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1

Combined Heat and Power Systems (CHP): Capabilities (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

D&MT Capabilities fact sheet that describes the NREL capabilities related to combined heat and power (CHP).

Not Available

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References EU Smart Grid Projects Map1 Overview Waste CHP plants can be used in the electricity market for upward regulation by bypassing the steam turbine. The technical...

3

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Development » Smart Grid » Distributed Technology Development » Smart Grid » Distributed Energy » Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems The CHP systems program aimed to facilitate acceptance of distributed energy in end-use sectors by forming partnerships with industry consortia in the commercial building, merchant stores, light industrial, supermarkets, restaurants, hospitality, health care and high-tech industries. In high-tech industries such as telecommunications, commercial data processing and internet services, the use of electronic data and signal processing have become a cornerstone in the U.S. economy. These industries represent high potential for CHP and distributed energy due to their ultra-high reliability and power quality requirements and related large

4

Combined Heat & Power (CHP) -A Clean Energy Solution for Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From the late 1970's to the early 1990's cogeneration or CHP saw enormous growth, especially in the process industries. By 1994, CHP provided 42 GW of electricity generation capacity -about 6 percent of the U.S. total. Three manufacturing industries (Pulp and paper -59 Twh; Chemicals -47 Twh; Petroleum refuting -IS Twh) accounted for 85% of all cogenerated electricity in 1994. But since the mid-1990s, installation of new CHP has slowed dramatically. This slow down is due to uncertainties and policies associated with electric utility restructuring and impending environmental regulations. By 1997, a group comprising CHP manufacturers and nonprofit groups had formed to identify these CHP barriers and to work to remove them. At the same time several studies on the role of energy efficiency in greenhouse gas emissions reductions identified CHP as one of the most promising options. These studies showed a key window of opportunity-many new or updated highly-efficient and lower-cost CHP systems will become available just when the industrial "boiler baby boom" retires. These technology opportunities take advantage of advances in materials, power electronics, and computer-aided design techniques have increased equipment efficiency and reliability dramatically, while reducing costs and emissions of pollutants. This next generation of turbines, fuel cells, and reciprocating engines is the result of intensive, collaborative research, development, and demonstration by government and industry. These have allowed for new configurations that reduce size yet increase output. Turbines are now cost-effective for systems down to 50 KW, the size of a small office or restaurant. Even smaller equipment is on the horizon. However, without rapid action, this opportune nexus of market, regulatory, and technology opportunities could dissipate. In fiscal year 1999, we launched the U. S. Department of Energy CHP Challenge program. By 2002 when the Challenge is complete, it should have substantially increased the use of CHP systems in industry and buildings. We estimate that efforts such as CHP Challenge could result in more than 50 MW of additional CHP electricity generation being installed at greater than 60 percent fuel-use efficiency (nearly double the average grid efficiency) by 2010. This paper will report on the first results of CHP Challenge and discuss future activities-especially in the industrial sector.

Parks, H.; Hoffman, P.; Kurtovich, M.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

A Preliminary Study on Designing Combined Heat and Power (CHP) System for the University Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) systems are an evolving technology that is at the front of the energy conservation movement. With the reduction in energy consumption and green house gas emissions, CHP systems are improving the efficiency of power generation. Our goal for this research is to develop a specification for a CHP System that will improve the University of Louisiana at Lafayettes operating efficiency. This system will reduce the operating cost of the university and provide reliable, clean energy to the College of Engineering and surrounding buildings. If this system is implemented correctly, it has the ability to meet the economic and reliability needs of the university. CHP systems are the combination of various forms of equipment to meet the electrical and thermal needs from one single fuel source. Major steps involved in the development of a CHP system including data collection and analysis, system calculations and system specifications will be discussed. This research also examines the barriers that CHP systems encounter with environmental regulations and grid interconnection.

Kozman, T. A.; Reynolds, C. M.; Lee, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect (Smart  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect Country Denmark Headquarters Location Sønderborg, Denmark Coordinates 54.913811°, 9.792178° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":54.913811,"lon":9.792178,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

7

Combined Heat and Power (CHP): Is It Right For Your Facility?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnership with the US DOE Partnership with the US DOE Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Is It Right For Your Facility U.S. DOE Industrial Technologies Program Webcast Series May 14 th , 2009 John J. Cuttica Cliff Haefke 312/996-4382 312/355-3476 cuttica@uic.edu chaefk1@uic.edu In Partnership with the US DOE Mid Atlantic www.chpcenterma.org Midwest www.chpcentermw.org Pacific www.chpcenterpr.org Northwest Region www.chpcenternw.org Northeast www.northeastchp.org Intermountain www.IntermountainCHP.org Gulf Coast www.GulfCoastCHP.org Southeastern www.chpcenterse.org In Partnership with the US DOE CHP Decision Making Process Presented by Ted Bronson & Joe Orlando Webcast Series January 8, 2009 CHP Regional Application Centers Walkthrough STOP Average Costs Typical Performance Yes No Energy Rates Profiles

8

Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect (Smart  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

effect (Smart effect (Smart Grid Project) (Thisted, Denmark) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect Country Denmark Headquarters Location Thisted, Denmark Coordinates 56.959167°, 8.703492° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.959167,"lon":8.703492,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

9

Distributed Generation as Combined Heat and Power (DG-CHP) (New...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Distributed Generation as Combined Heat and Power (DG-CHP) (New York) This is the approved revision of...

10

HEATMAPCHP - The International Standard for Modeling Combined Heat and Power Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEATMAPCHP is a software tool that can provide a comprehensive simulation of proposed and existing combined heat and power (CHP) plant and system applications, The software model provides a fully integrated analysis of central power production plants that are linked to district energy applications using hot water or steam for heating and/or chilled water-cooling and/or refrigeration connected to a network of buildings or other residential commercial, institutional, or industrial facilities. The program will provide designers, planners. engineers, investors, utilities, and operators with extensive technical, economical, and air emission information about a specific CHP application. The software can also be a valuable tool for community, military, regional, or national planners in defining all aspects of developing, evaluating, and justifying a new CHP project or upgrading an existing thermal system for CHP. Program output may be used to evaluate existing system performance or model the effects of various potential alternative system strategies including upgrades, expansions or conversion of thermal fluids (e.g., steam to hot water). A major feature of the program is its capability to comprehensively analyze a central CHP plant interface application involving thermal storage for both heating and cooling systems in conjunction with various technical distribution parameters covering both the supply and return elements of an extensive piping distribution system. Important features of the software include: the capability to utilize a myriad of fuel and equipment options; determination of air emission impacts that can result from CHP or central energy plant implementation; and the evaluation of extensive economic scenarios including the influence of environmental taxes on a variety of fuel alternatives.

Bloomquist, R. G.; O'Brien, R. G.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

State Barriers to CHP Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Every year, ACEEE collects data on regulatory policies in each state that theoretically serve to promote and discourage combined heat and power (CHP) development. In our annual State Energy Efficiency Scorecard (5), we assess the regulatory environment for CHP in each state and score states based on the favorability of their policies for CHP. As part of an effort to make this Scorecard more robust, ACEEE is conducting research to determine the practical realities of CHP development in each state from the perspective of CHP developers and technical assistance agencies. Preliminary research has shown that while certain regulations-and lack of regulations-can greatly influence the attractiveness or success of a project, there are market barriers outside the realm of policy that deserve a great deal of exploration and attention. Traditional regulatory barriers to CHP, such as interconnection procedures, air emissions regulations, and utility standby rates, do pose challenges for development in many states. However, discussions with CHP developers have revealed that many of these issues are overshadowed by economic and financial barriers, as well as other hidden market hurdles. Among these hurdles are the availability of natural gas at reasonable prices, the spark spread in a given region, the effectiveness of CHP developers, the presence of a devoted CHP champion at a host site, and the availability of financing mechanisms to mitigate the upfront capital burden on new projects. This paper will examine each region of the country and each state to determine specific barriers and outline a state-by-state market overview for CHP.

Chittum, A.; Kaufman, N.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

The Role of Incentives in Promoting CHP Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional wisdom suggests that financial incentives should be sufficient to spur the installation of combined heat and power (CHP) systems. However, the states with the most CHP development are often not the states with the most generous financial incentives. ACEEE has collected data on state regulatory policies that suggest that states with a regulatory structure favorable to CHP have more implementation activity. The four regulatory factors that stick out are: 1) fair interconnection standards; 2) output-based emissions regulations; 3) fair utility standby rates; and 4) that CHP is encouraged within a clean or renewable energy standard. We anticipate that these four regulatory factors correlate more strongly with empirical CHP implementation than the presence of financial incentives for CHP, which suggests that getting regulatory and market conditions right may be more important than providing incentives. This finding could also apply to many other facets of energy efficiency policy.

Kaufman, N.; Elliot, R. N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Packaged CHP System Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Packaged CHP System Assessment report provides an analysis of packaged combined heat and power (CHP) systems. The report summarizes and compares the technical characteristics of commercial product lines with electric power output up to 3,000 kWe.

2004-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

14

CHP in federal sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test Facility Texas DG Guidelines U of Md Test Bed Malden Mills Heatmap CHP Analysis Tool Microturbine tests Interconnection Standards 29 Palms USMC CHP Ft. Bragg CHP NYSERDAPark...

15

CHP, Waste Heat & District Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CHP Technologies and Applications CHP Technologies and Applications 25 Oct 11 Today's Electric Grid What is CHP * ASHRAE Handbook: "Combined heat and power (CHP). Simultaneous production of electrical or mechanical energy and useful thermal energy from a single energy stream." * CHP is not a single technology but a suite of technologies that can use a variety of fuels to generate electricity or power at the point of use. * CHP technology can be deployed quickly, cost-effectively, and with few geographic limitations. 11/1/2011 Slide 6 5/20/11 Slide 7 What is CHP? * On-site generation of Power and Thermal Energy from a single fuel source * 'Conventional' grid based generators are located remote from thermal applications while CHP plants are located close to thermal applications

16

Hexion CHP Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Built in 1998 in South Glens Falls, New York, the Hexion Chemical plant can produce up to 200 million pounds of formaldehyde per year. The formaldehyde is produced by combining methanol with air in the presence of a catalyst. Heat is recovered from the exothermic reaction through a heat transfer fluid jacket around the reactor vessel that controls reaction temperature and transfers heat to a secondary water/steam loop. Until 2004, most of the heat entrained in the steam was vented to the atmosphere via a condenser. Since that time, a turbine-generator system, designed by Turbosteam recovers this waste heat to produce up to 451 kilowatts of electricity. This innovative combined heat and power (CHP) system uses no fuel and produces zero emissions. The CHP system is equivalent to annually reducing carbon dioxide emissions by more than 2,700 tons. The EPA and DOE have recognized the project with an EPA CHP Certificate of Recognition. The project has been operating successfully since early 2004.

Bullock, B.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Obstacles and Opportunity: Overcoming Barriers in Today's CHP Marketplace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP), which can offer tremendous efficiency benefits to industrial facilities around the country, continues to be viewed as a long-term efficiency opportunity. However, the high up-front cost of CHP equipment and fuel-dependent operating costs have made CHP a difficult sell internally in some corporations. The recent recession and slow recovery have further discouraged facility managers and owners from making large capital investments such as CHP. This paper addresses the biggest barriers to new CHP project development from the perspective of those intimately involved in moving new CHP projects forward: CHP developers and CHP advocates. It identifies economic and financial barriers as the largest common barriers found throughout the U.S. It also suggests ways that CHP developers and advocates can address these barriers, and attempts to overcome them in the current economic context.

Chittum, A.; Kaufman, N.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Implementing CHP in Louisiana: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to evaluate issues related to implementing CHP systems in Louisiana. A case study is used to show the system design, economic analysis and permitting process. The implementation process will focus on the air permitting and the utility interconnection agreements for rural Louisiana. The development of general guidelines on CHP implementation in Louisiana will provide insight to many potential CHP adopters in the state of Louisiana. The methodology used involves researching current Federal and Louisiana state policies that regulate the air permitting and utility regulation for CHP systems. After the appropriate air permits and qualification for grid connection are identified, the next step in the process of solving the problem will be to locate appropriate contacts within the appropriate agencies. The final step of the problem solving will be to interview the appropriate personnel to identify the procedures that each department follows to implement CHP systems.

Kozman, T. A.; Carriere, J. L.; Lee, J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Making Combined Heat and Power District Heating(CHP-DH) networks in the United Kingdom economically viable: a comparative approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incentiveregime.InSwedenforexampleLocalAuthorities broughttogethertheownersofhighenergyconsumingbuildingssuch as apartment blocks and company owned office buildings in a bid to collaboratively invest in DH. In Sweden during the early 1970s DH networkswereheavilydependentonfossil... accelerated depletion of fossil fuel reserves and greaterpollutiontosurroundingenvironments. Figure 1: Aggregate energy efficiency comparisons of CHP and thermal generation (1991?2006)Source...

Kelly, S; Pollitt, Michael G.

20

Recent Developments in CHP Policy in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined Heat and Power (CHP), also known as cogeneration, refers to one of several technologies that allow a facility to generate electricity and useful heat simultaneously. It is highly efficient compared to conventional methods of generating heat and power separately. However, various market and policy barriers exist that prevent CHP from being more widely adopted. This paper provides an introduction to CHP and its benefits and an overview of the current CHP market, followed by an assessment of recent developments in CHP policy at the state level across the United States. New trends in CHP policy are highlighted, included an increase in the number of states that include CHP in their energy efficiency standards and the increased attention being paid to CHP's resiliency during times of disaster.

Farley, K.; Chittum, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulations chp combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Optimal design and control strategies for novel combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part I of II, datum design conditions and approach.  

SciTech Connect

Energy network optimization (ENO) models identify new strategies for designing, installing, and controlling stationary combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems (FCSs) with the goals of (1) minimizing electricity and heating costs for building owners and (2) reducing emissions of the primary greenhouse gas (GHG) - carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). A goal of this work is to employ relatively inexpensive simulation studies to discover more financially and environmentally effective approaches for installing CHP FCSs. ENO models quantify the impact of different choices made by power generation operators, FCS manufacturers, building owners, and governments with respect to two primary goals - energy cost savings for building owners and CO{sub 2} emission reductions. These types of models are crucial for identifying cost and CO{sub 2} optima for particular installations. Optimal strategies change with varying economic and environmental conditions, FCS performance, the characteristics of building demand for electricity and heat, and many other factors. ENO models evaluate both 'business-as-usual' and novel FCS operating strategies. For the scenarios examined here, relative to a base case of no FCSs installed, model results indicate that novel strategies could reduce building energy costs by 25% and CO{sub 2} emissions by 80%. Part I of II articles discusses model assumptions and methodology. Part II of II articles illustrates model results for a university campus town and generalizes these results for diverse communities.

Colella, Whitney G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Theoretical and Experimental Analysis of micro-CHP Energy Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the framework of the micro-CHP (Combined Heat and Power) energy systems and the Distributed Generation (GD) concept, an Integrated Energy System (IES) able to (more)

Vecci, Roberta and#60;1978and#62

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Clean Energy Solutions Large Scale CHP and Fuel Cells Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The New Jersey Economic Development Authority (EDA) is offering grants for the installation of combined heat and power (CHP) or fuel cell systems to commercial, industrial, and institutional...

24

Case Study of a Micro-CHP System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) involves the simultaneous generation of power and usable heat in a single process or appliance. CHP systems for large multi-family housing properties can reduce energy expenses, minimize environmental emissions and improve the reliability of the electricity supply. With the emergence of new micro-combined heat and power (Micro-CHP) systems, single family and multi- residences can now potentially realize the benefits of personal power. However as with any emerging technology...

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

25

CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: A PRELIMINARY INVENTORY OF ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eight Regional CHP Application Centers (RACs) are funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies in all 50 states. The RACs build end-user awareness by providing CHP-related information to targeted markets through education and outreach; they work with the states and regulators to encourage the creation and adoption of favorable public policies; and they provide CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. The RACs were started by DOE as a pilot program in 2001 to support the National CHP Roadmap developed by industry to accelerate deployment of energy efficient CHP technologies (U.S. Combined Heat and Power Association 2001). The intent was to foster a regional presence to build market awareness, address policy issues, and facilitate project development. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has supported DOE with the RAC program since its inception. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort involving DOE and some CHP industry stakeholders to establish quantitative metrics for measuring the RACs accomplishments. This effort incorporated the use of logic models to define and describe key RAC activities, outputs, and outcomes. Based on this detailed examination of RAC operations, potential metrics were identified associated with the various key sectors addressed by the RACs: policy makers; regulatory agencies; investor owned utilities; municipal and cooperative utilities; financiers; developers; and end users. The final product was reviewed by a panel of representatives from DOE, ORNL, RACs, and the private sector. The metrics developed through this effort focus on major RAC activities as well as on CHP installations and related outcomes. All eight RACs were contacted in August 2008 and asked to provide data for every year of Center operations for those metrics on which they kept records. In addition, data on CHP installations and related outcomes were obtained from an existing DOE-supported data base. The information provided on the individual RACs was summed to yield totals for all the Centers combined for each relevant item.

Schweitzer, Martin [ORNL

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Suggested Treatment of CHP Within an EERS Context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliable monitoring and measurement of the energy savings resulting from the installation of combined heat and power (CHP) systems and power recovered from waste energy (recycled energy) projects is becoming increasingly important. As a growing number of states and now the federal government look to mandatory energy efficiency portfolio programs such as an Energy Efficiency Resource Standard (EERS), CHP and waste heat recovery stands to play a substantial role as an efficiency resource. Estimating the energy savings resulting from the installation of a CHP system is critical to understanding and crediting the savings from CHP and recycled energy in a fair and uniform way. This paper proposes an approach to estimate CHP system savings, accounting for the wide variety of CHP systems available on the market today. It offers a specific methodology to meet state- and federal-level regulatory requirements emanating from an EERS. A full explanation of the proposed approach is provided.

Chittum, A.; Elliott, R. N.; Trombley, D.; Watson, S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

VA's CHP Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- 36,353 MWh Total Contract Cost - 70.3 million 1,900MWh generation + Extra Boilers + FREE STEAM VA's Existing CHP Plants Partnerships for Healing Environments 2010 6...

28

A Ranking of State Combined Heat and Power Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) has been identified as a significant opportunity for greater energy efficiency and decreased environmental impacts of energy consumption. Despite this, the regulatory and policy landscape for CHP is often quite discouraging to the deployment of these systems, despite their many benefits to customers and society at large. That the landscape changes considerably from state to state only confuses the matter. Of all the various types of distributed generation, CHP systems encompass technologies particularly hard hit by policies and regulations that do not actively support their deployment. Given the large size of some CHP systems, interconnection standards that clearly delineate interconnection processes for multi-megawatt systems are necessary. In addition, since many CHP technologies emit incremental criteria pollutants as part of their operation, the manner in which emissions are regulated by a state can significantly impact the financial realities of running a CHP system. In the absence of strong federal guidance, interconnection standards, tax incentives, tariff designs, environmental regulations and other policy measures that dramatically impact the attractiveness of CHP projects can only be significantly addressed by state lawmakers and regulators. State activity is essential to creating a policy framework that encourages CHP. Within the past several years, a number of states have made significant strides in implementing more CHP-friendly policies. Some states have worked to develop these policies at an accelerated rate while others have done little. In many cases the difference between states that are proactively encouraging CHP and states that are ignoring it all together is stark. This paper will identify which states are leading the way, which states are following, and what the policies of all states look like at this current point in time. It will define what CHP-friendly policies are, what makes a good policy better, and discuss the manners in which a variety of states have chosen to approach CHP. CHP system developers will come away with a clearer picture of each states unique CHP barriers, potential CHP customers will understand how their current CHP climate compares to that of other locations, and state lawmakers and CHP advocates will be able to learn about best practices in policy creation that already exist in the field.

Chittum, A.; Kaufman, N.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Building Energy Software Tools Directory : CHP Capacity Optimizer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHP Capacity Optimizer Back to Tool CHP Capacity Optimizer data entry screen CHP Capacity Optimizer results screen CHP Capacity Optimizer restult map...

30

Development and evaluation of a biomass-fired micro-scale CHP with organic rankine cycle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Combined Heat and Power Generation (CHP) or cogeneration has been considered worldwide as the major alternative to traditional energy systems in terms of signi ticant (more)

Shao, Yingjuan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Micro-CHP Technology Assessment and Benchmarking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant public and private R&D investments continue to be made in the area of high-efficiency distributed fossil generation. Micro generation in combined heat and power (micro-CHP) applications is part of the portfolio mix, with a focus on residential and small commercial market segments. Such systems offer a potentially attractive cost of electricity, low greenhouse gas emissions, and smaller capital investments and shorter lead times than large central generation facilities. As part of a smart grid...

2009-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

32

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: CHP Capacity Optimizer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Related Links CHP Capacity Optimizer CHP Capacity Optimizer logo Selecting the proper installed capacity for cooling, heating, and power (CHP) equipment is critical to the...

33

Opportunities for Utility-Owned CHP at Dry-Mill Fuel Ethanol Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report quantifies opportunities to co-locate natural-gas-fueled combined heat and power (CHP) facilities with corn dry-mill fuel ethanol plants in the upper Midwest. It also evaluates the opportunity to generate renewable power by fueling the CHP plants with biogas produced by anaerobic digestion of the byproducts of the corn wet-milling process.

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

34

Utility Perspective of mCHP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Market Development ?Dedicated Natural Gas rates for CHP in NY ... Upstate NY ? 29 Mw steam turbine at Healthcare facility ...

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

35

CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Transportation, Industry Topics: GHG inventory, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.epa.gov/chp/basic/calculator.html Country: United States UN Region: Northern America CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Screenshot References: http://www.epa.gov/chp/basic/calculator.html "This Emissions Estimator provides the amount of reduced emissions in terms of pounds of CO2, SO2, and NOX based on input from the User regarding the CHP technology being used. In turn the User will be provided with

36

The Confusing Allure of Combined Heat and Power: The Financial Attraction and Management Challenge of Reducing Energy Spend and Resulting Carbon Emissions Through Onsite Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sixty-one percent of global executives surveyed by McKinsey & Co. (in 2008) expect the issues associated with climate change to boost profitsif managed well. What these executives recognize is that new regulations, higher energy costs, and increased scrutiny by private gate-keepers (such as Wal-Mart) offer an opportunity to identify and implement more efficient practices in commercial and industrial environments. One of the most impactful solutions for the industrial sectorfrom the perspective of reducing energy spending and energy-related carbon emissionsis combined heat and power ("CHP"), sometimes referred to as cogeneration. However, the results of CHP deployment to date have been mixedlargely because companies do not fully appreciate the challenges of maintaining and operating a CHP system, optimizing its performance, and taking full advantage of the many benefits it offers. Despite these challenges, the slogan for CHP should perhaps be: "CHP, now more than ever".

Davis, R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

Between 2001 and 2005, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) created a set of eight Regional Application Centers (RACs) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies. By utilizing the thermal energy that is normally wasted when electricity is produced at central generating stations, Combined Heat and Power installations can save substantial amounts of energy compared to more traditional technologies. In addition, the location of CHP facilities at or near the point of consumption greatly reduces or eliminates electric transmission and distribution losses. The regional nature of the RACs allows each one to design and provide services that are most relevant to the specific economic and market conditions in its particular geographic area. Between them, the eight RACs provide services to all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Through the end of the federal 2009 fiscal year (FY 2009), the primary focus of the RACs was on providing CHP-related information to targeted markets, encouraging the creation and adoption of public policies and incentives favorable to CHP, and providing CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. Beginning with the 2010 fiscal year, the focus of the regional centers broadened to include district energy and waste heat recovery and these entities became formally known as Clean Energy Application Centers, as required by the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort to establish metrics to quantify the RACs accomplishments. That effort began with the development of a detailed logic model describing RAC operations and outcomes, which provided a basis for identifying important activities and accomplishments to track. A data collection spreadsheet soliciting information on those activities for FY 2008 and all previous years of RAC operations was developed and sent to the RACs in the summer of 2008. This represents the first systematic attempt at RAC program measurement in a manner consistent with approaches used for other efforts funded by DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP). In addition, data on CHP installations and associated effects were collected for the same years from a state-by-state database maintained for DOE by ICF international. A report documenting the findings of that study was produced in September, 2009. The purpose of the current report is to present the findings from a new study of RAC activities and accomplishments which examined what the Centers did in FY 2009, the last year in which they concentrated exclusively on CHP technologies. This study focused on identifying and describing RAC activities and was not designed to measure how those efforts influenced CHP installations or other outcomes.

Schweitzer, Martin [ORNL

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and/or cooling, and micro-CHP systems in the Californiaand/or cooling, and micro-CHP systems with and without heatmicro-generation systems, e.g. fuel cells with or without combined heat and power (CHP)

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Ontario Power Generation's 250 kWe Class Atmospheric Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC): Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study documents the demonstration experiences and lessons learned from a 250 kW solid oxide fuel cell system in a combined heat and power demonstration operating on natural gas. The project was a collaboration initiative between Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) and Ontario Power Generation (OPG) to install and test a first-of-a-kind SOFC system at OPG site in Toronto, Canada. This test and evaluation case study is one of several distributed generation project case studies under res...

2005-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

40

CHP Integrated with Burners for Packaged Boilers  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to engineer, design, fabricate, and field demonstrate a Boiler Burner Energy System Technology (BBEST) that integrates a low-cost, clean burning, gas-fired simple-cycle (unrecuperated) 100 kWe (net) microturbine (SCMT) with a new ultra low-NOx gas-fired burner (ULNB) into one compact Combined Heat and Power (CHP) product that can be retrofit on new and existing industrial and commercial boilers in place of conventional burners. The Scope of Work for this project was segmented into two principal phases: (Phase I) Hardware development, assembly and pre-test and (Phase II) Field installation and demonstration testing. Phase I was divided into five technical tasks (Task 2 to 6). These tasks covered the engineering, design, fabrication, testing and optimization of each key component of the CHP system principally, ULNB, SCMT, assembly BBEST CHP package, and integrated controls. Phase I work culminated with the laboratory testing of the completed BBEST assembly prior to shipment for field installation and demonstration. Phase II consisted of two remaining technical tasks (Task 7 and 8), which focused on the installation, startup, and field verification tests at a pre-selected industrial plant to document performance and attainment of all project objectives. Technical direction and administration was under the management of CMCE, Inc. Altex Technologies Corporation lead the design, assembly and testing of the system. Field demonstration was supported by Leva Energy, the commercialization firm founded by executives at CMCE and Altex. Leva Energy has applied for patent protection on the BBEST process under the trade name of Power Burner and holds the license for the burner currently used in the product. The commercial term Power Burner is used throughout this report to refer to the BBEST technology proposed for this project. The project was co-funded by the California Energy Commission and the Southern California Gas Company (SCG), a division of Sempra Energy. These match funds were provided via concurrent contracts and investments available via CMCE, Altex, and Leva Energy The project attained all its objectives and is considered a success. CMCE secured the support of GI&E from Italy to supply 100 kW Turbec T-100 microturbines for the project. One was purchased by the projects subcontractor, Altex, and a second spare was purchased by CMCE under this project. The microturbines were then modified to convert from their original recuperated design to a simple cycle configuration. Replacement low-NOx silo combustors were designed and bench tested in order to achieve compliance with the California Air Resources Board (CARB) 2007 emission limits for NOx and CO when in CHP operation. The converted microturbine was then mated with a low NOx burner provided by Altex via an integration section that allowed flow control and heat recovery to minimize combustion blower requirements; manage burner turndown; and recover waste heat. A new fully integrated control system was designed and developed that allowed one-touch system operation in all three available modes of operation: (1) CHP with both microturbine and burner firing for boiler heat input greater than 2 MMBtu/hr; (2) burner head only (BHO) when the microturbine is under service; and (3) microturbine only when boiler heat input requirements fall below 2 MMBtu/hr. This capability resulted in a burner turndown performance of nearly 10/1, a key advantage for this technology over conventional low NOx burners. Key components were then assembled into a cabinet with additional support systems for generator cooling and fuel supply. System checkout and performance tests were performed in the laboratory. The assembled system and its support equipment were then shipped and installed at a host facility where final performance tests were conducted following efforts to secure fabrication, air, and operating permits. The installed power burner is now in commercial operation and has achieved all the performance goals.

Castaldini, Carlo; Darby, Eric

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulations chp combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Optimal design and control strategies for novel combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part II of II, case study results.  

SciTech Connect

Innovative energy system optimization models are deployed to evaluate novel fuel cell system (FCS) operating strategies, not typically pursued by commercial industry. Most FCS today are installed according to a 'business-as-usual' approach: (1) stand-alone (unconnected to district heating networks and low-voltage electricity distribution lines), (2) not load following (not producing output equivalent to the instantaneous electrical or thermal demand of surrounding buildings), (3) employing a fairly fixed heat-to-power ratio (producing heat and electricity in a relatively constant ratio to each other), and (4) producing only electricity and no recoverable heat. By contrast, models discussed here consider novel approaches as well. Novel approaches include (1) networking (connecting FCSs to electrical and/or thermal networks), (2) load following (having FCSs produce only the instantaneous electricity or heat demanded by surrounding buildings), (3) employing a variable heat-to-power ratio (such that FCS can vary the ratio of heat and electricity they produce), (4) co-generation (combining the production of electricity and recoverable heat), (5) permutations of these together, and (6) permutations of these combined with more 'business-as-usual' approaches. The detailed assumptions and methods behind these models are described in Part I of this article pair.

Colella, Whitney G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Optimizal design and control strategies for novel Combined Heat and Power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part II of II, case study results.  

SciTech Connect

Innovative energy system optimization models are deployed to evaluate novel fuel cell system (FCS) operating strategies, not typically pursued by commercial industry. Most FCS today are installed according to a 'business-as-usual' approach: (1) stand-alone (unconnected to district heating networks and low-voltage electricity distribution lines), (2) not load following (not producing output equivalent to the instantaneous electrical or thermal demand of surrounding buildings), (3) employing a fairly fixed heat-to-power ratio (producing heat and electricity in a relatively constant ratio to each other), and (4) producing only electricity and no recoverable heat. By contrast, models discussed here consider novel approaches as well. Novel approaches include (1) networking (connecting FCSs to electrical and/or thermal networks), (2) load following (having FCSs produce only the instantaneous electricity or heat demanded by surrounding buildings), (3) employing a variable heat-to-power ratio (such that FCS can vary the ratio of heat and electricity they produce), (4) co-generation (combining the production of electricity and recoverable heat), (5) permutations of these together, and (6) permutations of these combined with more 'business-as-usual' approaches.

Colella, Whitney G.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Clean Hydrogen Producers Ltd CHP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Producers Ltd CHP Jump to: navigation, search Name Clean Hydrogen Producers Ltd (CHP) Place Geneva, Switzerland Zip 1209 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen, Solar Product Swiss...

44

Combined Heat and Power ecopower micro CHP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (Grandkids) ? Full in-floor radiant heating system in the house ? Geothermal system as backup. ? In 20 months of ecopower ...

2012-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

45

Distributed Generation Study/Patterson Farms CHP System Using Renewable  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Farms CHP System Using Renewable Farms CHP System Using Renewable Biogas < Distributed Generation Study Jump to: navigation, search Study Location Auburn, New York Site Description Agricultural Study Type Field Test Technology Internal Combustion Engine Prime Mover Caterpillar G379 Heat Recovery Systems Built-in Fuel Biogas System Installer Martin Machinery System Enclosure Dedicated Shelter System Application Combined Heat and Power Number of Prime Movers 1 Stand-alone Capability None Power Rating 200 kW0.2 MW 200,000 W 200,000,000 mW 2.0e-4 GW 2.0e-7 TW Nominal Voltage (V) 480 Heat Recovery Rating (BTU/hr) 1366072 Cooling Capacity (Refrig/Tons) Origin of Controller 3rd Party Custom Made Component Integration Customer Assembled Start Date 2007/05/02 Monitoring Termination Date 2007/05/26

46

GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION POTENTIAL WITH COMBINED HEAT AND POWER WITH DISTRIBUTED GENERATION PRIME MOVERS - ASME 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pending or recently enacted greenhouse gas regulations and mandates are leading to the need for current and feasible GHG reduction solutions including combined heat and power (CHP). Distributed generation using advanced reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines and fuel cells has been shown to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) compared to the U.S. electrical generation mix due to the use of natural gas and high electrical generation efficiencies of these prime movers. Many of these prime movers are also well suited for use in CHP systems which recover heat generated during combustion or energy conversion. CHP increases the total efficiency of the prime mover by recovering waste heat for generating electricity, replacing process steam, hot water for buildings or even cooling via absorption chilling. The increased efficiency of CHP systems further reduces GHG emissions compared to systems which do not recover waste thermal energy. Current GHG mandates within the U.S Federal sector and looming GHG legislation for states puts an emphasis on understanding the GHG reduction potential of such systems. This study compares the GHG savings from various state-of-the- art prime movers. GHG reductions from commercially available prime movers in the 1-5 MW class including, various industrial fuel cells, large and small gas turbines, micro turbines and reciprocating gas engines with and without CHP are compared to centralized electricity generation including the U.S. mix and the best available technology with natural gas combined cycle power plants. The findings show significant GHG saving potential with the use of CHP. Also provided is an exploration of the accounting methodology for GHG reductions with CHP and the sensitivity of such analyses to electrical generation efficiency, emissions factors and most importantly recoverable heat and thermal recovery efficiency from the CHP system.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

ENERGY ANALYSIS OF A MICRO-CHP DEMONSTRATION FACILITY.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Cooling, Heating, and Power (CHP) systems have been around for decades, but systems that utilize 20 kW or less, designated as Micro-CHP, are relatively (more)

Giffin, Paxton Keith

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Micro-CHP Modeling and Simulation using Thermodynamic Cycles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis discusses the thermoeconomic modeling and simulation of micro-CHP systems powered by various prime movers. Micro Cooling, Heating, and Power (micro-CHP) is becoming an (more)

Moran, Alan Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Biomass DHP/ CHP benefits at local and regional level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass DHP/ CHP ­ benefits at local and regional level Krzysztof Gierulski EC Baltic RenewableEnergy Workshop, Brussels 01.07.2002 #12;Biomass DHP/ CHP in Poland n Plan of the presentation n Promotion and dissemination of best practices (,,Promotion of conversion to biomass CHP at larger sites in PL", OPET) n

50

Balance of Plant Needs and Integration of Stack Components for Stationary Power and CHP Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Balance of Plant Needs and Balance of Plant Needs and Integration of Stack Components for Stationary Power and CHP Applications Applications Chris Ainscough P.E. Chief Engineer - PowerEdge Nuvera Fuel Cells cainscough@nuvera.com Background  Experience integrating systems based on fuel cells and reformers.  Applications include vehicles, combined heat and power (CHP), industrial plants, and forklifts. Who Needs Balance of Plant?  "...an electric generator that has no moving parts...This elegant device is called a fuel cell." Skerrett, P. J. "Fuel Cell Update." Popular Science. June 1993:89. print. No Moving Parts Except These  The typical fluid components in a PEM CHP system based on steam/methane reformer technology. (in red) SWITCH STACK PRV

51

List of CHP/Cogeneration Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CHP/Cogeneration Incentives CHP/Cogeneration Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 279 CHP/Cogeneration Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 279) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Advanced Energy Gross Receipts Tax Deduction (New Mexico) Sales Tax Incentive New Mexico Commercial Construction Installer/Contractor Retail Supplier CHP/Cogeneration Geothermal Electric Photovoltaics

52

Design of Heat Exchanger for Heat Recovery in CHP Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to review issues related to the design of heat recovery unit in Combined Heat and Power (CHP) systems. To meet specific needs of CHP systems, configurations can be altered to affect different factors of the design. Before the design process can begin, product specifications, such as steam or water pressures and temperatures, and equipment, such as absorption chillers and heat exchangers, need to be identified and defined. The Energy Engineering Laboratory of the Mechanical Engineering Department of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette and the Louisiana Industrial Assessment Center has been donated an 800kW diesel turbine and a 100 ton absorption chiller from industries. This equipment needs to be integrated with a heat exchanger to work as a Combined Heat and Power system for the University which will supplement the chilled water supply and electricity. The design constraints of the heat recovery unit are the specifications of the turbine and the chiller which cannot be altered.

Kozman, T. A.; Kaur, B.; Lee, J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Procuring Stationary Fuel Cells For CHP: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Federal agency leaders are expressing growing interest in using innovative fuel cell combined heat and power (CHP) technology at their sites, motivated by both executive branch sustainability targets and a desire to lead by example in the transition to a clean energy economy. Fuel cell CHP can deliver reliable electricity and heat with 70% to 85% efficiency. Implementing this technology can be a high efficiency, clean energy solution for agencies striving to meet ambitious sustainability requirements with limited budgets. Fuel cell CHP systems can use natural gas or renewable fuels, such as biogas. Procuring Stationary Fuel Cells for CHP: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers presents an overview of the process for planning and implementing a fuel cell CHP project in a concise, step-by-step format. This guide is designed to help agency leaders turn their interest in fuel cell technology into successful installations. This guide concentrates on larger (100 kW and greater) fuel cell CHP systems and does not consider other fuel cell applications such as cars, forklifts, backup power supplies or small generators (<100 kW). Because fuel cell technologies are rapidly evolving and have high up front costs, their deployment poses unique challenges. The electrical and thermal output of the CHP system must be integrated with the building s energy systems. Innovative financing mechanisms allow agencies to make a make versus buy decision to maximize savings. This guide outlines methods that federal agencies may use to procure fuel cell CHP systems with little or no capital investment. Each agency and division, however, has its own set of procurement procedures. This guide was written as a starting point, and it defers to the reader s set of rules if differences exist. The fuel cell industry is maturing, and project developers are gaining experience in working with federal agencies. Technology improvements, cost reductions, and experienced project developers are making fuel cell projects easier to put into service. In this environment, federal decision makers can focus on being smart buyers of fuel cell energy instead of attempting to become experts in fuel cell technology. For agencies that want to pursue a fuel cell CHP this guide presents a four step process for a successful project. 1. Perform a preliminary screening of the energy needs energy costs and incentives. 2. Compare a detailed project plan. 3. Make a financing and contracting decision. 4. Execute the project plan including financing, installation, and operation. The simplest procurement method is designated funding for the outright purchase of the fuel cell CHP system, although this is usually not the most cost-effective option. This guide describes the following financing options: Power purchase agreement Energy savings performance contract Utility energy services contract Enhanced use lease Fuel cell CHP technology can help federal facility managers comply with agency objectives for reducing energy consumption and air pollution emissions. Fuel cells do not generate particulate pollutants, unburned hydrocarbons or the gases that produce acid rain. Fuel cells emit less carbon dioxide (CO2) than other, less efficient technologies and use of renewable fuels can make them carbon neutral. Fuel cell CHP technology can deliver reliable electricity and heat with high efficiency (70% to 85%) in a small physical footprint with little noise, making it a cost-effective option for federal facilities.

Stinton, David P [ORNL; McGervey, Joseph [SRA International, Inc.; Curran, Scott [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Energy Efficiency Improvements Through the Use of Combined Heat...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) in Buildings Combined technology helps Federal energy managers meet mission critical energy needs Buildings Cooling, Heating and Power...

55

Combined Heat and Power: A Technology Whose Time Has Come  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

grid, the few buildings equipped with Combined Heat andthe grid system. 29 Source: EPA Combined Heat and Powergrid system. 21 Alternatively, a CHP system collects the wasted heat

Ferraina, Steven

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

MICRO-CHP System for Residential Applications  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of progress under Phase I of a project to develop and commercialize a micro-CHP system for residential applications that provides electrical power, heating, and cooling for the home. This is the first phase of a three-phase effort in which the residential micro-CHP system will be designed (Phase I), developed and tested in the laboratory (Phase II); and further developed and field tested (Phase III). The project team consists of Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc. (AMTI), responsible for system design and integration; Marathon Engine Systems, Inc. (MES), responsible for design of the engine-generator subsystem; AO Smith, responsible for design of the thermal storage and water heating subsystems; Trane, a business of American Standard Companies, responsible for design of the HVAC subsystem; and AirXchange, Inc., responsible for design of the mechanical ventilation and dehumidification subsystem.

Joseph Gerstmann

2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

Micro-CHP Systems for Residential Applications  

SciTech Connect

Integrated micro-CHP (Cooling, Heating and Power) system solutions represent an opportunity to address all of the following requirements at once: conservation of scarce energy resources, moderation of pollutant release into our environment, and assured comfort for home-owners. The objective of this effort was to establish strategies for development, demonstration, and sustainable commercialization of cost-effective integrated CHP systems for residential applications. A unified approach to market and opportunity identification, technology assessment, specific system designs, adaptation to modular product platform component conceptual designs was employed. UTRC's recommendation to U.S. Department of Energy is to go ahead with the execution of the proposed product development and commercialization strategy plan under Phase II of this effort. Recent indicators show the emergence of micro-CHP. More than 12,000 micro-CHP systems have been sold worldwide so far, around 7,500 in 2004. Market projections predict a world-wide market growth over 35% per year. In 2004 the installations were mainly in Europe (73.5%) and in Japan (26.4%). The market in North-America is almost non-existent (0.1%). High energy consumption, high energy expenditure, large spark-spread (i.e., difference between electricity and fuel costs), big square footage, and high income are the key conditions for market acceptance. Today, these conditions are best found in the states of New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, New England states. A multiple stage development plan is proposed to address risk mitigation. These stages include concept development and supplier engagement, component development, system integration, system demonstration, and field trials. A two stage commercialization strategy is suggested based on two product versions. The first version--a heat and power system named Micro-Cogen, provides the heat and essential electrical power to the homeowner. In its proposed embodiment, the system has a 2kW prime mover integrated to a furnace platform. The second version is a Micro-Trigen system with heating, cooling and power. It has the same Micro-Cogen platform integrated with a 14kW thermally activated chiller. A Stirling engine is suggested as a promising path for the prime mover. A LiBr absorption chiller is today's best technology in term of readiness level. Paybacks are acceptable for the Micro-Cogen version. However, there is no clear economically viable path for a Micro-Trigen version with today's available technology. This illustrates the importance of financial incentives to home owners in the initial stage of micro-CHP commercialization. It will help create the necessary conditions of volume demand to start transitioning to mass-production and cost reduction. Incentives to the manufacturers will help improve efficiency, enhance reliability, and lower cost, making micro-CHP products more attractive. Successful development of a micro-CHP system for residential applications has the potential to provide significant benefits to users, customers, manufacturers, and suppliers of such systems and, in general, to the nation as a whole. The benefits to the ultimate user are a comfortable and healthy home environment at an affordable cost, potential utility savings, and a reliable supply of energy. Manufacturers, component suppliers, and system integrators will see growth of a new market segment for integrated energy products. The benefits to the nation include significantly increased energy efficiency, reduced consumption of fossil fuels, pollutant and CO{sub 2} emissions from power generation, enhanced security from power interruptions as well as enhanced economic activity and job creation. An integrated micro-CHP energy system provides advantages over conventional power generation, since the energy is used more efficiently by means of efficient heat recovery. Foreign companies are readily selling products, mostly in Europe, and it is urgent to react promptly to these offerings that will soon em

Timothy DeValve; Benoit Olsommer

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

58

Micro-CHP Systems for Residential Applications  

SciTech Connect

Integrated micro-CHP (Cooling, Heating and Power) system solutions represent an opportunity to address all of the following requirements at once: conservation of scarce energy resources, moderation of pollutant release into our environment, and assured comfort for home-owners. The objective of this effort was to establish strategies for development, demonstration, and sustainable commercialization of cost-effective integrated CHP systems for residential applications. A unified approach to market and opportunity identification, technology assessment, specific system designs, adaptation to modular product platform component conceptual designs was employed. UTRC's recommendation to U.S. Department of Energy is to go ahead with the execution of the proposed product development and commercialization strategy plan under Phase II of this effort. Recent indicators show the emergence of micro-CHP. More than 12,000 micro-CHP systems have been sold worldwide so far, around 7,500 in 2004. Market projections predict a world-wide market growth over 35% per year. In 2004 the installations were mainly in Europe (73.5%) and in Japan (26.4%). The market in North-America is almost non-existent (0.1%). High energy consumption, high energy expenditure, large spark-spread (i.e., difference between electricity and fuel costs), big square footage, and high income are the key conditions for market acceptance. Today, these conditions are best found in the states of New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, New England states. A multiple stage development plan is proposed to address risk mitigation. These stages include concept development and supplier engagement, component development, system integration, system demonstration, and field trials. A two stage commercialization strategy is suggested based on two product versions. The first version--a heat and power system named Micro-Cogen, provides the heat and essential electrical power to the homeowner. In its proposed embodiment, the system has a 2kW prime mover integrated to a furnace platform. The second version is a Micro-Trigen system with heating, cooling and power. It has the same Micro-Cogen platform integrated with a 14kW thermally activated chiller. A Stirling engine is suggested as a promising path for the prime mover. A LiBr absorption chiller is today's best technology in term of readiness level. Paybacks are acceptable for the Micro-Cogen version. However, there is no clear economically viable path for a Micro-Trigen version with today's available technology. This illustrates the importance of financial incentives to home owners in the initial stage of micro-CHP commercialization. It will help create the necessary conditions of volume demand to start transitioning to mass-production and cost reduction. Incentives to the manufacturers will help improve efficiency, enhance reliability, and lower cost, making micro-CHP products more attractive. Successful development of a micro-CHP system for residential applications has the potential to provide significant benefits to users, customers, manufacturers, and suppliers of such systems and, in general, to the nation as a whole. The benefits to the ultimate user are a comfortable and healthy home environment at an affordable cost, potential utility savings, and a reliable supply of energy. Manufacturers, component suppliers, and system integrators will see growth of a new market segment for integrated energy products. The benefits to the nation include significantly increased energy efficiency, reduced consumption of fossil fuels, pollutant and CO{sub 2} emissions from power generation, enhanced security from power interruptions as well as enhanced economic activity and job creation. An integrated micro-CHP energy system provides advantages over conventional power generation, since the energy is used more efficiently by means of efficient heat recovery. Foreign companies are readily selling products, mostly in Europe, and it is urgent to react promptly to these offerings that will soon emerge on the U.S

Timothy DeValve; Benoit Olsommer

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

59

Distributed Generation Study/Patterson Farms CHP System Using...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Farms CHP System Using Renewable Biogas < Distributed Generation Study Jump to: navigation, search Study Location Auburn, New York Site Description Agricultural Study Type Field...

60

Installation and Instrumentation of a Micro-CHP Demonstration Facility.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Micro-Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) is the decentralized generation of electricity in which normally wasted heat is recovered for use in heating and cooling of (more)

Stone, Nicholas Alexander

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulations chp combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CHP Supported with Energy Efficiency Measures -- A Winning and Environmentally Sound Solution in Finland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"In the European Union Energy Programmes, one of the most significant measures in reducing carbon dioxides and other emissions is to build additional CHP technology. This will be implemented with measures to raise the energy efficiency. CHP technology is exceptionally widely used in Finland. At industrial sites, it accounts for more than in any other country in Europe. Owing to limited possibilities to build additional CHP, the focus in Finland is already shifting to other measures that add to energy efficiency. The energy intensive forest industry accounts for about 60% of the industrial energy use in Finland. The CHP plants form the basis for the industry's energy system. The agreement closed between industry and the Government obliges the forest companies to have energy analyses prepared The Government also supports projects that have increased energy efficiency as target. The industry has agreed amongst themselves during 1998 on the game rules that govern the enhancing of the energy efficiency at their pulp and paper mills. Through its solid mastering of the entire energy chain, Fortum -one of the leading Nordic energy companies, is focusing on the development of products and processes with strong environmental characteristics. Apart from actively implementing CHP projects around the Baltic region, the company is also strongly supporting the forest industry companies in their attempts to develop techniques aiming at enhancing energy efficiency at their mill units. The computer modeling know-how that over ten past years has been developed in the power plant environment provides the foundation for Fortum's energy analyses. This combined with customers know-how of energy and processes, creates an exceptionally efficient operation to enhance energy efficiency of pulp and paper mill units. "

Hannunkari, E.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

PSADEFS.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Definitions Definitions of Petroleum Products and Other Terms Alcohol. The family name of a group of organic chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group; CH 3 - (CH 2 )n-OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). Alkylate. The product of an alkylation reaction. It usu- ally refers to the high octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in blending high octane gaso- line. Alkylation. A refining process for chemically combining isobutane with olefin hydrocarbons (e.g., propylene, buty- lene) through the control of temperature and pressure in the presence of an acid catalyst, usually sulfuric acid or hydrofluoric acid. The product, alkylate, an isoparaffin, has high octane value and is blended with motor and aviation gasoline to improve the antiknock

63

Biomass DHP/ CHP benefits at local and regional level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass DHP/ CHP ­ benefits at local and regional level Krzysztof Gierulski EC Baltic RenewableEnergy Workshop, Brussels 01.07.2002 http://www.managenergy.net/conference/ren0702/gierulski.pdf #12;Biomass DHP of conversion to biomass CHP at larger sites in PL", OPET) n Technical assistance (,,Feasibility

64

State Opportunities for Action: Review of States' Combined Heat and Power Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) has been the focus of federal attention since the mid-1990s. However, many of the market barriers to CHP are at the state level. As a sign of the maturing CHP market, a number of states are now undertaking activities to addre

Brown, E.; Elliott, N.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Report number ex. Ris-R-1234(EN) 1 Local CHP Plants between the Natural Gas and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conversion capacity. In particular they supply a large share of the district heating networks with heat systems, viz., district heating, gas and electricity. 1 Introduction In Denmark, three energy systems form and district heating systems meet in combined heat and power (CHP) generation facilities, of which most

66

FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

system efficiency. Capstone Turbine Corporation is designing a combined 65 kilowatt CHP system and biomass gasifier that can use stalks, grass and other material to generate...

67

Combined heat and power technology fills an important energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home; Browse by Tag; Most ... Combined heat and power technology fills an important ... CHP capacity additions followed the pattern of the electric power industry ...

68

Combined heat and power technology fills an important energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Combined heat and power (CHP), also called cogeneration, is an efficient approach to generating electric power and useful thermal energy for heating ...

69

Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentationgiven at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meetingcovers combined heat and power (CHP) technologies and their applications.

70

Equilibrium Modeling of Combined Heat and Power deployment in Philadelphia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Combined heat and power (CHP) generates electricity and heat from the same fuel source and can provide these services at higher equivalent conversion efficiency relative (more)

Govindarajan, Anand

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

State Opportunities for Action: Review of States' Combined Heat and Power Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) has been the focus of federal attention since the mid-1990s. However, many of the market barriers to CHP are at the state level. As a sign of the maturing of the CHP market, a number of states are now undertaking activities to address barriers to CHP, and some states have begun to provide incentives to encourage the development of systems in their states. This report outlines current state-level activities regarding CHP in the areas of interconnection, emissions standards, and financial incentives offered for CHP. Moreover, because this report intends to educate the public about the difficulties of installing CHP, specifically not covered in this report are utility-owned CHP facilities and large investor-owned utilities (IOUs).

Brown, E.; Scott, K.; Elliott, R. N.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Mid-Atlantic Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mid-Atlantic Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Mid-Atlantic Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Mid-Atlantic Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Mid-Atlantic www.midatlanticCHPTAP.org Jim Freihaut Pennsylvania State University 814-863-0083 jdf11@psu.edu Delaware View Energy and Environmental Analysis Inc.'s (EEA) database of all known CHP installations in Delaware. District of Columbia View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in the District of Columbia. Maryland Baltimore Refuse Energy Co., Baltimore View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in Maryland. New Jersey View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in New Jersey.

73

Fuel Cell Power Model for CHP and CHHP Economics and Performance Analysis (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation describes the fuel cell power model for CHP and CHHP economics and performance analysis.

Steward, D.; Penev, M.

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

74

Southeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Southeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Southeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Southeast www.southeastCHPTAP.org Isaac Panzarella North Carolina State University 919-515-0354 ipanzarella@ncsu.edu Alabama View Energy and Environmental Analysis Inc.'s (EEA) database of all known CHP installations in Alabama. Arkansas Fourche Creek Wastewater Treatment Facility, Little Rock View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in Arkansas. Florida Howard F. Curren Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant, Tampa Shands Hospital, Gainesville View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in Florida.

75

A Management Tool for Analyzing CHP Natural Gas Liquids Recovery System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to develop a management tool for analyzing combined heat and power (CHP) natural gas liquids (NGL) recovery systems. The methodology is developed around the central ideas of product recovery, possible recovery levels, and the flexibility of the process. These ideas led to the design of the CHP-NGL recovery system and the development of the equipment sizing and economic analysis methods. Requirements for sizing refrigeration units, heat exchangers, and pumps are discussed and demonstrated. From the data sheets it is possible to gather costs associated with the project and demonstrate the economic feasibility of the system. The amount of NGL recovered, heating value, payback period, cash flow, net present value of money, and the internal rate of return are calculated and demonstrated to be favorable to this project.

Olsen, C.; Kozman, T. A.; Lee, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Guide to Combined Heat and Power Systems for Boiler Owners and Operators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) or cogeneration is the sequential production of two forms of useful energy from a single fuel source. In most CHP applications, chemical energy in fuel is converted to both mechanical and thermal energy. The mechanical energy is generally used to generate electricity, while the thermal energy or heat is used to produce steam, hot water, or hot air. Depending on the application, CHP is referred to by various names including Building Cooling, Heating, and Power (BCHP); Cooling, Heating, and Power for Buildings (CHPB); Combined Cooling, Heating, and Power (CCHP); Integrated Energy Systems (IES), or Distributed Energy Resources (DER). The principal technical advantage of a CHP system is its ability to extract more useful energy from fuel compared to traditional energy systems such as conventional power plants that only generate electricity and industrial boiler systems that only produce steam or hot water for process applications. By using fuel energy for both power and heat production, CHP systems can be very energy efficient and have the potential to produce electricity below the price charged by the local power provider. Another important incentive for applying cogeneration technology is to reduce or eliminate dependency on the electrical grid. For some industrial processes, the consequences of losing power for even a short period of time are unacceptable. The primary objective of the guide is to present information needed to evaluate the viability of cogeneration for new or existing industrial, commercial, and institutional (ICI) boiler installations and to make informed CHP equipment selection decisions. Information presented is meant to help boiler owners and operators understand the potential benefits derived from implementing a CHP project and recognize opportunities for successful application of cogeneration technology. Topics covered in the guide follow: (1) an overview of cogeneration technology with discussions about benefits of applying cogeneration technology and barriers to implementing cogeneration technology; (2) applicable federal regulations and permitting issues; (3) descriptions of prime movers commonly used in CHP applications, including discussions about design characteristics, heat-recovery options and equipment, fuels and emissions, efficiency, maintenance, availability, and capital cost; (4) electrical generators and electrical interconnection equipment; (5) cooling and dehumidification equipment; (6) thermodynamic cycle options and configurations; (7) steps for evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of applying cogeneration technology; and (8) information sources.

Oland, CB

2004-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

77

Research, Development and Demonstration of Micro-CHP System for Residential Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ECR International and its joint venture company, Climate Energy, are at the forefront of the effort to deliver residential-scale combined heat and power (Micro-CHP) products to the USA market. Part of this substantial program is focused on the development of a new class of steam expanders that offers the potential for significantly lower costs for small-scale power generation technology. The heart of this technology is the scroll expander, a machine that has revolutionized the HVAC refrigerant compressor industry in the last 15 years. The liquid injected cogeneration (LIC) technology is at the core of the efforts described in this report, and remains an excellent option for low cost Micro-CHP systems. ECR has demonstrated in several prototype appliances that the concept for LIC can be made into a practical product. The continuing challenge is to identify economical scroll machine designs that will meet the performance and endurance requirements needed for a long life appliance application. This report describes the numerous advances made in this endeavor by ECR International. Several important advances are described in this report. Section 4 describes a marketing and economics study that integrates the technical performance of the LIC system with real-world climatic data and economic analysis to assess the practical impact that different factors have on the economic application of Micro-CHP in residential applications. Advances in the development of a working scroll steam expander are discussed in Section 5. A rigorous analytical assessment of the performance of scroll expanders, including the difficult to characterize impact of pocket to pocket flank leakage, is presented in Section 5.1. This is followed with an FEA study of the thermal and pressure induced deflections that would result from the normal operation of an advanced scroll expander. Section 6 describes the different scroll expanders and test fixtures developed during this effort. Another key technical challenge to the development of a long life LIC system is the development of a reliable and efficient steam generator. The steam generator and support equipment development is described in Section 7. Just one year ago, ECR International announced through its joint venture company, Climate Energy, that it was introducing to the USA market a new class of Micro-CHP product using the state-of-the-art Honda MCHP gas fired internal combustion (IC) engine platform. We now have installed Climate Energy Micro-CHP systems in 20 pilot demonstration sites for the 2005/2006 heating season. This breakthrough success with IC engine based systems paves the way for future advanced steam cycle Micro-CHP systems to be introduced.

Karl Mayer

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Micro Cooling, Heating, and Power (Micro-CHP) and Bio-Fuel Center, Mississippi State University  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initially, most micro-CHP systems will likely be designed as constant-power output or base-load systems. This implies that at some point the power requirement will not be met, or that the requirement will be exceeded. Realistically, both cases will occur within a 24-hour period. For example, in the United States, the base electrical load for the average home is approximately 2 kW while the peak electrical demand is slightly over 4 kW. If a 3 kWe micro- CHP system were installed in this situation, part of the time more energy will be provided than could be used and for a portion of the time more energy will be required than could be provided. Jalalzadeh-Azar [6] investigated this situation and presented a comparison of electrical- and thermal-load-following CHP systems. In his investigation he included in a parametric analysis addressing the influence of the subsystem efficiencies on the total primary energy consumption as well as an economic analysis of these systems. He found that an increase in the efficiencies of the on-site power generation and electrical equipment reduced the total monthly import of electricity. A methodology for calculating performance characteristics of different micro-CHP system components will be introduced in this article. Thermodynamic cycles are used to model each individual prime mover. The prime movers modeled in this article are a spark-ignition internal combustion engine (Otto cycle) and a diesel engine (Diesel cycle). Calculations for heat exchanger, absorption chiller, and boiler modeling are also presented. The individual component models are then linked together to calculate total system performance values. Performance characteristics that will be observed for each system include maximum fuel flow rate, total monthly fuel consumption, and system energy (electrical, thermal, and total) efficiencies. Also, whether or not both the required electrical and thermal loads can sufficiently be accounted for within the system specifications is observed. Case study data for various micro-CHP system configurations have been discussed and compared. Comparisons are made of the different prime mover/fuel combinations. Also, micro- CHP monthly energy cost results are compared for each system configuration to conventional monthly utility costs for equivalent monthly building power, heating, and cooling requirements.

Louay Chamra

2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

79

chp.aceee.final.rev1.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3739 3739 Carbon Emissions Reduction Potential in the US Chemicals and Pulp and Paper Industries by Applying CHP Technologies. Marta Khrushch, Ernst Worrell, Lynn Price, Nathan Martin, and Dan Einstein Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 1999 This work was supported by the Climate Protection Division, Office of Air and Radiation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY ii Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes

80

Yantai Tianli Biomass CHP Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yantai Tianli Biomass CHP Co Ltd Yantai Tianli Biomass CHP Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Yantai Tianli Biomass CHP Co Ltd Place Yantai, Shandong Province, China Zip 265300 Sector Biomass Product Yantai-based biomass CHP project developer. Coordinates 37.538971°, 121.374893° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.538971,"lon":121.374893,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

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81

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse GasAbatement Potential for California in 2020  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping project is to help the California Energy Commission's (CEC) Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program determine where it should make investments in research to support combined heat and power (CHP) deployment. Specifically, this project will: {sm_bullet} Determine what impact CHP might have in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, {sm_bullet} Determine which CHP strategies might encourage the most attractive early adoption, {sm_bullet} Identify the regulatory and technological barriers to the most attractive CHP strategies, and {sm_bullet} Make recommendations to the PIER program as to research that is needed to support the most attractive CHP strategies.

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare,Kristina

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Project Profiles Database  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

112210 Hog and Pig Farming 211112 Natural Gas Liquid Extraction 221112 Fossil Fuel Electric Power Generation 221210 Natural Gas Distribution 221310 Water Supply and...

83

Monitoring and Commissioning Verification Algorithms for CHP Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the algorithms for CHP system performance monitoring and commissioning verification (CxV). It starts by presenting system-level and component-level performance metrics, followed by descriptions of algorithms for performance monitoring and commissioning verification, using the metric presented earlier. Verification of commissioning is accomplished essentially by comparing actual measured performance to benchmarks for performance provided by the system integrator and/or component manufacturers. The results of these comparisons are then automatically interpreted to provide conclusions regarding whether the CHP system and its components have been properly commissioned and where problems are found, guidance is provided for corrections. A discussion of uncertainty handling is then provided, which is followed by a description of how simulations models can be used to generate data for testing the algorithms. A model is described for simulating a CHP system consisting of a micro-turbine, an exhaust-gas heat recovery unit that produces hot water, a absorption chiller and a cooling tower. The process for using this model for generating data for testing the algorithms for a selected set of faults is described. The next section applies the algorithms developed to CHP laboratory and field data to illustrate their use. The report then concludes with a discussion of the need for laboratory testing of the algorithms on a physical CHP systems and identification of the recommended next steps.

Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Jiang, Wei

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

WORKING PARK-FUEL CELL COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the aims and objectives of the project which was to design, install and operate a fuel cell combined heat and power (CHP) system in Woking Park, the first fuel cell CHP system in the United Kingdom. The report also covers the benefits that were expected to accrue from the work in an understanding of the full technology procurement process (including planning, design, installation, operation and maintenance), the economic and environmental performance in comparison with both conventional UK fuel supply and conventional CHP and the commercial viability of fuel cell CHP energy supply in the new deregulated energy markets.

Allan Jones

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Solar and CHP Sales Tax Exemption (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and CHP Sales Tax Exemption (Florida) and CHP Sales Tax Exemption (Florida) Solar and CHP Sales Tax Exemption (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial General Public/Consumer Residential Savings Category Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Heating & Cooling Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Heating Maximum Rebate No limit Program Info Start Date 07/01/1997 State Florida Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount All Provider Florida Department of Revenue Solar energy systems have been exempt from Florida's sales and use tax since July 1, 1997. The term "solar energy system" means the equipment and requisite hardware that provide and are used for collecting, transferring, converting, storing or using incidental solar energy for water heating,

86

Pan China Puyang Biomass CHP Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Puyang Biomass CHP Co Ltd Puyang Biomass CHP Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Pan-China(Puyang) Biomass CHP Co., Ltd. Place Puyang, Henan Province, China Zip 455000 Sector Biomass Product China based biomass project developer. Coordinates 29.459499°, 119.875023° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.459499,"lon":119.875023,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

87

Hybrid CH&P PON-11-507 Page 1 of 19  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid CH&P PON-11-507 Page 1 of 19 GRANT SOLICITATION CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION PON-11 and Power (DG/CHP/CCHP) Systems Research, Development and Demonstration PIER Renewable Energy and Advanced Generation APPLICATIONPACKAGE Date: January, 2012 EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor #12;Hybrid CH&P PON-11

88

Southwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Southwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Southwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Southwest www.southwestCHPTAP.org Christine Brinker Southwest Energy Efficiency Project 720-939-8333 cbrinker@swenergy.org Arizona Ina Road Water Pollution Control Facility, Tucson University of Arizona, Tucson View Energy and Environmental Analysis Inc.'s (EEA) database of all known CHP installations in Arizona. Colorado Metro Wastewater Reclamation District, Denver MillerCoors, Golden New Belgium Brewery, Fort Collins Trailblazer Pipeline, Fort Collins View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in Colorado.

89

Tracking Progress Last updated 10/7/2013 Combined Heat and Power 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of obtaining heat from a boiler and power from the electric grid. Additionally, since CHP system energyTracking Progress Last updated 10/7/2013 Combined Heat and Power 1 Combined Heat and Power Combined heat and power (CHP) systems, also referred to as cogeneration, generate on-site electricity

90

NREL's Advanced Thermal Conversion Laboratory at the Center for Buildings and Thermal Systems: On the Cutting-Edge of HVAC and CHP Technology (Revised)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure describes how the unique testing capabilities of NREL's Advanced Thermal Conversion Laboratory at the Center For Buildings and Thermal Systems can help industry meet the challenge of developing the next generation of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) and combined heat and power (CHP) equipment and concepts.

Not Available

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

GUIDELINES FOR CERTIFICATION OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Description 1 CHP System Name 2 CEC Plant ID 3 EIA Plant ID 4 Qualifying Facility ID (if applicable) 5 Thermal, and emissions related to combined heat and power (CHP) system power plant operations. This information is used the power plant is first reported on Form CEC-2843. The respondent should use the Commission assigned code

92

Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Combined Heat and Power Projects Combined Heat and Power Projects Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of CHP project profiles. Search the project profiles database. Project profiles can be searched by state, CHP TAP, market sector, North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code, system size, technology/prime mover, fuel, thermal energy use, and year installed. View a list of project profiles by market sector. To view project profiles by state, click on a state on the map or choose a state from the drop-down list below. "An image of the United States representing a select number of CHP project profiles on a state-by-state basis View Energy and Environmental Analysis Inc.'s (EEA) database of all known

93

NREL: Climate Neutral Research Campuses - Combined Heat and Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Heat and Power Combined Heat and Power Combined heat and power (CHP) systems on research campuses can reduce climate impact by 15% to 30% and yield a positive financial return, because they recover heat that is typically wasted in the generation of electric power and deliver that energy in a useful form. The following links go to sections that describe how CHP may fit into your climate action plans. Considerations Sample Project Related Links CHP systems can take advantage of large central heating plants and steam distribution systems that are available on many campuses. CHP systems may be new at a particular facility, but the process and equipment involve well-established industrial technologies. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency CHP Partnership offers technical information and resources that

94

Using and Measuring the Combined Heat and Power Advantage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined Heat and Power (CHP), also known as cogeneration, refers to the integration of thermal energy with power generation. CHP is a powerful energy conservation measure that has been identified as an important greenhouse gas reduction measure with net economic benefits. It complements other energy conservation measures. CHP can be used any place that heat is needed so it is used with a variety of applications, fuels, and equipment. There are ancillary benefits of CHP to the host site and the public including air quality, reliability, reduced water consumption, and economic development. There is no universal practice for reporting the efficiency of CHP systems which can result in both overstatement and understatement of the benefits of CHP compared to other power generation systems. Fuel Charged to Power (FCP) is the fuel, net of credit for thermal output, required to produce a kilowatt-hour of electricity. This provides a metric that is used for comparison to the heat rate of other types of generation and insight into the development of CHP projects that maximize economic and environmental benefits. Biomass generation is generally less efficient than fossil fuel generation due to size and combustion characteristics, which means that there is more benefit from CHP because there is more waste heat available for recovery. An example is presented demonstrating that CHP significantly improves the economics and environmental benefits for biomass to power.

John, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

A Study of a Diesel Engine Based Micro-CHP System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project, funded by New York State Energy Research and Development Agency (NYSERDA), investigated the potential for an oil-fired combined heat and power system (micro-CHP system) for potential use in residences that use oil to heat their homes. Obviously, this requires the power source to be one that uses heating oil (diesel). The work consisted of an experimental study using a diesel engine and an analytical study that examined potential energy savings and benefits of micro-CHP systems for 'typical' locations in New York State. A search for a small diesel engine disclosed that no such engines were manufactured in the U.S. A single cylinder engine manufactured in Germany driving an electric generator was purchased for the experimental work. The engine was tested using on-road diesel fuel (15 ppm sulfur), and biodiesel blends. One of the main objectives was to demonstrate the possibility of operation in the so-called HCCI (Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition) mode. The HCCI mode of operation of engines is being explored as a way to reduce the emission of smoke, and NOx significantly without exhaust treatment. This is being done primarily in the context of engines used in transportation applications. However, it is felt that in a micro-CHP application using a single cylinder engine, such an approach would confer those emission benefits and would be much easier to implement. This was demonstrated successfully by injecting the fuel into the engine air intake using a heated atomizer made by Econox Technologies LLC to promote significant vaporization before entering the cylinder. Efficiency and emission measurements were made under different electrical loads provided by two space heaters connected to the generator in normal and HCCI modes of operation. The goals of the analytical work were to characterize, from the published literature, the prime-movers for micro-CHP applications, quantify parametrically the expected energy savings of using micro-CHP systems instead of the conventional heating system, and analyze system approaches for interaction with the local electric utility. The primary energy savings between the space heating provided by a conventional space heating system with all the required electrical energy supplied by the grid and the micro-CHP system supplemented when needed by a conventional space heating and the grid supplied electricity. were calculated for two locations namely Long Island and Albany. The key results from the experimental work are summarized first and the results from the analytical work next. Experimental results: (1) The engine could be operated successfully in the normal and HCCI modes using both diesel and biodiesel blends. (2) The smoke levels are lower with biodiesel than with diesel in both modes of operation. (3) The NOx levels are lower with the HCCI mode of operation than with the normal mode for both fuels. (4) The engine efficiency in these tests is lower in the HCCI mode of operation. However, the system parameters were not optimized for such operation within the scope of this project. However, for an engine designed with such operation in mind, the efficiency would possibly be not lower. Analytical results: (1) The internal combustion engine (diesel engine in this case) is the only proven technology as a prime mover at present. However, as noted above, no U.S. engine is available at present. (2) For both locations, the use of a micro-CHP system results in primary energy savings. This is true whether the CHP system is used only to supply domestic hot water or to supply both hot water and space heat and even for a low efficiency system especially for the latter case. The size of the thermal storage (as long as it above a certain minimum) did not affect this. (3) For example, for a 2 kW CHP electrical efficiency of 25%, a typical house on Long Island will save about 30MBtu of energy per year for a combined space heat and domestic hot water system. This corresponds to annual energy savings of about 210 gallons oil equivalent per (4) The savings increased initially with the powe

Krishna, C.R.; Andrews, J.; Tutu, N.; Butcher, T.

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Combined Heat and Power System Implementation A Management Decision Guide: Industrial Center of Excellence Application Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide discusses how a well-balanced Combined Heat and Power (CHP) project is the most efficient power generation resource available and suggests the open exploration of collaboration and sharing of benefits between utilities and their key customers who have coincident electric and thermal loads for solid CHP project development. The overriding objective of the guide is to present a balanced and effective approach for potential CHP project developers, owners, and participants to make well-informed ...

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

97

Technical and Economic Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Technologies for Commercial Customer Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In general, the overall efficiency of energy utilization by conventional power systems averages around 33 percent. Combined heat and power (CHP) technologies installed at commercial and industrial sites, however, can increase the overall efficiency beyond 85 percent by recovering waste heat and putting it to beneficial use. Thus, CHP reduces the energy consumption and improves environmental quality. Currently, CHP accounts for approximately only 7 percent of total generation capacity and 40 percent of th...

2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

98

PEV-Based Combined Frequency and Voltage Regulation for Smart Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PEV-Based Combined Frequency and Voltage Regulation for Smart Grid Chenye Wu, Student Member, IEEE benefit both users and utilities. Index Terms--Smart grid, plug-in electric vehicles, demand side the power grid by providing various ancillary services. In fact, recent studies have suggested that PEVs can

Wu, Chenye

99

Advanced CHP Control Algorithms: Scope Specification  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this multiyear project is to develop algorithms for combined heat and power systems to ensure optimal performance, increase reliability, and lead to the goal of clean, efficient, reliable and affordable next generation energy systems.

Katipamula, Srinivas; Brambley, Michael R.

2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

100

Clean Energy Solutions Large Scale CHP and Fuel Cells Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Energy Solutions Large Scale CHP and Fuel Cells Program Clean Energy Solutions Large Scale CHP and Fuel Cells Program Clean Energy Solutions Large Scale CHP and Fuel Cells Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Maximum Rebate CHP: $3,000,000 or 30% of project costs Fuel Cells: $3,000,000 or 45% of project costs Program Info Start Date 01/17/2013 State New Jersey Program Type State Grant Program Rebate Amount CHP greater than 1 MW-3 MW: $0.55/wattt CHP > 3 MW: $0.35/watt Fuel Cells > 1 MW with waste heat utilization: $2.00/watt Fuel Cells > 1 MW without waste heat utilization: $1.50/watt

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulations chp combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A micro-COOLING, HEATING, AND POWER (m-CHP) INSTRUCTIONAL MODULE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cooling, Heating, and Power (CHP) is an emerging category of energy systems consisting of power generation equipment coupled with thermally activated components. The application of (more)

Oliver, Jason Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Customer Sited Combined Heat and Power on Maui: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the experience of Maui Electric Company (MECO) in developing and operating a 150 kW combined heat and power (CHP) project at a resort on Maui. Tests conducted during the project evaluated the heat rate and performance of the packaged CHP system, which had been originally designed for natural gas fueling but was fueled by commercial propane in this application.

2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

103

Combined Heat and Power Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Combined Heat and Power Basics Combined Heat and Power Basics Combined Heat and Power Basics November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis Combined heat and power (CHP), also known as cogeneration, is: A process flow diagram showing efficiency benefits of CHP CHP Process Flow Diagram The concurrent production of electricity or mechanical power and useful thermal energy (heating and/or cooling) from a single source of energy. A type of distributed generation, which, unlike central station generation, is located at or near the point of consumption. A suite of technologies that can use a variety of fuels to generate electricity or power at the point of use, allowing the heat that would normally be lost in the power generation process to be recovered to provide needed heating and/or cooling. CHP technology can be deployed quickly, cost-effectively, and with few

104

Combined Heat and Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Combined Heat and Power Combined Heat and Power Jump to: navigation, search All power plants release a certain amount of heat during electricity generation. This heat can be used to serve thermal loads, such as building heating and hot water requirements. The simultaneous production of electrical (or mechanical) and useful thermal power from a single source is referred to as a combined heat and power (CHP) process, or cogeneration. Contents 1 Combined Heat and Power Basics 2 Fuel Types 2.1 Rural Resources 2.2 Urban Resources 3 CHP Technologies 3.1 Steam Turbine 3.2 Gas Turbine 3.3 Microturbine 3.4 Reciprocating Engine 4 Example CHP Systems[7] 4.1 University of Missouri (MU) 4.2 Princeton University 4.3 University of Iowa 4.4 Cornell University 5 Glossary 6 References Combined Heat and Power Basics

105

Understanding Emissions from Combined Heat and Power Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) is more energy efficient than separate generation of electricity and thermal energy. In CHP, heat that is normally wasted in conventional power generation is recovered as useful energy for satisfying an existing thermal demand thus avoiding the losses that would otherwise be incurred from separate generation of power. Modeling analyses has demonstrated significant air emissions, transmission and price benefits of clean CHP technologies. Despite these benefits, CHP remains an underutilized technology hindered by a number of disincentives, including treatment under current air quality permitting practice, which does not recognize the efficiency benefits of CHP. Output-based standards begin to address these permitting shortcomings. This paper will discuss how to view emissions from CHP systems from an output-basis and compares emission from different technologies. Treatment of distributed generation is compared with central generation, and emissions from an integrated system that produces more than one usable output are discussed. Regulatory and policy strategies that encourage clear and efficient CHP are also discussed.

Shipley, A. M.; Greene, N.; Carter, S.; Elliott, R. N.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

MODELING THE DIFFUSION OF MICRO-CHP IN A RESIDENTIAL AREA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A thesis presented on the diffusion of micro-CHP in a residential area consisting of houses with multiple owners, currently using condensing boilers. The thesis shows that micro-CHP will not reach 50 % of the market in less than 20 years. Furthermore it analyses the impact of the heat demands, the gas electricity and feedback prices as well as the subsidies on the speed and time of adoption of micro-CHP. ii DECLARATION I declare that: this work has been prepared by myself, all literal or content based quotations are clearly pointed out,

Christian Chemaly; Technische Universitt Hamburg; Christian Chemaly

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Initial Market Assessment for Small-Scale Biomass-Based CHP  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to reexamine the energy generation market opportunities for biomass CHP applications smaller than 20 MW. This paper provides an overview of the benefits of and challenges for biomass CHP in terms of policy, including a discussion of the drivers behind, and constraints on, the biomass CHP market. The report provides a summary discussion of the available biomass supply types and technologies that could be used to feed the market. Two primary markets are outlined--rural/agricultural and urban--for small-scale biomass CHP, and illustrate the primary intersections of supply and demand for those markets. The paper concludes by summarizing the potential markets and suggests next steps for identifying and utilizing small-scale biomass.

Brown, E.; Mann, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Hybrid CH&P PON-11-507 Page 1 of 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highly Efficient Production of Electricity and Syngas Using a Natural-Gas Fuel Cell Low Emissions Exhaust with Coal- and Biomass-Derived Syngas Waste Vegetable Oil Driven CHP for Fast Food Restaurants #12;

109

Hybrid CH&P PON-11-507 Page 1 of 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid CH&P PON-11-507 Page 1 of 1 ATTACHMENT I Prevailing Wage Special Condition Template Public this Agreement, the Recipient shall submit to the Energy Commission a certificate signed by the Recipient and all

110

Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Combined Heat and Power ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Didn't Know About..." Be sure to check back for more entries soon. 10. Often called cogeneration or CHP, a combined heat and power system provides both electric power and heat from...

111

Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Focus Area: Solar Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.epa.gov/chp/documents/utility_incentives.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/utility-incentives-combined-heat-and- Language: English Policies: Financial Incentives This report reviews a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency study that researched 41 U.S. utilities and found that nearly half provided some kind of support for combined heat and power (CHP). Here they profile 16 utility programs that support CHP in ways excluding direct financial incentives. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Utility_Incentives_for_Combined_Heat_and_Power&oldid=514610

112

Performance Assessment of a Desiccant Cooling System in a CHP Application with an IC Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Performance of a desiccant cooling system was evaluated in the context of combined heat and power (CHP). The baseline system incorporated a desiccant dehumidifier, a heat exchanger, an indirect evaporative cooler, and a direct evaporative cooler. The desiccant unit was regenerated through heat recovery from a gas-fired reciprocating internal combustion engine. The system offered sufficient sensible and latent cooling capacities for a wide range of climatic conditions, while allowing influx of outside air in excess of what is typically required for commercial buildings. Energy and water efficiencies of the desiccant cooling system were also evaluated and compared with those of a conventional system. The results of parametric assessments revealed the importance of using a heat exchanger for concurrent desiccant post cooling and regeneration air preheating. These functions resulted in enhancement of both the cooling performance and the thermal efficiency, which are essential for fuel utilization improvement. Two approaches for mixing of the return air and outside air were examined, and their impact on the system cooling performance and thermal efficiency was demonstrated. The scope of the parametric analyses also encompassed the impact of improving the indirect evaporative cooling effectiveness on the overall cooling system performance.

Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.; Slayzak, S.; Judkoff, R.; Schaffhauser, T.; DeBlasio, R.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Impact of Air Quality Regulations on Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relatively small projects for generating electrical power at or near the point of use--distributed generation (DG)--offer unique opportunities for enhancing the U.S. electric system. This report finds that current air quality regulatory practices are inappropriately inhibiting the development of DG through a failure to recognize the environmental benefits offered by DG or by imposing requirements designed for larger systems that are not appropriate to DG systems. The report recommends that air quality regulation be made more efficient and appropriate for DG by establishing national standards for DG equipment. This report also recommends that DG projects be evaluated on a''net'' emissions basis by being given credit for any emission sources that they displace. Air quality regulation should also recognize the benefits of combined heat and power (CHP).

Bluestein, J.; Horgan, S.; Eldridge, M. M.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(DOE) (DOE) Industrial Technology Program (ITP) Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power (CHP) Richard Sweetser Senior Advisor DOE's Mid-Atlantic Clean Energy Application Center 32% Helping plants save energy today using efficient energy management practices and efficient new technologies Activities to spur widespread commercial use of CHP and other distributed generation solutions 10% Manufacturing Energy Systems 33% Industries of the Future R&D addressing top priorities in America's most energy-intensive industries and cross-cutting activities applicable to multiple industrial subsectors 25% Industrial Distributed Energy Industrial Technical Assistance DOE ITP FY'11 Budget: $100M Knowledge development and

115

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Pacific www.pacificCHPTAP.org Terry Clapham California Center for Sustainable Energy 858-244-4872 terry.clapham@energycenter.org California Alameda County Santa Rita Jail, Dublin Burlingame Wastewater Treatment Plant, Burlingame Chiquita Water Reclamation Plant, Santa Margarita DGS Central Plant, Sacramento East Bay Municipal Utility District, Oakland East Bay Municipal Utility District WWTP, Oakland EMWD Microturbine Energy System, Riverside County

116

Midwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Midwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Midwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Midwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Midwest www.midwestCHPTAP.org John Cuttica University of Illinois at Chicago 312-996-4382 cuttica@uic.edu Cliff Haefke University of Illinois at Chicago 312-355-3476 chaefk1@uic.edu Illinois Adkins Energy, Lena Advocate South Suburban Hospital, Hazel Crest Antioch Community High School, Antioch Elgin Community College, Elgin Evanston Township High School, Evanston Hunter Haven Farms, Inc., Pearl City Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago Lake Forest Hospital, Lake Forest

117

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Pacific www.pacificCHPTAP.org Terry Clapham California Center for Sustainable Energy 858-244-4872 terry.clapham@energycenter.org California Alameda County Santa Rita Jail, Dublin Burlingame Wastewater Treatment Plant, Burlingame Chiquita Water Reclamation Plant, Santa Margarita DGS Central Plant, Sacramento East Bay Municipal Utility District, Oakland East Bay Municipal Utility District WWTP, Oakland EMWD Microturbine Energy System, Riverside County

118

Northwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Northwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Northwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Northwest www.northwestCHPTAP.org David Sjoding Washington State University 360-956-2004 sjodingd@energy.wsu.edu Alaska Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, Anvik Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, Grayling Exit Glacier - Kenai Fjords National Park, Seward Golovin City, Golovin Inside Passage Electric Cooperative, Angoon Kokhanok City, Kokhanok St. Paul Island, St. Paul Island Village Council, Kongiganak City Village Council, Kwigillingok City Village Council, Stevens Village

119

Small Scale CHP and Fuel Cell Incentive Program (New Jersey) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Scale CHP and Fuel Cell Incentive Program (New Jersey) Small Scale CHP and Fuel Cell Incentive Program (New Jersey) Small Scale CHP and Fuel Cell Incentive Program (New Jersey) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Wind Maximum Rebate Limits (% of cost) vary by system type, but the following limits also exist: NJCEP Incentive: $1 million Pay for Performance Bonus Incentive: $250,000 Utility Match: $1 million Overall Maximum: $2.25 million Program Info Funding Source New Jersey Societal Benefits Charge (public benefits fund) State New Jersey Program Type State Grant Program

120

Microsoft Word - NonProprietary DOE MicroCHP Final Report.doc  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Micro-CHP Systems for Residential Applications Micro-CHP Systems for Residential Applications Final Report June 2006 Prepared by United Technologies Research Center 411 Silver Lane East Hartford, CT 06108 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Contract No. DE-FC26-04NT42217 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 Technical Contact: Timothy DeValve, Benoit Olsommer UTRC Micro-CHP Project Leaders (860) 610-7286, (860) 610-7463 devalvtd@utrc.utc.com, olsommbc@utrc.utc.com DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulations chp combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Renewable Combined Heat and Power Dairy Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

horsepower Guascor model SFGLD-560 biogas-fired lean burn internal combustion (IC) engine and generator set and modify the existing biogas toelectricity combined heat and power (CHP) system operated at Fiscalini bacteria to remove hydrogen sulfide presented in the biogas. Source: Fiscalini Farms Term: March 2011

122

Thermodynamic Modeling and Analysis of the Ratio of Heat to Power Based on a Conceptual CHP System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CHP system not only produces electrical energy, but also produces thermal energy. An extensive analysis of the CHP market reveals that one of the most important engineering characteristics is flexibility. A variable heat-to-power ratio has compelling advantages over a fixed one and enables a power plant to achieve reliability and flexibility, which are very important characteristics for a CHP system. In this paper, a conceptual SOFC/GT CHP system is presented. The parameters' effect on the variable heat-to-power ratio is investigated. As SOFC reactors are still under development, a flexible simulation tool based on mass and energy balances coupled with appropriate expressions for the reaction kinetics, thermodynamic constants and material properties, is presented for adaptation to different cell geometries and operating conditions. Simulation results show that the SOFC/GT CHP system's advantage over the engine is that a low stack running temperature can achieve a low heat-to- power ratio.

Liu, Z.; Li, X.; Liu, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Combined Heat and Power in Biofuels Production and Use of Biofuels for Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rise of the biofuels industry presents electric utilities with two types of opportunities: combined heat and power (CHP) applications in biofuel production facilities using topping and bottoming power generation cycles and the use of the biofuels as a fuel in electric power generation. This report reviews production processes for ethanol and biodiesel, including the prospects for CHP applications, and describes power generation opportunities for the use of biofuels in power production, especially in ...

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

124

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR A COMBINED POWER AND BIOMASS HEATING SYSTEM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOR A COMBINED POWER AND BIOMASS HEATING SYSTEM FORT YUKON, ALASKA U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE In Cooperation with USDA RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE DENALI COMMISSION APRIL 2013 ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS ADEC Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation AFRPA Alaska Forest Resources Practices Act BFE Base Flood Elevation BMP best management practice BTU British Thermal Unit CATG Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CFR Code of Federal Regulations CHP Combined Heat and Power CO carbon monoxide CO 2 carbon dioxide CWA Clean Water Act dBA A-weighted decibel DBH diameter at breast height DOE U.S. Department of Energy EA Environmental Assessment

125

Stirling engines in generating heat and electricity for micro: CHP systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an analysis of different generating heat and electricity systems with Stirling engine is made from the point of view of benefits and limitations, both operational and economic and environmental. Stirling engine has the ability to work ... Keywords: biomass, fossil fuels, generating heat and electricity system, m-CHP, stirling engine

Dan Scarpete; Krisztina Uzuneanu

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

EFFECT OF H2 PRODUCED THROUGH STEAM-METHANE REFORMING ON CHP PLANT EFFICIENCY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 EFFECT OF H2 PRODUCED THROUGH STEAM-METHANE REFORMING ON CHP PLANT EFFICIENCY O. Le Corre1 , C@emn.fr ABSTRACT In-situ hydrogen production is carried out by a catalytic reformer kit set up into exhaust gases-thermal reforming process is achieved. Hydrogen production is mainly dependent on O2 content in exhaust gases

127

Chemical Hygiene Plan The purpose of the Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP) is to outline laboratory work  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Hygiene Plan I. Policy The purpose of the Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP) is to outline community are protected from health hazards associated with chemicals with which they work. II. Authority The Chemical Hygiene Plan, required to comply with provisions of CCR Title 8 §5191 et al: A. Standard Operating

de Lijser, Peter

128

Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings Title Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6267E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Stadler, Michael, Markus Groissböck, Gonçalo Cardoso, Andreas Müller, and Judy Lai Abstract Governor Brown's research priorities include an additional 6.5 GW of combined heat and power (CHP) by 2030. As of 2009, roughly 0.25 GW of small natural gas and biogas fired CHP is documented by the Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) database. The SGIP is set to expire, and the anticipated grid de-carbonization based on the development of 20 GW of renewable energy will influence the CHP adoption. Thus, an integrated optimization approach for this analysis was chosen that allows optimizing the adoption of distributed energy resources (DER) such as photovoltaics (PV), CHP, storage technologies, etc. in the California commercial sector from the building owners' perspective. To solve this DER adoption problem the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and used extensively to address the problem of optimally investing and scheduling DER under multiple settings, has been used. The application of CHP at large industrial sites is well known, and much of its potential is already being realized. Conversely, commercial sector CHP, especially those above 50 to 100 kW peak electricity load, is widely overlooked. In order to analyze the role of DER in CO2 reduction, 147 representative sites in different climate zones were selected from the California Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS). About 8000 individual optimization runs, with different assumptions for the electric tariffs, natural gas costs, marginal grid CO2 emissions, and nitrogen oxide treatment costs, SGIP, fuel cell lifetime, fuel cell efficiency, PV installation costs, and payback periods for investments have been performed. The most optimistic CHP potential contribution in this sector in 2020 will be 2.7 GW. However, this result requires a SGIP in 2020, 46% average electric efficiency for fuel cells, a payback period for investments of 10 years, and a CO2 focused approach of the building owners. In 2030 it will be only 2.5 GW due to the anticipated grid de-carbonization. The 2030 result requires a 60% electric efficiency and 20 year life time for fuel cells, a payback period of 10 years, and a CO2 minimization strategy of building owners. Finally, the possible CHP potential in 2030 shows a significant variance between 0.2 GW and 2.5 GW, demonstrating the complex interactions between technologies, policies, and customer objectives.

129

Combined Heat & Power Technology Overview and Federal Sector Deployment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Overview and Overview and Federal Sector Deployment Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Spring 2013 - May 22-23 San Francisco, CA Hosted by: Pacific Gas and Electric Company Bob Slattery Oak Ridge National Laboratory CHP is an integrated energy system that:  is located at or near a facility  generates electrical and/or mechanical power  recovers waste heat for ◦ heating ◦ cooling ◦ dehumidification  can utilize a variety of technologies and fuels  is also referred to as cogeneration The on-site simultaneous generation of two forms of energy (heat and electricity) from a single fuel/energy source Defining Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Steam Electricity Fuel Prime Mover & Generator Heat Recovery Steam Boiler Conventional CHP

130

Combined Heat and Power for Saving Energy and Carbon in Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This section describes four micro CHP prime movers. Eachtime frame, the Stirling micro-CHP packages are targeted toComparison of residential micro CHP technologies to separate

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Business Case for a Micro-Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System in Commercial Applications  

SciTech Connect

Combined heat and power fuel cell systems (CHP-FCSs) provide consistent electrical power and hot water with greater efficiency and lower emissions than alternative sources. These systems can be used either as baseload, grid-connected, or as off-the-grid power sources. This report presents a business case for CHP-FCSs in the range of 5 to 50 kWe. Systems in this power range are considered micro-CHP-FCS. For this particular business case, commercial applications rather than residential or industrial are targeted. To understand the benefits of implementing a micro-CHP-FCS, the characteristics that determine their competitive advantage must first be identified. Locations with high electricity prices and low natural gas prices are ideal locations for micro-CHP-FCSs. Fortunately, these high spark spread locations are generally in the northeastern area of the United States and California where government incentives are already in place to offset the current high cost of the micro-CHP-FCSs. As a result of the inherently high efficiency of a fuel cell and their ability to use the waste heat that is generated as a CHP, they have higher efficiency. This results in lower fuel costs than comparable alternative small-scale power systems (e.g., microturbines and reciprocating engines). A variety of markets should consider micro-CHP-FCSs including those that require both heat and baseload electricity throughout the year. In addition, the reliable power of micro-CHP-FCSs could be beneficial to markets where electrical outages are especially frequent or costly. Greenhouse gas emission levels from micro-CHP-FCSs are 69 percent lower, and the human health costs are 99.9 percent lower, than those attributed to conventional coal-fired power plants. As a result, FCSs can allow a company to advertise as environmentally conscious and provide a bottom-line sales advantage. As a new technology in the early stages of adoption, micro-CHP-FCSs are currently more expensive than alternative technologies. As the technology gains a foothold in its target markets and demand increases, the costs will decline in response to improved manufacturing efficiencies, similar to trends seen with other technologies. Transparency Market Research forecasts suggest that the CHP-FCS market will grow at a compound annual growth rate of greater than 27 percent over the next 5 years. These production level increases, coupled with the expected low price of natural gas, indicate the economic payback period will move to less than 5 years over the course of the next 5 years. To better understand the benefits of micro-CHP-FCSs, The U.S. Department of Energy worked with ClearEdge Power to install fifteen 5-kWe fuel cells in the commercial markets of California and Oregon. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is evaluating these systems in terms of economics, operations, and their environmental impact in real-world applications. As expected, the economic analysis has indicated that the high capital cost of the micro-CHP-FCSs results in a longer payback period than typically is acceptable for all but early-adopter market segments. However, a payback period of less than 3 years may be expected as increased production brings system cost down, and CHP incentives are maintained or improved.

Brooks, Kriston P.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Anderson, David M.; Amaya, Jodi P.; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Srivastava, Viraj; Upton, Jaki F.

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

132

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the potential role of commercial sector distributed generation (DG) with combined heat and power (CHP) capability deployment in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reductions. CHP applications at large industrial sites are well known, and a large share of their potential has already been harvested. In contrast, relatively little attention has been paid to the potential of medium-sized commercial buildings, i.e., ones with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how this sector might implement DG with CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and operate various energy technologies, such as solar photovoltaics (PV), on-site thermal generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We apply a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that minimizes a site's annual energy costs as its objective. Using 138 representative mid-sized commercial sites in California (CA), existing tariffs of three major electricity distribution ultilities plus a natural gas company, and performance data of available technology in 2020, we find the GHG reduction potential for this CA commercial sector segment, which represents about 35percent of total statewide commercial sector sales. Under the assumptions made, in a reference case, this segment is estimated to be capable of economically installing 1.4 GW of CHP, 35percent of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) statewide 4 GW goal for total incremental CHP deployment by 2020. However, because CARB's assumed utilization is far higherthan is found by the MILP, the adopted CHP only contributes 19percent of the CO2 target. Several sensitivity runs were completed. One applies a simple feed-in tariff similar to net metering, and another includes a generous self-generation incentive program (SGIP) subsidy for fuel cells. The feed-in tariff proves ineffective at stimulating CHP deployment, while the SGIP buy down is more powerful. The attractiveness of CHP varies widely by climate zone and service territory, but in general, hotter inland areas and San Diego are the more attractive regions because high cooling loads achieve higher equipment utilization. Additionally, large office buildings are surprisingly good hosts for CHP, so large office buildings in San Diego and hotter urban centers emerge as promising target hosts. Overall the effect on CO2 emissions is limited, never exceeding 27percent of the CARB target. Nonetheless, results suggest that the CO2 emissions abatement potential of CHP in mid-sized CA buildings is significant, and much more promising than is typically assumed.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Lipman, Tim; Megel, Olivier; Ganguly, Srirupa; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

133

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System Callaway Spring 2011 #12;Abstract A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar of analysis of Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power (DCS-CHP) systems is a design

California at Berkeley, University of

134

Combined heat and power economic dispatch by mesh adaptive direct search algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The optimal utilization of multiple combined heat and power (CHP) systems is a complex problem. Therefore, efficient methods are required to solve it. In this paper, a recent optimization technique, namely mesh adaptive direct search (MADS) is implemented ... Keywords: Combined heat and power, Economic dispatch, Mesh adaptive direct search algorithm, Optimization

Seyyed Soheil Sadat Hosseini; Ali Jafarnejad; Amir Hossein Behrooz; Amir Hossein Gandomi

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

A modified unit decommitment algorithm in combined heat and power production planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the unit commitment in multi-period combined heat and power (CHP) production planning, considering the possibility to trade power on the spot market. We present a modified unit decommitment algorithm (MUD) that starts with a good ... Keywords: combined heat and power production, deregulated power market, energy optimization, modelling, modified unit decommitment, unit commitment

Aiying Rong; Risto Lahdelma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System October 3, 2011 - 4:43pm Addthis U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today applauded the commissioning of a combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell system at Portland Community College in Oregon. The CHP fuel cell system will help Portland Community College save on its energy bills and help achieve its energy efficiency and sustainability goals. Students at the College will also learn about the fuel cell technology used in the project as part of a comprehensive alternative energy curriculum offered by the school. "The benefits of a combined heat and power fuel cell system, coupled with

137

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engine-generators this CHP system generates steam for spaceengine-generators this CHP system generates steam for space

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program Southwest Gas Corporation - Combined Heat and Power Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate 50% of the installed cost of the project Program Info State Arizona Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $400/kW - $500/kW up to 50% of the installed cost of the project Provider Southwest Gas Corporation Southwest Gas Corporation (SWG) offers incentives to qualifying commercial and industrial facilities who install efficient Combined Heat and Power systems (CHP). CHP systems produce localized, on-site power and heat which can be used in a variety of ways. Incentives vary based upon the efficiency

139

Research, Development and Demonstration of Micro-CHP Systems for Residential Applications - Phase I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Micro-CHP Phase I effort was to develop a conceptual design for a Micro-CHP system including: Defining market potential; Assessing proposed technology; Developing a proof-of-principle design; and Developing a commercialization strategy. TIAX LLC assembled a team to develop a Micro-CHP system that will provide electricity and heating. TIAX, the contractor and major cost-share provider, provided proven expertise in project management, prime-mover design and development, appliance development and commercialization, analysis of residential energy loads, technology assessment, and market analysis. Kohler Company, the manufacturing partner, is a highly regarded manufacturer of standby power systems and other residential products. Kohler provides a compellingly strong brand, along with the capabilities in product development, design, manufacture, distribution, sales, support, service, and marketing that only a manufacturer of Kohler's status can provide. GAMA, an association of appliance and equipment manufacturers, provided a critical understanding of appliance commercialization issues, including regulatory requirements, large-scale market acceptance issues, and commercialization strategies. The Propane Education & Research Council, a cost-share partner, provided cost share and aided in ensuring the fuel flexibility of the conceptual design. Micro-CHP systems being commercialized in Europe and Japan are generally designed to follow the household thermal load, and generate electricity opportunistically. In many cases, any excess electricity can be sold back to the grid (net metering). These products, however, are unlikely to meet the demands of the U.S. market. First, these products generally cannot provide emergency power when grid power is lost--a critical feature to market success in the U.S. Even those that can may have insufficient electric generation capacities to meet emergency needs for many U.S. homes. Second, the extent to which net metering will be available in the U.S. is unclear. Third, these products are typically not designed for use in households having forced hot-air heating, which is the dominant heating system in the U.S. The U.S. market will also require a major manufacturer that has the reputation and brand recognition, low-cost manufacturing capability, distribution, sales, and service infrastructure, and marketing power to achieve significant market size with a previously unknown and unproven product. History has proven time and time again that small-to-medium-size manufacturers do not have the resources and capabilities to achieve significant markets with such products. During the Phase I effort, the Team developed a conceptual design for a Micro-CHP system that addresses key DOE and U.S. market needs: (1) Provides emergency power adequate for critical household loads, with none of the key drawbacks associated with typical, low-cost emergency generators, such as liquid fuel storage, inability to power ''hard-wired'' loads, need to run temporary extension cords for plug loads, manual set up required, susceptibility to overload, and risk of failure due to lack of maintenance and infrequent operation; (2) Requires no special skills to install--plumbers, electricians and HVAC technicians will typically have all necessary skills; (3) Can be used with the major residential fuels in the U.S., including natural gas and propane, and can be easily adapted to fuel oil as well as emerging fuels as they become available; and (4) Significantly reduces household energy consumption and energy costs.

Robert A. Zogg

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

140

Combined Heat and Power: Effective Energy Solutions for a Sustainable Future  

SciTech Connect

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) solutions represent a proven and effective near-term energy option to help the United States enhance energy efficiency, ensure environmental quality, promote economic growth, and foster a robust energy infrastructure. Using CHP today, the United States already avoids more than 1.9 Quadrillion British thermal units (Quads) of fuel consumption and 248 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions annually compared to traditional separate production of electricity and thermal energy. This CO{sub 2} reduction is the equivalent of removing more than 45 million cars from the road. In addition, CHP is one of the few options in the portfolio of energy alternatives that combines environmental effectiveness with economic viability and improved competitiveness. This report describes in detail the four key areas where CHP has proven its effectiveness and holds promise for the future as an: (1) Environmental Solution: Significantly reducing CO{sub 2} emissions through greater energy efficiency; (2) Competitive Business Solution: Increasing efficiency, reducing business costs, and creating green-collar jobs; (3) Local Energy Solution: Deployable throughout the US; and (4) Infrastructure Modernization Solution: Relieving grid congestion and improving energy security. CHP should be one of the first technologies deployed for near-term carbon reductions. The cost-effectiveness and near-term viability of widespread CHP deployment place the technology at the forefront of practical alternative energy solutions such as wind, solar, clean coal, biofuels, and nuclear power. Clear synergies exist between CHP and most other technologies that dominate the energy and environmental policy dialogue in the country today. As the Nation transforms how it produces, transports, and uses the many forms of energy, it must seize the clear opportunity afforded by CHP in terms of climate change, economic competitiveness, energy security, and infrastructure modernization. The energy efficiency benefits of CHP offer significant, realistic solutions to near- and long-term energy issues facing the Nation. With growing demand for energy, tight supply options, and increasing environmental constraints, extracting the maximum output from primary fuel sources through efficiency is critical to sustained economic development and environmental stewardship. Investment in CHP would stimulate the creation of new 'green-collar' jobs, modernize aging energy infrastructure, and protect and enhance the competitiveness of US manufacturing industries. The complementary roles of energy efficiency, renewable energy, and responsible use of traditional energy supplies must be recognized. CHP's proven performance and potential for wider use are evidence of its near-term applicability and, with technological improvements and further elimination of market barriers, of its longer term promise to address the country's most important energy and environmental needs. A strategic approach is needed to encourage CHP where it can be applied today and address the regulatory and technical challenges preventing its long-term viability. Experience in the United States and other countries shows that a balanced set of policies, incentives, business models, and investments can stimulate sustained CHP growth and allow all stakeholders to reap its many well-documented benefits.

Shipley, Ms. Anna [Sentech, Inc.; Hampson, Anne [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., an ICF Company; Hedman, Mr. Bruce [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., an ICF Company; Garland, Patricia W [ORNL; Bautista, Paul [Sentech, Inc.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulations chp combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

EFFECTS ON CHP PLANT EFFICIENCY OF H2 PRODUCTION THROUGH PARTIAL OXYDATION OF NATURAL GAS OVER TWO GROUP VIII METAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFECTS ON CHP PLANT EFFICIENCY OF H2 PRODUCTION THROUGH PARTIAL OXYDATION OF NATURAL GAS OVER TWO with natural gas in spark ignition engines can increase for electric efficiency. In-situ H23 production for spark ignition engines fuelled by natural gas has therefore been investigated recently, and4 reformed

142

FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

efforts, the Energy Department is supporting research, development and demonstration projects to help grow the CHP market, including finding CHP solutions that fit small- and...

143

Neural-optimal control algorithm for real-time regulation of in-line storage in combined sewer systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Attempts at implementing real-time control systems as a cost-effective means of minimizing the pollution impacts of untreated combined sewer overflows have largely been unsustained due to the complexity of the real-time control problem. Optimal real-time ... Keywords: Artificial intelligence, Combined sewers, Hydraulic sewer models, Neural networks, Optimal control, Real-time control, Urban stormwater management

Suseno Darsono; John W. Labadie

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Combined Heat and Power with Your Local Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnership Working Group Combined Heat and Power C.A. Skip Cofield October 16, 2012 Agenda * Southern Company * Combined Heat and Power (CHP) * Southern Company CHP * Utility Partnerships 2 Southern Company Overview Operating Companies: * Alabama Power * Georgia Power * Gulf Power * Mississippi Power Subsidiaries: * Southern LINC * Southern Nuclear * Southern Power * Southern Telecom 3 Retail Generating Units Wholesale Generating Units * 4.4 million customers * 43,500+ MW * 26,000+ employees * 120,000 square miles of retail service territory * 27,000 mi. of transmission lines * 3,700 substations * $17.7B in operating revenue * $2.2B in net income * $39.2B in market cap * $59.3B in assets * $13.5B annual op. expense 4 Southern Company Overview

145

Proposing a decision-making model using analytical hierarchy process and fuzzy expert system for prioritizing industries in installation of combined heat and power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Restructuring electric power and increasing energy cost encourage large energy consumers to utilize combined heat and power (CHP) systems. In addition to these two factors, the gradual exclusion of subsidies is the third factor intensifying the utilization ... Keywords: Analytic hierarchy process, Combined heat and power, Decision making, Fuzzy expert system, Industry

Mehdi Piltan; Erfan Mehmanchi; S. F. Ghaderi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program Results for CY2009, Appendix 6: Method of Calculating Results from DOE's Combined Heat and Power Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

87 DOE Industrial Technologies Program 87 DOE Industrial Technologies Program Appendix 6: Method of Calculating Results from DOE's Combined Heat and Power Activities u CHP Table........................................................................................................................................................................................... 189 Method of Calculating Results from DOE's Combined Heat and Power Activities Industrial Distributed Energy, a cross-cutting activity within the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP), builds on activities conducted by DOE's Office of Industrial Technologies

147

Effects of a carbon tax on microgrid combined heat and power adoption  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the economically optimal adoption and operation of distributed energy resources (DER) by a hypothetical California microgrid consisting of a group of commercial buildings over an historic test year, 1999. The optimization is conducted using a customer adoption model (DER-CAM) developed at Berkeley Lab and implemented in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS). A microgrid is a semiautonomous grouping of electricity and heat loads interconnected to the existing utility grid (macrogrid) but able to island from it. The microgrid minimizes the cost of meeting its energy requirements (consisting of both electricity and heat loads) by optimizing the installation and operation of DER technologies while purchasing residual energy from the local combined natural gas and electricity utility. The available DER technologies are small-scale generators (< 500 kW), such as reciprocating engines, microturbines, and fuel cells, with or without combined heat and power (CHP) equipment, such as water and space heating and/or absorption cooling. By introducing a tax on carbon emissions, it is shown that if the microgrid is allowed to install CHP-enabled DER technologies, its carbon emissions are mitigated more than without CHP, demonstrating the potential benefits of small-scale CHP technology for climate change mitigation. Reciprocating engines with heat recovery and/or absorption cooling tend to be attractive technologies for the mild southern California climate, but the carbon mitigation tends to be modest compared to purchasing utility electricity because of the predominance of relatively clean central station generation in California.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

EFFECT OF H2 PRODUCED THROUGH STEAM-METHANE REFORMING ON CHP PLANT EFFICIENCY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In-situ hydrogen production is carried out by a catalytic reformer kit set up into exhaust gases for a CHP plant based on spark ignition engine running under lean conditions. An overall auto-thermal reforming process is achieved. Hydrogen production is mainly dependent on O2 content in exhaust gases. Experiments are conducted at constant speed at 2 air/fuel ratios and 4 additional natural gas flow rates. H2 content varies in the range 6 % to 10 % in vol. H2 content effect is analyzed with respect to performance and emissions. Comparing with EGR shows an increasing of electrical efficiency of 1 % whilst heat recovery decreases by 1%. NO and HC decrease by 18 % and 12%, but CO increases by 14%, respectively. The results show that: (i) graphite joints were destroyed under effect of H2 and high temperature; (ii) a cold spot appeared in the RGR line, and condensation has as consequence a carbon deposit; and (iii) no back-fire or knock occurred.

O. Le Corre; C. Rahmouni; K. Saikaly; I. Dincer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Thermo economic comparison of conventional micro combined heat and power systems with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat and power systems (CHP) on this scale is called micro CHP (mCHP). First, the energy consumption-family household. The SOFC-mCHP system provides electricity as well as hot water for use and space heating heating located in larger cities. Secondly, there are CHP systems used in a decentralized form

Liso, Vincenzo

150

A policy letter. DG-GRID Improving distribution network regulation for enhancing the share of sustainable distributed generation in Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A policy letter. DG-GRID Improving distribution network regulation for enhancing the share-generation of electricity and heat (CHP). This drives the growth of distributed generation (DG) ­ generators connected to the distribution network ­ to significant levels. The DG-GRID project1 carried out by nine European universities

151

Highly Efficient, 5-kW CHP Fuel Cells Demonstrating Durability and Economic Value in Residential and Light Commercial Applications - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report James Petrecky Plug Power 968 Albany Shaker Road Latham, NY 12110 Phone: (518) 782-7700 ext: 1977 Email: james_petrecky@plugpower.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Reg Tyler Phone: (720) 356-1805 Email: Reginald.Tyler@go.doe.gov Vendor: ClearEdge Power, Hillsboro, OR Project Start Date: October 1, 2009 Project End Date: September 15, 2013 Objectives Quantify the durability of proton exchange membrane * (PEM) fuel cell systems in residential and light commercial combined heat and power (CHP) applications in California. Optimize system performance though testing of multiple * high-temperature units through collection of field data.

152

Op%mal Scheduling of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Plants1 under Time-sensi%ve Electricity Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Co-genera8on of electricity and heat Storage Microgrids2 1. "Systema%c u. A microgrid refers to a "local grid" that can work autonomously from the central

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

153

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHP) CHP combined with absorption cooling District heatingor CHP combined with absorption cooling is not a practicalrequiring cooling, absorption cooling can be Combined heat

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with CombinedHeat and Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The addition of solar thermal and heat storage systems can improve the economic, as well as environmental attraction of micro-generation systems, e.g. fuel cells with or without combined heat and power (CHP) and contribute to enhanced CO2 reduction. However, the interactions between solar thermal collection and storage systems and CHP systems can be complex, depending on the tariff structure, load profile, etc. In order to examine the impact of solar thermal and heat storage on CO2 emissions and annual energy costs, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program. The objective is minimization of annual energy costs. This paper focuses on analysis of the optimal interaction of solar thermal systems, which can be used for domestic hot water, space heating and/or cooling, and micro-CHP systems in the California service territory of San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E). Contrary to typical expectations, our results indicate that despite the high solar radiation in southern California, fossil based CHP units are dominant, even with forecast 2020 technology and costs. A CO2 pricing scheme would be needed to incent installation of combined solar thermal absorption chiller systems, and no heat storage systems are adopted. This research also shows that photovoltaic (PV) arrays are favored by CO2 pricing more than solar thermal adoption.

Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Lai, Judy; Siddiqui, Afzal

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a transformative technology. Solar PV, wind, geothermal, andon the whole. Thus, solar CHP and PV systems can be comparedevaluate whether solar CHP and PV systems perform similarly

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Thermal Energy Corporation Combined Heat and Power Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet the planned heating and cooling load growth at the Texas Medical Center (TMC), Thermal Energy Corporation (TECO) implemented Phase 1 of a Master Plan to install an additional 32,000 tons of chilled water capacity, a 75,000 ton-hour (8.8 million gallon) Thermal Energy Storage (TES) tank, and a 48 MW Combined Heat and Power (CHP) system. The Department of Energy selected TMC for a $10 million grant award as part of the Financial Assistance Funding Opportunity Announcement, U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology, Recovery Act: Deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems, District Energy Systems, Waste Energy Recovery Systems, and Efficiency Industrial Equipment Funding Opportunity Number: DE-FOA-0000044 to support the installation of a new 48 MW CHP system at the TMC located just outside downtown Houston. As the largest medical center in the world, TMC is home to many of the nation??s best hospitals, physicians, researchers, educational institutions, and health care providers. TMC provides care to approximately six million patients each year, and medical instruction to over 71,000 students. A medical center the size of TMC has enormous electricity and thermal energy demands to help it carry out its mission. Reliable, high-quality steam and chilled water are of utmost importance to the operations of its many facilities. For example, advanced medical equipment, laboratories, laundry facilities, space heating and cooling all rely on the generation of heat and power. As result of this project TECO provides this mission critical heating and cooling to TMC utilizing a system that is both energy-efficient and reliable since it provides the capability to run on power independent of the already strained regional electric grid. This allows the medical center to focus on its primary mission ?? providing top quality medical care and instruction ?? without worrying about excessive energy costs or the loss of heating and cooling due to the risk of power outages. TECO??s operation is the largest Chilled Water District Energy System in the United States. The company used DOE??s funding to help install a new high efficiency CHP system consisting of a Combustion Turbine and a Heat Recovery Steam Generator. This CHP installation was just part of a larger project undertaken by TECO to ensure that it can continue to meet TMC??s growing needs. The complete efficiency overhaul that TECO undertook supported more than 1,000 direct and indirect jobs in manufacturing, engineering, and construction, with approximately 400 of those being jobs directly associated with construction of the combined heat and power plant. This showcase industrial scale CHP project, serving a critical component of the nation??s healthcare infrastructure, directly and immediately supported the energy efficiency and job creation goals established by ARRA and DOE. It also provided an unsurpassed model of a district energy CHP application that can be replicated within other energy intensive applications in the industrial, institutional and commercial sectors.

E. Bruce Turner; Tim Brown; Ed Mardiat

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes the current economic and environmental performance of combined heat and power (CHP) systems in power interruption intolerant commercial facilities. Through a series of three case studies, key trade-offs are analyzed with regard to the provision of black-out ridethrough capability with the CHP systems and the resutling ability to avoid the need for at least some diesel backup generator capacity located at the case study sites. Each of the selected sites currently have a CHP or combined heating, cooling, and power (CCHP) system in addition to diesel backup generators. In all cases the CHP/CCHP system have a small fraction of the electrical capacity of the diesel generators. Although none of the selected sites currently have the ability to run the CHP systems as emergency backup power, all could be retrofitted to provide this blackout ride-through capability, and new CHP systems can be installed with this capability. The following three sites/systems were used for this analysis: (1) Sierra Nevada Brewery - Using 1MW of installed Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells operating on a combination of digestor gas (from the beer brewing process) and natural gas, this facility can produce electricty and heat for the brewery and attached bottling plant. The major thermal load on-site is to keep the brewing tanks at appropriate temperatures. (2) NetApp Data Center - Using 1.125 MW of Hess Microgen natural gas fired reciprocating engine-generators, with exhaust gas and jacket water heat recovery attached to over 300 tons of of adsorption chillers, this combined cooling and power system provides electricity and cooling to a data center with a 1,200 kW peak electrical load. (3) Kaiser Permanente Hayward Hospital - With 180kW of Tecogen natural gas fired reciprocating engine-generators this CHP system generates steam for space heating, and hot water for a city hospital. For all sites, similar assumptions are made about the economic and technological constraints of the power generation system. Using the Distributed Energy Resource Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we model three representative scenarios and find the optimal operation scheduling, yearly energy cost, and energy technology investments for each scenario below: Scenario 1 - Diesel generators and CHP/CCHP equipment as installed in the current facility. Scenario 1 represents a baseline forced investment in currently installed energy equipment. Scenario 2 - Existing CHP equipment installed with blackout ride-through capability to replace approximately the same capacity of diesel generators. In Scenario 2 the cost of the replaced diesel units is saved, however additional capital cost for the controls and switchgear for blackout ride-through capability is necessary. Scenario 3 - Fully optimized site analysis, allowing DER-CAM to specify the number of diesel and CHP/CCHP units (with blackout ride-through capability) that should be installed ignoring any constraints on backup generation. Scenario 3 allows DER-CAM to optimize scheduling and number of generation units from the currently available technologies at a particular site. The results of this analysis, using real data to model the optimal schedulding of hypothetical and actual CHP systems for a brewery, data center, and hospital, lead to some interesting conclusions. First, facilities with high heating loads will typically prove to be the most appropriate for CHP installation from a purely economic standpoint. Second, absorption/adsorption cooling systems may only be economically feasible if the technology for these chillers can increase above current best system efficiency. At a coefficient of performance (COP) of 0.8, for instance, an adsorption chiller paired with a natural gas generator with waste heat recovery at a facility with large cooling loads, like a data center, will cost no less on a yearly basis than purchasing electricity and natural gas directly from a utility. Third, at marginal additional cost, if the reliability of CHP systems proves to be at

Norwood, Zack; Lipman, Tim; Marnay, Chris; Kammen, Dan

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

158

Real-Time Combined Heat and Power Operational Strategy Using a Hierarchical Optimization Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing attempts to optimize the operation of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) systems for building applications have two major limitations: the electrical and thermal loads are obtained from historical weather profiles; and the CHP system models ignore transient responses by using constant equipment efficiencies. This paper considers the transient response of a building combined with a hierarchical CHP optimal control algorithm to obtain a real-time integrated system that uses the most recent weather and electric load information. This is accomplished by running concurrent simulations of two transient building models. The first transient building model uses current as well as forecast input information to obtain short term predictions of the thermal and electric building loads. The predictions are then used by an optimization algorithm, i.e., a hierarchical controller, that decides the amount of fuel and of electrical energy to be allocated at the current time step. In a simulation, the actual physical building is not available and, hence, to simulate a real-time environment, a second, building model with similar but not identical input loads are used to represent the actual building. A state-variable feedback loop is completed at the beginning of each time step by copying, i.e., measuring, the state variable from the actual building and restarting the predictive model using these ?measured? values as initial conditions. The simulation environment presented in this paper features nonlinear effects such as the dependence of the heat exchanger effectiveness on their operating conditions. The results indicate that the CHP engine operation dictated by the proposed hierarchical controller with uncertain weather conditions have the potential to yield significant savings when compared to conventional systems using current values of electricity and fuel prices.

Yun, Kyung Tae; Cho, Heejin; Luck, Rogelio; Mago, Pedro J.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Effects of a carbon tax on microgrid combined heat and power adoption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the economically optimal adoption and operation of distributed energy resources (DER) by a hypothetical California microgrid consisting of a group of commercial buildings over an historic test year, 1999. The optimization is conducted using a customer adoption model (DER-CAM) developed at Berkeley Lab and implemented in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS). A microgrid is a semiautonomous grouping of electricity and heat loads interconnected to the existing utility grid (macrogrid) but able to island from it. The microgrid minimizes the cost of meeting its energy requirements (consisting of both electricity and heat loads) by optimizing the installation and operation of DER technologies while purchasing residual energy from the local combined natural gas and electricity utility. The available DER technologies are small-scale generators (microgrid is allowed to install CHP-enabled DER technologies, its carbon emissions are mitigated more than without CHP, demonstrating the potential benefits of small-scale CHP technology for climate change mitigation. Reciprocating engines with heat recovery and/or absorption cooling tend to be attractive technologies for the mild southern California climate, but the carbon mitigation tends to be modest compared to purchasing utility electricity because of the predominance of relatively clean central station generation in California.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Optimal Scheduling of Industrial Combined Heat and Power Plants under Time-sensitive Electricity Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) plants are widely used in industrial applications. In the aftermath of the recession, many of the associated production processes are under-utilized, which challenges the competitiveness of chemical companies. However, under-utilization can be a chance for tighter interaction with the power grid, which is in transition to the so-called smart grid, if the CHP plant can dynamically react to time-sensitive electricity prices. In this paper, we describe a generalized mode model on a component basis that addresses the operational optimization of industrial CHP plants. The mode formulation tracks the state of each plant component in a detailed manner and can account for different operating modes, e.g. fuel-switching for boilers and supplementary firing for gas turbines, and transitional behavior. Transitional behavior such as warm and cold start-ups, shutdowns and pre-computed start-up trajectories is modeled with modes as well. The feasible region of operation for each component is described based on input-output relationships that are thermodynamically sound, such as the Willans line for steam turbines. Furthermore, we emphasize the use of mathematically efficient logic constraints that allow solving the large-scale models fast. We provide an industrial case study and study the impact of different scenarios for under-utilization. 1

Sumit Mitra; Ignacioe. Grossmann

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulations chp combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Use of Time-Aggregated Data in Economic Screening Analyses of Combined Heat and Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) projects (also known as cogeneration projects) usually undergo a series of assessments and viability checks before any commitment is made. A screening analysis, with electrical and thermal loads characterized on an annual basis, may be performed initially to quickly determine the economic viability of the proposed project. Screening analyses using time-aggregated data do not reflect several critical cost influences, however. Seasonal and diurnal variations in electrical and thermal loads, as well as time-of-use utility pricing structures, can have a dramatic impact on the economics. A more accurate economic assessment requires additional detailed data on electrical and thermal demand (e.g., hourly load data), which may not be readily available for the specific facility under study. Recent developments in CHP evaluation tools, however, can generate the needed hourly data through the use of historical data libraries and building simulation. This article utilizes model-generated hourly load data for four potential CHP applications and compares the calculated cost savings of a CHP system when evaluated on a time-aggregated (i.e., annual) basis to the savings when evaluated on an hour-by-hour basis. It is observed that the simple, aggregated analysis forecasts much greater savings (i.e., greater economic viability) than the more detailed hourly analysis. The findings confirm that the simpler tool produces results with a much more optimistic outlook, which, if taken by itself, might lead to erroneous project decisions. The more rigorous approach, being more reflective of actual requirements and conditions, presents a more accurate economic comparison of the alternatives, which, in turn, leads to better decision risk management.

Hudson II, Carl Randy [ORNL

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Effects of a carbon tax on combined heat and power adoption by a microgrid  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the economically optimal adoption and operation of distributed energy resources (DER) by a hypothetical California microgrid ((mu)Grid) consisting of a group of commercial buildings over an historic test year, 1999. The optimization is conducted using a customer adoption model (DER-CAM) developed at Berkeley Lab and implemented in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS). A (mu)Grid is a semiautonomous grouping of electricity and heat loads interconnected to the existing utility grid (macrogrid) but able to island from it. The (mu)Grid minimizes the cost of meeting its energy requirements (consisting of both electricity and heat loads) by optimizing the installation and operation of DER technologies while purchasing residual energy from the local combined natural gas and electricity utility. The available DER technologies are small-scale generators (< 500 kW), such as reciprocating engines, microturbines, and fuel cells, with or without CHP equipment, such as water- and space-heating and/or absorption cooling. By introducing a tax on carbon emissions, it is shown that if the (mu)Grid is allowed to install CHP-enabled DER technologies, its carbon emissions are mitigated more than without CHP, demonstrating the potential benefits of small-scale CHP technology for climate change mitigation. Reciprocating engines with heat recovery and/or absorption cooling tend to be attractive technologies for the mild southern California climate, but the carbon mitigation tends to be modest compared to purchasing utility electricity because of the predominance of relatively clean generation in California.

Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Siddidqui, Afzal S.; Stadler, Michael

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Specification of Selected Performance Monitoring and Commissioning Verification Algorithms for CHP Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is assisting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Distributed Energy (DE) Program by developing advanced control algorithms that would lead to development of tools to enhance performance and reliability, and reduce emissions of distributed energy technologies, including combined heat and power technologies. This report documents phase 2 of the program, providing a detailed functional specification for algorithms for performance monitoring and commissioning verification, scheduled for development in FY 2006. The report identifies the systems for which algorithms will be developed, the specific functions of each algorithm, metrics which the algorithms will output, and inputs required by each algorithm.

Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas

2006-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

164

`Capture ready' regulation of fossil fuel power plants Betting the UK's carbon emissions on promises of future technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

preparation. In contrast, the Combined Heat and Power (CHP) plant in Seal Sands licensed in 2008 has not been CCGT Centrica Yes 05/02/09 Pembroke, South West Wales CCGT RWE npower Yes 28/08/08 Seal Sands, Teesside-leakage to boiler Design air ducts and fans for re-use for flue gas recycle FGD design that copes with different gas

Haszeldine, Stuart

165

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies on Microgrid Viability: An Investigation forother benefits to the CHP or microgrid system host site. See

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Effects of a carbon tax on microgrid combined heat and power adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emiel (2000). Distributed Generation in Competitiveenergy resources; DER; Distributed Generation; DG; Economicof CHP in distributed generation greatly increases the

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power, Boost Industrial Efficiency FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power, Boost Industrial Efficiency October 21, 2013 - 11:30am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 Underscoring President Obama's Climate Action Plan to cut harmful emissions and double energy efficiency, the Energy Department is taking action to develop the next generation of combined heat and power (CHP) technology and help local communities and businesses make cost-effective investments that save money and energy. As part of this effort, the Department launched today seven new regional Combined Heat and Power Technical Assistance Partnerships across the country to help strengthen U.S. manufacturing competitiveness, lower energy consumption and reduce

168

FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power, Boost Industrial Efficiency FACT SHEET: Energy Department Actions to Deploy Combined Heat and Power, Boost Industrial Efficiency October 21, 2013 - 11:30am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 Underscoring President Obama's Climate Action Plan to cut harmful emissions and double energy efficiency, the Energy Department is taking action to develop the next generation of combined heat and power (CHP) technology and help local communities and businesses make cost-effective investments that save money and energy. As part of this effort, the Department launched today seven new regional Combined Heat and Power Technical Assistance Partnerships across the country to help strengthen U.S. manufacturing competitiveness, lower energy consumption and reduce

169

Combined heat and power technology fills an important energy niche ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel consumption at CHP plants. Useful thermal output ... data on all generators at plants greater than one megawatt on the Annual Power Plant Operations ...

170

Federal Energy Management Program: Combined Heat and Power Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electricity; and the waste heat is used in some type of thermal process. Process flow for a typical CHP system leverages heat created during electricity generation to...

171

Berkeley Lab Study Evaluates Potential Combined Heat and Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stadler evaluated an integrated approach that optimizes the adoption of distributed energy resources (DER). This study focused on commercial-sector CHP, especially those...

172

Forecast Combinations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast combinations have frequently been found in empirical studies to produce better forecasts on average than methods based on the ex-ante best individual forecasting model. Moreover, simple combinations that ignore correlations between forecast errors often dominate more refined combination schemes aimed at estimating the theoretically optimal combination weights. In this chapter we analyze theoretically the factors that determine the advantages from combining forecasts (for example, the degree of correlation between forecast errors and the relative size of the individual models forecast error variances). Although the reasons for the success of simple combination schemes are poorly understood, we discuss several possibilities related to model misspecification, instability (non-stationarities) and estimation error in situations where thenumbersofmodelsislargerelativetothe available sample size. We discuss the role of combinations under asymmetric loss and consider combinations of point, interval and probability forecasts. Key words: Forecast combinations; pooling and trimming; shrinkage methods; model misspecification, diversification gains

Allan Timmermann; Jel Codes C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Thermodynamic Analysis of Combined Cycle District Heating System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of the University of Massachusetts' Combined Heat and Power (CHP) District Heating System. Energy and exergy analyses are performed based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics for power generation systems that include a 10 MW Solar combustion gas turbine, a 4-MW steam turbine, a 100,000 pph heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), three 125,000 pph package boilers, and auxiliary equipment. In the analysis, actual system data is used to assess the district heating system performance, energy and exergy efficiencies, exergetic improvement potential and exergy losses. Energy and exergy calculations are conducted for the whole year on an hourly basis. System efficiencies are calculated for a wide range of component operating loads. The results show how thermodynamic analysis can be used to identify the magnitudes and location of energy losses in order to improve the existing system, processes or components.

Suresh, S.; Gopalakrishnan, H.; Kosanovic, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Definition: Combined heat and power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

heat and power heat and power Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Combined heat and power The production of electricity and heat from a single process. Almost synonymous with the term cogeneration, but slightly more broad. Under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA), the definition of cogeneration is the production of electric energy and "another form of useful thermal energy through the sequential use of energy." Since some facilities produce both heat and power but not in a sequential fashion, the term CHP is used.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition View on Reegle Reegle Definition Cogeneration power plants produce electricity but do not waste the heat this process creates. The heat is used for district heating or other purposes, and thus the overall efficiency is improved. For example could

175

THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FACILITIES THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FACILITIES Section 1308 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 ("EISA 2007") directed the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the States, to undertake a study of the laws affecting the siting of privately-owned distribution wires on or across public rights of way and to consider the impact of those laws on the development of combined heat and power ("CHP") facilities, as well as to determine whether a change in those laws would impact utility operations, costs or reliability, or impact utility customers. The study is also to consider whether changing the laws would

176

STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FACILITIE STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FACILITIE Section 1308 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 ("EISA 2007") directed the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the States, to undertake a study of the laws affecting the siting of privately-owned distribution wires on or across public rights of way and to consider the impact of those laws on the development of combined heat and power ("CHP") facilities, as well as to determine whether a change in those laws would impact utility operations, costs or reliability, or impact utility customers. The study is also to consider whether a change in those laws

177

THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FACILITIES THE EFFECT OF PRIVATE WIRE LAWS ON DEVELOPMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER FACILITIES Section 1308 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 ("EISA 2007") directed the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the States, to undertake a study of the laws affecting the siting of privately-owned distribution wires on or across public rights of way and to consider the impact of those laws on the development of combined heat and power ("CHP") facilities, as well as to determine whether a change in those laws would impact utility operations, costs or reliability, or impact utility customers. The study is also to consider whether changing the laws would

178

Review of Potential Federal and State Green House Gas Policy Drivers for Combined Heat and Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power generation sector contributes about one-third of all green house gas (GHG) emissions in the United States. To curb the reduction of green house gas emissions, all options in the electric power value chain must be considered and evaluated. The more efficient utilization of natural gas fuel via use of distributed combined cooling, heating, and power (CHP) systems in the end-use sector may be one option to mitigating GHG emissions. This research project was undertaken to assess the extent...

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

179

PipelineMarch 2013 Volume 5, Issue 2 COMBINED HEAT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Management division is designing a CHP power plant featuring a spinning turbine that might remind you by Thomas Edison in an 1882 commercial power plant. CHP technology has evolved since then and is needed growth has increased steam demand. Without the plant, demand will exceed reliable steam production

Webb, Peter

180

Table 8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

11 Commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants. 4 Jet fuel, kerosene, other petroleum liquids, and waste oil. 12 Industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulations chp combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

An engineering-economic analysis of combined heat and power technologies in a (mu)grid application  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an investigation at Ernesto Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) of the potential for coupling combined heat and power (CHP) with on-site electricity generation to provide power and heating, and cooling services to customers. This research into distributed energy resources (DER) builds on the concept of the microgrid (mGrid), a semiautonomous grouping of power-generating sources that are placed and operated by and for the benefit of its members. For this investigation, a hypothetical small shopping mall (''Microgrid Oaks'') was developed and analyzed for the cost effectiveness of installing CHP to provide the mGrid's energy needs. A mGrid consists of groups of customers pooling energy loads and installing a combination of generation resources that meets the particular mGrid's goals. This study assumes the mGrid is seeking to minimize energy costs. mGrids could operate independently of the macrogrid (the wider power network), but they are usually assumed to be connected, through power electronics, to the macrogrid. The mGrid in this study is assumed to be interconnected to the macrogrid, and can purchase some energy and ancillary services from utility providers.

Bailey, Owen; Ouaglal, Boubekeur; Bartholomew, Emily; Marnay, Chris; Bourassa, Norman

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Environmental Regulators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Reports Brookhaven's Environmental Regulators When it comes to the environment, Brookhaven National Laboratory must comply with the regulations of many local, state and...

183

Search Combinators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to model search in a constraint solver can be an essential asset for solving combinatorial problems. However, existing infrastructure for defining search heuristics is often inadequate. Either modeling capabilities are extremely limited or users are faced with a general-purpose programming language whose features are not tailored towards writing search heuristics. As a result, major improvements in performance may remain unexplored. This article introduces search combinators, a lightweight and solver-independent method that bridges the gap between a conceptually simple modeling language for search (high-level, functional and naturally compositional) and an efficient implementation (low-level, imperative and highly non-modular). By allowing the user to define application-tailored search strategies from a small set of primitives, search combinators effectively provide a rich domain-specific language (DSL) for modeling search to the user. Remarkably, this DSL comes at a low implementation cost to the...

Schrijvers, Tom; Wuille, Pieter; Samulowitz, Horst; Stuckey, Peter J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Special Notice PROPOSED SUBSISTENCE HALIBUT REGULATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for denied applications for a CHP, Ceremonial Permit, Educational Permit, or subsistence halibut registration certificate. Comments You may comment on these proposals in four ways: a) by mail; b) by fax; c) by e-mail; or

185

ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM "PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study ofother benefits to the CHP or microgrid system host site. Seecapability in a CERTS Microgrid configuration in reference [

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Distributed energy resources customer adoption modeling with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHP (PX and Tariff case) Distributed Energy Resources42 Figure 10. Energy Consumption Breakdown - 1999 (TariffFigure 10. Energy Consumption Breakdown - 1999 (Tariff Case)

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial-Building Microgrids, IEEE Transactions on2009, Special Issue on Microgrids and Energy Management, (CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storageCHP, often with absorption chillers that use waste heat forand heat-driven absorption chillers. Figure 1 shows a

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM "PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incentives to install CHP, the least expensive method to power the facility would be to buy all electricity and natural gas

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incentives to install CHP the least expensive method to power the facility would be to buy all electricity and natural gas

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Sustainable design and durability of domestic micro combined heat and power scroll expander systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Research to understand the mechanisms of wear within the main components of three different micro-CHP scroll expander systems was conducted. This was performed in order (more)

Tzanakis, Iakovos

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental impact study: CSP vs. CdTe thin filmsolar CHP Rankine CSP concentrating distributed the concentrating solar power (CSP) troughs in the central

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

AMO Industrial Distributed Energy: Combine Heat and Power: A...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

capacity. Finally, the economics of CHP are improving as a result of the changing outlook in the long-term supply and price of North American natural gas - a preferred fuel...

194

AMO Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat and Power Basics  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

or power at the point of use, allowing the heat that would normally be lost in the power generation process to be recovered to provide needed heating andor cooling. CHP...

195

Effects of a shortened depreciation schedule on the investment costs for combined heat and power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate and compare several generic depreciation methods to assess the effectiveness of possible policy measures with respect to the depreciation schedules for investments in combined heat and power plants in the United States. We assess the different depreciation methods for CHP projects of various sizes (ranging from 1 MW to 100 MW). We evaluate the impact of different depreciation schedules on the tax shield, and the resulting tax savings to potential investors. We show that a shorter depreciation cycle could have a substantial impact on the cost of producing power, making cogeneration more attractive. The savings amount to approximately 6-7 percent of capital and fixed operation and maintenance costs, when changing from the current system to a 7 year depreciation scheme with switchover from declining balance to straight line depreciation. Suggestions for further research to improve the analysis are given.

Kranz, Nicole; Worrell, Ernst

2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cumberland County, PA East Pennsboro WWTP Biogas Recovery and Utilization Using CHP Project. Under PA Green Energy Works Combined Heat and Power - Install CHP unit to generate...

197

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

its partnership with DOE, the combined heat and power (CHP) program of the International Energy Agency (IEA) conducts research and analysis of CHP markets and deployment efforts...

198

Home Energy Score: Frequently Asked Questions for Homeowners...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Steven Chu today applauded the commissioning of a combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell system at Portland Community College in Oregon. The CHP fuel cell system...

199

Spatial Disaggregation of CO2 Emissions for the State of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

home to several natural gas power and CHP plants operated bynatural gas used by electric and combined heat and power (CHP) plants,

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and points of contact. Technology Benefits Application Weighted Score Combined Heat and Power (CHP) A CHP system recovers otherwise wasted heat from electricity generation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulations chp combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Philadelphia,Pennsylvania AIMCO CHP Projects Under PA Green Energy Works Combined Heat and Power - Install eight CHP systems at four high density residential properties. The...

202

110 kW Stationary Combined Heat and Power Systems Status and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for SOFC-based mCHP system is presented. January 2013 Keywords: micro-CHP SOFC Anode gas recycle Ejector Energy System Simulation a b s t r a c Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) for small-scale residential applications is presented. A novel detailed pro

203

Optimal Combination of Distributed Energy System in an Eco-Campus of Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

e n / k W h (0.067$/kWh). n heat price Current system C+PV+(PV+(DERwith CHP) DERwith CHP Do- Nothing Ene;rgy aver age pric e]\\/kWi) Fig.12.Heat unit price

Yang, Yongwen; Gao, Weijun; Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

PSADEFS.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

are lease condensate and liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gilsonite, and oil shale. Drip gases are also included, but topped crude oil (residual oil) and other...

205

Alternative Regulation (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Utility regulators, including the Public Service Board, have applied a new type of regulation, often called "alternative regulation" or "incentive regulation." There are many variants of this type...

206

Government Regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Interest in the use of so-called voluntary approaches to supplement or replace formal environmental regulation is on the rise, both in Europe and in the United States. These approaches fall into two general ...

Ashford, Nicholas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Opportunities for Combined Heat and Power in Data Centers  

SciTech Connect

Data centers represent a rapidly growing and very energy intensive activity in commercial, educational, and government facilities. In the last five years the growth of this sector was the electric power equivalent to seven new coal-fired power plants. Data centers consume 1.5% of the total power in the U.S. Growth over the next five to ten years is expected to require a similar increase in power generation. This energy consumption is concentrated in buildings that are 10-40 times more energy intensive than a typical office building. The sheer size of the market, the concentrated energy consumption per facility, and the tendency of facilities to cluster in 'high-tech' centers all contribute to a potential power infrastructure crisis for the industry. Meeting the energy needs of data centers is a moving target. Computing power is advancing rapidly, which reduces the energy requirements for data centers. A lot of work is going into improving the computing power of servers and other processing equipment. However, this increase in computing power is increasing the power densities of this equipment. While fewer pieces of equipment may be needed to meet a given data processing load, the energy density of a facility designed to house this higher efficiency equipment will be as high as or higher than it is today. In other words, while the data center of the future may have the IT power of ten data centers of today, it is also going to have higher power requirements and higher power densities. This report analyzes the opportunities for CHP technologies to assist primary power in making the data center more cost-effective and energy efficient. Broader application of CHP will lower the demand for electricity from central stations and reduce the pressure on electric transmission and distribution infrastructure. This report is organized into the following sections: (1) Data Center Market Segmentation--the description of the overall size of the market, the size and types of facilities involved, and the geographic distribution. (2) Data Center Energy Use Trends--a discussion of energy use and expected energy growth and the typical energy consumption and uses in data centers. (3) CHP Applicability--Potential configurations, CHP case studies, applicable equipment, heat recovery opportunities (cooling), cost and performance benchmarks, and power reliability benefits (4) CHP Drivers and Hurdles--evaluation of user benefits, social benefits, market structural issues and attitudes toward CHP, and regulatory hurdles. (5) CHP Paths to Market--Discussion of technical needs, education, strategic partnerships needed to promote CHP in the IT community.

Darrow, Ken [ICF International; Hedman, Bruce [ICF International

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

The effect of CO regulations on the cost of corn ethanol production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

e MJ-1 by co-firing 20% biomass in its boiler system, incurring only a small change in production (e.g. raw starch hydrolysis and corn oil extraction, plus either CHP or biomass co-firing), and even (e.g. raw starch hydrolysis and corn oil extraction, plus either CHP or biomass co-firing), and even

Kammen, Daniel M.

209

Anaerobic Digestion and Combined Heat and Power Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the underlying objectives of this study is to recover the untapped energy in wastewater biomass. Some national statistics worth considering include: (1) 5% of the electrical energy demand in the US is used to treat municipal wastewater; (2) This carbon rich wastewater is an untapped energy resource; (3) Only 10% of wastewater treatment plants (>5mgd) recover energy; (4) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to produce > 575 MW of energy nationwide; and (5) Wastewater treatment plants have the potential to capture an additional 175 MW of energy from waste Fats, Oils and Grease. The WSSC conducted this study to determine the feasibility of utilizing anaerobic digestion and combined heat and power (AD/CHP) and/or biosolids gasification and drying facilities to produce and utilize renewable digester biogas. Digester gas is considered a renewable energy source and can be used in place of fossil fuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The project focus includes: (1) Converting wastewater Biomass to Electricity; (2) Using innovative technologies to Maximize Energy Recovery; and (3) Enhancing the Environment by reducing nutrient load to waterways (Chesapeake Bay), Sanitary Sewer Overflows (by reducing FOG in sewers) and Greenhouse Gas Emissions. The study consisted of these four tasks: (1) Technology screening and alternative shortlisting, answering the question 'what are the most viable and cost effective technical approaches by which to recover and reuse energy from biosolids while reducing disposal volume?'; (2) Energy recovery and disposal reduction potential verification, answering the question 'how much energy can be recovered from biosolids?'; (3) Economic environmental and community benefit analysis, answering the question 'what are the potential economic, environmental and community benefits/impacts of each approach?'; and (4) Recommend the best plan and develop a concept design.

Frank J. Hartz

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

210

South Dakota State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Identification Home Federal and State Regulations State Regulations South Dakota State Regulations: South Dakota State of South Dakota The South Dakota...

211

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by CHP heat output P e Electrical power output of system Qratio of thermal to electrical power output R d Desiredratio of thermal to electrical power output T a Ambient

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of CHP varies widely by climate zone and service territory,sites 2 in different climate zones were picked. These samplevaries considerably by climate zone, and in general, the

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Staff Workshop to Explore Microgrids as a Distributed Energygenerate close to them in microgrids, such as the Consor-of CHP sys- tems in microgrids. The current state of the art

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and decreased cost of heat and electricity grid (Casten andgrid. Chapter 1 begins with analysis of the relative demand for electricity and heatheat can be cost-effectively stored with available technologies. (c) DCS-CHP thus can ameliorate grid-

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Combined Heat and Power for Saving Energy and Carbon in Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

high electricity costs, net metering and high thermal-to-favor microCHP include net metering policies that allow homecurrently not eligible for net metering in most New England

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Novel heat pipe combination  

SciTech Connect

The basic heat pipe principle is employed in a heat pipe combination wherein two heat pipes are combined in opposing relationship to form an integral unit; such that the temperature, heat flow, thermal characteristics, and temperature-related parameters of a monitored environment or object exposed to one end of the heat pipe combination can be measured and controlled by controlling the heat flow of the opposite end of the heat pipe combination.

Arcella, F.G.

1978-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

217

Carbon and Energy Savings from Combined Heat and Power: A Closer Look  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze and update our estimates of CHP's potential for U.S. manufacturers. Typical efficiencies of available CHP technologies are used to estimate their energy use and carbon emissions. In calculating the baseline against which CHP is compared, we take into account efficiency improvements in both the industrial sector and in the electricity-producing sector. We find that manufacturers save energy and reduce their carbon emissions substantially if they replace all retiring boilers stocks and new additions to the stock (from 1994 to 2010), with existing cost-effective CHP technologies. Carbon equivalent (=12/44 carbon dioxide) emissions would be reduced by up to 70 million metric tons of carbon (MtC) per year in 2010, (18%-30% manufacturer's projected emissions), and energy use reduced by up to 7 Exajoule (EJ). These estimates also take into account growth in manufacturing, as forecast by AEO-98, and expected improvements in CHP, boilers, and electric generating technologies. However, without policy innovation, actual CHP installed by U.S. manufacturers will likely fall far short of our estimates.

Roop, J. M.; Kaarsberg, T.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Context: Policy & Regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Regulation of Halon and Halon Substitutes. ... Disparities in Environmental Regulations and Their Effect ... Impediments and Incentives for Incorporating ...

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

219

Alaska State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alaska State Regulations: Alaska State of Alaska The Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (AOGCC) regulates the drilling for and production of oil and gas resources, the...

220

Arizona State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arizona State Regulations: Arizona State of Arizona The Arizona Geological Survey (AZGS) Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (OGCC) regulates the drilling for and production of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulations chp combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Mississippi State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mississippi State Regulations: Mississippi State of Mississippi The Mississippi State Oil and Gas Board (MSOGB), an independent agency, promulgates and enforces rules to regulate...

222

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Federal Reserve System, ... for Administration Defense District in EIAs ... include electricity output from combined heat and power (CHP) ...

223

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Federal Reserve System, ... Generation supplied by electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) ... See Petroleum for Administration ...

224

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Generation supplied by electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) ... See Petroleum for Administration Defense District ... Federal ...

225

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Commercial and industrial sectors include electricity output from combined heat and power (CHP) ... Federal Reserve System, ... Defense District ...

226

United States - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

State Energy Data System ... District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho ... includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) ...

227

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Heating Oil Residential Prices ... Commercial and industrial sectors include electricity output from combined heat and power (CHP) ... Federal Reserve ...

228

United States - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho ... electrical system energy losses. ... includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) ...

229

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy; Grid systems; Optimization; Heat flow; Financialof grid power and by utilizing combined heat and power (CHP)

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

EERE: Advanced Manufacturing Office - Site Map  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

- Combustion - Compressed Air - Distributed Energy Combined Heat and Power (CHP) - Fuel and Feedstock Flexibility - Information & Communications Technology Data Centers -...

231

Technology Reviews | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Reviews Technology Reviews Technology Reviews November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis Selecting a distributed energy (DE) technology for a specific application depends on many factors. Considerations include the amount of power needed, the duty cycle, space constraints, thermal needs, emission regulations, fuel availability, utility prices, and interconnection issues. The following technology reviews include descriptions of a variety of DE and combined heat and power (CHP) technologies, providing (when available) such parameters as efficiency, size, and projected cost to install and maintain. Behavior of Capstone and Honeywell Microturbine Generators During Load Changes, 38 pp, Feb. 2004 Catalogue of CHP Technologies, Dec. 2012 Cost Analysis of Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Control Alternatives for

232

Regulating the information gatekeepers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns about biased manipulation of search results may require intervention involving government regulation.

Patrick Vogl; Michael Barrett

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Combined heat and power for drinking water production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABB Kraftwerke AG, of Mannheim, Germany, is presently involved in two huge projects aimed at supplying electric power and drinking water in the Arabian Gulf. To limit fuel consumption as much as possible, electricity and water are produced in CHP plants. These plants are powered either by gas turbines equipped with HRSGs, or by conventional boilers feeding controlled extraction-condensing steam turbines. The selection of one of the two systems depends mainly on the type of fuel available (oil or natural gas), on the power/water loads through the year and other local factors. The gas turbine-based CHP systems can be setup in a shorter time and feature a slightly higher overall efficiency. The steam turbine solution, once the plant is commissioned, needs less maintenance. In the final analysis, operating costs of the two solutions are equivalent.

Chellini, R.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Regulating with Carrots, Regulating with Sticks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of necessary brevity. To vehicle manufacturers, inconsistent1997: 461). Motor vehicle manufacturers successfully arguedonly on engine and vehicle manufacturers. 3. Regulating

Thornton, Dorothy; Kagan, Robert; Gunningham, Neil

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Klystron-linac combination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combination klystron-linear accelerator which utilizes anti-bunch electrons generated in the klystron section as a source of electrons to be accelerated in the accelerator section. Electron beam current is controlled by second harmonic bunching, constrictor aperture size and magnetic focusing. Rf coupling is achieved by internal and external coupling.

Stein, W.E.

1980-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

236

Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat andpower applications  

SciTech Connect

While demand for electricity continues to grow, expansion of the traditional electricity supply system, or macrogrid, is constrained and is unlikely to keep pace with the growing thirst western economies have for electricity. Furthermore, no compelling case has been made that perpetual improvement in the overall power quality and reliability (PQR)delivered is technically possible or economically desirable. An alternative path to providing high PQR for sensitive loads would generate close to them in microgrids, such as the Consortium for Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid. Distributed generation would alleviate the pressure for endless improvement in macrogrid PQR and might allow the establishment of a sounder economically based level of universal grid service. Energy conversion from available fuels to electricity close to loads can also provide combined heat and power (CHP) opportunities that can significantly improve the economics of small-scale on-site power generation, especially in hot climates when the waste heat serves absorption cycle cooling equipment that displaces expensive on-peak electricity. An optimization model, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), developed at Berkeley Lab identifies the energy bill minimizing combination of on-site generation and heat recovery equipment for sites, given their electricity and heat requirements, the tariffs they face, and a menu of available equipment. DER-CAM is used to conduct a systemic energy analysis of a southern California naval base building and demonstrates atypical current economic on-site power opportunity. Results achieve cost reductions of about 15 percent with DER, depending on the tariff.Furthermore, almost all of the energy is provided on-site, indicating that modest cost savings can be achieved when the microgrid is free to select distributed generation and heat recovery equipment in order to minimize its over all costs.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; HamachiLaCommare, Kristina

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

Combined Heating and Power Using Microturbines in a Major Urban Hotel  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a cooperative effort to install and operate a Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) System at a major hotel in San Francisco, CA. The packaged CHP System integrated four microturbines, a double-effect absorption chiller, two fuel gas boosters, and the control hardware and software to ensure that the system operated predictably, reliably, and safely. The chiller was directly energized by the recycled hot exhaust from the microturbines, and could be configured to provide either chilled or hot water. As installed, the system was capable of providing up to 227 kW of net electrical power and 142 Refrigeration Tons (RT) of chilled water at a 59oF (15oC) ambient temperature. For the year, the CHP efficiency was 54 percent. Significant lessons learned from this test and verification project are discussed as well as measured performance and economic considerations.

Sweetser, Richard [Exergy Partners Corp.; Wagner, Timothy [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC); Leslie, Neil [Gas Technology Institute; Stovall, Therese K [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Incentive regulation and the regulation of incentives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This thesis explores the regulatory problem of incentives and the question of how to create a regulatory framework that most nearly aligns the firm's private interests with the public good. The main themes are: (1) an efficiency loss is inherent in the regulatory relationship, as long as the regulator knows less about the firm's operations than the firm itself; and (2) regulation itself is an incentive mechanism, so that the regulator can choose how to motivate the firm but now whether to do so. An analytical model is used to show the tradeoff between inducing efficient production and efficient pricing. The thesis surveys and analyzes incentive regulation mechanisms adopted by state utility commissions, using a Washington state plan as a case study. A natural extension of incentive regulation is discussed, in which the firm's reward depends on the total gain in consumer surplus rather than just the reduction in expenditures. The ability of the regulator to commit to future actions is central to incentive regulation, as well as many other aspects of regulation.

Blackmon, B.G. Jr.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

c007.chp:Corel VENTURA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September September 1998 2 Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products by Grade, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons) Geographic Area Products April 1998 May 1998 June 1998 July 1998 August 1998 September 1998 Cumulative Year To Date 1997 Cumulative Year To Date 1998 Adjusted Year To Date % Change 1 United States Motor Gasoline ......................... 10,610,961 11,050,072 11,122,985 11,574,440 11,361,574 10,744,656 93,964,635 96,549,545 2.8 Regular .................................... 7,582,161 7,880,019 7,944,320 8,207,736 8,034,715 7,602,564 67,296,190 68,662,550 2.0 Conventional ........................... 5,060,136 5,276,193 5,366,477 5,552,097 5,403,924 5,083,172 45,547,967 45,575,903 0.1 Oxygenated ............................ 183,304 185,744 196,783 186,843 181,571 199,535 1,719,120

240

TABLE17.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. 7. Refinery Net Production of Finished Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining Districts, January 1998 Liquefied Refinery Gases ........................................... 576 -7 569 2,415 -51 392 2,756 Ethane/Ethylene ..................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Ethane ............................................................... W W W W W W W Ethylene ............................................................ W W W W W W W Propane/Propylene ................................................ 1,656 33 1,689 2,645 329 628 3,602 Propane ............................................................. W W W 1,979 W W W Propylene .......................................................... W W W 666 W W W Normal Butane/Butylene ........................................ -804 -39 -843 -320 -337 -180 -837 Normal Butane ..................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulations chp combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

table04.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. 4. PAD District I-Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 1998 Crude Oil ........................................... 824 - 53,357 -2,000 -89 5,262 0 46,830 0 0 16,235 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ........ 829 569 1,233 - 4,737 -869 - 252 24 7,961 5,223 Pentanes Plus ................................ 79 - 0 - 0 7 - 0 1 71 19 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ............ 750 569 1,233 - 4,737 -876 - 252 24 7,889 5,204 Ethane/Ethylene ........................ 262 0 0 - 0 0 - 0 0 262 0 Propane/Propylene .................... 334 1,689 1,206 - 4,630 -262 - 0 20 8,101 4,043 Normal Butane/Butylene ............ 116 -843 27 - 107 -548 - 162 3 -210 821 Isobutane/Isobutylene ................ 38 -277 0 - 0 -66 - 90 0 -263 340 Other Liquids .................................... -272 - 5,668 - 350 537 - 7,268 17 -2,076 19,354 Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates ... 1,973

242

c007.chp:Corel VENTURA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

April April 1998 2 Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products by Grade, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons) Geographic Area Products November 1997 December 1997 January 1998 February 1998 March 1998 April 1998 Cumulative Year To Date 1997 Cumulative Year To Date 1998 Adjusted Year To Date % Change 1 United States Motor Gasoline ......................... 10,143,551 10,826,964 10,047,308 9,380,747 10,656,802 10,623,119 39,940,408 40,707,976 1.9 Regular .................................... 7,277,667 7,726,152 7,148,868 6,693,799 7,568,368 7,590,321 28,635,725 29,001,356 1.3 Conventional ........................... 4,682,550 4,963,896 4,563,601 4,300,943 4,969,360 5,069,150 19,138,480 18,903,054 -1.2 Oxygenated ............................ 359,994 386,009 365,693 317,923 252,846 183,287

243

table09.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3,434 3,434 - 5,080 -9 -1,729 230 0 6,546 0 0 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ....... 1,272 347 65 - -68 -208 - 229 29 1,566 Pentanes Plus .................................. 188 - 33 - -5 30 - 66 0 119 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............. 1,084 347 31 - -63 -238 - 163 29 1,446 Ethane/Ethylene ........................... 503 24 18 - 112 -52 - 0 0 709 Propane/Propylene ....................... 363 301 4 - -158 -120 - 0 21 610 Normal Butane/Butylene .............. 76 3 6 - -11 -89 - 100 8 54 Isobutane/Isobutylene ................... 142 19 4 - -6 22 - 63 0 73 Other Liquids .................................... 172 - 223 - -73 82 - 216 65 -41 Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates .... 149 - 1 - 0 6 - 97 46 0 Unfinished Oils ................................. - - 221 - 4 72 - 195 0 -41 Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. .......... 23 - 1 - -77 4 - -76 19 0 Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. ....... - - 0 - 0 (s) - (s) 0 0 Finished Petroleum Products

244

TABLE15.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. 5. Natural Gas Plant Net Production and Stocks of Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining PAD District I PAD District II Commodity East Appalachian Minn., Wis., Okla., Kans., Coast No. 1 Total Ind., Ill., Ky. N. Dak., S. Dak. Mo. Total Net Production Net Production Stocks Stocks Districts, (Thousand Barrels) PAD District III PAD Dist. PAD Dist. Commodity IV V Texas La. Texas Gulf Gulf N. La., New U.S. Inland Coast Coast Ark. Mexico Total Rocky Mt. West Coast Total January 1998 Natural Gas Liquids .................................................. 140 689 829 599 322 7,842 8,763 Pentanes Plus ......................................................... 11 68 79 109 81 956 1,146 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................... 129 621 750 490 241 6,886 7,617 Ethane ................................................................ 51 211 262 144 0 2,765 2,909

245

TABLE16.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6. 6. Refinery Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining Districts, January 1998 Crude Oil ................................................................... 44,047 2,783 46,830 70,320 12,891 21,794 105,005 Natural Gas Liquids ................................................. 252 0 252 2,613 131 1,076 3,820 Pentanes Plus ....................................................... 0 0 0 202 45 522 769 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ................................... 252 0 252 2,411 86 554 3,051 Ethane ............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Propane ............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Normal Butane .................................................. 162 0 162 1,792 76 435 2,303 Isobutane ..........................................................

246

c007.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 4,064,970 4,549,818 4,432,273 4,070,891 4,560,025 4,111,111 17,427,456 17,174,300 -1.5 No. 2 Fuel Oil ... 1,051,406 1,402,553 1,334,923...

247

c007.chp:Corel VENTURA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... 2,397,064 2,235,123 2,376,247 2,219,574 2,074,933 2,349,456 6,319,392 6,643,963 5.1 Midgrade ... 1,267,964 1,184,980...

248

c007.chp:Corel VENTURA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... 1,388,614 1,556,914 1,555,473 1,576,337 1,575,396 1,636,658 10,480,456 10,765,616 2.7 Oxygenated ... - - - - - - - - - Reformulated...

249

c007.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

of Petroleum Products by Grade, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons) Geographic Area Products August 1997 September 1997 October 1997 November 1997 December 1997 January...

250

c007.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of Petroleum Products by Grade, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons) Geographic Area Products September 1998 October 1998 November 1998 December 1998 January 1999...

251

c007.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of Petroleum Products by Grade, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons) Geographic Area Products July 1998 August 1998 September 1998 October 1998 November 1998 December...

252

c007.chp:Corel VENTURA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Petroleum Products by Grade, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons) Geographic Area Products January 1998 February 1998 March 1998 April 1998 May 1998 June 1998...

253

c007.chp:Corel VENTURA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Petroleum Products by Grade, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons) Geographic Area Products August 1998 September 1998 October 1998 November 1998 December 1998 January...

254

c007.chp:Corel VENTURA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Petroleum Products by Grade, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons) Geographic Area Products December 1997 January 1998 February 1998 March 1998 April 1998 May 1998...

255

c007.chp:Corel VENTURA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Petroleum Products by Grade, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons) Geographic Area Products April 1998 May 1998 June 1998 July 1998 August 1998 September 1998...

256

c007.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of Petroleum Products by Grade, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons) Geographic Area Products March 1998 April 1998 May 1998 June 1998 July 1998 August 1998 Cumulative...

257

TABLE34.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Oils ... 36 0 0 36 227 0 0 0 Motor Gasoline Blending Components ... 0 32 0 0 0 0 381 0 Finished Motor...

258

c007.chp:Corel VENTURA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

May May 1998 2 Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products by Grade, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons) Geographic Area Products December 1997 January 1998 February 1998 March 1998 April 1998 May 1998 Cumulative Year To Date 1997 Cumulative Year To Date 1998 Adjusted Year To Date % Change 1 United States Motor Gasoline ......................... 10,826,964 10,047,308 9,380,747 10,656,802 10,610,961 11,052,690 50,710,406 51,748,508 2.0 Regular .................................... 7,726,152 7,148,868 6,693,799 7,568,368 7,582,161 7,881,479 36,329,353 36,874,675 1.5 Conventional ........................... 4,963,896 4,563,601 4,300,943 4,969,360 5,060,136 5,277,653 24,409,850 24,171,693 -1.0 Oxygenated ............................ 386,009 365,693 317,923 252,846 183,304 185,744 1,124,465

259

c007.chp:Corel VENTURA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

January January 1999 2 Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products by Grade, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons) Geographic Area Products August 1998 September 1998 October 1998 November 1998 December 1998 January 1999 Cumulative Year To Date 1998 Cumulative Year To Date 1999 Adjusted Year To Date % Change 1 United States Motor Gasoline ......................... 11,361,574 10,756,677 11,218,355 10,469,445 11,107,600 9,938,801 10,047,308 9,938,801 -1.1 Regular .................................... 8,034,715 7,610,549 7,930,901 7,354,578 7,765,179 6,902,428 7,148,868 6,902,428 -3.4 Conventional ........................... 5,403,924 5,042,027 5,215,578 4,741,242 5,010,689 4,373,570 4,563,601 4,373,570 -4.2 Oxygenated ............................ 181,571 248,076 329,621 385,740 407,637 397,314

260

art9907.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Monthly PSA API OGJ NGD Million Million Percent Million Percent Million Percent Year Barrels Barrels of PSA Barrels of PSA Barrels of PSA 1997 2,355 2,326 98.8 2,330 98.9 2,312 98.2 1996 2,366 2,356 99.6 2,370 100.2 2,335 98.7 1995 2,394 2,382 99.5 2,393 100.0 2,358 98.5 1994 2,431 2,424 99.7 2,438 100.3 2,425 99.8 1993 2,499 2,504 100.2 2,520 100.8 2,492 99.7 1992 2,625 2,608 99.4 2,630 100.2 2,593 98.8 1991 2,707 2,687 99.3 2,692 99.4 2,665 98.4 1990 2,685 2,634 98.1 2,668 99.4 2,663 99.2 1989 2,779 2,781 100.1 2,834 102.0 2,751 99.0 1988 2,979 2,967 99.6 3,013 101.1 2,973 99.8 Table FE1. A Comparison of Data Series for Crude Oil Production, 1988-1997 Sources: PSA: Petroleum Supply Annual, 1988 through 1997, Table 2. API: American Petroleum Institute, Monthly Statistical Report, 1988 through 1997. OGJ: Oil and Gas Journal, 1988 through 1997. NGD: U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulations chp combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

table06.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,308 7,308 - 27,686 -2,263 59,993 -3,449 0 105,005 1,168 0 70,132 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ......... 8,763 2,756 3,599 - 265 -6,499 - 3,820 752 17,310 23,020 Pentanes Plus ................................... 1,146 - 42 - 519 214 - 769 455 269 1,988 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ............... 7,617 2,756 3,557 - -254 -6,713 - 3,051 297 17,041 21,032 Ethane/Ethylene ............................ 2,909 0 12 - -2,215 -110 - 0 0 816 2,868 Propane/Propylene ....................... 3,095 3,602 2,661 - 968 -4,799 - 0 96 15,029 13,173 Normal Butane/Butylene ............... 1,156 -837 486 - 571 -1,497 - 2,303 201 369 3,305 Isobutane/Isobutylene ................... 457 -9 398 - 422 -307 - 748 0 827 1,686 Other Liquids ..................................... 738 - 0 - 1,171 1,228 - 1,429 11 -759 26,014 Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates ..... 1,380 - 0 - 0 225 - 1,144 11 0 2,175 Unfinished Oils ..................................

262

table07.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

558 558 - 893 -73 1,935 -111 0 3,387 38 0 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ....... 283 89 116 - 9 -210 - 123 24 558 Pentanes Plus .................................. 37 - 1 - 17 7 - 25 15 9 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............. 246 89 115 - -8 -217 - 98 10 550 Ethane/Ethylene ........................... 94 0 (s) - -71 -4 - 0 0 26 Propane/Propylene ....................... 100 116 86 - 31 -155 - 0 3 485 Normal Butane/Butylene .............. 37 -27 16 - 18 -48 - 74 6 12 Isobutane/Isobutylene ................... 15 (s) 13 - 14 -10 - 24 0 27 Other Liquids .................................... 24 - 0 - 38 40 - 46 (s) -24 Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates .... 45 - 0 - 0 7 - 37 (s) 0 Unfinished Oils ................................. - - 0 - -4 17 - 3 0 -24 Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. .......... -21 - 0 - 42 16 - 6 (s) 0 Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. ....... - - 0 - 0 -1 - 1 0 0 Finished Petroleum Products .......... 71 3,648 9 - 646 154

263

table02.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. 2. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 1998 Crude Oil ............................................... 202,756 - 258,506 1,851 12,065 0 443,902 7,146 0 880,184 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ............ 55,963 15,419 7,378 - -15,412 - 14,810 2,118 77,244 79,784 Pentanes Plus .................................... 9,388 - 1,185 - 1,137 - 4,282 461 4,693 6,852 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ................ 46,575 15,419 6,193 - -16,549 - 10,528 1,657 72,551 72,932 Ethane/Ethylene ............................ 19,726 751 556 - -1,715 - 0 0 22,748 17,192 Propane/Propylene ........................ 16,528 16,343 4,241 - -9,623 - 0 904 45,831 34,422 Normal Butane/Butylene ................ 4,818 -2,023 880 - -5,547 - 7,256 753 1,213 12,826 Isobutane/Isobutylene .................... 5,503 348 516 - 336 - 3,272 0 2,759 8,492

264

TABLE27.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. 7. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD District, January 1998 Crude Oil a ....................................................................... 0 1,168 0 0 5,978 7,146 231 Natural Gas Liquids ...................................................... 24 752 885 6 451 2,118 68 Pentanes Plus ............................................................. 1 455 0 5 (s) 461 15 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ......................................... 24 297 885 (s) 450 1,657 53 Ethane/Ethylene ..................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Propane/Propylene ................................................. 20 96 637 (s) 149 904 29 Normal Butane/Butylene ......................................... 3 201 248 0 301 753 24 Isobutane/Isobutylene ............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Other Liquids ..................................................................

265

TABLE21.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Imports Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC .................................. 53,500 1,139 2,258 115 625 0 0 1,267 0 0 Algeria ...................................... 0 1,139 1,174 115 0 0 0 824 0 0 Iraq ........................................... 1,110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ....................................... 7,822 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia ............................. 44,568 0 1,084 0 625 0 0 443 0 0 Other OPEC ................................. 61,280 0 2,295 588 1,644 776 715 2,121 3 0 Indonesia .................................. 1,020 0 0 0 0 0 0 97 0 0 Nigeria ...................................... 19,360 0 0 0 0 0 0 166 0 0 Venezuela ................................. 40,900 0 2,295 588 1,644 776 715 1,858 3 0 Non OPEC ................................... 143,726 5,054 4,682 3,253 5,745 1,867

266

TABLE13.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. 3. PAD District V - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum (Thousand Barrels per Day) January 1998 Crude Oil ............................................ 2,165 - 440 154 -73 101 0 2,393 193 0 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ........ 93 43 (s) - 0 -51 - 98 15 75 Pentanes Plus ................................... 51 - 0 - 0 (s) - 42 (s) 9 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............. 42 43 (s) - 0 -51 - 56 15 66 Ethane/Ethylene ............................ (s) 0 0 - 0 0 - 0 0 (s) Propane/Propylene ....................... 12 47 (s) - 0 -26 - 0 5 80 Normal Butane/Butylene ............... 21 -8 0 - 0 -25 - 43 10 -15 Isobutane/Isobutylene ................... 10 5 0 - 0 (s) - 13 0 2 Other Liquids ..................................... 87 - 71 - 24 87 - 73 3 19 Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates ..... 109 - 28 - 0 14 - 121 3 0 Unfinished Oils ................................. - - 43 - 0 32 - -8 0 19 Motor

267

c007.chp:Corel VENTURA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

March March 1998 2 Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products by Grade, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons) Geographic Area Products October 1997 November 1997 December 1997 January 1998 February 1998 March 1998 Cumulative Year To Date 1997 Cumulative Year To Date 1998 Adjusted Year To Date % Change 1 United States Motor Gasoline ......................... 10,902,391 10,143,551 10,826,964 10,047,308 9,380,747 10,678,647 29,597,227 30,106,702 1.7 Regular .................................... 7,861,794 7,277,667 7,726,152 7,148,868 6,693,799 7,585,856 21,214,994 21,428,523 1.0 Conventional ........................... 5,189,145 4,682,550 4,963,896 4,563,601 4,300,943 4,987,963 14,015,431 13,852,507 -1.2 Oxygenated ............................ 275,585 359,994 386,009 365,693 317,923 248,437

268

c007.chp:Corel VENTURA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

January January 1998 2 Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products by Grade, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons) Geographic Area Products August 1997 September 1997 October 1997 November 1997 December 1997 January 1998 Cumulative Year To Date 1997 Cumulative Year To Date 1998 Adjusted Year To Date % Change 1 United States Motor Gasoline ......................... 11,104,799 10,295,602 10,902,391 10,143,551 10,826,964 10,054,359 9,875,179 10,054,359 1.8 Regular .................................... 7,974,380 7,441,944 7,861,794 7,277,667 7,726,152 7,155,537 7,071,855 7,155,537 1.2 Conventional ........................... 5,429,861 4,990,745 5,189,145 4,682,550 4,963,896 4,575,812 4,600,032 4,575,812 -0.5 Oxygenated ............................ 143,682 170,765 275,585 359,994 386,009 360,888

269

TABLE29.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9. 9. Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country, (Thousand Barrels per Day) January 1998 Arab OPEC .................................. 1,726 37 20 0 (s) 41 -3 (s) 296 391 2,116 Algeria ...................................... 0 37 0 0 0 27 0 0 252 316 316 Iraq ........................................... 36 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 36 Kuwait ....................................... 252 0 0 0 0 0 0 (s) (s) (s) 252 Qatar ........................................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (s) (s) (s) Saudi Arabia ............................. 1,438 0 20 0 (s) 14 0 (s) 43 78 1,515 United Arab Emirates ............... 0 0 0 0 (s) 0 -3 (s) (s) -3 -3 Other OPEC ................................. 1,977 (s) 52 25 14 68 -4 (s) 86 241 2,218 Indonesia .................................. 33 0 0 0 0 3 0 (s) (s) 3 36 Nigeria ...................................... 625 (s) 0 0 0 5 0 (s) 0 5 630 Venezuela

270

TABLE18.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8. 8. Refinery Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining Districts, January 1998 Crude Oil .................................................................... 14,835 511 15,346 8,591 1,779 2,386 12,756 Petroleum Products .................................................. 53,526 2,604 56,130 37,545 10,689 14,376 62,610 Pentanes Plus .......................................................... 0 0 0 4 209 225 438 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ...................................... 1,482 13 1,495 2,085 308 672 3,065 Ethane/Ethylene ................................................... 0 0 0 3 0 0 3 Propane/Propylene ............................................... 564 5 569 1,196 16 332 1,544 Normal Butane/Butylene ....................................... 584 6 590 608 205 232 1,045 Isobutane/Isobutylene ...........................................

271

TABLE20.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. 0. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD District, January 1998 Crude Oil a,b ................................................................... 53,357 48,515 139,013 3,980 13,641 258,506 8,339 Natural Gas Liquids ...................................................... 1,233 3,599 2,005 536 5 7,378 238 Pentanes Plus ............................................................ 0 42 1,031 112 0 1,185 38 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ........................................ 1,233 3,557 974 424 5 6,193 200 Ethane ................................................................... 0 0 544 0 0 544 18 Ethylene ................................................................. 0 12 0 0 0 12 (s) Propane ................................................................. 1,206 2,477 136 233 5 4,057 131 Propylene ...............................................................

272

TABLE28.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8. 8. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Destination, (Thousand Barrels) Destination Liquefied Finished Crude Pentanes Petroleum Motor Distillate Fuel Residual Oil a Plus Gases Gasoline Jet Fuel Kerosene Oil Fuel Oil January 1998 Argentina .............................................. 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 Australia ............................................... 0 0 (s) (s) 0 0 1 0 Bahama Islands ................................... 0 0 21 1 1 (s) 54 (s) Bahrain ................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Belgium & Luxembourg ........................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 Brazil .................................................... 0 0 (s) 0 82 0 150 0 Cameroon ............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Canada ................................................ 1,168 461 331 137 595 11 438 633 Chile .....................................................

273

TABLE31.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. 1. Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks of Selected Petroleum Products by PAD January 1998 PAD District I ........................................ 39,875 16,226 269 23,380 3,520 46,977 15,022 31,955 15,736 2,460 Connecticut ....................................... 1,625 1,625 0 0 131 4,252 999 3,253 70 W Delaware, D.C., Maryland ................. 2,413 1,906 0 507 169 2,677 869 1,808 2,331 W Florida ............................................... 6,051 0 0 6,051 115 2,063 1,131 932 1,009 55 Georgia ............................................. 2,118 0 0 2,118 46 1,125 701 424 97 W Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont ..... 869 536 0 333 333 1,847 583 1,264 618 W Massachusetts .................................. 1,359 1,359 0 0 175 3,157 570 2,587 508 W New Jersey ....................................... 8,106 5,929 0 2,177 508 13,443 3,320 10,123 5,715

274

TABLE25A.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

PAD PAD District V PAD District IV January 1998 Non OPEC .................................... 3,980 424 0 0 13 0 140 0 0 0 Canada ..................................... 3,980 424 0 0 13 0 140 0 0 0 Total .............................................. 3,980 424 0 0 13 0 140 0 0 0 Arab OPEC .................................. 2,409 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iraq ........................................... 1,110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ....................................... 1,299 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Other OPEC ................................. 1,614 0 363 0 0 0 0 97 0 0 Indonesia .................................. 1,020 0 0 0 0 0 0 97 0 0 Venezuela ................................. 594 0 363 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Non OPEC .................................... 9,618 5 972 0 13 475 22 0 0 0 Argentina .................................. 807 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Canada

275

TABLE33.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. 3. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline Between PAD Districts, January 1998 Crude Oil ........................................................ 0 433 157 978 772 0 58,118 Petroleum Products ...................................... 7,922 0 1,760 5,765 2,885 73,877 20,560 Pentanes Plus ............................................ 0 0 0 159 0 0 549 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ........................ 0 0 1,093 5,010 262 3,310 4,920 Motor Gasoline Blending Components ...... 0 0 1 0 0 0 1,310 Finished Motor Gasoline ............................ 5,162 0 438 502 897 38,620 7,634 Reformulated ......................................... 0 0 0 338 0 10,058 338 Oxygenated ........................................... 0 0 0 0 26 0 0 Other ...................................................... 5,162 0 438 164 871 28,562 7,296 Finished Aviation Gasoline

276

TABLE30.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

............. ............. 16,235 70,132 717,193 12,816 63,808 880,184 Refinery ......................................................................... 15,346 12,756 45,731 2,186 21,772 97,791 Tank Farms and Pipelines ............................................. 869 56,269 94,262 9,834 29,940 191,174 Leases ........................................................................... 20 1,107 13,770 796 961 16,654 Strategic Petroleum Reserve *a ...................................... 0 0 563,430 0 0 563,430 Alaskan In Transit .......................................................... 0 0 0 0 11,135 11,135 Total Stocks, All Oils (excluding Crude Oil) ...................... 172,408 157,248 244,587 18,844 96,499 689,586 Refinery ......................................................................... 56,130 62,610 139,080 13,137

277

vol2app.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

District District Descriptions and Maps The following are the Refining Districts which make up the Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) Dis- tricts. PAD District I East Coast: District of Columbia and the States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and the following counties of the State of New York: Cayuga, Tompkins, Chemung, and all counties east and north thereof. Also the following counties in the State of Penn- sylvania: Bradford, Sullivan, Columbia, Montour, North- umberland, Dauphin, York, and all counties east thereof. Appalachian No. 1: The State of West Virginia and those parts of the States of Pennsylvania and New York not included in the East Coast District. Sub-PAD District I New England: The States of Connecticut, Maine, Massa- chusetts,

278

c007.chp:Corel VENTURA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

October October 1998 2 Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products by Grade, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons) Geographic Area Products May 1998 June 1998 July 1998 August 1998 September 1998 October 1998 Cumulative Year To Date 1997 Cumulative Year To Date 1998 Adjusted Year To Date % Change 1 United States Motor Gasoline ......................... 11,050,072 11,122,985 11,574,440 11,361,574 10,756,677 11,205,440 104,699,055 107,767,006 2.9 Regular .................................... 7,880,019 7,944,320 8,207,736 8,034,715 7,610,549 7,928,191 75,005,479 76,598,726 2.1 Conventional ........................... 5,276,193 5,366,477 5,552,097 5,403,924 5,042,027 5,239,498 50,646,680 50,774,256 0.3 Oxygenated ............................ 185,744 196,783 186,843 181,571 248,076 303,759 1,957,702

279

TABLE19.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9. 9. Percent Refinery Yield of Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining Districts, a January 1998 Liquefied Refinery Gases ............................................ 1.2 -0.3 1.1 3.4 -0.4 1.9 2.6 Finished Motor Gasoline b ............................................ 49.1 39.8 48.6 51.6 54.9 50.0 51.7 Finished Aviation Gasoline c ........................................ 0.1 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.0 Naphtha-Type Jet Fuel ................................................ 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel .............................................. 6.3 1.2 6.0 6.4 7.8 6.1 6.5 Kerosene ..................................................................... 1.0 4.3 1.2 1.1 0.1 0.3 0.8 Distillate Fuel Oil ......................................................... 26.1 24.0 26.0 23.7 25.0 33.1 25.7 Residual Fuel Oil .........................................................

280

TABLE26.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6. 6. Imports of Residual Fuel Oil by Sulfur Content and by PAD District and State of Entry, January 1998 PAD District I ............................................................................................... 1,481 1,458 4,361 7,300 Delaware .................................................................................................. 0 0 305 305 Florida ...................................................................................................... 0 0 635 635 Maine ....................................................................................................... 67 0 215 282 Maryland .................................................................................................. 0 0 330 330 Massachusetts .........................................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulations chp combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

table05.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

27 27 - 1,721 -65 -3 170 0 1,511 0 0 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ....... 27 18 40 - 153 -28 - 8 1 257 Pentanes Plus .................................. 3 - 0 - 0 (s) - 0 (s) 2 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............. 24 18 40 - 153 -28 - 8 1 254 Ethane/Ethylene ............................ 8 0 0 - 0 0 - 0 0 8 Propane/Propylene ........................ 11 54 39 - 149 -8 - 0 1 261 Normal Butane/Butylene ............... 4 -27 1 - 3 -18 - 5 (s) -7 Isobutane/Isobutylene ................... 1 -9 0 - 0 -2 - 3 0 -8 Other Liquids .................................... -9 - 183 - 11 17 - 234 1 -67 Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates ..... 64 - 22 - 0 7 - 79 1 0 Unfinished Oils ................................. - - 34 - 0 -2 - 104 0 -68 Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. ........... -72 - 126 - 11 12 - 54 (s) 0 Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. ....... - - 0 - 0 1 - -2 0 1 Finished Petroleum Products .......... 76 1,798 771 - 2,918 -104 - - 63 5,603 Finished

282

TABLE14.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. 4. Production of Crude Oil by PAD District and State, January 1998 PAD District and State Total Daily Average (Thousand Barrels) PAD District I .......................................................................................... 824 27 Florida ................................................................................................. 523 17 New York ............................................................................................. 19 1 Pennsylvania ....................................................................................... 146 5 Virginia ................................................................................................. 1 (s) West Virginia ....................................................................................... 136 4 PAD District

283

TABLE23.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. 3. PAD District II-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ................................... 6,219 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ....................................... 1,253 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia ............................. 4,966 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Other OPEC .................................. 4,136 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Nigeria ...................................... 540 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela ................................. 3,596 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Non OPEC .................................... 38,160 3,557 0 0 76 0 107 19 0 18 Angola ....................................... 1,853 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Canada ..................................... 30,038 3,557 0 0 76 0 107 19 0 18 Colombia ................................... 1,777 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Ecuador .................................... 376 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Mexico .......................................

284

art0110.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

an an improvement in the accuracy of the 2000 data from good, to better, to best, for initial estimates to final values. These data were presented in a series of PD publications: the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report (WFR), the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM), and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Weekly estimates in the WPSR and WFR were the first values available. Figure FE1 illustrates that as reporting time increases from the weekly estimates to the interim monthly values to the final petroleum supply values, there is an improvement in the accuracy of the data. For the monthly-from-weekly (MFW) data, respondents have the shortest reporting time, and the data are least accurate but "good." For the PSM data, respondents have a longer reporting time than the weekly, and the data are more accurate or "better." For the PSA data, respondents

285

TABLE12.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. PAD District V-Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 1998 Crude Oil ... 67,121 - 13,641...

286

table04.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

4. PAD District I-Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 1998 Crude Oil ... 824 - 53,357 -2,000...

287

table02.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,569,770 Supply Disposition Commodity Unaccounted Field Refinery For Crude Stock Crude Refinery Products Ending Production Production Imports Oil a Change b Losses Inputs...

288

VOL2NOTE.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

companies report weekly data to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on crude oil and petro- leum product stocks, refinery inputs and production, and crude oil and...

289

TABLE30.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 0 0 0 0 11,135 11,135 Total Stocks, All Oils (excluding Crude Oil) ... 172,408 157,248 244,587 18,844 96,499 689,586 Refinery...

290

TABLE13.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commodity Imports by Unac- PAD counted Field Refinery District For Net Stock Crude Refinery Products Production Production of Entry a Crude Oil b Receipts Change c Losses...

291

TABLE11.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Commodity Imports by Unac- PAD counted Field Refinery District For Net Stock Crude Refinery Products Production Production of Entry a Crude Oil b Receipts Change c Losses...

292

table06.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of the Interior. Export data from the Bureau of the Census and Form EIA-810, "Monthly Refinery Report." 62 February 1998 Crude Oil ......

293

table07.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Commodity Imports by Unac- PAD counted Field Refinery District For Net Stock Crude Refinery Products Production Production of Entry a Crude Oil b Receipts Change c Losses...

294

TABLE18.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8. Refinery Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining Districts, January 1998 Crude Oil ......

295

table01.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

for crude oil represents the difference between the supply and disposition of crude oil. Refinery processing gain represents the volumetric amount by which total output is...

296

table10.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of the Interior. Export data from the Bureau of the Census and Form EIA-810, "Monthly Refinery Report." 110 February 1998 Crude Oil ......

297

TABLE16.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6. Refinery Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining Districts, January 1998 Crude Oil ......

298

table09.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Commodity Imports by Unac- PAD counted Field Refinery District For Net Stock Crude Refinery Products Production Production of Entry a Crude Oil b Receipts Change c Losses...

299

table05.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Commodity Imports by Unac- PAD counted Field Refinery District For Net Stock Crude Refinery Products Production Production of Entry a Crude Oil b Receipts Change c Losses...

300

table03.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

per Day) Supply Disposition Commodity Unaccounted Field Refinery For Crude Stock Crude Refinery Products Production Production Imports Oil a Change b Losses Inputs Exports...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulations chp combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

table08.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

of the Interior. Export data from the Bureau of the Census and Form EIA-810, "Monthly Refinery Report." 86 February 1998 Crude Oil ......

302

TABLE14.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

4. Production of Crude Oil by PAD District and State, January 1998 PAD District and State Total Daily Average (Thousand Barrels) PAD District I ......

303

TABLE17.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7. Refinery Net Production of Finished Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining Districts, January 1998 Liquefied Refinery Gases ... 576 -7...

304

TABLE15.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. Natural Gas Plant Net Production and Stocks of Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining PAD District I PAD District II Commodity East Appalachian Minn., Wis., Okla., Kans., Coast...

305

CHP in NYC: Obstacles and Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

goal a challenge. Dr. Hammer will also discuss other work taking place at his center related to microgrids, demand response, and buildings-related energy efficiency initiatives...

306

Putney Basketville Site Biomass CHP Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

publications. 25 5 Bioenergy Overview Biopower, or biomass power, is the use of biomass to generate electricity. Biopower system technologies include direct-firing,...

307

TABLE28.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

8. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Destination, (Thousand Barrels) Destination Liquefied Finished Crude Pentanes Petroleum Motor Distillate Fuel Residual Oil a Plus...

308

TABLE32.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between January 1998 Crude Oil ... 0 433 0 344...

309

TABLE20.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

0. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD District, January 1998 Crude Oil a,b ... 53,357 48,515 139,013...

310

TABLE24.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

4. PAD District III-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ... 38,701 294 2,258 0 0 0 0 443 0 0...

311

TABLE22.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2. PAD District I-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ... 6,171 845 0 115 625 0 0 824 0 0...

312

TABLE27.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD District, January 1998 Crude Oil a ... 0 1,168 0 0 5,978...

313

TABLE35.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Thousand Barrels) January 1998 Crude Oil ... 344 433 -89 62,087 2,094 59,993 Petroleum Products ......

314

TABLE33.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3. Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline Between PAD Districts, January 1998 Crude Oil ... 0 433 157 978...

315

TABLE23.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3. PAD District II-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ... 6,219 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait...

316

CHP/Cogeneration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cogeneration Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of CHPCogeneration Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCHPCogeneration&oldid267...

317

TABLE19.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9. Percent Refinery Yield of Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining Districts, a January 1998 Liquefied Refinery Gases ... 1.2 -0.3 1.1 3.4...

318

vol2app.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

District I East Coast: District of Columbia and the States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia,...

319

TABLE21.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

0 0 310 9 0 0 490 0 0 Japan ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Korea, Republic of ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Malaysia ......

320

TABLE29.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

-33 Japan ... -61 (s) 0 0 -2 -1 -46 -1 -12 -62 -123 Korea, Republic of ... -78 0 0 0 (s) 0 -13 (s) 1 -12 -90 Malaysia...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulations chp combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

TABLE25A.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Ecuador ... 2,007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Korea, Republic of ... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Malaysia ......

322

c007.chp:Corel VENTURA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Motor Gasoline ... 11,050,072 11,122,985 11,574,440 11,361,574 10,756,677 11,205,440 104,699,055 107,767,006 2.9 Regular ......

323

TABLE26.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6. Imports of Residual Fuel Oil by Sulfur Content and by PAD District and State of Entry, January 1998 PAD District I ......

324

c007.chp:Corel VENTURA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

February February 1999 2 Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products by Grade, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons) Geographic Area Products September 1998 October 1998 November 1998 December 1998 January 1999 February 1999 Cumulative Year To Date 1998 Cumulative Year To Date 1999 Adjusted Year To Date % Change 1 United States Motor Gasoline ......................... 10,756,677 11,218,355 10,469,445 11,107,600 9,938,105 9,708,621 19,428,055 19,646,726 1.1 Regular .................................... 7,610,549 7,930,901 7,354,578 7,765,179 6,900,227 6,769,190 13,842,667 13,669,417 -1.3 Conventional ........................... 5,042,027 5,215,578 4,741,242 5,010,689 4,376,908 4,333,263 8,864,544 8,710,171 -1.7 Oxygenated ............................ 248,076 329,621 385,740 407,637 395,832

325

c007.chp:Corel VENTURA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

July July 1998 2 Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products by Grade, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons) Geographic Area Products February 1998 March 1998 April 1998 May 1998 June 1998 July 1998 Cumulative Year To Date 1997 Cumulative Year To Date 1998 Adjusted Year To Date % Change 1 United States Motor Gasoline ......................... 9,380,747 10,656,802 10,610,961 11,050,072 11,122,985 11,601,316 72,564,234 74,470,191 2.6 Regular .................................... 6,693,799 7,568,368 7,582,161 7,880,019 7,944,320 8,229,697 51,879,866 53,047,232 2.3 Conventional ........................... 4,300,943 4,969,360 5,060,136 5,276,193 5,366,477 5,562,059 35,127,361 35,098,769 -0.1 Oxygenated ............................ 317,923 252,846 183,304 185,744 196,783 186,843 1,404,673 1,689,136

326

TABLE11.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. 1. PAD District IV-Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum (Thousand Barrels per Day) January 1998 Crude Oil ........................................... 356 - 204 52 -131 -1 0 483 0 0 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ........ 131 (s) 17 - -93 (s) - 19 (s) 35 Pentanes Plus .................................. 25 - 4 - -11 (s) - 5 (s) 12 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............. 106 (s) 14 - -82 (s) - 14 (s) 23 Ethane/Ethylene ........................... 31 0 0 - -41 0 - 0 0 -10 Propane/Propylene ....................... 48 9 8 - -23 -2 - 0 (s) 43 Normal Butane/Butylene ............... 18 -7 6 - -10 1 - 11 0 -5 Isobutane/Isobutylene ................... 9 -3 0 - -8 1 - 2 0 -4 Other Liquids .................................... 11 - 0 - 0 18 - -5 0 -2 Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates .... 3 - 0 - 0 -1 - 4 0 0 Unfinished Oils ................................. - - 0 - 0 3 - -1 0 -2 Motor Gasoline

327

TABLE12.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. 2. PAD District V-Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 1998 Crude Oil ............................................ 67,121 - 13,641 4,786 -2,251 3,132 0 74,187 5,978 0 63,808 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ........ 2,884 1,346 5 - 0 -1,591 - 3,038 451 2,337 3,315 Pentanes Plus ................................... 1,572 - 0 - 0 -1 - 1,293 (s) 280 23 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............. 1,312 1,346 5 - 0 -1,590 - 1,745 450 2,058 3,292 Ethane/Ethylene ............................ 2 0 0 - 0 0 - 0 0 2 0 Propane/Propylene ....................... 358 1,447 5 - 0 -805 - 0 149 2,466 1,676 Normal Butane/Butylene ............... 639 -241 0 - 0 -771 - 1,348 301 -480 1,111 Isobutane/Isobutylene ................... 313 140 0 - 0 -14 - 397 0 70 505 Other Liquids ..................................... 2,710 - 2,197 - 734 2,707 - 2,248 94 592 36,195 Other

328

table03.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. 3. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 1998 Crude Oil ............................................... 6,541 - 8,339 60 389 0 14,319 231 0 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ........... 1,805 497 238 - -497 - 478 68 2,492 Pentanes Plus .................................... 303 - 38 - 37 - 138 15 151 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ................ 1,502 497 200 - -534 - 340 53 2,340 Ethane/Ethylene ............................ 636 24 18 - -55 - 0 0 734 Propane/Propylene ........................ 533 527 137 - -310 - 0 29 1,478 Normal Butane/Butylene ............... 155 -65 28 - -179 - 234 24 39 Isobutane/Isobutylene ................... 178 11 17 - 11 - 106 0 89 Other Liquids ........................................ 285 - 476 - 244 - 564 69 -116 Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates ...... 369 - 51 - 33 - 337 50 0 Unfinished Oils ...................................

329

table08.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

106,453 106,453 - 157,490 -279 -53,603 7,143 0 202,918 0 0 717,193 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ........ 39,438 10,759 2,005 - -2,109 -6,438 - 7,105 885 48,541 46,872 Pentanes Plus .................................. 5,820 - 1,031 - -167 925 - 2,057 0 3,702 4,603 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............. 33,618 10,759 974 - -1,942 -7,363 - 5,048 885 44,839 42,269 Ethane/Ethylene ........................... 15,603 751 544 - 3,485 -1,605 - 0 0 21,988 14,111 Propane/Propylene ....................... 11,268 9,321 136 - -4,893 -3,707 - 0 637 18,902 15,091 Normal Butane/Butylene ............... 2,346 107 176 - -356 -2,748 - 3,088 248 1,685 7,266 Isobutane/Isobutylene ................... 4,401 580 118 - -178 697 - 1,960 0 2,264 5,801 Other Liquids .................................... 5,321 - 6,903 - -2,255 2,536 - 6,692 2,021 -1,280 65,913 Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates .... 4,613 - 22

330

TABLE35.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Thousand Thousand Barrels) January 1998 Crude Oil .................................................................. 344 433 -89 62,087 2,094 59,993 Petroleum Products ................................................ 103,659 8,121 95,538 34,597 13,141 21,456 Pentanes Plus ....................................................... 0 0 0 678 159 519 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ................................... 4,737 0 4,737 6,111 6,365 -254 Ethane/Ethylene ............................................... 0 0 0 773 2,988 -2,215 Propane/Propylene ........................................... 4,630 0 4,630 3,760 2,792 968 Normal Butane/Butylene ................................... 107 0 107 1,086 515 571 Isobutane/Isobutylene ...................................... 0 0 0 492 70 422 Unfinished Oils ......................................................

331

c007.chp:Corel VENTURA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

August August 1998 2 Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products by Grade, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons) Geographic Area Products March 1998 April 1998 May 1998 June 1998 July 1998 August 1998 Cumulative Year To Date 1997 Cumulative Year To Date 1998 Adjusted Year To Date % Change 1 United States Motor Gasoline ......................... 10,656,802 10,610,961 11,050,072 11,122,985 11,574,440 11,349,783 83,669,033 85,793,098 2.5 Regular .................................... 7,568,368 7,582,161 7,880,019 7,944,320 8,207,736 8,027,749 59,854,246 61,053,020 2.0 Conventional ........................... 4,969,360 5,060,136 5,276,193 5,366,477 5,552,097 5,395,647 40,557,222 40,484,454 -0.2 Oxygenated ............................ 252,846 183,304 185,744 196,783 186,843 180,846 1,548,355 1,869,982

332

TABLE31.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 1,284 0 0 1,284 W 717 585 132 W W North Dakota, South Dakota ... 714 0 1 713 W 654 368 286 W W Ohio ......

333

ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

a combined heat and power (CHP) system. CHP systems can recover and utilize heat from fuel cells, engines, turbines or microturbines to provide useful services such as cooling to...

334

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for CHP Application The proposed project will create a standardized 330 kWe combined heat and power (CHP) system that can be deployed to a large number of small industrial and...

335

Computation of the constrained infinite time linear quadratic regulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an efficient algorithm for computing the solution to the constrained infinite-time, linear quadratic regulator (CLQR) problem for discrete time systems. The algorithm combines multi-parametric quadratic programming with reachability ... Keywords: Constrained infinite horizon control, Invariant Set, Linear quadratic regulator, Model predictive control

Pascal Grieder; Francesco Borrelli; Fabio Torrisi; Manfred Morari

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

SOFC Technology R& D Needs Steven Shaffer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oxide fuel cell (SOFC) micro combined heat and power (CHP) system Vincenzo Liso*, Anders Christian February 2011 Accepted 11 April 2011 Available online 13 May 2011 Keywords: SOFC Micro CHP Thermal system fuel cell (SOFC) micro combined heat and power (CHP) system description and perspective Cogeneration

337

Regulators, Requirements, Statutes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulators, Requirements, Statutes Regulators, Requirements, Statutes Regulators, Requirements, Statutes The Laboratory must comply with environmental laws and regulations that apply to Laboratory operations. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Environmental laws and regulations LANL complies with more than 30 state and federal regulations and policies designed to protect human health and the environment. Regulators Regulators Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) EPA Homepage EPA - Region VI U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) DOE Homepage DOE Environmental Policy DOE Citizen's Advisory Board U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) Southwest Region 2 New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) NMED Homepage NMED DOE Oversight Office

338

New York State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New York New York State Regulations: New York State of New York The primary responsibility for regulating oil and gas activities within New York resides with the Bureau of Oil and Gas Regulation in the Division of Mineral Resources (Office of Natural Resources) of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC). Other offices and divisions within the NYSDEC administer the major environmental protection laws. Contact New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Division of Mineral Resources Bureau of Oil and Gas Regulation 625 Broadway, 3rd Floor Albany, NY 12233-6500 (518) 402-8056 (phone) (518) 402-8060 (fax) Disposal Practices and Applicable Regulations Environmental conservation rules and regulations are contained in Title 6 of the Official Compilation of Codes, Rules and Regulations of the State of New York (6 NYCRR). The rules and regulations for oil, gas and solution mining are provided in 6 NYCRR Parts 550-559.

339

Computer Use Regulation Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computer Use Regulation #12;Introduction · The following training materials will reference the contents of the Computer Use Regulations, but should not serve as a substitute for reading the actual responsibilities NCSU employees have under the regulations. · North Carolina State University's computer networks

Liu, Paul

340

Structural load combinations  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the latest results of the program entitled, ''Probability Based Load Combinations For Design of Category I Structures''. In FY 85, a probability-based reliability analysis method has been developed to evaluate safety of shear wall structures. The shear walls are analyzed using stick models with beam elements and may be subjected to dead load, live load and in-plane eqrthquake. Both shear and flexure limit states are defined analytically. The limit state probabilities can be evaluated on the basis of these limit states. Utilizing the reliability analysis method mentioned above, load combinations for the design of shear wall structures have been established. The proposed design criteria are in the load and resistance factor design (LRFD) format. In this study, the resistance factors for shear and flexure and load factors for dead and live loads are preassigned, while the load factor for SSE is determined for a specified target limit state probability of 1.0 x 10/sup -6/ or 1.0 x 10/sup -5/ during a lifetime of 40 years. 23 refs., 9 tabs.

Hwang, H.; Reich, M.; Ellingwood, B.; Shinozuka, M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulations chp combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Designing superior incentive regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discussion begun in the February 15 issue pointed out some potential drawbacks to popular incentive drawbacks to popular incentive regulation (IR) plans, as they operate in practice. The principal drawback is that the plans can create strong incentives for recontracting by well-intentioned regulators who face strong pressures to please their constituents. The likelihood of recontracting, in turn, can diminish the incentives for superior performance presented to the regulated firm. The question that remains is whether popular IR plans like price-cap regulation (PCR) can be modified to reduce the likelihood of recontracting, and thereby restore incentives for superior performance by the regulated firm. The answer is yes'.

Sappington, D.E.M.; Weisman, D.L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Surface Coal Mining Regulations (Mississippi) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Surface Coal Mining Regulations (Mississippi) Surface Coal Mining Regulations (Mississippi) Surface Coal Mining Regulations (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Utility Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality The Surface Coal Mining Regulations are a combination of permitting requirements and environmental regulations that limit how, where and when coal can be mined. It protects lands that are under special regulation due to their nature, and applies only to state lands. When applied to Coal with Carbon Capture and Storage projects the rules that would apply to a normal coal-mining project still apply. In addition to these measures, a CCS plant would need to adhere to all waste disposal requirements, water usage

343

Distributed energy resources customer adoption modeling with combined heat and power applications  

SciTech Connect

In this report, an economic model of customer adoption of distributed energy resources (DER) is developed. It covers progress on the DER project for the California Energy Commission (CEC) at Berkeley Lab during the period July 2001 through Dec 2002 in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Distributed Energy Resources Integration (DERI) project. CERTS has developed a specific paradigm of distributed energy deployment, the CERTS Microgrid (as described in Lasseter et al. 2002). The primary goal of CERTS distributed generation research is to solve the technical problems required to make the CERTS Microgrid a viable technology, and Berkeley Lab's contribution is to direct the technical research proceeding at CERTS partner sites towards the most productive engineering problems. The work reported herein is somewhat more widely applicable, so it will be described within the context of a generic microgrid (mGrid). Current work focuses on the implementation of combined heat and power (CHP) capability. A mGrid as generically defined for this work is a semiautonomous grouping of generating sources and end-use electrical loads and heat sinks that share heat and power. Equipment is clustered and operated for the benefit of its owners. Although it can function independently of the traditional power system, or macrogrid, the mGrid is usually interconnected and exchanges energy and possibly ancillary services with the macrogrid. In contrast to the traditional centralized paradigm, the design, implementation, operation, and expansion of the mGrid is meant to optimize the overall energy system requirements of participating customers rather than the objectives and requirements of the macrogrid.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Stadler, Michael; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Superconducting combined function magnets  

SciTech Connect

Superconducting accelerators and storage rings, presently under construction or in the design phase, are based on separate dipole and quadrupole magnets. It is here suggested that a hybrid lattice configuration consisting of dipoles and combined function gradient magnets would: (1) reduce the number of magnet units and their total cost; and (2) increase the filling factor and thus the energy at a given field. Coil cross sections are presented for the example of the Brookhaven Colliding Beam Accelerator. An asymmetric two-layer cable gradient magnet would have transfer functions of 10.42 G/A and 0.628 G cm/sup -1//A versus 15.77 G/A and 2.03 G cm/sup -1//A of the present separate dipoles and quadrupoles.

Hahn, H.; Fernow, R.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Combined Diagram: A Graphical Representation of Combination Evaporation Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combination methods estimate the partition of sensible and latent heat fluxes at the surface by combining the surface energy balance equation with the transfer equations for temperature and water vapor in the atmospheric surface layer. This paper ...

Ricardo C. Muoz

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Pressure reducing regulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure is disclosed. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes. 10 figs.

Whitehead, J.C.; Dilgard, L.W.

1995-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

347

Alabama State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State Regulations » Alabama State Regulations » Alabama State Regulations: Alabama State of Alabama The State Oil and Gas Board of Alabama, under the direction of the State Geologist and Oil and Gas Supervisor, is responsible for the regulation of oil and gas operations. The Board is divided into two administrative regions-north and south. The Board has broad authority in Alabama's oil and gas conservation statutes to promulgate and enforce rules and regulations to ensure the conservation and proper development of Alabama's petroleum resources. A major duty of the Board is to prevent pollution of fresh water supplies by oil, gas, salt water, or other contaminants resulting from oil and gas operations. The Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) administers the major federal environmental protection laws through regulations governing air pollution, water quality and supply, solid and hazardous waste management.

348

Biomass Gasification Combined Cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gasification combined cycle continues to represent an important defining technology area for the forest products industry. The ''Forest Products Gasification Initiative'', organized under the Industry's Agenda 2020 technology vision and supported by the DOE ''Industries of the Future'' program, is well positioned to guide these technologies to commercial success within a five-to ten-year timeframe given supportive federal budgets and public policy. Commercial success will result in significant environmental and renewable energy goals that are shared by the Industry and the Nation. The Battelle/FERCO LIVG technology, which is the technology of choice for the application reported here, remains of high interest due to characteristics that make it well suited for integration with the infrastructure of a pulp production facility. The capital cost, operating economics and long-term demonstration of this technology area key input to future economically sustainable projects and must be verified by the 200 BDT/day demonstration facility currently operating in Burlington, Vermont. The New Bern application that was the initial objective of this project is not currently economically viable and will not be implemented at this time due to several changes at and around the mill which have occurred since the inception of the project in 1995. The analysis shows that for this technology, and likely other gasification technologies as well, the first few installations will require unique circumstances, or supportive public policies, or both to attract host sites and investors.

Judith A. Kieffer

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Regulation of natural monopolies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This chapter provides a comprehensive overview of the theoretical and empirical literature on the regulation of natural monopolies. It covers alternative definitions of natural monopoly, regulatory goals, alternative ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Florida State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to conserve the state's oil and gas resources and minimize environmental impacts from exploration and production operations through regulation and inspection activities. The...

351

Louisiana State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Natural Resources (DNR), Office of Conservation (OC), is tasked with regulating the exploration and production of oil, gas, and other hydrocarbons, as well as protecting...

352

West Virginia State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protection (DEP) is responsible for monitoring and regulating all actions related to the exploration, drilling, storage, and production of oil and natural gas. The DEP, through...

353

Uniform Laws and Regulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Page 2. Uniform Laws and Regulations in the areas of legal metrology and engine fuel quality as adopted by the ...

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

354

Nuclear Regulation (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute establishes a regulatory program for sources of ionizing radiation, to be administered by the Montana Department of Health and Human Services. These regulations address permitting and...

355

Uniform Laws and Regulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Uniform Laws and Regulations in the areas of legal metrology and engine fuel quality as adopted by the 96th National Conference on ...

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

356

Utah State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Disposal). The DEQ administers Utah's environmental rules. Underground Disposal of Drilling Fluids (R649-3-25). The regulation allows injection of reserve pit drilling...

357

WIPP Documents - Federal Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Regulations 40 CFR Part 191 Environmental radiation protection standards for management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel, high-level and transuranic radioactive wastes....

358

Tidal Wetlands Regulations (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Most activities occurring in or near tidal wetlands are regulated, and this section contains information on such activities and required permit applications for proposed activities. Applications...

359

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://eetd.lbl.gov/EA/EMP/emp-pubs.html The work described in this report was funded by the California Energy Commission, Public Interest Energy owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by its trade name examine how this sector might implement DG with CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt

360

An Engineering-Economic Analysis of Combined Heat and Power Technologies in a Grid Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of increased overall conversion efficiency. First, carbon emissions from power plants and generators would be reduced. Second, the environmental problem of disposing of power plant waste heat into the environment of heat using conventional separate heat and power. For typical electrical and thermal efficiencies, CHP

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulations chp combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the importance of grid carbon intensity. Natural-gas-fired CHP is GHG preferable to grid power only when supply projection, in-state and imports Natural gas plants providing power to California are a mix ....................................................................................................................... 12 Table 7. 2020 forecasts of California electricity and natural gas prices

362

Regulators warned in adopting incentive regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Illinois Commerce Commission economist warns that regulators should be cautious about adopting incentive regulations, which are risky to consumers because of the inaccurate cost-efficiency measurement, faulty program design, and difficulties in program evaluation. The biggest problem with existing incentive programs is that they don't always produce lower rates in the long term. Properly designed and implemented, however, the programs can benefit both ratepayers and utilities. Programs which penalize bad performance without rewarding the good can cause problems. The authors outlines common characteristics of the program and recommends several incentive options.

Not Available

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Visions on Energy Production Technologies for Finland up to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1% 14% 16% 28% 1.2-1.5 CHP products District heat Back pressure turbine Combined cycle plants Micro-plants (microturbine, fuel cell,..) Heat storage Cold storage Hydrogen storage Clean water District cooling Hydrogen The share of district heating CHP electricity in Finland The share of total CHP electricity in Finland

364

Technical Plan --Market Transformation Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page 3.9 -1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat and power [CHP] and combined heat, hydrogen and power [CHHP]), energy storage renewable grid power.S. Environmental Protection Agency, "Catalog of CHP Technologies" (December 2008) (http://www.epa.gov/chp, Development and Demonstration Plan · Develop and launch energy efficiency and reliability certification

365

Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

美国能源部(DOE) 美国能源部(DOE) 工业技术项目(ITP) 工业分布式能源: 热电联产 (CHP) Richard Sweetser 高级顾问 美国能源部大西洋中西部清洁能源应用中心 2011年5月5-6日|劳伦斯伯克利国家实验室,伯克利市,加州 32% 利用高效的能源管理措施和新兴节 能技术帮助工厂节能 促进热电联产和其他分布式能源 解决方案的广泛商用 10% 制造业 能源系统 33% 未来新兴产业 研发工作,主要针对美国高能耗产 业中最重要的领域以及跨行业中可 应用到多个工业领域的生产活动 25% 工业分布式能源 工业技术

366

Energy Department Turns Up the Heat and Power on Industrial Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency and Renewable Energy What is Combined Heat and Power? Often called cogeneration or CHP, a combined heat and power system provides both electric power and thermal...

367

Federal Energy Management Program: Distributed Energy Resources...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distributed Energy Resources and Combined Heat and Power Distributed energy resources (DER) and combined heat and power (CHP) systems help Federal agencies meet increased demand,...

368

Indiana State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indiana Indiana State Regulations: Indiana State of Indiana The Indiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Division of Oil and Gas regulates petroleum exploration, production, and site abandonment activities, underground injection control, test hole drilling, and geophysical surveying operations. Otherwise, the Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) administers the major environmental protection laws. Contact Division of Oil and Gas (Indianapolis Central Office) 402 West Washington Street, Room 293 Indianapolis, IN 46204 (317) 232-4055 (phone) (317) 232-1550 (fax) (Division Contacts) Indiana Department of Environmental Management P.O. Box 6015 Indianapolis, IN 46206-6015 (317) 232-8603 (phone) (317) 233-6647 (fax) Disposal Practices and Applicable Regulations

369

North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade North America: Regulation of International Electricity...

370

Collaborative National Program for the Development and Performance Testing of Distributed Power Technologies with Emphasis on Combined Heat and Power Applications  

SciTech Connect

A current barrier to public acceptance of distributed generation (DG) and combined heat and power (CHP) technologies is the lack of credible and uniform information regarding system performance. Under a cooperative agreement, the Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI) and the U.S. Department of Energy have developed four performance testing protocols to provide a uniform basis for comparison of systems. The protocols are for laboratory testing, field testing, long-term monitoring and case studies. They have been reviewed by a Stakeholder Advisory Committee made up of industry, public interest, end-user, and research community representatives. The types of systems covered include small turbines, reciprocating engines (including Stirling Cycle), and microturbines. The protocols are available for public use and the resulting data is publicly available in an online national database and two linked databases with further data from New York State. The protocols are interim pending comments and other feedback from users. Final protocols will be available in 2007. The interim protocols and the national database of operating systems can be accessed at www.dgdata.org. The project has entered Phase 2 in which protocols for fuel cell applications will be developed and the national and New York databases will continue to be maintained and populated.

Soinski, Arthur; Hanson, Mark

2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

371

Interviewee Travel Regulations Scope  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3/2012 3/2012 Interviewee Travel Regulations Scope These regulations apply to the reimbursement of round-trip travel expenses incurred by interviewees. These regulations do not apply to applicants who live within a 50-mile radius of Los Alamos based on the Rand McNally Standard Highway Mileage Guide. Reimbursement With the exception of airfare, interviewees will be reimbursed for travel expenses according to Federal travel regulations. For interviewees, airfare reimbursement is limited to the lesser of the standard coach airfare or the actual amount paid. The lowest available airfare should be obtained based on the official business dates and locations. The reimbursement amount will be based on the most direct route available between the interviewee's residence and the laboratory. Costs incurred over the lowest available fare will be the

372

New Mexico State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Mexico New Mexico State Regulations: New Mexico State of New Mexico The Oil Conservation Division (OCD) in the New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department regulates oil and gas and geothermal operations in New Mexico. The OCD has the responsibility to gather oil and gas production data, permit new wells, establish pool rules and oil and gas allowables, issue discharge permits, enforce rules and regulations of the division, monitor underground injection wells and ensure that abandoned wells are properly plugged and the land is responsibly restored. Otherwise, the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) administers the major environmental protection laws. The Water Quality Control Commission (WQCC), which is administratively attached to the NMED, assigns responsibility for administering its regulations to constituent agencies, including the OCD.

373

GUIDANCE REGARDING NEPA REGULATIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

This memorandum was published in the Federal Register and appears at 48 Fed. Reg. 34263 (1983). Ed. Note] This memorandum was published in the Federal Register and appears at 48 Fed. Reg. 34263 (1983). Ed. Note] GUIDANCE REGARDING NEPA REGULATIONS 40 CFR Part 1500 Executive Office of the President Council on Environmental Quality 722 Jackson Place, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20006 July 22, 1983 Memorandum For: Heads of Federal Agencies From: A. Alan Hill, Chairman Re: Guidance Regarding NEPA Regulations The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) were issued on November 29, 1978. These regulations became effective for, and binding upon, most federal agencies on July 30, 1979, and for all remaining federal agencies on November 30, 1979. As part of the Council's NEPA oversight responsibilities it solicited through an August 14,

374

Virginia State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Virginia Virginia State Regulations: Virginia State of Virginia The Division of Gas and Oil in the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy (DMME) regulates the effects of gas and oil operations both on and below the surface. The Virginia Gas and Oil Board is to foster, encourage, and promote the safe and efficient exploration for and development, production, and utilization of gas and oil resources. Otherwise, three regulatory citizen boards are responsible for adopting Virginia 's environmental regulations. The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) staff administers the regulations as approved by the boards. Finally, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 3, through its Water Protection Division, administers Class II underground injection control (UIC) programs in Virginia in direct implementation.

375

Sulfur Dioxide Regulations (Ohio)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides sulfur dioxide emission limits for every county, as well as regulations for the emission, monitoring and...

376

Montana State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Montana State Regulations: Montana State of Montana The Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation (MBOGC) is a quasi-judicial body that is attached to the Department of Natural...

377

Combination moisture and hydrogen getter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (i) a solid acetylenic compound and (ii) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the resultant hydrogen.

Harrah, Larry A. (Albuquerque, NM); Mead, Keith E. (Peralta, NM); Smith, Henry M. (Overland Park, KS)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Designing superior incentive regulation  

SciTech Connect

The key to success in designing effective incentive regulation is relatively simple: Anticipate all of the incentives that will ultimately come to bear, and structure regulatory policy in advance to limit any adverse incentives. All is a critical word here. Attention commonly is focused on the incentives a proposed regulatory plan creates for the regulated firm to minimize production costs, diversify into new markets, and so on. While the incentives are important in assessing a regulatory plan, they are only one consideration. It is also critical to analyze the incentives the plan creates for other key players in the regulatory arena, particularly regulators. It is premature to draw any broad conclusions about the success of incentive regulation in the electric power and natural gas industries. While there is reason for optimism, concern remain. Some incentive regulation plans have been abandoned, in part because of: (1) unforeseen exogenous event that could not be administered within the confines of the plan; (2) public opposition to rewarding a utility for the superior performance it should have realized without the promise of financial reward; (3) adverse reaction to utility earnings in excess of those commonly authorized under traditional regulation, and (4) questions about the legality of the plans under state statutes.

Sappington, D.E.M.; Weisman, D.L.

1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Helping in collaborative activity regulation: modeling regulation scenarii  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The regulation was introduced into groupware in order to improve the actors collaboration. In our context, the regulation means the ability given to a group or a person that manages a group. This paper describes an approach of setting up about this regulation ... Keywords: XML, groupware, regulation, scenario

Stphane Talbot; Philippe Pernelle

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Wyoming State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wyoming Wyoming State Regulations: Wyoming State of Wyoming The Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (WOGCC) is the state agency authorized to regulate oil and gas exploration and production waste. The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) administers general environmental protection regulations. Contact Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission 2211 King Blvd. Casper, WY 82602 (street address) P.O. Box 2640 Casper, WY 82602 (mailing address) (307) 234-7147 (phone) (307) 234-5306 (fax) Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality 122 West 25th Street, Herscheler Building Cheyenne, WY 82002 (307) 777-7937 (phone) (307) 777-7682 (fax) Disposal Practices and Applicable Regulations Document # 4855, Agency (Oil and Gas Conservation Commission), General Agency, Board or Commission Rules, Chapter 4 (Environmental Rules, Including Underground Injection Control Program Rules for Enhanced Recovery and Disposal Projects), Section 1. Pollution and Surface Damage (Forms 14A and 14B) of the Wyoming Rules and Regulations contains the environmental rules administered by the WOGCC with respect to management options for exploration and production waste.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulations chp combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Autonomous grain combine control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for controlling a grain combine having a rotor/cylinder, a sieve, a fan, a concave, a feeder, a header, an engine, and a control system. The feeder of the grain combine is engaged and the header is lowered. A separator loss target, engine load target, and a sieve loss target are selected. Grain is harvested with the lowered header passing the grain through the engaged feeder. Separator loss, sieve loss, engine load and ground speed of the grain combine are continuously monitored during the harvesting. If the monitored separator loss exceeds the selected separator loss target, the speed of the rotor/cylinder, the concave setting, the engine load target, or a combination thereof is adjusted. If the monitored sieve loss exceeds the selected sieve loss target, the speed of the fan, the size of the sieve openings, or the engine load target is adjusted.

Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Lucas, James R.; Prickel, Marvin A.

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

382

Michigan State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Michigan Michigan State Regulations: Michigan State of Michigan The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), through the Supervisor of Wells, Geological and Land Management Division (GLM), oversees the regulation of oil and gas activities. DEQ staff monitors the environmental impacts of well drilling operations, oil and gas production facilities, and gas storage wells. Contact Michigan Department of Environmental Quality Geological and Land Management Division P.O. Box 30256 Lansing, MI 48909-7756 (517) 241-1515 (phone) (517) 241-1601 (fax) (Organization Chart) Disposal Practices and Applicable Regulations The rules governing oil and gas operations are contained in Part 615, Rules 324.101-324.1301 (Department of Environmental Quality, Oil and Gas Operations) of the Michigan Administrative Code.

383

Nuclear regulation and safety  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear regulation and safety are discussed from the standpoint of a hypothetical country that is in the process of introducing a nuclear power industry and setting up a regulatory system. The national policy is assumed to be in favor of nuclear power. The regulators will have responsibility for economic, reliable electric production as well as for safety. Reactor safety is divided into three parts: shut it down, keep it covered, take out the afterheat. Emergency plans also have to be provided. Ways of keeping the core covered with water are discussed. (DLC)

Hendrie, J.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power Information about the Department of Energy's Industrial Technologies...

385

Related Links | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Related Links Related Links Related Links November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis Need additional help or more information? DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) provide local, individualized solutions to customers on specific combined heat and power (CHP) projects. Partners of DOE's CHP Program include federal and state agencies, non-governmental organizations, international entities, private clean energy companies, technology developers, and commercial builders and developers. Partners American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) CHP Association International District Energy Association (IDEA) International Energy Agency (IEA) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA)

386

Emotion Regulation CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in emotion and emotion regulation. 3 This is a chapter excerpt from Guilford Publications. Handbook a fundamental role in the develop- ment of emotion, particularly in infancy and early childhood. Third the interaction of external and intrinsic influences. FUNDAMENTAL QUESTIONS AND DIRECTIONS FOR FUTURE INQUIRY

Gross, James J.

387

Stability issues in IC Low Drop Out voltage regulators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance issues of IC Low Drop Out (LDO) voltage regulators, with specific reference to stability, are discussed in this thesis. Evaluation of existing frequency compensation schemes and their performances across operating loads is presented. The problem of instability of the LDO voltage regulator at low Electo Static Resistance (ESR) of the load capacitors and the consequences of this problem are highlighted. As a solution to some of the discussed problems, an alternate LDO voltage regulator topology that is stable with low Electro Static Resistance (ESR) capacitive loads is presented. The proposed scheme, instead of relying on the zero generated by the load capacitor and its ESR combination for stability, generates a zero internally. The LDO voltage regulator is implemented and fabricated in AMI 0.5mm CMOS technology through MOSIS service. It is demonstrated that this scheme realizes robust frequency compensation, facilitates use of Multi Layer Ceramic Capacitors (MLCC) for load of LDO regulators, and improves transient response and noise performance. Test results from the prototype provide an evaluation of the most important parameters of the regulator: ground current, load regulation, line regulation, output noise and start-up time.

Chava, Krishna Chaitanya

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Understanding the Impact of Large-Scale Penetration of Micro Combined Heat & Power Technologies within Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

increase with the incorporation of additional features such as a hot water storage unit integrated ........................................................................................................ 30 FIGURE 2.2.4: FUEL CELL BASIC OPERATION............................................................................................................ 32 FIGURE 3.1.1: RESIDENTIAL HEATING & ELECTRIC SYSTEM USING A MICRO-CHP UNIT UNDER A HOT

Rudnick, Hugh

389

A primer on incentive regulation for electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

In contemplating a regulatory approach, the challenge for regulators is to develop a model that provides incentives for utilities to engage in socially desirable behavior. In this primer, we provide guidance on this process by discussing (1) various models of economic regulation, (2) problems implementing these models, and (3) the types of incentives that various models of regulation provide electric utilities. We address five regulatory models in depth. They include cost-of-service regulation in which prudently incurred costs are reflected dollar-for-dollar in rates and four performance-based models: (1) price-cap regulation, in which ceilings are placed on the average price that a utility can charge its customers; (2) revenue-cap regulation, in which a ceiling is placed on revenues; (3) rate-of-return bandwidth regulation, in which a utility`s rates are adjusted if earnings fall outside a {open_quotes}band{close_quotes} around equity returns; and (4) targeted incentives, in which a utility is given incentives to improve specific components of its operations. The primary difference between cost-of-service and performance-based approaches is the latter sever the tie between costs and prices. A sixth, {open_quotes}mixed approach{close_quotes} combines two or more of the five basic ones. In the recent past, a common mixed approach has been to combine targeted incentives with cost-of-service regulation. A common example is utilities that are subject to cost-of-service regulation are given added incentives to increase the efficiency of troubled electric-generating units.

Hill, L.J.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Combining optical spectroscopy and interferometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern optical spectrographs and optical interferometers push the limits in the spectral and spatial regime, providing important new tools for the exploration of the universe. In this contribution I outline the complementary nature of spectroscopic & interferometric observations and discuss different strategies for combining such data. Most remarkable, the latest generation of "spectro-interferometric" instruments combine the milliarcsecond angular resolution achievable with interferometry with spectral capabilities, enabling direct constraints on the distribution, density, kinematics, and ionization structure of the gas component in protoplanetary disks. I will present some selected studies from the field of star- & planet formation and hot star research in order to illustrate these fundamentally new observational opportunities.

Kraus, Stefan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

H gas turbine combined cycle  

SciTech Connect

A major step has been taken in the development of the Next Power Generation System--``H`` Technology Combined Cycle. This new gas turbine combined-cycle system increases thermal performance to the 60% level by increasing gas turbine operating temperature to 1,430 C (2,600 F) at a pressure ratio of 23 to 1. Although this represents a significant increase in operating temperature for the gas turbine, the potential for single digit NOx levels (based upon 15% O{sub 2}, in the exhaust) has been retained. The combined effect of performance increase and environmental control is achieved by an innovative closed loop steam cooling system which tightly integrates the gas turbine and steam turbine cycles. The ``H`` Gas Turbine Combined Cycle System meets the goals and objectives of the DOE Advanced Turbine System Program. The development and demonstration of this new system is being carried out as part of the Industrial/Government cooperative agreement under the ATS Program. This program will achieve first commercial operation of this new system before the end of the century.

Corman, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

392

The combined Lagrangian advection method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present and test a new hybrid numerical method for simulating layerwise-two-dimensional geophysical flows. The method radically extends the original Contour-Advective Semi-Lagrangian (CASL) algorithm [5] by combining three computational elements for ... Keywords: Contour advection, Pseudo-spectral, Two-dimensional turbulence, Vortex methods

David G. Dritschel; Jrme Fontane

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

ELECTRON EMISSION REGULATING MEANS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

>An electronic regulating system is described for controlling the electron emission of a cathode, for example, the cathode in a mass spectrometer. The system incorporates a transformer having a first secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding load by grid controlled vacuum tubes. A portion of the electron current emitted by the cathode is passed through a network which develops a feedback signal. The system arrangement is completed by using the feedback signal to control the vacuum tubes in the second secondary winding through a regulator tube. When a change in cathode emission occurs, the feedback signal acts to correct this change by adjusting the load on the transformer.

Brenholdt, I.R.

1957-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

394

California State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

California California State Regulations: California State of California The California Department of Conservation's Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources oversees the drilling, operation, maintenance, and plugging and abandonment of oil, natural gas, and geothermal wells. The regulatory program emphasizes the development of oil, natural gas, and geothermal resources in the state through sound engineering practices that protect the environment, prevent pollution, and ensure public safety. Other agencies that may be involved in the regulation of drilling wastes include the State Water Resources Control Board and appropriate Regional Water Quality Control Boards, the California Integrated Waste Management Board, the California Air Resources Board and appropriate Air Quality Management Districts or Air Pollution Control Districts, and the Department of Toxic Substances Control.

395

North Dakota State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North Dakota North Dakota State Regulations: North Dakota State of North Dakota The North Dakota Industrial Commission (NDIC), through its Oil and Gas Division (OGD), is the regulatory agency for oil and gas exploration and production activities in North Dakota. The North Dakota Department of Health (NDDH) Environmental Health Section (EHS) has the responsibility to safeguard the quality of North Dakota's air, land, and water resources. Contact North Dakota Industrial Commission Oil and Gas Division 600 East Boulevard Avenue, Dept. 405 Bismarck, ND 58505-0840 (701) 328-8020 (phone) (701) 328-8022 (fax) North Dakota Department of Health Environmental Health Section 1200 Missouri Avenue P.O. Box 5520 Bismarck, ND 58506-5520 (701) 328-5150 (phone) (701) 328-5200 (fax) Disposal Practices and Applicable Regulations

396

Nevada State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nevada Nevada State Regulations: Nevada State of Nevada The Nevada Division of Minerals (Nevada Commission of Mineral Resources) administers programs and activities to further the responsible development and production of Nevada's mineral resources, including the regulation of oil- and gas-well drilling operations. Otherwise, the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (Nevada Department of Conservation and Mineral Resources) administers the major environmental protection laws. Contact Nevada Division of Minerals (Carson City Office) 400 West King Street, Suite 106 Carson City, NV 89703 (775) 684-7040 (phone) (775) 684-7052 (fax) (Las Vegas Office) 2030 East Flamingo Road, Suite 220 Las Vegas, NV 89119 (702) 486-4343 (phone) (702) 486-4345 (fax) Nevada Division of Environmental Protection

397

Colorado State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Colorado Colorado State Regulations: Colorado State of Colorado The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC), a division of the Department of Natural Resources (DNR), regulates oil and gas activities in Colorado. The COGCC has broad statutory authority with respect to impacts on any air, water, soil, or biological resources resulting from oil and gas operations. The COGCC implements the state ground water standards and classifications as they relate to oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) activities. The COGCC has jurisdiction for all Class II injection wells except those on Indian lands. The COGCC has jurisdiction for the management of all E&P wastes except at commercial disposal facilities. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) administers the environmental protection laws related to air quality, waste discharge to surface water, and commercial disposal facilities.

398

Kansas State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kansas Kansas State Regulations: Kansas State of Kansas The Kansas Corporation Commission (KCC) Conservation Division regulates oil and gas operations and protects correlative rights and environmental resources. Otherwise, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) administers the major environmental protection laws. Contact Kansas Corporation Commission (Main Office) 1500 S.W. Arrowhead Road Topeka, KS 66604-2425 (785) 271-3100 (phone) (785) 271-3354 (fax) Conservation Division Finney State Office Building 130 South Market, Room 2078 Wichita, KS 67202-3802 (316) 337-6200 (phone) (316) 337-6211 (fax) Kansas Department of Health and Environment Charles Curtis State Office Building 1000 S.W. Jackson Topeka, KS 66612 (785) 296-1500 (phone) (785) 368-6368 (fax)

399

Oklahoma State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oklahoma Oklahoma State Regulations: Oklahoma State of Oklahoma The Oklahoma Corporation Commission (OCC), through the Oil and Gas Division, assists the domestic oil and gas industry, protects and preserves the environment, and conserves the natural resources. General environmental protection regulations are administered by the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). Contact Oklahoma Corporation Commission Oil and Gas Division P.O. Box 52000 Oklahoma City, OK 73152-2000 (mailing address) (405) 521-2302 (phone) 2101 North Lincoln Blvd. Oklahoma City, OK 73105 (street address) Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality P.O. Box 1677 Oklahoma City, OK 73101-1677 (mailing address) 707 North Robinson Oklahoma City, OK 73102 (street address) (405) 702-1000 (phone)

400

A regulated magnetron pulser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes and analysis of a 4.5-kV, 500-mA, regulated current pulser used to drive a Hitachi ZM130 magnetron in a particle-accelerator injector. In this application, precise beam from the injector. A high-voltage triode vacuum tube with active feedback is used to control the magnetron current. Current regulation and accuracy is better than 1%. The pulse width may be varied from as little as 5 {mu}m to cw by varying the width of a gate pulse. The current level can be programmed between 10 and 500 mA. Design of the pulser including circuit simulations, power calculations, and high-voltage issues are discussed.

Rose, C.R.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulations chp combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

REGULATING HAWAII'S PETROLEUM INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was prepared in response to House Resolution No. 174, H.D. 2, which was adopted during the Regular Session of 1995. The Resolution requested the Legislative Reference Bureau to conduct a study to obtain the views of selected state agencies and representatives of Hawaii's petroleum industry in order to assist the Legislature in formulating policies that protect the interests of Hawaii's gasoline consumers. The Resolution sought information and the views of survey participants on a broad range of proposals to regulate Hawaii's petroleum industry. This study reviews each of these proposals in terms of their value to consumers, and explores both regulatory policy options and alternatives to regulation available to state lawmakers. The Bureau extends its sincere appreciation to all those whose participation and cooperation made this study possible. A list of contact persons, including the names of survey participants and others who helped to contribute to this study, is contained in Appendix B.

Mark J. Rosen; Wendell K. Kimura

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Regulation of Meiotic Recombination  

SciTech Connect

Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system for assaying recombination using tetrad analysis in a higher eukaryotic system (6). This system enabled the measurement of the frequency and distribution of recombination events at a genome wide level in wild type Arabidopsis (7), construction of genetic linkage maps which include positions for each centromere (8), and modeling of the strength and pattern of interference (9). This proposal extends the use of tetrad analysis in Arabidopsis by using it as the basis for assessing the phenotypes of mutants in genes important for recombination and the regulation of crossover interference and performing a novel genetic screen. In addition to broadening our knowledge of a classic genetic problem - the regulation of recombination by crossover interference - this proposal also provides broader impact by: generating pedagogical tools for use in hands-on classroom experience with genetics, building interdisciplinary collegial partnerships, and creating a platform for participation by junior scientists from underrepresented groups. There are three specific aims: (1) Isolate mutants in Arabidopsis MUS81 homologs using T-DNA and TILLING (2) Characterize recombination levels and interference in mus81 mutants (3) Execute a novel genetic screen, based on tetrad analysis, for genes that regulate meiotic recombination

Gregory p. Copenhaver

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

403

Federal Regulations: BOEM and BSEE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

development and enforcement of safety and environmental regulations, permitting offshore exploration, development and production, inspections, offshore regulatory programs, oil...

404

Computing Borel's Regulator II.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In our earlier article we described a power series formula for the Borel regulator evaluated on the odd-dimensional homology of the general linear group of a number field and, concentrating on dimension three for simplicity, described a computer algorithm which calculates the value to any chosen degree of accuracy. In this sequel we give an algorithm for the construction of the input homology classes and describe the results of one cyclotomic field computation.

Zacky Choo; Wajid Mannan; Rubn J. Snchez-Garca; Victor P. Snaith

405

Improving CS regulations.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

President Carter issued Executive Order 12044 (3/28/78) that required all Federal agencies to distinguish between significant and insignificant regulations, and to determine whether a regulation will result in major impacts. This study gathered information on the impact of the order and the guidelines on the Office of Conservation and Solar Energy (CS) regulatory practices, investigated problems encountered by the CS staff when implementing the order and guidelines, and recommended solutions to resolve these problems. Major tasks accomplished and discussed are: (1) legislation, Executive Orders, and DOE Memoranda concerning Federal administrative procedures relevant to the development and analysis of regulations within CS reviewed; (2) relevant DOE Orders and Memoranda analyzed and key DOE and CS staff interviewed in order to accurately describe the current CS regulatory process; (3) DOE staff from the Office of the General Counsel, the Office of Policy and Evaluation, the Office of the Environment, and the Office of the Secretary interviewed to explore issues and problems encountered with current CS regulatory practices; (4) the regulatory processes at five other Federal agencies reviewed in order to see how other agencies have approached the regulatory process, dealt with specific regulatory problems, and responded to the Executive Order; and (5) based on the results of the preceding four tasks, recommendations for potential solutions to the CS regulatory problems developed. (MCW)

Nesse, R.J.; Scheer, R.M.; Marasco, A.L.; Furey, R.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Policy and Regulations | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy and Regulations Policy and Regulations In supporting Department of Energy needs, we provide assistance in internal and external policy. DOE Policies Federal Regulations OMB...

407

Environmental regulation with incomplete information and imperfect monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental protection agencies issue regulations without complete information about the economic cost of pollution abatement. The lack of information limits the ability of environmental protection agencies to restore economic efficiency when regulating firms generating pollution. In the three papers of this dissertation, optimal environmental regulations are derived in the presence of asymmetric information about pollution abatement costs. In the regulatory equilibria analyzed in Chapter 1, firms are induced to reveal the information they possess concerning abatement costs through the judicious use of abatement standard-subsidy combinations. The incentive compatible environmental regulations are superior to uniform standard-subsidy schemes. The maintained assumption is that firms automatically comply with the pollution abatement standards adopted by the regulator. In the models of Chapters 2 and 3, it is recognized that compliance may have to be induced through appropriate monitoring and enforcement measures. In the model of Chapter 2, the regulator precommits to monitoring of compliance with the incentive compatible environmental regulations, and asymmetric information characterizes the interaction between the firm and regulator. The probabilities of monitoring, abatement standards, and corresponding subsides are chosen to ensure firm compliance. Enforcement considerations distort downward the pollution abatement requirements mandated for firms. In the analysis of Chapter 3, the regulator is unable to credibly precommit to a monitoring strategy. In the Nash equilibrium to the enforcement subgame, monitoring must be a best response on the part of the regulator to the level of firm noncompliance and vice versa. Without precommitment to monitoring, the pollution abatement standards supporting a separating equilibrium are independent of monitoring costs. The inability to precommit to monitoring increases the expected level of noncompliance and decrease welfare.

Ellis, G.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Table 6.8 Natural Gas Prices by Sector, 1967-2011 (Dollars per ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Commercial sector, including commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 7 The percentage of the sector's consumption in Table ...

409

Arizona | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

who generate electricity using solar, wind, hydroelectric, geothermal, biomass, biogas, combined heat and power (CHP) or fuel cell technologies. The ACC has not set a firm...

410

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

See Petroleum for Administration Defense District in EIAs ... include electricity output from combined heat and power (CHP) ... Reserve System, ...

411

Table 6.3 Coal Stocks by Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

c The electric power sector comprises electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) ... System. See Note 4, "Coal ... the 50 states and the Distr ...

412

United States - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho ... System Energy Losses h: Total g: Distillate ... includes commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP ...

413

Connecticut - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho ... System Energy Losses i: Total f,h: Distillate ... commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) ...

414

Colorado - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

State Energy Data System ... District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho ... comprises electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) ...

415

New York - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

State Energy Data System ... District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho ... comprises electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) ...

416

Table 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

c Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) ... and electrical system energy losses. ... Geographic coverage is the 50 states and the Distr ...

417

Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

See also Combined heat and power (CHP) plant and Electricity only plant. Electric utility: ... Pipeline (natural gas): A continuous pipe conduit, ...

418

Fact Sheets | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(AMO) Distributed Energy (DE) portfolio includes R&D on advanced reciprocating engine systems (ARES), combined heat and power (CHP) technologies, as well as demonstrations...

419

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

http:energy.govnepadownloadscx-010731-categorical-exclusion-determination Article Market Analyses Need information on the market potential for combined heat and power (CHP) in...

420

Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

biomass. Through 2000, also includes non-renewable waste ... Data also include a small number of electric utility combined-heat-and-power (CHP) ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulations chp combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Table 8.11d Electric Net Summer Capacity: Commercial and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

9 Commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. ... other biomass. For all years, also includes non-renewable waste ...

422

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to customers who generate electricity using solar, wind, hydroelectric, geothermal, biomass, biogas, combined heat and power (CHP) or fuel cell technologies. The ACC has......

423

Data:D5e33bc1-dbbf-4cbe-8f38-01b38819ad26 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

limited to, Wind, Photovoltaics, Biomass, Hydroelectric, Fuel Cells, Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Generation, and Municipal Solid Waste with generation facilities rated greater...

424

Table 5.14c Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants within the NAICS 22 category whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity ...

425

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulatory Commission Nod http:energy.govarticlesdoe-transport-moab-mill-tailings-rail Download CX-002944: Categorical Exclusion Determination Combined Heat and Power (CHP)...

426

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulatory Commission Nod http:energy.govarticlesdoe-transport-moab-mill-tailings-rail Download CX-002943: Categorical Exclusion Determination Combined Heat and Power (CHP)...

427

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Industries and Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems Combustion Compressed Air Distributed EnergyCombined Heat and Power (CHP) Fuel and Feedstock Flexibility Information & Communications Technology Data Centers...

428

Improve Overall Plant Efficiency and Fuel Use, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program combined heat and power (CHP) tool can help identify energy savings in gas turbine-driven systems.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water outflow of the steam turbine condenser. Due to theHigh-temperature CHP Steam expansion turbine Combined CycleNatural gas expansion turbine Steam Distribution System

Zhou, Nan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Rutgers University CHP Plant Involves upgrading a combined heat and power cogeneration plant within an existing structure to provide additional electricity and thermal...

431

Candidate Alloys for Cost-Effective, High-Efficiency, High ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 16, 2007... attractive sources for combined heat and power (CHP) cogeneration. ... and suggest that these alloys developed for gas- and micro-turbine...

432

AMO Industrial Distributed Energy: Clean Energy Application Centers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

this topic. DOE's Regional Clean Energy Application Centers (CEACs), formerly called the Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Regional Application Centers (RACs), promote and assist in...

433

Advanced Manufacturing Office: About Technical Assistance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application Centers (CEACs) provide outreach to manufacturers considering adoption of combined heat and power (CHP) technology-to save energy and money. Energy Experts and...

434

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants whose primary business is to sell electricity, or electricity...

435

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Philadelphia Gas Works CHP Project Under PA Green Energy Works Combined Heat and Power - Install 200 kW microturbine and chiller into existing central utility plant...

436

Contour Global L P | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in under-served markets, such as that for renewable energy technologies and Combined Heat and Power (CHP), within developed economics. References Contour Global L.P.1...

437

Luis A. Luyo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and improvements to the High Temperature Guarded Hot Plate lab, the Residential Fuel Cell lab, the Micro-Combined Heat and Power (Micro-CHP ...

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

438

Mark W. Davis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Since 2008, Mr. Davis has led a project to develop a performance rating methodology for Micro-Combined Heat and Power (Micro-CHP) devices. ...

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

439

City of Boston - Green Power Purchasing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

properties to be evaluated for the feasibility of installing solar, wind, bio-energy, combined heat and power (CHP), and green roofs. (The executive order updated an...

440

Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

nuclear power; distributed combined heat and power (CHP); fuel cells that generate electricity; certain solid waste conversion technologies; and demand side management or energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulations chp combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 15, 2009 ... Combined heat and power (CHP) technologies, which capture and reuse waste heat from electric or mechanical power, account for about nine...

442

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and power CHP and combined heat, hydrogen and power CHHP), energy storage renewable grid power, and renewable hydrogen applications. In addition to the positive impact on the...

443

Combined-cycle power tower  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper evaluates a new power tower concept that offers significant benefits for commercialization of power tower technology. The concept uses a molten nitrate salt centralreceiver plant to supply heat, in the form of combustion air preheat, to a conventional combined-cycle power plant. The evaluation focused on first commercial plants, examined three plant capacities (31, 100, and 300 MWe), and compared these plants with a solar-only 100-MWe plant and with gas-only combined-cycle plants in the same three capacities. Results of the analysis point to several benefits relative to the solar-only plant including low energy cost for first plants, low capital cost for first plants, reduced risk with respect to business uncertainties, and the potential for new markets. In addition, the concept appears to have minimal technology development requirements. Significantly, the results show that it is possible to build a first plant with this concept that can compete with existing gas-only combined-cycle plants.

Bohn, M.S.; Williams, T.A.; Price, H.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Texas State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Texas Texas State Regulations: Texas State of Texas The Railroad Commission of Texas (RCC), through the Oil and Gas Division, administers oil and gas exploration, development, and production operations, except for oil and gas leasing, royalty payments, surface damages through oil and gas operations, and operator-landowner contracts. The RCC and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), formerly, the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC), have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding clarifying jurisdiction over oil field wastes generated in connection with oil and gas exploration, development, and production. The RCC Oil and Gas Division operates nine district offices, each staffed with field enforcement and support personnel.

445

Self-regulating valve  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A variable, self-regulating valve having a hydraulic loss coefficient proportional to a positive exponential power of the flow rate. The device includes two objects in a flow channel and structure which assures that the distance between the two objects is an increasing function of the flow rate. The range of spacing between the objects is such that the hydraulic resistance of the valve is an increasing function of the distance between the two objects so that the desired hydraulic loss coefficient as a function of flow rate is obtained without variation in the flow area.

Humphreys, D.A.

1982-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

446

Growth regulation by macrophages  

SciTech Connect

The evidence reviewed here indicates that macrophages, either acting alone or in concert with other cells, influence the proliferation of multiple types of cells. Most of the data indicate that these effects are mediated by soluble macrophage-elaborated products (probably proteins) although the role of direct cell-to-cell contacts cannot be ruled out in all cases. A degree of success has been achieved on the biochemical characterization of these factors, due mainly to their low specific activity in conditioned medium and the lack of rapid, specific assays. Understanding the growth-regulating potential of macrophages is an important and needed area of research.

Wharton, W.; Walker, E.; Stewart, C.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

San Diego County - Wind Regulations (California) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Regulations (California) San Diego County - Wind Regulations (California) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Wind Buying & Making...

448

Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana) Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana) Eligibility Agricultural Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial...

449

Chemistry of combined residual chlorination  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The decay of the combined chlorine residual was investigated in this work. Recent concerns about the formation of undesirable compounds such as chloroform with free residual chlorination have focused attention on the alternative use of combined residual chlorination. This work investigates the applicability of reactions proposed to describe the transformations and decay of the combined residual with time. Sodium hypochlorite was added to buffered solutions of ammonia with the chlorine residual being monitored over periods extending up to 10 days. The reaction was studied at four initial concentrations of hypochlorite of 100, 50, 25 and 10 mg/L as Cl/sub 2/ with molar application ratios of chlorine to ammonia, defined herein as M ratios, of 0.90, 0.50, 0.25 and 0.05 at each hypochlorite dose. Sixty-eight experiments were conducted at the pH of 6.6 and 7.2. The conclusions are: (1) in the absence of free chlorine, the concentration of NH/sub 3/ does not seem to affect the rate of disappearance of the residual other than through the formation of NHCl/sub 2/ by NH/sub 2/Cl hydrolysis; (2) the reaction between NHCl/sub 2/ and NH/sub 4//sup +/ to form NH/sub 2/Cl is either much slower than reported by Gray et. al. or the mechanism is different with a rate limiting step not involving NH/sub 3/ or NH/sub 4//sup +/; (3) a redox reaction in addition to the first-order decomposition of NHCl/sub 2/ appears necessary. Model simulation results indicated that a reaction of the type NH/sub 2/Cl + NHCl/sub 2/ ..-->.. P added to the first-order NHCl/sub 2/ decomposition can explain the results observed except at the higher chlorine doses.

Leao, S.F.; Selleck, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Gap and stripline combined monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combined gap and stripline monitor device (10) for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchotron radiation facility. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions (11a, 11b) with an axial gap (12) therebetween. An outer pipe (14) cooperates with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips (23a-d) cooperate with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length.

Yin, Yan (Palo Alto, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Gap and stripline combined monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combined gap and stripline monitor device for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchrotron radiation facility is disclosed. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions with an axial gap therebetween. An outer pipe cooperates with the first beam pipe portion to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips cooperate with the first beam pipe portion to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length. 4 figs.

Yin, Y.

1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

452

Solar heat regulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar heat regulating device is described for selectively heating with sunlight the air inside a building having a window and shielding and insulating the air inside the building from the heat of sunlight outside the building including: a frame for mounting the solar heat regulating device inside the building and adjacent to the window; a plurality of hollow vanes, each of the vanes having at least one passageway for passing air therethrough; the vanes having a heat absorptive surface on a first side thereof which allows solar radiation impinging on the heat absorptive surface to heat the air contained in the one passageway of the vanes; the vanes having a heat reflective surface on a second side of the vanes which reflects the solar radiation impinging on the second side of the vanes and shields the inside of the building from solar radiation impinging on the vanes; and the vanes having side portions extending between the first and second sides of the vanes, the side portions, and the first and second sides forming the one passageway through each of the vanes, the side portions and the first and second sides of the vanes terminating in top end and bottom end portions.

Boynton, S.L.

1987-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

453

[Regulation of terpene metabolism  

SciTech Connect

During the last grant period, we have completed studies on the key pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism in sage and peppermint, and have, by several lines of evidence, deciphered the rate-limiting step of each pathway. We have at least partially purified and characterized the relevant enzymes of each pathway. We have made a strong case, based on analytical, in vivo, and in vitro studies, that terpene accumulation depends upon the balance between biosynthesis and catabolism, and provided supporting evidence that these processes are developmentally-regulated and very closely associated with senescence of the oil glands. Oil gland ontogeny has been characterized at the ultrastructural level. We have exploited foliar-applied bioregulators to delay gland senescence, and have developed tissue explant and cell culture systems to study several elusive aspects of catabolism. We have isolated pure gland cell clusters and localized monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism within these structures, and have used these preparations as starting materials for the purification to homogeneity of target regulatory'' enzymes. We have thus developed the necessary background knowledge, based on a firm understanding of enzymology, as well as the necessary experimental tools for studying the regulation of monoterpene metabolism at the molecular level. Furthermore, we are now in a position to extend our systematic approach to other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15]-C[sub 30]) produced by oil glands.

Croteau, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

[Regulation of terpene metabolism  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the last grant period, we have completed studies on the key pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism in sage and peppermint, and have, by several lines of evidence, deciphered the rate-limiting step of each pathway. We have at least partially purified and characterized the relevant enzymes of each pathway. We have made a strong case, based on analytical, in vivo, and in vitro studies, that terpene accumulation depends upon the balance between biosynthesis and catabolism, and provided supporting evidence that these processes are developmentally-regulated and very closely associated with senescence of the oil glands. Oil gland ontogeny has been characterized at the ultrastructural level. We have exploited foliar-applied bioregulators to delay gland senescence, and have developed tissue explant and cell culture systems to study several elusive aspects of catabolism. We have isolated pure gland cell clusters and localized monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism within these structures, and have used these preparations as starting materials for the purification to homogeneity of target regulatory'' enzymes. We have thus developed the necessary background knowledge, based on a firm understanding of enzymology, as well as the necessary experimental tools for studying the regulation of monoterpene metabolism at the molecular level. Furthermore, we are now in a position to extend our systematic approach to other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15]-C[sub 30]) produced by oil glands.

Croteau, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Combined power plants -- Past, present, and future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The early history of combined power plants is described, together with the birth of the CCGT plant (the combined cycle gas turbine). Sustained CCGT development in the 1970s and 1980s, based on sound thermodynamic considerations, is outlined. Finally more recent developments and future prospects for the combined gas turbine/steam turbine combined plant are discussed.

Horlock, J.H. [Whittle Lab., Cambridge (United Kingdom)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Combined Corex/DRI technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A feasible steelmaking alternative, the Corex/direct reduction/electric arc furnace combination, provides an economic route for the production of high quality steel products. This combination is a major step into a new generation of iron and steel mills. These mills are based on the production of liquid steel using noncoking coal and comply with the increasing demands of environmental protection. The favorable production costs are based on: Utilization of Corex and DRI/HBI plants; Production of hot metal equal to blast furnace quality; Use of low cost raw materials such as noncoking coal and lump ore; Use of process gas as reducing agent for DRI/HBI production; and Use of electric arc furnace with high hot metal input as the steelmaking process. The high flexibility of the process permits the adjustment of production in accordance with the strategy of the steel mills. New but proven technologies and applications of the latest state of art steelmaking process, e.g., Corex, in conjunction with DRI production as basic raw material for an electric arc furnace, will insure high quality, high availability, optimized energy generation at high efficiency rates, and high product quality for steelmaking.

Flickenschild, A.J.; Reufer, F. [Deutsche Voest-Alpine Industrieanlagenbau GmbH, Dusseldorf (Germany); Eberle, A.; Siuka, D. [Voest-Alpine Industrieanlagenbau, Linz (Austria)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Federal Regulations: Environmental Protection Agency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disposal Practices and Applicable Regulations Hazardous Waste Exemption for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Wastes. In 1980, Congress conditionally exempted oil and gas...

458

California Appliance Efficiency Regulation Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Julie Osborn As part of the response to last summer's electricity crisis, the California Energy Commission (CEC) is updating the state's appliance efficiency regulations. On...

459

Underground Injection Control Regulations (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article prohibits injection of hazardous or radioactive wastes into or above an underground source of drinking water, establishes permit conditions and states regulations for design,...

460

Export.gov - Regulations / Licenses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Division of the U.S. Census Bureau. The blog has several posts related to the Foreign Trade Regulations and maintaining export compliance. Foreign Standards and Certification...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regulations chp combined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Kentucky State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kentucky Kentucky State Regulations: Kentucky State of Kentucky The Division of Oil and Gas (DOG) in the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) fosters conservation of all mineral resources, encourages exploration of such resources, protects the correlative rights of land and mineral owners, prohibits waste and unnecessary surface loss and damage, and encourages the maximum recovery of oil and gas from all deposits. The Energy and Environment Cabinet brings together various Kentucky agencies. It is tasked with protecting and enhancing Kentucky's natural resources. The Department for Environmental Protection (DEP) administers the major environmental protection laws. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 4 administers Class II underground injection control (UIC) programs in Kentucky in direct implementation.

462

Nebraska State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nebraska Nebraska State Regulations: Nebraska State of Nebraska The Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (NOGCC) seeks to prevent waste, protect correlative rights of all owners, and encourage and authorize secondary recovery, pressure maintenance, cycling, or recycling, in order that the greatest ultimate recovery of oil and gas may be obtained within the state while protecting the environment. Otherwise, the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ) administers the major environmental protection laws. Contact Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission 922 Illinois Street, P.O. Box 399 Sidney, NE 69162 (308) 254-6919 (phone) (308) 254-6922 (fax) Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality 1200 "N" Street, Suite 400 P.O. Pox 98922 Lincoln, NE 68509

463

Regulation of Terpene Metabolism  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 Research over the last four years has progressed fairly closely along the lines initially proposed, with progress-driven expansion of Objectives 1, 2 and 3. Recent advances have developed from three research thrusts: 1. Random sequencing of an enriched peppermint oil gland cDNA library has given access to a large number of potential pathway and regulatory genes for test of function; 2. The availability of new DNA probes and antibodies has permitted investigation of developmental regulation and organization of terpenoid metabolism; and 3. The development of a transformation system for peppermint by colleagues at Purdue University has allowed direct transgenic testing of gene function and added a biotechnological component to the project. The current status of each of the original research objectives is outlined below.

Rodney Croteau

2004-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

464

Tools/Technical Assistance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tools/Technical Assistance Tools/Technical Assistance Tools/Technical Assistance November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis The CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) offer unbiased, non-commercial feasibility screenings to help determine if CHP, waste heat to power, or district energy is a good fit for your site, financially and technically. To learn more about how the CHP TAPs can offer technical assistance in your area, visit the CHP TAPs page. Thumbnail Image of DOE Regional Clean Energy Application Centers (CEACs) Handout This handout provides information about technical assistance available from the DOE CHP TAPs Addthis Related Articles Combined Heat and Power Projects Southwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Mid-Atlantic Region Combined Heat and Power Projects News January 15, 2014

465

[Regulation of terpene metabolism  

SciTech Connect

Terpenoid oils, resins, and waxes from plants are important renewable resources. The objective of this project is to understand the regulation of terpenoid metabolism using the monoterpenes (C[sub 10]) as a model. The pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism have been established, and the relevant enzymes characterized. Developmental studies relating enzyme levels to terpene accumulation within the oil gland sites of synthesis, and work with bioregulators, indicate that monoterpene production is controlled by terpene cyclases, the enzymes catalyzing the first step of the monoterpene pathway. As the leaf oil glands mature, cyclase levels decline and monoterpene biosynthesis ceases. Yield then decreases as the monoterpenes undergo catabolism by a process involving conversion to a glycoside and transport from the leaf glands to the root. At this site, the terpenoid is oxidatively degraded to acetate that is recycled into other lipid metabolites. During the transition from terpene biosynthesis to catabolism, the oil glands undergo dramatic ultrastructural modification. Degradation of the producing cells results in mixing of previously compartmentized monoterpenes with the catabolic enzymes, ultimately leading to yield decline. This regulatory model is being applied to the formation of other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15] C[sub 20], C[sub 30], C[sub 40]) within the oil glands. Preliminary investigations on the formation of sesquiterpenes (C[sub 15]) suggest that the corresponding cyclases may play a lesser role in determining yield of these products, but that compartmentation effects are important. From these studies, a comprehensive scheme for the regulation of terpene metabolism is being constructed. Results from this project wail have important consequences for the yield and composition of terpenoid natural products that can be made available for industrial exploitation.

Croteau, R.

1989-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

466

Efficiency combined cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of operating a combined cycle power plant. It comprises: flowing exhaust gas from a combustion turbine through a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG); flowing feed water through an economizer section of the HRSG at a flow rate and providing heated feed water; flowing a first portion of the heated feed water through an evaporator section of the HRSG and producing saturated steam at a production rate, the flow rate of the feed water through the economizer section being greater than required to sustain the production rate of steam in the evaporator section; flowing fuel for the turbine through a heat exchanger; and, flowing a second portion of the heated feed water provided by the economizer section through the heat exchanger then to an inlet of the economizer section, thereby heating the fuel flowing through the heat exchanger.

Pavel, J.; Meyers, G.A.; Baldwin, T.S.

1990-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

467

Combination drilling and skiving tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combination drilling and skiving tool including a longitudinally extending hollow skiving sleeve slidably and concentrically mounted on a right-handed twist drill. Dogs or pawls provided on the internal periphery of the skiving sleeve engage with the helical grooves of the drill. During a clockwise rotation of the tool, the drill moves downwardly and the sleeve translates upwardly, so that the drill performs a drilling operation on a workpiece. On the other hand, the drill moves upwardly and the sleeve translates downwardly, when the tool is rotated in a counter-clockwise direction, and the sleeve performs a skiving operation. The drilling and skiving operations are separate, independent and exclusive of each other.

Stone, William J. (Kansas City, MO)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Author's personal copy Combinations of WOX activities regulate tissue proliferation during  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is an essential part of embryonic development. Previous studies have shown that STIMPY (STIP)/ WOX9, a homeodomain and preventing premature differentiation in emerging seedlings. Here we present evidence that STIP performs similar functions during embryogenesis. Complete loss of STIP activity results in early embryonic arrest

Weigel, Detlef

469

Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development Topics: Analysis Tools Website: greet.es.anl.gov/ This full life-cycle model evaluates the energy and emission impacts of advanced vehicle technologies and new transportation fuels. The model allows users to evaluate various vehicle and fuel combinations. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Shift - Change to low-carbon modes Improve - Enhance infrastructure & policies Learn more about the avoid, shift, improve framework for limiting air

470

Politics, externalities, and risk: the regulation of chemical carcinogens  

SciTech Connect

Starting from the premise that the risk to human health posed by the production of potentially carcinogenic chemical compounds constitutes an externality, this dissertation examines the various mechanisms available to the political system for controlling cancer risks. Both governmental regulation and market-oriented economic incentive structures are evaluated for their effectiveness in reducing cancer risks. For reasons enumerated in the text, it was found that market-oriented strategies by themselves do not constitute an advantage over government regulation. However, a combination of direct regulation and a system of effluent charges adjusted to include the cost of anticipated harm could provide the optimal strategy for reducing cancer risks as well as for providing a mechanism for the compensation of victims.

Brandys, M.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Conversion Regulations Conversion Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on AddThis.com... Conversion Regulations All vehicle and engine conversions must meet standards instituted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), and state agencies like the California Air Resources Board (CARB).

472

Combined Analysis: structure-texture-microstructure-phase-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined Analysis: structure-texture-microstructure-phase- stresses-reflectivity determination by x #12;Combined Analysis: structure-texture-microstructure-phase-stresses- reflectivity determination ................................................................................................. 83 2.10.1 The phase problem in diffraction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

473

Model combination by decomposition and aggregation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on a general problem in statistical modeling, namely model combination. It proposes a novel feature-based model combination method to improve model accuracy and reduce model uncertainty. In this method, ...

Xu, Mingyang, 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Machine translation system combination by confusion forest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The state-of-the-art system combination method for machine translation (MT) is based on confusion networks constructed by aligning hypotheses with regard to word similarities. We introduce a novel system combination framework in which hypotheses are ...

Taro Watanabe; Eiichiro Sumita

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Improving abstract interpretations by combining domains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we consider static analyses based on abstract interpretation of logic programs over combined domains. It is known that analyses over combined domains potentially provide more information than obtainable by performing the independent abstract ...

M. Codish; A. Mulkers; M. Bruynooghe; M. Garca de la Banda; M. Hermenegildo

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Information about the Department of Energys Industrial Technologies Program and its Combined Heat and Power program.

477

Combined Cycle Performance Tracking Guideline: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRIs) Combined Cycle Performance Monitoring and Recovery Guideline (EPRI report 1023971) was developed in 2012 to provide plant owners and operators with a comprehensive guideline for identifying and quantifying combined-cycle performance losses and appropriate recovery activities for a generic F-Class combined-cycle power plant (CCPP). This report, Combined-Cycle Performance Tracking Guideline, has been developed as an adjunct ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

478

Results from Combined NMR and Electrochemical Impedance ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Oxygen-vacancy Transport in Heavily Doped Cubic Zirconia: Results from Combined NMR and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopies.

479

National Account Energy Alliance Final Report for the Ritz Carlton, San Francisco Combined Heat and Power Project  

SciTech Connect

Under collaboration between DOE and the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), UTC Power partnered with Host Hotels and Resorts to install and operate a PureComfort 240M Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) System at the Ritz-Carlton, San Francisco. This packaged CHP system integrated four microturbines, a double-effect absorption chiller, two fuel gas boosters, and the control hardware and software to ensure that the system operated predictably, reliably, and safely. The chiller, directly energized by the recycled hot exhaust from the microturbines, could be configured to provide either chilled or hot water. As installed, the system was capable of providing up to 227 kW of net electrical power and 142 RT of chilled water at a 59F ambient temperature.

Rosfjord, Thomas J [UTC Power

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Technical White Papers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical White Papers Technical White Papers Technical White Papers November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis The following technical white papers explore potential options to increase widespread deployment of distributed generation (DG) and combined heat and power (CHP). Issues such as the treatment of CHP in renewable portfolio standards and CHP commissioning are discussed. Avoiding a Train Wreck: Replacing Old Coal Plants with Energy Efficiency, 15 pp, Aug. 2011 Barriers to CHP with Renewable Portfolio Standards, 13 pp, Sept. 2007 A Case for CHP Commissioning, 57 pp, Apr. 2008 Characterization of the Installed Costs of Prime Movers using Gaseous Opportunity Fuels - Report Addendum, 7 pp, Sept. 2007 Combined Heat and Power (CHP): Essential for a Cost Effective Clean Energy Standard, 11 pp, Apr. 2011

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481

Vision and Roadmap Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vision and Roadmap Documents Vision and Roadmap Documents Vision and Roadmap Documents November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis The combined heat and power (CHP) federal-state partnership began with the National CHP Roadmap. In response to a challenge by the CHP industry, DOE established an active program of CHP research, development, and deployment. The creation of various technology roadmaps ensued. Recent vision documents describe a bright future for CHP technologies that have the power to help the nation meet its energy and climate goals. Accelerating Combined Heat & Power Deployment, 28 pp, Aug. 2011 Annual Workshop Results for the National CHP Roadmap Baltimore, 5 pp, June 2001 and Breakout Session Summary Reports (One Year Later), 3 pp, Oct. 2001 Boston, 2 pp, Oct. 2002 Chicago, 11 pp, Sept. 2003

482

Technical White Papers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

White Papers White Papers Technical White Papers November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis The following technical white papers explore potential options to increase widespread deployment of distributed generation (DG) and combined heat and power (CHP). Issues such as the treatment of CHP in renewable portfolio standards and CHP commissioning are discussed. Avoiding a Train Wreck: Replacing Old Coal Plants with Energy Efficiency, 15 pp, Aug. 2011 Barriers to CHP with Renewable Portfolio Standards, 13 pp, Sept. 2007 A Case for CHP Commissioning, 57 pp, Apr. 2008 Characterization of the Installed Costs of Prime Movers using Gaseous Opportunity Fuels - Report Addendum, 7 pp, Sept. 2007 Combined Heat and Power (CHP): Essential for a Cost Effective Clean Energy Standard, 11 pp, Apr. 2011

483

Post regulation circuit with energy storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A charge regulation circuit provides regulation of an unregulated voltage supply and provides energy storage. The charge regulation circuit according to the present invention provides energy storage without unnecessary dissipation of energy through a resistor as in prior art approaches.

Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA); Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Distributed Generation Heat Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic and environmental drivers are promoting the adoption of combined heat and power (CHP) systems. Technology advances have produced new and improved distributed generation (DG) units that can be coupled with heat recovery hardware to create CHP systems. Performance characteristics vary considerably among DG options, and it is important to understand how these characteristics influence the selection of CHP systems that will meet both electric and thermal site loads.

2002-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

485

Kansas Air Quality Regulations (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All new air contaminant emission sources or alterations to emission sources that are required to be reported shall be in compliance with all applicable emission control regulations at the time that...

486

A Regulator's View of Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission regulates essentially all types of public utilities and has the authority to investigate issues of public interest. To establish a point of reference, Pennsylvania's utilities contribute about 5 percent of the total national electric generation. In view of the energy requirements of Pennsylvania's industry and the impact of increasing energy costs on employment the Commission directed its technical staff to investigate the potential for industrial cogeneration and a pricing formula consistent with the electric utilities' costs. The Commission's technical staff has completed proposed regulations to implement the provisions of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) Section 210 concerning small power producers. The regulations incorporate suggestions from both potential producers and utilities. Staff has devised a strategy for utility purchases of energy and capacity which should be of interest to regulators in other jurisdictions, encourage potential cogenerators and satisfy utilities.

Shanaman, S. M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

International Electricity Regulation | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulation International Electricity Regulation U.S. trade in electric energy with Canada and Mexico is rising, bringing economic and reliability benefits to the United States and...

488

Guidance Regarding NEPA Regulations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA Regulations Guidance Regarding NEPA Regulations This document provides Council on Environmental Quality guidance on several topics: scoping, categorical exclusions, adoption...

489

Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

this regulation. This effectively exempts natural gas extraction using hydraulic fracturing from the regulation. Importantly, water, gas and other materials injected into a...

490

Price regulation for waste hauling franchises in California: an examination of how regulators regulate pricing and the effects of competition on regulated markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thomadakis, Stavros. Price Regulation Under Uncertainty in698. Bs, Dieter. Pricing and Price Regulation. Elsevier.Optimal Structure of Public Prices. The American Economic

Seltzer, Steven A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Aquifer Protection Area Land Use Regulations (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations describe allowable activities within aquifer protection areas, the procedure by which such areas are delineated, and relevant permit requirements. The regulations also describe...

492

Vermont Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations are intended to protect public health and the environment by comprehensively regulating the generation, storage, collection, transport, treatment, disposal, use, reuse, and...

493

DOE G 430.1-1 Chp 9, Operating Costs  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost ...

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

494

Job 4459300 Ref.No. Prepd. CHP/GEA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inspection of boilers exceeding 500 kW: State Energy Inspection District heating sector Min. of Economy

495

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: CHP Capacity Optimizer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

non-cooling electrical loads for a one-year period. It also requires the relevant utility electricity cost structure (i.e., tariff) and price of on-site primary fuel. Data needs on...

496

A Method for CHP System Evaluation & Microgrid Demonstrations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

be presented that show the characteristics of Japanese dispersed power systems and microgrids. Mr. Sakakura is a Ph.D. student at TUAT with a research focus on Energy System...

497

ORNL/TM-2001/280 Analysis of CHP Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy efficiency gain. 2 Calculations based on EPA egrid, http://www.epa.gov/cleanenergy/energyresources/egrid

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

498

Optimization Online - Nonlinear Optimisation in CHP-Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 14, 2002 ... Especially for the application of renewable energies the optimal use of these storage capabilities will increase the overall efficiency.

499

DOE G 430.1-1 Chp 15, Estimating Methods  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Estimating methods, estimating indirect and direct costs, and other estimating considerations are discussed in this chapter.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

500

Aisin G-60 Packaged MicroCHP Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes laboratory test experience with a 6-kWe micro-cogeneration system developed by Aisin Seiki Corporation, an affiliate of Toyota Corporation of Japan. Over 400 of these units have been deployed to date in Japan. In the U.S., a single unit has been in operation at a restaurant near Syracuse, New York since January 2004. Other units were installed in Iowa, Oklahoma, and Michigan in late 2004. An additional 20 units were planned for expanded field trials in summer 2005, including the su...

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z