Sample records for regulation induced climate

  1. Detection of Greenhouse-Gas-Induced Climatic Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, P.D.; Wigley, T.M.L.

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to assemble and analyze instrumental climate data and to develop and apply climate models as a basis for (1) detecting greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change, and (2) validation of General Circulation Models.

  2. Climate change-induced shifts in fire for Mediterranean ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz, Max A.

    RESEARCH PAPER Climate change-induced shifts in fire for Mediterranean ecosystems Enric Batllori1 Climate change, climate uncertainty, fire-climate relationship, fire shifts, Mediterranean biome Mediterranean biome and identify potential shifts in fire activity under an ensemble of global climate

  3. Coal and climate regulations can co-exist

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, J. [Duke Energy Corp., Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Jim Rogers, president and chief executive officer of Duke Energy Corporation, examines how coal and climate change regulations can co-exist. He addresses the need for economically sound choices for future energy needs, which is complicated by what he refers to as 'the elephant in the room'climate change. He observes that new CO{sub 2} regulations would increase the USA's cost of generating electricity over time and result in higher prices for customers, and he advocates that a gradual, economy-wide, market-based U.S. climate policy is the best option. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  4. Detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigley, T.M.L.; Jones, P.D.

    1992-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The aims of the US Department of Energy's Carbon Dioxide Research Program are to improve assessments of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and to define and reduce uncertainties through selected research. This project will address: The regional and seasonal details of the expected climatic changes; how rapidly will these changes occur; how and when will the climatic effects of CO[sub 2] and other greenhouse gases be first detected; and the relationships between greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and changes caused by other external and internal factors. The present project addresses all of these questions. Many of the diverse facets of greenhouse-gas-related climate research can be grouped under three interlinked subject areas: modeling, first detection and supporting data. This project will include the analysis of climate forcing factors, the development and refinement of transient response climate models, and the use of instrumental data in validating General Circulation Models (GCMs).

  5. Human-induced climate change reduces chance of flooding in Okavango...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human-induced climate change reduces chance of flooding in Okavango Delta Human-induced climate change reduces chance of flooding in Okavango Delta March 27, 2014 | Tags:...

  6. Detection of CO sub 2 -induced climatic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigley, T.M.L.; Jones, P.D.

    1990-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The aims of the US Department of Energy's CO{sub 2} Climate Research Program are to improve assessments of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and to define and reduce uncertainties through selected research. We propose to continue earlier work in five areas: updating, improvement and analysis of our global (land and marine) temperature data set; the development and use of multivariate techniques for the detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change; the further development and use of simple transient-response climate models in order to elucidate the responses of the climate system to external and internal forcing; validation of General Circulation Models using a variety of test statistics, and the use of regression methods to produce sub-grid-scale information from GCM output. The present project addresses all of these questions. This document contains information of the progress in each area. 25 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Detection of CO sub 2 -Induced climatic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigley, T.M.L.; Jones, P.D.

    1989-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We will assemble and analyse instrumental climate data and to develop simple climate models as a basis for (1) detecting greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change, and (2) validation of General Circulation Models. In addition to variations in greenhouse gas concentrations, climate responds to a number of other forcing factors, changes in ocean circulation, volcanic activity, solar irradiance, etc. To detect the greenhouse effect, its signal must be isolated from the noise'' of natural climatic variability, a significant part of which is due to these other factors. A high quality, spatially extensive data base is required to define the noise and its spatial characteristics. Available land and marine data bases will updated and expanded, and differences between different data sets will be reconciled where possible. The data will be analysed to determine the potential effects on climate of greenhouse gas concentration changes and other factors. Analyses will be guided by simple energy balance climate models. These analyses are oriented toward obtaining early evidence of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change that would lead either to confirmation, rejection or modification of model projections, and toward the statistical validation of General Circulation Model control runs. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Research on Greenhouse-Gas-Induced Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlesinger, M. E.

    2001-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During the 5 years of NSF grant ATM 95-22681 (Research on Greenhouse-Gas-Induced Climate Change, $1,605,000, 9/15/1995 to 8/31/2000) we have performed work which we are described in this report under three topics: (1) Development and Application of Atmosphere, Ocean, Photochemical-Transport, and Coupled Models; (2) Analysis Methods and Estimation; and (3) Climate-Change Scenarios, Impacts and Policy.

  9. Detection of CO sub 2 -induced climatic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigley, T.M.L.

    1990-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In spite of the strong circumstantial evidence that the greenhouse effect has contributed significantly to the observed global warming, we are still unable to state unequivocally that the effect has been detected. Either we must eliminate all other possibilities, or we must identify one or more multivariate characteristics of the observed changes in climate that are unique signature of the greenhouse effect. We propose to continue earlier work in five areas: Updating, improvement and analysis of our global (land and marine) temperature data set, The development and use of multivariate techniques for the detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change, The further development and use of simple transient-response climate models in order to elucidate the responses of the climate system to external and internal forcing, Validation of General Circulation Models using a variety of test statistics, and The use of regression methods to produce sub-grid-scale information from GCM output. 63 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Human-Induced Climate Change Reduces Chance of Flooding in Okavango...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human-Induced Climate Change Reduces Chance of Flooding in Okavango Delta Human-Induced Climate Change Reduces Chance of Flooding in Okavango Delta Africa.gif Why it Matters: The...

  11. The impacts of land use-induced land cover change on climate extremes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avila, Francia Bismonte

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Simulations from the CSIRO Mk3L climate model, coupled to the CABLE land surface model, indicate that climate extremes indices are significantly affected by land use-induced… (more)

  12. Climatic regulation of the Black Sea hydro-meteorological and ecological properties at interannual-to-decadal time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dippner, Joachim W.

    Climatic regulation of the Black Sea hydro-meteorological and ecological properties at interannual Available online 3 March 2006 Abstract An examination of a wide spectrum of hydro

  13. Research on Ocean Resources, Marine Geo-Engineering and Climate Change -New Regulations: Implications for Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Research on Ocean Resources, Marine Geo-Engineering and Climate Change - New Regulations: Implications for Ocean Engineers Dr. Philomène Verlaan Visiting Colleague, Department of Oceanography & Senior Framework for Scientific Research Involving Ocean Fertilization", a definition of marine geo-engineering

  14. Finding the higher ground : assessing contrasting approaches to planning for climate change induced resettlement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schenk, Todd Edward William

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change induced resettlement (CCIR) is emerging as an issue that planners will need to address. It is expected that how planners in different political and economic contexts around the world respond will be shaped ...

  15. Induced technical change and the cost of climate policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sue Wing, Ian.

    This paper investigates the potential for a carbon tax to induce R&D, and for the consequent induced technical change (ITC) to lower the macroeconomic cost of abating carbon emissions. ITC is modelled within a general ...

  16. Soil erosion from sugar beet in Central Europe in response to climate change induced seasonal precipitation variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinton, John

    of adaptive land-use management for climate change response strategies in the agricultural sector. © 2007; Conservation agriculture; Erosion modelling 1. Introduction Climate change of anthropogenic origin is widelySoil erosion from sugar beet in Central Europe in response to climate change induced seasonal

  17. Detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change. Progress report, July 1, 1994--July 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, P.D.; Wigley, T.M.L.

    1995-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to assembly and analyze instrumental climate data and to develop and apply climate models as a basis for detecting greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change, and validation of General Circulation Models. In addition to changes due to variations in anthropogenic forcing, including greenhouse gas and aerosol concentration changes, the global climate system exhibits a high degree of internally-generated and externally-forced natural variability. To detect the anthropogenic effect, its signal must be isolated from the ``noise`` of this natural climatic variability. A high quality, spatially extensive data base is required to define the noise and its spatial characteristics. To facilitate this, available land and marine data bases will be updated and expanded. The data will be analyzed to determine the potential effects on climate of greenhouse gas and aerosol concentration changes and other factors. Analyses will be guided by a variety of models, from simple energy balance climate models to coupled atmosphere ocean General Circulation Models. These analyses are oriented towards obtaining early evidence of anthropogenic climatic change that would lead either to confirmation, rejection or modification of model projections, and towards the statistical validation of General Circulation Model control runs and perturbation experiments.

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid regulates ozone-induced Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ozone-induced Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: acid regulates ozone-induced Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Plant Molecular Biology 51:...

  19. Detection of CO/sub 2/-induced climate change. Progress report, 1 December 1985-15 July 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigley, T.M.L.; Jones, P.D.

    1986-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to assemble and analyze present and past instrumental climate data as a basis for detecting CO/sub 2/-induced climatic change and for validation of climate models. This report describes progress in the following areas: (1) southern hemisphere temperature data; (2) updating of gridded temperature data; (3) satellite data; (4) marine temperature data sets; (5) analysis of gridded mean sea level pressure data; (6) regional validation of climate models; and (7) detection studies. (ACR)

  20. Climate-change induced tropicalisation of marine communities in Western Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    Climate-change induced tropicalisation of marine communities in Western Australia William W. L, The University of British Columbia, BC, Canada, V6T 1Z4. B Ocean Institute, The University of Western Australia and School of Animal Biology, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009

  1. Detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change. Progress report, 1 December 1991--30 June 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigley, T.M.L.; Jones, P.D.

    1992-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The aims of the US Department of Energy`s Carbon Dioxide Research Program are to improve assessments of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and to define and reduce uncertainties through selected research. This project will address: The regional and seasonal details of the expected climatic changes; how rapidly will these changes occur; how and when will the climatic effects of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases be first detected; and the relationships between greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and changes caused by other external and internal factors. The present project addresses all of these questions. Many of the diverse facets of greenhouse-gas-related climate research can be grouped under three interlinked subject areas: modeling, first detection and supporting data. This project will include the analysis of climate forcing factors, the development and refinement of transient response climate models, and the use of instrumental data in validating General Circulation Models (GCMs).

  2. Avoiding dangerous climate change by inducing technological progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    , with the emissions projected to 2100. Two policy instruments are used to achieve these targets: emission trading by the permit schemes and taxes since they lead to substantial increases in the real cost of burning fossil when induced technological change is taken into account, but which generally assume that GDP is largely

  3. The Importance of Regulation-Induced Innovation for Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashford, Nicholas A.

    This article explores the complex relationship between environmental regulation, innovation, and sustainable development within the context of an increasingly globalizing economy. The economic development, environment, and ...

  4. Engineering a Direct and Inducible Protein-RNA Interaction To Regulate RNA Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belmont, Brian Joshua

    The importance and pervasiveness of naturally occurring regulation of RNA function in biology is increasingly being recognized. A common mechanism uses inducible protein?RNA interactions to shape diverse aspects of cellular ...

  5. New Directions: A facelift for the picture of the global energy balance Earth's climate is largely regulated by the global energy balance,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    New Directions: A facelift for the picture of the global energy balance Earth's climate is largely regulated by the global energy balance, which considers the energy flows within the climate system a perturbation of this energy balance, through a modification of the energy flows in the polluted atmosphere

  6. Original article Regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the MCF- 7 human breast cancer cell line. The results showed that biochanin A treatment induced dose- and time- dependent inhibition on MCF-7 cell growth at concentrations above 20 µg.mL­1. An examination of treated MCF-7 cell morphology revealed condensation of the chromosome and dehydration of the cyto- plasm

  7. Detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change. Progress report, 1 December 1992--30 June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigley, T.M.L.; Jones, P.D.

    1993-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The aims of the US Department of Energy`s Carbon Dioxide Research Program are to improve assessments of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and to define and reduce uncertainties through selected research. The main research areas covered by this proposal are (b), First Detection and (c) Supporting Data. The project will also include work under area (a), Modeling: specifically, analysis of climate forcing factors, the development and refinement of transient response climate models, and the use of instrumental data in validating General Circulating Models (GCMs).

  8. Markets versus Regulation: The Efficiency and Distributional Impacts of U.S. Climate Policy Proposals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rausch, S.

    Regulatory measures have proven the favored approach to climate change mitigation in the U.S., while market-based policies have gained little traction. Using a model that resolves the U.S. economy by region, income category, ...

  9. Climate regulation of humid tropical hydrology BHS 10th National Hydrology Symposium, Exeter, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, Nick A

    might influence tropical water resources. Introduction The humid tropics can be defined as the global, Bangladesh, and most of South-east Asia (Fosberg et al., 1961). Its climate contains distinctive dynamics

  10. TIMP3 is the primary TIMP to regulate agonist-induced vascular remodelling and hypertension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMillan, Andrew

    3 is the primary TIMP to regulate agonist- induced vascular remodelling and hypertension Ratnadeep Hypertension is accompanied by structural remodelling of vascular extracellular matrix (ECM). Tissue inhibitor. In response to a hypertensive stimulus, the balance between MMPs and TIMPs is altered. We examined the role

  11. A soil bacterium regulates plant acquisition of iron via deficiency-inducible mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paré, Paul W.

    A soil bacterium regulates plant acquisition of iron via deficiency-inducible mechanisms Huiming in most soils. While certain soil microbes produce chelating agents that enhance the solubility of iron understanding that select soil microbes play a signaling role in activating growth and stress responses

  12. ice-surface lowering or some regional climate change induced by ice-surface lowering. If attributed solely to a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flint-Garcia, Sherry

    ice-surface lowering or some regional climate change induced by ice-surface lowering. If attributed solely to a change in ice-surface elevation, the 3° to 4°C warming at Siple Dome (16) would indicate 500 to 650 m of ice-surface lowering, assuming a free atmospheric lapse rate of 6°C per 1000 m

  13. Climate response to tropical cyclone-induced ocean mixing in an1 Earth system model of intermediate complexity2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate response to tropical cyclone-induced ocean mixing in an1 Earth system model of intermediate system model of intermediate complexity. The parameterization is based on21 previously published global. Abstract19 We introduce a parameterization of ocean mixing by tropical cyclones (TCs) into20 an Earth

  14. Cap-and-Trade Climate Policies with Price-Regulated Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of electricity production--comprising all 16,891 electric- ity generators in the contiguous U.S.--in a multi-and-trade allowance allocation designs in a model of the U.S. economy where price-regulated electric utilities generate 30% of total CO2 emissions. Our empir- ical model embeds a generator-level description

  15. Light-induced nuclear import of phytochrome-A:GFP fusion proteins is differentially regulated in transgenic tobacco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schäfer, Eberhard

    Light-induced nuclear import of phytochrome-A:GFP fusion proteins is differentially regulated of the fusion protein was observed. By contrast, light-dependent nuclear import of the same fusion protein have recently shown that nuclear import of rice phyA:GFP is regulated by VLFR in transgenic tobacco

  16. Carbon-nitrogen interactions regulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks: results from an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009 P. E. Thornton et al. : Carbon-nitrogen interactionsregulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks Monfray, P. ,T. H. : A global ocean carbon climatology: Results from

  17. Prostaglandin E2 Receptor, EP3, Is Induced in Diabetic Islets and Negatively Regulates Glucose-and Hormone-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attie, Alan D.

    Prostaglandin E2 Receptor, EP3, Is Induced in Diabetic Islets and Negatively Regulates Glucose, the gene for the pros- taglandin E receptor 3 (EP3), was upregulated with diabetes. The EP3 receptor involved in the synthesis of PGE2. We hypothesized that increased signaling through EP3 might be coincident

  18. Body composition to climate change studies - the many facets of neutron induced prompt gamma-ray analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitra,S.

    2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In-vivo body composition analysis of humans and animals and in-situ analysis of soil using fast neutron inelastic scattering and thermal neutron capture induced prompt-gamma rays have been described. By measuring carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O), protein, fat and water are determined. C determination in soil has become important for understanding below ground carbon sequestration process in the light of climate change studies. Various neutron sources ranging from radio isotopic to compact 14 MeV neutron generators employing the associated particle neutron time-of-flight technique or micro-second pulsing were implemented. Gamma spectroscopy using recently developed digital multi-channel analyzers has also been described.

  19. Glaciers, ice sheets, and sea level: effect of a CO/sub 2/-induced climatic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The workshop examined the basic questions of how much water has been exchanged between land ice and ocean during the last century, what is happening now, and, given existing climate-modeling prediction, how much exchange can be expected in the next century. In addition, the evidence for exchange was examined and gaps in that evidence were identified. The report includes the 23 presentations made at the workshop, summarizes the workshop discussion, and presents the Committee's findings and recommendations. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 23 presentations.

  20. Planetary boundary layer depth in Global climate models induced biases in surface climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davy, Richard

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Earth has warmed in the last century with the most rapid warming occurring near the surface in the arctic. This enhanced surface warming in the Arctic is partly because the extra heat is trapped in a thin layer of air near the surface due to the persistent stable-stratification found in this region. The warming of the surface air due to the extra heat depends upon the amount of turbulent mixing in the atmosphere, which is described by the depth of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In this way the depth of the ABL determines the effective response of the surface air temperature to perturbations in the climate forcing. The ABL depth can vary from tens of meters to a few kilometers which presents a challenge for global climate models which cannot resolve the shallower layers. Here we show that the uncertainties in the depth of the ABL can explain up to 60 percent of the difference between the simulated and observed surface air temperature trends and 50 percent of the difference in temperature variability...

  1. Human-induced climate change reduces chance of flooding in Okavango Delta

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2MLLC HistoryVeteransto getEmployeeHumanHuman-induced

  2. A game of climate chicken : can EPA regulate greenhouse gases before the U.S. Senate ratifies the Kyoto Protocol?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bugnion, Véronique.; Reiner, David M.

    EPA's legal authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions under the Clean Air Act is reviewed. While EPA clearly does not have the authority to implement the precise terms of the Kyoto Protocol, arguments could be put ...

  3. Carbon-nitrogen interactions regulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks: results from an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, P. E.; Doney, S. C.; Lindsay, Keith; Moore, J. K.; Mahowald, N. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Fung, I.; Lamarque, J. F.; Feddema, Johannes J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    forests indi- cates that the model representation of competition between plants and microbes for new mineral nitrogen resources is reasonable. Our results suggest a weaker dependence of net land carbon flux on soil moisture changes in tropical regions... National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6335, USA 2Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543-1543, USA 3Climate and Global Dynamics Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research...

  4. Edinburgh Research Explorer Flavones induce neutrophil apoptosis by down-regulation of Mcl-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    - regulation of Mcl-1 via a proteasomal- dependent pathway Christopher D. Lucas,*,1 Keith C. Allen,* David A. Dorward,* Laura J. Hoodless,* Lauren A. Melrose,* John A. Marwick,* Carl S. Tucker, Christopher Haslett

  5. Pace of shifts in climate regions increases with global temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahlstein, Irina

    Human-induced climate change causes significant changes in local climates, which in turn lead to changes in regional climate zones. Large shifts in the world distribution of Köppen–Geiger climate classifications by the end ...

  6. Effects of soot-induced snow albedo change on snowpack and hydrological cycle in western United States based on Weather Research and Forecasting chemistry and regional climate simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Gustafson, William I.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ghan, Steven J.

    2009-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative forcing induced by soot on snow is a major anthropogenic forcing affecting the global climate. However, it is uncertain how the soot-induced snow albedo perturbation affects regional snowpack and the hydrological cycle. In this study we simulated the deposition of soot aerosol on snow and investigated the resulting impact on snowpack and the surface water budget in the western United States. A yearlong simulation was performed using the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) to determine an annual budget of soot deposition, followed by two regional climate simulations using WRF in meteorology-only mode, with and without the soot-induced snow albedo perturbations. The chemistry simulation shows large spatial variability in soot deposition that reflects the localized emissions and the influence of the complex terrain. The soot-induced snow albedo perturbations increase the net solar radiation flux at the surface during late winter to early spring, increase the surface air temperature, reduce snow water equivalent amount, and lead to reduced snow accumulation and less spring snowmelt. These effects are stronger over the central Rockies and southern Alberta, where soot deposition and snowpack overlap the most. The indirect forcing of soot accelerates snowmelt and alters stream flows, including a trend toward earlier melt dates in the western United States. The soot-induced albedo reduction initiates a positive feedback process whereby dirty snow absorbs more solar radiation, heating the surface and warming the air. This warming causes reduced snow depth and fraction, which further reduces the regional surface albedo for the snow covered regions. Our simulations indicate that the change of maximum snow albedo induced by soot on snow contributes to 60% of the net albedo reduction over the central Rockies. Snowpack reduction accounts for the additional 40%.

  7. Potential influence of climate-induced vegetation shifts on future land use and associated land carbon fluxes in Northern Eurasia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kicklighter, D W

    Climate change will alter ecosystem metabolism and may lead to a redistribution of vegetation and changes in fire regimes in Northern Eurasia over the 21st century. Land management decisions will interact with these ...

  8. Detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change. Progress report, 1 December 1991--30 June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigley, T.M.L.; Jones, P.D.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to changes due to variations in greenhouse gas concentrations, the global climate system exhibits a high degree of internally-generated and externally-forced natural variability. To detect the enhanced greenhouse effect, its signal must be isolated from the ``noise`` of this natural climatic variability. A high quality, spatially extensive data base is required to define the noise and its spatial characteristics. To facilitate this, available land and marine data bases will be updated and expanded. The data will be analyzed to determine the potential effects on climate of greenhouse gas concentration changes and other factors. Analyses will be guided by a variety of models, from simple energy balance climate models to ocean General Circulation Models. Appendices A--G contain the following seven papers: (A) Recent global warmth moderated by the effects of the Mount Pinatubo eruption; (B) Recent warming in global temperature series; (C) Correlation methods in fingerprint detection studies; (D) Balancing the carbon budget. Implications for projections of future carbon dioxide concentration changes; (E) A simple model for estimating methane concentration and lifetime variations; (F) Implications for climate and sea level of revised IPCC emissions scenarios; and (G) Sulfate aerosol and climatic change.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation of phosphorylation-induced conformational transitions in the mycobacterium tuberculosis response regulator PrrA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Guo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcmahon, Benjamin H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tung, Chang - Shung [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phosphorylation-activated modulation of response regulators (RR) is predominantly used by bacteria as a strategy in regulating their two-component signaling (TCS) systems, the underlying molecular mechanisms are however far from fully understood. In this work we have conducted a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the phosphorylation-induced conformational transitions of RRs with the Mycobacterium Tuberculosis PrrA as a particular example. Starting from the full-length inactive structure of PrrA we introduced a local disturbance by phosphorylating the conserved aspartic acid residue, Asp-58, in the regulatory domain. A Go-model-type algorithm packaged with AMBER force fields was then applied to simulate the dynamics upon phosphorylation. The MD simulation shows that the phosphorylation of Asp-58 facilitates PrrA, whose inactive state has a compact conformation with a closed interdomain interface, to open up with its interdomain separation being increased by an average of about 1.5 {angstrom} for a simulation of 20 ns. The trans-activation loop, which is completely buried within the interdomain interface in the inactive PrrA, is found to become more exposed with the phosphorylated structure as well. These results provide more structural details of how the phosphorylation of a local aspartate activates PrrA to undergo a global conformational rearrangement toward its extended active state. This work also indicates that MD simulations can serve as a fast tool to unravel the regulation mechanisms of all RRs, which is especially valuable when the structures of full-length active RRs are currently unavailable.

  10. Magnetically-Regulated Fragmentation Induced by Nonlinear Flows and Ambipolar Diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shantanu Basu; Glenn E. Ciolek; Wolf Dapp; James Wurster

    2009-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a parameter study of simulations of fragmentation regulated by gravity, magnetic fields, ambipolar diffusion, and nonlinear flows. The thin-sheet approximation is employed with periodic lateral boundary conditions, and the nonlinear flow field ("turbulence") is allowed to freely decay. In agreement with previous results in the literature, our results show that the onset of runaway collapse (formation of the first star) in subcritical clouds is significantly accelerated by nonlinear flows in which a large-scale wave mode dominates the power spectrum. In addition, we find that a power spectrum with equal energy on all scales also accelerates collapse, but by a lesser amount. For a highly super-Alfvenic initial velocity field with most power on the largest scales, the collapse occurs promptly during the initial compression wave. However, for trans-Alfvenic perturbations, a subcritical magnetic field causes a rebound from the initial compression, and the system undergoes several oscillations before runaway collapse occurs. Models that undergo prompt collapse have highly supersonic infall motions at the core boundaries. Cores in magnetically subcritical models with trans-Alfvenic initial perturbations also pick up significant systematic speeds by inheriting motions associated with magnetically-driven oscillations. Core mass distributions are much broader than in models with small-amplitude initial perturbations, although the disturbed structure of cores that form due to nonlinear flows does not guarantee subsequent monolithic collapse. Our simulations also demonstrate that significant power can (if present initially) be maintained with negligible dissipation in large-scale compressive modes of a magnetic thin sheet, in the limit of perfect flux freezing.

  11. Downregualtion of dynamin-related protein 1 attenuates glutamate-induced excitotoxicity via regulating mitochondrial function in a calcium dependent manner in HT22 cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Chi; Yuan, Xian-rui; Li, Hao-yu; Zhao, Zi-jin; Liao, Yi-wei; Wang, Xiang-yu; Su, Jun; Sang, Shu-shan; Liu, Qing, E-mail: xiangyaliuqing@163.com

    2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •Downregulation of Drp-1 attenuates glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. •Downregulation of Drp-1 inhibits glutamate-induced apoptosis. •Downregulation of Drp-1 reduces glutamate-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. •Downregulation of Drp-1 preserves intracellular calcium homeostasis. -- Abstract: Glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity is involved in many acute and chronic brain diseases. Dynamin related protein 1 (Drp-1), one of the GTPase family of proteins that regulate mitochondrial fission and fusion balance, is associated with apoptotic cell death in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Here we investigated the effect of downregulating Drp-1 on glutamate excitotoxicity-induced neuronal injury in HT22 cells. We found that downregulation of Drp-1 with specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) increased cell viability and inhibited lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release after glutamate treatment. Downregulation of Drp-1 also inhibited an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and cleavage of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Drp-1 siRNA transfection preserved the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), reduced cytochrome c release, enhanced ATP production, and partly prevented mitochondrial swelling. In addition, Drp-1 knockdown attenuated glutamate-induced increases of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+}, and preserved the mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} buffering capacity after excitotoxicity. Taken together, these results suggest that downregulation of Drp-1 protects HT22 cells against glutamate-induced excitatory damage, and this neuroprotection may be dependent at least in part on the preservation of mitochondrial function through regulating intracellular calcium homeostasis.

  12. MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review paper Riparian vegetation research in Mediterranean-climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stella, John C.

    MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review paper Riparian vegetation research in Mediterranean-climate are from land-use conversion to agriculture, streamflow regulation, nutrient enrichment, and climate change editors: N. Bonada & V. H. Resh / Streams in Mediterranean climate regions: lessons learned from the last

  13. Curcumin Regulates Low-Linear Energy Transfer {gamma}-Radiation-Induced NF{kappa}B-Dependent Telomerase Activity in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aravindan, Natarajan, E-mail: naravind@ouhsc.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Veeraraghavan, Jamunarani; Madhusoodhanan, Rakhesh; Herman, Terence S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Natarajan, Mohan [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We recently reported that curcumin attenuates ionizing radiation (IR)-induced survival signaling and proliferation in human neuroblastoma cells. Also, in the endothelial system, we have demonstrated that NF{kappa}B regulates IR-induced telomerase activity (TA). Accordingly, we investigated the effect of curcumin in inhibiting IR-induced NF{kappa}B-dependent hTERT transcription, TA, and cell survival in neuroblastoma cells. Methods and Materials: SK-N-MC or SH-SY5Y cells exposed to IR and treated with curcumin (10-100 nM) with or without IR were harvested after 1 h through 24 h. NF{kappa}B-dependent regulation was investigated either by luciferase reporter assays using pNF{kappa}B-, pGL3-354-, pGL3-347-, or pUSE-I{kappa}B{alpha}-Luc, p50/p65, or RelA siRNA-transfected cells. NF{kappa}B activity was analyzed using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and hTERT expression using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction. TA was determined using the telomerase repeat amplification protocol assay and cell survival using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltertrazolium bromide and clonogenic assay. Results: Curcumin profoundly inhibited IR-induced NF{kappa}B. Consequently, curcumin significantly inhibited IR-induced TA and hTERT mRNA at all points investigated. Furthermore, IR-induced TA is regulated at the transcriptional level by triggering telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter activation. Moreover, NF{kappa}B becomes functionally activated after IR and mediates TA upregulation by binding to the {kappa}B-binding region in the promoter region of the TERT gene. Consistently, elimination of the NF{kappa}B-recognition site on the telomerase promoter or inhibition of NF{kappa}B by the I{kappa}B{alpha} mutant compromises IR-induced telomerase promoter activation. Significantly, curcumin inhibited IR-induced TERT transcription. Consequently, curcumin inhibited hTERT mRNA and TA in NF{kappa}B overexpressed cells. Furthermore, curcumin enhanced the IR-induced inhibition of cell survival. Conclusions: These results strongly suggest that curcumin inhibits IR-induced TA in an NF{kappa}B dependent manner in human neuroblastoma cells.

  14. DHA down-regulates phenobarbital-induced cytochrome P450 2B1 gene expression in rat primary hepatocytes by attenuating CAR translocation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, C.-C.; Lii, C.-K.; Liu, K.-L. [Department of Nutrition, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Yang, J.-J. [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, H.-W. [Department of Nutrition, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: hawwen@csmu.edu.tw

    2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) plays an important role in regulating the expression of detoxifying enzymes, including cytochrome P450 2B (CYP 2B). Phenobarbital (PB) induction of human CYP 2B6 and mouse CYP 2b10 has been shown to be mediated by CAR. Our previous study showed that PB-induced CYP 2B1 expression in rat primary hepatocytes is down-regulated by both n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially docosahexaenoic acid (DHA); however, the mechanism for this down-regulation by DHA was previously unknown. The objective of the present study was to determine whether change in CAR translocation is involved in the down-regulation by n-6 and n-3 PUFAs of PB-induced CYP 2B1 expression in rat primary hepatocytes. We used 100 {mu}M arachidonic acid, linoleic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and DHA to test this hypothesis. PB triggered the translocation of CAR from the cytosol into the nucleus in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner in our hepatocyte system, and the CAR distribution in rat primary hepatocytes was significantly affected by DHA. DHA treatment decreased PB-inducible accumulation of CAR in the nuclear fraction and increased it in the cytosolic fraction in a dose-dependent manner. The down-regulation of CYP 2B1 expression by DHA occurred in a dose-dependent manner, and a similar pattern was found for the nuclear accumulation of CAR. The results of immunoprecipitation showed a CAR/RXR heterodimer bound to nuclear receptor binding site 1 (NR-1) of the PB-responsive enhancer module (PBREM) of the CYP 2B1gene. The EMSA results showed that PB-induced CAR binding to NR-1 was attenuated by DHA. Taken together, these results suggest that attenuation of CAR translocation and decreased subsequent binding to NR-1 are involved in DHA's down-regulation of PB-induced CYP 2B1 expression.

  15. Nickel-induced down-regulation of {Delta}Np63 and its role in the proliferation of keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Zhuo, E-mail: zhuo.zhang@uky.edu [Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, University of Kentucky, 121 Washington Avenue, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Li Wenqi [Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, University of Kentucky, 121 Washington Avenue, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Cheng Senping [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Yao Hua [Department of Stomatology, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310003 (China); Zhang Fan; Chang Qingshan [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Ke Zunji [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Wang Xin; Son, Young-Ok [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Luo Jia [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Shi Xianglin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Epidemiological, animal, and cell studies have demonstrated that nickel compounds are human carcinogens. The mechanisms of their carcinogenic actions remain to be investigated. p63, a close homologue of the p53 tumor suppressor protein, has been linked to cell fate determination and/or maintenance of self-renewing populations in several epithelial tissues, including skin, mammary gland, and prostate. {Delta}Np63, a dominant negative isoform of p63, is amplified in a variety of epithelial tumors including squamous cell carcinomas and carcinomas of the prostate and mammary glands. The present study shows that nickel suppressed {Delta}Np63 expression in a short-time treatment (up to 48 h). Nickel treatment caused activation of NF-{kappa}B. Blockage of NF-{kappa}B partially reversed nickel-induced {Delta}Np63 suppression. Nickel decreased interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and IRF7, IKK{epsilon}, and Sp100. Over-expression of IRF3 increased {Delta}Np63 expression suppressed by nickel. Nickel was able to activate p21, and its activation was offset by the over-expression of {Delta}Np63. In turn, elevated p63 expression counteracted the ability of nickel to restrict cell growth. The present study demonstrated that nickel decreased interferon regulatory proteins IRF3 and IRF7, and activated NF-{kappa}B, resulting in {Delta}Np63 suppression and then p21 up-regulation. {Delta}Np63 plays an important role in nickel-induced cell proliferation. - Highlights: > Ni suppressed {Delta}Np63 expression in HaCat cells. > Ni activated NF-{kappa}B, decreased expressions of IRF3 and IRF7, IKK{epsilon}, and Sp100. > Over-expression of IRF3 increased {Delta}Np63 expression suppressed by Ni. > Ni activated p21, and its activation was offset by over-expression of {Delta}Np63. > Elevated p63 expression counteracted the ability of nickel to restrict cell growth.

  16. Response of a tundra ecosytem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, W.C.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this research was to document current patterns of CO{sub 2} flux in selected locations of the circumpolar arctic, and to develop the information necessary to predict how these fluxes may be affected by climate change. In fulfillment of these objectives, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured at several sites on the North Slope of Alaska during the 1990-94 growing season (June-August) to determine the local and regional patterns, of seasonal CO{sub 2} exchange. In addition, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured in the Russian and Icelandic Arctic to determine if the patterns of CO{sub 2} exchange observed in Arctic Alaska were representative of the circumpolar arctic, while cold-season CO{sub 2} flux measurements were carried out during the 1993-94 winter season to determine the magnitude of CO{sub 2} efflux not accounted for by the growing season measurements. Manipulations of soil water table depth and surface temperature, which were identified from the extensive measurements as being the most important variables in determining the magnitude and direction of net CO{sub 2} exchange, were carried out during the 1993-94 growing seasons in tussock and wet sedge tundra ecosystems. Finally, measurements of CH{sub 4} flux were also measured at several of the North Slope study sites during the 1990-91 growing seasons. Measurements were made on small (e.g. 0.5 m{sup 2}) plots using a portable gas-exchange system and cuvette. The sample design allowed frequent measurements of net CO{sub 2} exchange and respiration over diurnal and seasonal cycles, and a large spatial extent that incorporated both locally and regionally diverse tundra surface types. Measurements both within and between ecosystem types typically extended over soil water table depth and temperature gradients, allowing for the indirect analysis of the effects of anticipated climate change scenarios on net CO{sub 2} exchange. In situ experiments provided a direct means for testing hypotheses.

  17. Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, W.C.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this research was to document current patterns of CO{sub 2} flux in selected locations of the circumpolar arctic, and to develop the information necessary to predict how these fluxes may be affected by climate change. In fulfillment of these objectives, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured at several sites on the North Slope of Alaska during the 1990--94 growing season (June--August) to determine the local and regional patterns of seasonal CO{sub 2} exchange. In addition, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured in the Russian and Icelandic Arctic to determine if the patterns of CO{sub 2} exchange observed in Arctic Alaska were representative of the circumpolar Arctic, while cold-season CO{sub 2} flux measurements were carried out during the 1993--94 winter season to determine the magnitude of CO{sub 2} efflux not accounted for by the growing season measurements. Manipulations of soil water table depth and surface temperature, which were identified from the extensive measurements as being the most important variables in determining the magnitude and direction of net CO{sub 2} exchange, were carried out during the 1993--94 growing seasons in tussock and wet sedge tundra ecosystems. Finally, measurements of CH{sub 4} flux were also measured at several of the North Slope study sites during the 1990--91 growing seasons.

  18. Lactoferrin inhibits dexamethasone-induced chondrocyte impairment from osteoarthritic cartilage through up-regulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and suppression of FASL, FAS, and Caspase 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tu, Yihui [Department of Orthopaedics, Yangpu District Central Hospital Affiliated to Tongji University School of Medicine, 450 Tengyue Road, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Orthopaedics, Yangpu District Central Hospital Affiliated to Tongji University School of Medicine, 450 Tengyue Road, Shanghai (China); Xue, Huaming [Department of Orthopaedics, Yangpu District Central Hospital Affiliated to Tongji University School of Medicine, 450 Tengyue Road, Shanghai (China) [Department of Orthopaedics, Yangpu District Central Hospital Affiliated to Tongji University School of Medicine, 450 Tengyue Road, Shanghai (China); Institute of Life Science, College of Medicine, Swansea University, Singleton Park (United Kingdom); Francis, Wendy [Institute of Life Science, College of Medicine, Swansea University, Singleton Park (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Life Science, College of Medicine, Swansea University, Singleton Park (United Kingdom); Davies, Andrew P. [Department of Orthopaedics and Trauma, Moriston Hospital, Swansea (United Kingdom)] [Department of Orthopaedics and Trauma, Moriston Hospital, Swansea (United Kingdom); Pallister, Ian; Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu [Institute of Life Science, College of Medicine, Swansea University, Singleton Park (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Life Science, College of Medicine, Swansea University, Singleton Park (United Kingdom); Xia, Zhidao, E-mail: zhidao.xia@gmail.com [Institute of Life Science, College of Medicine, Swansea University, Singleton Park (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Life Science, College of Medicine, Swansea University, Singleton Park (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •Dex exerts dose-dependant inhibition of HACs viability and induction of apoptosis. •Dex-induced impairment of chondrocytes was attenuated by rhLF. •ERK and FASL/FAS signaling are involved in the effects of rhLF. •OA patients with glucocorticoid-induced cartilage damage may benefit from treatment with rhLF. -- Abstract: Dexamethasone (Dex) is commonly used for osteoarthritis (OA) with excellent anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect. However, Dex also has many side effects following repeated use over prolonged periods mainly through increasing apoptosis and inhibiting proliferation. Lactoferrin (LF) exerts significantly anabolic effect on many cells and little is known about its effect on OA chondrocytes. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate whether LF can inhibit Dex-induced OA chondrocytes apoptosis and explore its possible molecular mechanism involved in. MTT assay was used to determine the optimal concentration of Dex and recombinant human LF (rhLF) on chondrocytes at different time and dose points. Chondrocytes were then stimulated with Dex in the absence or presence of optimal concentration of rhLF. Cell proliferation and viability were evaluated using MTT and LIVE/DEAD assay, respectively. Cell apoptosis was evaluated by multi-parameter apoptosis assay kit using both confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, respectively. The expression of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), FAS, FASL, and Caspase-3 (CASP3) at the mRNA and protein levels were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunocytochemistry, respectively. The optimal concentration of Dex (25 ?g/ml) and rhLF (200 ?g/ml) were chosen for the following experiments. rhLF significantly reversed the detrimental effect of Dex on chondrocytes proliferation, viability, and apoptosis. In addition, rhLF significantly prevented Dex-induced down-regulation of ERK and up-regulation of FAS, FASL, and CASP3. These findings demonstrated that rhLF acts as an anabolic effect on chondrocytes through significantly reversing Dex-induced chondrocytes apoptosis. This study may contribute to further investigating the clinical application of LF on OA.

  19. Moderate extracellular acidification inhibits capsaicin-induced cell death through regulating calcium mobilization, NF-{kappa}B translocation and ROS production in synoviocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Fen; Yang, Shuang; Zhao, Dan; Zhu, Shuyan; Wang, Yuxiang [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics and Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials of Education Ministry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)] [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics and Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials of Education Ministry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Li, Junying, E-mail: jyli04@nankai.edu.cn [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics and Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials of Education Ministry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)] [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics and Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials of Education Ministry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate extracellular acidification regulates intracellular Ca{sup 2+} mobilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification activates NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation in synoviocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification depresses the ROS production induced by capsaicin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification inhibits capsaicin-caused synoviocyte death. -- Abstract: We previously show the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in primary synoviocytes from collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Capsaicin and lowered extracellular pH from 7.4 to 5.5 induce cell death through TRPV1-mediated Ca{sup 2+} entry and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, under the pathological condition in rheumatoid arthritis, the synovial fluid is acidified to a moderate level (about pH 6.8). In the present study, we examined the effects of pH 6.8 on the TRPV1-mediated cell death. Our finding is different or even opposite from what was observed at pH 5.5. We found that the moderate extracellular acidification (from pH 7.4 to 6.8) inhibited the capsaicin-induced Ca{sup 2+} entry through attenuating the activity of TRPV1. In the mean time, it triggered a phospholipse C (PLC)-related Ca{sup 2+} release from intracellular stores. The nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B was found at pH 6.8, and this also depends on PLC activation. Moreover, the capsaicin-evoked massive ROS production and cell death were depressed at pH 6.8, both of which are dependent on the activation of PLC and NF-{kappa}B. Taken together, these results suggested that the moderate extracellular acidification inhibited the capsaicin-induced synoviocyte death through regulating Ca{sup 2+} mobilization, activating NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and depressing ROS production.

  20. Copper deficiency alters cell bioenergetics and induces mitochondrial fusion through up-regulation of MFN2 and OPA1 in erythropoietic cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bustos, Rodrigo I.; Jensen, Erik L.; Ruiz, Lina M.; Rivera, Salvador; Ruiz, Sebastián [Center for Biomedical Research, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago (Chile)] [Center for Biomedical Research, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago (Chile); Simon, Felipe; Riedel, Claudia [Center for Biomedical Research, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago (Chile) [Center for Biomedical Research, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago (Chile); Millennium Institute of Immunology and Immunotherapy, Santiago (Chile); Ferrick, David [Seahorse Bioscience, Billerica, MA (United States)] [Seahorse Bioscience, Billerica, MA (United States); Elorza, Alvaro A., E-mail: aelorza@unab.cl [Center for Biomedical Research, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago (Chile); Millennium Institute of Immunology and Immunotherapy, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •In copper deficiency, cell proliferation is not affected. In turn, cell differentiation is impaired. •Enlarged mitochondria are due to up-regulation of MNF2 and OPA1. •Mitochondria turn off respiratory chain and ROS production. •Energy metabolism switch from mitochondria to glycolysis. -- Abstract: Copper is essential in cell physiology, participating in numerous enzyme reactions. In mitochondria, copper is a cofactor for respiratory complex IV, the cytochrome c oxidase. Low copper content is associated with anemia and the appearance of enlarged mitochondria in erythropoietic cells. These findings suggest a connection between copper metabolism and bioenergetics, mitochondrial dynamics and erythropoiesis, which has not been explored so far. Here, we describe that bathocuproine disulfonate-induced copper deficiency does not alter erythropoietic cell proliferation nor induce apoptosis. However it does impair erythroid differentiation, which is associated with a metabolic switch between the two main energy-generating pathways. That is, from mitochondrial function to glycolysis. Switching off mitochondria implies a reduction in oxygen consumption and ROS generation along with an increase in mitochondrial membrane potential. Mitochondrial fusion proteins MFN2 and OPA1 were up-regulated along with the ability of mitochondria to fuse. Morphometric analysis of mitochondria did not show changes in total mitochondrial biomass but rather bigger mitochondria because of increased fusion. Similar results were also obtained with human CD34+, which were induced to differentiate into red blood cells. In all, we have shown that adequate copper levels are important for maintaining proper mitochondrial function and for erythroid differentiation where the energy metabolic switch plus the up-regulation of fusion proteins define an adaptive response to copper deprivation to keep cells alive.

  1. BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE In hilly areas and climates prone to local controls, thermally-induced wind systems develop (e.g., Fernando et al, 2001 and Hunt et al, In Review). Two "transitions" occur morning and evening when winds reverse from downvalley to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE In hilly areas and climates prone to local controls, thermally-induced wind and at the west end of the lake. A complete energy budget set of sensors are recording diurnal data and records

  2. FIRE AND CLIMATE CHANGE IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FIRE AND CLIMATE CHANGE IN CALIFORNIA Changes in the Distribution and Frequency of Fire's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012026 Prepared for: California Energy Commission to climate change has the potential to induce alteration of future fire activity. This research presents just

  3. Greenhouse Gas Dissonance: The History of EPA's Regulations and the Incongruity of Recent Legal Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno, Robert B.; Zalzal, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    denial of the scientific data underpinning climate change.denial notice asserted that not regulating GHG emissions from motor vehicles dovetailed with President Bush's "comprehensive global climate change

  4. HYDROPOWER RELICENSING AND CLIMATE CHANGE1 Joshua H. Viers2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    HYDROPOWER RELICENSING AND CLIMATE CHANGE1 Joshua H. Viers2 ABSTRACT: Hydropower represents impacts to natural and human communities, future long-term fixed licenses of hydropower operation. (KEY TERMS: climate change; environmental regulations; hydropower; relicensing; water law; water policy

  5. Library Regulations Library Regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    Library Regulations 2012-13 Library Regulations UNIVERSITY OF BIRMINGHAM REGULATIONS LIBRARY REGULATIONS Preamble: The Library Regulations apply to all users of library facilities managed on behalf of the University by Library Services, and thus there are sections that apply also to non- members of the University

  6. EGCG protects endothelial cells against PCB 126-induced inflammation through inhibition of AhR and induction of Nrf2-regulated genes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Sung Gu [Superfund Research Program, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States) [Superfund Research Program, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Department of Animal and Food Sciences, College of Agriculture, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Han, Seong-Su [Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)] [Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Toborek, Michal [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Hennig, Bernhard, E-mail: bhennig@uky.edu [Superfund Research Program, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States) [Superfund Research Program, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Department of Animal and Food Sciences, College of Agriculture, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tea flavonoids such as epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) protect against vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis via their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory functions. Persistent and widespread environmental pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), can induce oxidative stress and inflammation in vascular endothelial cells. Even though PCBs are no longer produced, they are still detected in human blood and tissues and thus considered a risk for vascular dysfunction. We hypothesized that EGCG can protect endothelial cells against PCB-induced cell damage via its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. To test this hypothesis, primary vascular endothelial cells were pretreated with EGCG, followed by exposure to the coplanar PCB 126. Exposure to PCB 126 significantly increased cytochrome P450 1A1 (Cyp1A1) mRNA and protein expression and superoxide production, events which were significantly attenuated following pretreatment with EGCG. Similarly, EGCG also reduced DNA binding of NF-?B and downstream expression of inflammatory markers such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and vascular cell adhesion protein-1 (VCAM-1) after PCB exposure. Furthermore, EGCG decreased endogenous or base-line levels of Cyp1A1, MCP-1 and VCAM-1 in endothelial cells. Most of all, treatment of EGCG upregulated expression of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-controlled antioxidant genes, including glutathione S transferase (GST) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, silencing of Nrf2 increased Cyp1A1, MCP-1 and VCAM-1 and decreased GST and NQO1 expression, respectively. These data suggest that EGCG can inhibit AhR regulated genes and induce Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzymes, thus providing protection against PCB-induced inflammatory responses in endothelial cells. -- Highlights: ? PCBs cause endothelial inflammation and subsequent atherosclerosis. ? Nutrition can modulate toxicity by environmental pollutants. ? We demonstrated that EGCG can decrease PCB-induced inflammation. ? EGCG protection was via inhibition of AhR and induction of Nrf2 regulatory genes.

  7. Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007: Mitigation of Climate Change. Full report. WorkingIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change www.webcda.it LaIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change”. Il Rapporto

  8. Roles of Sensory Nerves in the Regulation of Radiation-Induced Structural and Functional Changes in the Heart

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Tripathi, Preeti [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Sharma, Sunil [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Moros, Eduardo G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Zheng, Junying [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Hauer-Jensen, Martin [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Surgical Service, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Boerma, Marjan, E-mail: mboerma@uams.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Radiation Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a chronic severe side effect of radiation therapy of intrathoracic and chest wall tumors. The heart contains a dense network of sensory neurons that not only are involved in monitoring of cardiac events such as ischemia and reperfusion but also play a role in cardiac tissue homeostasis, preconditioning, and repair. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of sensory nerves in RIHD. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered capsaicin to permanently ablate sensory nerves, 2 weeks before local image-guided heart x-ray irradiation with a single dose of 21 Gy. During the 6 months of follow-up, heart function was assessed with high-resolution echocardiography. At 6 months after irradiation, cardiac structural and molecular changes were examined with histology, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analysis. Results: Capsaicin pretreatment blunted the effects of radiation on myocardial fibrosis and mast cell infiltration and activity. By contrast, capsaicin pretreatment caused a small but significant reduction in cardiac output 6 months after irradiation. Capsaicin did not alter the effects of radiation on cardiac macrophage number or indicators of autophagy and apoptosis. Conclusions: These results suggest that sensory nerves, although they play a predominantly protective role in radiation-induced cardiac function changes, may eventually enhance radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis and mast cell activity.

  9. Climate Systems and Climate Change Is Climate Change Real?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    Chapter 10 Climate Systems and Climate Change #12;Is Climate Change Real? 1980 1898 2005 2003 #12;Arctic Sea Ice Changes #12;Observed Global Surface Air Temperature #12;! Current climate: weather station data, remote sensing data, numerical modeling using General Circulation Models (GCM) ! Past climate

  10. Multi-institutional project to study climate change's effect...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    storage from the atmosphere (the carbon sink) may already be declining in response to climate change-induced reductions in precipitation and increases in temperature." Because...

  11. Review: Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jennifer

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    introduction to global climate change, the greenhouseReview: Global Climate Change: A Primer By Orrin H PilkeyPilkey, Keith C. Global Climate Change: a primer. Durham,

  12. Apportioning Climate Change Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farber, Daniel A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apportioning Climate Change Costs Daniel A. Farber* I. II.ON CLIMATE CHANGE FOUR QUESTIONS ABOUTof how to respond to climate change. Most public attention

  13. Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battisti, David

    Novim Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies Jason J. Blackstock David S. Battisti Santa Barbara, California #12;Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies This report should, A. A. N. Patrinos, D. P. Schrag, R. H. Socolow and S. E. Koonin, Climate Engineering Responses

  14. Climate Change and Indiana Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contribute to changes in global climate patterns. Global warming can occur from a variety of causes, both, rainfall or winds) sustained over several decades or longer. Global Warming: An increase in the average natural and human induced. #12;7/23/2009 3 A Brief History of "Global Warming" Source: National Center

  15. Changing Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    these data with predictions from the IPCC. Professor of geography at Texas State University, Dr. David Butler, does climate change research mainly in the Rocky Moun- tains with U.S. Geological Survey funding. He has also done research on how climate...://wiid.twdb.state.tx.us Detailed information about individual water wells. This system uses a geographic information system-based tool to show locations of water wells and download data on water levels and water quality. Reports that were developed about on-site conditions...

  16. Carbon Dioxide Effects Research and Assessment Program. Workshop on environmental and societal consequences of a possible CO/sub 2/-induced climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Workshop was part of a process of elucidating areas of uncertainty where research is needed before meaningful forecasts and sound decisions can be made about the CO/sub 2/ issue. The conferees were divided into five panels dealing with the ocean and the cryosphere: the less managed biosphere; the managed biosphere (chiefly agricultural, forest, and grazing lands); the ways society and its institutions might respond to climate changes; and issues involving the economic and geopolitical consequences of CO/sub 2/ build-up. Also, 28 papers or discussion drafts dealing with a wide variety of topics were contributed to the conference.

  17. Climate Change and Extinctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinervo, Barry

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lectures presents: Climate Change and Extinctions Happening2013. He will present a climate change extinction model that

  18. Regulating energy transfer of excited carriers and the case for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regulating energy transfer of excited carriers and the case for excitation-induced hydrogen dissociation on hydrogenated Regulating energy transfer of excited carriers and the case...

  19. Detecting the climatic effects of increasing carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacCracken, M C; Luther, F M [eds.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents what is known about detecting the CO2-induced changes in climate, and describes the uncertainties and unknowns associated with this monitoring and analysis effort. The various approaches for detecting CO2-induced climate changes are discussed first, followed by a review of applications of these strategies to the various climatic variables that are expected to be changing. Recommendations are presented for research and analysis activities. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers. (ACR)

  20. Uncertainty in climate science and climate policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uncertainty in climate science and climate policy Jonathan Rougier University of Bristol, UK Michel1.tex. 1 Introduction This essay, written by a statistician and a climate scientist, describes our view of the gap that exists between current practice in mainstream climate science, and the practical

  1. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development Daniel H. Cole*THE COSTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE . ADAPTATIONCONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE . IV. A.

  2. Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Annual technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, W.C.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Northern ecosystems contain up to 455 Gt of C in the soil active layer and upper permafrost. The soil carbon in these layers is equivalent to approximately 60% of the carbon currently in the atmosphere as CO{sub 2}. Much of this carbon is stored in the soil as dead organic matter. Its fate is subject to the net effects of global change on the plant and soil systems of northern ecosystems. The arctic alone contains about 60 Gt C, 90% of which is present in the soil active layer and upper permafrost. The arctic is assumed to have been a sink for CO{sub 2} during the historic and recent geologic past. The arctic has the potential to be a very large, long-term source or sink of CO{sub 2} with respect to the atmosphere. In situ experimental manipulations of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, indicated that there is little effect of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on leaf level photosynthesis or whole-ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux over the course of weeks to years, respectively. However, there may be longer- term ecosystem responses to elevated CO{sub 2} that could ultimately affect ecosystem CO{sub 2} balance. In addition to atmospheric CO{sub 2}, climate may affect net ecosystem carbon balance. Recent results indicate that the arctic has become a source of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. This change coincides with recent climatic variation in the arctic, and suggests a positive feedback of arctic ecosystems on atmospheric CO{sub 2} and global change. The research proposed in this application has four principal aspects: (A) Long-term response of arctic plants and ecosystems to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}; (B) Circumpolar patterns of net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux; (C) In situ controls by temperature and moisture on net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux; (D) Scaling of CO{sub 2} flux from plot, to landscape, to regional scales (In conjunction with research proposed for NSF support).

  3. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change as approved Prepared by the California AirBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  4. Climate change action plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delivery Climate change action plan 2009-2011 #12;2 | Climate change action plan ©istockphoto.com #12;Climate Change Action Plan Climate change action plan | 3 Contents Overview 4 Preface and Introduction 5 Climate change predictions for Scotland 6 The role of forestry 7 Protecting and managing

  5. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources BoardBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  6. Climate Past, Climate Present, Climate Future Douglas Nychka,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nychka, Douglas

    series and an energy balance model. 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000 -1.5-1.0-0.50.00.5 Year Degree. Supported by US NSF 7th World Congress Prob. and Stat., Singapore July 2008 #12;What is climate? Climate will use statistics to talk about the "known un- knowns" for the Earth's climate Statistics uses

  7. A general equilibrium analysis of climate policy for aviation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillespie, Christopher Whittlesey

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regulation of aviation's contribution to the global problem of climate change is increasingly likely in the near term, but the method agreed upon by most economists-a multi-sectoral market-based approach such as a cap and ...

  8. Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Annual technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, W.C.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Northern ecosystems contain up to 455 Gt of C in the soil active layer and upper permafrost, which is equivalent to approximately 60% of the carbon currently in the atmosphere as CO{sub 2}. Much of this carbon is stored in the soil as dead organic matter. Its fate is subject to the net effects of global change on the plant and soil systems of northern ecosystems. The arctic alone contains about 60 Gt C, 90% of which is present in the soil active layer and upper permafrost, and is assumed to have been a sink for CO{sub 2} during the historic and recent geologic past. Depending on the nature, rate, and magnitude of global environmental change, the arctic may have a positive or negative feedback on global change. Results from the DOE- funded research efforts of 1990 and 1991 indicate that the arctic has become a source of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. Measurements made in the Barrow, Alaska region during 1992 support these results. This change coincides with recent climatic variation in the arctic, and suggests a positive feedback of arctic ecosystems on atmospheric CO{sub 2} and global change. There are obvious potential errors in scaling plot level measurements to landscape, mesoscale, and global spatial scales. In light of the results from the recent DOE-funded research, and the remaining uncertainties regarding the change in arctic ecosystem function due to high latitude warming, a revised set of research goals is proposed for the 1993--94 year. The research proposed in this application has four principal aspects: (A) Long- term response of arctic plants and ecosystems to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}. (B) Circumpolar patterns of net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux. (C) In situ controls by temperature and moisture on net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux. (D) Scaling of CO{sub 2} flux from plot, to landscape, to regional scales.

  9. Comment on "Methodology and results of calculating Central California surface temperature trends: evidence of human-induced climate change?" by Christy et al. (2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonfils, C; Duffy, P; Lobell, D

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the causes of observed regional temperature trends is essential to projecting the human influences on climate, and the societal impacts of these influences. In their recent study, Christy et al. (2006, hereinafter CRNG06) hypothesized that the presence of irrigated soils is responsible for rapid warming of summer nights occurring in California's Central Valley over the last century (1910-2003), an assumption that rules out any significant effect due to increased greenhouse gases, urbanization, or other factors in this region. We question this interpretation, which is based on an apparent contrast in summer nighttime temperature trends between the San Joaquin Valley ({approx} +0.3 {+-} 0.1 C/decade) and the adjacent western slopes of the Sierra Nevada (-0.25 {+-} 0.15 C/decade), as well as the amplitude, sign and uncertainty of the Sierra nighttime temperature trend itself. We, however, do not dispute the finding of other Sierra and Valley trends. Regarding the veracity of the apparent Sierra nighttime temperature trend, CRNG06 generated the Valley and Sierra time-series using a meticulous procedure that eliminates discontinuities and isolates homogeneous segments in temperature records from 41 weather stations. This procedure yields an apparent cooling of about -0.25 {+-} 0.15 C/decade in the Sierra region. However, because removal of one of the 137 Sierra segments, from the most elevated site (Huntington Lake, 2140m), causes an increase in nighttime temperature trend as large as the trend itself (of +0.25 C/decade, CH06), and leads to a zero trend, the apparent cooling of summer nights in the Sierra regions seems, in fact, largely uncertain.

  10. Future Climate Engineering Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Future Climate Engineering Solutions Joint report 13 engineering participating engeneering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Engineering Solutions ­ A Climate call from engineers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Summaries of National Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Summary of The Climate Plan

  11. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changing feedbacks in the climate–biosphere system Front.313–32 Bonan G B 2008 Forests and climate change: forcings,feedbacks, and the climate benefits of forests Science

  12. Climate Code Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Nick; Jones, David

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Code Foundation - who are we? A non-profit organisation founded in August 2010; our goal is to promote the public understanding of climate science, by increasing the visibility and clarity of the software used in climate science...

  13. Estradiol-Induced Object Memory Consolidation in Middle-Aged Female Mice Requires Dorsal Hippocampal Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase and Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Activation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Michael C.

    We previously demonstrated that dorsal hippocampal extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation is necessary for 17?[beta]-estradiol (E2[E subscript 2]) to enhance novel object recognition in young ovariectomized ...

  14. Corporate Climate Change Adaptation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbertsson, Nicole

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? On-going and future climate change is universally acknowledged. Climate changeincorporating global mean temperature rise, impacts on global hydrology and ecosystems willaffect human society and… (more)

  15. Climate Change Response

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Interior Climate Change Response "From the Everglades to the Great Lakes to Alaska and everywhere in between, climate change is a leading threat to natural and cultural...

  16. Climate Action Plan (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Commonwealth of Kentucky established the Kentucky Climate Action Plan Council (KCAPC) process to identify opportunities for Kentucky to respond to the challenge of global climate change while...

  17. Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Post-field season work plan, September 1, 1994--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The preliminary data from the temperature and water table manipulations indicated that net CO{sub 2} flux of both tussock and wet sedge tundra ecosystems is sensitive to changes in water table depth and soil temperature. The preliminary results from the patch, landscape, and regional flux measurements indicate that there are large deficiencies in our current ability to extrapolate from patch and landscape levels to the region. During fall 1994, our primary goals are to: (1) Analyze a full season of net CO{sub 2} flux from the in situ manipulations, and determine the effects of water table depth and elevated temperature on the C balance of arctic ecosystems. Once this task is complete, the data will be published in a form that discusses the importance of these environmental controls, and their relevance to future CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. (2) Analyze tower- and aircraft-based eddy correlation flux data, and develop methods to reduce the time required to analyze these data. (3) Determine the importance of environmental controls of the exchange of CO{sub 2} at each spatial scale, and to develop the necessary routines that will permit the scaling of fine-scale flux data to landscape and regional scales. (4) Prepare manuscripts for publication on net CO{sub 2} flux data for each spatial scale, latitudinal flux pattern, and on methods and considerations for scaling from point measurements to the landscape and regional scale.

  18. Lysyl oxidase like 4, a novel target gene of TGF-{beta}1 signaling, can negatively regulate TGF-{beta}1-induced cell motility in PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dong Joon [Medical Genomics Research Center, KRIBB, P.O. Box 115, Yusong, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Chul; Yang, Suk-Jin; Lee, Jung Ju; Bae, Eun Mi; Kim, Dong Min; Min, Sang Hyun; Kim, Soo Jung [Medical Genomics Research Center, KRIBB, P.O. Box 115, Yusong, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dong Chul [Ilsong Institute of Life Science, Hallym University, Anyang 431-060 (Korea, Republic of); Sang, Byung Chan [College of Agricultural Life and Sciences, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Myung, Pyung Keun [College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyung Chan [Medical Genomics Research Center, KRIBB, P.O. Box 115, Yusong, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kpark@kribb.re.kr; Yeom, Young Il [Medical Genomics Research Center, KRIBB, P.O. Box 115, Yusong, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: yeomyi@kribb.re.kr

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) is a multi-functional cytokine involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation and extracellular matrix formation. In search for novel genes mediating the TGF-{beta}1 function at downstream signaling, we performed a cDNA microarray analysis and identified 60 genes whose expression is regulated by TGF-{beta}1 in the liver cancer cell line PLC/PRF/5. Among them, we report here lysyl oxidase like 4 (LOXL4) as a novel target of TGF-{beta}1 signaling, and provide experimental evidence for its expression regulation and function. LOXL4 was found to be the only member of LOX family whose expression is induced by TGF-{beta}1 in hepatoma cells. Deletion mapping of the LOXL4 promoter indicated that the TGF-{beta}1 regulation of LOXL4 expression is mediated through the binding of AP1 transcription factor to a conserved region of the promoter. This was confirmed by the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay that captured c-Fos-bound chromatin from TGF-{beta}1-treated cells. Forced expression of LOXL4 in PLC/PRF/5 cells resulted in inhibition of cell motility through Matrigel in the presence of TGF-{beta}1 treatment. In parallel, LOXL4 suppressed the expression of laminins and {alpha}3 integrin and the activity of MMP2. These results suggest that LOXL4 may function as a negative feedback regulator of TGF-{beta}1 in cell invasion by inhibiting the metabolism of extracellular matrix (ECM) components.

  19. Overexpression of KAI1 induces autophagy and increases MiaPaCa-2 cell survival through the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Chun-Yan [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Institute of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Disease, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Institute of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Disease, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China); Department of Gastroenterology, Shenyang General Hospital of PLA, 83 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Yan, Jun; Yang, Yue-Feng; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Li, Qing-Fang; Zhang, Qun-Wei; Wang, Li-Sheng [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China)] [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Guo, Xiao-Zhong, E-mail: guoxiaozhong1962@163.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Shenyang General Hospital of PLA, 83 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)] [Department of Gastroenterology, Shenyang General Hospital of PLA, 83 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, Hua, E-mail: wanghua@bmi.ac.cn [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China)] [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China)

    2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Research highlights: {yields} We first investigate the effects of KAI1 on autophagy in MiaPaCa-2 cells. {yields} Our findings demonstrate that KAI1 induces autophagy, which in turn inhibits KAI1-induced apoptosis. {yields} This study also supplies a possible novel therapeutic method for the treatment of pancreatic cancer using autophagy inhibitors. -- Abstract: KAI1, a metastasis-suppressor gene belonging to the tetraspanin family, is known to inhibit cancer metastasis without affecting the primary tumorigenicity by inhibiting the epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling pathway. Recent studies have shown that hypoxic conditions of solid tumors induce high-level autophagy and KAI1 expression. However, the relationship between autophagy and KAI1 remains unclear. By using transmission electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and Western blotting, we found that KAI1 can induce autophagy in a dose- and time-dependent manner in the human pancreatic cell line MiaPaCa-2. KAI1-induced autophagy was confirmed by the expression of autophagy-related proteins LC3 and Beclin 1. KAI1 induces autophagy through phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinases rather than that of AKT. KAI1-induced autophagy protects MiaPaCa-2 cells from apoptosis and proliferation inhibition partially through the downregulation of poly [adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose] polymerase (PARP) cleavage and caspase-3 activation.

  20. Diverse cell stresses induce unique patterns of tRNA up- and down-regulation: tRNA-seq for quantifying changes in tRNA copy number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang, Yan Ling Joy

    Emerging evidence points to roles for tRNA modifications and tRNA abundance in cellular stress responses. While isolated instances of stress-induced tRNA degradation have been reported, we sought to assess the effects of ...

  1. "Managing Department Climate Change"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    "Managing Department Climate Change" #12;Presenters · Ronda Callister Professor, Department Department Climate? · Assesment is essential for determining strategies for initiating change · In a research climate · Each panelist will describe an intervention designed to improve department climate ­ Ronda

  2. programs in climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) project develops and maintains advanced numerical models of the ocean, sea ice, and ice sheets for use in global climate change

  3. Carbachol ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal epithelial tight junction damage by down-regulating NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ying [Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care Medicine and Emergency Medicine Center, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, Hubei Province, People's Republic of China (China)] [Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care Medicine and Emergency Medicine Center, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, Hubei Province, People's Republic of China (China); Li, Jianguo, E-mail: 2010lijianguo@sina.cn [Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care Medicine and Emergency Medicine Center, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, Hubei Province, People's Republic of China (China)] [Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care Medicine and Emergency Medicine Center, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, Hubei Province, People's Republic of China (China)

    2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol reduced the lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol ameliorated the lipopolysaccharide-induced ileal tight junction damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol prevented the LPS-induced NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol exerted its beneficial effects in an {alpha}7 nicotinic receptor-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Carbachol is a cholinergic agonist that protects the intestines after trauma or burn injury. The present study determines the beneficial effects of carbachol and the mechanisms by which it ameliorates the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with 10 mg/kg LPS. Results showed that the gut barrier permeability was reduced, the ultrastructural disruption of tight junctions (TJs) was prevented, the redistribution of zonula occludens-1 and claudin-2 proteins was partially reversed, and the nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-{kappa}{beta}) and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) activation in the intestinal epithelium were suppressed after carbachol administration in LPS-exposed rats. Pretreatment with the {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}7nAchR) antagonist {alpha}-bungarotoxin blocked the protective action of carbachol. These results suggested that carbachol treatment can protect LPS-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. Carbachol exerts its beneficial effect on the amelioration of the TJ damage by inhibiting the NF-{kappa}{beta} and MLCK pathways in an {alpha}7nAchR-dependent manner.

  4. Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Formulating Climate Change...

  5. Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate Engineering Center Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States October 29, 2009 #12;2Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States 2 Response Strategies to ClimateResponse Strategies to Climate ChangeChange

  6. {gamma}-aminobutyric acid{sub A} (GABA{sub A}) receptor regulates ERK1/2 phosphorylation in rat hippocampus in high doses of Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE)-induced impairment of spatial memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Gang; Zhang Wenbin [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Military Preventive Medicine, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China); Zhang Yun [465 Hospital, Jilin Medical College, Jilin 132001 (China); Chen Yaoming; Liu Mingchao; Yao Ting; Yang Yanxia; Zhao Fang [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Military Preventive Medicine, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China); Li Jingxia; Huang Chuanshu [Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, Tuxedo, New York 10987 (United States); Luo Wenjing [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Military Preventive Medicine, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China)], E-mail: luowenj@fmmu.edu.cn; Chen Jingyuan [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Military Preventive Medicine, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China)], E-mail: jy_chen@fmmu.edu.cn

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental and occupational exposure to Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE) has been reported to induce neurotoxicological and neurobehavioral effects, such as headache, nausea, dizziness, and disorientation, etc. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in MTBE-induced neurotoxicity are still not well understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of MTBE on spatial memory and the expression and function of GABA{sub A} receptor in the hippocampus. Our results demonstrated that intraventricular injection of MTBE impaired the performance of the rats in a Morris water maze task, and significantly increased the expression of GABA{sub A} receptor {alpha}1 subunit in the hippocampus. The phosphorylation of ERK1/2 decreased after the MTBE injection. Furthermore, the decreased ability of learning and the reduction of phosphorylated ERK1/2 level of the MTBE-treated rats was partly reversed by bicuculline injected 30 min before the training. These results suggested that MTBE exposure could result in impaired spatial memory. GABA{sub A} receptor may play an important role in the MTBE-induced impairment of learning and memory by regulating the phosphorylation of ERK in the hippocampus.

  7. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Changeand Kate Scow. 2006. “Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.

  8. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Kate Scow. 2006. “Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.Sea Level. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.

  9. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CLIMATE CHANGE Multiplying Threats to National Securityfor the impacts of climate change on national security. Pagea warming world. Page 11 “Climate change acts as a threat

  10. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    net impact of climate change on agriculture in California,of Climate Change on California Agriculture. ” PresentationEffects of Climate Change on California Agriculture Positive

  11. Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsidered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009 Paper 1080 Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredby author(s). Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredimpact of climate change on agriculture, there still exists

  12. Review: Preparing for Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunnas, Jan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Preparing for Climate Change By Michael D.Stephen, Preparing for Climate Change. A Boston Review Book.alkaline paper. “Climate change is inevitable, but disaster

  13. Urban Growth and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, Matthew E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007a The Economic Impacts of Climate Change: Evidence fromGreenstone. 2007b. Climate Change, Mortality and Adaptation:and Ariel Dinar, 1999, Climate Change, Agriculture, and

  14. Functional ANOVA and Regional Climate Experiments: A Statistical Analysis of Dynamic Downscaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sain, Steve

    added an urgency to predict changes in our climate due to our future behavior. The primary tools used the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (Solomon et al., 2007, http the Earth's climate, such as natural changes in solar or volcanic activity, human-induced changes

  15. Agriculture and Trade Opportunities for Tanzania: Past Volatility and Future Climate Changerode_672 429..447

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    Agriculture and Trade Opportunities for Tanzania: Past Volatility and Future Climate Changerode_672 global heterogeneity in climate-induced agricultural variability,Tanzania has the potential to substan could thus export grain to countries as climate change increases the likelihood of severe precipitation

  16. Climate change in a shoebox: Right result, wrong physics Paul Wagoner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobin, Roger G.

    Climate change in a shoebox: Right result, wrong physics Paul Wagoner TERC, Cambridge of carbon dioxide's far-infrared absorption in global climate change are more subtle than is commonly Teachers. DOI: 10.1119/1.3322738 I. INTRODUCTION The worldwide interest in climate change induced by the by

  17. Climate WorkshopsClimate Workshops for Department Chairsp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilbury, Dawn

    Climate WorkshopsClimate Workshops for Department Chairsp University of Wisconsin ADVANCE-IT Slides) #12;Why focus on departmental climate? Individuals experience climate in their immediate workplace negative climate than male faculty Improving department climate is critical for retention and advancement

  18. The Climate Policy Dilemma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pindyck, Robert S.

    Climate policy poses a dilemma for environmental economists. The economic argument for stringent greenhouse gas (GHG) abatement is far from clear. There is disagreement among both climate scientists and economists concerning ...

  19. The Climate Policy Dilemma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pindyck, Robert S.

    Climate policy poses a dilemma for environmental economists. The economic argument for stringent GHG abatement is far from clear. There is disagreement among both climate scientists and economists over the likelihood of ...

  20. Cambridge in transition : regulating parking in a growing city

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrentino, Cara Elizabeth

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parking is regulated today by cities to achieve a variety of goals including traffic reduction, air quality improvement, urban densification, and climate change mitigation. In the City of Cambridge, Massachusetts, parking ...

  1. NARUC: Regulation at the crossroads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reports on the review of changes during the last decade of the regulation of industries by the federal government. The state commissioners that make up the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners discuss the changing regulatory climate for a competitive industry, changes in the federal-state relationship, proposed changes in jurisdictional boundaries, acid rain legislation and emissions trading, and Senator J. Bennet Johnson's amendment to the Public Utilities Holding Company Act.

  2. METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Ming

    AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Journal of Climate EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary PDF it is available. © 201 American Meteorological Society1 #12;Sun et al. climate downscaling of the Australian currents 1 Marine downscaling of a future climate scenario for Australian boundary currents Chaojiao Sun

  3. Campus Climate Camden Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Stephen José

    Campus Climate Report Camden Campus New Brunswick/Piscataway Campus Newark Campus Student Survey #12;I. INTRODUCTION Executive Summary The Rutgers Campus Climate Survey was designed to determine how University, the campus climate surveys revealed strong areas of satisfaction with the Rutgers University

  4. Forest Research: Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

  5. Climate Change Workshop 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    1 Climate Change Workshop 2007 Adaptive Management and Resilience Relevant for the Platte River, UNL Climate Change Workshop 2007 · Resilience ·Why it matters · Adaptive Management ·How it helps ·Adaptive Capacity · What it is Overview Climate Change Workshop 2007 "A public Domain, once a velvet carpet

  6. Campus Conversations: CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attari, Shahzeen Z.

    review and input from scholars with expertise in climate change and communication. #12; Welcome Thank youCampus Conversations: CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE CAMPUS Southwestern Pennsylvania Program booklet is an adaptation and updating of Global Warming and Climate Change, a brochure developed in 1994

  7. Environment and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galles, David

    Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE #12;The opinions expressed;Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE Edited by Frank Laczko and Christine with with the financial support of #12;3 Migration, Environment and Climate Change: Assessing the Evidence Contents

  8. Climate Change Economics and Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, Daniela

    AFRICA COLLEGE Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy Adapting to Climate Change 3 CLIMATE...Furthermore, there is strong scientific evidence that climate change will disrupt the global economy, environment and society a growing population in a changing climate is, therefore, a major global challenge. Changes in climate

  9. Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice 10 November 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    1 Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice 10 November 2011 J. Hansen, M. Sato, coincident with increased global warming. The most dramatic and important change of the climate dice change is the natural variability of climate. How can a person discern long-term climate change, given

  10. Involvement of a chromatin modifier in response to mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP)-induced Sertoli cell injury: Probably an indirect action via the regulation of NF?B/FasL circuitry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Shiwei [Department of Urology, 174th Hospital of PLA, Fujian 361001 (China)] [Department of Urology, 174th Hospital of PLA, Fujian 361001 (China); Dong, Yushu [Department of Neurosurgery, 463rd Hospital of PLA, Shenyang 110042 (China)] [Department of Neurosurgery, 463rd Hospital of PLA, Shenyang 110042 (China); Xu, Chun; Jiang, Liming; Chen, Yongjie; Jiang, Cheng [Department of Urology, 174th Hospital of PLA, Fujian 361001 (China)] [Department of Urology, 174th Hospital of PLA, Fujian 361001 (China); Hou, Wugang, E-mail: gangwuhou@163.com [Department of Anesthesiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China)] [Department of Anesthesiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Li, Wei, E-mail: liweipepeyato@163.com [Department of Human Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China)] [Department of Human Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •MTA1 expression is upregulated in SCs upon MEHP treatment. •Knockdown of MTA1 in SCs impairs the MEHP-induced NF?B signaling activation. •Knockdown of MTA1 inhibits recruitment of NF?B onto FasL promoter in MEHP-treated SCs. -- Abstract: The Fas/FasL signaling pathway, controlled by nuclear factor-?B (NF?B) at the transcriptional level, is critical for triggering germ cell apoptosis in response to mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP)-induced Sertoli cell (SC) injury, but the exact regulation mechanism remain unknown. Here, we discovered that expression level of Metastasis associated protein 1 (MTA1), a component of the Mi-2/nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase complex, was upregulated in SCs during the early recovery after MEHP exposure. This expression change was in line with the dynamic changes in germ cell apoptosis in response to MEHP treatment. Furthermore, a knockdown of MTA1 by RNAi in SCs was found to impair the MEHP-induced early activation of NF?B pathway and abolish the recruitment of NF?B onto FasL promoter, which consequently diminished the MEHP-triggered FasL induction. Considering that Fas/FasL is a well characterized apoptosis initiating signaling during SCs injury, our results point to a potential “switch on” effect of MTA1, which may govern the activation of NF?B/FasL cascade in MEHP-insulted SCs. Overall, the MTA1/NF?B/FasL circuit may serve as an important defensive/repairing mechanism to help to control the germ cell quality after SCs injury.

  11. Climate Change Attribution Using Empirical Decomposition of Climatic Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loehle, Craig; 10.2174/1874282301105010074

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The climate change attribution problem is addressed using empirical decomposition. Cycles in solar motion and activity of 60 and 20 years were used to develop an empirical model of Earth temperature variations. The model was fit to the Hadley global temperature data up to 1950 (time period before anthropogenic emissions became the dominant forcing mechanism), and then extrapolated from 1951 to 2009. After subtraction of the model, the residuals showed an approximate linear upward trend after 1942. Herein we assume that the residual upward warming observed during the second half of the 20th century has been mostly induced by a worldwide rapid increase of anthropogenic emissions, urbanization and land use change. The warming observed before 1942 is relatively small and it is assumed to have been mostly naturally induced by a climatic recovery since the Little Ice Age of the 17th century and the Dalton Minimum at the beginning of the 19th century. The resulting full natural plus anthropogenic model fits the enti...

  12. The inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on platelet-derived growth factor-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration through up-regulating PGC-1{alpha} expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Wei [Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China) [Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of cardiology, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 246 Xuefu Road, Harbin 150081 (China); Guo, Ting; Zhang, Yan; Jiang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yongxian [Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China)] [Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zen, Ke, E-mail: kzen@nju.edu.cn [Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China)] [Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China); Yu, Bo, E-mail: yubodr@163.com [Department of cardiology, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 246 Xuefu Road, Harbin 150081 (China)] [Department of cardiology, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 246 Xuefu Road, Harbin 150081 (China); Zhang, Chen-Yu, E-mail: cyzhang@nju.edu.cn [Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China)] [Jiangsu Diabetes Center, State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dexamethasone has been shown to inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration, which is required for preventing restenosis. However, the mechanism underlying effect of dexamethasone remains unknown. We have previously demonstrated that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1{alpha}) can inhibit VSMC migration and proliferation. Here, we investigated the role of PGC-1{alpha} in dexamethasone-reduced VSMC migration and explored the possible mechanism. We first examined PGC-1{alpha} expression in cultured rat aortic VSMCs. The results revealed that incubation of VSMCs with dexamethasone could significantly elevate PGC-1{alpha} mRNA expression. In contrast, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) decreased PGC-1{alpha} expression while stimulating VSMC migration. Mechanistic study showed that suppression of PGC-1{alpha} by small interfering RNA strongly abrogated the inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on VSMC migration, whereas overexpression of PGC-1{alpha} had the opposite effect. Furthermore, an analysis of MAPK signal pathways showed that dexamethasone inhibited ERK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation in VSMCs. Overexpression of PGC-1{alpha} decreased both basal and PDGF-induced p38 MAPK phosphorylation, but it had no effect on ERK phosphorylation. Finally, inhibition of PPAR{gamma} activation by a PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 abolished the suppressive effects of PGC-1{alpha} on p38 MAPK phosphorylation and VSMC migration. These effects of PGC-1{alpha} were enhanced by a PPAR{gamma} agonist troglitazone. Collectively, our data indicated for the first time that one of the anti-migrated mechanisms of dexamethasone is due to the induction of PGC-1{alpha} expression. PGC-1{alpha} suppresses PDGF-induced VSMC migration through PPAR{gamma} coactivation and, consequently, p38 MAPK inhibition.

  13. Alternative Regulation (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Utility regulators, including the Public Service Board, have applied a new type of regulation, often called "alternative regulation" or "incentive regulation." There are many variants of this type...

  14. Climate history and paleoclimate -HS 2011 Climate proxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 Climate proxies 18O Climate History & Paleoclimate ­ September 30, 2011 #12;How do we know about the past? Instrumental Historical Through proxies Climate proxies Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 #12;What is a `proxy'? "Proxy, as used here

  15. Ensemble climate predictions using climate models and observational constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REVIEW Ensemble climate predictions using climate models and observational constraints BY PETER A. STOTT 1,* AND CHRIS E. FOREST 2 1 Hadley Centre for Climate Change (Reading Unit), Meteorology Building for constraining climate predictions based on observations of past climate change. The first uses large ensembles

  16. Climate history and paleoclimate -HS 2011 Future climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 Future climate Climate History & Paleoclimate - December 9, 2011 1 #12;Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 IPCC 2007 4th Assessment report (AR4) More information can be found: http://www.ipcc.ch/ Remark: 5th assessment report is due in 2013/2014 2 #12;Climate

  17. Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Professor of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulme, Mike

    Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Mike Hulme Professor of Climate Change Science, Society and Sustainability Group School of Environmental Sciences Rethinking Climate Change, Conflict security" "increase risk of conflicts among and within nations" #12;· from `climatic change' to `climate-change

  18. Is this climate porn? How does climate change communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Is this climate porn? How does climate change communication affect our perceptions and behaviour;1 Is this climate porn? How does climate change communication affect our perceptions and behaviour? Thomas D. Lowe 1 these kinds of messages (which have recently been dubbed `climate porn' (Ereaut and Segnit, 2006)), can

  19. Climate Change Review of Muller's chapter on Climate Change from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Browder, Tom

    Climate Change · Review of Muller's chapter on Climate Change from Physics for Future Society) controversy on climate change (e.g. resignation of Hal Lewis, Ivar Giaever and other notable. #12;Some climate changes basics · IPCC = Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change · The IPCC

  20. Government Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashford, Nicholas

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract. Interest in the use of so-called voluntary approaches to supplement or replace formal environmental regulation is on the rise, both in Europe and in the United States. These approaches fall into two general ...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - aggregation-induced enhanced emission Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roundtable Moderator: Tom Sparrow, Purdue University Summary: affected by emissions trading regulations related to climate change: Duke Power, Caterpillar, and BP. Some......

  2. The Climate Impacts LINK Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    The Climate Impacts LINK Project The Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia Funded by the UK Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions, Contract Ref EPG 1/1/68 The Climate Impacts LINK Project: Applying Results from the Hadley Centre's Climate Change Experiments for Climate

  3. Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises Committee on Abrupt Climate Change Ocean Studies Board of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Abrupt climate change : inevitable surprises / Committee on Abrupt Climate Change, Ocean Studies Board, Polar Research Board, Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate

  4. Conservation and Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

  5. Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air ResourcesBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  6. Presented by Climate End Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. Department of Energy Bettge_LCF Climate_SC10 CESM working groups · Application ­ Climate change, paleoclimate climate change projections for IPCC AR5 Gerald Meehl and Warren Washington, NCAR · Climate changePresented by Climate End Station Thomas Bettge National Center for Atmospheric Research James B

  7. The Corn and Climate Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.

    Climate Change Science Program Office Part 2: Climate Impacts on Midwestern Agriculture: MonitoringThe Corn and Climate Report An overview of climate science in the service of Midwestern agriculture Administration National Weather Service North Central Bioeconomy Consortium US Climate Change Science Program

  8. International Finance and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    International Finance and Climate Change Thursday, October 17, 2013 Breakfast ­ 8:30 a Principal Climate Change Specialist, Climate Business Group at International Finance Corporation, World Bank Group Vladimir Stenek Senior Climate Change Specialist, Climate Business Department of the International

  9. Drought Update Colorado Climate Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drought Update Colorado Climate Center Roger Pielke, Sr., Director Prepared by Tara Green and Odie Bliss http://climate.atmos.colostate.edu #12;© 2003 by The Colorado Climate Center. 2 http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/research/2003/mar/st005dv00pcp200303.html #12;© 2003 by The Colorado Climate Center. 3 #12;© 2003

  10. Climate Change, Drought & Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry Climate Change, Drought, and Environment—Michael Champ, Executive Director, The Sustainable Water Challenge

  11. Climate Action Plan (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Governor Timothy M. Kaine established the Governor's Commission on Climate Change in December 2007. The commission prepared a plan for Virginia that identified ways to reduce greenhouse gas...

  12. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    much more than carbon sequestration does, and often in abiophysics, carbon sequestration, climate change, climatethe accompanying carbon sequestration does—and sometimes in

  13. ClimateChangeLIVE Webcast: Join the Climate Conversation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join ClimateChangeLIVE's webcast, bringing together students and climate experts for a discussion about climate change and what students and classes around the country are doing to be part of the climate solution. Students will be able to interact with climate scientists and experts online through Facebook and Twitter. A GreenWorks! grant will be offered to help schools with climate action projects.

  14. 1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate A BrAzil-UK AnAlysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;3DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL April 2011Alysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;4 DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE

  15. Conceptualizing climate change in the context of a climate system: implications for climate and environmental education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    Conceptualizing climate change in the context of a climate system: implications for climate 1 September 2011) Today there is much interest in teaching secondary students about climate change. Much of this effort has focused directly on students' understanding of climate change. We hypothesize

  16. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Climate Impacts of Intermittent Upper Ocean1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    heat content locally. Recent studies5 suggest that TC-induced ocean mixing can have global climate climate impacts by contributing to oceanic poleward heat transport [Emanuel,32 2001; Sriver and HuberJOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Climate Impacts of Intermittent

  17. Variation in Estimated Ozone-Related Health Impacts of Climate Change due to Modeling Choices and Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, Ellen S.; Grambsch, A.; Weaver, C. P.; Morefield, Philip; Huang, Jin; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Nolte, Christopher G.; Adams, P. J.; Liang, Xin-Zhong; Zhu, J.; Mahoney, Hardee

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future climate change may cause air quality degradation via climate-induced changes in meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and emissions into the air. Few studies have explicitly modeled the potential relationships between climate change, air quality, and human health, and fewer still have investigated the sensitivity of estimates to the underlying modeling choices.

  18. Global air quality and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of Chemistry- Climate Models 5, 2010. 320 S. Wu,and R. Van Dorland, in Climate Change 2007: The PhysicalInter- governmental Panel on Climate Change, ed. D. Qin, M.

  19. Climate Change at Annual Timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stine, Alexander Robin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1900–93, Journal of Climate, 10 (5), 1004–1020, 1997. Zhou,University of East Anglia’s Climate Research Unit (Jones etand those from WCRP “Climate of the Twentieth Century”

  20. MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION TO PUBLIC HEALTH RISKS's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012041 Prepared for: California Energy Commission of California. #12; ii ABSTRACT This study reviewed first available frameworks for climate change adaptation

  1. book review: Climate change mapped

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shanahan, Mike

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of millions 2 .   Climate change is a moving target and introductions  to  climate change’, the Atlas stands out media reporting on climate change.   Cambridge University 

  2. Climate Change at Annual Timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stine, Alexander Robin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    carbon cycling to global climate change, Nature, 393 (6682),2005. Meehl, G. , et al. , Climate Change 2007: The PhysicalIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, chap. 10. Global

  3. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    developing countries "can significantly offset the adverse effects of climate change").Climate Change, 2 which calls on developed countries (but not developing countries)developing countries that will bear the bulk of the effects of climate change.

  4. Uptake of donor lymphocytes treated with 8-methoxypsoralen and ultraviolet A light by recipient dendritic cells induces CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells and down-regulates cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, De-Hua [Organ Transplant Center, Chinese PLA 309th Hospital, No. 17A Hei-Shan-Hu Road, Beijing 100091 (China)] [Organ Transplant Center, Chinese PLA 309th Hospital, No. 17A Hei-Shan-Hu Road, Beijing 100091 (China); Dou, Li-Ping [Department of Hematology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, No. 28 Fu-Xing Road, Beijing 100853 (China)] [Department of Hematology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, No. 28 Fu-Xing Road, Beijing 100853 (China); Wei, Yu-Xiang; Du, Guo-Sheng; Zou, Yi-Ping; Song, Ji-Yong; Zhu, Zhi-Dong; Cai, Ming; Qian, Ye-Yong [Organ Transplant Center, Chinese PLA 309th Hospital, No. 17A Hei-Shan-Hu Road, Beijing 100091 (China)] [Organ Transplant Center, Chinese PLA 309th Hospital, No. 17A Hei-Shan-Hu Road, Beijing 100091 (China); Shi, Bing-Yi, E-mail: shibingyi@medmail.com.cn [Organ Transplant Center, Chinese PLA 309th Hospital, No. 17A Hei-Shan-Hu Road, Beijing 100091 (China)] [Organ Transplant Center, Chinese PLA 309th Hospital, No. 17A Hei-Shan-Hu Road, Beijing 100091 (China)

    2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is an effective immunomodulatory therapy and has been demonstrated to be beneficial for graft-vs-host disease and solid-organ allograft rejection. ECP involves reinfusion of a patient's autologous peripheral blood leukocytes treated ex vivo with 8-methoxypsoralen and UVA light radiation (PUVA). Previous studies focused only on ECP treatment of recipient immune cells. Our study is the first to extend the target of ECP treatment to donor immune cells. The results of in vitro co-culture experiments demonstrate uptake of donor PUVA-treated splenic lymphocytes (PUVA-SPs) by recipient immature dendritic cells (DCs). Phagocytosis of donor PUVA-SPs does not stimulate phenotype maturation of recipient DCs. In the same co-culture system, donor PUVA-SPs enhanced production of interleukin-10 and interferon-{gamma} by recipient DCs and impaired the subsequent capability of recipient DCs to stimulate recipient naive T cells. Phagocytosis of donor PUVA-SP (PUVA-SP DCs) by recipient DCs shifted T-cell responses in favor of T helper 2 cells. Infusion of PUVA-SP DCs inhibited cardiac allograft rejection in an antigen-specific manner and induced CD4{sup +}CD25{sup high}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells. In conclusion, PUVA-SP DCs simultaneously deliver the donor antigen and the regulatory signal to the transplant recipient, and thus can be used to develop a novel DC vaccine for negative immune regulation and immune tolerance induction.

  5. Nuclear apoJ: A low dose radiation inducible regulator of cell death. Final report for period September 15, 1998 - September 14, 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aronow, Bruce J.

    2002-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was based on preliminary data that was published by Dr. Boothman (Yang et al. 2000) which indicated a strong induction of apoJ gene expression, increased secretion of the protein, and accumulation of an apparently somewhat different form of the apoJ protein in the nucleus of MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells undergoing response to DNA damage. A clone expressing apoJ protein was isolated that was capable of interacting with Ku80, a component of the double strand break repair complex that is essential for the successful repair of rearranging immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes as evidenced by failure to produce mature B and T cells in the absence of Ku70. ApoJ clones isolated and characterized by Dr. Boothman bound strongly to a Ku-70 ''bait'' protein. Over-expression of these same clones in a cell line was capable of killing the cell. ApoJ is very strongly induced in many instances of programmed cell death and has been proposed repeatedly to play some sort of effector role in the process. Our principle hypothesis for this study was that the strong induction of the apoJ gene and the particular expression of a nuclear form of the protein was potentially a causal factor in the decision point made by the cell as it attempts to repair double-strand breakage based DNA damage. The hypothesis was that if sufficiently high damage occurred, it would be deleterious to maintain the cell's viability through continued DNA repair. One method to inhibit DNA repair might be by inhibiting proteins such as Ku-70 that are necessary for double-strand break repair. If apoJ does play a critical role in tipping the decision balance over to cell death, we reasoned that deficiency of apoJ would cause increased accumulation of cells with DNA damage and that this might decrease cell death in response to DNA damage and increase tumor occurrence rates. To test this hypothesis and its potential implications, we exposed wildtype and apoJ deficient animals that we constructed through gene targeting to increasing levels of ionizing radiation from a Cesium source. Data gathered under the support of this grant application initially indicated that apoJ deficient animals were more resistant to radiation, but as we accumulated more and more data points and covered a tighter exposure range, the genotype-based differences became insignificant. However, the possibility existed that because mortality based radiation-resistance could be attributable to mechanism for which nuclear apoJ was not rate determining, we maintained a very large of colony of apoJ knockout and wildtype animals in both the C57/B16 and Cv129 strain backgrounds that were exposed to sub-lethal levels of ionizing radiation to monitor for the occurrence of tumors. These animals were allowed to fully recover and age normally in either germ free or normal animal housing. Our results demonstrated no significant differences between wildtype and apoJ knockout animals over a period that extended up to 30 months for individual animals. We recorded similar weight gain, a relatively low mortality rate, and a similar mixture and rate of sarcoma and adenocarcinomas after surviving the initial ionizing radiation exposures. Thus we conclude that apoJ gene function, which was totally eliminated by our gene targeting, did not influence radiation sensitivity or serve as a tumor suppressor in response to DNA damage.

  6. Climate Sciences: Atmospheric Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    1 Climate Sciences: Atmospheric Thermodynamics Instructor: Lynn Russell, NH343 http://aerosol.ucsd.edu/courses.html Text: Curry & Webster Atmospheric Thermodynamics Ch1 Composition Ch2 Laws Ch3 Transfers Ch12 Energy Climate Sciences: Atmospheric Thermodynamics Instructor: Lynn Russell, NH343 http

  7. Moving Toward Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as a response to climate disruption. Even the most optimistic models forecast that if greenhouse-gas emissions Appendix 1 Solutions on the Ground 67 Appendix 2 Reliability of Trends and Forecasts 78 Literature Cited 81. In the absence of substantial reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions, the climate of the Y2Y region

  8. Climatic change at high elevation sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Henry F. Diaz

    1998-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A Workshop on climatic change at high elevation sites was held September 11-15, 1995 in Wengen, Switzerland. The meeting was sponsored by both U.S. (Department of Energy, National Science Foundation and National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration) and European (Swiss National Science Foundation, European Science Foundation, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology) agencies. The goals of the workshop were to (1) focus the attention of the world climate community on the existence of unique high elevation geophysical records around the world, (2) highlight the value of these observing sites for climate change detection efforts and to help insure the continued support of governments and of relevant institutions in the maintenance of these high elevation data gathering efforts, (3) discuss and evaluate climatic trends that may be present in these records, and to compare the information with available paleoenvironmental records of glaciers, tree-rings and varved sediments from the alpine zones, and (4) discuss and evaluate information about elevational differences in current and projected greenhouse-gas induced climatic changes in coupled General Circulation Models.

  9. P 4.1 CITEL Climate change and international trade from an economic and legal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    45 P 4.1 CITEL Climate change and international trade from an economic and legal perspective PI What does the law of the World Trade Organization (WTO law) say about border tax adjustment measures (BTA measures) for regulations, technical standards and taxes on climate-related process and production

  10. Climate Change and Plant Diseases: Forests, Crops, and Food Katherine Siegel '13 and Priyan Wickremesinghe `13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Kate

    : Plants provide humans and animals with food, shelter, and fuel, and they form the foundation of ecosystem services including water supply, climate regulation, and erosion control. Plant health is essential to the proper functioning of ecosystems, which in turn support human health and well-being. Climate change can

  11. International Governance of Climate Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parson, Edward; Ernst, Lia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Change, Geoengineering, and International1992); David W. Keith, Geoengineering the Climate: HistoryStephen H. Schneider, Geoengineering: Could — Or Should — We

  12. Urban Growth and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, Matthew E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1999, Climate Change, Agriculture, and Developing Countries:climate change matters because it is likely to be the case that local governments in developing countries

  13. Climate simulators and climate projections Jonathan Rougier1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Peter

    Climate simulators and climate projections Jonathan Rougier1 Department of Mathematics University;Abstract We provide a statistical interpretation of current practice in climate mod- elling. This includes: definitions for weather and climate; clarifying the relationship between simulator output and simulator

  14. Dealing in Doubt: The Climate Denial Industry and Climate Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairchild, Mark D.

    Dealing in Doubt: The Climate Denial Industry and Climate Science A Brief History of Attacks action on climate change has become more likely. This time, though, there is a difference. In recent, despite its lack of evidence or scientific support. The last peak in the climate denial campaign

  15. The role of solar absorption in climate and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The role of solar absorption in climate and climate change William Collins UC Berkeley Research Boulder, Colorado, USA #12;2 Prior Research on Absorption and Climate Field Experiments: · Central · Climate with enhanced cloud absorption Synthesis of models and aerosol observations: · Development

  16. Regulation 28: Library REGULATION 28: LIBRARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Regulation 28: Library 180 REGULATION 28: LIBRARY The purpose of this Regulation is to safeguard the common interests of all Library users. All persons are admitted on the understanding that they have read and agreed to observe the Library Regulations. Breach of this Regulation could result in membership being

  17. 48 CRO MAR/APR 2008 Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Andrew J.

    , with the price of oil reaching heights of $105 a barrel and a price for carbon threatening to raise it from $5 Mulally, "I firmly believe we are at an inflection point in the world's history as it relates to climate and it takes several forms. First, federal regulation that will create a price for carbon is coming within

  18. Biological Impacts of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarty, John P.

    Biological Impacts of Climate Change John P McCarty, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE and reproduction depend on how well adapted individuals are to local climate patterns. Climate change can disrupt subsequent impacts on populations or species' distributions across geographic regions. Climate change may

  19. Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gvirtzman, Haim

    climate and cultural changes are observed in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Near East [e.g., Bookman et1 23 Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International Journal Devoted to the Description, Causes and Implications of Climatic Change ISSN 0165-0009 Volume 112 Combined 3-4 Climatic Change (2012) 112:769-789 DOI

  20. Understanding and Attributing Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Jason E.

    9 Understanding and Attributing Climate Change Coordinating Lead Authors: Gabriele C. Hegerl (USA. Nicholls, J.E. Penner and P.A. Stott, 2007: Under- standing and Attributing Climate Change. In: Climate of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Solomon, S., D. Qin, M. Manning, Z. Chen, M. Marquis, K.B. Averyt, M

  1. Potential Impacts of CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Potential Impacts of CLIMATE CHANGE on U.S. Transportation Potential Impacts of CLIMATE CHANGE on U.S. Transportation TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH BOARD SPECIAL REPORT 290 #12;#12;Committee on Climate Change and U Washington, D.C. 2008 www.TRB.org Potential Impacts of CLIMATE CHANGE on U.S. Transportation TRANSPORTATION

  2. Refining climate models

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Warren, Jeff; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Ricciuto, Daniel

    2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Using dogwood trees, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers are gaining a better understanding of the role photosynthesis and respiration play in the atmospheric carbon dioxide cycle. Their findings will aid computer modelers in improving the accuracy of climate simulations.

  3. Climate Action Plan (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recognizing the implications that global climate change may have on the economy, environment and quality of life in Minnesota, Governor Tim Pawlenty signed into law the 2007 Next Generation Energy...

  4. Climate Action Plan (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There is a growing scientific consensus that increasing emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere are affecting the temperature and variability of the Earth’s climate. Recognizing the...

  5. Refining climate models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Jeff; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Ricciuto, Daniel

    2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Using dogwood trees, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers are gaining a better understanding of the role photosynthesis and respiration play in the atmospheric carbon dioxide cycle. Their findings will aid computer modelers in improving the accuracy of climate simulations.

  6. Climate Science and Drought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas Climate Change and Drought Wendy Gordon, Ph.D. The University of Texas ? Austin Environmental Science Institute Texas Wildfires 2011 From the beginning of the fire season on November 15, 2010 to October 31, 2011 nearly 28,000 fires had... have been particularly severe due to the ongoing 2011 Southern US drought, and exacerbating the problem is land management practices, the unusual convergence of strong winds, unseasonably warm temperatures, and low humidity. Climate...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - apoptotic mechanisms induced Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cells induced... Ab with nave apoptotic T cells induced robust immunity. The infusion of large numbers of apoptotic cells has... Regulation of Immune ... Source: Iowa...

  8. Regulators, Requirements, Statutes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Statutes Regulators, Requirements, Statutes The Laboratory must comply with environmental laws and regulations that apply to Laboratory operations. Contact Environmental...

  9. Estimating the potential for twenty-first century sudden climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    change; water cycle; solar variability; ice sheets; abrupt climate change; sea-level rise 1. Introduction­climate feedbacks clearly have the potential to induce sudden change, but are relatively poorly understood that was addressed effectively by the world community. Thinning of the stratospheric ozone layer caused widespread

  10. Geoengineering the Earth's Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Google Tech Talks

    2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Emergency preparedness is generally considered to be a good thing, yet there is no plan regarding what we might do should we be faced with a climate emergency. Such an emergency could take the form of a rapid shift in precipitation patterns, a collapse of the great ice sheets, the imminent triggering of strong climate system feedbacks, or perhaps the loss of valuable ecosystems. Over the past decade, we have used climate models to investigate the potential to reverse some of the effects of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere by deflecting some incoming sunlight back to space. This would probably be most cost-effectively achieved with the placement of small particles in or above the stratosphere. Our model simulations indicate that such geoengineering approaches could potentially bring our climate closer to the state is was in prior to the introduction of greenhouse gases. This talk will present much of what is known about such geoengineering approaches, and raise a range of issues likely to stimulate lively discussion. Speaker: Ken Caldeira Ken Caldeira is a scientist at the Carnegie Institution Department of Global Ecology and a Professor (by courtesy) at the Stanford University Department of Environmental and Earth System Sciences. Previously, he worked for 12 years in the Energy and Environment Directorate at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Department of Energy). His research interests include the numerical simulation of Earth's climate, carbon, and biogeochemistry; ocean acidification; climate emergency response systems; evaluating approaches to supplying environmentally-friendly energy services; ocean carbon sequestration; long-term evolution of climate and geochemical cycles; and marine biogeochemical cycles. Caldeira has a B.A. in Philosophy from Rutgers College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences from New York University.

  11. Geoengineering the Earth's Climate

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Google Tech Talks

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emergency preparedness is generally considered to be a good thing, yet there is no plan regarding what we might do should we be faced with a climate emergency. Such an emergency could take the form of a rapid shift in precipitation patterns, a collapse of the great ice sheets, the imminent triggering of strong climate system feedbacks, or perhaps the loss of valuable ecosystems. Over the past decade, we have used climate models to investigate the potential to reverse some of the effects of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere by deflecting some incoming sunlight back to space. This would probably be most cost-effectively achieved with the placement of small particles in or above the stratosphere. Our model simulations indicate that such geoengineering approaches could potentially bring our climate closer to the state is was in prior to the introduction of greenhouse gases. This talk will present much of what is known about such geoengineering approaches, and raise a range of issues likely to stimulate lively discussion. Speaker: Ken Caldeira Ken Caldeira is a scientist at the Carnegie Institution Department of Global Ecology and a Professor (by courtesy) at the Stanford University Department of Environmental and Earth System Sciences. Previously, he worked for 12 years in the Energy and Environment Directorate at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Department of Energy). His research interests include the numerical simulation of Earth's climate, carbon, and biogeochemistry; ocean acidification; climate emergency response systems; evaluating approaches to supplying environmentally-friendly energy services; ocean carbon sequestration; long-term evolution of climate and geochemical cycles; and marine biogeochemical cycles. Caldeira has a B.A. in Philosophy from Rutgers College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences from New York University.

  12. Late Holocene hurricane activity and climate variability in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, Daniel Philip

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hurricane activity in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico and its relationship to regional and large-scale climate variability during the Late Holocene is explored. A 4500-year record of hurricane-induced storm surges is ...

  13. Climate & Environmental Sciences | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environmental Sciences Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand...

  14. Northeast Climate Science Center: Transposing Extreme Rainfall...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Center: Transposing Extreme Rainfall to Assess Climate Vulnerability Northeast Climate Science Center: Transposing Extreme Rainfall to Assess Climate Vulnerability November 12,...

  15. NEW WORK AND STUDY OPPORTUNITIES IN CLIMATE CHANGE Climate System Analysis Group (CSAG)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    . - Postdoc: Climate modeling - Postdoc: Climate change information communication and dissemination - Research Associate: Climate change information communication and dissemination - PhD: Climate change information communication and dissemination - MSc/PhD: Physical science of climate change What to expect: Successful

  16. Status of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Status of Climate Change 2013 CaTee Conference San Antonio 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-56 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Menu for Today • IPCC 2013: Assessment Report #5 • Facts about Climate Change... • Who will Win, Who will Lose • What Needs to be Done ESL-KT-13-12-56 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 IPCC #5 • No great surprises - Sharper language • Uncertainties are still large • Essentially...

  17. Climate Data Operators (CDO)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group and Userof aChristinaCliff joins EMSL as101010ClimateClimate

  18. UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National Adaptation Programme Meg Patel Defra #12 change #12;Weather & climate impacts - economic, societal, environmental Water consumption per capita;Legislative Framework Climate Change Act 2008 Adaptation Reporting Power 2011 Climate Change Risk Assessment

  19. ii Colorado Climate Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;ii Colorado Climate Table of Contents Web: http://climate.atmos.colostate.edu Colorado Climate Spring 2002 Vol. 3, No. 2 Lightning in Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Colorado Climate in Review

  20. Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric T. DeWeaver

    2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. The examination of present-day climate also includes diagnostic intercomparison of model simulations and observed mean climate and climate variability using reanalysis and satellite datasets. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A further objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system.

  1. Emission Regulations Reduced Impact of Climate Change in CA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    black carbon on California. In conducting the study, scientists used computer models and air pollution data collected by aircraft, satellite and ground monitors. The study's...

  2. Climate regulation of fire emissions and deforestation in equatorial Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    different types of fire, with peat fires emitting up to fourof carbon released from peat and forest fires in IndonesiaM, Wo¨sten H, Page S (2006) PEAT-CO2: assessment of CO2

  3. Emission Regulations Reduced Impact of Climate Change in CA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4: Networking for37 East and West Other SLACScienceSeniorEmission

  4. Climate Action Plan (Ontario, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Climate Ready, Ontario's Adaptation Strategy and Action Plan, outlines the problems, goals, and key strategies for the province's approach to climate change and the problems it poses. The Plan...

  5. Session Title Climate Smart Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Elizabeth A.

    Session Title Climate Smart Agriculture Session Date Khosla (moderator) Professor, Soil and Crop Sciences College of Agricultural Climate Smart Agriculture is a multi-disciplinary approach to practice agriculture

  6. Climate Change | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Climate Change Climate Change September 16, 2014 C3E Spotlights Women Leaders in Clean Energy Careers Women clean energy leaders convene in Boston for the Women in Clean Energy...

  7. Farming: A Climate Change Culprit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Simulations run at NERSC show impact of land-use change on African monsoon precipitation June 7, 2014 | Tags:...

  8. Climate Action Plan (New Hampshire)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    29 members of Governor John Lynch’s Climate Change Policy Task Force developed a Climate Action Plan in 2009. It is aimed at achieving the greatest feasible reductions in greenhouse gas emissions...

  9. Climate Extremes, Uncertainty and Impacts Climate Change Challenge: The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Extremes, Uncertainty and Impacts Climate Change Challenge: The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, AR4) has resulted in a wider acceptance of global climate change climate extremes and change impacts. Uncertainties in process studies, climate models, and associated

  10. Climate Action Plan (Manitoba, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manitoba's Climate Action Plan centers around energy efficiency, although it includes mandates and initiatives for renewable sources of energy.

  11. Variable temperature seat climate control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karunasiri, Tissa R. (Van Nuys, CA); Gallup, David F. (Pasadena, CA); Noles, David R. (Glendale, CA); Gregory, Christian T. (Alhambra, CA)

    1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A temperature climate control system comprises a variable temperature seat, at least one heat pump, at least one heat pump temperature sensor, and a controller. Each heat pump comprises a number of Peltier thermoelectric modules for temperature conditioning the air in a main heat exchanger and a main exchanger fan for passing the conditioned air from the main exchanger to the variable temperature seat. The Peltier modules and each main fan may be manually adjusted via a control switch or a control signal. Additionally, the temperature climate control system may comprise a number of additional temperature sensors to monitor the temperature of the ambient air surrounding the occupant as well as the temperature of the conditioned air directed to the occupant. The controller is configured to automatically regulate the operation of the Peltier modules and/or each main fan according to a temperature climate control logic designed both to maximize occupant comfort during normal operation, and minimize possible equipment damage, occupant discomfort, or occupant injury in the event of a heat pump malfunction.

  12. BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

  13. BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report executive summary #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

  14. CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS, VULNERABILITIES, AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012071 Prepared for: California Energy, as well as projections of future changes in climate based on modeling studies using various plausible

  15. Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources #12;CLIMATE CHANGE SCOPING PLAN State of California Air Resources Board Resolution 08-47 December 11 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that cause global warming; WHEREAS, the adverse impacts of climate change

  16. Climate Change Action Plan Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    Climate Change Action Plan Report Intermountain Region 2013 National Park Service Resource Stewardship and Science Landscape Conservation and Climate Change Division #12;About this Report Each National Park Service is responding to the challenge of climate change; and (2) raise awareness among NPS

  17. 4, 28752899, 2007 Climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    HESSD 4, 2875­2899, 2007 Climate change impact and model inaccuracy P. Droogers et al. Title Page are under open-access review for the journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Climate change impact­2899, 2007 Climate change impact and model inaccuracy P. Droogers et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  18. Climate Change Major information sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.ipcc.ch/ Vital Climate Graphics, at http://www.grida.no/climate/vital/ Climate Change Impacts on US, at http://www.gcrio.org/NationalAssessment/ Greenhouse Warming Prediction #12;Energy Predictions 2 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA); International Energy Agency (IEA) 2% growth per year, or doubling in 35 years (shortcut: 70/%=doubling) Fossil

  19. COLORADO CLIMATE Basic Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or cold, wetness or dryness, calm or storm, clearness or cloudiness Climate - the statistical collection;The Earth's Energy Balance Incoming energy from the sun (solar radiation) heats the Earth Some by the Earth and re-emitted Incoming solar radiation is shorter wavelengths (higher energy) than what

  20. ENERGY FLOWS CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    ENERGY FLOWS FORCINGS CLIMATE CHANGE A REALLY TOUGH PROBLEM Stephen E. Schwartz, BNL, 7-20-11 www average temperature 15°C or 59°F #12;ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION Power per area Energy per time per area Unit" temperature to radiative flux. #12;GLOBAL ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per

  1. CLIMATE POLICY The Planet's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falge, Eva

    CLIMATE POLICY The Planet's Laundromat The Planet's Laundromat ANTHROPOLOGY Rukina's Remarkable Planck Society's Science Express last fall as it began its trip through India. India's Prime Minister Man). As a mem- ber of the German delegation, the visit afford- ed me the opportunity to learn more about India

  2. Exploring Mars' Climate History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exploring Mars' Climate History #12;2 Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter ESA Mars Express (NASA: MARSIS by studying the solar wind and other interactions with the Sun. #12;The solar wind is a high-speed stream of electrons and protons released from the Sun. #12;High-energy photons (light) stream constantly from the Sun

  3. METEOROLOGY 5503 CLIMATE DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    ­ Present Average Climate System Behavior (14 lectures) History; Vision of Victor Starr; Global Budgets of Angular Momentum, Energy, Water Vapor; Regional Water Budget; Meridional Ocean Heat Transport 3 and Indices: Diagnostic Tools (wind stress curl, velocity potential, outgoing LW radiation); ENSO cycles

  4. COLORADO CLIMATE PREPAREDNESS PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, Jason

    COLORADO CLIMATE PREPAREDNESS PROJECT FINAL REPORT Prepared by the Western Water Assessment for the State of Colorado #12;#12;Authors Kristen Averyt University of Colorado Boulder, CU-NOAA Western Water Assessment Kelsey Cody University of Colorado Boulder, Environmental Studies Program Eric Gordon University

  5. aerosols and climate : uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contributes to creating a level playing field. (BC emissions tradeble like CO2 emissions?) OUTLINE #12;size. policy measures, is even more uncertain (emissions & their chemical fingerprint are uncertain (not just aerosol emissions, not just climate impacts) OUTLINE #12;- Standardization doesn't reduce

  6. Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk Forum 2012 A Joint Program with LA RIMS Education Day Rethinking Catastrophic Risk in Risk Management: Earthquake-Related Challenges Featuring: Keynote Speaker Dr. Frank Beuthin, Willis Group Holdings Plc. Yohei Miyamoto, Aon Risk Solutions Curtis deVera, Marsh

  7. Climate Entrepreneurship ...turning an idea into business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Climate Entrepreneurship ...turning an idea into business Dr. Anaďs Sägesser, Director Climate-KIC Switzerland Dr. Regina Vogel, Education Lead Climate-KIC Switzerland Akitaka Fujii, Executive Assistant Climate-KIC Switzerland 20 October 2014 #12;Climate-KIC 2 #12;Climate-KIC 3 «... 1968 you went

  8. Oregon Climate Assessment Report December 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    - Climate change and agriculture in Oregon"" " " " " 151 Chapter 5 - The potential effects of climate changeOregon Climate Assessment Report December 2010 Oregon Climate Change Research Institute #12;Oregon Climate Assessment Report December 2010 Oregon Climate Change Research Institute Recommended citation

  9. Photoperiodic Regulation of the Seasonal Pattern of Photosynthetic Capacity and the Implications for Carbon Cycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauerle, William L. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Oren, Ram [Duke University; Way, Danielle A. [Duke University; Qian, Song S. [Duke University; Stoy, Paul C. [Montana State University; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Bowden, Joseph D. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Reynolds, Robert F. [Clemson University

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although temperature is an important driver of seasonal changes in photosynthetic physiology, photoperiod also regulates leaf activity. Climate change will extend growing seasons if temperature cues predominate, but photoperiod-controlled species will show limited responsiveness to warming. We show that photoperiod explains more seasonal variation in photosynthetic activity across 23 tree species than temperature. Although leaves remain green, photosynthetic capacity peaks just after summer solstice and declines with decreasing photoperiod, before air temperatures peak. In support of these findings, saplings grown at constant temperature but exposed to an extended photoperiod maintained high photosynthetic capacity, but photosynthetic activity declined in saplings experiencing a naturally shortening photoperiod; leaves remained equally green in both treatments. Incorporating a photoperiodic correction of photosynthetic physiology into a global-scale terrestrial carbon-cycle model significantly improves predictions of seasonal atmospheric CO{sub 2} cycling, demonstrating the benefit of such a function in coupled climate system models. Accounting for photoperiod-induced seasonality in photosynthetic parameters reduces modeled global gross primary production 2.5% ({approx}4 PgC y{sup -1}), resulting in a >3% ({approx}2 PgC y{sup -1}) decrease of net primary production. Such a correction is also needed in models estimating current carbon uptake based on remotely sensed greenness. Photoperiod-associated declines in photosynthetic capacity could limit autumn carbon gain in forests, even if warming delays leaf senescence.

  10. Forest Road Building Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has regulations for building a forest road, if development requires one. Regulations include zoning ordinances and permits for stream crossing, grading...

  11. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008). "Accountability of networked climate governance: Therise of transnational climate partnerships." GlobalBoard. CARB (2008d). Climate change proposed scoping plan: a

  12. Climate Change in the South American Monsoon System: Present Climate and CMIP5 Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Charles; Carvalho, Leila M. V

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lau, 1998: Does a monsoon climate exist over South America?J. Climate, 11, 1020–1040.America monsoon system. Climate Dyn. , 36, 1865–1880, doi:

  13. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Board. CARB (2008d). Climate change proposed scoping plan: aJ. (2009). "Cities, Climate Change and Urban Heat Islandet al. (2006). Climate change in California: health,

  14. Bringing climate change down to earth : science and participation in Canadian and Australian climate change campaigns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padolsky, Miriam Elana

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    about Global Climate Change. Public Understanding of ScienceFoundation. 2005a. Climate Change: A Matter of SurvivalFoundation. 2005b. Climate Change > Actions 2005 [cited 10

  15. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    impacts of climate change on California agriculture. Climateby climate change in California, such as agriculture areas agriculture. Without proactive climate change mitigation

  16. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a critical conversation on climate change, privatization andamounts due to climate change." Atmospheric Environment 41(Board. CARB (2008d). Climate change proposed scoping plan: a

  17. Climate Survey Original TemplateClimate Survey Original TemplateClimate Survey Original TemplateClimate Survey Original Template The Chair of the Department of DEPT NAME, NAME, is dedicated to improving workplace climate in your office. As part

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Climate Survey Original TemplateClimate Survey Original TemplateClimate Survey Original TemplateClimate workplace climate in your office. As part of this effort, we will be assessing the climate as perceived the success of this campus climate initiative across universities. Again, we will aggregate the data so

  18. ENERGY, CLIMATE AND SUSTAINABLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENERGY, CLIMATE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT NAMAs and the Carbon Market Nationally Appropriate . . . . . . . . . . . 63 ChristianEllermann, NaMas FOr disPersed eNergy eNd-Use sectOrs: Using the building sectorDenmark,theNetherlandsMinistryofForeignAffairs,nortotherespectiveorganizationsofeachindividualauthor. CapacityDevelopmentforCDM(CD4CDM)Project UNEPRisøCentre, RisøNationalLaboratoryforSustainableEnergy The

  19. Climate-Energy Nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Sayler; Randall Gentry; Jie Zhuang

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 140-page published proceedings of the workshop include individual articles and PowerPoint slides for all workshop presentations. The proceedings also contain pertinent background information on the China-US Joint Research Center, partnering organizations, and workshop goals and objectives. Overall, the workshop increased the understanding of the impacts of climate change on energy use and renewable energy production as well as the complex relationships among land use, energy production, and ecological restoration. The workshop served as an international platform for scientists and students of different research backgrounds to develop a unified perspective on energy and climate relationships. Such understanding will benefit future cooperation between China and the US in mitigating global climate change. The workshop’s agenda, which is highly interdisciplinary, explored many potential opportunities for international collaboration in ecosystem management, climate modeling, greenhouse gas emissions, and bioenergy sustainability. International research groups have been suggested in the areas of genomes and biotechnology of energy plants, sustainable management of soil and water resources, carbon sequestration, and microbial processes for ecological cycles. The project has attracted considerable attention from institutes beyond the China-US Joint Research Center partners, and several of them (such as Institute of Qing-Tibet Plateau Research, Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Institute of Applied Ecology, CAS) have expressed interest in joining the partnership. In addition, the workshop played a significant role in facilitating establishment of private-public partnerships between government and private bioenergy companies (such as L.R. Shugarts and Associates, Inc.), including seed providers (Blade Energy Crops, Thousand Oaks, CA), pilot demonstration projects at coal-producing cities (e.g., Huaibei, Anhui province, China), and the development of methodology for assessment of the sustainable production of biofuels (such as life-cycle analysis, sustainability metrics, and land-use policy). Establishment of two US-China scientific research networks in the area of bioenergy and environmental science is a significant result of the workshop.

  20. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust Documentation DataProductswsicloudwsicloudsummarygifAOS3 ARM9 ARM Climate

  1. ARM - Different Climates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation DataDatastreamswacrspeccmaskcopolDatastreamsxsacrslrAlaskaDefensive Shotgun -ListDifferent Climates

  2. Carbon dioxide and climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific and public interest in greenhouse gases, climate warming, and global change virtually exploded in 1988. The Department's focused research on atmospheric CO{sub 2} contributed sound and timely scientific information to the many questions produced by the groundswell of interest and concern. Research projects summarized in this document provided the data base that made timely responses possible, and the contributions from participating scientists are genuinely appreciated. In the past year, the core CO{sub 2} research has continued to improve the scientific knowledge needed to project future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations, to estimate climate sensitivity, and to assess the responses of vegetation to rising concentrations of CO{sub 2} and to climate change. The Carbon Dioxide Research Program's goal is to develop sound scientific information for policy formulation and governmental action in response to changes of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1990 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments.

  3. Workshop in Regulation &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    Electric Institute, "Regulatory Issues" Michael A. Crew, Rutgers University, "Incentive Regulation" Howard

  4. Climate change will exacerbate California’s insect pest problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trumble, John; Butler, Casey

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hadley Centre. 2007. Climate Change. www. metoffice.gov.uk/on parasitoids in a climate change perspective. Ann RevIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. 2007. Climate

  5. Climate Change and San Francisco Bay-Delta Tidal Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, V. Thomas; Callaway, John C.; Schile, Lisa M.; Vasey, Michael C.; Herbert, Ellen R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Institute for Climate Change Research, Coastalcontext of predicted climate change. Madrońo 54(3):234–248.MD. 2005. From climate-change spaghetti to climate-change

  6. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change of the tropical climate : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Short­term variability studies : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 8 2.3 Climate drift sensitivity studies

  7. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team) : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Anthropogenic climate change studies: scenario experiments (96) : : : : : : : : : 7 2 following its creation, the ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' team had to make its proofs in order

  8. Climate Change and Tourism Dr David Viner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    Climate Change and Tourism Ă©CLAT Dr David Viner Climatic Research Unit University of East Anglia d.viner@uea.ac.uk Tourism has a strong international dimension and is sensitive to any changes of climate that alter to attract visitors are likely to be vulnerable to climate change and the implementation of climate change

  9. CLIMATE CHANGE: Past, Present and Future: Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    CLIMATE CHANGE: Past, Present and Future: Introduction Richard Allan, Department of Meteorology r.p.allan@reading.ac.uk #12;Text Books and References · Henson, B., Rough Guide to Climate Change http://www.amazon.co.uk/Climate-Change-Guides-Reference- Titles/dp/1858281059 · Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Climate Change 2007, www

  10. 4, 173211, 2008 Climate and glacier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    CPD 4, 173­211, 2008 Climate and glacier response to ENSO in subtropical Andes E. Dietze et al.0 License. Climate of the Past Discussions Climate of the Past Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Climate of the Past Response of regional climate and glacier ice proxies to El Ni

  11. IN THIS ISSUE Regional Climate Change..............1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamann, Andreas

    IN THIS ISSUE · Regional Climate Change..............1 · From the Executive Director...........2 release of new climate change scenarios from the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM) heralds of the fundamental questions remaining with respect to understanding climate change and even climate variability. And

  12. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    seas, droughts and fresh water shortages. ? Risk Assessmentinse- curity, water and food shortages, and climate-drivenalso struggle with shortages in fresh water, food and other

  13. Renewable Energy and Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy and Climate Change Symposium in Honor of 2009 and 2010 ACS Fellows in the Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Division Helena Chum, NREL Research Fellow August...

  14. Climate Action Plan (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Governor Sanford issued Executive Order 2007-04 on February 16, 2007, establishing the South Carolina Climate, Energy and Commerce Advisory Committee (CECAC).

  15. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climate change is coal gasification, which can make theworld leaders in coal gasification tech- nology, has beenexperimenting with "in situ" gasification, where the coal is

  16. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Impacts on California’s Water Supply Source Medellin-AzuaraClimate Change on Yields and Water use of Major Californiawith Less: Agricultural Water Conservation and Efficiency in

  17. Climate Action Plan (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recognizing the profound implications that global warming and climate variation could have on the economy, environment and quality of life in the Southwest, New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson...

  18. Climate Change and Open Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Percival, Ian

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Obtaining reliable answers to the major scientific questions raised by climate change in time to take appropriate action gives added urgency to the open access program.

  19. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group and Userof aChristinaCliff joins EMSLClimateClimate Change

  20. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group and Userof aChristinaCliff joins EMSLClimateClimate

  1. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust Documentation DataProductswsicloudwsicloudsummarygifAOS3 ARM9 ARM Climate0

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive SolarEducation Programs:CRF ResearchersPhysicsFacility InflowClimate

  3. Climate VISION: Contact Us

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart ofMeasuring DopamineEnergy,6. Radiative Forcing of ClimateCONTACT US

  4. Climate VISION: News

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart ofMeasuring DopamineEnergy,6. Radiative Forcing of ClimateCONTACTNews

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy AdvancedEnergyEnergyMapping Water Availability inClimate

  6. www.climate.iitb.ac.in 1st CLIMATE SCIENCE AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarawagi, Sunita

    www.climate.iitb.ac.in 1st CLIMATE SCIENCE AND POLICY WORKSHOP (CSPW)(CSPW) 6th & 7th March, 2014 a scientific understanding of regional climate change and connect it to impacts and effective response. www.climate.iitb.ac.in #12;Interdisciplinary Programme in Climate Studies Indian Institute of Technology Bombay The Climate

  7. Long-term climate variability and abrupt climate change Instructor: Dr. Igor Kamenkovich, associate professor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Long-term climate variability and abrupt climate change Instructor: Dr. Igor Kamenkovich, associate students to learn about existing theories of abrupt climate changes and climate variability on time scales of long-term climate variability and abrupt climate change. This course compliments current MPO courses

  8. Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment Hydrology, Earth Science and Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    GRACE Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment Hydrology, Earth Science and Climate Ole Baltazar of blood cell Delivers 10-Day / Monthly gravity field From 2002 Onwards Study gravity field changes | side 6 Range responds to Gravity #12;GRACE science results | 28. November 2007 | OA | side 7 Variations

  9. Sea Level Rise Adaptation: From Climate Chaos to Climate Resilience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    Sea Level Rise Adaptation: From Climate Chaos to Climate Resilience Human Dimensions and Ocean, 2013 #12;Main Discussion Points · How do we incorporate Sea-Level Rise into planning and regulatory actions? · What Does the new NRC Report on Sea- Level Rise mean to Decision-makers? · How does Sea-Level

  10. Climate Change and National Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is increasingly recognized as having national security implications, which has prompted dialogue between the climate change and national security communities – with resultant advantages and differences. Climate change research has proven useful to the national security community sponsors in several ways. It has opened security discussions to consider climate as well as political factors in studies of the future. It has encouraged factoring in the stresses placed on societies by climate changes (of any kind) to help assess the potential for state stability. And it has shown that, changes such as increased heat, more intense storms, longer periods without rain, and earlier spring onset call for building climate resilience as part of building stability. For the climate change research community, studies from a national security point of view have revealed research lacunae, for example, such as the lack of usable migration studies. This has also pushed the research community to consider second- and third-order impacts of climate change, such as migration and state stability, which broadens discussion of future impacts beyond temperature increases, severe storms, and sea level rise; and affirms the importance of governance in responding to these changes. The increasing emphasis in climate change science toward research in vulnerability, resilience, and adaptation also frames what the intelligence and defense communities need to know, including where there are dependencies and weaknesses that may allow climate change impacts to result in security threats and where social and economic interventions can prevent climate change impacts and other stressors from resulting in social and political instability or collapse.

  11. Climate Change and Place Roundtable Discussion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Urban Development and Climate Change,” 2007. The fullThink about what runaway climate change would mean where youWorld Changing Seattle, WA Climate change is global in scale

  12. CLIMATE VULNERABILITY AND ADAPTATION STUDY FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE VULNERABILITY AND ADAPTATION STUDY FOR CALIFORNIA Legal Analysis of Barriers's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012019 Prepared for: California Energy Commission to that framework that would facilitate adaptation to climate change. Since such changes may be difficult

  13. Climate Workshops for Department Chairs Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    #12;Climate Workshops for Department Chairs Introduction Why focus on Department Chairs? Goals participating departments Evidence from Campus-wide Climate Surveys #12;Why focus on Department Chairs? Individuals experience climate in their immediate workplace ­ the department Chairs can significantly

  14. Climate policy and dependence on traded carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew, Robbie M; Davis, Steven J; Peters, Glen P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contact us My IOPscience Climate policy and dependence on10.1088/1748-9326/8/3/034011 Climate policy and dependenceCenter for International Climate and Environmental Research—

  15. CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION: PHYSIOLOGY, LIFE HISTORY, AND ECOSYSTEM CHANGE A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center of the uncertainties with climate change effects on terrestrial ecosystems is understanding where transitions

  16. Continental margin architecture : sea level and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jenna Catherine

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. , 2006. Rapid sea-level rise and Holocene climate in theJ. , 2006. Rapid sea-level rise and Holocene climate in theJ. , 2006. Rapid sea-level rise and Holocene climate in the

  17. Climate Action Champions Request for Applications | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Climate Action Champions Request for Applications Climate Action Champions Request for Applications October 27, 2014 5:00PM EDT Climate Action Champions On Oct. 1, 2014, the Obama...

  18. ATNI Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians is hosting the Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change. This two-day conference will discuss climate change impacts, policy on climate change, tribal needs, funding opportunities, and more.

  19. Climate Change: High Water Impacts and Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Climate Change: High Water Impacts and Adaptation David S. Liebl and Kenneth W. Potter Co of global climate change­ WICCI Stormwater Working Group #12;Projected Climate Change 200-2100 What Global

  20. Review: What We Know about Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennant, Matthew Aaron

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    about anthropogenic climate change and how to positivelyWhat We Know About Climate Change By Kerry Emanuel ReviewedKerry. What We Know about Climate Change. Cambridge, MA: The

  1. Too Much Riding on Climate Change?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerra, Erick

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    165. Too Much Riding on Climate Change? Wachs, M. , and J.Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 2000. IPCC SpecialToo Much Riding on Climate Change? By Erick Guerra Abstract

  2. CLIMATE CHANGE AND WATER SUPPLY SECURITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE AND WATER SUPPLY SECURITY: Reconfiguring Groundwater Management to Reduce with climate change, present a significant planning challenge for California's water agencies. This research Drought Vulnerability A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate

  3. Hydrologic Response to Climate Variability, Climate Change, and Climate Extreme in the U.S.: Climate Model Evaluation and Projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai R.; Qian, Yun

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water resources are sensitive to climate variability and change; predictions of seasonal to interannual climate variations and projections of long-term climate trends can provide significant values in managing water resources. This study examines the control (1975–1995) and future (1995–2100) climate simulated by a global climate model (GCM) and a regional climate simulation driven by the GCM control simulation for the U.S. Comparison of the regional climate simulation with observations across 13 subregions showed that the simulation captured the seasonality and the distributions of precipitation rate quite well. The GCM control and climate change simulations showed that, as a result of a 1% increase in greenhouse gas concentrations per year, there will be a warming of 2–3°C across the U.S. from 2000 to 2100. Although precipitation is not projected to change during this century, the warming trend will increase evapotranspiration to reduce annual basin mean runoff over five subregions along the coastal and south-central U.S.

  4. Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    1 23 Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International Journal Devoted to the Description, Causes that the most genetically diverse populations are the ones most at risk from climate change, so that global warming will erode the species' genetic variability faster than it curtails the species' geographic

  5. Historic and Projected Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Historic and Projected Climate Change F A C T S H E E T This evidence strongly indicates in glaciers and polar ice, and shifts in precipitation intensity and trends. LONG-TERM CLIMATE RECORDS Since) like carbon dioxide (CO2 ) are well-documented. · The atmospheric buildup of CO2 and other GHGs

  6. Thinking about global climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Opinions regarding issues related to global climate change are presented. The focus is on socioeconomic and historical aspects. World War II is discussed as an intellectual and emotional turning point in global issues, and global climate change is identified as a possible turning point of similar significance. Political, scientific, and public points of view regarding the issue are discussed.

  7. Ocean circulation plays a key role in distributing solar energy and maintaining climate, by moving heat from Earth's equator to the poles. At

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    Ocean circulation plays a key role in distributing solar energy and maintaining climate, by moving get cold and salty enough to sink to great depths. This globally interconnected process of "overturning circulation" occurs in all ocean basins and helps to regulate Earth's climate. Aquarius

  8. Projecting the climatic effects of increasing carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacCracken, M C; Luther, F M [eds.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the current knowns, unknowns, and uncertainties regarding the projected climate changes that might occur as a result of an increasing atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration. Further, the volume describes what research is required to estimate the magnitude and rate of a CO/sub 2/-induced clamate change with regional and seasonal resolution. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers. (ACR)

  9. Symbiosis: Addressing Biomass Production Challenges and Climate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Symbiosis: Addressing Biomass Production Challenges and Climate Change Symbiosis: Addressing Biomass Production Challenges and Climate Change This presentation was the opening...

  10. BPA prepares for a changing climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    both generally and as part of events such as El Nio. Evidence of global and regional climate change is mounting. The recently released National Climate Assessment confirmed...

  11. Training for Climate Adaptation in Conservation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wildlife Conservation Society and the Northern Institute of Applied Climate Science are hosting this two-day training for climate adaptation.

  12. Climate & Environmental Sciences | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate & Environment Climate Change Science Institute Earth and Aquatic Sciences Ecosystem Science Environmental Data Science and Systems Energy-Water Resource Systems Human...

  13. Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the Southwest Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the...

  14. Natural Gas Regulations (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Administrative Regulation title 805 promulgates the rules and regulations pertaining to natural gas production in Kentucky. In addition to KAR title 405, chapter 30, which pertains to any...

  15. Climate variability and climate change vulnerability and adaptation. Workshop summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatti, N.; Cirillo, R.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Dixon, R.K. [U.S. Country Studies Program, Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Representatives from fifteen countries met in Prague, Czech Republic, on September 11-15, 1995, to share results from the analysis of vulnerability and adaptation to global climate change. The workshop focused on the issues of global climate change and its impacts on various sectors of a national economy. The U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), which has been signed by more than 150 governments worldwide, calls on signatory parties to develop and communicate measures they are implementing to respond to global climate change. An analysis of a country`s vulnerability to changes in the climate helps it identify suitable adaptation measures. These analyses are designed to determine the extent of the impacts of global climate change on sensitive sectors such as agricultural crops, forests, grasslands and livestock, water resources, and coastal areas. Once it is determined how vulnerable a country may be to climate change, it is possible to identify adaptation measures for ameliorating some or all of the effects.The objectives of the vulnerability and adaptation workshop were to: The objectives of the vulnerability and adaptation workshop were to: Provide an opportunity for countries to describe their study results; Encourage countries to learn from the experience of the more complete assessments and adjust their studies accordingly; Identify issues and analyses that require further investigation; and Summarize results and experiences for governmental and intergovernmental organizations.

  16. How Do We Know that Human Activities Have Influenced Global Climate?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santer, Benjamin D.

    2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Human activities have significantly altered not only the chemical composition of Earth's atmosphere, but also the climate system. Human influences have led to increases in well-mixed greenhouse gases, decreases in stratospheric ozone, and changes in the atmospheric burdens of sulfate and soot aerosols. All of these atmospheric constituents interact with incoming solar and outgoing terrestrial radiation. Human-induced changes in the concentrations of these constituents modify the natural radiative balance of Earth's atmosphere, and therefore perturb climate. Quantifying the size of the human effect on climate is a difficult statistical problem. 'Fingerprint' methods are typically used for this purpose. These methods involve rigorous statistical comparisons of modeled and observed climate change patterns. Fingerprinting assumes that each individual influence on climate has a unique signature in climate records. The climate fingerprints in response to different forcing factors are typically estimated with computer models, which can be used to perform the controlled experiments that we cannot conduct in the real world. One criticism of the findings of previous scientific assessments is that they have relied heavily on fingerprint studies involving changes in near-surface temperature. Recent fingerprint work, however, has considered a variety of other climate variables, such as ocean heat content, stratospheric temperatures, Northern Hemisphere sea ice extent, sea level pressure, atmospheric water vapor, and the height of the tropopause. These studies illustrate that a human-induced climate change signal is identifiable in many different variables and geographic regions, and that the climate system is telling us an internally- and physically-consistent story.

  17. How Do We Know That Human Activities Have Influenced Global Climate?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Benjamin D. Santer

    2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Human activities have significantly altered not only the chemical composition of Earth's atmosphere, but also the climate system. Human influences have led to increases in well-mixed greenhouse gases, decreases in stratospheric ozone, and changes in the atmospheric burdens of sulfate and soot aerosols. All of these atmospheric constituents interact with incoming solar and outgoing terrestrial radiation. Human-induced changes in the concentrations of these constituents modify the natural radiative balance of Earth's atmosphere, and therefore perturb climate. Quantifying the size of the human effect on climate is a difficult statistical problem. "Fingerprint" methods are typically used for this purpose. These methods involve rigorous statistical comparisons of modeled and observed climate change patterns. Fingerprinting assumes that each individual influence on climate has a unique signature in climate records. The climate fingerprints in response to different forcing factors are typically estimated with computer models, which can be used to perform the controlled experiments that we cannot conduct in the real world. One criticism of the findings of previous scientific assessments is that they have relied heavily on fingerprint studies involving changes in near-surface temperature. Recent fingerprint work, however, has considered a variety of other climate variables, such as ocean heat content, stratospheric temperatures, Northern Hemisphere sea ice extent, sea level pressure, atmospheric water vapor, and the height of the tropopause. These studies illustrate that a human-induced climate change signal is identifiable in many different variables and geographic regions, and that the climate system is telling us an internally- and physically-consistent story.

  18. Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

  19. 3 Library Regulations Definitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    3 Library Regulations Definitions In Regulation 3: 'Library' means the University Library as defined in Regulation 3.1; 'Library staff' means the staff of the University Library; 'Librarian' means the University Librarian and Head of Information Resources Directorate or nominee; `Library Committee' means

  20. Computer Use Regulation Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Paul

    Computer Use Regulation #12;Introduction · The following training materials will reference the contents of the Computer Use Regulations, but should not serve as a substitute for reading the actual responsibilities NCSU employees have under the regulations. · North Carolina State University's computer networks

  1. Watershed response and land energy feedbacks under climate change depend upon groundwater.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, R M; Kollet, S J

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Human induced climate change will have a significant impact on the hydrologic cycle, creating changes in fresh water resources, land cover, and feedbacks that are difficult to characterize, which makes it an issue of global importance. Previous studies have not included subsurface storage in climate change simulations and feedbacks. A variably-saturated groundwater flow model with integrated overland flow and land surface model processes is used to examine the interplay between coupled water and energy processes under climate change conditions. A case study from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) USA, an important agricultural region that is susceptible to drought, is used as the basis for three scenarios simulations using a modified atmospheric forcing dataset to reflect predicted effects due to human-induced climate change. These scenarios include an increase in the atmospheric temperature and variations in rainfall amount and are compared to the present-day climate case. Changes in shallow soil saturation and groundwater levels are quantified as well as the corresponding energy fluxes at the land surface. Here we show that groundwater and subsurface lateral flow processes are critical in understanding hydrologic response and energy feedbacks to climate change and that certain regions are more susceptible to changes in temperature, while others to changes in precipitation. This groundwater control is critical for understanding recharge and drought processes, possible under future climate conditions.

  2. Load regulating expansion fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagner, L.M.; Strum, M.J.

    1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A free standing self contained device for bonding ultra thin metallic films, such as 0.001 inch beryllium foils is disclosed. The device will regulate to a predetermined load for solid state bonding when heated to a bonding temperature. The device includes a load regulating feature, whereby the expansion stresses generated for bonding are regulated and self adjusting. The load regulator comprises a pair of friction isolators with a plurality of annealed copper members located therebetween. The device, with the load regulator, will adjust to and maintain a stress level needed to successfully and economically complete a leak tight bond without damaging thin foils or other delicate components. 1 fig.

  3. Load regulating expansion fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagner, Lawrence M. (San Jose, CA); Strum, Michael J. (San Jose, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free standing self contained device for bonding ultra thin metallic films, such as 0.001 inch beryllium foils. The device will regulate to a predetermined load for solid state bonding when heated to a bonding temperature. The device includes a load regulating feature, whereby the expansion stresses generated for bonding are regulated and self adjusting. The load regulator comprises a pair of friction isolators with a plurality of annealed copper members located therebetween. The device, with the load regulator, will adjust to and maintain a stress level needed to successfully and economically complete a leak tight bond without damaging thin foils or other delicate components.

  4. The Effects of Climate and Electricity Emissions on Air Quality in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    , and both are regulated under the U.S. Clean Air Act. While emissions from fossil fuel combustion suggests that air quality co-benefits associated with CO2 emission reductions could be significantThe Effects of Climate and Electricity Emissions on Air Quality in the United States by Steven D

  5. Climate Change Effects on High-Elevation Hydropower System in KAVEH MADANI LARIJANI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    i Climate Change Effects on High-Elevation Hydropower System in California By KAVEH MADANI LARIJANI ___________________________________________ Committee in Charge 2009 #12;ii Abstract The high-elevation hydropower system in California, composed of more than 150 hydropower plants and regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC

  6. Climate ChangeClimate Change and Runoff Managementand Runoff Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    % ) Radiated by atmosphere as heat (66%) Heat radiated by the earth Heat Troposphere Lower Stratosphere (ozone · Result: a statistical range of probable climate change GCM grid Downscaled (8x8 km) grid D. Vimont, UW

  7. Climate Change: The Sun's Role

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerald E. Marsh

    2007-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The sun's role in the earth's recent warming remains controversial even though there is a good deal of evidence to support the thesis that solar variations are a very significant factor in driving climate change both currently and in the past. This precis lays out the background and data needed to understand the basic scientific argument behind the contention that variations in solar output have a significant impact on current changes in climate. It also offers a simple, phenomenological approach for estimating the actual-as opposed to model dependent-magnitude of the sun's influence on climate.

  8. 2, 11551186, 2006 Mid-Holocene climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    CPD 2, 1155­1186, 2006 Mid-Holocene climate change in Europe: a data-model comparison S. Brewer et.clim-past-discuss.net/2/1155/2006/ © Author(s) 2006. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Climate of the Past Discussions Climate of the Past Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Climate

  9. Climate-development-energy policy related seminars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Paula Kivimaa (Finnish Environment Institute) From energy to climate policy in Finland Energy & climate Energy & Climate Tue 3rd Dec 18.00- 19.30 Large Jubilee Jeremy Leggett (SolarCentury) The EnergyClimate-development-energy policy related seminars Autumn term 2013 Date Time Location Speaker

  10. ProGreen 2014 Colorado Climate Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Complex Mountain topography · Solar energy and seasonal cycles drive our climate #12;Colorado has" and we LOVE IT! #12;Monitoring our Climate · Elements: temperature, precipitation, snow, wind, solarProGreen 2014 Colorado Climate Update Nolan Doesken Colorado State Climatologist Colorado Climate

  11. Journal of Climate EARLY ONLINE RELEASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yongyun

    investigate the climate dynamic feedbacks during a transition from the present climate7 to the extremely coldJournal of Climate EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary PDF of the author-produced manuscript. Hu, 2011: The initiation of modern "soft Snowball" and "hard Snowball" climates in CCSM3. Part II

  12. An iconic approach to representing climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    1 An iconic approach to representing climate change Saffron Jessica O'Neill A thesis submitted-experts to be meaningfully engaged with the issue of climate change. This thesis investigates the value of engaging non-experts with climate change at the individual level. Research demonstrates that individuals perceive climate change

  13. Stormwater, Climate Change and Wisconsin's Coastal Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Stormwater, Climate Change and Wisconsin's Coastal Communities Johnson Foundation at Wingspread · Precipitation and high water · Adapting to our changing climate · Assisting coastal communities Photo: WDNR #12 source of risk from changing climate. City of Green Bay watershed - #12;Predicted climate includes

  14. Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters Rob Goldston MIT IAP plays a large role in replacing coal red plants. al hydro electricity options penetrate in the climate way across scenarios, showing a slight severe climate targets. In Industry, the climate target has

  15. Expanding Global Cooperation on Climate Justice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    in evaluating the financial architecture necessary to support just and sustainable climate interventions

  16. 4, 289308, 2008 Climate change and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    CPD 4, 289­308, 2008 Climate change and rainstorms in East China M. Domroes and D. Schaefer Title forum of Climate of the Past Recent climate change affecting rainstorm occurrences? A case study in East­308, 2008 Climate change and rainstorms in East China M. Domroes and D. Schaefer Title Page Abstract

  17. Climate change and water supply, management and use: A literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, L.H.; Draves, J.D.; Hunsaker, C.T.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is evidence that atmospheric concentrations Of C0{sub 2}, tropospheric 0{sub 3}, and CH{sub 4}, among other gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect, have increased in recent decades, and that these changes may induce changes in global air temperatures and regional climate features in coming years. A literature review was conducted to sample the literature base on which our understanding of the water resource impacts of climate change rests. Water resource issues likely to be important include hydrologic response to climate change, the resilience of water supply systems to changing climatic and hydrologic conditions, and the effects of climate change on water quality and water uses (such as navigation and energy generation). A computer-assisted search of literature on the effects of climate change on these subjects was conducted. All studies were classified by type of paper (e.g., review, discussion, case study), region, water resource variable studied, and source of climate scenario. The resulting bibliography containing more than 200 references was largely annotated. Case studies of potential hydrologic impacts have been more common than studies of impacts on water management or water use, but this apparent research gap is decreasing. Case studies demonstrating methods of incorporating potential risks of climate change into water project planning and management have been performed. Considerable variability in regional coverage exists; the Great Lakes basin and California receive relatively more attention than such regions as New England and the Missouri River basin. General circulation model-based and hypothetical climate scenarios have been the dominant sources of climate scenarios used in case studies, although a variety of other methods for developing climate scenarios have been developed.

  18. Soil ecosystem functioning under climate change: plant species and community effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kardol, Paul [ORNL; Cregger, Melissa [ORNL; Campany, Courtney E [ORNL; Classen, Aimee T [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedbacks of terrestrial ecosystems to climate change depend on soil ecosystem dynamics. Soil ecosystems can directly and indirectly respond to climate change. For example, warming directly alters microbial communities by increasing their activity. Climate change may also alter plant community composition, thus indirectly altering the microbial communities that feed on their inputs. To better understand how climate change may directly and indirectly alter soil ecosystem functioning, we investigated old-field plant community and soil ecosystem responses to single and combined effects of elevated [CO2], warming, and water availability. Specifically, we collected soils at the plot level (plant community soils), and beneath dominant plant species (plant-specific soils). We used microbial enzyme activities and soil nematodes as indicators for soil ecosystem functioning. Our study resulted in two main findings: 1) Overall, while there were some interactions, water, relative to increases in [CO2] and warming, had the largest impact on plant community composition, soil enzyme activities, and soil nematodes. Multiple climate change factors can interact to shape ecosystems, but in this case, those interactions were largely driven by changes in water availability. 2) Indirect effects of climate change, via changes in plant communities, had a significant impact on soil ecosystem functioning and this impact was not obvious when looking at plant community soils. Climate change effects on enzyme activities and soil nematode abundance and community structure strongly differed between plant community soils and plant-specific soils, but also within plant-specific soils. In sum, these results indicate that accurate assessments of climate change impacts on soil ecosystem functioning require incorporating the concurrent changes in plant function and plant community composition. Climate change-induced shifts in plant community composition will likely modify or counteract the direct impact of climate change on soil ecosystem functioning, and hence, these indirect effects should be taken into account when predicting how climate change will alter ecosystem functioning.

  19. Climate Insights 101 Questions and Discussion Points: Module 1, Lesson 4: An Introduction to Climate Modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Climate Insights 101 Questions and Discussion Points: Module 1, Lesson 4: An Introduction to Climate Modelling 1 Climate Insights 101 Questions and Discussion Points Module 1, Lesson 4: An Introduction to Climate Modelling Available at http://pics.uvic.ca/education/climate-insights-101 Updated May

  20. Climate Sensitivity Estimated From Earth's Climate History James E. Hansen and Makiko Sato

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    1 Climate Sensitivity Estimated From Earth's Climate History James E. Hansen and Makiko Sato NASA's climate history potentially can yield accurate assessment of climate sensitivity. Imprecise knowledge of the fast-feedback climate sensitivity, which is the sensitivity that most immediately affects humanity. Our

  1. Chicago Climate Exchange, Inc. 2010 Chicago Climate Exchange 1 The Role of Exchanges and Standardization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chicago Climate Exchange®, Inc.© 2010 Chicago Climate Exchange 1 The Role of Exchanges and Standardization in Reducing Emissions at Scale Michael J. Walsh, Ph.D. Executive Vice President Chicago Climate Exchange, Inc. #12;Chicago Climate Exchange®, Inc.© 2010 Chicago Climate Exchange Pacala-Socolow GHG

  2. Climate Mathematician Job Advertisement, September 2013 FACULTY POSITION IN CLIMATE MATHEMATICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallo, Linda C.

    1 Climate Mathematician Job Advertisement, September 2013 FACULTY POSITION IN CLIMATE MATHEMATICS in Climate Mathematics, beginning in August 2014. Exceptional candidates at the Associate Professor level an active interdisciplinary research program in climate mathematics with a focus on next generation climate

  3. Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change Changes · Due to ­ Climate Change ­ Land Cover / Land Use Change ­ Interaction of Climate and Land Cover Change · Resolution ­ Space ­ Time Hydro-Climatic Change · Variability vs. Change (Trends) · Point data

  4. "Climate change is sure to occur in some form." The study of climate impacts notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "Climate change is sure to occur in some form." 1 #12;The study of climate impacts notes how scientists generally agree that humans are changing the climate, and that if we continue pumping carbon we learn from past climate variations? How can we best adapt to climate change? This report attempts

  5. Assessing the effects of ocean diffusivity and climate sensitivity on the rate of global climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittner, Andreas

    sensitivity and ocean heat uptake on the rate of future climate change. We apply a range of values for climate a significant effect on the rate of transient climate change for high values of climate sensitivity, while values of climate sensitivity and low values of ocean diffusivity. Such high rates of change could

  6. Essays in climate and development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerrero Compeán, Roberto

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is a collection of three essays on environmental policy and empirical development economics, unified in their underlying inquiry of the welfare effects of climate in Mexico. The first chapter presents ...

  7. Nature Climate Change features Los

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research February 27, 2013 New print edition of journal tags tree-stress project for cover story LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Feb. 27, 2013-The print...

  8. Stabilization and Global Climate Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarofim, Marcus C.

    Academic and political debates over long-run climate policy often invoke “stabilization” of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs), but only rarely are non-CO2 greenhouse gases addressed explicitly. Even ...

  9. Climate Forcings and Climate Sensitivities Diagnosed from Coupled Climate Model Integrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forster, P M A F; Taylor, K E

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple technique is proposed for calculating global mean climate forcing from transient integrations of coupled Atmosphere Ocean General Circulation Models (AOGCMs). This 'climate forcing' differs from the conventionally defined radiative forcing as it includes semi-direct effects that account for certain short timescale responses in the troposphere. Firstly, we calculate a climate feedback term from reported values of 2 x CO{sub 2} radiative forcing and surface temperature time series from 70-year simulations by twenty AOGCMs. In these simulations carbon dioxide is increased by 1%/year. The derived climate feedback agrees well with values that we diagnose from equilibrium climate change experiments of slab-ocean versions of the same models. These climate feedback terms are associated with the fast, quasi-linear response of lapse rate, clouds, water vapor and albedo to global surface temperature changes. The importance of the feedbacks is gauged by their impact on the radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere. We find partial compensation between longwave and shortwave feedback terms that lessens the inter-model differences in the equilibrium climate sensitivity. There is also some indication that the AOGCMs overestimate the strength of the positive longwave feedback. These feedback terms are then used to infer the shortwave and longwave time series of climate forcing in 20th and 21st Century simulations in the AOGCMs. We validate the technique using conventionally calculated forcing time series from four AOGCMs. In these AOGCMs the shortwave and longwave climate forcings we diagnose agree with the conventional forcing time series within {approx}10%. The shortwave forcing time series exhibit order of magnitude variations between the AOGCMs, differences likely related to how both natural forcings and/or anthropogenic aerosol effects are included. There are also factor of two differences in the longwave climate forcing time series, which may indicate problems with the modeling of well-mixed-greenhouse-gas changes. The simple diagnoses we present provide an important and useful first step for understanding differences in AOGCM integrations, indicating that some of the differences in model projections can be attributed to different prescribed climate forcing, even for so-called standard climate change scenarios.

  10. Business Responses to Climate Change. Identifying Emergent Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolk, A.; Pinkse, J. [Business School, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Companies face much uncertainty about the competitive effects of the recently adopted Kyoto Protocol on global climate change and the current and future regulations that may emerge from it. Companies have considerable discretion to explore different market strategies to address global warming and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This article examines these strategic options by reviewing the market-oriented actions that are currently being taken by 136 large companies that are part of the Global 500. There are six different market strategies that companies use to address climate change and that consist of different combinations of the market components available to managers. Managers can choose between more emphasis on improvements in their business activities through innovation or employ compensatory approaches such as emissions trading. They can either act by themselves or work with other companies, NGOs, or (local) governments.

  11. Information theory and climate prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Lai-yung

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INFORMATION THEORY AND CLIMATE PREDICTION A Thesis by LAI-YUNG LEUNG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject...: Meteorology INFORMATION THEORY AND CLIMATE PREDICTION A Thesis by LAI-YUNG LEUNG Approved as to style and content by: Gerald R. North (Chairman) George L. Huebner (Member) Robert O. Reid (Member) James R. Scoggins (Head of Department) May 19BB...

  12. Glossary: Carbon dioxide and climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Glossary contains definitions of selected CO{sub 2}-related terms as well as tables containing information related to CO{sub 2} and climate. Each term is defined with an emphasis on its relationship to CO{sub 2} and climate. Many of the definitions are then followed by a more detailed description of the term and its use. References to the literature from which the definitions were taken are listed at the end of the Glossary.

  13. Climate dynamics and fluid mechanics: Natural variability and related uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Ghil; Mickaël D. Chekroun; Eric Simonnet

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this review-and-research paper is twofold: (i) to review the role played in climate dynamics by fluid-dynamical models; and (ii) to contribute to the understanding and reduction of the uncertainties in future climate-change projections. To illustrate the first point, we focus on the large-scale, wind-driven flow of the mid-latitude oceans which contribute in a crucial way to Earth's climate, and to changes therein. We study the low-frequency variability (LFV) of the wind-driven, double-gyre circulation in mid-latitude ocean basins, via the bifurcation sequence that leads from steady states through periodic solutions and on to the chaotic, irregular flows documented in the observations. This sequence involves local, pitchfork and Hopf bifurcations, as well as global, homoclinic ones. The natural climate variability induced by the LFV of the ocean circulation is but one of the causes of uncertainties in climate projections. Another major cause of such uncertainties could reside in the structural instability in the topological sense, of the equations governing climate dynamics, including but not restricted to those of atmospheric and ocean dynamics. We propose a novel approach to understand, and possibly reduce, these uncertainties, based on the concepts and methods of random dynamical systems theory. As a very first step, we study the effect of noise on the topological classes of the Arnol'd family of circle maps, a paradigmatic model of frequency locking as occurring in the nonlinear interactions between the El Nino-Southern Oscillations (ENSO) and the seasonal cycle. It is shown that the maps' fine-grained resonant landscape is smoothed by the noise, thus permitting their coarse-grained classification. This result is consistent with stabilizing effects of stochastic parametrization obtained in modeling of ENSO phenomenon via some general circulation models.

  14. Global climate feedbacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  15. Evolving Role of the Power Sector Regulator: A Clean Energy Regulators Initiative Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinaman, O.; Miller, M.; Bazilian, M.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper seeks to briefly characterize the evolving role of power sector regulation. Given current global dynamics, regulation of the power sector is undergoing dramatic changes. This transformation is being driven by various factors including technological advances and cost reductions in renewable energy, energy efficiency, and demand management; increasing air pollution and climate change concerns; and persistent pressure for ensuring sustainable economic development and increased access to energy services by the poor. These issues add to the already complex task of power sector regulation, of which the fundamental remit remains to objectively and transparently ensure least-cost service delivery at high quality. While no single regulatory task is trivial to undertake, it is the prioritization and harmonization of a multitude of objectives that exemplifies the essential challenge of power sector regulation. Evolving regulatory roles can be understood through the concept of existing objectives and an additional layer of emerging objectives. Following this categorization, we describe seven existing objectives of power sector regulators and nine emerging objectives, highlighting key challenges and outlining interdependencies. This essay serves as a preliminary installment in the Clean Energy Regulatory Initiative (CERI) series, and aims to lay the groundwork for subsequent reports and case studies that will explore these topics in more depth.

  16. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitehead, John C. (Davis, CA); Dilgard, Lemoyne W. (Willits, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes.

  17. Internalizing Climate Change—Scientific Resource Management and the Climate Change Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dettinger, Michael D.; Culberson, Steven

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Council. 2001. Climate change sci- ence: an analysis of someNWT, Dracup JA. 2004. Climate change impacts uncertainty forVR, Kusler J. 2000. Climate change: Potential impacts and

  18. Tidal Wetlands Regulations (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Most activities occurring in or near tidal wetlands are regulated, and this section contains information on such activities and required permit applications for proposed activities. Applications...

  19. Regulation of natural monopolies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter provides a comprehensive overview of the theoretical and empirical literature on the regulation of natural monopolies. It covers alternative definitions of natural monopoly, regulatory goals, alternative ...

  20. Regulations of Wells (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Environmental Protection regulates the construction, repair, and abandonment of wells, as well as the persons and businesses undertaking such practices. Governing boards of water...

  1. Nuclear Regulation (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute establishes a regulatory program for sources of ionizing radiation, to be administered by the Montana Department of Health and Human Services. These regulations address permitting and...

  2. Utility Regulation (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission enforces regulations in this legislation that apply to all individuals, corporations, companies, and partnerships that may own, operate, manage, or control...

  3. Coal Mining Regulations (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Administrative Regulation Title 405 chapters 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10, 12, 16, 18 and 20 establish the laws governing coal mining in the state.

  4. The impact of tropical cyclones (TC) on global climate is still debated. They rapidly mix the water column beneath them, bringing cold water to the surface.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    of Climate, 21, 638 Sriver & Huber, 2007, Observational evidence for an ocean heat pump induced by tropicalThe impact of tropical cyclones (TC) on global climate is still debated. They rapidly mix the water column beneath them, bringing cold water to the surface. One way to parameterise this process

  5. AEROSOL, CLOUDS, AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCHWARTZ, S.E.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth's climate is thought to be quite sensitive to changes in radiative fluxes that are quite small in absolute magnitude, a few watts per square meter, and in relation to these fluxes in the natural climate. Atmospheric aerosol particles exert influence on climate directly, by scattering and absorbing radiation, and indirectly by modifying the microphysical properties of clouds and in turn their radiative effects and hydrology. The forcing of climate change by these indirect effects is thought to be quite substantial relative to forcing by incremental concentrations of greenhouse gases, but highly uncertain. Quantification of aerosol indirect forcing by satellite- or ground-based remote sensing has proved quite difficult in view of inherent large variation in the pertinent observables such as cloud optical depth, which is controlled mainly by liquid water path and only secondarily by aerosols. Limited work has shown instances of large magnitude of aerosol indirect forcing, with local instantaneous forcing upwards of 50 W m{sup 66}-2. Ultimately it will be necessary to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models to accurately identify the anthropogenic forcing at present and over secular time and to assess the influence of this forcing in the context of other forcings of climate change. While the elements of aerosol processes that must be represented in models describing the evolution and properties of aerosol particles that serve as cloud condensation particles are known, many important components of these processes remain to be understood and to be represented in models, and the models evaluated against observation, before such model-based representations can confidently be used to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models.

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - atp induced vasodilatation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atp induced vasodilatation Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Current concepts of the regulation...

  7. alpha-related apoptosis-inducing ligand: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    c release channel MAC, mitochondrial apoptosis-induced channel CiteSeer Summary: Bcl-2 family proteins regulate apoptosis, in part, by controlling formation of the mitochondrial...

  8. Northeast Climate Science Center: Transposing Extreme Rainfall to Assess Climate Vulnerability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Climate models predict significant increases in the magnitude and frequency of extreme rainfalls.  However, climate model projections of precipitation vary greatly across models.  For communities...

  9. Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation Photo showing climate zone maps based on...

  10. Climate Change, the Clean Air Act, and Industrial Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaswan, Alice

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Change, the Clean Air Act, and Industrial PollutionCONSIDERATIONS IN CLIMATE POLICY . A.pollutant Considerations into Climate Policy 1.

  11. Climate Change and San Francisco Bay-Delta Tidal Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, V. Thomas; Callaway, John C.; Schile, Lisa M.; Vasey, Michael C.; Herbert, Ellen R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Institute for Climate Change Research, Coastalthe context of predicted climate change. Madrońo 54(3):234–18–20. Dettinger MD. 2005. From climate-change spaghetti to

  12. Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models Berkeley Lab Researcher Says Climate Science is Entering New...

  13. Building America Climate-Specific Guidance | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building America Building America Climate-Specific Guidance Building America Climate-Specific Guidance Building America Climate-Specific Guidance 2014 Housing Innovation...

  14. President Obama on Climate Change | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    President Obama on Climate Change President Obama on Climate Change Addthis Speakers President Barack Obama Duration 2:46 Topic Energy Sector Jobs Renewables Solar Climate Change...

  15. Climate Change Task Force Webinar Series | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Climate Change Task Force Webinar Series Climate Change Task Force Webinar Series The four-part Climate Change Impacts and Indian Country webinar series provided tribal leaders an...

  16. Stakeholder Engagement in Climate Change Policymaking in American Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiack, Duran; Kamieniecki , Sheldon

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the dimensions of climate change communication by conductingdynamics around climate change communication at thethe dimensions of climate change communication by conducting

  17. Economic Damages from Climate Change: An Assessment of Market Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanemann, W Michael; Dale, Larry

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the affects of climate change on agriculture in irrigatedmarket impacts from climate change on US agriculture and onimpacts of climate change on US agriculture. The first set

  18. Seawalls Are Not Enough: Climate Change & U.S. Interests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Jody; Guzman, Andrew

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of climate change on agriculture, for example, isthe impacts of climate change on agriculture. The reasonsimpact of climate change on agriculture, forestry, coastal

  19. What is the Economic Cost of Climate Change?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanemann, W. Michael

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sea Level, California Climate Change Center, Report CEC-500-in the assessment of climate change damages: illustrationThe Economic Cost of Climate Change Impact on California

  20. Climate Change and Flood Operations in the Sacramento Basin, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willis, Ann D.; Lund, Jay R.; Townsley, Edwin S.; Faber, Beth A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington, D.C. : Climate Change Science Program andProgress in incorporating climate change into management ofJULY 2011 Climate Change and Flood Operations in the

  1. Climate Change, the Clean Air Act, and Industrial Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaswan, Alice

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    typical NSPS). 2012] CLIMATE CHANGE & INDUSTRIAL POLLUTION169, at 1256-57. 2012] CLIMATE CHANGE & INDUSTRIAL POLLUTION10482 tbl. 11. 2012] CLIMATE CHANGE & INDUSTRIAL POLLUTION

  2. Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Hayley

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Climate Change Convention and Developing Countries: Fromand Climate Change: Perspectives from Developing Countries.developing countries by shift- ing the governance of climate change

  3. Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate Change Uncertainty Quantification, the Next Frontier The Role Played by Oceans in Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Restrepo, Juan M.

    Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate Change Uncertainty Quantification, the Next Department University of Arizona October 11, 2008 #12;Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate, Undergraduate Students: 2. UQGQG #12;Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate Change Uncertainty

  4. Regional Climate Modeling: Progress, Challenges, and Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuqing; Leung, Lai R.; McGregor, John L.; Lee, Dong-Kyou; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Ding, Yihui; Kimura, Fujio

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional climate modeling with regional climate models (RCMs) has matured over the past decade and allows for meaningful utilization in a broad spectrum of applications. In this paper, latest progresses in regional climate modeling studies are reviewed, including RCM development, applications of RCMs to dynamical downscaling for climate change assessment, seasonal climate predictions and climate process studies, and the study of regional climate predictability. Challenges and potential directions of future research in this important area are discussed, with the focus on those to which less attention has been given previously, such as the importance of ensemble simulations, further development and improvement of regional climate modeling approach, modeling extreme climate events and sub-daily variation of clouds and precipitation, model evaluation and diagnostics, applications of RCMs to climate process studies and seasonal predictions, and development of regional earth system models. It is believed that with both the demonstrated credibility of RCMs’ capability in reproducing not only monthly to seasonal mean climate and interannual variability but also the extreme climate events when driven by good quality reanalysis and the continuous improvements in the skill of global general circulation models (GCMs) in simulating large-scale atmospheric circulation, regional climate modeling will remain an important dynamical downscaling tool for providing the needed information for assessing climate change impacts and seasonal climate predictions, and a powerful tool for improving our understanding of regional climate processes. An internationally coordinated effort can be developed with different focuses by different groups to advance regional climate modeling studies. It is also recognized that since the final quality of the results from nested RCMs depends in part on the realism of the large-scale forcing provided by GCMs, the reduction of errors and improvement in physics parameterizations in both GCMs and RCMs remain a priority for climate modeling community.

  5. Economics, ethics, and climate policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, R.B.; Monahan, P.A.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Are the costs of greenhouse gas emissions abatement justified by the perceived benefits of sustained climate stability Do people of the present generation have a moral right to impose climate risks on their descendants in generations to come This report examines these questions in light of the emergent facts of climate science and their socioeconomic implications. We consider alternative normative criteria for social decision-making with particular emphasis on cost-benefit analysis and the principle of sustainable development. While each framework yields important insights, we argue that the gross uncertainties associated with climate change and the distribution of impacts between present and future generations constrain the usefulness of cost-benefit criteria in evaluating climate policy. If one accepts the ethical proposition that it is morally wrong to impose catastrophic risks on unborn generations when reducing those risks would not noticeably diminish the quality of life of existing persons, a case can be made for concerted policy action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  6. Economics, ethics, and climate policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, R.B.; Monahan, P.A.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Are the costs of greenhouse gas emissions abatement justified by the perceived benefits of sustained climate stability? Do people of the present generation have a moral right to impose climate risks on their descendants in generations to come? This report examines these questions in light of the emergent facts of climate science and their socioeconomic implications. We consider alternative normative criteria for social decision-making with particular emphasis on cost-benefit analysis and the principle of sustainable development. While each framework yields important insights, we argue that the gross uncertainties associated with climate change and the distribution of impacts between present and future generations constrain the usefulness of cost-benefit criteria in evaluating climate policy. If one accepts the ethical proposition that it is morally wrong to impose catastrophic risks on unborn generations when reducing those risks would not noticeably diminish the quality of life of existing persons, a case can be made for concerted policy action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  7. Workshop in Regulation &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    Smart Grid and Regulatory Issues April 1, 2011 K&L Gates LLP, 1601 K Street, NW, Washington, DC Viable Regulation." Victor Glass, NECA, Comments January 14, 2011 Smart Grid and Regulatory Issues Location: Rutgers, The Brattle Group, "Smart Grid/Smart Regulation" John Caldwell, EEI, "Economic Efficiency and the Smart Grid

  8. A National Strategy for Advancing Climate Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunlea, Edward; Elfring, Chris

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate models are the foundation for understanding and projecting climate and climate-related changes and are thus critical tools for supporting climate-related decision making. This study developed a holistic strategy for improving the nationâ??s capability to accurately simulate climate and related Earth system changes on decadal to centennial timescales. The committeeâ??s report is a high level analysis, providing a strategic framework to guide progress in the nationâ??s climate modeling enterprise over the next 10-20 years. This study was supported by DOE, NSF, NASA, NOAA, and the intelligence community.

  9. The Potential for Wind Induced Ventilation to Meet Occupant Comfort Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, S. J.; Huang, Y. J.; Ritschard, R. L.; Foley, D. M.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a simple graphic tool that enables a building designer to evaluate the potential for wind induced ventilation cooling in several climate zones. Long term weather data were analyzed to determine the conditions for which available...

  10. Sensitivity studies on the impacts of Tibetan Plateau snowpack pollution on the Asian hydrological cycle and monsoon climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Flanner, M. G.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Wang, Weiguo

    2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP), the highest and largest plateau in the world, has long been identified to be critical in regulating the Asian monsoon climate and hydrological cycle. The snowpack and glaciers over the TP provide fresh water to billions of people in Asian countries, but the TP glaciers have been retreating extensively at a speed faster than any other part of the world. In this study a series of experiments with a global climate model are designed to simulate black carbon (BC) and dust in snow and their radiative forcing and to assess the relative impacts of anthropogenic CO2 and carbonaceous particles in the atmosphere and snow, respectively, on the snowpack over the TP, as well as their subsequent impacts on the Asian monsoon climate and hydrological cycle. Results show a large BC content in snow over the TP, especially the southern slope, with concentration larger than 100 µk/kg. Because of the high aerosol content in snow and large incident solar radiation in the low latitude and high elevation, the TP exhibits the largest surface radiative forcing induced by aerosols (e.g. BC, Dust) in snow compared to other snow-covered regions in the world. The aerosol-induced snow albedo perturbations generate surface radiative forcing of 5-25 W m-2 during spring, with a maximum in April or May. BC-in-snow increases the surface air temperature by around 1.0oC averaged over the TP and reduces snowpack over the TP more than that induced by pre-industrial to present CO2 increase and carbonaceous particles in the atmosphere during spring. As a result, runoff increases during late winter and early spring but decreases during late spring and early summer (i.e. a trend toward earlier melt dates). The snowmelt efficacy, defined as the snowpack reduction per unit degree of warming induced by the forcing agent, is 1-4 times larger for BC-in-snow than CO2 increase during April-July, indicating that BC-in-snow more efficiently accelerates snowmelt because the increased net solar radiation induced by reduced albedo melts the snow more efficiently than snow melt due to warming in the air. The TP also influences the South (SAM) and East (EAM) Asian monsoon through its dynamical and thermal forcing. During boreal spring, aerosols are transported by the southwesterly and reach the higher altitude and/or deposited in the snowpack over the TP. While BC and OM in the atmosphere directly absorb sunlight and warm the air, the darkened snow surface polluted by BC absorbs more solar radiation and increases the skin temperature, which warms the air above by the increased sensible heat flux over the TP. Both effects enhance the upward motion of air and spur deep convection along the TP during pre-monsoon season, resulting in earlier onset of the SAM and increase of moisture, cloudiness and convective precipitation over northern India. BC-in-snow has a more significant impact on the EAM in July than CO2 increase and carbonaceous particles in the atmosphere. Contributed by the significant increase of both sensible heat flux associated with the warm skin temperature and latent heat flux associated with increased soil moisture with long memory, the role of the TP as a heat pump is elevated from spring through summer as the land-sea thermal contrast increases to strengthen the EAM. As a result, both southern China and northern China become wetter, but central China (i.e. Yangtze River Basin) becomes drier - a near zonal anomaly pattern that is consistent with the dominant mode of precipitation variability in East Asia. ?

  11. Precipitation extremes under climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Gorman, Paul A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of precipitation extremes to climate change is considered using results from theory, modeling, and observations, with a focus on the physical factors that control the response. Observations and simulations with climate models show that precipitation extremes intensify in response to a warming climate. However, the sensitivity of precipitation extremes to warming remains uncertain when convection is important, and it may be higher in the tropics than the extratropics. Several physical contributions govern the response of precipitation extremes. The thermodynamic contribution is robust and well understood, but theoretical understanding of the microphysical and dynamical contributions is still being developed. Orographic precipitation extremes and snowfall extremes respond differently from other precipitation extremes and require particular attention. Outstanding research challenges include the influence of mesoscale convective organization, the dependence on the duration considered, and the need to...

  12. Climate Change | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartment of4CenterPointChristinaClay Sell SwornofEnergyClimateClimate

  13. Climate Change | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASLNanoporous Materials | Center forClimate Change Climate

  14. www.noaa.gov/climate Proposed Climate Service in NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and partners. The reorganization is budget neutral, does not change staffing levels, require employee, September 2010 Climate Service Example: Construction NOAA provides air-freezing data to the home building. This resulted in annual building cost savings of $330 million and energy cost savings of 586,000 megawatt

  15. Does the Bush Administration's climate policy mean climate protection?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    population. If the share of fossil fuels in the energy balance and the efficiency level of energy gas emissions. What are the prospects for participation in climate protection by the United States protection actions in the United States, other than those of the Bush Administration. 1. The main principles

  16. Climate determinism revisited: multiple equilibria in a complex climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, John

    by incoming solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere. We demonstrate that the multiple equilibria owe `snowball' state. Although low-order energy balance models of the climate are known to exhibit-640 Ma ago, e.g. Hoffmann et al. 1998), to a warm-house (no-ice) in the Cretaceous (e.g. Zachos et al

  17. Climate Action Plans and Long-Range Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Climate Action Plans and Long-Range Transportation Plans in the Pacific Northwest: A Review Climate Change and Impacts Mitigation versus Adaptation Impacts of Climate Change: Nation & the Pacific Northwest Climate Change Planning Efforts Transportation Sector Response - Survey Recommendations Continued

  18. Fall 2000 Vol. 1, No. 4 22 Colorado Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Climate Fall 2000 Vol. 1, No. 4 #12;22 Colorado Climate Table of Contents Climate Memories ................................................................................. 2 A Time for Time Series ­ Trends in Observed Solar Energy in Colorado? ....................................................................................................... 6 Colorado Climate in Review

  19. Colorado Climate Winter 1999/2000 Vol. 1, No. 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Climate Winter 1999/2000 Vol. 1, No. 1 Inside: What Is Climate? 1999 Water Year Review Climate on the Web Drought in Colorado #12;Colorado Climate Center Atmospheric Science Department Colorado ................................................................................................................................... 12 Drought in Colorado

  20. Oil Shortages, Climate Change and Collective Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newbery, David

    strategies, all provide tools to guide policy analysis. Stern (2006) took over 600 pages to both quantify and analyse the economics of climate change, specifically asking how to estimate the social cost of carbon and the benefits of mitigating climate...

  1. Climate Action Plan (Nova Scotia, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nova Scotia's Climate Change Action Plan has two main goals: reducing the province's contribution to climate change by reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and preparing for changes to the...

  2. Climate Leadership Conference | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    City 1250 S Hayes St. Arlington, VA 22202 Hosted and organized by the Association of Climate Change Officers (ACCO), Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES), and the...

  3. UNEP Rise Centre Energy, Climate and Sustainable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNEP Risře Centre ­ Energy, Climate and Sustainable Development Organisational set;UNEP Risře Centre ­ Energy, Climate and Sustainable Development International and Danish research team by an International Scientific Advisory Panel · Risř - Programme on Energy, Environment & Development Planning #12

  4. Watershed Academy Webcast on Climate Resilience

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Climate Resilience: What to Expect, How to Prepare, and  What you can Learn from Others." This webcast will share findings from the most recent National Climate Assessment report concerning...

  5. Implications of Climate Science for Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, H.D.

    2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change presents the greatest challenge ever faced by our domestic and international institutions, and a great deal of the difficulty lies in the science of the issue. Because human influence on global climate differs ...

  6. Climate impact metrics for energy technology evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Morgan Rae

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The climate change mitigation potential of energy technologies depends on how their lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions compare to global climate stabilization goals. Current methods for comparing technologies, which assess ...

  7. State of the climate in 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganesan, Anita

    Several large-scale climate patterns influenced climate conditions and weather patterns across the globe during 2010. The transition from a warm El Nińo phase at the beginning of the year to a cool La Nińa phase by July ...

  8. Analysis of Climate Policy Targets under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Henry D.

    Although policymaking in response to the climate change is essentially a challenge of risk management, most studies of the relation of emissions targets to desired climate outcomes are either deterministic or subject to a ...

  9. Challenges of Adapting to a Changing Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurd, Brian H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Global Climate Change on Agriculture: An Interpretiveon U.S. Agriculture, in THE IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON THEclimate change and the potential roles for adaptation are more severe for ecosystems than they are for managed systems like agriculture.

  10. Winter climate response to continental snow anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Gavin, 1969-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate variability has emerged in recent decades as an important field of geoscience research. A thorough understanding of the patterns and causes of climate variability is required to predict and prepare for upcoming ...

  11. California Energy Commission ADOPTED REGULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Energy Commission ADOPTED REGULATIONS FEBRUARY 2013 CEC-400-2010-004-CMF NONRESIDENTIAL BUILDING ENERGY USE DISCLOSURE PROGRAM Proposed Regulations: California Code of Regulations, Title 20, Division 2, Chapter 4, Article 9, Sections 1680 1685 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Edmund

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20, 2013, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Energy Efficiency, Facilities, Global Climate & Energy, Materials Science, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, Partnership, Research &...

  13. Climate Change: Some Scientific and Political Realities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, J. G.

    Climate Change: Some Scientific and Political Realities Jim Crawford Trane jim.crawford@trane.com www.trane.com Abstract Atmospheric scientists tell us that mankind is changing the climate, and is setting in motion forces that can... make essentially irreversible changes in the climate of the future. Naysayers dispute whether mankind is even capable of changing the climate. Today we are hearing more from the scientists and less from the naysayers. This presentation will review...

  14. Questions of bias in climate models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Wigley, Tom M.; Meinshausen, Malte; Rogelj, Joeri

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent work by Shindell usefully contributes to the debate over estimating climate sensitivity by highlighting an important aspect of the climate system: that climate forcings that occur over land result in a more rapid temperature response than forcings that are distributed more uniformly over the globe. While, as noted in this work, simple climate models may be biased by assuming the same temperature response for all forcing agents, the implication that the MAGICC model is biased in this way is not correct.

  15. Climate Analysis The central theme of the Climate Analysis Division is the analysis and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Climate Analysis The central theme of the Climate Analysis Division is the analysis and diagnosis of the climate and its variability on the basis of observations and models. The objective of this research of climate change scenarios for impact studies using downscaling techniques. The research can be summarised

  16. When Climate is Changing: Effects of Phenology and Local Climate on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    When Climate is Changing: Effects of Phenology and Local Climate on Individual Fitness Meit Öberg-91-576-7973-4 © 2014 Meit Öberg, Uppsala Print: SLU Service/Repro, Uppsala 2014 Cover: Meit Öberg #12;When Climate is Changing: Effects of Phenology and Local Climate on Individual Fitness Abstract The fitness impacts

  17. Climate Prediction Center Products in Support of National Security Mike Halpert, Deputy Director, Climate Prediction Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Climate Prediction Center Products in Support of National Security Mike Halpert, Deputy Director, Climate Prediction Center 5200 Auth Rd. Camp Springs, MD 20746 301-763-8000 x7535 Mike.Halpert@noaa.gov The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) delivers climate prediction, monitoring, and diagnostic products

  18. NOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National Security Challenges: Abstract Submission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    climate variability and climate change effect on the potential for growing crops for biofuel in GeorgiaNOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National, miscanthus, and other, are already being evaluated due to their large biomass productivity. The local farmers

  19. UWM Global Climate Change and Sustainable Development Initiative CONFERENCE ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    UWM Global Climate Change and Sustainable Development Initiative CONFERENCE ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Sponsored By UWM Global Climate Change and Sustainable Development Initiative Co Conference Description This conference will discuss the global issue of climate change in the regional

  20. Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Analysis How to Link Physical Climate Data and Economic Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Analysis ­ How to Link Physical Climate Data and Economic There are a number of structural and conceptual differences between the information provided by climate change models of economic concepts applied to climate change impact and adaptation policy assessment, and to illustrate how

  1. Stormwater ManagementStormwater Management and Climate Change:and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Stormwater ManagementStormwater Management and Climate Change:and Climate Change: Implications for · Wisconsin's changing climate · Stormwater management · Impacts and adaptation #12;WICCI Identifying impacts activities. Develop and recommend adaptation strategies. Mission: Assess and anticipate climate change

  2. A climate change index: Where climate change may be most prominent in the 21st century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    A climate change index: Where climate change may be most prominent in the 21st century Miche`le B; accepted 30 November 2006; published 10 January 2007. [1] A Climate Change Index (CCI) is developed to a single index that is a measure for the strength of future climate change relative to today's natural

  3. Climate Change Laws of the World Project Columbia Center for Climate Change Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Laws of the World Project Columbia Center for Climate Change Law Monica Molina, Columbia College '14 Supervisor Meredith Wilensky, J.D. Introduction The Climate Change Laws of the World Project is an ongoing effort at the Center for Climate Change Law (CCCL) to aggregate existing domestic

  4. NOAA/National Climatic Data Center Open Access to Physical Climate Data Policy December 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    climate data available from NOAA's various climate observing systems as well as the output data from state range of solar, geophysical, environmental, and human dimensions data. As an example of dataNOAA/National Climatic Data Center Open Access to Physical Climate Data Policy December 2009

  5. Climate change in the Netherlands | 1 Climate change in the Netherlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Climate change in the Netherlands | 1 Climate change in the Netherlands Supplements to the KNMI'06 scenarios #12;2 | Climate change in the Netherlands Abstract 1 Introduction 1.1 Objective and contents 1 of climate simulations 2.6 Observed rapid warming in the Netherlands Probability of extremes in a changing

  6. H usescience and experience in dealing with climate change Holland Climate House

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    House at the Copenhagen Climate Conference. We hope you will enjoy your stay with us. During the entire issues such as new regional climate models and the climate-proofing of cities. There will be discussions. On behalf of these organisations we invite you to join us in the Holland Climate House. Prof. Pier Vellinga

  7. Agriculture, Climate Change and Climate Change Mitigation Bruce A. McCarl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Agriculture, Climate Change and Climate Change Mitigation Bruce A. McCarl Regents Professor Change Happen Let's Avoid Climate Change Mitigation Effects Presented at Texas Recycling and Sustainability Summit San Antonio, Sept 29, 2004 #12;Climate Change has in part a human cause Source http

  8. Overlooked Issues in theOverlooked Issues in the Climate Change DebateClimate Change Debate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the environment change as well. Decision makers need assessments of how climate vulnerability has changed. 2 of ClimateViews of Climate Change ScienceChange Science #12;Climate change including regional impacts can of rioting and nuclear war; Britain will be 'Siberian' in less than 20 years; Threat to the world is greater

  9. Climate policy gets down to business

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powicki, C.R.; Douglas, J.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As Europe negotiates caps and allocations for Phase 2 emissions trading (for 2008-2012) the United States' first mandatory cap and trade initiative is gathering steam in the northeast. The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) is designed to stabilise CO{sub 2} emissions from regulated power plants in seven states at approximately 1990 levels from 2009 to 2014 and then reduce them by a total of 10% during a second five-year period. The states included are: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York and Vermont. Meanwhile, a variety of other regional and state-level initiatives are taking shape over a total of 30 states, targeting the electric power, automotive, oil and gas, real estate and financial services sectors. Emissions targets have been set by several utilities such as American Electric Power, Cinergy and DTE Energy. Several have joined the Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX) to trade emissions allowances. Decentralised initiatives are seen by David Victor, director of the Program in Energy and Sustainable Development at Stamford University, as a necessary development, coined a Madisonian approach. Several legislation proposals aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions have been introduced. Regardless of what Congress eventually turns into law, successful development of advanced technology will, in the authors' opinion, be the requisite for making them work. 5 figs.

  10. Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system: from past to future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arneth, A.; Harrison, S. P.; Zaehle, S.; Tsigaridis, K; Menon, S; Bartlein, P.J.; Feichter, J; Korhola, A; Kulmala, M; O'Donnell, D; Schurgers, G; Sorvari, S; Vesala, T

    2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The terrestrial biosphere plays a major role in the regulation of atmospheric composition, and hence climate, through multiple interlinked biogeochemical cycles (BGC). Ice-core and other palaeoenvironmental records show a fast response of vegetation cover and exchanges with the atmosphere to past climate change, although the phasing of these responses reflects spatial patterning and complex interactions between individual biospheric feedbacks. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemical cycles to anthropogenically-forced climate changes and air pollution, with equally complex feedbacks. For future conditions, although carbon cycle-climate interactions have been a major focus, other BGC feedbacks could be as important in modulating climate changes. The additional radiative forcing from terrestrial BGC feedbacks other than those conventionally attributed to the carbon cycle is in the range of 0.6 to 1.6 Wm{sup -2}; all taken together we estimate a possible maximum of around 3 Wm{sup -2} towards the end of the 21st century. There are large uncertainties associated with these estimates but, given that the majority of BGC feedbacks result in a positive forcing because of the fundamental link between metabolic stimulation and increasing temperature, improved quantification of these feedbacks and their incorporation in earth system models is necessary in order to develop coherent plans to manage ecosystems for climate mitigation.

  11. Incorporating long-term climate change in performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, P.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baker, B.L. [Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Economy, K. [Ecodynamics Research Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Garner, J.W. [Applied Physics, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Rudeen, D.K. [New Mexico Engineering Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is developing the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico for the disposal of transuranic wastes generated by defense programs. Applicable regulations (40 CFR 191) require the DOE to evaluate disposal-system performance for 10,000 yr. Climatic changes may affect performance by altering groundwater flow. Paleoclimatic data from southeastern New Mexico and the surrounding area indicate that the wettest and coolest Quaternary climate at the site can be represented by that at the last glacial maximum, when mean annual precipitation was approximately twice that of the present. The hottest and driest climates have been similar to that of the present. The regularity of global glacial cycles during the late Pleistocene confirms that the climate of the last glacial maximum is suitable for use as a cooler and wetter bound for variability during the next 10,000 yr. Climate variability is incorporated into groundwater-flow modeling for WIPP PA by causing hydraulic head in a portion of the model-domain boundary to rise to the ground surface with hypothetical increases in precipitation during the next 10,000 yr. Variability in modeled disposal-system performance introduced by allowing had values to vary over this range is insignificant compared to variability resulting from other causes, including incomplete understanding of transport processes. Preliminary performance assessments suggest that climate variability will not affect regulatory compliance.

  12. Solar influences on Climate PROFESSOR JOANNA HAIGH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar influences on Climate PROFESSOR JOANNA HAIGH Executive summary THE SUN PROVIDES THE ENERGY THAT DRIVES THE EARTH'S CLIMATE system. Variations in the composition and intensity of incident solar and additional to those from man-made climate change. In the current epoch, solar variation impacts on regional

  13. 8, 34053430, 2008 Climate and emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 8, 3405­3430, 2008 Climate and emission changes over Canada and Mexico E. Tagaris et al. Title Chemistry and Physics Discussions The role of climate and emission changes in future air quality over.russell@ce.gatech.edu) 3405 #12;ACPD 8, 3405­3430, 2008 Climate and emission changes over Canada and Mexico E. Tagaris et al

  14. WP1 Climate services for road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    WP1 Climate services for road authorities Janette Bessembinder et al. #12;2 A1: review, analysis and assessment of existing climate change projections regarding TEN-T needs A2: Development of a common methodology for the production of regional climate projections to provide consistent input data for risk

  15. `Climate Realism' Brian Zaharatos March 11, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    `Climate Realism' Brian Zaharatos March 11, 2012 Last week, the Oredigger (Colorado School of Mines, that was the title of the online version; the print version was titled, "The Climate Change Debate Heats Up"). This article gave an account of a recent talk by hosted by CSM's Geophysics department on `climate realism

  16. CLIMATE ACTION PLAN NOVEMBER 10, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    CLIMATE ACTION PLAN NOVEMBER 10, 2009 SANDY DEJOHN PHYSICAL FACILITIES DEPARTMENT #12;~ i ~ TABLE the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment, I believe strongly in working to achieve its helped shape and develop the information contained in this Climate Action Plan: (Names listed

  17. "This climate of suspicion we're

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    "This climate of suspicion we're Published online 20 January 2010 | Nature 463, 284-287 (2010) | doi:10.1038/463284a News Feature Like any other field, research on climate change has some fundamental the University of East Anglia's Climatic Research Unit (CRU) in November presented an early Christmas present

  18. 4, 23852405, 2007 CO2 and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BGD 4, 2385­2405, 2007 CO2 and climate affect European carbon ballance R. Harrison and C. Jones Competing roles of rising CO2 and climate change in the contemporary European carbon balance R. Harrison and C. Jones Met Office, Hadley Centre for Climate Change, Exeter, EX1 3PB, UK Received: 13 April 2007

  19. CLIMATE ACTION PLAN JUNE 1, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    UC DAVIS 2009­2010 CLIMATE ACTION PLAN JUNE 1, 2010 #12;UC Davis 2009-2010 Climate Action Plan Page 2 UC DAVIS 2009-2010 CLIMATE ACTION PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgements...................................................................................................... 24 Chapter 3: Emissions Reduction Actions 3.1 Energy Use Reduction to Date

  20. Advanced Review Greenland climate change: from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    Advanced Review Greenland climate change: from the past to the future Val´erie Masson-Delmotte,1 cores in and around Greenland allow us to place the current trends in regional climate, ice sheet lake sediments in southern Greenland document major environmental and climatic conditions during

  1. European Climate Assessment & Dataset Report 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    European Climate Assessment & Dataset Report 2008 ECA&D · · · · European Climate Assessment & Dataset (ECA&D) Report 2008 "Towards an operational system for assessing observed changes in climate & Dataset Report 2008 ECA&D · · · · Aryan van Engelen, Albert Klein Tank, Gerard van de Schrier and Lisette

  2. Distinguished Lecturer Series Understanding Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Distinguished Lecturer Series Understanding Climate Change: Opportunities and Challenges for Data A Climate change is the defining environmental challenge facing our planet, yet there is considerable.Anew and transformative approach is required to understand the potential impact of climate change. Data driven approaches

  3. Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Tomography, Satellite Altimetry, and Modeling The ATOC to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore in the advective heat flux. Changes in oceanic heat storage are a major expected element of future climate shifts

  4. POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON FLOODING IN WISCONSIN Ken Potter and Zach Schuster flood scenarios in Wisconsin · Potential impact of climate change on Wisconsin flooding · Ongoing #12;WISCONSIN INITIATIVE ON CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS · Partnership between the University of Wisconsin

  5. Considering Climate Change in Hydropower Relicensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Considering Climate Change in Hydropower Relicensing ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH PIER Environmental climate change when relicensing hydropower units, stating that there is a lack of scientific information this project, researchers are conducting an environmental study on climate change for the Yuba River

  6. CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATIONS FOR LOCAL WATER MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATIONS FOR LOCAL WATER MANAGEMENT IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC Climate change will affect both sea level and the temporal and spatial distribution of runoff

  7. BIODIVERSITY The geography of climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Nathan

    BIODIVERSITY REVIEW The geography of climate change: implications for conservation biogeography D. J. B. Kraft1 INTRODUCTION It is widely recognized that climate change poses a grave threat., 2007). The impacts of climate change are broadly detectable in many taxa, including shifts in phenology

  8. The Environmental Justice Dimensions of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Environmental Justice Dimensions of Climate Change Marie Lynn Miranda, Douglas A. Hastings to mitigate the severe impacts of climate change predicted to occur in the twenty-first century. Many with climate change. This study investigates the varying degrees to which developing and developed nations

  9. Simulation of Recent Southern Hemisphere Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simulation of Recent Southern Hemisphere Climate Change Nathan P. Gillett1 * and David W. J. Thompson2 Recent observations indicate that climate change over the high latitudes of the Southern's surface as well. Recent climate change in the Southern Hemi- sphere (SH) is marked by a strengthening

  10. Abrupt Climate Change R. B. Alley,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    Abrupt Climate Change R. B. Alley,1 J. Marotzke,2 W. D. Nordhaus,3 J. T. Overpeck,4 D. M. Peteet,5. Wallace8 Large, abrupt, and widespread climate changes with major impacts have occurred repeatedly in the past, when the Earth system was forced across thresholds. Although abrupt climate changes can occur

  11. Outreach and Adaptive Strategies for Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outreach and Adaptive Strategies for Climate Change: The Role of NOAA Sea Grant Extension years and generations about how to adapt to a changing climate. Effective preparation for possible effects of climate change includes engagement of resource managers, planners, public works officials

  12. Arnold Schwarzenegger DATA SOURCES FOR CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor DATA SOURCES FOR CLIMATE CHANGE RESEARCH WITH A COMPUTABLE GENERAL-Holst, University of California, Berkeley PIERPROJECTREPORT June 2007 CEC-500-2006-080 #12;California Climate Change for Climate Change Research with a Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Model of the California Economy

  13. TSINGHUA -MIT China Energy & Climate Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TSINGHUA - MIT China Energy & Climate Project Will economic restructuring in China reduce trade to: discover new interactions among natural and human climate system components; objectively assess future; and improve methods to model, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts

  14. TV Weathercasters as Climate Change Communicators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TV Weathercasters as Climate Change Communicators Kris Wilson Ph.D. School of Journalism University. 2012) #12;TV Weathercasters as Climate Change Communicators On-line survey (n=571) (52% response rate change more frequently in the future #12;TV Weathercasters as Climate Change Communicators "As a TV

  15. The Sun and Climate Solar Irradiance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    The Sun and Climate #12;Solar Irradiance The Solar Constant f = 1.4 x 106 erg/cm2/s. Over is higher when the Sun is more magnetically active. ·The Sun was magnetically active, and the climate the Sun Drive Climate? #12;The Temperature's Rising #12;Sunspots and CO2 What is Cause and What is Effect

  16. 4, 40374067, 2007 Impact of Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    HESSD 4, 4037­4067, 2007 Impact of Climate Change in Thuringia P. Krause and S. Hanisch Title Page and analysis of the impact of climate change on the hydrological dynamics in Thuringia, Germany P. Krause and S. Krause (p.krause@uni-jena.de) 4037 #12;HESSD 4, 4037­4067, 2007 Impact of Climate Change in Thuringia P

  17. 5, 14071439, 2008 Impacts of climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    HESSD 5, 1407­1439, 2008 Impacts of climate change on Blue Nile flows M. E. Elshamy et al. Title Impacts of climate change on Blue Nile flows using bias-corrected GCM scenarios M. E. Elshamy 1,2 , I. A of the European Geosciences Union. 1407 #12;HESSD 5, 1407­1439, 2008 Impacts of climate change on Blue Nile flows

  18. 4, 30553085, 2007 Winter climate affects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    HESSD 4, 3055­3085, 2007 Winter climate affects long-term trends in stream water nitrate H. A. de and Earth System Sciences Winter climate affects long-term trends in stream water nitrate in acid Winter climate affects long-term trends in stream water nitrate H. A. de Wit et al. Title Page Abstract

  19. Kiran Maharjan Climate change and floods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    management processes by providing many kinds of information. The level of vulnerability of people towardsKiran Maharjan Climate change and floods Climate change and floods Vulnerability analysis of people, in the livelihoods of people. Hence, climate change is making everyone vulnerable to its impacts. Most of the people

  20. WATER AND ENERGY SECTOR VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WATER AND ENERGY SECTOR VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE WARMING IN THE SIERRA NEVADA: Water Year explores the sensitivity of water indexing methods to climate change scenarios to better understand how water management decisions and allocations will be affected by climate change. Many water management

  1. Ohio Farmer Attitudes About Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    5/16/2014 1 Ohio Farmer Attitudes About Climate Change Thursday, May 15, 2014 Byrd Polar Research Climate Assessment Report--Agriculture Section #12;5/16/2014 2 USDA Corn CAP Grant (OSU--Moore, Lal, Dick' Attitudes about Climate Change (2012) #12;5/16/2014 14 Sugar Creek Amish 83% Non Amish 39% USA CORN BELT

  2. Climatic Research Unit University of East Anglia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    studies:the Maldives, Australia and the Mediterranean. Climate Change andTourism www January, 2000, University of Surrey). These publications review the impacts of climate change for a wide range of international holiday destinations visited by UK tourists. The impacts of climate change

  3. 7, 1114111189, 2007 Climate change and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 7, 11141­11189, 2007 Climate change and tropospheric ozone G. Zeng et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Impact of climate change on tropospheric ozone and its global budgets G. Zeng, J. A. Pyle, and P. Zeng (guang.zeng@atm.ch.cam.ac.uk) 11141 #12;ACPD 7, 11141­11189, 2007 Climate change and tropospheric

  4. Research Note Impacts of climate change on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Note Impacts of climate change on forestry in Scotland ­ a synopsis of spatial modelling research Duncan Ray January 2008 Climate change is now one of the greatest global challenges, and research by climate change. This Research Note provides an initial synopsis of the likely impacts, with preliminary

  5. Climate Change and Water Resources in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuille, Mathias

    Climate Change and Water Resources in the Tropical Andes Mathias Vuille Inter-American Development Bank Environmental Safeguards Unit TECHNICAL NOTE No. IDB-TN-515 March 2013 #12;Climate Change-American Development Bank Felipe Herrera Library Vuille, Mathias. Climate change and water resources in the tropical

  6. UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE UNITED NATIONS 1992 FCCC/INFORMAL/84 GE.05-62220 (E) 200705 #12;UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE The Parties to this Convention in predictions of climate change, particularly with regard to the timing, magnitude and regional patterns thereof

  7. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Synergisms between climate change mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    but increasingly so in developing countries and economies in transition. Certain measures that integrate climateORIGINAL ARTICLE Synergisms between climate change mitigation and adaptation: an insurance an aggregator of the impacts of climate change and a market actor able to play a material role in decreasing

  8. ii Colorado Climate Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;ii Colorado Climate Table of Contents Web: http://climate.atmos.colostate.edu Colorado Climate Winter 2001-2002 Vol. 3, No. 1 Why Is the Park Range Colorado's Snowfall Capital? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 The Cold-Land Processes Field Experiment: North-Central Colorado

  9. Colorado's AMAZING Climate Nolan Doesken, State Climatologist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado's AMAZING Climate Nolan Doesken, State Climatologist Colorado Climate Center Atmospheric Science Department Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO Graphics assistance provided by Wendy Ryan Colorado without · Later that same year, Colorado re-established the State Climate program with support

  10. 3, 11331166, 2007 Glacier-climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the Past Reconstructing glacier-based climates of LGM Europe and Russia ­ Part 1: Numerical modelling for climate change the LGM is a popular time period for testing the ability of GCMs to simulate past cli-25CPD 3, 1133­1166, 2007 Glacier-climate model for recosntructing palaeoclimates R. Allen et al

  11. Presented by Climate Extremes: The Science,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presented by Climate Extremes: The Science, Impacts, and Policy Relevance Auroop R. Ganguly-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Ganguly_ClimateExtremes_SC10 Global warming is credible: Without-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Ganguly_ClimateExtremes_SC10 Knowledge gaps exist in the science

  12. Sunnyvale Marine Climate Deep Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    German, A.; Siddiqui, A.; Dakin, B.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) and Allen Gilliland of One Sky Homes collaborated on a marine climate retrofit project designed to meet both Passive House (PH) and Building America (BA) program standards. The scope included sealing, installing wall, roof and floor insulation (previously lacking), replacing windows, upgrading the heating and cooling system, and installing.

  13. Campus Sustainability Goals Energy & Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Lucia

    Campus Sustainability Goals Energy & Climate By 2014, reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 use to 10% below 2008 levels by 2020. Built Environment Design future projects to minimize energy and water consumption and wastewater production; incorporate sustainable design principles into capital

  14. Climate Change and Runoff Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    UV radiation Solar radiation Reflected by atmosphere (34% ) Radiated by atmosphere as heat (66%) Heat radiated by the earth Heat Troposphere Lower Stratosphere (ozone layer) Greenhouse Effect-natural #12 range of probable climate change GCM grid Downscaled (8x8 km) grid D. Vimont, UW-Madison #12;Temperature

  15. Climate Action Champions Informational Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An informational webinar will be held on Thursday, Oct. 9 from 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST) to provide applicants with an overview of the Climate Action Champions opportunity, the application process, and answer any questions.

  16. Climate Analysis, Monitoring, and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    facing California, with projected impacts reaching every sector of the state's economy and public health. The energy sector will not be spared. The potential repercussions of climate change include frequent heat waves, increased energy consumption, reduced hydropower generation in the summer season

  17. CLIMATE CHANGE Stephen E. Schwartz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    ://www.ecd.bnl.gov/steve #12;OUTLINE Earth's energy balance Perturbations Keyquestions Influence of aerosols Climate research ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter Schwartz, 1996, modified sensitivity can result in huge averted costs. #12;DMS #12;AEROSOL IN MEXICO CITY BASIN #12;AEROSOL IN MEXICO

  18. Climate Change Worksheet Energy Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    of distance from the equator). The tropics are net absorbers of energy as the amount of absorbed solar energyClimate Change Worksheet «» Energy Budget For any balanced budget, what comes in must equal what goes out. In the case of planets orbiting the Sun, this means that the incoming solar radiation must

  19. Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashkenazy, Yossi "Yosef"

    global warming scenario. According to the GFDL model, both the Australian and Kalahari basin dunes1 23 Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International Journal Devoted to the Description, Causes of stabilized dunes in the world, and changes in their mobility have significant economic implications. Global

  20. Colorado Climate Update Nolan Doesken

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the Colorado Farm Show Wednesday, January 30, 2013 Prepared by Wendy Ryan and Zach Schwalbe #12;Topics we;Monitoring our Climate · Elements: temperature, precipitation, snow, wind, solar, evaporation, soil Average Solar Radiation National Renewal Energy Laboratory: www.nrel.gov Colorado is a part

  1. Natural Climate Variability Michael Ghil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghil, Michael

    periodic (often called quasi-periodic) variations in Earth's orbit around the Sun affect the intensity-gas concentrations in the atmosphere, such as that of carbon dioxide (CO2), will increase surface temperatures through the greenhouse effect (see Projection of Future Changes in Climate, Volume 1). This temperature

  2. CLIMATE ACTION PLAN SEPTEMBER 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maccabe, Barney

    CLIMATE ACTION PLAN SEPTEMBER 2009 UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO · OFFICE OF SUSTAINABILITY · ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO #12;#12;The University of New Mexico is committed to reducing energy usage and our d. Policy 2100 "Sustainability"............ 53 e. Policy 5100 "Energy Management" 58 B. Future

  3. 2010 Climate Action Plan Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feschotte, Cedric

    of climate on the world have forced us to reassess our way of living and come up with viable, sustainable responsible, sustainable world in which to live and learn. Sincerely, Michael K. Young President of Sustainability The President's Sustainability Advisory Board The CAP Planning Team #12;2 #12;3 From the Desk

  4. {open_quotes}Virtual climate{close_quotes} and climate change assessment: Paving the way for workable climate change policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrick, C.N. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A climate change assessment framework that integrates physical change with societal vulnerability is proposed. The purpose of the assessment would be to focus research on the physical science uncertainties with the most potential to adversely affect key economic, political, and cultural activities. The framework centers on the concept of virtual climate, which is defined as the large-scale, protracted, and routinized augmentation/offset of natural climatic conditions. The assessment process would focus on the superimposition of climate change on those socio-cultural factors that determine the degree to which specific societal groups (regions) have already offset climate conditions to support preferred patterns of life.

  5. Climate Change Guidance: A Pragmatic Approach to Client

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    10/21/11 Climate Change Guidance: A Pragmatic Approach to Client Needs Climate, Water and Ecosystems- Shaping the Great Plains October 13, 2011 #12;10/21/11 Climate Change Guidance: A Pragmatic Approach to Client NeedsClimate Science ­ 2011 ·Yes, the climate is changing. ·Climate science is changing

  6. NIH Portfolio Analysis on Climate Change and Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madey, Gregory R.

    NIH Portfolio Analysis on Climate Change and Health Total studies that in some way relate to climate change 1,357 > Directly relate to climate change 7 > Examine the climate variables on health 85 response to climate change By David Taylor Climate change and its relationship to health research

  7. Sulfur Dioxide Regulations (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides sulfur dioxide emission limits for every county, as well as regulations for the emission, monitoring and...

  8. Dam Safety Regulation (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Dam Safety Regulation is to ensure that all dams constructed in the state of Mississippi are permitted and thus do not potentially harm wildlife, water supplies and property. ...

  9. Dam Safety Regulations (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All dams, except those owned by the U.S., are under the jurisdiction of these regulations. These dams will be classified by hazard rating, and may be subject to periodic inspections. The...

  10. Underground Storage Tank Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Underground Storage Tank Regulations is relevant to all energy projects that will require the use and building of pipelines, underground storage of any sorts, and/or electrical equipment. The...

  11. SB 4 Well Stimulation Treatment Regulations Text of Proposed Regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    surveys; routine activities that do not affect the integrity of the well or the formation; the removal SB 4 Well Stimulation Treatment Regulations Text of Proposed Regulations Page 1 of 13 SB 4 WELL STIMULATION TREATMENT REGULATIONS TEXT OF PROPOSED REGULATIONS Added text is shown in underline

  12. Dissemination of Climate Model Output to the Public and Commercial Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Stockwell, PhD

    2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate is defined by the Glossary of Meteorology as the mean of atmospheric variables over a period of time ranging from as short as a few months to multiple years and longer. Although the term climate is often used to refer to long-term weather statistics, the broader definition of climate is the time evolution of a system consisting of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere. Physical, chemical, and biological processes are involved in interactions among the components of the climate system. Vegetation, soil moisture, and glaciers are part of the climate system in addition to the usually considered temperature and precipitation (Pielke, 2008). Climate change refers to any systematic change in the long-term statistics of climate elements (such as temperature, pressure, or winds) sustained over several decades or longer. Climate change can be initiated by external forces, such as cyclical variations in the Earth's solar orbit that are thought to have caused glacial and interglacial periods within the last 2 million years (Milankovitch, 1941). However, a linear response to astronomical forcing does not explain many other observed glacial and interglacial cycles (Petit et al., 1999). It is now understood that climate is influenced by the interaction of solar radiation with atmospheric greenhouse gasses (e.g., carbon dioxide, chlorofluorocarbons, methane, nitrous oxide, etc.), aerosols (airborne particles), and Earth's surface. A significant aspect of climate are the interannual cycles, such as the El Nino La Nina cycle which profoundly affects the weather in North America but is outside the scope of weather forecasts. Some of the most significant advances in understanding climate change have evolved from the recognition of the influence of ocean circulations upon the atmosphere (IPCC, 2007). Human activity can affect the climate system through increasing concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases, air pollution, increasing concentrations of aerosol, and land alteration. A particular concern is that atmospheric levels of CO{sub 2} may be rising faster than at any time in Earth's history, except possibly following rare events like impacts from large extraterrestrial objects (AMS, 2007). Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations have increased since the mid-1700s through fossil fuel burning and changes in land use, with more than 80% of this increase occurring since 1900. The increased levels of CO{sub 2} will remain in the atmosphere for hundreds to thousands of years. The complexity of the climate system makes it difficult to predict specific aspects of human-induced climate change, such as exactly how and where changes will occur, and their magnitude. The Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) was established by World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the United Nations in 1988. The IPCC was tasked with assessing the scientific, technical and socioeconomic information needed to understand the risk of human-induced climate change, its observed and projected impacts, and options for adaptation and mitigation. The IPCC concluded in its Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) that warming of the climate system is unequivocal, and that most of the observed increase in globally averaged temperatures since the mid-20th century is very likely due to the observed increased in anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations (IPCC, 2007).

  13. Predicting the effect of climate change on wildfire behavior and initial attack success

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, William; Fried, Jeremy S.; Gilless, J. Keith; Riley, William J.; Moody, Tadashi J.; Simon de Blas, Clara; Hayhoe, Katharine; Moritz, Max; Stephens, Scott; Torn, Margaret

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focused on how climate change-induced effects on weather will translate into changes in wildland fire severity and outcomes in California, particularly on the effectiveness of initial attack at limiting the number of fires that escape initial attack. The results indicate that subtle shifts in fire behavior of the sort that might be induced by the climate changes anticipated for the next century are of sufficient magnitude to generate an appreciable increase in the number of fires that escape initial attack. Such escapes are of considerable importance in wildland fire protection planning, given the high cost to society of a catastrophic escape like those experienced in recent decades in the Berkeley-Oakland, Santa Barbara, San Diego, or Los Angeles areas. However, at least for the three study areas considered, it would appear that relatively modest augmentations to existing firefighting resources might be sufficient to compensate for change-induced changes in wildland fire outcomes.

  14. Climate SolutionS CS pgs final.indd 1 12/21/07 2:25:52 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    forests and conserve natural resources. Climate solutions was printed on 60-lb. legacy offset, an Fs · 21 Carbon taxes · 25 Carbon caps · 28 regulations · 34 Investments · 36 What states can do · 38 What;Part 3 | Carbon Capping 101 three varieties of cap-and-trade · 49 A seat in exxon stadium · 51 lessons

  15. Without a solid commitment from the world's leaders, innovative ways to combat climate change are likely to come to nothing.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    will not be enough. The fossil fuels burned up so far have already committed the world to a serious amount of climate notably tradable permit regimes, taxes on fuels, regulations on power generation and energy efficiency, and subsidies for renewable energy and improved technologies. These tools can work if applied seriously -- so

  16. A new scenario framework for climate change research: The concept of Shared Climate Policy Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriegler, Elmar; Edmonds, James A.; Hallegatte, Stephane; Ebi, Kristie L.; Kram, Tom; Riahi, Keywan; Winkler, Harald; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents the concept of shared climate policy assumptions as an important element of the new scenario framework. Shared climate policy assumptions capture key climate policy dimensions such as the type and scale of mitigation and adaptation measures. They are not specified in the socio-economic reference pathways, and therefore introduce an important third dimension to the scenario matrix architecture. Climate policy assumptions will have to be made in any climate policy scenario, and can have a significant impact on the scenario description. We conclude that a meaningful set of shared climate policy assumptions is useful for grouping individual climate policy analyses and facilitating their comparison. Shared climate policy assumptions should be designed to be policy relevant, and as a set to be broad enough to allow a comprehensive exploration of the climate change scenario space.

  17. Price regulation for waste hauling franchises in California: an examination of how regulators regulate pricing and the effects of competition on regulated markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seltzer, Steven A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and popular recent “incentive regulation” alternatives,if costs increase. Incentive regulation – most particularly

  18. CLIMATE CHANGE CERTAINTIES AND UNCERTAINTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    Year CO2concentration(ppm) 180 200 220 240 260 280 300 320 340 360 380 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 underlies much of the assessment of climate change over the industrial period. #12;INCREASES IN CO2 OVER THE INDUSTRIAL PERIOD #12;ATMOSPHERIC CO2 EMISSIONS Time series 1700 - 2003 3.0 2.5 2.0 1.5 1.0 0.5 0

  19. Climatic Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreisVolcanicPower Address:Climatic Solar Jump to: navigation,

  20. Abating climate change. What will be done and the consequences for investors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raskin, A.; Mellquist, N.; Shah, S.; Winton, B.

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is meant for institutional investors. Sections discuss: the science of climate change; global emissions - abatement scenario; coal - the world's dominant fuel for electric generation; CO{sub 2} transport and storage; nuclear energy - the new green solution; renewable energy - harnessing the power of water, wind and sun; regulation; increasing energy efficiency - the lowest cost option; enhancing the efficiency of electric applications; enhancing the efficiency of transportation; macroeconomic implications; and investment implications.

  1. A Hierarchical Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ringler, Todd; Collins, William D.; Taylor, Mark; Ashfaq, Moetasim

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tools for predicting the evolution of the climate system. Through decades of development, GCMs have demonstrated useful skill in simulating climate at continental to global scales. However, large uncertainties remain in projecting climate change at regional scales, which limit our ability to inform decisions on climate change adaptation and mitigation. To bridge this gap, different modeling approaches including nested regional climate models (RCMs), global stretch-grid models, and global high-resolution atmospheric models have been used to provide regional climate simulations (Leung et al. 2003). In previous efforts to evaluate these approaches, isolating their relative merits was not possible because factors such as dynamical frameworks, physics parameterizations, and model resolutions were not systematically constrained. With advances in high performance computing, it is now feasible to run coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs at horizontal resolution comparable to what RCMs use today. Global models with local refinement using unstructured grids have become available for modeling regional climate (e.g., Rauscher et al. 2012; Ringler et al. 2013). While they offer opportunities to improve climate simulations, significant efforts are needed to test their veracity for regional-scale climate simulations.

  2. Distinct promoters regulate tissue-specific and differential expression of kallikrein 6 in CNS demyelinating disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blaber, Michael

    , and therein is regulated by injury. In the case of CNS demyelinating disease, K6 expression in CNS occurs in a tissue- specific fashion and are differentially regulated in response to CNS injury. While the human peripheral tissue. In a murine model of human CNS demyelinating inflammatory disease induced by Theiler's pi

  3. The availability of purine nucleotides regulates natural competence by controlling translation of the competence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redfield, Rosemary J. "Rosie"

    The availability of purine nucleotides regulates natural competence by controlling translation that the depletion of purine nucleotides under competence- inducing conditions activates the CRP-dependent competence-specific regulator Sxy. Depletion of extra- or intra-cellular purine nucleotides activates Sxy translation, while

  4. Cell cycle regulators in the control of Emilie Blanchet, Jean-Sbastien Annicotte, and Lluis Fajas*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in the regulation of glucose-induced insulin secretion. There is enough evidence to indicate that the CDK4-pRB-E2F1 cycle regulators in lipids and adipocytes metabolism Lipids metabolism not only consists on lipid synthesis and degradation, but also on lipid signaling, and fatty acid storage in adipose tissue

  5. Climate impacts on agriculture: Implications for crop production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatfield, Jerry L.; Boote, Kenneth J.; Kimball, B. A.; Ziska, Lewis A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Ort, Don; Thomson, Allison M.; Wolfe, David W.

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in temperature, CO2, and precipitation under the scenarios of climate change for the next 30 years present a challenge to crop production. This review focuses on the impact of temperature, CO2, and ozone on agronomic crops and the implications for crop production. Understanding these implications for agricultural crops is critical for developing cropping systems resilient to stresses induced by climate change. There is variation among crops in their response to CO2, temperature, and precipitation changes and, with the regional differences in predicted climate, a situation is created in which the responses will be further complicated. For example, the temperature effects on soybean could potentially cause yield reductions of 2.4% in the South but an increase of 1.7% in the Midwest. The frequency of years when temperatures exceed thresholds for damage during critical growth stages is likely to increase for some crops and regions. The increase in CO2 contributes significantly to enhanced plant growth and improved water use efficiency; however, there may be a downscaling of these positive impacts due to higher temperatures plants will experience during their growth cycle. A challenge is to understand the interactions of the changing climatic parameters because of the interactions among temperature, CO2, and precipitation on plant growth and development and also on the biotic stresses of weeds, insects, and diseases. Agronomists will have to consider the variations in temperature and precipitation as part of the production system if they are to ensure the food security required by an ever increasing population.

  6. Downscaled climate change impacts on agricultural water resources in Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmsen, E.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006. Climate Change in the Caribbean: Water, Agriculture,role of agriculture in climate system and in climate change.

  7. Effects of solar UV radiation and climate change on biogeochemical cycling: Interactions and feedbacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson III, David J [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar UV radiation, climate and other drivers of global change are undergoing significant changes and models forecast that these changes will continue for the remainder of this century. Here we assess the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles and the interactions of these effects with climate change, including feedbacks on climate. Such interactions occur in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. While there is significant uncertainty in the quantification of these effects, they could accelerate the rate of atmospheric CO{sub 2} increase and subsequent climate change beyond current predictions. The effects of predicted changes in climate and solar UV radiation on carbon cycling in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are expected to vary significantly between regions. The balance of positive and negative effects on terrestrial carbon cycling remains uncertain, but the interactions between UV radiation and climate change are likely to contribute to decreasing sink strength in many oceanic regions. Interactions between climate and solar UV radiation will affect cycling of elements other than carbon, and so will influence the concentration of greenhouse and ozone-depleting gases. For example, increases in oxygen-deficient regions of the ocean caused by climate change are projected to enhance the emissions of nitrous oxide, an important greenhouse and ozone-depleting gas. Future changes in UV-induced transformations of aquatic and terrestrial contaminants could have both beneficial and adverse effects. Taken in total, it is clear that the future changes in UV radiation coupled with human-caused global change will have large impacts on biogeochemical cycles at local, regional and global scales.

  8. Climate change and forests in India: note from the guest editors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravindtranath, N.H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    approaches to analysis of climate change impacts on forestsand adaptation to climate change in the forest sector.the Climate Economics Branch, Climate Change Division, U.S.

  9. Design of Optimal Regulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin; Robert Sierakowski

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Current research suggests the use of a liner quadratic performance index for optimal control of regulators in various applications. Some examples include correcting the trajectory of rocket and air vehicles, vibration suppression of flexible structures, and airplane stability. In all these cases, the focus is in suppressing/decreasing system deviations rapidly. However, if one compares the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) solution with optimal solutions (minimum time), it is seen that the LQR solution is less than optimal in some cases indeed (3-6) times that obtained using a minimum time solution. Moreover, the LQR solution is sometimes unacceptable in practice due to the fact that values of control extend beyond admissible limits and thus the designer must choose coefficients in the linear quadratic form, which are unknown. The authors suggest methods which allow finding a quasi-optimal LQR solution with bounded control which is closed to the minimum time solution. They also remand the process of the minimum time decision. Keywords: Optimal regulator, minimum time controller, Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR). -- This paper is declared a work of the U.S. Government and not subject to copyright protection in the USA. The manuscript is accepted as paper AIAA-2003-6638 by 2nd AIAA Unmanned Unlimited Systems, Technologies, and Operations-Aerospace, Land, and See Conference and Workshop - Exhibit, San Diego, California, USA, 15-18 Sep. 2003.

  10. A High-Resolution Global Climate Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, P B

    2001-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A major factor limiting the quality and usefulness of global climate models is the coarse spatial resolution of these models. Global climate models today are typically run at resolutions of {approx}300 km (or even coarser) meaning that the smallest features represented are 300 km across. As Figure 1 shows, this resolution does not allow adequate representation of small or even large topographic features (e.g. the Sierra Nevada mountains). As a result of this and other problems, coarse-resolution global models do not come close to accurately simulating climate on regional spatial scales (e.g. within California). Results on continental and larger sales are much more realistic. An important consequence of this inability to simulate regional climate is that global climate model results cannot be used as the basis of assessments of potential societal impacts of climate change (e.g. effects on agriculture in the Central Valley, on management of water resources, etc.).

  11. Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Holt, E.; Carroll, G.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the potential effects that emerging mandatory carbon markets have for voluntary markets for renewable energy, or green power markets. In an era of carbon regulation, green power markets will continue to play an important role because many consumers may be interested in supporting renewable energy development beyond what is supported through mandates or other types of policy support. The paper examines the extent to which GHG benefits motivate consumers to make voluntary renewable energy purchases and summarizes key issues emerging as a result of these overlapping markets, such as the implications of carbon regulation for renewable energy marketing claims, the demand for and price of renewable energy certificates (RECs), and the use of RECs in multiple markets (disaggregation of attributes). It describes carbon regulation programs under development in the Northeast and California, and how these might affect renewable energy markets in these regions, as well as the potential interaction between voluntary renewable energy markets and voluntary carbon markets, such as the Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX). It also briefly summarizes the experience in the European Union, where carbon is already regulated. Finally, the paper presents policy options for policymakers and regulators to consider in designing carbon policies to enable carbon markets and voluntary renewable energy markets to work together.

  12. Soil degradation, global warming and climate impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feddema, Johannes J.; Freire, Sergio Carneiro

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    will demonstrate one methodology for assessing the potential large-scale impacts of soil degradation on African climates and water resources. In addition it will compare and contrast these impacts to those expected from global warming and compare impacts for differ...- ent watershed regions on the continent. 2. METHODS In order to make a similar comparison between pro- jected climate change scenarios due to global warming © Inter-Research 2001 *E-mail: feddema@ku.edu Soil degradation, global warming and climate...

  13. The NCCR Climate, Switzerland`s Centre of Excellence in Climate and Climate Impact Research, invites young scientists to join leading climate researchers in a scenic Swiss Alpine setting for keynote lectures, workshops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    The NCCR Climate, Switzerland`s Centre of Excellence in Climate and Climate Impact Research, invites young scientists to join leading climate researchers in a scenic Swiss Alpine setting for keynote lectures, workshops and poster sessions on the occasion of the 12th NCCR Climate Summer School 2013

  14. Climate and Institutional Change ADVANCE efforts to improve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    #12;Climate and Institutional Change ADVANCE efforts to improve departmental climate #12;Why Climate? Recruitment--women more likely to come to a department with good climate Retention--women faculty more likely to stay in a department with good climate Advancement--women more likely to be promoted

  15. How Climate Change is Playing Out in Minnesota: Extreme Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    How Climate Change is Playing Out in Minnesota: Extreme Weather Dr. Mark Seeley Dept of Soil, Water Climate Headlines Data Sources Changing Minnesota Climate Features Climate Consequences Implications for Severe Weather #12;Three Reasons to Accept That Climate Change is Real #12;#12;Stationary (1) Cyclical (2

  16. MSc Climate Change A cross-disciplinary degree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    MSc Climate Change A cross-disciplinary degree www.geog.ucl.ac.uk/climate LONDON'S GLOBAL of climatic change and to develop adaptation strategies. The UCL MSc Climate Change provides rigorous scientific and vocational training for the next generation of climate change professionals. Students

  17. Unit References Module 1: The Science of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Kate

    164 Unit References Module 1: The Science of Climate Change 1. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. (2007). Climate change 2007: synthesis report. IPCC Plenary XXVII (Valencia, Spain, 12-17 November 2007). 2. America's Climate Choices: Panel on Advancing the Science of Climate Change, National

  18. Colorado Climate Spring 2000 Vol. 1, No. 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Climate Spring 2000 Vol. 1, No. 2 Inside: · Growing Season Trends · Urban Heat Islands · Where Do Climate Data Come From · Climate Prediction in the 21st Century #12;22 ColoradoClimate Colorado Climate Center Atmospheric Science Department Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523-1371 ISSN

  19. The Climate Challenge... and What's at Stake

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chu, Steven

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Secretary Chu uses a famous moment from the Apollo 8 mission to lay out what's at stake as we take on the climate challenge.

  20. Review: Integrating Climate, Energy and Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, David E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate, Energy and Air Pollution By Gary Bryner with RobertEnergy, and Air Pollution. Cambridge, Massachusetts, The MITClimate, Energy, and Air Pollution provides a well-