have an interest in processes that result in sustainable use of ocean space with minimal effects to existing ocean users. Both stakeholders and regulators have an interest in avoiding legal challenges by meeting the intent of federal, state, and local laws that govern siting and operation of MHK technologies. The intention of work under Task 2.1.7 is to understand and work to address these varied interests, reduce conflict, identify efficiencies, and ultimately reduce the regulatory costs, time, and potential environmental impacts associated with developing, siting, permitting, and deploying MHK systems.

Geerlofs, Simon H.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Blake, Kara M.; Hanna, Luke A.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Utility & Regulatory Factors Affecting Cogeneration & Independent Power Plant Design & Operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UTILITY & REGULATORY FACTORS AFFECTiNG COGENERATION & INDEPENDENT POWER PLANT DESIGN & OPERATION Richard P. Felak General Electric Company Schenectady, New York ABSTRACT In specifying a cogeneration or independent power plant, the owner... should be especially aware of the influences which electric utilities and regulatory bodies will have on key parameters such as size, efficiency, design. reliability/ availabilitY, operating capabilities and modes, etc. This paper will note examples...

Felak, R. P.

402

Regulatory and extra-regulatory testing to demonstrate radioactive material packaging safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Packages for the transportation of radioactive material must meet performance criteria to assure safety and environmental protection. The stringency of the performance criteria is based on the degree of hazard of the material being transported. Type B packages are used for transporting large quantities of radioisotopes (in terms of A{sub 2} quantities). These packages have the most stringent performance criteria. Material with less than an A{sub 2} quantity are transported in Type A packages. These packages have less stringent performance criteria. Transportation of LSA and SCO materials must be in {open_quotes}strong-tight{close_quotes} packages. The performance requirements for the latter packages are even less stringent. All of these package types provide a high level of safety for the material being transported. In this paper, regulatory tests that are used to demonstrate this safety will be described. The responses of various packages to these tests will be shown. In addition, the response of packages to extra-regulatory tests will be discussed. The results of these tests will be used to demonstrate the high level of safety provided to workers, the public, and the environment by packages used for the transportation of radioactive material.

Ammerman, D.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment: A Review of Methods and an Empirical Analysis (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To gain an understanding of the long-term county-level impacts from a large sample of wind power projects and to understand the potential significance of methodological criticisms, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and NREL recently joined efforts to complete a first-of-its-kind study that quantifies the annual impact on county-level personal income resulting from wind power installations in nearly 130 counties across 12 states. The results of this study, as well as a comparison with the prior county-level estimates generated from input-output models, are summarized here.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop (RAPID) Toolkit (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop (RAPID) Toolkit combines the former Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Database, and other resources into a Web-based tool that gives the regulatory and utility-scale geothermal developer communities rapid and easy access to permitting information. RAPID currently comprises five tools - Permitting Atlas, Regulatory Roadmap, Resource Library, NEPA Database, and Best Practices. A beta release of an additional tool, the Permitting Wizard, is scheduled for late 2014. Because of the huge amount of information involved, RAPID was developed in a wiki platform to allow industry and regulatory agencies to maintain the content in the future so that it continues to provide relevant and accurate information to users. In 2014, the content was expanded to include regulatory requirements for utility-scale solar and bulk transmission development projects. Going forward, development of the RAPID Toolkit will focus on expanding the capabilities of current tools, developing additional tools, including additional technologies, and continuing to increase stakeholder involvement.

Young, K. R.; Levine, A.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Moving from Status to Trends: Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium 2012 367GTR-NRS-P-105 IMPACTS OF NITROGEN AND SULFUR DEPOSITION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relationship between tree growth and critical load exceedance (based on curve describing forest productivity and S is greater than the critical load may be examples of such forest conditions. When critical loads are exceeded a positive or negative impact on tree growth may depend largely upon whether the critical load is exceeded

406

Analysis of the principal's perceptions of the implementation and impact of the accelerated reader and other selected reading strategies used by Texas gold performance elementary schools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) to identify the principal??s perception of the levels of implementation and impact of selected reading strategies used by selected elementary schools in Texas to improve student success in reading and (2) to determine the principal??s perception of the extent...

Elmore, Olivia Carol

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

407

Analysis of the Impact of Balancing Area Cooperation on the Operation of WECC and the Compounding Effect of Wind and Solar Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is the intent of this analysis to examine the operational benefits of increased cooperation between a large number of WECC operating regions.

Jordan, G.; Piwko, D.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Economic Impact Reporting Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2007/08 November 2008 #12;#12;Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2007/08 #12;STFC Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2007/08 Contents: Introduction..............................................................................................................................................2 1: Overall Economic Impacts

409

Economic Impact Reporting Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2008/09 #12;#12;Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2008/09 #12;STFC Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2008/09 Contents: Introduction..............................................................................................................................................2 1: Overall Economic Impacts

410

Evolutionary conservation of regulatory elements in vertebrate HOX gene clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to their high degree of conservation, comparisons of DNA sequences among evolutionarily distantly-related genomes permit to identify functional regions in noncoding DNA. Hox genes are optimal candidate sequences for comparative genome analyses, because they are extremely conserved in vertebrates and occur in clusters. We aligned (Pipmaker) the nucleotide sequences of HoxA clusters of tilapia, pufferfish, striped bass, zebrafish, horn shark, human and mouse (over 500 million years of evolutionary distance). We identified several highly conserved intergenic sequences, likely to be important in gene regulation. Only a few of these putative regulatory elements have been previously described as being involved in the regulation of Hox genes, while several others are new elements that might have regulatory functions. The majority of these newly identified putative regulatory elements contain short fragments that are almost completely conserved and are identical to known binding sites for regulatory proteins (Transfac). The conserved intergenic regions located between the most rostrally expressed genes in the developing embryo are longer and better retained through evolution. We document that presumed regulatory sequences are retained differentially in either A or A clusters resulting from a genome duplication in the fish lineage. This observation supports both the hypothesis that the conserved elements are involved in gene regulation and the Duplication-Deletion-Complementation model.

Santini, Simona; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Meyer, Axel

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

Scientific Impact  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System OutagesNews PressThemes Scientific Impact

412

ARTICLE Communicatedby JohnRime1 Analysis of Neuron Models with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

early to try to assess what impact such a process might have on the behavior of neurons and neural activity. 0 Slow regulatory processes can significantly enhance the stability of the model neuron to enviro

Columbia University

413

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest 1992 edition. Volume 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest provides a summary of information about the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRC's regulatory responsibilities, the activities NRC licenses, and general information on domestic and worldwide nuclear energy. This digest is a compilation of nuclear- and NRC-related data and is designed to provide a quick reference to major facts about the agency and industry it regulates. In general, the data cover 1975 through 1991, with exceptions noted. Information on generating capacity and average capacity factor for operating US commercial nuclear power reactors is obtained from monthly operating reports that are submitted directly to the NRC by the licensee. This information is reviewed by the NRC for consistency only and no independent validation and/or verification is performed.

Olive, K [ed.] [ed.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Regulatory requirements affecting disposal of asbestos-containing waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities. The performance of these activities may generate asbestos-containing waste because asbestos was formerly used in many building materials, including floor tile, sealants, plastics, cement pipe, cement sheets, insulating boards, and insulating cements. The regulatory requirements governing the disposal of these wastes depend on: (1) the percentage of asbestos in the waste and whether the waste is friable (easily crumbled or pulverized); (2) other physical and chemical characteristics of the waste; and (3) the State in which the waste is generated. This Information Brief provides an overview of the environment regulatory requirements affecting disposal of asbestos-containing waste. It does not address regulatory requirements applicable to worker protection promulgated under the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHAct), the Mining Safety and Health Act (MSHA), or the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

The Economic Impact of New Mexico State University in 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Economic Impact of New Mexico State University in 2010 #12; The Economic Impact of New Mexico State University in 2010 Prepared Analysis Arrowhead Center New Mexico State University Las Cruces, NM 88005

Johnson, Eric E.

416

EA-1183: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

183: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1183: Finding of No Significant Impact Coal-fired Diesel Generator University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska Based on analysis in the EA, DOE...

417

Regulatory impacts and affects of emissions of the combustion of scrap tires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scrap tires have several advantages as a fuel for combustion. Combustion of scrap tires as a supplement to existing fuel is an economically viable alternative. In addition, policies that would reduce the growing stockpiles of scrap tires would also reduce its potential environmental hazards (emissions of toxic compounds from arson-caused fires and breeding ground for disease-carrying insects). The growing number of industrial applications as a supplemental fuel include cement kilns, the pulp and paper industry, and utility boilers. A growing body of studies of air emissions from scrap tire and tire-derived fuel (TDF-) supplemented combustion has been conducted over the past decade. For some pollutants and applications, co-combustion with TDF has been shown to decrease emissions. This paper summarizes trends in the effects of supplementing combustion with TDF on emissions of different pollutants. At the same time, scrap tire and TDF combustion are not currently regulated by a specific NSPS or MACT standard because these standards typically regulate an emission unit, not a fuel type. The USEPA is currently debating how to regulate facilities which supplement their combustion with scrap tires. This paper discusses some options that the USEPA is considering.

Karell, M.A.; Blumenthal, M.H.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Basin-scale hydrogeologic impacts of CO2 storage: Capacity and regulatory implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

94720, United States 1. Introduction Geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) in deep formations (e regulation of CO2 storage projects. Our assessment arises from a hypothetical future carbon sequestration valuable groundwater resources overlying the deep sequestration aquifers. In this paper, we discuss how

Zhou, Quanlin

419

Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Storage: Regulatory and Capacity Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the2009. Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships –from geologic carbon sequestration: area-of-review

Birkholzer, J.T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Accounting for Technological Change in Regulatory Impact Analyses: The Learning Curve Technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

learning curves for energy technology policy: A component-publicly supported energy technologies." Energy Policy 37(in renewable energy technologies." Energy Policy 34(2006):

Taylor, Margaret

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalancedDepartment ofColumbusReportNuclear Reactor TechnologyReport on

422

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Regulatory Authorities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scattering characterizesAnalysis

423

Survey of state regulatory activities on least cost planning for gas utilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. Incorporating the concept of meeting customer energy service needs entails a recognition that customers' costs must be considered along with the utility's costs in the economic analysis of energy options. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. All state commissions were surveyed to assess the current status of gas planning and demand-side management and to identify significant regulatory issues faced by commissions during the next several years. The survey was to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least-cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: (1) status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; (2) type and scope ofnatural gas DSM programs in effect, includeing fuel substitution; (3) economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; (4) relationship between prudence reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; and (5) key regulatory issues facing gas utilities during the next five years. 34 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

Goldman, C.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, Washington, DC (United States)); Hopkins, M.E. (Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

EIS-0156: Cowlitz Falls Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission prepared this statement to assess the environmental impacts of constructing and operating a proposed 70-megawatt hydroelectric dam and electrical infrastructure on the Cowlitz River near Morton and Randle, Washington. The U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration adopted this statement on 12/6/1990 to fulfil its National Environmental Policy Act requirement for its proposed action to acquire the power output from the Cowlitz Falls Hydroelectric Project.

425

Legal and regulatory issues affecting aquifer thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document updates and expands the report with a similar title issued in October 1980. This document examines a number of legal and regulatory issues that potentially can affect implementation of the aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) concept. This concept involves the storage of thermal energy in an underground aquifer until a later date when it can be effectively utilized. Either heat energy or chill can be stored. Potential end uses of the energy include district space heating and cooling, industrial process applications, and use in agriculture or aquaculture. Issues are examined in four categories: regulatory requirements, property rights, potential liability, and issues related to heat or chill delivery.

Hendrickson, P.L.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Compendium of Regulatory Requirements Governing Underground Injection of Drilling Wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a comprehensive compendium of the regulatory requirements governing the injection processes used for disposing of drilling wastes; in particular, for a process referred to in this report as slurry injection. The report consists of a narrative discussion of the regulatory requirements and practices for each of the oil- and gas-producing states, a table summarizing the types of injection processes authorized in each state, and an appendix that contains the text of many of the relevant state regulations and policies.

Puder, Markus G.; Bryson, Bill; Veil, John A.

2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

427

Nuclear regulatory legislation, 104th Congress, Volume 1, No. 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first of two volumes compiling statutes and material pertaining to nuclear regulatory legislation through the 104th Congress, 2nd Session. It is intended for use as a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) internal resource document. Legislative information reproduced in this document includes portions of the Atomic Energy Act, Energy Reorganization Act, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act, and Nuclear Waste Policy Act. Other information included in this volume pertains to NRC user fees, NRC authorizations, the Inspector General Act, and the Administrative Procedure Act.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Regulatory Response to Carbon Starvation in Caulobacter crescentus. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST3 AÇORIANONewsRegulatoryRegulatory Response to

429

Regulatory practices in India for establishing nuclear power stations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) of India was established as an independent regulatory authority charged with regulating radiation protection and nuclear safety. This article reviews the current state of India`s nuclear power reactor program and discusses the makeup of functions of the AERB, including the preparation of issuance of safety codes, guides, and other standards, with special recent emphasis on pressurized-heavy-water reactors (PHWRs). The AERB`s relationship to nuclear plant owners is discussed, as are the inspection and control functions the AERB performs, both for the construction and operation of nuclear plants and the licensing of operating personnel. 8 refs., 2 figs.

De, A.K. [Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Calcutta (India); Singh, S.P. [Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Bombay (India)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Economic impact study of consumer product efficiencies. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The economic impact study of household appliance efficiencies is briefly reported. Task I, Direct Impact on Industry, contains 4 subtasks: materials, labor inputs, energy inputs, and investment. Task II, Direct Impact on Consumers, contains 3 subtasks: life-cycle cost to the consumer, usage patterns, and long-term demand forecast and analysis. The 2 subtasks in Task III, Energy Savings and Impact on Utilities, are residential energy savings and cost and impact on utility generating capacity.

Not Available

1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

431

Environmental impact statement for initiation of transuranic waste disposal at the waste isolation pilot plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

WIPP`s long-standing mission is to demonstrate the safe disposal of TRU waste from US defense activities. In 1980, to comply with NEPA, US DOE completed its first environmental impact statement (EIS) which compared impacts of alternatives for TRU waste disposal. Based on this 1980 analysis, DOE decided to construct WIPP in 1981. In a 1990 decision based on examination of alternatives in a 1990 Supplemental EIS, DOE decided to continue WIPP development by proceeding with a testing program to examine WIPP`s suitability as a TRU waste repository. Now, as DOE`s Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) attempts to complete its regulatory obligations to begin WIPP disposal operations, CAO is developing WIPP`s second supplemental EIS (SEIS-II). To complete the SEIS-II, CAO will have to meet a number of challenges. This paper explores both the past and present EISs prepared to evaluate the suitability of WIPP. The challenges in completing an objective comparison of alternatives, while also finalizing other critical-path compliance documents, controlling costs, and keeping stakeholders involved during the decision-making process are addressed.

Johnson, H.E. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Carlsbad, NM (United States) Carlsbad Area Office; Whatley, M.E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Genome-wide analysis of transcriptional expression programs, regulatory networks and Cis-regulatory sequences in Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Historically, knowledge of gene-specific transcription has been accumulated by the study of the individual genetic and physical interactions between transcriptional regulators and the genes they regulate, often requiring ...

Harbison, Christopher T., 1973-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

The Economic Impacts of NIST Cholesterol Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

00-4 Planning Report The Economic Impacts of NIST Cholesterol Standards Program Prepared by: TASC, Inc. for National Institute of Standards & Technology Program Office Strategic Planning and Economic Analysis Group September 2000 U.S Department of Commerce Technology Administration #12;The Economic Impacts

434

Carbon capture retrofits and the cost of regulatory uncertainty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power generation firms confront impending replacement of an aging coal-fired fleet in a business environment characterized by volatile natural gas prices and uncertain carbon regulation. We develop a stochastic dynamic programming model of firm investment decisions that minimizes the expected present value of future power generation costs under uncertain natural gas and carbon prices. We explore the implications of regulatory uncertainty on generation technology choice and the optimal timing of investment, and assess the implications of these choices for regulators. We find that interaction of regulatory uncertainty with irreversible investment always raises the social cost of carbon abatement. Further, the social cost of regulatory uncertainty is strongly dependent on the relative competitiveness of IGCC plants, for which the cost of later carbon capture retrofits is comparatively small, and on the firm's ability to use investments in natural gas generation as a transitional strategy to manage carbon regulation uncertainty. Without highly competitive IGCC or low gas prices, regulatory uncertainty can increase the expected social cost of reducing emissions by 40 to 60%.

Reinelt, P.S.; Keith, D.W. [SUNY College of Fredonia, Fredonia, NY (United States). Dept. of Economics

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

argentine nuclear regulatory: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

argentine nuclear regulatory First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 UNITED STATES NUCLEAR...

436

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION Before Commissioners: Joseph T of Energy and Ancillary Services Investigation of the Practices of the California Independent System of Electric and Natural Gas Prices Enron Power Marketing, Inc. and Enron Energy Services, Inc. Enron Power

Laughlin, Robert B.

437

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION Before Commissioners: Joseph T Company v. Sellers of Energy and Ancillary Services Investigation of Practices of the California Independent System Operator and the California Power Exchange Puget Sound Energy, Inc. v. Sellers of Energy

Laughlin, Robert B.

438

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION Before Commissioners: Joseph T Company v. Sellers of Energy and Ancillary Services Into Markets Operated by the California Independent.; Avista Energy, Inc.(Avista); Calpine Energy Services, L.P. (Calpine); El Paso Marketing, LP (f/k/a El

Laughlin, Robert B.

439

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION Before Commissioners: Joseph T 18 C.F.R. § 385.602 (2006). 4 The Settlement defines the Western Energy Markets as those markets Company v. Sellers of Energy and Ancillary Services Investigation of Practices of the California

Laughlin, Robert B.

440

Report on the Workshop on Regulatory Approaches to Smart  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report on the Workshop on Regulatory Approaches to Smart Grid Investment and Deployment May APEC Secretariat APEC#212-CT-04.2 #12;SCSC Smart Grid Workshop 2012 Page 1 Grid Investment and Deployment May 16-17, 2012 Quebec City, Canada #12;SCSC Smart Grid Workshop 2012

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Leptin and regulatory T lymphocytes in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Leptin and regulatory T lymphocytes in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension Alice Huertas1 Centre National de Référence de l'Hypertension Pulmonaire SévÚre, Service de Pneumologie et Réanimation Respiratoire, HÎpital Antoine BéclÚre, AP-HP, Clamart, F- 92140; 3 INSERM U999 Hypertension Artérielle

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

442

Air Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions Sources, and Regulatory Reference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

permit regulations are designed to track, record, and control air pollutants belonging to severalAir Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions Sources, and Regulatory Reference Department: Chemical on chemical classifications. This reference outlines major categories of air pollutants found at SLAC

Wechsler, Risa H.

443

Metabolism and proliferation share common regulatory pathways in cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metabolism and proliferation share common regulatory pathways in cancer cells. Vanessa Fritz, proliferation, and cancer inserm-00491405,version1-11Jun2010 Author manuscript, published in "Oncogene 2010;29(31):4369-77" DOI : 10.1038/onc.2010.182 #12;Metabolism, proliferation and cancer Fritz and Fajas 2 Abstract Cancer

Boyer, Edmond

444

DEVELOPING A SET OF REGULATORY ANALOGS FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPING A SET OF REGULATORY ANALOGS FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION D.M. Reiner1 , H.J. Herzog2 1 Judge Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA, email: hjherzog@mit.edu ABSTRACT Carbon capture and sequestration variables critical for determining the success of carbon sequestration as a viable climate policy option

445

A SEARCH FOR REGULATORY ANALOGS TO CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A SEARCH FOR REGULATORY ANALOGS TO CARBON SEQUESTRATION D.M. Reiner and H.J. Herzog1 1 Laboratory for Energy and the Environment, M.I.T., Cambridge, MA. 02139, USA ABSTRACT Carbon capture and sequestration for determining the success of carbon sequestration as a viable climate policy option. INTRODUCTION To date

446

ERDC/ELTR-08-28 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-08-28 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Arid West Region (Version 2.0) U.S. Army Corps of Engineers September 2008 EnvironmentalLaboratory Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands

US Army Corps of Engineers

447

ERDC/ELTR-07-24 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-07-24 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Alaska Region (Version 2.0) U.S. Army Corps of Engineers September 2007 EnvironmentalLaboratory Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands

US Army Corps of Engineers

448

Construction cost impact analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy mandatory performance standards for new federal commercial and multi-family, high-rise residential buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with federal legislation, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has conducted a project to demonstrate use of its Energy Conservation Voluntary Performance Standards for Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings; Mandatory for New Federal Buildings; Interim Rule (referred to in this report as DOE-1993). A key requisite of the legislation requires DOE to develop commercial building energy standards that are cost effective. During the demonstration project, DOE specifically addressed this issue by assessing the impacts of the standards on (1) construction costs, (2) builders (and especially small builders) of multi-family, high-rise buildings, and (3) the ability of low-to moderate-income persons to purchase or rent units in such buildings. This document reports on this project.

Di Massa, F.V.; Hadley, D.L.; Halverson, M.A.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Utility Goals for the Efficiency Resource: Impact of PUC Rulemaking Project No. 39674 on Future Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utility Goals for the Efficiency Resource: Impact of PUC Rulemaking Project No. 39674 on Future Programs Amy Martin CATEE Conference October 10, 2012 Overview ? Frontier Associates ? EUMMOT ? Utility Program Overview and Results to Date... Pricing & Resource Planning ? Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Programs ? Market Research ? Regulatory Assistance ? Database Solutions ? EUMMOT Administrator Who is EUMMOT? Electric Utility Marketing Managers of Texas (EUMMOT...

Martin, A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Environmental Policy Factors in the Maritime Industry and Anticipated Regulatory Trends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Increased environmental regulatory policy has been put in place by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) in response to waterborne oil pollution events. We examine the IMO regulatory response to these incidences. This paper covers literature...

Hayes, Richard D.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

451

Possible Regulatory Role for the Histidine-Rich Loop in the Zinc...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regulatory Role for the Histidine-Rich Loop in the Zinc Transport Protein, ZnuA. Possible Regulatory Role for the Histidine-Rich Loop in the Zinc Transport Protein, ZnuA. Abstract:...

452

Regulatory and technical reports (abstract index journal): Annual compilation for 1996, Volume 21, No. 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compilation is the annual cumulation of bibliographic data and abstracts for the formal regulatory and technical reports issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Staff and its contractors.

Sheehan, M.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Systematic dissection of regulatory motifs in 2000 predicted human enhancers using a massively parallel reporter assay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genome-wide chromatin annotations have permitted the mapping of putative regulatory elements across multiple human cell types. However, their experimental dissection by directed regulatory motif disruption has remained ...

Kheradpour, Pouya

454

A Semi-Empirical Model for Studying the Impact of Thermal Mass and Cost-Return Analysis on Mixed-mode Ventilation in Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vertical location EME Energy consumption by mechanical ventilation z0 Vertical location of the neutral and cost-return analysis on mixed-mode ventilation in office buildings," Energy and Buildings, 67, 267 consume about 40% of total primary energy [1], and the energy consumption of office buildings comprises

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

455

E-Print Network 3.0 - agr regulatory mutants Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . 214 B. Regulatory Genes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 X. Cercosporin Degradation... directly tested with cercosporin- deficient mutants. UV-generated ......

456

Thermo-mechanical study of bare 48Y UF6 containers exposed to the regulatory fire environment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the regulatory agencies world-wide require that containers used for the transportation of natural UF6 and depleted UF6 must survive a fully-engulfing fire environment for 30 minutes as described in 10CFR71 and in TS-R-1. The primary objective of this project is to examine the thermo-mechanical performance of 48Y transportation cylinders when exposed to the regulatory hypothetical fire environment without the thermal protection that is currently used for shipments in those countries where required. Several studies have been performed in which UF6 cylinders have been analyzed to determine if the thermal protection currently used on UF6 cylinders of type 48Y is necessary for transport. However, none of them could clearly confirm neither the survival nor the failure of the 48Y cylinder when exposed to the regulatory fire environment without the additional thermal protection. A consortium of five companies that move UF6 is interested in determining if 48Y cylinders can be shipped without the thermal protection that is currently used. Sandia National Laboratories has outlined a comprehensive testing and analysis project to determine if these shipping cylinders are capable of withstanding the regulatory thermal environment without additional thermal protection. Sandia-developed coupled physics codes will be used for the analyses that are planned. A series of destructive and non-destructive tests will be performed to acquire the necessary material and behavior information to benchmark the models and to answer the question about the ability of these containers to survive the fire environment. Both the testing and the analysis phases of this project will consider the state of UF6 under thermal and pressure loads as well as the weakening of the steel container due to the thermal load. Experiments with UF6 are also planned to collect temperature- and pressure-dependent thermophysical properties of this material.

Ammerman, Douglas James; Lopez, Carlos; Morrow, Charles; Korbmacher, Tim (Urenco Enrichment Co. Ltd., Gronau, Germany); Charette, Marc-Andre (Cameco Corporation, Port Hope, ON, Canada)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

EA-0912: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of No Significant Impact Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Based on the analysis in the Environmental Assessment, and after careful...

458

The Application of Performance Assessment to Make Regulatory and Operational Changes in an Operating Nuclear Waste Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes how performance assessment (PA) is used to support changes to the regulatory basis of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The WIPP, located near Carlsbad, New Mexico is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as the nation's only deep geologic repository for the disposal of transuranic nuclear waste. In 1998, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified that the WIPP met the performance requirements of 40 CFR Part 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes. A PA analysis of long term (10,000 year) repository performance successfully demonstrated that the probability and consequences of potential long-term releases of radionuclides to the accessible environment would be well below the established limits. These results were key in obtaining WIPP's initial certification, allowing the first shipment and disposal of nuclear waste in March of 1999. As disposal operations have taken place over the last eight years, changes have been identified in the regulatory and operational realms of the facility that would enhance waste disposal efficiency. Such changes, however, cannot be made without prior consent of the EPA. Therefore, changes planned by the DOE must be thoroughly described and supported by varying degrees of the same type of analyses that were conducted to demonstrate the WIPP's containment capabilities as presented in the initial compliance application submitted to EPA in 1996. Such analyses are used to identify the impacts or benefits of implementing the planned change. The DOE has successfully used performance assessment analyses for the approval of changes such as: 1) the disposal of super-compacted waste forms, and; 2) the adoption of new parameters and modeling assumptions In some cases the planned changes are simpler in nature than those listed above, and therefore only require targeted or simplified PA analyses to demonstrate the effect on performance. Targeted analyses have been used to successfully gain approval of the following: 1) a reduction in the amount of magnesium oxide (MgO) chemical buffer backfill that must be emplaced in the repository 2) a change in the repository mining/disposal horizon In addition to these approved changes, the DOE has used PA analyses to support the following planned change requests that await EPA's approval: 1) panel closure redesign 2) further reduction in the MgO-to-waste ratio Finally, this paper will discuss some of the changes that the DOE is currently preparing and plans to submit to the EPA for approval in the near future. This paper will describe how a set of analytical tools initially used to open the WIPP continues to have a role in making the repository more efficient and adaptable as variations in waste streams, operational demands, and other dynamic forces change the operating environment over time. (authors)

Patterson, R. [Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Kirkes, R. [John Hart and Associates, P.A., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Special committee review of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's severe accident risks report (NUREG--1150)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) published a draft report Severe Accident Risks: An Assessment for Five US Nuclear Power Plants,'' NUREG-1150. This report updated, extended and improved upon the information presented in the 1974 Reactor Safety Study,'' WASH-1400. Because the information in NUREG-1150 will play a significant role in implementing the NRC's Severe Accident Policy, its quality and credibility are of critical importance. Accordingly, the Commission requested that the RES conduct a peer review of NUREG-1150 to ensure that the methods, safety insights and conclusions presented are appropriate and adequately reflect the current state of knowledge with respect to reactor safety. To this end, RES formed a special committee in June of 1989 under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The Committee, composed of a group of recognized national and international experts in nuclear reactor safety, was charged with preparing a report reflecting their review of NUREG-1150 with respect to the adequacy of the methods, data, analysis and conclusions it set forth. The report which precedes reflects the results of this peer review.

Kouts, H.J.C. (Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (USA)); Apostolakis, G.; Kastenberg, W.E. (California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA)); Birkhofer, E.H.A. (Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany, F.R.)); Hoegberg, L.G. (Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)); LeSage, L.G. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Rasmussen, N.C. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Camb

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Motivation Influences Choice in the Exploration/ Exploitation Dilemma: Regulatory Fit Effects in a Gambling Task  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, D.A., Maddox, W.T., & Markman, A.B. (in press). Regulatory Fit Effects in a choice task. PsychonomicMotivation Influences Choice in the Exploration/ Exploitation Dilemma: Regulatory Fit Effects appealing options. ­In category learning, a regulatory fit has been shown to increase exploration

Maddox, W. Todd

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Synthetic Biology and the U.S. Biotechnology Regulatory System: Challenges and Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synthetic Biology and the U.S. Biotechnology Regulatory System: Challenges and Options Sarah R. Carter, Ph.D., J. Craig Venter Institute; Michael Rodemeyer, J.D., University of Virginia; Michele S. Garfinkel, Ph.D., EMBO; Robert M. Friedman, Ph.D., J. Craig Venter Institute In recent years, a range of genetic engineering techniques referred to as “synthetic biology” has significantly expanded the tool kit available to scientists and engineers, providing them with far greater capabilities to engineer organisms than previous techniques allowed. The field of synthetic biology includes the relatively new ability to synthesize long pieces of DNA from chemicals, as well as improved methods for genetic manipulation and design of genetic pathways to achieve more precise control of biological systems. These advances will help usher in a new generation of genetically engineered microbes, plants, and animals. The JCVI Policy Center team, along with researchers at the University of Virginia and EMBO, examined how well the current U.S. regulatory system for genetically engineered products will handle the near-term introduction of organisms engineered using synthetic biology. In particular, the focus was on those organisms intended to be used or grown directly in the environment, outside of a contained facility. The study concludes that the U.S. regulatory agencies have adequate legal authority to address most, but not all, potential environmental, health and safety concerns posed by these organisms. Such near-term products are likely to represent incremental changes rather than a marked departure from previous genetically engineered organisms. However, the study also identified two key challenges for the regulatory system, which are detailed in the report. First, USDA’s authority over genetically engineered plants depends on the use of an older engineering technique that is no longer necessary for many applications. The shift to synthetic biology and other newer genetic engineering techniques will leave many engineered plants without any pre-market regulatory review. Second, the number and diversity of engineered microbes for commercial use will increase in the near future, challenging EPA’s resources, expertise, and perhaps authority to regulate them. For each of these challenges, the report sets out a series of options, including an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of each option from a variety of perspectives, for policy makers to consider. Policy responses will depend on the trade-offs chosen among competing considerations. This report, funded by the Department of Energy with additional funds from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, is the result of a two-year process that included interviews, commissioned background papers, discussions, and two workshops that sought input from a wide range of experts, including U.S. federal agency regulators, legal and science policy experts, representatives from the biotechnology indusŹtry, and non-governmental organizaŹtions. This cross-section of views informed this report, but the conclusions are solely those of the authors. An Executive Summary, full Report, and background papers are available at: http://www.jcvi.org/cms/research/projects/synthetic-biology-and-the-us-biotechnology-regulatory-system/overview/

Carter, Sarah R. [J. Craig Venter Institute; Rodemeyer, Michael [University of Virginia; Garfinkel, Michele S. [EMBO; Friedman, Robert M [J. Craig Venter Institute

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Alaska North Slope National Energy Strategy initiative: Analysis of five undeveloped fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy was directed in the National Energy Strategy to establish a federal interagency task force to identify specific technical and regulatory barriers to the development of five undeveloped North Slope Alaska fields and make recommendations for their resolution. The five fields are West Sak, Point Thomson, Gwydyr Bay, Seal Island/Northstar, and Sandpiper Island. Analysis of environmental, regulatory, technical, and economic information, and data relating to the development potential of the five fields leads to the following conclusions: Development of the five fields would result in an estimated total of 1,055 million barrels of oil and 4.4 trillion cubic feet of natural gas and total investment of $9.4 billion in 1992 dollars. It appears that all five of the fields will remain economically marginal developments unless there is significant improvement in world oil prices. Costs of regulatory compliance and mitigation, and costs to reduce or maintain environmental impacts at acceptable levels influence project investments and operating costs and must be considered in the development decision making process. The development of three of the fields (West Sak, Point Thomson, and Gwydyr Bay) that are marginally feasible would have an impact on North Slope production over the period from about 2000 to 2014 but cannot replace the decline in Prudhoe Bay Unit production or maintain the operation of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) beyond about 2014 with the assumption that the TAPS will shut down when production declines to the range of 400 to 200 thousand barrels of oil/day. Recoverable reserves left in the ground in the currently producing fields and soon to be developed fields, Niakuk and Point McIntyre, would range from 1 billion to 500 million barrels of oil corresponding to the time period of 2008 to 2014 based on the TAPS shutdown assumption.

Thomas, C.P.; Allaire, R.B.; Doughty, T.C.; Faulder, D.D.; Irving, J.S.; Jamison, H.C.; White, G.J.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix O: Economic and Social Impact.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Appendix O of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System measures the economic and social effects of the alternative system operation strategies and includes both geographic and methodology components. Areas discussed in detail include the following: purpose, scope and process; an economic history of the Columbia River Basin and its use today including the Columbia River and Socio-economic development in the Northwest and Major uses of the River System; Analysis procedures and methodologies including national economic evaluation, the concepts, analysis of assumptions, analysis for specific river uses, water quality, Regional evaluation, analysis, and social impacts; alternatives and impacts including implementation costs, andromous fish, resident fish and wildlife, flood control, irrigation and municipal and industrial water supply, navigation impacts, power, recreation, annual costs, regional economic analysis. Extensive comparison of alternatives is included.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Privacy Impact Assessment  

Energy Savers [EERE]

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: ORG NAME - SYSTEM NAME PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 1 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template....

465

Enhanced IGCC regulatory control and coordinated plant-wide control strategies for improving power ramp rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of ongoing R&D activities at the National Energy Technology Laboratory’s (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training & Research (AVESTAR™) Center, this paper highlights strategies for enhancing low-level regulatory control and system-wide coordinated control strategies implemented in a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with carbon capture. The underlying IGCC plant dynamic model contains 20 major process areas, each of which is tightly integrated with the rest of the power plant, making individual functionally-independent processes prone to routine disturbances. Single-loop feedback control although adequate to meet the primary control objective for most processes, does not take into account in advance the effect of these disturbances, making the entire power plant undergo large offshoots and/or oscillations before the feedback action has an opportunity to impact control performance. In this paper, controller enhancements ranging from retuning feedback control loops, multiplicative feed-forward control and other control techniques such as split-range control, feedback trim and dynamic compensation, applicable on various subsections of the integrated IGCC plant, have been highlighted and improvements in control responses have been given. Compared to using classical feedback-based control structure, the enhanced IGCC regulatory control architecture reduces plant settling time and peak offshoots, achieves faster disturbance rejection, and promotes higher power ramp-rates. In addition, improvements in IGCC coordinated plant-wide control strategies for “Gasifier-Lead”, “GT-Lead” and “Plantwide” operation modes have been proposed and their responses compared. The paper is concluded with a brief discussion on the potential IGCC controller improvements resulting from using advanced process control, including model predictive control (MPC), as a supervisory control layer.

Mahapatra, P.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Knowledge Management Initiatives Used to Maintain Regulatory Expertise in Transportation and Storage of Radioactive Materials - 12177  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was established in 1974 with the mission to license and regulate the civilian use of nuclear materials for commercial, industrial, academic, and medical uses in order to protect public health and safety, and the environment, and promote the common defense and security. Currently, approximately half (?49%) of the workforce at the NRC has been with the Agency for less than six years. As part of the Agency's mission, the NRC has partial responsibility for the oversight of the transportation and storage of radioactive materials. The NRC has experienced a significant level of expertise leaving the Agency due to staff attrition. Factors that contribute to this attrition include retirement of the experienced nuclear workforce and mobility of staff within or outside the Agency. Several knowledge management (KM) initiatives have been implemented within the Agency, with one of them including the formation of a Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation (SFST) KM team. The team, which was formed in the fall of 2008, facilitates capturing, transferring, and documenting regulatory knowledge for staff to effectively perform their safety oversight of transportation and storage of radioactive materials, regulated under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) Part 71 and Part 72. In terms of KM, the SFST goal is to share critical information among the staff to reduce the impact from staff's mobility and attrition. KM strategies in place to achieve this goal are: (1) development of communities of practice (CoP) (SFST Qualification Journal and the Packaging and Storing Radioactive Material) in the on-line NRC Knowledge Center (NKC); (2) implementation of a SFST seminar program where the seminars are recorded and placed in the Agency's repository, Agency-wide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS); (3) meeting of technical discipline group programs to share knowledge within specialty areas; (4) development of written guidance to capture 'administrative and technical' knowledge (e.g., office instructions (OIs), generic communications (e.g., bulletins, generic letters, regulatory issue summary), standard review plans (SRPs), interim staff guidance (ISGs)); (5) use of mentoring strategies for experienced staff to train new staff members; (6) use of Microsoft SharePoint portals in capturing, transferring, and documenting knowledge for staff across the Division from Division management and administrative assistants to the project managers, inspectors, and technical reviewers; and (7) development and implementation of a Division KM Plan. A discussion and description of the successes and challenges of implementing these KM strategies at the NRC/SFST will be provided. (authors)

Lindsay, Haile; Garcia-Santos, Norma; Saverot, Pierre; Day, Neil; Gambone Rodriguez, Kimberly; Cruz, Luis; Sotomayor-Rivera, Alexis; Vechioli, Lucieann; Vera, John; Pstrak, David [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Mail Stop EBB-03D-02M, 6003 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Final base case community analysis: Indian Springs, Nevada for the Clark County socioeconomic impact assessment of the proposed high- level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a base case description of the rural Clark County community of Indian Springs in anticipation of change associated with the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. As the community closest to the proposed site, Indian Springs may be seen by site characterization workers, as well as workers associated with later repository phases, as a logical place to live. This report develops and updates information relating to a broad spectrum of socioeconomic variables, thereby providing a `snapshot` or `base case` look at Indian Springs in early 1992. With this as a background, future repository-related developments may be analytically separated from changes brought about by other factors, thus allowing for the assessment of the magnitude of local changes associated with the proposed repository. Given the size of the community, changes that may be considered small in an absolute sense may have relatively large impacts at the local level. Indian Springs is, in many respects, a unique community and a community of contrasts. An unincorporated town, it is a small yet important enclave of workers on large federal projects and home to employees of small- scale businesses and services. It is a rural community, but it is also close to the urbanized Las Vega Valley. It is a desert community, but has good water resources. It is on flat terrain, but it is located within 20 miles of the tallest mountains in Nevada. It is a town in which various interest groups diverge on issues of local importance, but in a sense of community remains an important feature of life. Finally, it has a sociodemographic history of both surface transience and underlying stability. If local land becomes available, Indian Springs has some room for growth but must first consider the historical effects of growth on the town and its desired direction for the future.

NONE

1992-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

468

Nuclear regulatory legislation, 104th Congress. Volume 2, No. 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the second of two volumes compiling statutes and material pertaining to nuclear regulatory legislation through the 104th Congress, 2nd Session. It is intended for use as a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) internal resource document. Legislative information reproduced in this document includes portions of the Paperwork Reduction Act, various acts pertaining to low-level radioactive waste, the Clean Air Act, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act, the West Valley Demonstration Project Act, Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Export Licensing Statutes, and selected treaties, agreements, and executive orders. Other information provided pertains to Commissioner tenure, NRC appropriations, the Chief Financial Officers Act, information technology management reform, and Federal civil penalties.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Economic Impact PermianBasin'sOil&GasIndustry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Petroleum Evaluation Engineers (SPEE) parameters for evaluating Resource Plays 53 Appendix C: Detailed Play to traditional economic impacts, this report includes a petroleum engineering-based analysis that providesEconomic Impact PermianBasin'sOil&GasIndustry #12;The Economic Impact of the Permian Basin's Oil

Zhang, Yuanlin

470

Data Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis of the material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system is necessary to understand the limits and vulnerabilities of the system to internal threats. A self-appraisal helps the facility be prepared to respond to internal threats and reduce the risk of theft or diversion of nuclear material. The material control and accountability (MC&A) system effectiveness tool (MSET) fault tree was developed to depict the failure of the MPC&A system as a result of poor practices and random failures in the MC&A system. It can also be employed as a basis for assessing deliberate threats against a facility. MSET uses fault tree analysis, which is a top-down approach to examining system failure. The analysis starts with identifying a potential undesirable event called a 'top event' and then determining the ways it can occur (e.g., 'Fail To Maintain Nuclear Materials Under The Purview Of The MC&A System'). The analysis proceeds by determining how the top event can be caused by individual or combined lower level faults or failures. These faults, which are the causes of the top event, are 'connected' through logic gates. The MSET model uses AND-gates and OR-gates and propagates the effect of event failure using Boolean algebra. To enable the fault tree analysis calculations, the basic events in the fault tree are populated with probability risk values derived by conversion of questionnaire data to numeric values. The basic events are treated as independent variables. This assumption affects the Boolean algebraic calculations used to calculate results. All the necessary calculations are built into the fault tree codes, but it is often useful to estimate the probabilities manually as a check on code functioning. The probability of failure of a given basic event is the probability that the basic event primary question fails to meet the performance metric for that question. The failure probability is related to how well the facility performs the task identified in that basic event over time (not just one performance or exercise). Fault tree calculations provide a failure probability for the top event in the fault tree. The basic fault tree calculations establish a baseline relative risk value for the system. This probability depicts relative risk, not absolute risk. Subsequent calculations are made to evaluate the change in relative risk that would occur if system performance is improved or degraded. During the development effort of MSET, the fault tree analysis program used was SAPHIRE. SAPHIRE is an acronym for 'Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations.' Version 1 of the SAPHIRE code was sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 1987 as an innovative way to draw, edit, and analyze graphical fault trees primarily for safe operation of nuclear power reactors. When the fault tree calculations are performed, the fault tree analysis program will produce several reports that can be used to analyze the MPC&A system. SAPHIRE produces reports showing risk importance factors for all basic events in the operational MC&A system. The risk importance information is used to examine the potential impacts when performance of certain basic events increases or decreases. The initial results produced by the SAPHIRE program are considered relative risk values. None of the results can be interpreted as absolute risk values since the basic event probability values represent estimates of risk associated with the performance of MPC&A tasks throughout the material balance area (MBA). The RRR for a basic event represents the decrease in total system risk that would result from improvement of that one event to a perfect performance level. Improvement of the basic event with the greatest RRR value produces a greater decrease in total system risk than improvement of any other basic event. Basic events with the greatest potential for system risk reduction are assigned performance improvement values, and new fault tree calculations show the improvement in total system risk. The ope

Powell, Danny H [ORNL] [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 2: Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 2 contains copies of the documents which established the relationship between NRC, DOE, USEC, and DOL (Dept of Labor) required to facilitate regulatory oversight transition.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

472

Federal Energy Regulatory Commission fiscal year 1997 annual financial statements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants` audit of the Federal Energy Regulatory commission`s statements of financial position, and the related statements of operations and changes in net position. The auditors` work was conducted in accordance with generally accepted government auditing standards. An independent public accounting firm conducted the audit. The auditors` reports on the Commission`s internal control structure and compliance with laws and regulations disclosed no reportable conditions or instances of noncompliance.

NONE

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

473

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, January 1997. Volume 45, Number 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book contains issuances of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board, Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Director`s Decision for January 1997. The issuances concern Sequoyah Fuels Corporation and General Atomics Gore, Oklahoma Site decontamination and decommissioning funding; Louisiana Energy Services, Claiborne Enrichment Center denies appeal to review emergency planning; General Public Utilities Nuclear Corporation, Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating station, challenges to technical specifications concerning spent fuel pool; and Consumers Power Company, Palisades Nuclear Plant dry cask storage of spent nuclear fuel.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Variable Renewable Energy: a Regulatory Roadmap (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is not a one-size-fits-all approach to the regulation of variable renewable energy (VRE), but international experience reveals many approaches that are proving successful. Drawing upon research and experiences from various international contexts, the 21st Century Power Partnership in conjunction with the Clean Energy Solutions Center and Clean Energy Regulators Initiative identified key issues and ideas that have emerged as variable deployment has grown. The Power Partnership research, published in 2014, identified four broad categories of regulatory issues.

Not Available

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Original Impact Calculations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Original Impact Calculations, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

476

Application of the LBB regulatory approach to the steamlines of advanced WWER 1000 reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LBB regulatory approach adopted in Russia in 1993 as an extra safety barrier is described for advanced WWER 1000 reactor steamline. The application of LBB concept requires the following additional protections. First, the steamline should be a highly qualified piping, performed in accordance with the applicable regulations and guidelines, carefully screened to verify that it is not subjected to any disqualifying failure mechanism. Second, a deterministic fracture mechanics analysis and leak rate evaluation have been performed to demonstrate that postulated through-wall crack that yields 95 1/min at normal operation conditions is stable even under seismic loads. Finally, it has been verified that the leak detection systems are sufficiently reliable, diverse and sensitive, and that adequate margins exist to detect a through wall crack smaller than the critical size. The obtained results are encouraging and show the possibility of the application of the LBB case to the steamline of advanced WWER 1000 reactor.

Kiselyov, V.A.; Sokov, L.M.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

LEDSGP/analysis/impacts/DIAWebinar on Development Impact Assessment...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Because governments' development priorities are the drivers behind LEDS, optimization tools used for LEDS should incorporate development benefits to reflect this...

478

Handbook of methods for risk-based analysis of Technical Specification requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technical Specifications (TS) requirements for nuclear power plants define the Limiting Conditions for Operation (LCOs) and Surveillance Requirements (SRs) to assure safety during operation. In general, these requirements were based on deterministic analysis and engineering judgments. Experiences with plant operation indicate that some elements of the requirements are unnecessarily restrictive, while others may not be conducive to safety. Improvements in these requirements are facilitated by the availability of plant specific Probabilistic Safety Assessments (PSAs). The use of risk and reliability-based methods to improve TS requirements has gained wide interest because these methods can: quantitatively evaluate the risk impact and justify changes based on objective risk arguments. Provide a defensible basis for these requirements for regulatory applications. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) Office of Research is sponsoring research to develop systematic risk-based methods to improve various aspects of TS requirements. The handbook of methods, which is being prepared, summarizes such risk-based methods. The scope of the handbook includes reliability and risk-based methods for evaluating allowed outage times (AOTs), action statements requiring shutdown where shutdown risk may be substantial, surveillance test intervals (STIs), defenses against common-cause failures, managing plant configurations, and scheduling maintenances. For each topic, the handbook summarizes methods of analysis and data needs, outlines the insights to be gained, lists additional references, and presents examples of evaluations.

Samanta, P.K.; Vesely, W.E.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

479

HANFORD REGULATORY EXPERIENCE REGULATION AT HANFORD A CASE STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford has played a pivotal role in the United States' defense for more than 60 years, beginning with the Manhattan Project in the 1940s. During its history, the Hanford Site has had nine reactors producing plutonium for the United States' nuclear weapons program. All the reactors were located next to the Columbia River and all had associated low-level radioactive and hazardous waste releases. Site cleanup, which formally began in 1989 with the signing of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement, involves more than 1,600 waste sites and burial grounds, and the demolition of more than 1,500buildings and structures, Cleanup is scheduled to be complete by 2035. Regulatory oversight of the cleanup is being performed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington State Department of Ecology(Ecology) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Revised Code of Washington, 'Hazardous Waste Management.' Cleanup of the waste sites and demolition of the many buildings and structures generates large volumes of contaminated soil, equipment, demolition debris, and other wastes that must be disposed of in a secure manner to prevent further environmental degradation. From a risk perspective, it is essential the cleanup waste be moved to a disposal facility located well away from the Columbia River. The solution was to construct very large engineered landfill that meets all technical regulatory requirements, on the Hanford Site Central Plateau approximately 10kilometers from the river and 100metersabovegroundwater. This landfill, called the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility or ERDF is a series of cells, each 150x 300 meters wide at the bottom and 20 meters deep. This paper looks at the substantive environmental regulations applied to ERDF, and how the facility is designed to protect the environment and meet regulatory requirements. The paper describes how the U.S. Department of Energy(DOE),EPA, and Ecology interact in its regulation. In addition, the response to a recent $1 million regulatory fine is described to show actual interactions and options in this aspect of the regulatory process. The author acknowledges the significant contributions by Messrs. Clifford Clark and Owen Robertson. Ms. Nancy Williams provided graphics support and Ms. Laurie Kraemer edited the report.

HAWKINS AR

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

480

Federal Government Congressional Budget Office, Budget Analysis Division Washington, DC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Administration, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research Washington, DC Federal Energy Regulatory CommissionFederal Government Congressional Budget Office, Budget Analysis Division Washington, DC Department Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Transportation & Air Quality Ann Arbor, MI Federal Drug

Shyy, Wei

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulatory impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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481

Supplement Analysis for Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory -- Modification of Management Methods for Transuranic Waste Characterization at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) (DOE/EIS-0238) adequately addresses the environmental effects of a waste management proposal for installing and operating modular units for the characterization of transuranic (TRU) waste1 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area (TA)-54, Area G, or if the SWEIS needs to be supplemented. Council on Environmental Quality regulations at Title 40, Section 1502.9 (c) of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR 1502.9[c]) require federal agencies to prepare a supplement to an EIS when an agency makes substantial changes in the proposed action that are relevant to environmental concerns or there are circumstances or information relevant to concerns and bearing on the proposed action or its impacts. This SA is prepared in accordance with Section 10 CFR 1021.314(c) of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) regulations for NEPA implementation stating that ''When it is unclear whether or not an EIS supplement is required, DOE shall prepare a Supplement Analysis.'' This SA specifically compares key impact assessment parameters of the waste management program evaluated in the SWEIS with those of a proposal that would change the approach of a portion of this management program. It also provides an explanation of any differences between the proposed action and activities described in the previous SWEIS analysis. DOE proposes to expedite the shipment of legacy TRU waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The Cerro Grande Fire in 2000 and events of September 11, 2001, have focused attention on the potential risk to the public and the credible security hazard posed by the amount of plutonium stored above ground at LANL and the increased necessity to safeguard our nation's nuclear waste. The safest place for defense-generated TRU waste has been determined to be DOE's permitted repository for TRU waste 2100 feet underground at WIPP. The proposed accelerated plan to dispose of TRU waste at WIPP would result in the complete disposition of LANL legacy TRU waste by 2010; this accelerated disposition would be 20 years ahead of schedule, at a savings of $500 million in life-cycle costs and result in 3,000 fewer shipments to WIPP. However, the current individual small facilities at LANL lack the buildings, equipment, and trained personnel to conduct efficient characterization activities on an increased scale. Installing new modular structures and equipment close to the drum storage location at TA-54 in housings designed for a large inventory and high throughput would support DOE's expedited shipment program by increasing the repackaging rate, and it would also decrease on-site transportation vulnerabilities.

N /A

2002-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

482

Planning Report 01-1 Economic Impact Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planning Report 01-1 Economic Impact Assessment of the NIST's Josephson Volt Standard Program and Economic Analysis Group July 2001 U.S Department of Commerce Technology Administration #12;Economic Impact of Standards and Technology Program Office Strategic Planning and Economic Analysis Group Prepared under

483

Nuclear Regulatory legislation: 103d Congress. Volume 1, No. 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 103d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances: February 1995. Volume 41, Number 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book contains an issuance of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and a Director`s Decision. The issuance concerns consideration by the Commission of appeals from both the Initial Decision and a Reconsideration Order issued by the Presiding Officer involving two materials license amendment applications filed by the University of Missouri. The Director`s Decision from the Office of Enforcement denies petitions filed by Northeast Utilities employees requesting that accelerated enforcement action be taken against Northeast Utilities for activities concerned with NU`s fitness-for-duty program.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Nuclear regulatory legislation: 102d Congress. Volume 1, No. 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 102d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include: The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Nuclear regulatory legislation, 102d Congress. Volume 2, No. 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 102d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Nuclear Regulatory legislation: 103d Congress. Volume 2, No. 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 103d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Reducing Regulatory Burden EO 13563 Third RFI | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 |Rebecca MatulkaDeliveryUpdatedRFI Reducing Regulatory

489

Regulatory Burden RFI Executive Order 13563 | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 |RebeccaRegional StandardsExecutive Order 13563 Regulatory

490

DOE Comments Regulatory Burden RFI | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmartDepartment of1 Ingrid A.C.ofComments Regulatory Burden RFI

491

Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalancedDepartment ofColumbusReport #Study |Regional SmallVisitors CanRegulatory

492

Texas - PUC - Public Utility Regulatory Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump Jump to: navigation, searchTetra Sun Jump to:Regulatory Act

493

Measuring the Economic Impacts of Federal Investments in Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measuring the Economic Impacts of Federal Investments in Research evaluates approaches to measuring the returns on federal research investments. This report identifies new methodologies and metrics that can be developed and used for assessing returns on research across a wide range of fields (biomedical, information technology, energy, agriculture, environment, and other biological and physical sciences, etc.), while using one or more background papers that review current methodologies as a starting point for the discussion. It focuses on tools that are able to exploit available data in the relatively near term rather than on methodologies that may require substantial new data collection. Over the last several years, there has been a growing interest in policy circles in identifying the payoffs from federal agency research investments, especially in terms of economic growth, competitiveness, and jobs. The extraordinary increase in research expenditures under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 and the President�������¹����������������s commitment to science and technology (S&T) funding increases going forward have heightened the need for measuring the impacts of research investments. Without a credible analysis of their outcomes, the recent and proposed increases in S&T funding may not be sustained, especially given competing claims for federal funding and pressures to reduce projected federal budget deficits. Motivated by these needs and requirements, Measuring the Economic Impacts of Federal Investments in Research reviews and discusses the use of quantitative and qualitative data to evaluate the returns on federal research and development (R&D) investments. Despite the job-focused mandate of the current ARRA reporting requirements, the impact of S&T funding extend well beyond employment. For instance, federal funding in energy research may lead to innovations that would reduce energy costs at the household level, energy imports at the national level, and greenhouse gas emissions at the global level. In principle, these benefits can be measured as a return on research investments, with appropriate consideration of time lags to research outcomes and attribution to private as well as public expenditure. With appropriate metrics, the same could be true for benefits to public health, environmental quality, and food productivity and security. Federal funding of research leads to the development of human capital that is deployed in a variety of occupations with economic and social impacts. Research also produces information that is used in formal (e.g., regulatory and judicial) and informal (e.g., firm and consumer) decision making processes. In addition to reviewing the range of work (by academics, consultants, and research agencies themselves) that has been done in measuring research outcomes and providing a forum to discuss their methods, this report also considers the different methodologies used across fields of research (e.g., agriculture and energy research) to identifies which are applicable to a range of federal S&T funding.

Olson, S; Merrill, S

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

494

Regulatory Interactions in ProKaryotes from RegTransBase  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

RegTransBase, a manually curated database of regulatory interactions in prokaryotes, captures the knowledge in published scientific literature using a controlled vocabulary. RegTransBase describes a large number of regulatory interactions reported in many organisms and contains various types of experimental data, in particular: the activation or repression of transcription by an identified direct regulator determining the transcriptional regulatory function of a protein (or RNA) directly binding to DNA or RNA mapping or prediction of binding sites for a regulatory protein characterization of regulatory mutations Currently, the RegTransBase content is derived from about 3000 relevant articles describing over 7000 experiments in relation to 128 microbes. It contains data on the regulation of about 7500 genes and evidence for 6500 interactions with 650 regulators. RegTransBase also contains manually created position weight matrices (PWM) that can be used to identify candidate regulatory sites in over 60 species. (Specialized Interface)

Dubchak, Inna; Gelfand, Mikhail

495

Energy Impact Illinois  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presents how Energy Impact Illinois overcame barriers in the multifamily sector through financing partnerships and expert advice.