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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

untitled  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Year Regular Midgrade Premium All Grades Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale Through Retail...

2

Pore Structure of the Argonne Premium Coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pore Structure of the Argonne Premium Coals ... Constitution of Illinois No. 6 Argonne Premium Coal: A Review ... Constitution of Illinois No. 6 Argonne Premium Coal: A Review ...

John W. Larsen; Peter Hall; Patrick C. Wernett

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Density Measurements of Argonne Premium Coal Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Density Measurements of Argonne Premium Coal Samples ... Constitution of Illinois No. 6 Argonne Premium Coal: A Review ... Constitution of Illinois No. 6 Argonne Premium Coal: A Review ...

He Huang; Keyu Wang; David M. Bodily; V. J. Hucka

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Why Do Inner City Residents Pay Higher Premiums? The Determinants of Automobile Insurance Premiums  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Determinants of Automobile Insurance Premiums Paul M.The Determinants of Automobile Insurance Premiums Abstractplace-based component of automobile insurance premiums. We

Ong, Paul M.; Stoll, Michael A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Making premium diesel fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For refiners, extra processing and blending is a practical, though not always easy, option for improving diesel fuel properties; however, it entails compromises. For example, ignition quality can be improved by including more paraffins, but this negatively impacts the required low-temperature operability properties. Another example is adding aromatics to increase the diesel`s Btu value, but aromatics burn poorly and tend to cause smoking. Due to these and other types of diametrical trade-offs, the scope of distillate processing and fuels blending at the refinery is often very limited. Therefore, fuel additives are rapidly becoming the only alternative for obtaining the superior quality necessary in a premium diesel fuel. If stabilizers, dispersants and other fuel additive components are used in the additive package, the product can be marketed as a premium diesel fuel additive. Engines using this additive-treated fuel will consistently have less emissions, produce optimum power from the fuel energy conversion process and perform to design specifications. And the user will truly have a premium diesel fuel. The paper discusses detergent additives, cetane or ignition improvers, fuel stabilizers, cold weather additives, and lubricity additives.

Pipenger, G. [Amalgamated Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Exploring California PV Home Premiums  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the Solar Home Price Premium: ElectricityStudy of 30 Single?Family Homes in the North and Northwestin California: The Effect on Home Sales Prices. Contemporary

Hoen, Ben

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Refiner Prices of Gasoline, All Grades - Sales to End Users  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product/ Sales Type: Gasoline, All Grades - Sales to End Users (U.S. only) Gasoline, All Grades - Through Retail Outlets Gasoline, All Grades - Other End Users Gasoline, All Grades - Sales for Resale Gasoline, All Grades - DTW (U.S. only) Gasoline, All Grades - Rack (U.S. only) Gasoline, All Grades - Bulk (U.S. only) Regular Gasoline - Sales to End Users (U.S. only) Regular Gasoline - Through Retail Outlets Regular Gasoline - Other End Users Regular Gasoline - Sales for Resale Regular Gasoline - DTW (U.S. only) Regular Gasoline - Rack (U.S. only) Regular Gasoline - Bulk (U.S. only) Midgrade Gasoline - Sales to End Users (U.S. only) Midgrade Gasoline - Through Retail Outlets Midgrade Gasoline - Other End Users Midgrade Gasoline - Sales for Resale Midgrade Gasoline - DTW (U.S. only) Midgrade Gasoline - Rack (U.S. only) Midgrade Gasoline - Bulk (U.S. only) Premium - Sales to End Users (U.S. only) Premium Gasoline - Through Retail Outlets Premium Gasoline - Other End Users Premium Gasoline - Sales for Resale Premium Gasoline - DTW (U.S. only) Premium Gasoline - Rack (U.S. only) Premium Gasoline - Bulk (U.S. only) Period: Monthly Annual

8

The Argonne Premium Coal Sample Program  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Argonne Premium Coal Sample Program ... Direct Determination of Sulfur Species in Coals from the Argonne Premium Sample Program by Solid Sampling Electrothermal Vaporization Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry ... Direct Determination of Sulfur Species in Coals from the Argonne Premium Sample Program by Solid Sampling Electrothermal Vaporization Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry ...

Karl S. Vorres

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

15N CPMAS NMR of the Argonne Premium Coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

15N CPMAS NMR of the Argonne Premium Coals ... 15N NMR data are reported for the Argonne Premium Coals. ... XPS studies of the Argonne Premium Coals (APC) detected three general types of nitrogens. ...

Mark S. Solum; Ronald J. Pugmire; David M. Grant; Simon R. Kelemen; Martin L. Gorbaty; Robert A. Wind

1997-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

10

Premium Mobile Projector sony.com/projectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VPL-MX20 Premium Mobile Projector sony.com/projectors #12;2 Slim,Lightweight,and Stylish ­ the VPL-MX20 Data Projector is the Perfect Choice for Mobile Applications Sony's VPL-MX20 premium mobile

Saskatchewan, University of

11

Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California, September 2008 Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California,...

12

Microsoft Word - medicare-premium-rates.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

*subject *subject to graduated eligibility Graduated Eligibility Graduated Eligibility is applicable to medical and dental premiums and defines what portion of the employer contribution you are responsible for based on your years of service upon retirement. For example, if you have 15 years of service upon retirement, you would pay the full retiree premium for your medical and dental coverage, as well as 25% of the employer contribution. With 20 years of service upon retirement, you would only pay the retiree premium. Years o f Service % of Employer Contribution LANL pays % of Employer Contribution Retiree Pays 10 50% 50% 11 55% 45% 12 60% 40% 13 65% 35% 14 70% 30% 15 75% 25% 16 80% 20% 17 85% 15% 18 90% 10% 19 95% 5% 20+ 100% 0% 2014 Monthly Medical Premiums for

13

Thermochemical comparisons of six Argonne premium coal samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermochemical comparisons of six Argonne premium coal samples ... The rates of solvent swelling of the Argonne Premium Sample coals have been measured in various organic solvents at various temperatures. ...

Michael Gumkowski; Qitao Liu; Edward M. Arnett

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Oil prices and government bond risk premiums Herv Alexandre*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil prices and government bond risk premiums By Hervé Alexandre*º Antonin de Benoist * Abstract : This article analyses the impact of oil price on bond risk premiums issued by emerging economies. No empirical study has yet focussed on the effects of the oil price on government bond risk premiums. We develop

Boyer, Edmond

15

Trade liberalisation, prices and the skill premium in South Africa.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??We look at how trade liberalisation, working through product prices, has affected the skill premium in South Africa over the period 1990-2009. Our main finding (more)

Mashiane, Jeffrey.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Is there wage premium to computer use in Sweden.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This paper examines the wage premium to computer use in Sweden in the early 1990s. I use simple regression model and interaction terms in (more)

Zhang, Pengcheng

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Relation between premium of a CDS index and premiums of the index components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and investment and thanks to standardization by the International Swaps and Derivatives Association, CDS becomes risk (See e.g., Hull, 2000; Chaplin, 2005). It is a contract that provides protection against a default, the buyer of the CDS index contract pays premium in return for loss protection. If any name in the index

Walker, Michael B.

18

Distribution of Pendant Alkyl Groups in the Argonne Premium Coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Distribution of Pendant Alkyl Groups in the Argonne Premium Coals ... Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, and Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 ... The ruthenium(VIII) oxidation reaction has been employed to determine the distribution of alkyl groups that are bonded to aromatic structural elements in lignin and the Argonne Premium Coals. ...

Marcus Obeng; Leon M. Stock

1996-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

19

The Chemical Analysis of Argonne Premium Coal Samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Chemical Analysis of Argonne Premium Coal Samples U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY BULLETIN 2144 #12 from the offices listed below. Detailed ordering instructions, along with prices of the last offerings OFFICE, WASHINGTON : 1997 The Chemical Analysis of Argonne Premium Coal Samples Edited by Curtis A

Laughlin, Robert B.

20

Energy Conservation Tax Credits - Small Premium Projects (Corporate) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conservation Tax Credits - Small Premium Projects Conservation Tax Credits - Small Premium Projects (Corporate) Energy Conservation Tax Credits - Small Premium Projects (Corporate) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Local Government Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Insulation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Solar Maximum Rebate 35% of qualifying project costs The sum of all incentives, grants, credits, or other public funds may not exceed total project costs Program Info Start Date 2011 State Oregon Program Type Corporate Tax Credit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Energy Conservation Tax Credits - Small Premium Projects (Personal) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Conservation Tax Credits - Small Premium Projects (Personal) Energy Conservation Tax Credits - Small Premium Projects (Personal) Energy Conservation Tax Credits - Small Premium Projects (Personal) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Insulation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Solar Maximum Rebate 35% of qualifying project costs The sum of all incentives, grants, credits, or other public funds may not exceed total project costs Program Info Start Date 2011 State Oregon Program Type

22

Regular price  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D-LINK DWL-1000AP 802.11B Wireless LAN Access Point 11Mbps Best Deal On Earth! Regular price: $399.00. Sale price: $234.00. DWL-120> D-LINK...

23

Managing risk in premium fruit and vegetable supply chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production planning in premium fresh produce supply chains is challenging due to the uncertainty of both supply and demand. A two-stage planning algorithm using mixed integer linear programming and Monte Carlo simulation ...

Merrill, Joshua Matthew

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Height premiums for seaside community condominiums : an empirical analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis investigates the value that condominium buyers in oceanfront communities place on how high above the ground their home will be. It is assumed that buyers will pay a premium for height, but to date no study has ...

Loker, Randall (Randall David)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Adsorption and Diffusion of Alcohol Vapors by Argonne Premium Coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Adsorption and Diffusion of Alcohol Vapors by Argonne Premium Coals ... Adsorption of methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, and n-butanol by Pocahontas No. 3, Upper Freeport, Illinois No. 6, and Beulah-Zap Argonne premium coals was investigated to clarify the effect of alkyl group bulk on adsorption and to evaluate the micropore and cross-linked structure of coals. ... Coals are thought to have a large surface area with an interconnected network of slitlike pores.1 However, Larsen et al.2 measured the adsorption of various gases on five Argonne Premium coals and, except for Beulah-Zap lignite, found that the very steep dependence of BET surface area was related to the molecular volume of the gas. ...

Toshimasa Takanohashi; Yuki Terao; Takahiro Yoshida; Masashi Iino

2000-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

26

Why Now Is Not the Time for Premium Support  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...necessary to make competition among insurers and traditional Medicare work efficiently and fairly. To date, insurers have been able to outfox the best risk-adjustment algorithms. Consequently, even if premium-support ideas look promising on paper, the political economy of Medicare offers ample reason... The idea of a premium-support system for Medicare dates from 1995, but current proposals do not contain appropriate safeguards, and the circumstances of the U.S. health care system have changed in ways that would make the approach unwise today.

Aaron H.J.; Frakt A.B.

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

27

Ionomer-Like Structures and ?-Cation Interactions in Argonne Premium Coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ionomer-Like Structures and ?-Cation Interactions in Argonne Premium Coals ... The increase in the amount of pyridine-soluble material obtained from Argonne Premium coals after acid treatment is examined. ... Accordingly, here we present results obtained from studies of the Argonne Premium coals before and after acid treatment. ...

Pakorn Opaprakasit; Alan W. Scaroni; Paul C. Painter

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

28

Constitution of Illinois No. 6 Argonne Premium Coal: A Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Constitution of Illinois No. 6 Argonne Premium Coal: A Review ... The aromatic moieties present in coal structures have been characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR),(9-13) X-ray diffraction (XRD),(14) high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM),(15-18) and ruthenium ion catalyzed oxidation (RICO). ...

Fidel Castro-Marcano; Jonathan P. Mathews

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

29

PREMIUMS PAID FOR GREEN GENERATION IN THE APX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PREMIUMS PAID FOR GREEN GENERATION PREMIUMS PAID FOR GREEN GENERATION IN THE APX GREEN POWER MARKET Janis C. Pepper Enertron Consultants / APX pepper@enertroncons.com 650-949-5719 Presented at Windpower 2000 May 1, 2000 Abstract Automated Power Exchange (APX) operates markets that allow buyers and sellers of electricity to do business with each other easily, efficiently, and directly. The APX Green Power Market opened on March 30, 1998 with the start of the restructured electricity market in California, providing a wholesale marketplace for buyers and sellers of renewable power to transact. Those renewable energy plants that are no longer under utility contracts, and new merchant renewable plants, are selling through this market. The overwhelming majority of green buyers and green sellers operating in the California market use the APX Green Power Market. APX

30

CREAT A CONSORTIUM AND DEVELOP PREMIUM CARBON PRODUCTS FROM COAL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory and matching funds from industry and academic institutions continued to excel in developing innovative technologies to use coal and coal-derived feedstocks to produce premium carbon product. During Budget Period 5, eleven projects were supported and sub-contracted were awarded to seven organizations. The CPCPC held two meetings and one tutorial at various locations during the year. Budget Period 5 was a time of growth for CPCPC in terms of number of proposals and funding requested from members, projects funded and participation during meetings. Although the membership was stable during the first part of Budget Period 5 an increase in new members was registered during the last months of the performance period.

John M. Andresen

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Sorption Behaviors of Various Organic Vapors to Argonne Premium Coal Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sorption Behaviors of Various Organic Vapors to Argonne Premium Coal Samples ... Sorption of various organic vapors by Argonne Premium coals (APCS-1, 3, 5, and 8) was investigated to clarify the coal?organic interaction, sorption mechanism, and micropore and cross-linking structure of coals. ... Otake and Suuberg4 showed the behaviors of solvent swelling of Argonne premium sample coals by diffusion of various organic solvents are quite different among the coals used, which did not correlate well with coal rank. ...

Kazuhiko Shimizu; Toshimasa Takanohashi; Masashi Iino

1998-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

32

Premium Efficiency Motor Selection and Application Guide A Handbook for Industry  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This handbook informs new motor purchase decisions by identifying energy and cost savings that can come from replacing motors with premium efficiency units.

33

U.S. Sales to End Users Prices for Motor Gasoline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales Type: Sales to End Users, Average Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale, Average DTW Rack Bulk Sales Type: Sales to End Users, Average Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale, Average DTW Rack Bulk Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Formulation/ Grade Sales Type Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gasoline, Average - - - - - - 1983-2013 Regular Gasoline - - - - - - 1983-2013 Midgrade Gasoline - - - - - - 1988-2013 Premium Gasoline - - - - - - 1983-2013 Conventional, Average - - - - - - 1994-2013 Conventional Regular - - - - - - 1994-2013 Conventional Midgrade - - - - - - 1994-2013 Conventional Premium - - - - - - 1994-2013 Oxygenated, Average 1994-2006 Oxygenated Regular

34

Iron Species in Argonne Premium Coal Samples:? An Investigation Using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Iron Species in Argonne Premium Coal Samples:? An Investigation Using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy ... Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 ... Iron K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the iron species that are present within the Argonne Premium Coal Samples. ...

Stephen R. Wasserman; Randall E. Winans; Robert McBeth

1996-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

35

Premium Power Corporation Smart Grid Demonstration Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corporation Smart Grid Demonstration Project Corporation Smart Grid Demonstration Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Premium Power Corporation Country United States Headquarters Location North Reading, Massachusetts Recovery Act Funding $7,320,000.00 Total Project Value $16,080,554.00 Coordinates 42.5750939°, -71.0786653° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

36

Argonne premium coal sample program. Annual technical progress report. Reporting period : 2/2006-2/2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project provides highly uniform, premium (unexposed to oxygen) coal samples to researchers investigating coal structure, properties and behavior, and maintains accessible databases of published reports describing work carried out on the Argonne Premium Coal Samples. The samples are made available to DOE researchers and others. The eight carefully selected samples have been kept in as pristine a condition as possible through careful control the conditions in all stages from sample collection throughout processing and packaging. The samples are available in glass ampoules to ensure sample uniformity and maintain premium quality to ensure sample integrity.

Hunt, J. E.; Chemistry

2007-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

37

EXC-12-0006 - In the Matter of Premium Quality Lighting, Inc. | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 - In the Matter of Premium Quality Lighting, Inc. 6 - In the Matter of Premium Quality Lighting, Inc. EXC-12-0006 - In the Matter of Premium Quality Lighting, Inc. On July 27, 2012, OHA issued a decision granting an Application for Exception filed by Premium Quality Lighting, Inc. (PQL) for relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 430, Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps (Lighting Efficiency Standards). In its exception request, PQL asserted that it will suffer a serious hardship, gross inequity and an unfair distribution of burdens if required to adhere to the new Lighting Efficiency Standards, effective July 14, 2012 (2009 Final Rule), with respect to its 700 series T8 General Service

38

Two-Dimensional EPR Spectroscopic Studies on the Radicals in Argonne Premium Coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two-Dimensional EPR Spectroscopic Studies on the Radicals in Argonne Premium Coals ... Both coals showed nuclear modulation effects due to1H and naturally abundant 13C nuclear spins. ...

Tadaaki Ikoma; Osamu Ito; Shozo Tero-Kubota; Kimio Akiyama

1998-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

39

Single-pulse excitation carbon-13 NMR measurements on the Argonne premium coal samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Single-pulse excitation carbon-13 NMR measurements on the Argonne premium coal samples ... Interactions of Organic Liquids with Coals:? Analysis by Solid-State 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ...

J. A. Franz; R. Garcia; J. C. Linehan; G. D. Love; C. E. Snape

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

CO2 adsorption capacity of argonne premium coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Adsorption and desorption isotherms of CO2 on dried Argonne Premium coal samples were investigated. A small hysteresis was detected between the adsorption and desorption isotherms. The hysteresis was small or negligible for high rank coals but discernable for low rank coals. The isotherms were found to be rectilinear and to fit the conventional adsorption equations poorly. The rectilinear shape of the adsorption isotherms was related to the solubility of the CO2 in the coal and to coal swelling. Using an adsorption model that accounted for volumetric effects provided good agreement between the surface areas calculated from the high-pressure isotherms and the literature values obtained under traditional low-pressure conditions. Ignoring the volumetric effects resulted in estimated surface areas that were 40% larger for the higher-ranked coals and 60100% larger for the lower-ranked coals. The heat of adsorption, after correcting for volumetric effects, was fairly constant (261 kJ/mol) regardless of rank. The adsorption capacity, average pore size, and volume effect for each of the Argonne coals were also estimated employing the same model. The model equation explicitly accounts for volumetric effects, attributable to the solubility of CO2 in the organic matrix and the coal swelling, and estimates the actual adsorbed amount.

Ekrem Ozdemir; Badie I Morsi; Karl Schroeder

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Beginning Regular Expressions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Whether you are an occasional programmer or simply one who hasn't used regular expressions yet, this easy-to-follow text shows the component parts of regular expressions, what they mean, how to use them, and pitfalls to be aware of when using them.

Andrew Watt

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Mortgage default and student outcomes, the solar home price premium, and the magnitude of housing price declines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effect of falling home prices on small business borrowing,2 Understanding the Solar Home Price Premium: Electricitysocial influences on price, Journal of Political Economy,

Dastrup, Samuel R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

U.S. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Motor Gasoline 376,636.4 362,968.6 362,798.5 365,247.6 354,951.9 347,234.5 1983-2012 Regular 320,735.1 314,030.5 313,098.1 315,643.3 309,398.0 301,510.3 1983-2012 Conventional Regular 216,075 207,958.8 208,347.1 210,638.4 204,350.9 200,785.6 1994-2012 Oxygenated Regular - - - - - - 1994-2012 Reformulated Regular 104,660 106,071.7 104,751.1 105,004.9 105,047.1 100,724.7 1994-2012 Midgrade 20,282.6 18,229.4 16,706.5 15,633.9 13,707.6 13,500.5 1989-2012 Conventional Midgrade 14,369.3 13,559.2 12,537.8 11,971.8 10,521.2 10,550.0 1994-2012 Oxygenated Midgrade - - - - - - 1994-2012 Reformulated Midgrade 5,913.4 4,670.2 4,168.7 3,662.1 3,186.4 2,950.5 1994-2012 Premium

44

Create a Consortium and Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of these projects was to investigate alternative technologies for non-fuel uses of coal. Special emphasis was placed on developing premium carbon products from coal-derived feedstocks. A total of 14 projects, which are the 2003 Research Projects, are reported herein. These projects were categorized into three overall objectives. They are: (1) To explore new applications for the use of anthracite in order to improve its marketability; (2) To effectively minimize environmental damage caused by mercury emissions, CO{sub 2} emissions, and coal impounds; and (3) To continue to increase our understanding of coal properties and establish coal usage in non-fuel industries. Research was completed in laboratories throughout the United States. Most research was performed on a bench-scale level with the intent of scaling up if preliminary tests proved successful. These projects resulted in many potential applications for coal-derived feedstocks. These include: (1) Use of anthracite as a sorbent to capture CO{sub 2} emissions; (2) Use of anthracite-based carbon as a catalyst; (3) Use of processed anthracite in carbon electrodes and carbon black; (4) Use of raw coal refuse for producing activated carbon; (5) Reusable PACs to recycle captured mercury; (6) Use of combustion and gasification chars to capture mercury from coal-fired power plants; (7) Development of a synthetic coal tar enamel; (8) Use of alternative binder pitches in aluminum anodes; (9) Use of Solvent Extracted Carbon Ore (SECO) to fuel a carbon fuel cell; (10) Production of a low cost coal-derived turbostratic carbon powder for structural applications; (11) Production of high-value carbon fibers and foams via the co-processing of a low-cost coal extract pitch with well-dispersed carbon nanotubes; (12) Use of carbon from fly ash as metallurgical carbon; (13) Production of bulk carbon fiber for concrete reinforcement; and (14) Characterizing coal solvent extraction processes. Although some of the projects funded did not meet their original goals, the overall objectives of the CPCPC were completed as many new applications for coal-derived feedstocks have been researched. Future research in many of these areas is necessary before implementation into industry.

Frank Rusinko; John Andresen; Jennifer E. Hill; Harold H. Schobert; Bruce G. Miller

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Guidance on Waivers of Premium Pay To Meet A Critical Need  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

on Waivers of Premium Pay on Waivers of Premium Pay To Meet A Critical Need (9/5/08) Background: 5 CFR $550.106(b)(l) provides that the bi-weekly limit on premium pay be waived for overtime work that is critical to an agency's mission. Criteria: DOE has established the following criteria for making these determinations. Requests must address these criteria. 1. The work must directly affect a Departmental element's core business activity. 2. The work must be urgent and unavoidable, i.e., it cannot be delayed or extended over a longer period of time. 3. Additional human resources with the expertise needed cannot be added due to the immediacy of the business need. 4. No other appropriate compensation option is available. Approval Process: Requests are to be addressed to the Director, Office of Human Capital Management and

46

Truth and Consequences Insurance-Premium Rate Regulation and the ACA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Over the past decade, the largest health insurance companies have seen a disproportionate increase in profits of 250%, or 10 times the rate of inflation. During the past year alone, there has been a double-digit increase in health insurance premiums. In response to such increases, the new health... Over the past decade, the largest health insurance companies have seen a disproportionate increase in profits of 250%, or 10 times the rate of inflation. During the past year alone, there has been a double-digit increase in health insurance premiums.1 In ...

Mills A.Engelhard C.L.Tereskerz P.M.

2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

47

Gas Mileage of 2014 Vehicles by Dodge  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 Dodge Vehicles 4 Dodge Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 2014 Dodge Avenger 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2014 Dodge Avenger 21 City 24 Combined 30 Highway 2014 Dodge Avenger 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic 6-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2014 Dodge Avenger 20 City 24 Combined 31 Highway 2014 Dodge Avenger 6 cyl, 3.6 L, Automatic 6-spd, Regular Gas or E85 Compare 2014 Dodge Avenger Gas 19 City 22 Combined 29 Highway E85 14 City 16 Combined 21 Highway 2014 Dodge Challenger 6 cyl, 3.6 L, Automatic 5-spd, Midgrade Gasoline Compare 2014 Dodge Challenger 18 City 21 Combined 27 Highway 2014 Dodge Challenger 8 cyl, 5.7 L, Automatic 5-spd, Midgrade Gasoline Compare 2014 Dodge Challenger 15 City 18 Combined 25 Highway 2014 Dodge Challenger 8 cyl, 5.7 L, Manual 6-spd, Premium Gasoline

48

Microsoft Word - 2014 Non-Med retiree premiums_30Sept13UH  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 Monthly Premiums 4 Monthly Premiums for Retirees Without Medicare Medical Plans* PPO Single Adult + Children Two Adults Family RET LANS Gross RET LANS Gross RET LANS Gross RET LANS Gross $123 $521 $644 $221 $939 $1,160 $258 $1,096 $1,354 $356 $1,509 $1,865 HDHP Single Adult + Children Two Adults Family RET LANS Gross RET LANS Gross RET LANS Gross RET LANS Gross $88 $523 $611 $158 $943 $1,101 $185 $1,100 $1,285 $255 $1,514 $1,769 Dental, Vision, and Legal Insurance Dental Insurance* Vision Insurance Legal Insurance Self $43.11 $9.82 $10.73 Adult + Child(ren) $87.79 $19.85 $14.37 Two Adults $80.46 $19.65 $14.37 Family $143.66 $24.57 $15.59 *Graduated Eligibility

49

A one-time opportunity to expand the market for premium efficiency motors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mid-Atlantic utility conducted a detailed research study on their motors market. The study showed that their motor loads come mostly from motors under 50 horsepower, and predominantly from industry. The proportion of premium-efficiency motor sales is very low relative to other areas which, unlike this utility's service territory, have a history of rebate programs. Most sales in this utility's territory are for replacement motors. Manufacturers are planning to create new lines of motors which meet the 1997 federal minimum motor-efficiency manufacturing standard, but are less efficient than premium motors. Few of these motors are on the market yet. The mandatory federal efficiency standard creates a unique, one-time situation where premium-efficiency motors will be a better-established and more familiar product among customers and vendors than less efficient motors. The utility has begun a motors rebate and technical assistance program which is intended to use this one-time opportunity to significantly expand the market for premium motors. Rebates are tied to the new Consortium for Energy Efficiency motor standards to ensure a common message to manufacturers among utilities. While the majority of premium motors available locally already meet the standard, this will encourage manufacturers to bring the rest of their offerings in line. Like many motors programs, this program will offer rebates, marketing, and technical assistance. However, the program design calls for a short-term (three year), very intense effort, including a rebate set at 100% of incremental cost, a short-term vendor bonus, and intensive marketing to large customers. Additionally, the large savings per motor in 1997 (when the baseline is inefficient standard motors) will justify a more generous payment in the first year. Many other US utility motor rebate programs have offered less generous incentives and used less intensive marketing, but have had only marginal impacts on markets (often 20--30%), or have taken many years to have an impact. This program will test the theory that it is better to strike hard at the right moment than to gnaw at the edges of a market for many years. While the program was designed for one utility, the overall approach would be more effective at working with vendors and customers if utilities joined together to sponsor a similar program with common terms and single redemption centers. This may be an option in the coming months.

Gordon, F.; Tumidaj, L.; Hoernlein, D.; Coakley, S.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Regularizing role of teleparallelism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The properties of the gravitational energy-momentum 3-form and of the superpotential 2-form are discussed in the covariant teleparallel framework, where the Weitzenb\\"ock connection represents inertial effects related to the choice of the frame. Due to its odd asymptotic behavior, the contribution of the inertial effects often yields unphysical (divergent or trivial) results for the total energy of the system. However, in the covariant teleparallel approach, the energy is always finite and nontrivial. The teleparallel connection plays a role of a regularizing tool which subtracts the inertial effects without distorting the true gravitational contribution. As a crucial test of the covariant formalism, we reanalyze the computation of the total energy of the Schwarzschild and the Kerr solutions.

Tiago Gribl Lucas; Yuri N. Obukhov; J. G. Pereira

2009-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

51

Regularizing role of teleparallelism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of the gravitational energy-momentum 3-form and of the superpotential 2-form are discussed in the covariant teleparallel framework, where the Weitzenboeck connection represents inertial effects related to the choice of the frame. Because of its odd asymptotic behavior, the contribution of the inertial effects often yields unphysical (divergent or trivial) results for the total energy of the system. However, in the covariant teleparallel approach, the energy is always finite and nontrivial. The teleparallel connection plays a role of a regularizing tool which subtracts the inertial effects without distorting the true gravitational contribution. As a crucial test of the covariant formalism, we reanalyze the computation of the total energy of the Schwarzschild and the Kerr solutions.

Lucas, Tiago Gribl; Obukhov, Yuri N.; Pereira, J. G. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, UNESP-Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, 01140-070 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica Teorica, UNESP-Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, 01140-070 Sao Paulo, Brazil and Department of Theoretical Physics, Moscow State University, 117234 Moscow (Russian Federation); Instituto de Fisica Teorica, UNESP-Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, 01140-070 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Engineering Development of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaing for Premium Fuel Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ash in six common bituminous coals, Taggart, Winifrede, Elkhorn No. 3, Indiana VII, Sunnyside and Hiawatha, could be liberated by fine grinding to allow preparation of clean coal meeting premium fuel specifications (< 1- 2 lb/ MBtu ash and <0.6 lb/ MBtu sulfur) by laboratory and bench- scale column flotation or selective agglomeration. Over 2,100 tons of coal were cleaned in the PDU at feed rates between 2,500 and 6,000 lb/ h by Microcel? column flotation and by selective agglomeration using recycled heptane as the bridging liquid. Parametric testing of each process and 72- hr productions runs were completed on each of the three test coals. The following results were achieved after optimization of the operating parameters: The primary objective was to develop the design base for commercial fine coal cleaning facilities for producing ultra- clean coals which can be converted into coal-water slurry premium fuel. The coal cleaning technologies to be developed were advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration, and the goal was to produce fuel meeting the following specifications -- Less than 2 pounds of ash per million Btu (860 grams per gigajoule) and

Frank J. Smit; Gene L. Schields; Mehesh C. Jha; Nick Moro

1997-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

53

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope included laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction and operation of 2 t/hr process development unit (PDU). This report represents the findings of the PDU Advanced Column Flotation Testing and Evaluation phase of the program and includes a discussion of the design and construction of the PDU. Three compliance steam coals, Taggart, Indiana VII and Hiawatha, were processed in the PDU to determine performance and design parameters for commercial production of premium fuel by advanced flotation. Consistent, reliable performance of the PDU was demonstrated by 72-hr production runs on each of the test coals. Its capacity generally was limited by the dewatering capacity of the clean coal filters during the production runs rather than by the flotation capacity of the Microcel column. The residual concentrations of As, Pb, and Cl were reduced by at least 25% on a heating value basis from their concentrations in the test coals. The reduction in the concentrations of Be, Cd, Cr, Co, Mn, Hg, Ni and Se varied from coal to coal but the concentrations of most were greatly reduced from the concentrations in the ROM parent coals. The ash fusion temperatures of the Taggart and Indiana VII coals, and to a much lesser extent the Hiawatha coal, were decreased by the cleaning.

Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

1997-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

54

Regular-expression derivatives reexamined SCOTT OWENS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. For regular sets of strings, i.e., sets defined by regular expressions (REs), the derivative is also a regular is elegant and easily supports extended regular expressions; i.e., REs extended with Boolean operations expressions, but since the extensions are conservative (i.e., regular languages are closed under Boolean

Strickland, Stevie

55

LBNL-6484E Exploring California PV Home Premiums Ben Hoen, Geoffrey T. Klise, Joshua Graff-Zivin, Mark  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

484E 484E Exploring California PV Home Premiums Ben Hoen, Geoffrey T. Klise, Joshua Graff-Zivin, Mark Thayer, Joachim Seel and Ryan Wiser Environmental Energy Technologies Division December 2013 Download from: http://emp.lbl.gov/publications/exploring-california-pv-home-premiums This research builds on work published in 2011 entitled "An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California," LBNL- 4476E, which can be downloaded here: http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/emp/reports/lbnl-

56

Direct Determination of Pyrite Content in Argonne Premium Coals by the Use of Sulfur X-ray Near Edge Absorption Spectroscopy (S-XANES)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Direct Determination of Pyrite Content in Argonne Premium Coals by the Use of Sulfur X-ray Near Edge Absorption Spectroscopy (S-XANES) ... Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 ... Argonne premium coal samples are used by researchers worldwide as standards in coal research. ...

Trudy B. Bolin

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Regularization Predicts While Discovering Taxonomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we discuss a regularization framework to solve multi-category when the classes are described by an underlying class taxonomy. In particular we discuss how to learn the class taxonomy while learning a multi-category ...

Mroueh, Youssef

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

58

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type" Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Gasoline, All Grades",7,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Data 2","Regular Gasoline",7,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Data 3","Midgrade Gasoline",7,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1986" ,"Data 4","Premium Gasoline",7,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014"

59

POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #31 - Procedures for Regularizing...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 - Procedures for Regularizing Illegal Appointments POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM 31 - Procedures for Regularizing Illegal Appointments As part of the Department's ongoing effort to...

60

Thermodynamics of regular black hole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate thermodynamics for a magnetically charged regular black hole (MCRBH), which comes from the action of general relativity and nonlinear electromagnetics, comparing with the Reissner-Norstr\\"om (RN) black hole in both four and two dimensions after dimensional reduction. We find that there is no thermodynamic difference between the regular and RN black holes for a fixed charge $Q$ in both dimensions. This means that the condition for either singularity or regularity at the origin of coordinate does not affect the thermodynamics of black hole. Furthermore, we describe the near-horizon AdS$_2$ thermodynamics of the MCRBH with the connection of the Jackiw-Teitelboim theory. We also identify the near-horizon entropy as the statistical entropy by using the AdS$_2$/CFT$_1$ correspondence.

Yun Soo Myung; Yong-Wan Kim; Young-Jai Park

2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Managing Commodity Risks in Highway Contracts: Quantifying Premiums, Accounting for Correlations Among Risk Factors, and Designing Optimal Price-Adjustment Contracts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fixed-price contracts. In turn, the contractors respond by adding premiums in bid prices. If the contractors overprice the risk, the price of fixed-price contract could exceed the price of the contract with adjustment clauses. Consequently, highway...

Zhou, Xue

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

62

A molecular model for Illinois No. 6 Argonne Premium coal: Moving toward capturing the continuum structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A large-scale molecular model for Illinois No. 6 Argonne Premium coal is generated based on an automated construction approach in an effort to move toward capturing the continuum structure. The model contains 50,789atoms within 728 molecules and is the largest, most complex coal representation constructed to-date. The aromatic ring size distribution was based on multiple high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) lattice fringe micrographs and was duplicated with automated construction protocols (Fringe3D) in molecular modeling space. Additional structural data was obtained from the abundant literature assessing this Argonne Premium coal. Organic oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur functionalities were incorporated primarily into the polyaromatic structures according to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray adsorption near-edge structure spectroscopy data. Aliphatic carbons were in the form of cross-links (bridges and loops) and pendant alkyl groups based on the combination of laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDIMS), ruthenium ion catalyzed oxidation, elemental analysis, and NMR data in good agreement with the literature. Bound and bulk water was also included. Construction of the coal molecules was performed by use of Perl scripts developed in Materials Studio to eliminate personal bias and improve the accuracy and the scale of the structure generated. The large-scale model captured a broad and continuous molecular weight distribution in accordance with LDIMS data here ranging from 100 to 2850Da, enabling inclusion of structural diversity to capture a portion of the continuum structure. A theoretical pyridine extraction yield, determined by a group contribution approach, was in agreement with the experimental value. The extract and residue representations were generated from the large-scale Illinois coal model and showed consistency with NMR, elemental analysis and LDIMS trends. The distribution of heteroatomic classes and double bond equivalents was also well-defined experimentally based on electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. These data further constrain the molecular weight of extractable material and was consistent with limited pyridine extractability and model heteroatom classes. Future work will be well served by staying within the limits established by the approach and increasing the structural diversity (sampling frequency through increased scale) to better capture the complex nature of coal structural diversity, i.e., the continuum.

Fidel Castro-Marcano; Vladislav V. Lobodin; Ryan P. Rodgers; Amy M. McKenna; Alan G. Marshall; Jonathan P. Mathews

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Regular maps with almost Sylow-cyclic automorphism groups, and classification of regular maps with Euler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regular maps with almost Sylow-cyclic automorphism groups, and classification of regular maps with Euler characteristic -p2 Marston Abstract A regular map M is a cellular decomposition of a surface such that its * *automor

Conder, Marston

64

Interlaboratory comparisons of petrography of liquefaction residues from three Argonne premium coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three Argonne Premium coal samples, the Beulah-Zap lignite (North Dakota), the high volatile A bituminous Stockton (West Virginia), and the low volatile Pocahontas No. 3 Virginia), were ground to three initial sizes: ?20 mesh, ?100 mesh, and micronized. The samples were each subjected to liquefaction at 673 K for 30 min at a 2:1 tetralin: coal ratio and in an H2 atmosphere at 13.79 \\{MPa\\} (?2000 psi). Polished pellets of the uncoverted residues were circulated to three laboratories for a study designed to determine, albeit on a limited scale, the interlaboratory consistency in constituent identification and the problem areas in maceral/neo-maceral/mineral recognition. Within broad categories, the agreement for the Beulah-Zap and Pocahontas No. 3 residues is good. The high volatile A bituminous Stockton coal was the most plastic and most altered, resulting in a residue lending itself to more subjective interpretations. The biggest discrepancy between the laboratories is in the distinction of granular residue and mineral matter and in the transitions between partially reacted macerals and vitroplast and between vitroplast and granular residue. The initial size of the feed coal appears to influence the recognition of material in the residue.

James C. Hower; Ken B. Anderson; Glenda Mackay; Henrique Pinheiro; Deolinda Flores; Manuel J. Lemos de Sousa

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Regular variation without limits N. H. Bingham  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

( ) 8 ; > 0: (CFE) Subject to a mild regularity condition, (CFE) forces g to be a power: g( ) = 8 > 0

Haase, Markus

66

U.S. Motor Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Motor Gasoline Regular Gasoline Midgrade Gasoline Premium Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Oxygenated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Product: Motor Gasoline Regular Gasoline Midgrade Gasoline Premium Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Oxygenated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Sales Type Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Sales to End Users, Total 28,179.6 24,384.0 24,143.9 23,567.1 24,120.5 23,282.9 1983-2013 Through Retail Outlets 26,507.1 22,632.7 22,641.3 22,038.2 22,474.5 21,660.0 1983-2013 Sales for Resale, Total NA NA NA NA NA NA 1983-2013 DTW 24,954.1 29,704.3 30,138.3 29,222.8 30,011.9 28,880.3 1994-2013 Rack 236,373.7 242,166.6 243,892.5 243,789.7 248,761.4 237,431.5 1994-2013

67

Price of Motor Gasoline Through Retail Outlets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prices, Sales Volumes & Stocks by State Prices, Sales Volumes & Stocks by State (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Data Series: Retail Price - Motor Gasoline Retail Price - Regular Gasoline Retail Price - Midgrade Gasoline Retail Price - Premium Gasoline Retail Price - Aviation Gasoline Retail Price - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Retail Price - Propane Retail Price - Kerosene Retail Price - No. 1 Distillate Retail Price - No. 2 Distillate Retail Price - No. 2 Fuel Oil Retail Price - No. 2 Diesel Fuel Retail Price - No. 4 Fuel Oil Prime Supplier Sales - Motor Gasoline Prime Supplier Sales - Regular Gasoline Prime Supplier Sales - Midgrade Gasoline Prime Supplier Sales - Premium Gasoline Prime Supplier Sales - Aviation Gasoline Prime Supplier Sales - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Prime Supplier Sales - Propane (Consumer Grade) Prime Supplier Sales - Kerosene Prime Supplier Sales - No. 1 Distillate Prime Supplier Sales - No. 2 Distillate Prime Supplier Sales - No. 2 Fuel Oil Prime Supplier Sales - No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prime Supplier Sales - No. 4 Fuel Oil Prime Supplier Sales - Residual Fuel Oil Stocks - Finished Motor Gasoline Stocks - Reformulated Gasoline Stocks - Conventional Gasoline Stocks - Motor Gasoline Blending Components Stocks - Kerosene Stocks - Distillate Fuel Oil Stocks - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Sulfur Stocks - Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Stocks - Distillate F.O., Greater 500 ppm Sulfur Stocks - Residual Fuel Oil Stocks - Propane/Propylene Period: Monthly Annual

68

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

Intermittency and Regularized Fredholm Determinants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider real-analytic maps of the interval $I=[0,1]$ which are expanding everywhere except for a neutral fixed point at 0. We show that on a certain function space the spectrum of the associated Perron-Frobenius operator ${\\cal M}$ has a decomposition $Sp ({\\cal M}) = \\sigma_c \\cup \\sigma_p$ where $\\sigma_c=[0,1]$ is the continuous spectrum of ${\\cal M}$ and $\\sigma_p$ is the pure point spectrum with no points of accumulation outside 0 and 1. We construct a regularized Fredholm determinant $d(\\lambda)$ which has a holomorphic extension to $\\lambda \\in C-\\sigma_c$ and can be analytically continued from each side of $\\sigma_c$ to an open neighborhood of $\\sigma_c-{0,1}$ (on different Riemann sheets). In $C-\\sigma_c$ the zero-set of $d(\\lambda)$ is in one-to-one correspondence with the point spectrum of ${\\cal M}$. Through the conformal transformation $\\lambda(z) = 1/(4z) (1+z)^2$ the function $d \\circ \\lambda(z)$ extends to a holomorphic function in a domain which contains the unit disc.

Hans Henrik Rugh

1996-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

74

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prices of Petroleum Products Table 28. Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade...

75

Application of TGFTIR to the determination of organic oxygen and its speciation in the Argonne premium coal samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During rapid pyrolysis of coal, TGFTIR (thermogravimetry Fourier transform infrared) technique can be effectively used to simultaneously detect and measure the three main O-containing gases, namely H2O, CO and CO2. Their sum corresponds to the quantitative amount of oxygen in the coal and is, in general, inherently more accurate than the by-difference values. In this paper, we first attempt to relate the by-difference values for %O reported for the Argonne premium coal samples (lignite to bituminous rank) (Argonne Users Handbook) to those determined from a TGFTIR examination of the pyrolysis gases evolved. Another objective of the work is to relate the pyrolysis gases (H2O, CO and CO2) evolved to oxygen-containing functional groups found in coals as well as the evolution of these functional groups as a function of rank. Correlations are also developed between the TGFTIR oxygen values and other parameters determined for the Argonne Premium Coals. In particular, comparisons of our results using TGFTIR with analyses carried out by other workers on functional group analysis of acidic groups are considered.

J.A. MacPhee; J.-P. Charland; L. Giroux

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Fundamentals of Regularization in Celestial Mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

¨org Waldvogel, Seminar for Applied Mathematics, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH, CH-8092 Zurich an elegant treatment of the basics of orbital mechanics. We illustrate the simplicity of handling perturbed-Civita's regularization. In Section 3 we will describe in detail the planar regularization procedure and show

Waldvogel, Jörg

77

Moisture determination and structure investigation of native and dried Argonne premium coals. A hydrogen-1 solid-state NMR relaxation study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Moisture determination and structure investigation of native and dried Argonne premium coals. ... This work has been undertaken aiming to estimate the size of pores in moist coals on the basis of the nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation characteristics of water sorbed in the pores as the molecular probe. ...

X. Yang; A. R. Garcia; J. W. Larsen; B. G. Silbernagel

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Wide angle X-ray scattering study of the layering in three of the Argonne premium coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using wide angle X-ray scattering methods, the phase interference curves and the inter-layer structure curves of thee of the Argonne Premium Coals were measured. These analyses indicate the inter-layer structuring is rank dependent. In the sub-bituminous coal (WyodakAnderson), the number of layers in the average short-range structural domain is ca. 2.3, with the average inter-layer distance being 4.1. For Pittsburgh #8 coal, the average inter-layer distance decreases slightly, to 4.0, while the number of layers in the average short-range structural domain increases to ca. 3. For the more mature Pocahontas #3, a low-volatile bituminous coal, the inter-layer distance decreases to 3.7, and the average short-range structural domain contains 4.55 layers.

D.L. Wertz; J.L. Quin

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is a major step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal-water slurry fuel (CWF) can be produced from selected coals and that this premium fuel will be a cost-effective replacement for oil and natural gas now fueling some of the industrial and utility boilers in the United States. The replacement of oil and gas with CWF can only be realized if retrofit costs are kept to a minimum and retrofit boiler emissions meet national goals for clean air. These concerns establish the specifications for maximum ash and sulfur levels and combustion properties of the CWF. This cost-share contract is a 48-month program which started on September 30, 1992. This report discusses the technical progress made during the 4th quarter of the project from July 1 to September 30, 1993.

Smit, F.J.; Hogsett, R.F.; Jha, M.C.

1993-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

80

Quantitative Characterizations of Regularity Properties of ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

38, 367426 (1996). 3. Bakan A., Deutsch F., Li W.: Strong CHIP, normality, and linear regularity of convex sets. Trans. Amer. Math. Soc. 357, 38313863 (2005).

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Regular application of LCA in industrial practice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The methodology of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) has proved to be suitable to support industrial decision making in several case studies. Nevertheless, the regular application of LCA in industrial practice is still uncommon. The major reason for this is constituted by the extensive demand of Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) data from the product life cycle, which is needed for the regular execution of LCA studies. In order to enable a better integration of LCA in industrial decision making, this article outlines a concept for the use of data from Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Systems for the calculation of LCI on a regular basis. The developed concept supports a regular publication of environmental product declarations based on ISO/TR 14025 (Type III).

Hans-Jorg Bullinger; Gunnar Jurgens

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Regularity of BPA-systems is decidable  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is decidable whether a system in Basic Process Algebra (BPA) is regular with respect to bisimulation semantics. Basic operators in BPA are alternative composition, sequential composition and guarded ... We pre...

Sjouke Mauw; Hans Mulder

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Regularity of BPA-Systems is Decidable  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is decidable whether a system in Basic Process Algebra (BPA) is regular with respect to bisimulation semantics. Basic operators in BPA are alternative composition, sequential composition and guarded ... We pre...

Sjouke Mauw; Hans Mulder

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Model solutions of regularized relativistic transport equations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present numerical solutions of recently proposed relativistic transport equations for fluctuating hadronic fields with simplified model Lagrangians containing a spin-1/2 nucleon and a light scalar or pseudoscalar meson. We introduce and implement a method for regularizing tadpoles and vector loops which is consistent with the previously proposed regularization of the scalar loops. The resulting solutions in vacuum are well behaved, exhibiting the expected differences between the scalar and pseudoscalar cases without apparent pathologies.

Joseph P. Milana and Philip J. Siemens

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Weighted power counting and chiral dimensional regularization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We define a modified dimensional-regularization technique that overcomes several difficulties of the ordinary technique, and is specially designed to work efficiently in chiral and parity violating quantum field theories, in arbitrary dimensions greater than 2. When the dimension of spacetime is continued to complex values, spinors, vectors and tensors keep the components they have in the physical dimension, therefore the gamma matrices are the standard ones. Propagators are regularized with the help of evanescent higher-derivative kinetic terms, which are of Majorana type in the case of chiral fermions. If the new terms are organized in a clever way, weighted power counting provides an efficient control on the renormalization of the theory, and allows us to show that the resulting chiral dimensional regularization is consistent to all orders. The new technique considerably simplifies the proofs of properties that hold to all orders, and makes them suitable to be generalized to wider classes of models. Typica...

Anselmi, Damiano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

U.S. Refiner Sales to End Users (Average) Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales Type: Sales to End Users, Average Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale, Average DTW Rack Bulk Sales Type: Sales to End Users, Average Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale, Average DTW Rack Bulk Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Formulation/ Grade Sales Type Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Conventional, Average 3.030 3.137 3.122 3.063 3.042 2.972 1994-2013 Conventional Regular 3.005 3.116 3.102 3.040 3.017 2.948 1994-2013 Conventional Midgrade 3.167 3.256 3.239 3.200 3.193 3.121 1994-2013 Conventional Premium 3.269 3.354 3.327 3.291 3.274 3.203 1994-2013 Oxygenated, Average - - - - - - 1994-2013 Oxygenated Regular - - - - - - 1994-2013 Oxygenated Midgrade - - - - - - 1994-2013

87

Synthesis for Regular Specifications over Unbounded Domains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthesis for Regular Specifications over Unbounded Domains Jad Hamza # , Barbara Jobstmann + , Viktor Kuncak # # ENS Cachan, France + CNRS/Verimag, France, # EPFL, Switzerland Abstract---Synthesis that are correct by construction. Previous work includes synthesis of reactive finite­state systems from linear

Kuncak, Viktor

88

Synthesis for Regular Specifications over Unbounded Domains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthesis for Regular Specifications over Unbounded Domains Jad Hamza, Barbara Jobstmann, Viktor Kuncak ENS Cachan, France CNRS/Verimag, France, EPFL, Switzerland Abstract--Synthesis from specifications is a promising method of obtaining systems that are correct by construction. Previous work includes synthesis

Jobstmann, Barbara

89

Synthesis for Regular Specifications over Unbounded Domains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthesis for Regular Specifications over Unbounded Domains Jad Hamza, Barbara Jobstmann, Viktor Kuncak ENS Cachan, France CNRS/Verimag, France, EPFL, Switzerland Abstract--Synthesis from declarative. Previous work includes synthesis of reactive finite-state systems from linear temporal logic and its

Kuncak, Viktor

90

Uniformly Regular and Singular Riemannian Herbert Amann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Sobolev spaces, including sharp em- bedding and trace theorems, etc. Although fractional order Sobolev spaces can and trace theorems in this generality. For these to hold one has to impose restrictions on the underlying otherwise, m N? := N\\{0}. An atlas K for M is said to be uniformly regular if it consists of normalized

Amann, Herbert

91

Uniformly Regular and Singular Riemannian Herbert Amann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Sobolev spaces, including sharp em- bedding and trace theorems, etc. Although fractional order Sobolev spaces can and trace theorems in this generality. For these to hold one has to impose restrictions on the underlying). Unless explicitly stated otherwise, m N? := N\\{0}. An atlas K for M is said to be uniformly regular

Amann, Herbert

92

HAMILTON DECOMPOSITIONS OF REGULAR EXPANDERS: APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HAMILTON DECOMPOSITIONS OF REGULAR EXPANDERS: APPLICATIONS DANIELA K¨UHN AND DERYK OSTHUS Abstract is linear in n and which is a robust outexpander has a decomposition into edge-disjoint Hamilton cycles into (n - 1)/2 edge-disjoint Hamilton cycles, whenever n is sufficiently large. This verified a conjecture

Kühn, Daniela

93

Causation, Regularities, and Time: Hume's Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that there is more to causation than regularity, contiguity, and time order. Hume claims to clarify the content of our "ideas" (mental contents) and of the relations among them, and he does not clearly demarcate that nonlogical terms have meaning only if one can tell by observation whether they apply to things

Fitelson, Branden

94

1. Control moisture. 2. Clean regularly.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

run help control pollutants. When outdoor air is brought into the home, ideally it is filtered1. Control moisture. 2. Clean regularly. 3. Ventilate to improve indoor air quality. 4. Keep provides a way to remove pollutants and to control humidity. Windows that open and exhaust fans #12;that

95

Spin dynamics and spin counting in the 13C CP/MAS analysis of Argonne Premium coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The carbonyl-labelled compound, [3.2.1]bicyclo-4-pyrrolidino-N-methyl-octan-8-one triflate (13CO-123), has been used as an intensity standard for quantitative 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (n.m.r.) analysis (including spin counting) of Argonne Premium coals. The cross-polarization time constants, TCH, and the rotating-frame proton spin-lattice relaxation times, T1?H, have been determined for each major 13C peak of each coal via a combination of variable contact-time and variable spin-lock experiments. Two or three components of rotating-frame 1H relaxation decay and two or three components of TCH behaviour have been observed for each major 13C peak of each coal. These data have been used to determine the number of carbon atoms detected in each coal; these values are in the range 7787% of the amount of carbon known to be in each coal from elemental analysis data, except for Pocahontas No. 3, for which only 50% of the carbon was detected.

Antoni Jurkiewicz; Gary E. Maciel

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

CO2 Isotherms Measured on Moisture-Equilbrated Argonne Premium Coals at 550C and 15 Mpa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sorption isotherms, which describe the coals gas storage capacity, are important for estimating the carbon sequestration potential of coal seams. The DOE-NETL initiated a second inter-laboratory isotherm comparison of coals where CO2 sorption isotherms were collected on moisture-equilibrated coals at temperatures and pressures relevant to CO2 sequestration. Each laboratory used the same coal samples and followed the same general procedure; however, each laboratory used their own apparatus and isotherm measurement technique. This study investigated the inter-laboratory reproducibility of carbon dioxide isotherm measurements on moisture-equilibrated Argonne premium coal samples (Pocahontas #3, Illinois #6, and Beulah Zap). Six independent laboratories provided isotherm data on the three moisture-equilibrated coal samples at 55oC and pressures up to 15 MPa. Agreement among the laboratories was good up to 8 MPa. At the higher pressures, the data among the laboratories diverged significantly for two of the laboratories and coincided reasonably well for four of the laboratories. This work provides guidance for estimating the reproducibility that might be expected when comparing published sorption isotherms on moisture-equilibrated coals from different laboratories.

Goodman, A.L.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Density matrix minimization with $\\ell_1$ regularization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a convex variational principle to find sparse representation of low-lying eigenspace of symmetric matrices. In the context of electronic structure calculation, this corresponds to a sparse density matrix minimization algorithm with $\\ell_1$ regularization. The minimization problem can be efficiently solved by a split Bergman iteration type algorithm. We further prove that from any initial condition, the algorithm converges to a minimizer of the variational principle.

Rongjie Lai; Jianfeng Lu; Stanley Osher

2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

98

Weighted power counting and chiral dimensional regularization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We define a modified dimensional-regularization technique that overcomes several difficulties of the ordinary technique, and is specially designed to work efficiently in chiral and parity violating quantum field theories, in arbitrary dimensions greater than 2. When the dimension of spacetime is continued to complex values, spinors, vectors and tensors keep the components they have in the physical dimension, therefore the $\\gamma $ matrices are the standard ones. Propagators are regularized with the help of evanescent higher-derivative kinetic terms, which are of the Majorana type in the case of chiral fermions. If the new terms are organized in a clever way, weighted power counting provides an efficient control on the renormalization of the theory, and allows us to show that the resulting chiral dimensional regularization is consistent to all orders. The new technique considerably simplifies the proofs of properties that hold to all orders, and makes them suitable to be generalized to wider classes of models. Typical examples are the renormalizability of chiral gauge theories and the Adler-Bardeen theorem. The difficulty of explicit computations, on the other hand, may increase.

Damiano Anselmi

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

99

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Prices of Petroleum Products U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 76 Table 31. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Premium All Grades Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Other End Users a Through Retail Outlets Other End Users a Through Retail Outlets Other End Users a Through Retail Outlets Other End Users a United States September 2013 .......... 3.032 2.796 2.757 3.231 3.092 2.861 3.346 3.078 3.064 3.076 2.818 2.792

100

Gas Mileage Tips - Driving More Efficiently  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Driving More Efficiently Driving More Efficiently Personalize Fuel Prices Select the fuel type and enter your fuel price to personalize savings estimates. Regular Midgrade Premium Diesel E85 CNG LPG $ 3.33 /gal Save My Prices Use Default Prices Click "Save My Prices" to apply your prices to other pages, or click "Use Default Prices" use national average prices. Drive Sensibly frustrated driver Aggressive driving (speeding, rapid acceleration and braking) wastes gas. It can lower your gas mileage by 33% at highway speeds and by 5% around town. Sensible driving is also safer for you and others, so you may save more than gas money. Fuel Economy Benefit: 5%-33% Equivalent Gasoline Savings: $0.17-$1.10/gallon Observe the Speed Limit (New Information) Graph showing MPG decreases rapidly at speeds above 50 mph

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Retail Gasoline and Diesel Surveys Retail Gasoline and Diesel Surveys Definitions Key Terms Definition Conventional Area Any area that does not require the sale of reformulated gasoline. All types of finished motor gasoline may be sold in this area. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the reformulated gasoline category. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Note: this survey designates all motor gasoline collected within a conventional area as conventional gasoline (see conventional area). Gasoline Grades The classification of gasoline by octane ratings. Each type of gasoline (conventional and reformulated) is classified by three grades - regular, midgrade, and premium. Note: gasoline sales are reported by grade in accordance with their classification at the time of sale. In general, automotive octane requirements are lower at high altitudes. Therefore, in some areas of the United States, such as the Rocky Mountain States, the octane ratings for the gasoline grades may be 2 or more octane points lower.

102

Quantification of mineral matter in the Argonne Premium Coals using interactive Rietveld-based X-ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mineral matter in the eight reference North American coal samples of the Argonne Premium Coal series has been investigated on a quantitative basis using X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. X-ray diffraction data obtained from electronic low-temperature (oxygenplasma) ash (LTA) residues, from ashes produced by heating the coals in air at 370C, and also from the raw coals themselves, were evaluated using an interactive data processing system (siroquant) based on Rietveld interpretation methods. The results from the three types of material (LTA, 370C ash and raw coal) were compared for each sample. This allowed the components present in the raw coals in crystalline form to be recognised separately from mineral artifacts produced, particularly in the low-rank coals, from interaction of organically associated elements (Ca, S, etc.) during the two ashing processes. After the allowance for the production of any artifacts, the quantitative mineral assemblages identified from XRD of the raw coals were found to be consistent, even for coals having a relatively low ash percentage (around 5%), with the results obtained from the respective mineral concentrates prepared by the ashing methods. The effects of heating the coal to 370C could also be distinguished, relative to the raw coal or the LTA, through changes in components such as pyrite and the clay minerals. Although some areas of uncertainty exist, particularly with magnesium in the low-rank coals, the calculated chemical compositions of the coal ash derived from the mineral mixtures identified for each coal were also found to be consistent with the results of direct chemical analysis of the respective coal ash materials.

Colin R. Ward; John C. Taylor; C.E. Matulis; L.S. Dale

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Rational Wachspress-type Finite Elements on Regular Hexagons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Finite Elements on Regular Hexagons J. L. GOUT Departement de Mathematiques, Universite...Finite Elements on Regular Hexagons J. L. GOUT Departement de Mathematiques, Universite...1975) (see also Apprato, Arcangeli & Gout, 1979a, b; Gout, 1979, 1980a, b......

J. L. GOUT

104

Wait-free Regular Storage from Byzantine Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a simple, efficient, and self-contained construction of a wait-free regular register from Byzantine storage components. Our construction utilizes a novel building block, called 1-regular register, which can be ...

Abraham, Ittai

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

105

System regularities in design of experiments and their applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation documents a meta-analysis of 113 data sets from published factorial experiments. The study quantifies regularities observed among main effects and multi-factor interactions. Such regularities are critical ...

Li, Xiang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Geodesic Study of Regular Hayward Black Hole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is devoted to study the geodesic structure of regular Hayward black hole. The timelike and null geodesic have been studied explicitly for radial and non-radial motion. For timelike and null geodesic in radial motion there exists analytical solution, while for non-radial motion the effective potential has been plotted, which investigates the position and turning points of the particle. It has been found that massive particle moving along timelike geodesics path are dragged towards the BH and continues move around BH in particular orbits.

G. Abbas; U. Sabiullah

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

107

Navier-Stokes regularity in 3D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This short proof shows that for smooth and sufficiently fast decaying initial data at infinity, the full incompressible Navier-Stokes solutions are eternal. The proof uses an orthogonal decomposition of the velocity field and some well-known vector calculus identities to establish a particular contradiction, which leads to a vanishing integral, which is the main integral that determines the evolution of enstrophy. As it is shown that enstrophy is non-increasing, it is well-know that the solutions stay regular at all times.

Jussi Lindgren

2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

108

Multichannel image regularization using anisotropic geodesic filtering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper extends a recent image-dependent regularization approach introduced in aiming at edge-preserving smoothing. For that purpose, geodesic distances equipped with a Riemannian metric need to be estimated in local neighbourhoods. By deriving an appropriate metric from the gradient structure tensor, the associated geodesic paths are constrained to follow salient features in images. Following, we design a generalized anisotropic geodesic filter; incorporating not only a measure of the edge strength, like in the original method, but also further directional information about the image structures. The proposed filter is particularly efficient at smoothing heterogeneous areas while preserving relevant structures in multichannel images.

Grazzini, Jacopo A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

The Coherence Premium:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Evidence was found for the partial explanation of firm succes from a new point of view: coherence. A positive relationship was found between coherence, a (more)

Van Braam Houckgeest, A.Q.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

A BLOCH DECAY AND ULTRA HIGH SPEED CP/MAS 13C NMR STUDY OF THE ARGONNE PREMIUM COALS AND SELECTED OXIDISED LOW-RANK COALS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter presents the results of a Bloch decay and ultrahigh speed cross-polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of the Argonne premium coals and selected oxidized low-rank coals. A Varian Associates VXR-300 NMR spectrometer operating at 75.4 \\{MHz\\} (13C) equipped with a Doty, Scientific, Inc. high-speed cross-polarization/magic angle probe was employed. Solid-state Bloch decay 13C NMR spectra were determined using 90 carbon pulse, 74 kHz dipolar proton decoupling during acquisition, and a 200-s recycle delay with 13 kHz magic angle spinning. The probe and sample rotor exhibited a background signal amounting to ca. 20% of the total intensity of the coal spectrum, and required careful FID scaling and subtraction of the signal obtained from the empty rotor and caps. CP/MAS spectra were determined at variable contact times from 25 ?S to 25 ms, with 5 s recycle times. The chapter presents a comparison of CP/MAS and Bloch decay results for the Argonne premium coals, a standard humic acid, and for a selection of oxidized coals.

J.C. Linehan; J.A. Franz

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Physical properties of selected block Argonne Premium bituminous coal related to CO2, CH4, and N2 adsorption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CO2, CH4, and N2 adsorption and gas-induced swelling were quantified for block Blind Canyon, Pittsburgh #8 and Pocahontas Argonne Premium coals that were dried and structurally relaxed at 75C in vacuum. Strain measurements were made perpendicular and parallel to the bedding plane on ~7נ7נ7mm3 coal blocks and gravimetric sorption measurements were obtained simultaneously on companion coal blocks exposed to the same gaseous environment. The adsorption amount and strain were determined after equilibration at P?1.8MPa. There is a strong non-linear correlation between strain and the quantity of gas adsorbed and the results for all gases and coals studied follow a common pattern. The dependence of the coal matrix shrinkage/swelling coefficient (Cgc) on the type and quantity of gas adsorbed is seen by plotting the ratio between the strain and the adsorbate concentration against the adsorbate concentration. In general, Cgc increases with increasing adsorbate concentration over the range of ~0.1 to 1.4mmol/g. Results from the dried block coals are compared to CO2 experiments using native coals with an inherent level of moisture as received. The amount of CO2 adsorbed using native coals (assuming no displacement of H2O by CO2) is significantly less than the dried coals. The gas-induced strain (S) and adsorption amount (M) were measured as a function of time following step changes in CO2, CH4, and N2 pressure from vacuum to 1.8MPa. An empirical diffusion equation was applied to the kinetic data to obtain the exponent (n) for time dependence for each experiment. The data for all coals were pooled and the exponent (n) evaluated using an ANOVA statistical analysis method. Values for (n) near 0.5 were found to be independent on the coal, the gas or type of measurement (e.g., parallel strain, perpendicular strain, and gas uptake). These data support the use of a Fickian diffusion model framework for kinetic analysis. The kinetic constant k was determined using a unipore diffusion model for each experiment and the data were pooled for ANOVA analysis. For dry coal, statistically significant differences for k were found for the gases (CO2>N2>CH4) and coals (Pocahontas>Blind Canyon>Pittsburgh #8) but not for the method of the kinetic measurement (e.g., strain or gas uptake). For Blind Canyon and Pittsburgh #8 coal, the rate of CO2 adsorption and gas-induced strain for dry coal was significantly greater than that of the corresponding native coal. For Pocahontas coal the rates of CO2 adsorption and gas-induced strain for dry and native coal were indistinguishable and may be related to its low native moisture and minimal amount of created porosity upon drying.

S.R. Kelemen; L.M. Kwiatek

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Statistical mechanics of Floquet systems with regular and chaotic states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the asymptotic state of time-periodic quantum systems with regular and chaotic Floquet states weakly coupled to a heat bath. The asymptotic occupation probabilities of these two types of states follow fundamentally different distributions. Among regular states the probability decreases from the state in the center of a regular island to the outermost state by orders of magnitude, while chaotic states have almost equal probabilities. We derive an analytical expression for the occupations of regular states of kicked systems, which depends on the winding numbers of the regular tori and the parameters temperature and driving frequency. For a constant winding number within a regular island it simplifies to Boltzmann-like weights $\\exp(-\\betaeff \\Ereg_m)$, similar to time-independent systems. For this we introduce the regular energies $\\Ereg_m$ of the quantizing tori and an effective winding-number-dependent temperature $1/\\betaeff$, different from the actual bath temperature. Furthermore, the occupations of other typical Floquet states in a mixed phase space are studied, i.e. regular states on nonlinear resonances, beach states, and hierarchical states, giving rise to distinct features in the occupation distribution. Avoided crossings involving a regular state lead to drastic consequences for the entire set of occupations. We introduce a simplified rate model whose analytical solutions describe the occupations quite accurately.

Roland Ketzmerick; Waltraut Wustmann

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

113

Accelerated Block-Coordinate Relaxation for Regularized Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aug 10, 2010 ... Accelerated Block-Coordinate Relaxation for Regularized Optimization. Stephen Wright (swright ***at*** cs.wisc.edu). Abstract: We discuss...

Stephen Wright

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

114

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 15, April--June 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Goal is engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. Scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on 6 coals to optimize these processes, followed by design/construction/operation of a 2-t/hr PDU. During this quarter, parametric testing of the 30-in. Microcel{trademark} flotation column at the Lady Dunn plant was completed and clean coal samples submitted for briquetting. A study of a novel hydrophobic dewatering process continued at Virginia Tech. Benefits of slurry PSD (particle size distribution) modification and pH adjustment were evaluated for the Taggart and Hiawatha coals; they were found to be small. Agglomeration bench-scale test results were positive, meeting product ash specifications. PDU Flotation Module operations continued; work was performed with Taggart coal to determine scaleup similitude between the 12-in. and 6-ft Microcel{trademark} columns. Construction of the PDU selective agglomeration module continued.

Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

1996-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

115

Video Denoising and Simplification Via Discrete Regularization on Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Video Denoising and Simplification Via Discrete Regularization on Graphs Mahmoud Ghoniem, Youssef algorithms for video de- noising and simplification based on discrete regularization on graphs. The main difference between video and image denoising is the temporal redundancy in video sequences. Recent works

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

116

Empirical Regularities of Asymmetric Pricing in the Gasoline Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Empirical Regularities of Asymmetric Pricing in the Gasoline Industry Marc Remer August 2, 2010 pricing in the retail gasoline industry, and also documents empirical regularities in the market. I find of asymmetric price movements in the retail gasoline industry. Yet, there is no general agreement as to whether

Niebur, Ernst

117

Quantifier elimination by cylindrical algebraic decomposition based on regular chains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A quantifier elimination algorithm by cylindrical algebraic decomposition based on regular chains is presented. The main idea is to refine a complex cylindrical tree until the signs of polynomials appearing in the tree are sufficient to distinguish the ... Keywords: cylindrical algebraic decomposition, quantifier elimination, regular chains, triangular decomposition

Changbo Chen; Marc Moreno Maza

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Total variation based Fourier reconstruction and regularization for computer tomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the reconstruted image. Insufficiency of data may be caused by the undersampling of projections, by the limitedTotal variation based Fourier reconstruction and regularization for computer tomography Xiao. Index Terms-- Computer tomography, reconstruction, regular- ization, iterative method, Fourier method

Zhang, Xiaoqun

119

Comparison of viewshed algorithms on regular spaced points  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Viewshed is a basic visibility structure and represents all visible points from a given viewpoint. The paper gives a survey of non-parallel viewshed algorithms using regular spaced points. At first, a comprehensive background of the problem is given, ... Keywords: computational geometry, regular spaced points, survey, viewshed, visibility

Branko Kau?i?; Borut Zalik

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Canadian practitioners' perception of research work investigating the cost premiums, long-term costs and health and productivity benefits of green buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite evidence suggesting conflicting views between practitioners and researchers when it comes to estimating the costs and financial benefits of green buildings, there exists no research work that has attempted to investigate practitioners' perception, and in particular Canadian practitioners', of the work conducted by researchers. To fill this gap in the literature, a web-based anonymous survey was administered to 1200 LEED accredited professionals in Canada to assess, among other things, practitioners' awareness, and confidence in research work assessing the cost premiums, long-term cost benefits, and health and productivity benefits of green buildings. The statistical analysis of the data using t-tests and mixed-model ANOVA tests showed that Canadian practitioners were still uncertain about results of the literature. Despite a slow change in attitudes the longer they worked in the field, practitioners continued to identify high cost premiums as the primary barrier to investing in green practices, and energy cost savings as the most important type of savings incurred in green buildings. The majority were uncertain about the size and impact of productivity and health benefits, and about how best to measure them. First-time adopters of LEED usually found the cost and complexity of the system prohibitive. Many believed that the decision to go green rested ultimately with the owner. That is why future research work needs to focus on improving knowledge transfer between practitioners and researchers and on improving the rigour and accuracy of the literature by using more empirical data, and getting practitioners to endorse research work in the field.

M.H. Issa; J.H. Rankin; A.J. Christian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2003 through September 30, 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) has been successfully operating the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by PSU, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with PSU responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes PSU and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. A second contract was executed with DOE NETL starting in October 2003 to continue the activities of CPCPC. An annual funding meeting was held in October 2003 and the council selected 10 projects for funding. Base funding for the projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the various subcontractors on March 1, 2004.

Andresen, John; Schobert, Harold; Miller, Bruce G

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Where the wind blows: Assessing the effect of fixed and premium based feed-in tariffs on the spatial diversification of wind turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Feed-in tariffs (FIT) are among the most important policy instruments to promote renewable electricity production. The fixed-price FIT (FFIT), which guarantee a fixed price for every unit of produced electricity and the premium based FIT (PFIT), which pay a premium on top of the market price are commonly implemented in the EU. Costs for balancing intermittent electricity production may be significantly higher with FFIT than with PFIT, and FFIT do not provide any incentive to produce electricity when marginal production costs are high. In contrast, PFIT do provide strong incentives to better match renewable power output with marginal production costs in the system. The purpose of this article is to assess the effects of the two tariff schemes on the choice of wind turbine locations. In an analytical model, we show that both the covariance between wind power supply and demand as well as between the different wind power locations matter for investors in a PFIT scheme. High covariance with other intermittent producers causes a decrease in market prices and consequently in revenues for wind power investors. They are therefore incentivized to diversify the locations of wind turbines to decrease the covariance between different wind power production locations. In an empirical optimization model, we analyze the effects of these two different schemes in a policy experiment for Austria. The numerical results show that under a PFIT scheme, (1) spatial diversification is incentivized, (2) the covariance of wind power production with marginal electricity production costs increases, and (3) the variances of the wind power output and of residual load decrease if wind power deployment attains 10% of total national electricity consumption.

J. Schmidt; G. Lehecka; V. Gass; E. Schmid

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, January--March 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is a major step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal-water slurry fuel (CWF) can be produced from selected coals and that this premium fuel will be a cost-effectve replacement for oil and natural gas now fueling some of the industrial and utility boilers in the United States as well as for advanced combustars currently under development. The replacement of oil and gas with CWF can only be realized if retrofit costs are kept to a minimum and retrofit boiler emissions meet national goals fbr clean air. These concerns establish the specifications for maximum ash and sulfur levels and combustion properties of the CWF. This cost-share contract is a 51-month program which started on September 30, 1992. This report discusses the technical progress, made during the 6th quarter of the project from January 1 to March 31, 1994. The project has three major objectives: (1) The primary objective is to develop the design base for prototype commercial advanced fine coal cleaning facilities capable of producing ultra-clean coals suitable for conversion to coal-water slurry fuel for premium fuel applications. The fine coal cleaning technologies are advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration. (2) A secondary objective is to develop the design base for near-term application of these advanced fine coal cleaning technologies in new or existing coal preparation plants for efficiently processing minus 28-mesh coal fines and converting this to marketable products in current market economics. (3) A third objective is to determine the removal of toxic trace elements from coal by advance column flotation and selective agglomeration technologies.

Smit, F.J.; Rowe, R.M.; Anast, K.R.; Jha, M.C.

1994-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

124

QJT as a Regularization: Origin of the New Gauge Anomalies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QJT is considered as a regularization of QFT, where the fields are replaced by finite $p$-jets. The regularized phase space is infinite-dimensional, because not all histories are determined by initial conditions. Gauge symmetries are not fully preserved by the regularization, and gauge anomalies arise. These anomalies are of a new type, not present in QFT. They generically diverge when the regulator is removed, but can be made finite with a particular choice of field content, provided that spacetime has at most four dimensions. The field content appears to include unphysical fields that violate the spin-statistics theorem.

T. A. Larsson

2009-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

125

Continuation of Time Bounds for a Regularized Boussinesq System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the periodic solution of a perturbed regularized Boussinesq system (Bona et al., J....2002, Bona et al., Nonlinearity 17:925952, 2004), namely the system ? t ...

Y. Mammeri

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Regular zeros of quadratic maps and their application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sufficient conditions for the existence of regular zeros of quadratic maps are obtained. Their applications are indicated to certain problems of analysis related to the inverse function theorem in a neighbourhood of an abnormal point. Bibliography: 13 titles.

Arutyunov, Aram V; Karamzin, Dmitry Yu

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

127

Regularity and approximation of systems arising in electromagnetic interrogation of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regularity and approximation of systems arising in electromagnetic interrogation of dielectric describes the electromagnetic interrogation of dielectric materials. We address the well describing the electromagnetic in- terrogation of dielectric materials. Let E and H be the intensities

128

Regularity of Elastic Fields in Composites Dorothee Knees1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an important role in the everyday life, examples are fiber- reinforced composites in car industry, piezo-electric condition for the subdomains and the energy densities. Furthermore, some applications of the regularity

Knees, Dorothee

129

Gas Mileage of 2013 Vehicles by Dodge  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Dodge Vehicles 3 Dodge Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 2013 Dodge Avenger 6 cyl, 3.6 L, Automatic 6-spd, Regular Gas or E85 Compare 2013 Dodge Avenger Gas 19 City 22 Combined 29 Highway E85 14 City 16 Combined 21 Highway 2013 Dodge Avenger 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic 6-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2013 Dodge Avenger View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 20 City 23 Combined 31 Highway 2013 Dodge Avenger 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2013 Dodge Avenger 21 City 24 Combined 29 Highway 2013 Dodge Challenger 8 cyl, 5.7 L, Automatic 5-spd, Midgrade Gasoline Compare 2013 Dodge Challenger 16 City 19 Combined 25 Highway 2013 Dodge Challenger 6 cyl, 3.6 L, Automatic 5-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2013 Dodge Challenger 18 City 21 Combined 27 Highway 2013 Dodge Challenger 8 cyl, 5.7 L, Manual 6-spd, Premium Gasoline

130

CLASSIFICATION OF FIRST-ORDER FLEXIBLE REGULAR BICYCLE POLYGONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLASSIFICATION OF FIRST-ORDER FLEXIBLE REGULAR BICYCLE POLYGONS ROBERT CONNELLY AND BAL´AZS CSIK´OS Abstract. A bicycle (n, k)-gon is an equilateral n-gon whose k-diagonals are equal. S. Tabachnikov proved that a regular n-gon is first-order flexible as a bicycle (n, k)-gon if and only if there is an integer 2 r n

Connelly, Robert

131

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) has been successfully operating the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by PSU, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with PSU responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes PSU and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. A second contract was executed with DOE NETL starting in October 2003 to continue the activities of CPCPC. An annual funding meeting was held in October 2003 and the council selected ten projects for funding. Base funding for the projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2004. Nine of the ten projects have been completed and the final reports for these 2004 projects are attached. An annual funding meeting was held in November 2004 and the council selected eleven projects for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2005. Three additional projects were selected for funding during the April 2005 tutorial/funding meeting. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on July 1, 2005.

Miller, Bruce G

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University has been successfully managing the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by Penn State, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. Base funding for the selected projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. At the annual funding meeting held in October 2003, ten projects were selected for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2004. Nine of the ten 2004 projects were completed during the previous annual reporting period and their final reports were submitted with the previous annual report (i.e., 10/01/04-09/30/05). The final report for the remaining project, which was submitted during this reporting period (i.e., 10/01/05-09/30/06), is attached. At the annual funding meeting held in November 2004, eleven projects were selected for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2005. Three additional projects were selected for funding during the April 2005 tutorial/funding meeting. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on July 1, 2005. Of these fourteen 2005 projects, eleven have been completed and the final reports are attached. An annual funding meeting was held in November 2005 and the council selected five projects for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2006, except for one that started October 1, 2006.

Bruce G. Miller

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

133

Quantum Backflow States from Eigenstates of the Regularized Current Operator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an exhaustive class of states with quantum backflow -- the phenomenon in which a state consisting entirely of positive momenta may have negative current and the probability flows in the opposite direction to the momentum. They are characterized by a general function of momenta subject to very weak conditions. Such a family of states is of interest in the light of a recent experimental proposal to measure backflow. We find one particularly simple state which has surprisingly large backflow -- about 41 percent of the lower bound on flux derived by Bracken and Melloy. We study the eigenstates of a regularized current operator and we show how some of these states, in a certain limit, lead to our class of backflow states. This limit also clarifies the correspondence between the spectrum of the regularized current operator, which has just two non-zero eigenvalues in our chosen regularization, and the usual current operator.

J. J. Halliwell; E. Gillman; O. Lennon; M. Patel; I. Ramirez

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

134

Breast ultrasound tomography with total-variation regularization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Breast ultrasound tomography is a rapidly developing imaging modality that has the potential to impact breast cancer screening and diagnosis. A new ultrasound breast imaging device (CURE) with a ring array of transducers has been designed and built at Karmanos Cancer Institute, which acquires both reflection and transmission ultrasound signals. To extract the sound-speed information from the breast data acquired by CURE, we have developed an iterative sound-speed image reconstruction algorithm for breast ultrasound transmission tomography based on total-variation (TV) minimization. We investigate applicability of the TV tomography algorithm using in vivo ultrasound breast data from 61 patients, and compare the results with those obtained using the Tikhonov regularization method. We demonstrate that, compared to the Tikhonov regularization scheme, the TV regularization method significantly improves image quality, resulting in sound-speed tomography images with sharp (preserved) edges of abnormalities and few artifacts.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Cuiping [KARMANOS CANCER INSTIT.; Duric, Neb [KARMANOS CANCER INSTIT

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Stability of negative ionization fronts: Regularization by electric screening?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We recently have proposed that a reduced interfacial model for streamer propagation is able to explain spontaneous branching. Such models require regularization. In the present paper we investigate how transversal Fourier modes of a planar ionization front are regularized by the electric screening length. For a fixed value of the electric field ahead of the front we calculate the dispersion relation numerically. These results guide the derivation of analytical asymptotes for arbitrary fields: for small wave-vector k, the growth rate s(k) grows linearly with k, for large k, it saturates at some positive plateau value. We give a physical interpretation of these results.

Manuel Arrays and Ute Ebert

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Temporal flooding of regular islands by chaotic wave packets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate the time evolution of wave packets in systems with a mixed phase space where regular islands and chaotic motion coexist. For wave packets started in the chaotic sea on average the weight on a quantized torus of the regular island increases due to dynamical tunneling. This flooding weight initially increases linearly and saturates to a value which varies from torus to torus. We demonstrate for the asymptotic flooding weight universal scaling with an effective tunneling coupling for quantum maps and the mushroom billiard. This universality is reproduced by a suitable random matrix model.

Lars Bittrich; Arnd Bcker; Roland Ketzmerick

2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

137

Fast Rates for Regularized Least-squares Algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

algorithm (RLS) on a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) in the regression setting. This problem hasFast Rates for Regularized Least-squares Algorithm Andrea Caponnetto and Ernesto De Vito AI Memo condition on the regression function. In [3] a covering number technique has been used to obtain explicit

Poggio, Tomaso

138

REGULARIZATION OF A PROGRAMMED RECURRENT ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REGULARIZATION OF A PROGRAMMED RECURRENT ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK Andrew J. Meade, Jr. Department ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK Andrew J. Meade, Jr. Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science into an artificial neural network architecture. GTR provides a rational means of combining theoretical models

Meade, Andrew J.

139

Regularized and Adaptive Nonlinear Moving Horizon Estimation of Bottomhole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pressure Drilling; Moving Horizon Estimation; Regularization. 1. INTRODUCTION Oil well drilling-to-atmosphere approach of conventional oil drilling attempts to meet inequality (1) by adjusting only the pump speed dynamics. For a more comprehensive intro- duction to oil well drilling, please refer to Devereux (1999

Johansen, Tor Arne

140

REGULAR ARTICLE European corn borer injury effects on lignin, carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REGULAR ARTICLE European corn borer injury effects on lignin, carbon and nitrogen in corn tissues herbivores often stimulate lignin deposition in injured plant tissue, but it is not known whether corn (Zea (Bacillus thuringiensis) genetic modifica- tion is also reported to affect lignin in corn. This study

Beaudoin, Georges

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Regularity Principle of Self-Management Naftaly Minsky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Regularity Principle of Self-Management Naftaly Minsky Department of Computer Science, Rutgers Introduction Several approaches to the self management and self or- ganization1 have been proposed during, by definition, a self managed system. And there are two well known approaches to such manage- ment, often called

Minsky, Naftaly

142

A feature selection method using improved regularized linear discriminant analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigation of genes, using data analysis and computer-based methods, has gained widespread attention in solving human cancer classification problem. DNA microarray gene expression datasets are readily utilized for this purpose. In this paper, we propose ... Keywords: Classification accuracy, Feature/gene selection, Linear discriminant analysis (LDA), Regularized LDA

Alok Sharma, Kuldip K. Paliwal, Seiya Imoto, Satoru Miyano

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Quaternions for Regularizing Celestial Mechanics the Right Way  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Applied Mathematics, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH, CH-8092 Zurich Theory and Applications statement. Beginning with a summary of quaternion algebra, we will describe the regular- ization procedure will first summarize the theory of quaternions and then give an overview of the new, elegant way of handling

Waldvogel, Jörg

144

Improving Home Automation by Discovering Regularly Occurring Device Usage Patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improving Home Automation by Discovering Regularly Occurring Device Usage Patterns Edwin O of two prediction algorithms, thus demonstrating multiple uses for a home automation system. Finally, we Several research efforts are focused on home automation. The Intelligent Room [2] uses an array of sensors

Cook, Diane J.

145

APPROXIMATE HAMILTON DECOMPOSITIONS OF ROBUSTLY EXPANDING REGULAR DIGRAPHS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPROXIMATE HAMILTON DECOMPOSITIONS OF ROBUSTLY EXPANDING REGULAR DIGRAPHS DERYK OSTHUS and is a robust outexpander has an approximate decomposition into edge-disjoint Hamilton cycles, i.e. G contains a set of r -o(r) edge-disjoint Hamilton cycles. Here G is a robust outexpander if for every set S which

Osthus, Deryk

146

REGULAR ARTICLE Why calcium inhibits magnesium-dependent enzyme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REGULAR ARTICLE Why calcium inhibits magnesium-dependent enzyme phosphoserine phosphatase. Keywords Phosphoserine phosphatase Á Magnesium Á Calcium Á Density functional calculations Á Inhibition mechanism 1 Introduction Phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP, EC 3.1.3.3) is a mono- nuclear magnesium

Liao, Rongzhen

147

A fast solver for Poisson problems on infinite regular lattices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Fast Multipole Method (FMM) provides a highly efficient computational tool for solving constant coefficient partial differential equations (e.g. the Poisson equation) on infinite domains. The solution to such an equation is given as the convolution ... Keywords: Discrete potential theory, Fast Multipole Method, Lattice Green's function, Lattice equations, Regular lattices

A. Gillman; P. G. Martinsson

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Manifold Identification in Dual Averaging for Regularized Stochastic ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dimensional manifold of parameter space along which the regularizer is smooth. (When an ?1 ...... Proof To measure the cardinality of the complement of St, that is, Sc t := {1,2,...,t}\\St, ..... the median (rather than the mean) and the standard deviation. The table also ...... Statistics and its Interface, 1:137153, 2008. I. Vaisman.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Tail Risk of Multivariate Regular Variation Third Revision, May 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the resulting position (X) - X is acceptable to regulators/supervisors. The general theory of coherent riskTail Risk of Multivariate Regular Variation Harry Joe Haijun Li Third Revision, May 2010 Abstract Tail risk refers to the risk associated with extreme values and is often affected by extremal

Li, Haijun

150

Regular Expressions for Natural Language Processing Steven Bird Ewan Klein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to know how many words can be formed from the letters: a, c, e, o, and n (e.g. ocean). We may want to ndRegular Expressions for Natural Language Processing Steven Bird Ewan Klein 2006-01-29 Version: 0

Hearst, Marti

151

Ecient HalfQuadratic Regularization with Granularity Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Centro de Investigacion en Matematicas A.C. Apdo. Postal 402, Guanajuato, Gto. Mexico 36020 mrivera;1 INTRODUCTION In the ...elds of image processing, image analysis and computer vision, one deals with the problem to be introduced in the reconstruction process. The regularized solution f¤ is computed by minimizing an energy

Rivera, Mariano

152

Jorg Waldvogel, ETH Zurich 1 Regularization of the Symmetric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J¨org Waldvogel, ETH Z¨urich 1 Regularization of the Symmetric Four-Body Problem by Elliptic Functions J¨org Waldvogel Seminar for Applied Mathematics ETH Z¨urich, Switzerland ICIAM 2011 International, ETH Z¨urich 2 Abstract Consider 4 point masses mk > 0 at positions xk(t) R2 , k = 1, 2, 3, 4, moving

Waldvogel, Jörg

153

Landscape regularity modelling for environmental challenges in agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landscape regularity modelling for environmental challenges in agriculture El Ghali Lazrak Jean-Fran¸cois Mari Marc Beno^it Abstract In agricultural landscapes, methods to identify and describe meaningful landscape patterns play an important role to understand the in- teraction between landscape organization

Boyer, Edmond

154

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 9, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design, and construction of a 2-t/hr process development unit (PDU). The PDU will then be operated to generate 200 ton lots of each of three project coals, by each process. The project began in October, 1992 and is scheduled for completion by March, 1997. During Quarter 9 (October--December, 1995), parametric and optimization testing was completed for the Taggart, Sunnyside, and Indiana VII coal using a 12-inch Microcel{trademark} flotation column. The detailed design of the 2-t/hr PDU grinding, flotation, and dewatering circuits neared completion with the specification of the major pieces of capital equipment to be purchased for these areas. Selective agglomeration test work investigated the properties of various industrial grades of heptane for use during bench- and PDU-scale testing. It was decided to use a hydrotreated grade of commercial heptane due to its low cost and low concentration of aromatic compounds. The final Subtask 6.4 CWF Formulation Studies Test Plan was issued. A draft version of the Subtask 6.5 Preliminary Design and Test Plan Report was also issued, discussing the progress made in the design of the bench-scale selective agglomeration unit. PDU construction work moved forward through the issuing of 26 request for quotations and 21 award packages for capital equipment.

Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C. [AMAX Research and Development Center, Golden, CO (United States)

1995-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

155

Electromechanical Mode Online Estimation using Regularized Robust RLS Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper proposes a regularized robust recursive least square (R3LS) method for on-line estimation of power-system electromechanical modes based on synchronized phasor measurement unit (PMU) data. The proposed method utilizes an autoregressive moving average exogenous (ARMAX) model to account for typical measurement data, which includes low-level pseudo-random probing, ambient, and ringdown data.? A robust objective function is utilized to reduce the negative influence from non-typical data, which include outliers and missing data. A dynamic regularization method is introduced to help include a priori knowledge about the system and reduce the influence of under-determined problems. Based on a 17-machine simulation model, it is shown through the Monte-Carlo method that the proposed R3LS method can estimate and track electromechani-cal modes by effectively using combined typical and non-typical measurement data.

Zhou, Ning; Trudnowski, Daniel; Pierre, John W.; Mittelstadt, William

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Hilbert series of Segre transform, and Castelnuovo-Mumford regularity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polynomial rings on disjoints of set of variables. For all i = 1, . . . , s, let Mi be a graded finitely generated Si-Cohen-Macaulay module. We assume that Mi = l 0Mi,l as Si-module. Let di = dim Mi, bi = di - 1 0, i = di - reg(Mi), where reg(Mi) is the Castelnuovo-Mumford regularity of Mi. If reg(Mi)

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

157

Regular ring dynamics in AX2 tetrahedral glasses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We review the experimental evidence and qualitative arguments for the existence of small highly regular rings of bonds in amorphous (a-)SiO2 and selected other AX2 tetrahedral glasses. The structure and vibrations of planar 3-rings and regular puckered 4-rings in a-SiO2 are then modeled using Born central and noncentral forces. The vibrational coupling of these rings to the more disordered glass network is modeled by attaching a Bethe lattice at each connection. The calculated vibrational properties of the breathing modes of the rings are found to be quite consistent with the observed frequencies, linewidths, and isotope shifts of the sharp lines D1 and D2 seen in the Raman spectra of a-SiO2. The results support the previous assignment of D2 (606 cm-1) to a planar 3-ring and D1 (495 cm-1) to a regular ring. Similar calculations for a-GeO2 are consistent with the suggestion that this material contains a substantial concentration of nearly planar 3-rings. Our methods can be generalized to treat similar forms of intermediate range order in glasses having other network connectivities.

R. A. Barrio; F. L. Galeener; E. Martnez; R. J. Elliott

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Exploring California PV Home Premiums  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2013) Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems in California:of the Effects of Photovoltaic Energy Systems on ResidentialEffects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home

Hoen, Ben

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Pumping Lemma for Regular Sets: Let D = (Q, , , q0, F) be a DFA.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pumping Lemma for Regular Sets: Let D = (Q, , , q0, F) be a DFA. Let n = |Q|. Let w L(D) s.t. |w(D)) Pumping Lemma for Regular Sets #12;proof: Let w L(D), |w| n, w = w1, w2, . . . , wn · u w = w1 w2 w3, 2, . . . Pumping Lemma for Regular Sets #12;Pumping Lemma for Regular Sets: Let D = (Q, , , q0, F

Immerman, Neil

160

Motion response of floating structures to regular waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Linearized and non-linear methods for analysing motion response of floating structures to regular waves are discussed in this paper. The linearized method is based upon a traditional frequency domain approach, whereas the non-linear method is based upon the time integration method as proposed by Newmark. In addition, a new approximate method is proposed. This method, which employs a Newton-Raphson solution of the equations of motion, is an extension of the linearized method and is therefore valid for near linear systems. These methods are applied to a taut line moored structure; the Aker Tethered Production Platform and to a conventional semi-submersible, the Aker H3.

B.J. Natvig; J.W. Pendered

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Phase transitions and Geometrothermodynamics of Regular black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we study the thermodynamics and state space geometry of regular black hole solutions such as Bardeen black hole, Ay\\'{o}n-Beato and Garc\\'{i}a black hole, Hayward black hole and Berej-Matyjasek-Trynieki-Wornowicz black hole. We find that all these black holes show second order thermodynamic phase transitions(SOTPT) by observing discontinuities in heat capacity-entropy graphs as well as the cusp type double point in free energy-temperature graph. Using the formulation of geometrothermodynamics we again find the singularities in the heat capacity of the black holes by calculating the curvature scalar of the Legendre invariant metric.

R. Tharanath; Jishnu Suresh; V. C. Kuriakose

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

162

Constructing a logical, regular axis topology from an irregular topology  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Constructing a logical regular topology from an irregular topology including, for each axial dimension and recursively, for each compute node in a subcommunicator until returning to a first node: adding to a logical line of the axial dimension a neighbor specified in a nearest neighbor list; calling the added compute node; determining, by the called node, whether any neighbor in the node's nearest neighbor list is available to add to the logical line; if a neighbor in the called compute node's nearest neighbor list is available to add to the logical line, adding, by the called compute node to the logical line, any neighbor in the called compute node's nearest neighbor list for the axial dimension not already added to the logical line; and, if no neighbor in the called compute node's nearest neighbor list is available to add to the logical line, returning to the calling compute node.

Faraj, Daniel A.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Constructing a logical, regular axis topology from an irregular topology  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Constructing a logical regular topology from an irregular topology including, for each axial dimension and recursively, for each compute node in a subcommunicator until returning to a first node: adding to a logical line of the axial dimension a neighbor specified in a nearest neighbor list; calling the added compute node; determining, by the called node, whether any neighbor in the node's nearest neighbor list is available to add to the logical line; if a neighbor in the called compute node's nearest neighbor list is available to add to the logical line, adding, by the called compute node to the logical line, any neighbor in the called compute node's nearest neighbor list for the axial dimension not already added to the logical line; and, if no neighbor in the called compute node's nearest neighbor list is available to add to the logical line, returning to the calling compute node.

Faraj, Daniel A.

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

164

Numerical Regularization of Electromagnetic Quantum Fluctuations in Inhomogeneous Dielectric Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electromagnetic Casimir stresses are of relevance to many technologies based on mesoscopic devices such as MEMS embedded in dielectric media, Casimir induced friction in nano-machinery, micro-fluidics and molecular electronics. Computation of such stresses based on cavity QED generally require numerical analysis based on a regularization process. A new scheme is described that has the potential for wide applicability to systems involving realistic inhomogeneous media. From a knowledge of the spectrum of the stationary modes of the electromagnetic field the scheme is illustrated by estimating numerically the Casimir stress on opposite faces of a pair of perfectly conducting planes separated by a vacuum and the change in this result when the region between the plates is filled with an incompressible inhomogeneous non-dispersive dielectric.

Shin-itiro Goto; Alison C. Hale; Robin W. Tucker; Timothy J. Walton

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

165

Regular Black Hole Metric with Three Constants of Motion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

According to the no-hair theorem, astrophysical black holes are uniquely characterized by their masses and spins and are described by the Kerr metric. Several parametric spacetimes which deviate from the Kerr metric have been proposed in order to test this theorem with observations of black holes in both the electromagnetic and gravitational-wave spectra. Such metrics often contain naked singularities or closed timelike curves in the vicinity of the compact objects that can limit the applicability of the metrics to compact objects that do not spin rapidly, and generally admit only two constants of motion. The existence of a third constant, however, can facilitate the calculation of observables, because the equations of motion can be written in first-order form. In this paper, I design a Kerr-like black hole metric which is regular everywhere outside of the event horizon, possesses three independent constants of motion, and depends nonlinearly on four free functions that parameterize potential deviations from ...

Johannsen, Tim

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

On the Moreau-Yosida regularization of the vector k-norm related ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mar 8, 2011 ... In this paper, we conduct a thorough study on the first and second order properties of the Moreau-Yosida regularization of the ..... operations. 8...

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

167

An efficient technique for writing regular expressions of special finite state machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), the regular expression of the FSM is ~1 1 (rl s(4, 2) res + rl, (E. . . )'r. ', , + r, ', , &, ?r?', , + r, ', ?&?, QrQa + ria) (17) 31 Thus, the regular expression of the FSM shown in Figure 14(b) is Rii (R (R ) R +Rci(Rug) Ra~ +R Rxig +R gR Rii +rig... of the three submachine shown in Figure 16. Thus, the regular expression of the FSM shown in Figure 15 is equal to the union of Rii Rii and R, ', . That is, i 2 3 R?= R?+ R?+ R, i. Generally, if a FSM can be decomposed into m submachine, and the regular...

Chen, Xi

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

168

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

All Grades, Areas and Formulations" All Grades, Areas and Formulations" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Regular Conventional",20,"Weekly","12/16/2013","8/20/1990" ,"Data 2","Regular Reformulated",18,"Weekly","12/16/2013","11/28/1994" ,"Data 3","Regular All Areas All Formulations",28,"Weekly","12/16/2013","8/20/1990" ,"Data 4","Midgrade Conventional",20,"Weekly","12/16/2013","11/28/1994" ,"Data 5","Midgrade Reformulated",18,"Weekly","12/16/2013","11/28/1994"

169

A continuation approach to regularization for traveltime tomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In most geometries in which seismic traveltime tomography is applied the slowness field is not well-determined from traveltimes alone. Nonuniqueness is common. Even when the slowness field is uniquely determined, small changes in the measured traveltimes can lead to large errors in the computed slowness field. A priori information is often available--well-logs, initial rough estimates of the slowness from structural geology, etc. This a priori information can be incorporated into a traveltime inversion algorithm using penalty terms. To further regularize the problem, smoothing constrains can also be incorporated using penalty terms by penalizing derivatives of the slowness field. A major decision to be made is the selection of the weights on the penalty terms, particularly the smoothing penalty weights. The authors use a continuation approach for selecting the smoothing penalty weights. Instead of fixing the smoothing penalty weights, they decrease the smoothing penalty weights in a step-by-step fashion, using the slowness model computed using the previous (larger) weights as the initial slowness model for the next step using the new (smaller) weights. A surprising outcome in synthetic problems is that the model error continues to decrease as they continue to decrease the smoothing penalty weights even after the data error had leveled off at the noise level. This continuation approach can solve synthetic problems more accurately than with fixed smoothing penalty weights, and appears to yield more features of interest in real-data applications of traveltime tomography.

Bube, K.P. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Langan, R.T. [Chevron Petroleum Technology, La Habra, CA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Black hole entanglement entropy regularized in a freely falling frame  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We compute the black hole horizon entanglement entropy SE for a massless scalar field, first with a hard cutoff and then with high frequency dispersion, both imposed in a frame that falls freely across the horizon. Using WKB methods, we find that SE is finite for a hard cutoff or superluminal dispersion, because the mode oscillations do not diverge at the horizon and the contribution of high transverse momenta is cut off by the angular momentum barrier. For subluminal dispersion, the entropy depends on the behavior at arbitrarily high transverse momenta. In all cases it scales with the horizon area. For the hard cutoff it is linear in the cutoff, rather than quadratic. This discrepancy from the familiar result arises from the difference between the free-fall frame and the static frame in which a cutoff is usually imposed. In the superluminal case the entropy scales with a fractional power of the cutoff that depends on the index of the dispersion relation. Implications for the possible relation between regularized entanglement entropy and the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy are discussed. An appendix provides an explicit derivation of the entangled, thermal nature of the near-horizon free-fall vacuum for a dispersive scalar field in four dimensions.

Ted Jacobson and Renaud Parentani

2007-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

171

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 119,409 126,351 129,240 138,077 140,629 120,215 1,091,914 1,106,473 1.7 Regular 107,403 113,871 116,502 123,871 126,317 107,784 991,801 996,970 0.9 Conventional 107,403 113,871 116,502 123,871 126,317 107,784 991,801 996,970 0.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,280 1,320 1,356 1,530 1,491 1,224 11,852 11,699 -0.9 Conventional 1,280 1,320 1,356 1,530 1,491 1,224 11,852 11,699 -0.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,726 11,160 11,382 12,676 12,821 11,207 88,261 97,804 11.2 Conventional 10,726 11,160 11,382 12,676 12,821 11,207 88,261 97,804 11.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

172

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 483,146 517,898 526,837 540,301 564,932 507,854 4,476,666 4,559,051 2.2 Regular 383,622 416,870 424,735 430,015 447,094 403,797 3,490,879 3,624,230 4.2 Conventional 76,131 87,574 90,924 99,358 103,625 85,392 752,417 777,719 3.7 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 307,491 329,296 333,811 330,657 343,469 318,405 2,738,462 2,846,511 4.3 Midgrade 36,183 38,726 38,791 40,369 42,027 36,317 375,934 340,976 -9.0 Conventional 4,848 5,549 5,989 7,246 7,514 5,617 60,295 52,990 -11.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 31,335 33,177 32,802 33,123 34,513 30,700 315,639 287,986 -8.4 Premium 63,341 62,302 63,311 69,917 75,811 67,740 609,853 593,845 -2.3

173

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 103,710 107,583 128,992 122,068 133,706 136,216 727,503 732,275 0.1 Regular 87,146 89,279 112,686 106,242 115,310 117,202 598,517 627,865 4.3 Conventional 47,766 48,793 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 39,380 40,486 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – W – NA Midgrade 6,076 6,783 6,276 5,802 6,492 6,793 50,651 38,222 -25.0 Conventional 3,128 3,568 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,948 3,215 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,488 11,521 10,030 10,024 11,904 12,221 W 66,188 NA Conventional 5,684 6,316 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,804 5,205 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

174

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 507,854 551,005 519,384 532,551 507,798 473,140 930,735 980,938 5.4 Regular 403,797 439,428 413,569 423,893 404,830 375,054 734,113 779,884 6.2 Conventional 85,392 90,979 84,964 85,820 86,681 79,490 155,254 166,171 7.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 318,405 348,449 328,605 338,073 318,149 295,564 578,859 613,713 6.0 Midgrade 36,317 37,629 34,336 34,877 33,314 31,586 71,456 64,900 -9.2 Conventional 5,617 5,829 5,231 5,343 5,332 4,984 10,809 10,316 -4.6 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 30,700 31,800 29,105 29,534 27,982 26,602 60,647 54,584 -10.0 Premium 67,740 73,948 71,479 73,781 69,654 66,500 125,166 136,154 8.8

175

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 133,706 137,219 136,075 139,236 130,776 128,461 1,295,616 1,267,826 -2.5 Regular 115,310 117,700 117,117 118,534 113,616 111,521 1,079,234 1,089,151 0.6 Conventional W W W W W 82,755 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 28,766 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,492 6,744 6,728 7,311 6,170 6,296 81,920 64,678 -21.3 Conventional W W W W W 4,406 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 1,890 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,904 12,775 12,230 13,391 10,990 10,644 134,462 113,997 -15.5 Conventional W W W W W 7,778 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 2,866 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

176

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 522,909 496,923 511,860 469,410 527,337 464,928 480,036 464,928 -3.1 Regular 383,811 368,609 381,794 351,762 397,163 352,437 339,080 352,437 3.9 Conventional 89,198 83,179 85,363 77,639 84,422 74,152 49,126 74,152 50.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 294,613 285,430 296,431 274,123 312,741 278,285 289,954 278,285 -4.0 Midgrade 53,258 49,512 50,511 45,003 49,862 42,715 49,981 42,715 -14.5 Conventional 9,746 8,535 8,326 7,099 7,742 6,825 5,463 6,825 24.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 43,512 40,977 42,185 37,904 42,120 35,890 44,518 35,890 -19.4 Premium 85,840 78,802 79,555 72,645 80,312 69,776 90,975 69,776 -23.3

177

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 121,599 126,592 126,169 141,479 140,449 137,146 1,173,202 1,140,517 -3.1 Regular 107,152 113,569 111,791 124,284 123,026 121,321 1,018,510 1,004,959 -1.7 Conventional W W W W W 93,225 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,106 3,739 3,923 4,403 4,610 4,305 47,837 38,143 -20.6 Conventional W W W W W 3,682 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,341 9,284 10,455 12,792 12,813 11,520 106,855 97,415 -9.2 Conventional W W W W W 9,730 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

178

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 115,008 129,009 135,752 132,774 149,898 146,040 1,057,561 1,034,025 -2.2 Regular 102,049 114,076 117,825 114,646 128,881 126,677 904,267 896,639 -0.8 Conventional W 98,123 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W 15,953 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,397 4,632 5,351 5,367 6,079 5,748 49,203 42,984 -12.6 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,562 10,301 12,576 12,761 14,938 13,615 104,091 94,402 -9.3 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

179

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 532,551 507,798 471,966 528,923 525,025 563,267 2,419,127 2,596,979 7.4 Regular 423,893 404,830 374,051 423,574 425,312 450,585 1,918,589 2,078,352 8.3 Conventional 85,820 86,681 78,103 84,785 84,632 94,085 398,420 428,286 7.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 338,073 318,149 295,948 338,789 340,680 356,500 1,520,169 1,650,066 8.5 Midgrade 34,877 33,314 31,476 35,018 33,447 37,176 183,472 170,431 -7.1 Conventional 5,343 5,332 4,965 5,126 4,880 5,761 26,624 26,064 -2.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 29,534 27,982 26,511 29,892 28,567 31,415 156,848 144,367 -8.0 Premium 73,781 69,654 66,439 70,331 66,266 75,506 317,066 348,196 9.8

180

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 496,452 488,936 430,725 477,184 488,726 508,061 2,376,555 2,393,632 1.4 Regular 445,406 439,340 387,401 428,557 437,307 450,215 2,130,982 2,142,820 1.2 Conventional 89,443 92,274 83,145 88,943 93,114 96,168 398,967 453,644 14.5 Reformulated 355,963 347,066 304,256 339,614 344,193 354,047 1,732,015 1,689,176 -1.8 Midgrade 8,190 7,994 7,243 7,978 7,840 8,951 40,963 40,006 -1.7 Conventional 903 921 836 886 867 1,111 4,252 4,621 9.4 Reformulated 7,287 7,073 6,407 7,092 6,973 7,840 36,711 35,385 -3.0 Premium 42,856 41,602 36,081 40,649 43,579 48,895 204,610 210,806 3.7 Conventional 4,150 4,510 3,841 4,051 5,033 5,533 20,695 22,968 11.7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 106,552 112,818 127,713 121,599 126,592 126,169 738,087 721,443 -2.8 Regular 92,915 98,586 112,315 107,152 113,569 111,791 641,081 636,328 -1.3 Conventional W 61,721 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W 36,865 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,270 4,425 4,362 4,106 3,739 3,923 31,157 24,825 -20.8 Conventional 2,157 2,245 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,113 2,180 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,367 9,807 11,036 10,341 9,284 10,455 65,849 60,290 -8.9 Conventional W 5,377 9,727 W W W W W NA Oxygenated W 4,430 1,309 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

182

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 555,511 521,124 527,101 509,281 530,764 461,105 504,188 461,105 -8.5 Regular 496,300 466,275 472,106 456,590 476,567 414,239 452,854 414,239 -8.5 Conventional 103,140 92,473 90,578 83,269 85,583 77,162 87,933 77,162 -12.2 Reformulated 393,160 373,802 381,528 373,321 390,984 337,077 364,921 337,077 -7.6 Midgrade 10,283 9,258 9,110 8,696 8,813 7,806 9,657 7,806 -19.2 Conventional 1,439 1,091 965 882 905 832 1,073 832 -22.5 Reformulated 8,844 8,167 8,145 7,814 7,908 6,974 8,584 6,974 -18.8 Premium 48,928 45,591 45,885 43,995 45,384 39,060 41,677 39,060 -6.3 Conventional 7,090 5,477 5,106 4,337 4,314 3,926 4,769 3,926 -17.7

183

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 113,339 129,220 103,710 107,583 128,992 122,057 485,992 462,342 -5.7 Regular 93,150 106,433 87,146 89,279 112,686 106,233 400,133 395,344 -2.0 Conventional 53,121 58,414 47,766 48,793 W W W W NA Oxygenated 40,029 48,019 39,380 40,486 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – W – NA Midgrade 7,437 8,430 6,076 6,783 6,276 5,802 33,765 24,937 -26.8 Conventional 3,943 4,377 3,128 3,568 W W W W NA Oxygenated 3,494 4,053 2,948 3,215 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,752 14,357 10,488 11,521 10,030 10,022 W 42,061 NA Conventional 7,016 7,564 5,684 6,316 W W W W NA Oxygenated 5,736 6,793 4,804 5,205 W W W W NA

184

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 131,902 130,122 116,547 121,960 106,552 112,814 225,544 219,366 -4.4 Regular 114,896 112,836 100,676 105,782 92,915 98,582 192,485 191,497 -2.2 Conventional W 85,371 61,541 W W 61,717 119,723 W NA Oxygenated W 27,465 39,135 W W 36,865 72,762 W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,965 5,059 4,888 4,985 4,270 4,425 11,410 8,695 -25.1 Conventional W 3,614 2,496 2,445 2,157 2,245 7,291 4,402 -40.6 Oxygenated W 1,445 2,392 2,540 2,113 2,180 4,119 4,293 2.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,041 12,227 10,983 11,193 9,367 9,807 21,649 19,174 -12.9 Conventional W 9,096 6,224 W W 5,377 12,852 W NA

185

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Definitions Key Terms Definition Bulk Sales Wholesale sales of gasoline in individual transactions which exceed the size of a truckload. Dealer Tank Wagon Sales (DTW) Wholesale sales of gasoline priced on a delivered basis to a retail outlet. Gas Plant Operator Any firm, including a gas plant owner, which operates a gas plant and keeps the gas plant records. A gas plant is a facility in which natural gas liquids are separated from natural gas or in which natural gas liquids are fractionated or otherwise separated into natural gas liquid products or both. For the purposes of this survey, gas plant operator data are contained in the refiner categories. Gasoline Grades The classification of gasoline by octane ratings. Each type of gasoline (conventional and reformulated) is classified by three grades - regular, midgrade, and premium. Note: gasoline sales are reported by grade in accordance with their classification at the time of sale. In general, automotive octane requirements are lower at high altitudes. Therefore, in some areas of the United States, such as the Rocky Mountain States, the octane ratings for the gasoline grades may be 2 or more octane points lower.

186

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 116,937 123,361 112,056 110,080 126,845 126,596 473,447 475,577 0.4 Regular 105,946 112,014 101,850 99,730 115,120 115,029 429,613 431,729 0.5 Conventional 105,946 112,014 101,850 99,730 115,120 115,029 429,613 431,729 0.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,727 1,817 1,577 1,542 1,756 1,690 6,854 6,565 -4.2 Conventional 1,727 1,817 1,577 1,542 1,756 1,690 6,854 6,565 -4.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,264 9,530 8,629 8,808 9,969 9,877 36,980 37,283 0.8 Conventional 9,264 9,530 8,629 8,808 9,969 9,877 36,980 37,283 0.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

187

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 114,483 117,639 115,793 109,751 115,008 123,438 497,821 463,990 -6.8 Regular 96,041 99,099 98,040 94,445 102,049 108,904 427,645 403,438 -5.7 Conventional 59,921 61,268 60,258 59,465 W W W W NA Oxygenated 36,120 37,831 37,782 34,980 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,121 6,193 5,943 5,467 4,397 4,764 23,473 20,571 -12.4 Conventional 3,531 3,743 3,737 3,554 W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,590 2,450 2,206 1,913 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,321 12,347 11,810 9,839 8,562 9,770 46,703 39,981 -14.4 Conventional 7,264 7,339 6,945 5,907 W W W W NA Oxygenated 5,057 5,008 4,865 3,932 W W W W NA

188

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 485,599 445,136 487,348 483,146 517,898 526,698 2,913,722 2,945,825 1.7 Regular 382,693 351,420 383,984 383,622 416,870 424,633 2,269,099 2,343,222 3.8 Conventional 81,128 74,126 79,461 76,131 87,574 90,822 473,047 489,242 4.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 301,565 277,294 304,523 307,491 329,296 333,811 1,796,052 1,853,980 3.8 Midgrade 37,658 33,798 37,107 36,183 38,726 38,776 246,954 222,248 -9.5 Conventional 5,706 5,103 5,418 4,848 5,549 5,974 37,910 32,598 -13.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 31,952 28,695 31,689 31,335 33,177 32,802 209,044 189,650 -8.8 Premium 65,248 59,918 66,257 63,341 62,302 63,289 397,669 380,355 -3.8

189

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 129,009 135,752 132,774 149,898 143,203 131,902 1,185,472 1,163,090 -1.9 Regular 114,076 117,825 114,646 128,881 124,038 114,896 1,012,987 1,008,896 -0.4 Conventional 98,123 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 15,953 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,632 5,351 5,367 6,079 5,748 4,965 55,269 47,949 -13.2 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,301 12,576 12,761 14,938 13,417 12,041 117,216 106,245 -9.4 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

190

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 141,479 140,449 137,146 123,384 123,443 132,860 1,541,831 1,520,204 -1.7 Regular 124,284 123,026 121,321 108,630 108,923 116,374 1,337,804 1,338,886 -0.2 Conventional W W 93,225 80,733 66,084 71,013 W W NA Oxygenated W W NA NA 42,839 45,361 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,403 4,610 4,305 4,157 4,294 4,477 62,769 51,071 -18.9 Conventional W W 3,682 2,831 2,131 2,141 W W NA Oxygenated W W NA 1,326 2,163 2,336 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,792 12,813 11,520 10,597 10,226 12,009 141,258 130,247 -8.0 Conventional W W 9,730 7,507 5,628 6,834 W W NA Oxygenated W W NA 3,090 4,598 5,175 W W NA

191

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 121,960 106,552 112,818 127,713 121,599 126,564 605,313 595,246 -2.3 Regular 105,782 92,915 98,586 112,315 107,152 113,546 526,435 524,514 -1.0 Conventional W W 61,721 W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W 36,865 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,985 4,270 4,425 4,362 4,106 3,734 25,790 20,897 -19.5 Conventional 2,445 2,157 2,245 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,540 2,113 2,180 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,193 9,367 9,807 11,036 10,341 9,284 53,088 49,835 -6.7 Conventional W W 5,377 9,727 W W W W NA Oxygenated W W 4,430 1,309 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

192

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 125,808 119,737 113,339 129,220 103,710 107,583 240,789 211,293 -13.7 Regular 104,798 99,178 93,150 106,433 87,146 89,279 197,956 176,425 -12.4 Conventional W 72,818 53,121 58,414 47,766 48,793 W 96,559 NA Oxygenated W 26,360 40,029 48,019 39,380 40,486 81,481 79,866 -3.6 Reformulated – – – – – [–] W – NA Midgrade 7,653 7,656 7,437 8,430 6,076 6,783 16,533 12,859 -23.5 Conventional W 5,046 3,943 4,377 3,128 3,568 8,292 6,696 -20.6 Oxygenated W 2,610 3,494 4,053 2,948 3,215 8,241 6,163 -26.5 Reformulated – – – – – [–] – – – Premium 13,357 12,903 12,752 14,357 10,488 11,521 W 22,009 NA

193

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 110,080 126,845 126,596 134,691 134,417 146,382 877,080 891,067 1.6 Regular 99,730 115,120 115,029 121,891 121,352 131,690 793,415 806,662 1.7 Conventional 99,730 115,120 115,029 121,891 121,352 131,690 793,415 806,662 1.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,542 1,756 1,690 1,760 1,750 1,919 12,683 11,994 -5.4 Conventional 1,542 1,756 1,690 1,760 1,750 1,919 12,683 11,994 -5.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,808 9,969 9,877 11,040 11,315 12,773 70,982 72,411 2.0 Conventional 8,808 9,969 9,877 11,040 11,315 12,773 70,982 72,411 2.0 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

194

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 125,271 127,361 115,819 113,187 130,255 126,993 462,353 486,254 6.0 Regular 108,520 109,905 99,816 97,998 111,793 109,367 395,353 418,974 6.9 Conventional 62,396 62,355 55,542 53,186 W W W W NA Oxygenated 46,124 47,550 44,274 44,812 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,420 6,738 5,913 5,424 6,711 6,086 24,937 24,134 -2.4 Conventional 3,840 3,681 3,428 2,863 6,196 W W W NA Oxygenated 2,580 3,057 2,485 2,561 515 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,331 10,718 10,090 9,765 11,751 11,540 42,063 43,146 3.4 Conventional 5,564 5,846 5,492 5,053 10,535 W W W NA Oxygenated 4,767 4,872 4,598 4,712 1,216 W W W NA

195

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 122,068 133,706 137,219 136,075 139,236 130,776 1,168,496 1,139,365 -2.8 Regular 106,242 115,310 117,700 117,117 118,534 113,616 972,177 977,630 0.2 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,802 6,492 6,744 6,728 7,311 6,170 74,458 58,382 -21.9 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,024 11,904 12,775 12,230 13,391 10,990 121,861 103,353 -15.5 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

196

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 506,958 545,539 557,326 578,792 575,573 533,235 5,013,394 4,817,378 -3.9 Regular 446,104 480,482 489,993 505,930 503,624 465,652 4,287,269 4,222,778 -1.5 Conventional 88,991 98,590 106,317 115,384 117,509 101,392 860,025 894,858 4.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 357,113 381,892 383,676 390,546 386,115 364,260 3,427,244 3,327,920 -2.9 Midgrade 18,128 19,540 20,189 22,411 22,431 18,855 223,642 177,820 -20.5 Conventional 2,220 2,548 2,831 3,825 3,614 2,661 32,067 24,885 -22.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 15,908 16,992 17,358 18,586 18,817 16,194 191,575 152,935 -20.2 Premium 42,726 45,517 47,144 50,451 49,518 48,728 502,483 416,780 -17.1

197

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 127,713 121,599 126,592 126,169 141,479 140,449 1,041,300 1,003,371 -4.0 Regular 112,315 107,152 113,569 111,791 124,284 123,026 903,614 883,638 -2.6 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,362 4,106 3,739 3,923 4,403 4,610 42,872 33,838 -21.4 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,036 10,341 9,284 10,455 12,792 12,813 94,814 85,895 -9.8 Conventional 9,727 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 1,309 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

198

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,169 141,479 140,449 137,146 123,384 121,162 1,419,871 1,385,063 -2.7 Regular 111,791 124,284 123,026 121,321 108,630 106,804 1,232,022 1,220,393 -1.2 Conventional W W W 93,225 80,733 64,938 W W NA Oxygenated W W W NA NA 41,866 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,923 4,403 4,610 4,305 4,157 4,284 57,784 46,584 -19.6 Conventional W W W 3,682 2,831 2,130 W W NA Oxygenated W W W NA 1,326 2,154 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,455 12,792 12,813 11,520 10,597 10,074 130,065 118,086 -9.5 Conventional W W W 9,730 7,507 5,559 W W NA Oxygenated W W W NA 3,090 4,515 W W NA

199

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 517,898 526,837 540,301 564,932 507,854 551,003 4,990,670 5,110,054 2.7 Regular 416,870 424,735 430,015 447,094 403,797 439,426 3,896,856 4,063,656 4.6 Conventional 87,574 90,924 99,358 103,625 85,392 90,977 844,768 868,696 3.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 329,296 333,811 330,657 343,469 318,405 348,449 3,052,088 3,194,960 5.0 Midgrade 38,726 38,791 40,369 42,027 36,317 37,629 416,116 378,605 -8.7 Conventional 5,549 5,989 7,246 7,514 5,617 5,829 66,363 58,819 -11.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 33,177 32,802 33,123 34,513 30,700 31,800 349,753 319,786 -8.3 Premium 62,302 63,311 69,917 75,811 67,740 73,948 677,698 667,793 -1.1

200

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 580,742 556,122 584,646 525,232 495,628 553,048 1,617,006 1,573,908 -1.6 Regular 492,401 473,300 495,194 443,125 418,949 471,700 1,338,260 1,333,774 0.8 Conventional 99,633 93,097 97,753 89,276 84,235 92,353 265,100 265,864 1.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 392,768 380,203 397,441 353,849 334,714 379,347 1,073,160 1,067,910 0.6 Midgrade 27,555 24,969 26,978 25,145 23,637 25,345 87,880 74,127 -14.7 Conventional 4,083 3,397 3,613 3,520 3,396 3,436 12,677 10,352 -17.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 23,472 21,572 23,365 21,625 20,241 21,909 75,203 63,775 -14.3 Premium 60,786 57,853 62,474 56,962 53,042 56,003 190,866 166,007 -12.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 124,695 128,129 139,212 139,507 142,185 127,373 1,195,427 1,155,359 -3.4 Regular 112,510 115,823 125,667 124,434 126,339 113,384 1,074,003 1,035,130 -3.6 Conventional 112,510 115,823 125,667 124,434 126,339 113,384 W 1,035,130 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,958 2,859 3,031 3,341 3,503 2,965 31,059 27,915 -10.1 Conventional 2,958 2,859 3,031 3,341 3,503 2,965 W 27,915 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,227 9,447 10,514 11,732 12,343 11,024 90,365 92,314 2.2 Conventional 9,227 9,447 10,514 11,732 12,343 11,024 W 92,314 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

202

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 122,936 133,205 139,935 139,701 142,976 125,846 1,131,379 1,167,604 3.6 Regular 110,833 118,938 124,805 123,746 127,337 112,893 995,838 1,038,492 4.7 Conventional W 99,124 W 103,498 W 91,616 W W NA Oxygenated W 19,814 W 20,248 W 21,277 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,183 3,610 3,716 3,912 3,977 3,371 38,032 33,470 -11.7 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,920 10,657 11,414 12,043 11,662 9,582 97,509 95,642 -1.6 Conventional 7,806 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 1,114 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

203

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 119,409 126,351 129,240 138,077 140,629 120,215 1,091,914 1,106,473 1.7 Regular 107,403 113,871 116,502 123,871 126,317 107,784 991,801 996,970 0.9 Conventional 107,403 113,871 116,502 123,871 126,317 107,784 991,801 996,970 0.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,280 1,320 1,356 1,530 1,491 1,224 11,852 11,699 -0.9 Conventional 1,280 1,320 1,356 1,530 1,491 1,224 11,852 11,699 -0.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,726 11,160 11,382 12,676 12,821 11,207 88,261 97,804 11.2 Conventional 10,726 11,160 11,382 12,676 12,821 11,207 88,261 97,804 11.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

204

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 143,657 132,937 131,479 120,805 126,608 113,004 112,056 113,004 0.8 Regular 129,325 120,067 118,905 109,582 114,523 103,156 101,850 103,156 1.3 Conventional 129,325 120,067 118,905 109,582 114,523 103,156 101,850 103,156 1.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,903 1,721 1,668 1,545 1,739 1,231 1,577 1,231 -21.9 Conventional 1,903 1,721 1,668 1,545 1,739 1,231 1,577 1,231 -21.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,429 11,149 10,906 9,678 10,346 8,617 8,629 8,617 -0.1 Conventional 12,429 11,149 10,906 9,678 10,346 8,617 8,629 8,617 -0.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

205

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 119,493 110,992 117,088 108,674 122,452 125,233 480,923 473,447 -0.7 Regular 108,458 100,387 106,414 98,792 111,102 113,305 436,094 429,613 -0.7 Conventional 108,458 100,387 106,414 98,792 111,102 113,305 436,094 429,613 -0.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,769 1,792 1,666 1,581 1,792 1,815 9,695 6,854 -28.7 Conventional 1,769 1,792 1,666 1,581 1,792 1,815 9,695 6,854 -28.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,266 8,813 9,008 8,301 9,558 10,113 35,134 36,980 6.1 Conventional 9,266 8,813 9,008 8,301 9,558 10,113 35,134 36,980 6.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

206

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 551,005 519,384 532,551 507,798 471,966 528,669 1,418,083 1,508,433 6.4 Regular 439,428 413,569 423,893 404,830 374,051 423,343 1,118,097 1,202,224 7.5 Conventional 90,979 84,964 85,820 86,681 78,103 85,079 234,715 249,863 6.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 348,449 328,605 338,073 318,149 295,948 338,264 883,382 952,361 7.8 Midgrade 37,629 34,336 34,877 33,314 31,476 35,066 108,563 99,856 -8.0 Conventional 5,829 5,231 5,343 5,332 4,965 5,145 16,227 15,442 -4.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 31,800 29,105 29,534 27,982 26,511 29,921 92,336 84,414 -8.6 Premium 73,948 71,479 73,781 69,654 66,439 70,260 191,423 206,353 7.8

207

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 111,114 105,103 116,335 119,409 126,351 129,240 705,523 707,552 0.8 Regular 100,685 95,316 105,221 107,403 113,871 116,502 642,680 638,998 0.0 Conventional 100,685 95,316 105,221 107,403 113,871 116,502 642,680 638,998 0.0 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,145 1,088 1,265 1,280 1,320 1,356 7,530 7,454 -0.5 Conventional 1,145 1,088 1,265 1,280 1,320 1,356 7,530 7,454 -0.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,284 8,699 9,849 10,726 11,160 11,382 55,313 61,100 11.1 Conventional 9,284 8,699 9,849 10,726 11,160 11,382 55,313 61,100 11.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

208

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 135,752 132,774 149,898 143,203 131,902 125,448 1,317,924 1,288,538 -2.2 Regular 117,825 114,646 128,881 124,038 114,896 108,917 1,125,200 1,117,813 -0.7 Conventional W W W W W 86,345 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 22,572 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,351 5,367 6,079 5,748 4,965 4,740 61,812 52,689 -14.8 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,576 12,761 14,938 13,417 12,041 11,791 130,912 118,036 -9.8 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

209

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 118,909 110,150 125,199 124,695 128,129 139,212 767,530 746,294 -2.8 Regular 106,914 97,816 112,243 112,510 115,823 125,667 690,590 670,973 -2.8 Conventional 106,914 97,816 112,243 112,510 115,823 125,667 W 670,973 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,106 3,096 3,056 2,958 2,859 3,031 20,248 18,106 -10.6 Conventional 3,106 3,096 3,056 2,958 2,859 3,031 W 18,106 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,889 9,238 9,900 9,227 9,447 10,514 56,692 57,215 0.9 Conventional 8,889 9,238 9,900 9,227 9,447 10,514 W 57,215 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

210

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 127,703 122,936 133,205 139,935 139,701 142,976 998,548 1,041,758 4.8 Regular 113,498 110,833 118,938 124,805 123,746 127,337 878,533 925,599 5.8 Conventional 91,743 W 99,124 W 103,498 W W W NA Oxygenated 21,755 W 19,814 W 20,248 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,705 3,183 3,610 3,716 3,912 3,977 33,818 30,099 -10.6 Conventional 3,187 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 518 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,500 8,920 10,657 11,414 12,043 11,662 86,197 86,060 0.3 Conventional 8,746 7,806 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated NA 1,114 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

211

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 520,563 494,955 496,452 488,936 430,725 476,239 1,394,949 1,395,900 1.2 Regular 467,394 442,377 445,406 439,340 387,401 427,559 1,253,307 1,254,300 1.2 Conventional 98,631 89,489 89,443 92,274 83,145 88,569 232,570 263,988 14.8 Reformulated 368,763 352,888 355,963 347,066 304,256 338,990 1,020,737 990,312 -1.9 Midgrade 8,844 8,424 8,190 7,994 7,243 7,992 23,623 23,229 -0.6 Conventional 1,015 881 903 921 836 886 2,431 2,643 9.9 Reformulated 7,829 7,543 7,287 7,073 6,407 7,106 21,192 20,586 -1.8 Premium 44,325 44,154 42,856 41,602 36,081 40,688 118,019 118,371 1.4 Conventional 4,696 4,075 4,150 4,510 3,841 4,051 11,814 12,402 6.1

212

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 545,541 567,208 520,002 553,717 553,949 505,933 1,017,514 1,059,882 2.4 Regular 452,103 468,190 426,231 451,348 455,314 417,681 826,695 872,995 3.8 Conventional 92,595 96,551 84,706 90,958 89,720 83,902 172,442 173,622 -1.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 359,508 371,639 341,525 360,390 365,594 333,779 654,253 699,373 5.1 Midgrade 30,416 31,258 29,317 32,045 31,218 27,952 65,171 59,170 -10.7 Conventional 4,820 4,956 4,291 4,765 4,659 4,089 10,378 8,748 -17.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 25,596 26,302 25,026 27,280 26,559 23,863 54,793 50,422 -9.5 Premium 63,022 67,760 64,454 70,324 67,417 60,300 125,648 127,717 0.0

213

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 507,798 471,966 528,923 525,025 566,449 561,919 2,945,964 3,162,080 7.3 Regular 404,830 374,051 423,574 425,312 453,084 447,496 2,343,324 2,528,347 7.9 Conventional 86,681 78,103 84,785 84,632 94,055 93,656 489,344 521,912 6.7 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 318,149 295,948 338,789 340,680 359,029 353,840 1,853,980 2,006,435 8.2 Midgrade 33,314 31,476 35,018 33,447 37,392 37,173 222,263 207,820 -6.5 Conventional 5,332 4,965 5,126 4,880 5,763 5,925 32,613 31,991 -1.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 27,982 26,511 29,892 28,567 31,629 31,248 189,650 175,829 -7.3 Premium 69,654 66,439 70,331 66,266 75,973 77,250 380,377 425,913 12.0

214

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 139,935 139,701 142,976 125,585 133,383 132,214 1,375,367 1,432,940 4.5 Regular 124,805 123,746 127,337 112,647 119,751 117,558 1,210,807 1,275,555 5.7 Conventional W 103,498 W 91,370 82,252 69,032 W W NA Oxygenated W 20,248 W 21,277 37,499 48,526 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,716 3,912 3,977 3,370 3,629 3,715 46,503 40,813 -12.0 Conventional W W W W 2,182 1,558 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 1,447 2,157 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,414 12,043 11,662 9,568 10,003 10,941 118,057 116,572 -1.0 Conventional W W W W 6,316 5,317 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 3,687 5,624 W W NA

215

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 120,530 123,655 110,788 128,326 135,052 144,606 623,613 642,427 3.0 Regular 102,740 105,511 94,520 110,336 117,278 124,693 536,897 552,338 2.9 Conventional 54,646 56,780 53,384 91,767 W W W W NA Oxygenated 48,094 48,731 41,136 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,178 6,168 5,450 6,010 5,845 6,363 30,684 29,836 -2.8 Conventional 3,547 3,392 3,052 5,351 W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,631 2,776 2,398 659 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,612 11,976 10,818 11,980 11,929 13,550 56,032 60,253 7.5 Conventional 6,254 6,016 5,941 10,395 W W W W NA Oxygenated 5,358 5,960 4,877 1,585 W W W W NA

216

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 124,392 117,292 115,606 122,264 125,761 130,716 607,082 611,639 0.1 Regular 112,370 106,132 104,410 111,432 114,120 119,277 545,306 555,371 1.2 Conventional 112,370 106,132 104,410 111,432 114,120 119,277 545,306 555,371 1.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,693 2,570 2,491 2,207 2,427 2,168 15,075 11,863 -21.8 Conventional 2,693 2,570 2,491 2,207 2,427 2,168 15,075 11,863 -21.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,329 8,590 8,705 8,625 9,214 9,271 46,701 44,405 -5.5 Conventional 9,329 8,590 8,705 8,625 9,214 9,271 46,701 44,405 -5.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

217

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 488,936 430,725 477,184 488,726 508,081 505,974 2,896,881 2,899,626 0.6 Regular 439,340 387,401 428,557 437,307 450,215 447,456 2,593,573 2,590,276 0.4 Conventional 92,274 83,145 88,943 93,114 96,168 96,218 497,347 549,862 11.2 Reformulated 347,066 304,256 339,614 344,193 354,047 351,238 2,096,226 2,040,414 -2.1 Midgrade 7,994 7,243 7,978 7,840 8,971 9,185 50,458 49,211 -1.9 Conventional 921 836 886 867 1,110 1,165 5,446 5,785 6.8 Reformulated 7,073 6,407 7,092 6,973 7,861 8,020 45,012 43,426 -3.0 Premium 41,602 36,081 40,649 43,579 48,895 49,333 252,850 260,139 3.5 Conventional 4,510 3,841 4,051 5,033 5,533 6,005 26,640 28,973 9.4

218

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 118,555 116,747 127,703 122,936 133,205 140,007 721,443 759,153 5.8 Regular 104,022 102,420 113,498 110,833 118,938 124,871 636,328 674,582 6.6 Conventional 61,295 61,912 91,743 W 99,124 W W W NA Oxygenated 42,727 40,508 21,755 W 19,814 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,122 3,874 3,705 3,183 3,610 3,716 24,825 22,210 -10.0 Conventional 1,960 1,900 3,187 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,162 1,974 518 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,411 10,453 10,500 8,920 10,657 11,420 60,290 62,361 4.0 Conventional 5,562 5,909 8,746 7,806 W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,849 4,544 NA 1,114 W W W W NA

219

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 515,841 536,199 510,224 545,228 504,188 468,538 960,722 972,726 1.2 Regular 455,816 474,668 453,976 487,995 452,854 420,289 859,766 873,143 1.6 Conventional 92,476 93,958 87,267 92,950 87,933 82,130 162,053 170,063 4.9 Reformulated 363,340 380,710 366,709 395,045 364,921 338,159 697,713 703,080 0.8 Midgrade 10,972 11,173 10,401 10,787 9,657 8,794 20,005 18,451 -7.8 Conventional 1,284 1,244 1,061 1,144 1,073 974 2,129 2,047 -3.9 Reformulated 9,688 9,929 9,340 9,643 8,584 7,820 17,876 16,404 -8.2 Premium 49,053 50,358 45,847 46,446 41,677 39,455 80,951 81,132 0.2 Conventional 6,229 5,648 4,458 4,797 4,769 4,624 9,157 9,393 2.6

220

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 509,281 530,764 461,105 446,330 487,514 467,445 1,984,705 1,862,394 -6.9 Regular 456,590 476,567 414,239 400,799 438,269 419,689 1,786,214 1,672,996 -7.1 Conventional 83,269 85,583 77,162 75,965 79,443 76,333 335,511 308,903 -8.7 Reformulated 373,321 390,984 337,077 324,834 358,826 343,356 1,450,703 1,364,093 -6.7 Midgrade 8,696 8,813 7,806 7,543 8,274 8,141 36,428 31,764 -13.5 Conventional 882 905 832 793 806 750 3,942 3,181 -20.0 Reformulated 7,814 7,908 6,974 6,750 7,468 7,391 32,486 28,583 -12.7 Premium 43,995 45,384 39,060 37,988 40,971 39,615 162,063 157,634 -3.5 Conventional 4,337 4,314 3,926 3,956 3,932 3,590 16,900 15,404 -9.6

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 133,205 139,935 139,701 142,976 125,585 133,383 1,255,313 1,300,726 4.0 Regular 118,938 124,805 123,746 127,337 112,647 119,751 1,104,865 1,157,997 5.2 Conventional 99,124 W 103,498 W 91,370 82,252 W W NA Oxygenated 19,814 W 20,248 W 21,277 37,499 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,610 3,716 3,912 3,977 3,370 3,629 42,259 37,098 -11.9 Conventional W W W W W 2,182 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 1,447 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,657 11,414 12,043 11,662 9,568 10,003 108,189 105,631 -2.0 Conventional W W W W W 6,316 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 3,687 W W NA

222

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine Maine Motor Gasoline 59,884 62,599 63,465 72,088 72,911 59,813 503,187 554,952 10.7 Regular 56,559 59,138 59,685 67,043 67,739 56,214 474,245 523,059 10.7 Conventional 56,559 59,138 59,685 67,043 67,739 56,214 474,245 523,059 10.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 490 701 745 1,037 1,017 571 5,636 5,995 6.8 Conventional 490 701 745 1,037 1,017 571 5,636 5,995 6.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 2,835 2,760 3,035 4,008 4,155 3,028 23,306 25,898 11.5 Conventional 2,835 2,760 3,035 4,008 4,155 3,028 23,306 25,898 11.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W No. 1 Distillate W W W W W W W W NA

223

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 544,776 585,964 544,609 570,066 532,203 487,119 979,764 1,019,322 4.0 Regular 433,667 470,192 438,253 459,523 428,774 399,696 778,881 828,470 6.4 Conventional 91,845 98,835 90,774 95,486 90,155 83,021 164,784 173,176 5.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 341,822 371,357 347,479 364,037 338,619 316,675 614,097 655,294 6.7 Midgrade 35,957 37,629 35,045 36,612 35,132 29,913 64,790 65,045 0.4 Conventional 5,748 5,973 5,333 5,575 5,644 4,757 10,297 10,401 1.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 30,209 31,656 29,712 31,037 29,488 25,156 54,493 54,644 0.3 Premium 75,152 78,143 71,311 73,931 68,297 57,510 136,093 125,807 -7.6

224

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 523,744 573,398 571,866 610,670 616,068 545,544 4,908,400 4,992,566 1.7 Regular 432,090 465,864 462,449 488,921 499,355 452,096 3,914,132 4,068,858 4.0 Conventional 86,165 94,205 96,905 106,748 109,285 92,588 829,429 847,392 2.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 345,925 371,659 365,544 382,173 390,070 359,508 3,084,703 3,221,466 4.4 Midgrade 30,510 34,242 34,914 38,917 38,243 30,421 326,185 304,156 -6.8 Conventional 4,179 5,204 5,476 6,910 6,876 4,825 52,810 48,332 -8.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 26,331 29,038 29,438 32,007 31,367 25,596 273,375 255,824 -6.4 Premium 61,144 73,292 74,503 82,832 78,470 63,027 668,083 619,552 -7.3

225

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,592 126,169 141,479 140,449 137,146 135,752 1,303,324 1,276,269 -2.4 Regular 113,569 111,791 124,284 123,026 121,321 119,328 1,131,346 1,124,287 -0.9 Conventional W W W W 93,225 80,733 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W NA NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,739 3,923 4,403 4,610 4,305 4,642 52,896 42,785 -19.4 Conventional W W W W 3,682 2,831 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W NA NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,284 10,455 12,792 12,813 11,520 11,782 119,082 109,197 -8.6 Conventional W W W W 9,730 7,507 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W NA NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

226

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 115,819 113,187 130,255 126,911 137,441 135,583 733,278 759,196 4.1 Regular 99,816 97,998 111,793 109,294 117,996 117,302 628,363 654,199 4.7 Conventional 55,542 53,186 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 44,274 44,812 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,913 5,424 6,711 6,086 6,550 6,371 38,173 37,055 -2.4 Conventional 3,428 2,863 6,196 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,485 2,561 515 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,090 9,765 11,751 11,531 12,895 11,910 66,742 67,942 2.4 Conventional 5,492 5,053 10,535 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,598 4,712 1,216 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

227

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 128,129 139,212 139,507 142,185 127,373 129,846 1,324,158 1,285,205 -2.9 Regular 115,823 125,667 124,434 126,339 113,384 116,508 1,188,541 1,151,638 -3.1 Conventional 115,823 125,667 124,434 126,339 113,384 116,508 W 1,151,638 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,859 3,031 3,341 3,503 2,965 3,032 34,516 30,947 -10.3 Conventional 2,859 3,031 3,341 3,503 2,965 3,032 W 30,947 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,447 10,514 11,732 12,343 11,024 10,306 101,101 102,620 1.5 Conventional 9,447 10,514 11,732 12,343 11,024 10,306 W 102,620 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

228

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 132,857 118,555 116,747 127,703 122,936 133,838 595,274 619,779 4.8 Regular 116,372 104,022 102,420 113,498 110,833 119,514 524,537 550,287 5.6 Conventional 71,011 61,295 61,912 91,743 W W W W NA Oxygenated 45,361 42,727 40,508 21,755 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,477 4,122 3,874 3,705 3,183 3,612 20,902 18,496 -10.9 Conventional 2,141 1,960 1,900 3,187 W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,336 2,162 1,974 518 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,008 10,411 10,453 10,500 8,920 10,712 49,835 50,996 3.0 Conventional 6,833 5,562 5,909 8,746 7,806 9,328 W 37,351 NA Oxygenated 5,175 4,849 4,544 NA 1,114 NA W W NA

229

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 129,849 123,027 124,392 117,292 115,606 122,264 354,258 355,162 -0.8 Regular 116,510 111,045 112,370 106,132 104,410 111,432 316,973 321,974 0.5 Conventional 116,510 111,045 112,370 106,132 104,410 111,432 316,973 321,974 0.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,032 2,728 2,693 2,570 2,491 2,207 9,258 7,268 -22.4 Conventional 3,032 2,728 2,693 2,570 2,491 2,207 9,258 7,268 -22.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,307 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,705 8,625 28,027 25,920 -8.5 Conventional 10,307 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,705 8,625 28,027 25,920 -8.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

230

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 142,185 127,373 129,849 123,027 124,392 117,292 118,909 117,292 -1.4 Regular 126,339 113,384 116,510 111,045 112,370 106,132 106,914 106,132 -0.7 Conventional 126,339 113,384 116,510 111,045 112,370 106,132 106,914 106,132 -0.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,503 2,965 3,032 2,728 2,693 2,570 3,106 2,570 -17.3 Conventional 3,503 2,965 3,032 2,728 2,693 2,570 3,106 2,570 -17.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,343 11,024 10,307 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,889 8,590 -3.4 Conventional 12,343 11,024 10,307 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,889 8,590 -3.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

231

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 113,187 130,255 126,911 137,441 135,583 140,693 886,641 899,889 2.0 Regular 97,998 111,793 109,294 117,996 117,302 120,126 763,749 774,325 1.9 Conventional 53,186 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 44,812 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,424 6,711 6,086 6,550 6,371 6,780 44,407 43,835 -0.8 Conventional 2,863 6,196 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,561 515 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,765 11,751 11,531 12,895 11,910 13,787 78,485 81,729 4.6 Conventional 5,053 10,535 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,712 1,216 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

232

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 559,488 600,331 607,637 544,776 585,964 544,609 5,699,021 6,042,966 6.0 Regular 445,690 474,800 481,922 433,667 470,192 438,253 4,535,649 4,825,375 6.4 Conventional 93,600 107,710 110,970 91,845 98,835 90,774 970,689 1,021,990 5.3 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 352,090 367,090 370,952 341,822 371,357 347,479 3,564,960 3,803,385 6.7 Midgrade 37,061 41,258 41,734 35,957 37,629 35,045 415,787 399,331 -4.0 Conventional 5,927 7,552 7,706 5,748 5,973 5,333 64,417 64,305 -0.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 31,134 33,706 34,028 30,209 31,656 29,712 351,370 335,026 -4.7 Premium 76,737 84,273 83,981 75,152 78,143 71,311 747,585 818,260 9.5

233

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 128,461 125,271 127,361 115,819 113,187 130,255 340,285 359,261 6.7 Regular 111,521 108,520 109,905 99,816 97,998 111,793 289,111 309,607 8.3 Conventional 82,755 62,396 62,355 55,542 53,186 W W W NA Oxygenated 28,766 46,124 47,550 44,274 44,812 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,296 6,420 6,738 5,913 5,424 6,711 19,135 18,048 -4.6 Conventional 4,406 3,840 3,681 3,428 2,863 6,196 W 12,487 NA Oxygenated 1,890 2,580 3,057 2,485 2,561 515 W 5,561 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,644 10,331 10,718 10,090 9,765 11,751 32,039 31,606 -0.3 Conventional 7,778 5,564 5,846 5,492 5,053 10,535 W 21,080 NA

234

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 112,818 127,713 121,599 126,592 126,169 141,479 898,097 862,922 -4.4 Regular 98,586 112,315 107,152 113,569 111,791 124,284 779,576 760,612 -2.9 Conventional 61,721 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 36,865 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,425 4,362 4,106 3,739 3,923 4,403 37,124 29,228 -21.6 Conventional 2,245 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,180 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,807 11,036 10,341 9,284 10,455 12,792 81,397 73,082 -10.6 Conventional 5,377 9,727 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,430 1,309 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

235

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 140,449 137,146 123,384 123,443 132,857 118,557 106,552 118,557 11.3 Regular 123,026 121,321 108,630 108,923 116,372 104,014 92,915 104,014 11.9 Conventional W 93,225 80,733 66,084 71,011 61,319 W 61,319 NA Oxygenated W NA NA 42,839 45,361 42,695 W 42,695 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,610 4,305 4,157 4,294 4,477 4,123 4,270 4,123 -3.4 Conventional W 3,682 2,831 2,131 2,141 1,960 2,157 1,960 -9.1 Oxygenated W NA 1,326 2,163 2,336 2,163 2,113 2,163 2.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,813 11,520 10,597 10,226 12,008 10,420 9,367 10,420 11.2 Conventional W 9,730 7,507 5,628 6,833 5,565 W 5,565 NA

236

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 127,361 115,819 113,187 130,255 126,911 137,441 596,059 623,613 5.3 Regular 109,905 99,816 97,998 111,793 109,294 117,996 510,663 536,897 5.8 Conventional 62,355 55,542 53,186 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 47,550 44,274 44,812 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,738 5,913 5,424 6,711 6,086 6,550 31,429 30,684 -1.7 Conventional 3,681 3,428 2,863 6,196 W W W W NA Oxygenated 3,057 2,485 2,561 515 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,718 10,090 9,765 11,751 11,531 12,895 53,967 56,032 4.5 Conventional 5,846 5,492 5,053 10,535 W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,872 4,598 4,712 1,216 W W W W NA

237

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 132,214 134,901 121,056 120,708 129,584 129,173 485,941 500,521 3.0 Regular 117,558 119,426 108,545 108,142 116,394 115,901 430,773 448,982 4.2 Conventional 69,032 69,189 73,017 72,929 W W W W NA Oxygenated 48,526 50,237 35,528 35,213 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,715 3,919 3,612 3,378 3,439 3,369 14,884 13,798 -7.3 Conventional 1,558 1,636 1,812 1,618 W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,157 2,283 1,800 1,760 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,941 11,556 8,899 9,188 9,751 9,903 40,284 37,741 -6.3 Conventional 5,317 5,622 5,550 5,821 W W 28,023 W NA Oxygenated 5,624 5,934 3,349 3,367 W W W W NA

238

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 116,335 119,409 126,351 129,240 138,077 140,629 969,751 986,258 2.1 Regular 105,221 107,403 113,871 116,502 123,871 126,317 881,032 889,186 1.3 Conventional 105,221 107,403 113,871 116,502 123,871 126,317 881,032 889,186 1.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,265 1,280 1,320 1,356 1,530 1,491 10,548 10,475 -0.3 Conventional 1,265 1,280 1,320 1,356 1,530 1,491 10,548 10,475 -0.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,849 10,726 11,160 11,382 12,676 12,821 78,171 86,597 11.2 Conventional 9,849 10,726 11,160 11,382 12,676 12,821 78,171 86,597 11.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

239

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 124,202 126,203 128,935 134,724 138,634 128,837 1,167,661 1,125,619 -3.6 Regular 113,853 115,311 118,200 121,899 125,218 116,899 1,056,054 1,025,767 -2.9 Conventional 113,853 115,311 118,200 121,899 125,218 116,899 1,056,054 1,025,767 -2.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,390 1,394 1,443 1,617 1,625 1,482 15,618 12,901 -17.4 Conventional 1,390 1,394 1,443 1,617 1,625 1,482 15,618 12,901 -17.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,959 9,498 9,292 11,208 11,791 10,456 95,989 86,951 -9.4 Conventional 8,959 9,498 9,292 11,208 11,791 10,456 95,989 86,951 -9.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

240

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 140,679 145,648 126,428 129,343 121,892 120,906 1,539,831 1,544,092 0.6 Regular 120,112 124,098 110,212 111,742 104,683 103,096 1,327,866 1,328,142 0.3 Conventional W W W 82,134 58,559 55,021 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 29,608 46,124 48,075 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,780 7,144 5,841 6,099 6,003 6,181 77,342 75,103 -2.6 Conventional W W W 4,303 3,324 3,551 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 1,796 2,679 2,630 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 13,787 14,406 10,375 11,502 11,206 11,629 134,623 140,847 4.9 Conventional W W W 8,321 6,003 6,272 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 3,181 5,203 5,357 W W NA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 507,176 555,881 533,257 569,990 572,053 597,002 3,826,569 3,889,308 1.2 Regular 418,716 464,230 446,469 482,419 485,233 501,270 3,113,783 3,253,651 4.0 Conventional 84,937 90,443 84,959 94,986 97,027 107,337 645,598 649,409 0.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 333,779 373,787 361,510 387,433 388,206 393,933 2,468,185 2,604,242 5.0 Midgrade 27,962 28,700 27,413 27,894 26,615 29,730 234,918 199,532 -15.5 Conventional 4,099 3,919 3,612 3,973 3,959 5,242 36,600 29,463 -19.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 23,863 24,781 23,801 23,921 22,656 24,488 198,318 170,069 -14.6 Premium 60,498 62,951 59,375 59,677 60,205 66,002 477,868 436,125 -9.2

242

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 124,186 133,338 134,214 120,819 125,045 116,740 1,407,938 1,365,982 -3.3 Regular 113,226 121,394 121,927 109,859 114,124 106,063 1,262,370 1,241,968 -1.9 Conventional 113,226 121,394 121,927 109,859 114,124 106,063 1,262,370 1,241,968 -1.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,961 2,082 2,075 1,769 1,731 1,651 33,741 23,129 -31.7 Conventional 1,961 2,082 2,075 1,769 1,731 1,651 33,741 23,129 -31.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,999 9,862 10,212 9,191 9,190 9,026 111,827 100,885 -10.1 Conventional 8,999 9,862 10,212 9,191 9,190 9,026 111,827 100,885 -10.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

243

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 122,163 124,443 117,552 113,930 111,114 105,113 219,163 216,227 0.3 Regular 110,769 113,333 106,683 103,132 100,685 95,323 199,189 196,008 0.1 Conventional 110,769 113,333 106,683 103,132 100,685 95,323 199,189 196,008 0.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,304 1,307 1,223 1,252 1,145 1,089 2,408 2,234 -5.7 Conventional 1,304 1,307 1,223 1,252 1,145 1,089 2,408 2,234 -5.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,090 9,803 9,646 9,546 9,284 8,701 17,566 17,985 4.1 Conventional 10,090 9,803 9,646 9,546 9,284 8,701 17,566 17,985 4.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

244

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 128,935 134,724 138,634 128,837 126,103 120,512 1,419,945 1,372,234 -3.4 Regular 118,200 121,899 125,218 116,899 114,985 109,751 1,284,541 1,250,503 -2.6 Conventional 118,200 121,899 125,218 116,899 114,985 109,751 1,284,541 1,250,503 -2.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,443 1,617 1,625 1,482 1,405 1,347 18,831 15,653 -16.9 Conventional 1,443 1,617 1,625 1,482 1,405 1,347 18,831 15,653 -16.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,292 11,208 11,791 10,456 9,713 9,414 116,573 106,078 -9.0 Conventional 9,292 11,208 11,791 10,456 9,713 9,414 116,573 106,078 -9.0 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

245

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 525,025 566,449 559,488 600,331 607,637 544,776 4,626,959 4,912,393 6.2 Regular 425,312 453,084 445,690 474,800 481,922 433,667 3,680,918 3,916,930 6.4 Conventional 84,632 94,055 93,600 107,710 110,970 91,845 792,995 832,381 5.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 340,680 359,029 352,090 367,090 370,952 341,822 2,887,923 3,084,549 6.8 Midgrade 33,447 37,392 37,061 41,258 41,734 35,957 343,819 326,657 -5.0 Conventional 4,880 5,763 5,927 7,552 7,706 5,748 53,343 52,999 -0.6 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 28,567 31,629 31,134 33,706 34,028 30,209 290,476 273,658 -5.8 Premium 66,266 75,973 76,737 84,273 83,981 75,152 602,222 668,806 11.1

246

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 120,819 125,045 119,493 110,992 117,088 108,674 232,898 225,762 -1.4 Regular 109,859 114,124 108,458 100,387 106,414 98,792 210,542 205,206 -0.9 Conventional 109,859 114,124 108,458 100,387 106,414 98,792 210,542 205,206 -0.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,769 1,731 1,769 1,792 1,666 1,581 5,061 3,247 -34.8 Conventional 1,769 1,731 1,769 1,792 1,666 1,581 5,061 3,247 -34.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,191 9,190 9,266 8,813 9,008 8,301 17,295 17,309 1.8 Conventional 9,191 9,190 9,266 8,813 9,008 8,301 17,295 17,309 1.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

247

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 139,236 130,776 128,461 125,271 127,361 115,330 103,710 115,330 11.2 Regular 118,534 113,616 111,521 108,520 109,905 99,406 87,146 99,406 14.1 Conventional W W 82,755 62,396 62,355 55,132 47,766 55,132 15.4 Oxygenated W W 28,766 46,124 47,550 44,274 39,380 44,274 12.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 7,311 6,170 6,296 6,420 6,738 5,913 6,076 5,913 -2.7 Conventional W W 4,406 3,840 3,681 3,428 3,128 3,428 9.6 Oxygenated W W 1,890 2,580 3,057 2,485 2,948 2,485 -15.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 13,391 10,990 10,644 10,331 10,718 10,011 10,488 10,011 -4.5 Conventional W W 7,778 5,564 5,846 5,413 5,684 5,413 -4.8

248

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 136,622 125,808 119,737 113,339 129,220 103,695 122,818 103,695 -15.6 Regular 113,449 104,798 99,178 93,150 106,433 87,131 101,479 87,131 -14.1 Conventional W W 72,818 53,121 58,414 47,751 W 47,751 NA Oxygenated W W 26,360 40,029 48,019 39,380 40,988 39,380 -3.9 Reformulated – – – – – – W – NA Midgrade 8,750 7,653 7,656 7,437 8,430 6,076 8,163 6,076 -25.6 Conventional W W 5,046 3,943 4,377 3,128 4,088 3,128 -23.5 Oxygenated W W 2,610 3,494 4,053 2,948 4,075 2,948 -27.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 14,423 13,357 12,903 12,752 14,357 10,488 W 10,488 NA Conventional W W 9,375 7,016 7,564 5,684 W 5,684 NA

249

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 139,789 134,234 138,886 144,986 126,268 128,894 1,303,091 1,310,878 0.6 Regular 120,111 114,632 118,057 122,577 107,051 108,435 1,121,359 1,118,508 -0.3 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,196 6,170 6,572 7,047 6,066 6,586 62,974 62,110 -1.4 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 13,482 13,432 14,257 15,362 13,151 13,873 118,758 130,260 9.7 Conventional W W W W W 9,885 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 3,988 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

250

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prime Supplier Sales Volume Prime Supplier Sales Volume Definitions Key Terms Definition Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Finished Aviation Gasoline A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifications are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Gasoline Grades The classification of gasoline by octane ratings. Each type of gasoline (conventional and reformulated) is classified by three grades - regular, midgrade, and premium. Note: gasoline sales are reported by grade in accordance with their classification at the time of sale. In general, automotive octane requirements are lower at high altitudes. Therefore, in some areas of the United States, such as the Rocky Mountain States, the octane ratings for the gasoline grades may be 2 or more octane points lower.

251

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 566,449 559,488 600,331 607,637 544,776 583,133 5,178,870 5,495,526 6.1 Regular 453,084 445,690 474,800 481,922 433,667 468,135 4,121,313 4,385,065 6.4 Conventional 94,055 93,600 107,710 110,970 91,845 98,333 884,958 930,714 5.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 359,029 352,090 367,090 370,952 341,822 369,802 3,236,355 3,454,351 6.7 Midgrade 37,392 37,061 41,258 41,734 35,957 37,398 381,451 364,055 -4.6 Conventional 5,763 5,927 7,552 7,706 5,748 5,948 59,186 58,947 -0.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 31,629 31,134 33,706 34,028 30,209 31,450 322,265 305,108 -5.3 Premium 75,973 76,737 84,273 83,981 75,152 77,600 676,106 746,406 10.4

252

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 138,886 144,986 126,268 130,385 114,483 116,987 1,552,270 1,543,839 -0.5 Regular 118,057 122,577 107,051 109,801 96,041 98,109 1,334,794 1,314,024 -1.6 Conventional W W W 80,782 59,921 60,892 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 29,019 36,120 37,217 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,572 7,047 6,066 6,616 6,121 6,286 75,413 74,547 -1.1 Conventional W W W 4,628 3,531 3,646 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 1,988 2,590 2,640 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 14,257 15,362 13,151 13,968 12,321 12,592 142,063 155,268 9.3 Conventional W W W 9,980 7,264 7,439 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 3,988 5,057 5,153 W W NA

253

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 130,717 124,186 133,338 134,214 120,819 125,138 1,284,739 1,249,335 -3.1 Regular 119,281 113,226 121,394 121,927 109,859 114,199 1,151,189 1,135,980 -1.6 Conventional 119,281 113,226 121,394 121,927 109,859 114,199 1,151,189 1,135,980 -1.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,165 1,961 2,082 2,075 1,769 1,730 30,987 21,477 -30.9 Conventional 2,165 1,961 2,082 2,075 1,769 1,730 30,987 21,477 -30.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,271 8,999 9,862 10,212 9,191 9,209 102,563 91,878 -10.7 Conventional 9,271 8,999 9,862 10,212 9,191 9,209 102,563 91,878 -10.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

254

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 128,326 135,052 139,789 134,234 138,886 143,748 1,045,772 1,054,478 0.8 Regular 110,336 117,278 120,111 114,632 118,057 121,427 898,749 901,872 0.3 Conventional 91,767 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,010 5,845 6,196 6,170 6,572 6,994 50,970 49,405 -3.1 Conventional 5,351 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 659 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,980 11,929 13,482 13,432 14,257 15,327 96,053 103,201 7.4 Conventional 10,395 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 1,585 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

255

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 115,606 122,264 125,761 130,717 124,186 133,338 885,337 869,164 -2.3 Regular 104,410 111,432 114,120 119,281 113,226 121,394 795,000 789,995 -1.1 Conventional 104,410 111,432 114,120 119,281 113,226 121,394 795,000 789,995 -1.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,491 2,207 2,427 2,165 1,961 2,082 21,429 15,903 -26.1 Conventional 2,491 2,207 2,427 2,165 1,961 2,082 21,429 15,903 -26.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,705 8,625 9,214 9,271 8,999 9,862 68,908 63,266 -8.6 Conventional 8,705 8,625 9,214 9,271 8,999 9,862 68,908 63,266 -8.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

256

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 117,292 115,606 122,264 125,761 130,717 124,184 746,294 735,824 -1.9 Regular 106,132 104,410 111,432 114,120 119,281 113,224 670,973 668,599 -0.9 Conventional 106,132 104,410 111,432 114,120 119,281 113,224 670,973 668,599 -0.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,570 2,491 2,207 2,427 2,165 1,961 18,106 13,821 -24.1 Conventional 2,570 2,491 2,207 2,427 2,165 1,961 18,106 13,821 -24.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,590 8,705 8,625 9,214 9,271 8,999 57,215 53,404 -7.2 Conventional 8,590 8,705 8,625 9,214 9,271 8,999 57,215 53,404 -7.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

257

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Refiner/Reseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD District Refiner/Reseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD District and State, 1986-Present (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Year Regular Midgrade Premium All Grades Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale United States 1986 ...................................... 63.6 52.9 NA NA 74.6 61.7 64.2 53.8 1987 ...................................... 67.0 57.2 NA NA 78.8 67.4 68.4 59.2 1988 ...................................... 66.1 55.1 NA NA 79.4 67.5 68.6 58.0 1989 ...................................... 73.7 62.3 80.2 69.1 88.3 75.2 77.3 65.8 1990 ...................................... 87.2 76.2 93.6 82.3 100.1 87.7 90.1 78.9 1991 ......................................

258

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 117,088 108,674 122,452 125,233 130,653 131,907 735,826 736,007 0.6 Regular 106,414 98,792 111,102 113,305 117,817 118,961 668,601 666,391 0.2 Conventional 106,414 98,792 111,102 113,305 117,817 118,961 668,601 666,391 0.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,666 1,581 1,792 1,815 1,879 1,869 13,821 10,602 -22.9 Conventional 1,666 1,581 1,792 1,815 1,879 1,869 13,821 10,602 -22.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,008 8,301 9,558 10,113 10,957 11,077 53,404 59,014 11.1 Conventional 9,008 8,301 9,558 10,113 10,957 11,077 53,404 59,014 11.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

259

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 123,027 124,392 117,292 115,606 122,264 125,733 478,953 480,895 -0.4 Regular 111,045 112,370 106,132 104,410 111,432 114,092 429,483 436,066 0.7 Conventional 111,045 112,370 106,132 104,410 111,432 114,092 429,483 436,066 0.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,728 2,693 2,570 2,491 2,207 2,427 12,216 9,695 -21.3 Conventional 2,728 2,693 2,570 2,491 2,207 2,427 12,216 9,695 -21.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,705 8,625 9,214 37,254 35,134 -6.5 Conventional 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,705 8,625 9,214 37,254 35,134 -6.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

260

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 534,207 506,958 545,539 557,326 578,792 590,558 4,493,513 4,299,128 -4.3 Regular 468,021 446,104 480,482 489,993 505,930 516,633 3,832,579 3,770,135 -1.6 Conventional 94,827 88,991 98,590 106,317 115,384 116,082 768,268 792,039 3.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 373,194 357,113 381,892 383,676 390,546 400,551 3,064,311 2,978,096 -2.8 Midgrade 19,431 18,128 19,540 20,189 22,411 21,871 203,031 158,405 -22.0 Conventional 2,536 2,220 2,548 2,831 3,825 3,711 29,340 22,321 -23.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 16,895 15,908 16,992 17,358 18,586 18,160 173,691 136,084 -21.7 Premium 46,755 42,726 45,517 47,144 50,451 52,054 457,903 370,588 -19.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 115,509 118,066 126,458 126,327 130,524 133,704 996,782 969,751 -3.1 Regular 105,682 107,662 115,160 114,987 117,633 120,719 908,868 881,032 -3.5 Conventional 105,682 107,662 115,160 114,987 117,633 120,719 908,868 881,032 -3.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,246 1,255 1,340 1,281 1,456 1,562 11,419 10,548 -8.0 Conventional 1,246 1,255 1,340 1,281 1,456 1,562 11,419 10,548 -8.0 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,581 9,149 9,958 10,059 11,435 11,423 76,495 78,171 1.8 Conventional 8,581 9,149 9,958 10,059 11,435 11,423 76,495 78,171 1.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

262

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 507,903 477,845 534,207 506,958 545,539 544,735 3,287,099 3,117,187 -5.2 Regular 445,636 417,336 468,021 446,104 480,482 478,313 2,800,304 2,735,892 -2.3 Conventional 87,304 84,544 94,827 88,991 98,590 102,228 549,079 556,484 1.3 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 358,332 332,792 373,194 357,113 381,892 376,085 2,251,225 2,179,408 -3.2 Midgrade 18,945 17,890 19,431 18,128 19,540 19,980 147,368 113,914 -22.7 Conventional 2,326 2,324 2,536 2,220 2,548 2,831 19,695 14,785 -24.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 16,619 15,566 16,895 15,908 16,992 17,149 127,673 99,129 -22.4 Premium 43,322 42,619 46,755 42,726 45,517 46,442 339,427 267,381 -21.2

263

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 121,892 120,530 123,655 110,788 128,326 136,041 486,172 498,810 2.6 Regular 104,683 102,740 105,511 94,520 110,336 118,228 418,901 428,595 2.3 Conventional 58,559 54,646 56,780 53,384 91,767 W W W NA Oxygenated 46,124 48,094 48,731 41,136 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,003 6,178 6,168 5,450 6,010 5,882 24,134 23,510 -2.6 Conventional 3,324 3,547 3,392 3,052 5,351 W W W NA Oxygenated 2,679 2,631 2,776 2,398 659 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,206 11,612 11,976 10,818 11,980 11,931 43,137 46,705 8.3 Conventional 6,003 6,254 6,016 5,941 10,395 W W W NA

264

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 145,648 126,428 129,343 121,892 120,530 122,643 115,819 122,643 5.9 Regular 124,098 110,212 111,742 104,683 102,740 104,593 99,816 104,593 4.8 Conventional W W 82,134 58,559 54,646 55,813 55,542 55,813 0.5 Oxygenated W W 29,608 46,124 48,094 48,780 44,274 48,780 10.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 7,144 5,841 6,099 6,003 6,178 6,152 5,913 6,152 4.0 Conventional W W 4,303 3,324 3,547 3,374 3,428 3,374 -1.6 Oxygenated W W 1,796 2,679 2,631 2,778 2,485 2,778 11.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 14,406 10,375 11,502 11,206 11,612 11,898 10,090 11,898 17.9 Conventional W W 8,321 6,003 6,254 5,934 5,492 5,934 8.0

265

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,327 130,524 133,704 122,163 124,443 117,552 1,372,235 1,333,909 -3.1 Regular 114,987 117,633 120,719 110,769 113,333 106,683 1,250,504 1,211,817 -3.4 Conventional 114,987 117,633 120,719 110,769 113,333 106,683 1,250,504 1,211,817 -3.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,281 1,456 1,562 1,304 1,307 1,223 15,653 14,382 -8.4 Conventional 1,281 1,456 1,562 1,304 1,307 1,223 15,653 14,382 -8.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,059 11,435 11,423 10,090 9,803 9,646 106,078 107,710 1.2 Conventional 10,059 11,435 11,423 10,090 9,803 9,646 106,078 107,710 1.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

266

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 490,623 514,004 485,038 507,317 485,599 444,938 926,862 930,537 2.1 Regular 385,329 405,977 381,467 399,305 382,693 351,486 706,114 734,179 5.7 Conventional 88,190 92,351 79,597 83,245 81,128 74,126 151,919 155,254 3.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 297,139 313,626 301,870 316,060 301,565 277,360 554,195 578,925 6.2 Midgrade 39,487 40,182 38,304 40,249 37,658 33,573 84,254 71,231 -14.0 Conventional 6,437 6,068 5,346 5,771 5,706 5,103 13,490 10,809 -18.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 33,050 34,114 32,958 34,478 31,952 28,470 70,764 60,422 -13.2 Premium 65,807 67,845 65,267 67,763 65,248 59,879 136,494 125,127 -6.8

267

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 123,384 123,443 132,857 118,555 116,747 127,700 347,083 363,002 5.7 Regular 108,630 108,923 116,372 104,022 102,420 113,498 303,816 319,940 6.5 Conventional 80,733 66,084 71,011 61,295 61,912 91,743 W 214,950 NA Oxygenated NA 42,839 45,361 42,727 40,508 21,755 W 104,990 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,157 4,294 4,477 4,122 3,874 3,704 13,057 11,700 -9.4 Conventional 2,831 2,131 2,141 1,960 1,900 3,186 W 7,046 NA Oxygenated 1,326 2,163 2,336 2,162 1,974 518 W 4,654 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,597 10,226 12,008 10,411 10,453 10,498 30,210 31,362 5.0 Conventional 7,507 5,628 6,833 5,562 5,909 8,744 W 20,215 NA

268

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 523,217 546,228 535,449 499,935 542,611 516,779 2,026,913 2,094,774 3.3 Regular 458,192 480,634 470,492 438,673 479,616 456,628 1,777,097 1,845,409 3.8 Conventional 92,553 95,604 92,531 89,836 92,595 86,101 355,666 361,063 1.5 Reformulated 365,639 385,030 377,961 348,837 387,021 370,527 1,421,431 1,484,346 4.4 Midgrade 18,587 19,274 19,363 18,187 19,268 18,846 74,394 75,664 1.7 Conventional 2,209 2,216 2,248 2,263 2,142 1,889 9,406 8,542 -9.2 Reformulated 16,378 17,058 17,115 15,924 17,126 16,957 64,988 67,122 3.3 Premium 46,438 46,320 45,594 43,075 43,727 41,305 175,422 173,701 -1.0

269

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,203 128,935 134,724 138,634 128,837 126,103 1,299,140 1,251,722 -3.6 Regular 115,311 118,200 121,899 125,218 116,899 114,985 1,174,959 1,140,752 -2.9 Conventional 115,311 118,200 121,899 125,218 116,899 114,985 1,174,959 1,140,752 -2.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,394 1,443 1,617 1,625 1,482 1,405 17,286 14,306 -17.2 Conventional 1,394 1,443 1,617 1,625 1,482 1,405 17,286 14,306 -17.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,498 9,292 11,208 11,791 10,456 9,713 106,895 96,664 -9.6 Conventional 9,498 9,292 11,208 11,791 10,456 9,713 106,895 96,664 -9.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

270

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 110,788 128,326 135,052 139,789 134,234 138,886 899,875 910,730 1.2 Regular 94,520 110,336 117,278 120,111 114,632 118,057 774,311 780,445 0.8 Conventional 53,384 91,767 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 41,136 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,450 6,010 5,845 6,196 6,170 6,572 43,835 42,411 -3.2 Conventional 3,052 5,351 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,398 659 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,818 11,980 11,929 13,482 13,432 14,257 81,729 87,874 7.5 Conventional 5,941 10,395 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,877 1,585 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

271

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 530,764 461,105 446,330 487,514 467,445 514,161 2,499,689 2,376,555 -5.6 Regular 476,567 414,239 400,799 438,269 419,689 457,986 2,250,807 2,130,982 -5.9 Conventional 85,583 77,162 75,965 79,443 76,333 90,064 426,937 398,967 -7.2 Reformulated 390,984 337,077 324,834 358,826 343,356 367,922 1,823,870 1,732,015 -5.7 Midgrade 8,813 7,806 7,543 8,274 8,141 9,199 45,357 40,963 -10.3 Conventional 905 832 793 806 750 1,071 4,954 4,252 -14.7 Reformulated 7,908 6,974 6,750 7,468 7,391 8,128 40,403 36,711 -9.7 Premium 45,384 39,060 37,988 40,971 39,615 46,976 203,525 204,610 -0.1 Conventional 4,314 3,926 3,956 3,932 3,590 5,291 21,487 20,695 -4.3

272

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 521,124 527,101 509,281 530,764 461,105 446,180 972,727 907,285 -8.3 Regular 466,275 472,106 456,590 476,567 414,239 400,649 873,143 814,888 -8.2 Conventional 92,473 90,578 83,269 85,583 77,162 75,815 170,063 152,977 -11.5 Reformulated 373,802 381,528 373,321 390,984 337,077 324,834 703,080 661,911 -7.4 Midgrade 9,258 9,110 8,696 8,813 7,806 7,543 18,451 15,349 -18.2 Conventional 1,091 965 882 905 832 793 2,047 1,625 -21.9 Reformulated 8,167 8,145 7,814 7,908 6,974 6,750 16,404 13,724 -17.7 Premium 45,591 45,885 43,995 45,384 39,060 37,988 81,133 77,048 -6.6 Conventional 5,477 5,106 4,337 4,314 3,926 3,956 9,393 7,882 -17.5

273

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 136,075 139,236 130,776 128,461 125,271 127,346 1,558,358 1,520,443 -2.7 Regular 117,117 118,534 113,616 111,521 108,520 109,826 1,300,368 1,307,497 0.3 Conventional W W W 82,755 62,396 62,276 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 28,766 46,124 47,550 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,728 7,311 6,170 6,296 6,420 6,738 97,184 77,836 -20.1 Conventional W W W 4,406 3,840 3,681 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 1,890 2,580 3,057 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,230 13,391 10,990 10,644 10,331 10,782 160,806 135,110 -16.2 Conventional W W W 7,778 5,564 5,910 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 2,866 4,767 4,872 W W NA

274

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 117,639 115,793 109,751 115,008 129,009 136,249 637,610 605,810 -5.0 Regular 99,099 98,040 94,445 102,049 114,076 118,315 547,756 526,925 -3.8 Conventional 61,268 60,258 59,465 W 98,123 100,786 W W NA Oxygenated 37,831 37,782 34,980 W 15,953 17,529 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,193 5,943 5,467 4,397 4,632 5,351 29,669 25,790 -13.1 Conventional 3,743 3,737 3,554 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,450 2,206 1,913 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,347 11,810 9,839 8,562 10,301 12,583 60,185 53,095 -11.8 Conventional 7,339 6,945 5,907 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 5,008 4,865 3,932 W W W W W NA

275

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 123,655 110,788 128,326 135,052 139,789 134,994 759,196 772,604 1.8 Regular 105,511 94,520 110,336 117,278 120,111 115,386 654,199 663,142 1.4 Conventional 56,780 53,384 91,767 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 48,731 41,136 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,168 5,450 6,010 5,845 6,196 6,170 37,055 35,839 -3.3 Conventional 3,392 3,052 5,351 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,776 2,398 659 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,976 10,818 11,980 11,929 13,482 13,438 67,942 73,623 8.4 Conventional 6,016 5,941 10,395 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 5,960 4,877 1,585 W W W W W NA

276

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 555,627 513,590 550,648 514,054 550,377 517,805 516,781 517,805 0.2 Regular 495,544 460,050 493,937 460,528 491,662 463,776 460,826 463,776 0.6 Conventional 98,019 85,817 90,049 80,032 90,649 86,635 83,587 86,635 3.6 Reformulated 397,525 374,233 403,888 380,496 401,013 377,141 377,239 377,141 0.0 Midgrade 14,063 11,714 11,956 11,129 12,327 11,408 14,583 11,408 -21.8 Conventional 1,989 1,208 1,145 948 1,239 1,122 1,811 1,122 -38.0 Reformulated 12,074 10,506 10,811 10,181 11,088 10,286 12,772 10,286 -19.5 Premium 46,020 41,826 44,755 42,397 46,388 42,621 41,372 42,621 3.0 Conventional 6,625 4,768 4,532 3,734 4,536 5,020 4,122 5,020 21.8

277

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 485,038 507,317 485,599 445,136 487,348 483,146 1,889,882 1,901,229 1.4 Regular 381,467 399,305 382,693 351,420 383,984 383,622 1,465,417 1,501,719 3.3 Conventional 79,597 83,245 81,128 74,126 79,461 76,131 301,022 310,846 4.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 301,870 316,060 301,565 277,294 304,523 307,491 1,164,395 1,190,873 3.1 Midgrade 38,304 40,249 37,658 33,798 37,107 36,183 162,713 144,746 -10.3 Conventional 5,346 5,771 5,706 5,103 5,418 4,848 24,202 21,075 -12.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 32,958 34,478 31,952 28,695 31,689 31,335 138,511 123,671 -10.0 Premium 65,267 67,763 65,248 59,918 66,257 63,341 261,752 254,764 -1.9

278

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 518,672 519,911 533,875 490,623 514,004 485,038 5,401,348 5,457,173 0.7 Regular 410,259 408,078 417,472 385,329 405,977 381,467 3,942,774 4,267,422 7.9 Conventional 87,896 94,215 96,792 88,190 92,351 79,597 788,969 924,192 16.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 322,363 313,863 320,680 297,139 313,626 301,870 3,153,805 3,343,230 5.7 Midgrade 42,183 43,082 44,099 39,487 40,182 38,304 541,340 452,108 -16.7 Conventional 6,874 7,724 8,310 6,437 6,068 5,346 83,053 71,795 -13.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 35,309 35,358 35,789 33,050 34,114 32,958 458,287 380,313 -17.3 Premium 66,230 68,751 72,304 65,807 67,845 65,267 917,234 737,643 -19.8

279

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 134,234 138,886 144,986 126,268 130,385 114,483 1,428,284 1,426,852 -0.1 Regular 114,632 118,057 122,577 107,051 109,801 96,041 1,228,882 1,215,915 -1.1 Conventional W W W W 80,782 59,921 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 29,019 36,120 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,170 6,572 7,047 6,066 6,616 6,121 69,107 68,261 -1.2 Conventional W W W W 4,628 3,531 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 1,988 2,590 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 13,432 14,257 15,362 13,151 13,968 12,321 130,295 142,676 9.5 Conventional W W W W 9,980 7,264 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 3,988 5,057 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

280

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 143,203 131,902 130,122 116,547 121,960 106,552 115,793 106,552 -8.0 Regular 124,038 114,896 112,836 100,676 105,782 92,915 98,040 92,915 -5.2 Conventional W W 85,371 61,541 W W 60,258 W NA Oxygenated W W 27,465 39,135 W W 37,782 W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,748 4,965 5,059 4,888 4,985 4,270 5,943 4,270 -28.2 Conventional W W 3,614 2,496 2,445 2,157 3,737 2,157 -42.3 Oxygenated W W 1,445 2,392 2,540 2,113 2,206 2,113 -4.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 13,417 12,041 12,227 10,983 11,193 9,367 11,810 9,367 -20.7 Conventional W W 9,096 6,224 W W 6,945 W NA Oxygenated W W 3,131 4,759 W W 4,865 W NA

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281

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 135,583 140,679 145,648 126,428 129,343 122,337 1,410,385 1,423,631 1.2 Regular 117,302 120,112 124,098 110,212 111,742 105,054 1,215,940 1,225,417 1.1 Conventional W W W W 82,134 58,930 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 29,608 46,124 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,371 6,780 7,144 5,841 6,099 6,003 70,604 68,922 -2.1 Conventional W W W W 4,303 3,324 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 1,796 2,679 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,910 13,787 14,406 10,375 11,502 11,280 123,841 129,292 4.7 Conventional W W W W 8,321 6,064 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 3,181 5,216 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

282

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 461,983 490,382 472,638 505,168 518,672 520,748 3,417,154 3,434,470 0.0 Regular 353,719 388,272 371,031 393,423 410,259 408,801 2,466,016 2,677,900 8.1 Conventional 77,773 76,905 72,198 84,129 87,896 94,206 454,002 567,253 24.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 275,946 311,367 298,833 309,294 322,363 314,595 2,012,014 2,110,647 4.4 Midgrade 41,541 40,340 38,119 42,058 42,183 43,139 346,783 290,093 -16.7 Conventional 6,665 5,449 5,263 6,834 6,874 7,701 49,839 45,611 -8.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 34,876 34,891 32,856 35,224 35,309 35,438 296,944 244,482 -18.1 Premium 66,723 61,770 63,488 69,687 66,230 68,808 604,355 466,477 -23.2

283

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,608 113,104 109,327 121,653 124,202 126,203 610,268 594,489 -2.6 Regular 114,523 103,250 99,731 111,406 113,853 115,311 553,620 543,551 -1.8 Conventional 114,523 103,250 99,731 111,406 113,853 115,311 553,620 543,551 -1.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,739 1,231 1,295 1,424 1,390 1,394 8,325 6,734 -19.1 Conventional 1,739 1,231 1,295 1,424 1,390 1,394 8,325 6,734 -19.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,346 8,623 8,301 8,823 8,959 9,498 48,323 44,204 -8.5 Conventional 10,346 8,623 8,301 8,823 8,959 9,498 48,323 44,204 -8.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

284

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 494,955 496,452 488,936 430,725 477,184 488,871 1,862,394 1,885,716 2.1 Regular 442,377 445,406 439,340 387,401 428,557 437,307 1,672,996 1,692,605 2.0 Conventional 89,489 89,443 92,274 83,145 88,943 93,114 308,903 357,476 16.7 Reformulated 352,888 355,963 347,066 304,256 339,614 344,193 1,364,093 1,335,129 -1.3 Midgrade 8,424 8,190 7,994 7,243 7,978 7,985 31,764 31,200 -1.0 Conventional 881 903 921 836 886 1,012 3,181 3,655 15.9 Reformulated 7,543 7,287 7,073 6,407 7,092 6,973 28,583 27,545 -2.8 Premium 44,154 42,856 41,602 36,081 40,649 43,579 157,634 161,911 3.6 Conventional 4,075 4,150 4,510 3,841 4,051 5,033 15,404 17,435 14.1

285

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 139,701 142,976 125,585 133,383 132,214 134,904 1,503,924 1,567,844 4.5 Regular 123,746 127,337 112,647 119,751 117,558 119,426 1,323,450 1,394,981 5.7 Conventional 103,498 W 91,370 82,252 69,032 69,189 W W NA Oxygenated 20,248 W 21,277 37,499 48,526 50,237 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,912 3,977 3,370 3,629 3,715 3,922 50,922 44,735 -11.9 Conventional W W W 2,182 1,558 1,639 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 1,447 2,157 2,283 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,043 11,662 9,568 10,003 10,941 11,556 129,552 128,128 -0.8 Conventional W W W 6,316 5,317 5,622 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 3,687 5,624 5,934 W W NA

286

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 134,901 121,056 120,708 129,584 129,173 130,155 619,146 630,676 1.9 Regular 119,426 108,545 108,142 116,394 115,901 117,951 549,711 566,933 3.1 Conventional 69,189 73,017 72,929 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 50,237 35,528 35,213 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,919 3,612 3,378 3,439 3,369 3,135 18,494 16,933 -8.4 Conventional 1,636 1,812 1,618 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,283 1,800 1,760 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,556 8,899 9,188 9,751 9,903 9,069 50,941 46,810 -8.1 Conventional 5,622 5,550 5,821 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 5,934 3,349 3,367 W W W W W NA

287

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 132,774 149,898 143,203 131,902 130,122 116,547 1,442,448 1,409,759 -2.3 Regular 114,646 128,881 124,038 114,896 112,836 100,676 1,230,848 1,222,408 -0.7 Conventional W W W W 85,371 61,541 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 27,465 39,135 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,367 6,079 5,748 4,965 5,059 4,888 68,060 57,896 -14.9 Conventional W W W W 3,614 2,496 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 1,445 2,392 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,761 14,938 13,417 12,041 12,227 10,983 143,540 129,455 -9.8 Conventional W W W W 9,096 6,224 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 3,131 4,759 W W NA

288

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 130,122 116,547 121,960 106,552 112,818 127,713 340,552 347,083 0.8 Regular 112,836 100,676 105,782 92,915 98,586 112,315 294,534 303,816 2.0 Conventional 85,371 61,541 W W 61,721 W W W NA Oxygenated 27,465 39,135 W W 36,865 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,059 4,888 4,985 4,270 4,425 4,362 15,807 13,057 -18.3 Conventional 3,614 2,496 2,445 2,157 2,245 W W W NA Oxygenated 1,445 2,392 2,540 2,113 2,180 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,227 10,983 11,193 9,367 9,807 11,036 30,211 30,210 -1.1 Conventional 9,096 6,224 W W 5,377 9,727 W W NA Oxygenated 3,131 4,759 W W 4,430 1,309 W W NA

289

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 472,638 505,168 518,672 519,911 533,875 490,499 4,425,394 4,458,007 0.4 Regular 371,031 393,423 410,259 408,078 417,472 385,260 3,212,404 3,479,909 7.9 Conventional 72,198 84,129 87,896 94,215 96,792 88,126 626,721 752,180 19.6 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 298,833 309,294 322,363 313,863 320,680 297,134 2,585,683 2,727,729 5.1 Midgrade 38,119 42,058 42,183 43,082 44,099 39,436 447,025 373,571 -16.7 Conventional 5,263 6,834 6,874 7,724 8,310 6,391 67,954 60,335 -11.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 32,856 35,224 35,309 35,358 35,789 33,045 379,071 313,236 -17.7 Premium 63,488 69,687 66,230 68,751 72,304 65,803 765,965 604,527 -21.4

290

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 471,966 528,923 525,025 566,449 559,488 597,880 3,486,265 3,757,529 7.8 Regular 374,051 423,574 425,312 453,084 445,690 473,265 2,773,339 2,999,806 8.2 Conventional 78,103 84,785 84,632 94,055 93,600 107,210 588,702 629,066 6.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 295,948 338,789 340,680 359,029 352,090 366,055 2,184,637 2,370,740 8.5 Midgrade 31,476 35,018 33,447 37,392 37,061 40,905 262,632 248,613 -5.3 Conventional 4,965 5,126 4,880 5,763 5,927 7,511 39,859 39,504 -0.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 26,511 29,892 28,567 31,629 31,134 33,394 222,773 209,109 -6.1 Premium 66,439 70,331 66,266 75,973 76,737 83,710 450,294 509,110 13.1

291

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Hawaii Motor Gasoline 36,063 37,112 34,945 37,474 37,458 32,636 328,239 321,814 -1.6 Regular 28,208 28,918 27,272 29,299 29,242 25,225 259,624 251,473 -2.8 Conventional 28,208 28,918 27,272 29,299 29,242 25,225 259,624 251,473 -2.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,046 2,141 1,997 2,159 2,181 2,006 18,071 18,741 4.1 Conventional 2,046 2,141 1,997 2,159 2,181 2,006 18,071 18,741 4.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 5,809 6,053 5,676 6,016 6,035 5,405 50,544 51,600 2.5 Conventional 5,809 6,053 5,676 6,016 6,035 5,405 50,544 51,600 2.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

292

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 564,932 507,854 551,005 519,384 532,551 507,718 485,599 507,718 4.6 Regular 447,094 403,797 439,428 413,569 423,893 404,806 382,693 404,806 5.8 Conventional 103,625 85,392 90,979 84,964 85,820 86,657 81,128 86,657 6.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 343,469 318,405 348,449 328,605 338,073 318,149 301,565 318,149 5.5 Midgrade 42,027 36,317 37,629 34,336 34,877 33,300 37,658 33,300 -11.6 Conventional 7,514 5,617 5,829 5,231 5,343 5,318 5,706 5,318 -6.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 34,513 30,700 31,800 29,105 29,534 27,982 31,952 27,982 -12.4 Premium 75,811 67,740 73,948 71,479 73,781 69,612 65,248 69,612 6.7

293

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 113,930 111,114 105,103 116,335 119,409 126,351 579,196 578,312 0.5 Regular 103,132 100,685 95,316 105,221 107,403 113,871 527,693 522,496 -0.3 Conventional 103,132 100,685 95,316 105,221 107,403 113,871 527,693 522,496 -0.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,252 1,145 1,088 1,265 1,280 1,320 6,249 6,098 -1.8 Conventional 1,252 1,145 1,088 1,265 1,280 1,320 6,249 6,098 -1.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,546 9,284 8,699 9,849 10,726 11,160 45,254 49,718 10.6 Conventional 9,546 9,284 8,699 9,849 10,726 11,160 45,254 49,718 10.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

294

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 113,104 109,327 121,653 124,202 126,203 128,935 744,685 723,424 -2.9 Regular 103,250 99,731 111,406 113,853 115,311 118,200 674,972 661,751 -2.0 Conventional 103,250 99,731 111,406 113,853 115,311 118,200 674,972 661,751 -2.0 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,231 1,295 1,424 1,390 1,394 1,443 10,075 8,177 -18.8 Conventional 1,231 1,295 1,424 1,390 1,394 1,443 10,075 8,177 -18.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,623 8,301 8,823 8,959 9,498 9,292 59,638 53,496 -10.3 Conventional 8,623 8,301 8,823 8,959 9,498 9,292 59,638 53,496 -10.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

295

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 137,441 135,583 140,679 145,648 126,428 128,134 1,285,114 1,300,085 1.5 Regular 117,996 117,302 120,112 124,098 110,212 110,732 1,107,420 1,119,353 1.4 Conventional W W W W W 82,137 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 28,595 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,550 6,371 6,780 7,144 5,841 6,030 64,184 62,850 -1.8 Conventional W W W W W 4,303 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 1,727 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,895 11,910 13,787 14,406 10,375 11,372 113,510 117,882 4.2 Conventional W W W W W 8,321 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 3,051 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

296

Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

03 03 Table A1. Refiner/Reseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD District and State, 1984-Present (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Year Regular Midgrade Premium All Grades Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale United States 1984 ...................................... 93.2 84.9 NA NA 101.8 92.4 92.0 83.8 1985 ...................................... 93.3 84.9 NA NA 102.3 92.8 92.4 84.1 1986 ...................................... 63.6 52.9 NA NA 74.6 61.7 64.2 53.8 1987 ...................................... 67.0 57.2 NA NA 78.8 67.4 68.4 59.2 1988 ...................................... 66.1 55.1 NA NA 79.4 67.5 68.6 58.0 1989 ......................................

297

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 520,531 538,385 528,784 556,220 507,903 477,845 1,020,860 985,748 -3.4 Regular 455,324 471,622 460,881 485,119 445,636 417,336 862,074 862,972 0.1 Conventional 91,948 94,093 88,528 93,937 87,304 84,544 173,511 171,848 -1.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 363,376 377,529 372,353 391,182 358,332 332,792 688,563 691,124 0.4 Midgrade 20,551 19,614 19,560 21,299 18,945 17,890 48,782 36,835 -24.5 Conventional 2,717 2,378 2,410 2,604 2,326 2,324 6,916 4,650 -32.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 17,834 17,236 17,150 18,695 16,619 15,566 41,866 32,185 -23.1 Premium 44,656 47,149 48,343 49,802 43,322 42,619 110,004 85,941 -21.9

298

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 487,348 483,146 517,898 526,837 540,301 557,239 3,986,053 4,043,504 1.9 Regular 383,984 383,622 416,870 424,735 430,015 441,753 3,105,550 3,215,092 4.0 Conventional 79,461 76,131 87,574 90,924 99,358 101,228 664,227 689,930 4.3 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 304,523 307,491 329,296 333,811 330,657 340,525 2,441,323 2,525,162 3.9 Midgrade 37,107 36,183 38,726 38,791 40,369 41,572 336,457 304,204 -9.2 Conventional 5,418 4,848 5,549 5,989 7,246 7,464 53,868 47,323 -11.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 31,689 31,335 33,177 32,802 33,123 34,108 282,589 256,881 -8.7 Premium 66,257 63,341 62,302 63,311 69,917 73,914 544,046 524,208 -3.2

299

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 139,212 139,507 142,185 127,373 129,849 123,032 1,448,714 1,408,240 -2.8 Regular 125,667 124,434 126,339 113,384 116,510 111,050 1,300,022 1,262,690 -2.9 Conventional 125,667 124,434 126,339 113,384 116,510 111,050 W 1,262,690 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,031 3,341 3,503 2,965 3,032 2,728 37,887 33,675 -11.1 Conventional 3,031 3,341 3,503 2,965 3,032 2,728 W 33,675 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,514 11,732 12,343 11,024 10,307 9,254 110,805 111,875 1.0 Conventional 10,514 11,732 12,343 11,024 10,307 9,254 W 111,875 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

300

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 125,199 124,695 128,129 139,212 139,507 144,488 1,055,712 1,030,289 -2.4 Regular 112,243 112,510 115,823 125,667 124,434 128,593 948,829 924,000 -2.6 Conventional 112,243 112,510 115,823 125,667 124,434 128,593 W 924,000 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,056 2,958 2,859 3,031 3,341 3,519 27,613 24,966 -9.6 Conventional 3,056 2,958 2,859 3,031 3,341 3,519 W 24,966 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,900 9,227 9,447 10,514 11,732 12,376 79,270 81,323 2.6 Conventional 9,900 9,227 9,447 10,514 11,732 12,376 W 81,323 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 528,923 525,025 566,449 559,488 600,331 607,207 4,119,105 4,367,187 6.0 Regular 423,574 425,312 453,084 445,690 474,800 481,685 3,277,121 3,483,026 6.3 Conventional 84,785 84,632 94,055 93,600 107,710 111,156 707,603 740,722 4.7 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 338,789 340,680 359,029 352,090 367,090 370,529 2,569,518 2,742,304 6.7 Midgrade 35,018 33,447 37,392 37,061 41,258 41,537 307,502 290,503 -5.5 Conventional 5,126 4,880 5,763 5,927 7,552 7,706 47,726 47,251 -1.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 29,892 28,567 31,629 31,134 33,706 33,831 259,776 243,252 -6.4 Premium 70,331 66,266 75,973 76,737 84,273 83,985 534,482 593,658 11.1

302

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 505,168 518,672 519,911 533,875 490,623 514,004 4,928,031 4,972,135 0.6 Regular 393,423 410,259 408,078 417,472 385,329 405,977 3,588,437 3,885,955 7.9 Conventional 84,129 87,896 94,215 96,792 88,190 92,351 711,279 844,595 18.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 309,294 322,363 313,863 320,680 297,139 313,626 2,877,158 3,041,360 5.4 Midgrade 42,058 42,183 43,082 44,099 39,487 40,182 495,955 413,804 -16.8 Conventional 6,834 6,874 7,724 8,310 6,437 6,068 75,985 66,449 -12.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 35,224 35,309 35,358 35,789 33,050 34,114 419,970 347,355 -17.6 Premium 69,687 66,230 68,751 72,304 65,807 67,845 843,639 672,376 -20.6

303

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 514,004 485,038 507,317 485,599 445,136 487,354 1,417,244 1,418,089 1.2 Regular 405,977 381,467 399,305 382,693 351,420 383,987 1,094,386 1,118,100 3.3 Conventional 92,351 79,597 83,245 81,128 74,126 79,461 228,824 234,715 3.7 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 313,626 301,870 316,060 301,565 277,294 304,526 865,562 883,385 3.2 Midgrade 40,182 38,304 40,249 37,658 33,798 37,109 124,594 108,565 -11.9 Conventional 6,068 5,346 5,771 5,706 5,103 5,418 18,939 16,227 -13.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 34,114 32,958 34,478 31,952 28,695 31,691 105,655 92,338 -11.6 Premium 67,845 65,267 67,763 65,248 59,918 66,258 198,264 191,424 -2.4

304

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 519,911 533,875 490,623 514,004 485,038 507,934 5,935,217 5,965,107 0.2 Regular 408,078 417,472 385,329 405,977 381,467 399,925 4,344,611 4,667,347 7.1 Conventional 94,215 96,792 88,190 92,351 79,597 83,473 874,137 1,007,665 15.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 313,863 320,680 297,139 313,626 301,870 316,452 3,470,474 3,659,682 5.2 Midgrade 43,082 44,099 39,487 40,182 38,304 40,176 591,701 492,284 -17.0 Conventional 7,724 8,310 6,437 6,068 5,346 5,794 90,790 77,589 -14.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 35,358 35,789 33,050 34,114 32,958 34,382 500,911 414,695 -17.4 Premium 68,751 72,304 65,807 67,845 65,267 67,833 998,905 805,476 -19.6

305

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 110,992 117,088 108,674 122,452 125,233 131,002 611,640 604,449 -0.5 Regular 100,387 106,414 98,792 111,102 113,305 118,166 555,375 547,779 -0.7 Conventional 100,387 106,414 98,792 111,102 113,305 118,166 555,375 547,779 -0.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,792 1,666 1,581 1,792 1,815 1,879 11,860 8,733 -25.9 Conventional 1,792 1,666 1,581 1,792 1,815 1,879 11,860 8,733 -25.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,813 9,008 8,301 9,558 10,113 10,957 44,405 47,937 8.7 Conventional 8,813 9,008 8,301 9,558 10,113 10,957 44,405 47,937 8.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

306

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 115,793 109,751 115,008 129,009 135,752 136,659 771,844 741,972 -3.9 Regular 98,040 94,445 102,049 114,076 117,825 118,360 662,388 644,795 -2.7 Conventional 60,258 59,465 W 98,123 W W W W NA Oxygenated 37,782 34,980 W 15,953 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,943 5,467 4,397 4,632 5,351 5,458 35,839 31,248 -12.8 Conventional 3,737 3,554 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,206 1,913 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,810 9,839 8,562 10,301 12,576 12,841 73,617 65,929 -10.4 Conventional 6,945 5,907 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,865 3,932 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

307

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 123,940 125,772 118,909 110,150 125,199 124,695 500,521 478,953 -4.3 Regular 110,947 112,956 106,914 97,816 112,243 112,510 448,982 429,483 -4.3 Conventional 66,529 67,457 106,914 97,816 112,243 112,510 W 429,483 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,352 3,268 3,106 3,096 3,056 2,958 13,798 12,216 -11.5 Conventional 1,661 1,559 3,106 3,096 3,056 2,958 W 12,216 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,641 9,548 8,889 9,238 9,900 9,227 37,741 37,254 -1.3 Conventional 5,240 5,150 8,889 9,238 9,900 9,227 W 37,254 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

308

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 146,328 138,917 138,012 128,012 123,940 125,772 1,517,105 1,568,511 3.4 Regular 131,286 124,315 123,729 113,898 110,947 112,956 1,350,867 1,407,721 4.2 Conventional W 106,842 W 82,565 66,529 67,457 W W NA Oxygenated W NA W 31,333 44,418 45,499 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,864 3,807 3,502 3,435 3,352 3,268 45,545 41,476 -8.9 Conventional W W W 2,414 1,661 1,559 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 1,021 1,691 1,709 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,178 10,795 10,781 10,679 9,641 9,548 120,693 119,314 -1.1 Conventional W W W 7,751 5,240 5,150 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 2,928 4,401 4,398 W W NA

309

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 464,879 461,983 490,382 472,638 505,168 518,666 2,929,735 2,913,716 -1.1 Regular 352,395 353,719 388,272 371,031 393,423 410,243 2,105,292 2,269,083 7.2 Conventional 74,146 77,773 76,905 72,198 84,129 87,896 366,432 473,047 28.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 278,249 275,946 311,367 298,833 309,294 322,347 W 1,796,036 NA Midgrade 42,713 41,541 40,340 38,119 42,058 42,260 W 247,031 NA Conventional 6,825 6,665 5,449 5,263 6,834 6,874 40,254 37,910 -6.3 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 35,888 34,876 34,891 32,856 35,224 35,386 W 209,121 NA Premium 69,771 66,723 61,770 63,488 69,687 66,163 W 397,602 NA

310

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 532,203 485,311 533,762 523,744 573,398 570,002 3,159,649 3,218,420 1.9 Regular 428,774 397,921 441,388 432,090 465,864 461,379 2,526,541 2,627,416 4.0 Conventional 90,155 82,287 89,054 86,165 94,205 97,033 521,856 538,899 3.3 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 338,619 315,634 352,334 345,925 371,659 364,346 2,004,685 2,088,517 4.2 Midgrade 35,132 30,039 31,738 30,510 34,242 34,518 207,708 196,179 -5.6 Conventional 5,644 4,734 4,484 4,179 5,204 5,452 31,993 29,697 -7.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 29,488 25,305 27,254 26,331 29,038 29,066 175,715 166,482 -5.3 Premium 68,297 57,351 60,636 61,144 73,292 74,105 425,400 394,825 -7.2

311

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,911 137,441 135,583 140,679 145,648 126,428 1,156,653 1,171,951 1.7 Regular 109,294 117,996 117,302 120,112 124,098 110,212 995,899 1,008,621 1.6 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,086 6,550 6,371 6,780 7,144 5,841 57,888 56,820 -1.5 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,531 12,895 11,910 13,787 14,406 10,375 102,866 106,510 3.9 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

312

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 138,917 138,012 128,012 123,940 125,772 118,479 121,056 118,479 -2.1 Regular 124,315 123,729 113,898 110,947 112,956 106,713 108,545 106,713 -1.7 Conventional 106,842 W 82,565 66,529 67,457 106,713 73,017 106,713 46.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,807 3,502 3,435 3,352 3,268 2,959 3,612 2,959 -18.1 Conventional W W 2,414 1,661 1,559 2,959 1,812 2,959 63.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,795 10,781 10,679 9,641 9,548 8,807 8,899 8,807 -1.0 Conventional W W 7,751 5,240 5,150 8,807 5,550 8,807 58.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

313

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 129,584 129,173 130,014 136,995 146,328 147,395 1,009,994 1,061,253 5.1 Regular 116,394 115,901 117,816 123,792 131,286 132,073 896,468 953,949 6.4 Conventional W W W W W 114,438 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,439 3,369 3,143 3,307 3,864 3,905 30,978 28,017 -9.6 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,751 9,903 9,055 9,896 11,178 11,417 82,548 79,287 -4.0 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

314

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 461,105 446,330 487,514 467,445 514,161 520,326 3,010,145 2,896,881 -4.3 Regular 414,239 400,799 438,269 419,689 457,986 462,591 2,707,348 2,593,573 -4.7 Conventional 77,162 75,965 79,443 76,333 90,064 98,380 518,931 497,347 -4.7 Reformulated 337,077 324,834 358,826 343,356 367,922 364,211 2,188,417 2,096,226 -4.7 Midgrade 7,806 7,543 8,274 8,141 9,199 9,495 54,568 50,458 -8.0 Conventional 832 793 806 750 1,071 1,194 6,079 5,446 -10.9 Reformulated 6,974 6,750 7,468 7,391 8,128 8,301 48,489 45,012 -7.7 Premium 39,060 37,988 40,971 39,615 46,976 48,240 248,229 252,850 1.3 Conventional 3,926 3,956 3,932 3,590 5,291 5,945 27,118 26,640 -2.3

315

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 511,860 469,410 527,337 464,879 461,983 466,311 1,432,770 1,393,173 -3.8 Regular 381,794 351,762 397,163 352,395 353,719 370,831 1,016,897 1,076,945 4.7 Conventional 85,363 77,639 84,422 74,146 77,773 72,960 145,115 224,879 53.3 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 296,431 274,123 312,741 278,249 275,946 297,871 871,782 852,066 -3.3 Midgrade 50,511 45,003 49,862 42,713 41,541 37,312 147,343 121,566 -18.4 Conventional 8,326 7,099 7,742 6,825 6,665 5,174 15,916 18,664 16.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 42,185 37,904 42,120 35,888 34,876 32,138 131,427 102,902 -22.6 Premium 79,555 72,645 80,312 69,771 66,723 58,168 268,530 194,662 -28.3

316

Connecticut Prices, Sales Volumes & Stocks  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

- - - - - - 1986-2013 - - - - - - 1986-2013 Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel (Refiner Sales) W W W W W W 1984-2013 Kerosene (Refiner Sales) - W W - - NA 1984-2013 No. 1 Distillate (Refiner Sales) - - - - - - 1984-2013 No. 2 Distillate - - - - - - 1983-2013 No. 2 Fuel Oil (Residential) - - - - - - 1983-2013 No. 2 Diesel Fuel (Retail Outlets) - - - - - - 1994-2013 No. 4 Fuel Oil (Refiner Sales) W W W W W NA 1993-2013 Prime Supplier Sales Volumes (Thousand Gallons per Day) Motor Gasoline 3,969.5 4,012.0 3,982.9 4,034.9 3,938.4 3,955.8 1983-2013 Regular 3,431.9 3,470.2 3,458.0 3,486.5 3,382.7 3,432.7 1983-2013 Midgrade 62.5 64.9 67.3 73.9 67.8 57.4 1988-2013 Premium 475.0 476.9 457.6 474.5 487.9 465.7 1983-2013 Aviation Gasoline 2.7 4.1 3.0 6.1 3.4 3.5 1983-2013

317

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 116,747 127,703 122,936 133,205 139,935 140,080 857,910 899,161 5.3 Regular 102,420 113,498 110,833 118,938 124,805 124,098 755,633 798,614 6.2 Conventional 61,912 91,743 W 99,124 W 103,850 W W NA Oxygenated 40,508 21,755 W 19,814 W 20,248 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,874 3,705 3,183 3,610 3,716 3,909 29,154 26,119 -10.0 Conventional 1,900 3,187 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 1,974 518 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,453 10,500 8,920 10,657 11,414 12,073 73,123 74,428 2.3 Conventional 5,909 8,746 7,806 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,544 NA 1,114 W W W W W NA

318

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,458 126,327 130,524 133,704 122,163 124,443 1,251,722 1,216,357 -3.1 Regular 115,160 114,987 117,633 120,719 110,769 113,333 1,140,752 1,105,134 -3.4 Conventional 115,160 114,987 117,633 120,719 110,769 113,333 1,140,752 1,105,134 -3.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,340 1,281 1,456 1,562 1,304 1,307 14,306 13,159 -8.3 Conventional 1,340 1,281 1,456 1,562 1,304 1,307 14,306 13,159 -8.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,958 10,059 11,435 11,423 10,090 9,803 96,664 98,064 1.1 Conventional 9,958 10,059 11,435 11,423 10,090 9,803 96,664 98,064 1.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

319

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 125,045 119,493 110,992 117,088 108,674 122,452 355,162 348,214 -0.9 Regular 114,124 108,458 100,387 106,414 98,792 111,102 321,974 316,308 -0.7 Conventional 114,124 108,458 100,387 106,414 98,792 111,102 321,974 316,308 -0.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,731 1,769 1,792 1,666 1,581 1,792 7,268 5,039 -29.9 Conventional 1,731 1,769 1,792 1,666 1,581 1,792 7,268 5,039 -29.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,190 9,266 8,813 9,008 8,301 9,558 25,920 26,867 4.8 Conventional 9,190 9,266 8,813 9,008 8,301 9,558 25,920 26,867 4.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

320

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 519,384 532,551 507,798 471,966 528,923 525,127 1,901,229 2,033,814 7.0 Regular 413,569 423,893 404,830 374,051 423,574 425,403 1,501,719 1,627,858 8.4 Conventional 84,964 85,820 86,681 78,103 84,785 84,662 310,846 334,231 7.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 328,605 338,073 318,149 295,948 338,789 340,741 1,190,873 1,293,627 8.6 Midgrade 34,336 34,877 33,314 31,476 35,018 33,448 144,746 133,256 -7.9 Conventional 5,231 5,343 5,332 4,965 5,126 4,880 21,075 20,303 -3.7 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 29,105 29,534 27,982 26,511 29,892 28,568 123,671 112,953 -8.7 Premium 71,479 73,781 69,654 66,439 70,331 66,276 254,764 272,700 7.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Premium All Grades Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Other End Users a Through Retail Outlets Other End Users a Through Retail Outlets Other End Users a Through Retail Outlets Other End Users a United States January ............................... 133.0 134.5 122.5 144.3 151.2 130.9 156.6 154.7 142.4 135.8 136.5 124.6 February ............................. 144.1 134.4 131.2 157.8 149.6 135.7 170.5 155.1 153.2 147.2 136.1 133.3 March .................................. 147.6 140.2 137.7 160.3 152.1 143.3 172.4 159.9 158.0

322

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 123,768 109,386 109,777 115,509 118,066 126,458 594,489 579,196 -3.2 Regular 112,568 99,533 99,656 105,682 107,662 115,160 543,551 527,693 -3.6 Conventional 112,568 99,533 99,656 105,682 107,662 115,160 543,551 527,693 -3.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,331 1,199 1,209 1,246 1,255 1,340 6,734 6,249 -7.8 Conventional 1,331 1,199 1,209 1,246 1,255 1,340 6,734 6,249 -7.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,869 8,654 8,912 8,581 9,149 9,958 44,204 45,254 1.7 Conventional 9,869 8,654 8,912 8,581 9,149 9,958 44,204 45,254 1.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

323

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 139,507 142,185 127,373 129,849 123,027 124,397 1,574,756 1,532,632 -2.7 Regular 124,434 126,339 113,384 116,510 111,045 112,374 1,413,225 1,375,059 -2.7 Conventional 124,434 126,339 113,384 116,510 111,045 112,374 W 1,375,059 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,341 3,503 2,965 3,032 2,728 2,694 41,174 36,369 -11.7 Conventional 3,341 3,503 2,965 3,032 2,728 2,694 W 36,369 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,732 12,343 11,024 10,307 9,254 9,329 120,357 121,204 0.7 Conventional 11,732 12,343 11,024 10,307 9,254 9,329 W 121,204 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

324

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 490,382 472,638 505,168 518,672 519,911 532,719 3,939,380 3,966,352 0.3 Regular 388,272 371,031 393,423 410,259 408,078 416,243 2,850,677 3,093,420 8.1 Conventional 76,905 72,198 84,129 87,896 94,215 96,116 544,853 663,378 21.3 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 311,367 298,833 309,294 322,363 313,863 320,127 2,305,824 2,430,042 5.0 Midgrade 40,340 38,119 42,058 42,183 43,082 44,172 399,285 334,208 -16.6 Conventional 5,449 5,263 6,834 6,874 7,724 8,288 59,695 53,922 -10.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 34,891 32,856 35,224 35,309 35,358 35,884 339,590 280,286 -17.8 Premium 61,770 63,488 69,687 66,230 68,751 72,304 689,418 538,724 -22.2

325

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 109,327 121,653 124,202 126,203 128,935 134,724 891,067 858,148 -3.7 Regular 99,731 111,406 113,853 115,311 118,200 121,899 806,662 783,650 -2.9 Conventional 99,731 111,406 113,853 115,311 118,200 121,899 806,662 783,650 -2.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,295 1,424 1,390 1,394 1,443 1,617 11,994 9,794 -18.3 Conventional 1,295 1,424 1,390 1,394 1,443 1,617 11,994 9,794 -18.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,301 8,823 8,959 9,498 9,292 11,208 72,411 64,704 -10.6 Conventional 8,301 8,823 8,959 9,498 9,292 11,208 72,411 64,704 -10.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

326

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 525,232 495,628 551,143 531,765 584,325 598,426 3,292,306 3,286,519 0.4 Regular 443,125 418,949 470,196 458,180 500,637 509,217 2,752,381 2,800,304 2.3 Conventional 89,276 84,235 89,770 85,230 97,842 102,726 542,072 549,079 1.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 353,849 334,714 380,426 372,950 402,795 406,491 2,210,309 2,251,225 2.4 Midgrade 25,145 23,637 24,880 22,345 24,606 26,175 169,802 146,788 -13.1 Conventional 3,520 3,396 3,187 2,510 3,230 3,852 24,221 19,695 -18.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 21,625 20,241 21,693 19,835 21,376 22,323 145,581 127,093 -12.2 Premium 56,962 53,042 56,067 51,240 59,082 63,034 370,123 339,427 -7.8

327

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 130,255 126,911 137,441 135,583 140,679 148,423 1,025,877 1,048,298 2.6 Regular 111,793 109,294 117,996 117,302 120,112 126,586 882,283 900,897 2.5 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,711 6,086 6,550 6,371 6,780 7,144 51,718 50,979 -1.0 Conventional 6,196 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 515 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,751 11,531 12,895 11,910 13,787 14,693 91,876 96,422 5.4 Conventional 10,535 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 1,216 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

328

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 128,012 123,940 125,772 118,909 110,150 125,387 371,348 354,446 -4.6 Regular 113,898 110,947 112,956 106,914 97,816 112,428 333,081 317,158 -4.8 Conventional 82,565 66,529 67,457 106,914 97,816 112,428 W 317,158 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,435 3,352 3,268 3,106 3,096 3,056 10,429 9,258 -11.2 Conventional 2,414 1,661 1,559 3,106 3,096 3,056 W 9,258 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,679 9,641 9,548 8,889 9,238 9,903 27,838 28,030 0.7 Conventional 7,751 5,240 5,150 8,889 9,238 9,903 W 28,030 NA

329

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 129,220 103,710 107,583 128,992 122,068 133,706 605,163 596,059 -2.2 Regular 106,433 87,146 89,279 112,686 106,242 115,310 498,211 510,663 1.8 Conventional 58,414 47,766 48,793 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 48,019 39,380 40,486 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – W – NA Midgrade 8,430 6,076 6,783 6,276 5,802 6,492 42,016 31,429 -25.7 Conventional 4,377 3,128 3,568 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,053 2,948 3,215 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 14,357 10,488 11,521 10,030 10,024 11,904 W 53,967 NA Conventional 7,564 5,684 6,316 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 6,793 4,804 5,205 W W W W W NA

330

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 533,762 523,744 573,398 571,866 610,670 616,068 4,361,461 4,447,022 2.0 Regular 441,388 432,090 465,864 462,449 488,921 499,355 3,478,596 3,616,762 4.0 Conventional 89,054 86,165 94,205 96,905 106,748 109,285 737,049 754,804 2.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 352,334 345,925 371,659 365,544 382,173 390,070 2,741,547 2,861,958 4.4 Midgrade 31,738 30,510 34,242 34,914 38,917 38,243 290,107 273,735 -5.6 Conventional 4,484 4,179 5,204 5,476 6,910 6,876 47,058 43,507 -7.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 27,254 26,331 29,038 29,438 32,007 31,367 243,049 230,228 -5.3 Premium 60,636 61,144 73,292 74,503 82,832 78,470 592,758 556,525 -6.1

331

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 127,373 129,849 123,027 124,392 117,292 115,450 229,059 232,742 -0.1 Regular 113,384 116,510 111,045 112,370 106,132 104,278 204,730 210,410 1.1 Conventional 113,384 116,510 111,045 112,370 106,132 104,278 204,730 210,410 1.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,965 3,032 2,728 2,693 2,570 2,474 6,202 5,044 -20.0 Conventional 2,965 3,032 2,728 2,693 2,570 2,474 6,202 5,044 -20.0 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,024 10,307 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,698 18,127 17,288 -6.2 Conventional 11,024 10,307 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,698 18,127 17,288 -6.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

332

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 469,410 527,337 464,879 461,983 490,382 472,644 1,908,159 1,889,888 -1.8 Regular 351,762 397,163 352,395 353,719 388,272 371,037 1,362,156 1,465,423 6.7 Conventional 77,639 84,422 74,146 77,773 76,905 72,195 207,716 301,019 43.7 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 274,123 312,741 278,249 275,946 311,367 298,842 1,154,440 1,164,404 0.0 Midgrade 45,003 49,862 42,713 41,541 40,340 38,118 196,036 162,712 -17.7 Conventional 7,099 7,742 6,825 6,665 5,449 5,263 22,130 24,202 8.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 37,904 42,120 35,888 34,876 34,891 32,855 W 138,510 NA Premium 72,645 80,312 69,771 66,723 61,770 63,489 349,967 261,753 -25.8

333

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 513,590 550,648 514,054 550,377 518,226 477,497 1,006,008 995,723 0.7 Regular 460,050 493,937 460,528 491,662 464,200 427,973 897,253 892,173 1.1 Conventional 85,817 90,049 80,032 90,649 82,174 76,970 161,601 159,144 0.1 Reformulated 374,233 403,888 380,496 401,013 382,026 351,003 735,652 733,029 1.3 Midgrade 11,714 11,956 11,129 12,327 11,408 10,578 28,304 21,986 -21.0 Conventional 1,208 1,145 948 1,239 1,124 1,067 3,498 2,191 -36.3 Reformulated 10,506 10,811 10,181 11,088 10,284 9,511 24,806 19,795 -18.8 Premium 41,826 44,755 42,397 46,388 42,618 38,946 80,451 81,564 3.1 Conventional 4,768 4,532 3,734 4,536 4,692 4,409 8,045 9,101 15.0

334

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 134,691 134,417 146,382 143,657 132,937 131,479 1,272,690 1,299,140 2.1 Regular 121,891 121,352 131,690 129,325 120,067 118,905 1,150,389 1,174,959 2.1 Conventional 121,891 121,352 131,690 129,325 120,067 118,905 1,150,389 1,174,959 2.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,760 1,750 1,919 1,903 1,721 1,668 18,321 17,286 -5.6 Conventional 1,760 1,750 1,919 1,903 1,721 1,668 18,321 17,286 -5.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,040 11,315 12,773 12,429 11,149 10,906 103,980 106,895 2.8 Conventional 11,040 11,315 12,773 12,429 11,149 10,906 103,980 106,895 2.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

335

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,103 120,513 123,768 109,386 109,777 115,509 344,084 334,672 -3.8 Regular 114,985 109,752 112,568 99,533 99,656 105,616 314,387 304,805 -4.1 Conventional 114,985 109,752 112,568 99,533 99,656 105,616 314,387 304,805 -4.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,405 1,347 1,331 1,199 1,209 1,312 3,950 3,720 -6.9 Conventional 1,405 1,347 1,331 1,199 1,209 1,312 3,950 3,720 -6.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,713 9,414 9,869 8,654 8,912 8,581 25,747 26,147 0.4 Conventional 9,713 9,414 9,869 8,654 8,912 8,581 25,747 26,147 0.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

336

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 128,992 122,068 133,706 137,219 136,075 142,541 1,034,843 1,011,894 -2.6 Regular 112,686 106,242 115,310 117,700 117,117 121,620 859,427 867,100 0.5 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,276 5,802 6,492 6,744 6,728 7,311 66,751 52,212 -22.1 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,030 10,024 11,904 12,775 12,230 13,610 108,665 92,582 -15.1 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

337

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 107,583 128,992 122,068 133,706 137,219 132,842 895,949 866,120 -3.8 Regular 89,279 112,686 106,242 115,310 117,700 114,094 741,958 742,457 -0.4 Conventional 48,793 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 40,486 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,783 6,276 5,802 6,492 6,744 6,728 58,709 44,901 -23.9 Conventional 3,568 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 3,215 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,521 10,030 10,024 11,904 12,775 12,020 95,282 78,762 -17.7 Conventional 6,316 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 5,205 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

338

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 119,737 113,339 129,220 103,710 107,583 119,248 373,849 330,541 -12.6 Regular 99,178 93,150 106,433 87,146 89,279 102,540 306,715 278,965 -10.0 Conventional 72,818 53,121 58,414 47,766 48,793 85,366 W 181,925 NA Oxygenated 26,360 40,029 48,019 39,380 40,486 17,174 W 97,040 NA Reformulated – – – – – – W – NA Midgrade 7,656 7,437 8,430 6,076 6,783 6,467 26,108 19,326 -26.8 Conventional 5,046 3,943 4,377 3,128 3,568 5,419 W 12,115 NA Oxygenated 2,610 3,494 4,053 2,948 3,215 1,048 W 7,211 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,903 12,752 14,357 10,488 11,521 10,241 W 32,250 NA Conventional 9,375 7,016 7,564 5,684 6,316 8,973 W 20,973 NA

339

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 149,898 143,203 131,902 130,122 116,547 121,960 1,567,974 1,531,719 -2.3 Regular 128,881 124,038 114,896 112,836 100,676 105,782 1,337,161 1,328,190 -0.7 Conventional W W W 85,371 61,541 W W W NA Oxygenated W W W 27,465 39,135 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,079 5,748 4,965 5,059 4,888 4,985 74,450 62,881 -15.5 Conventional W W W 3,614 2,496 2,445 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 1,445 2,392 2,540 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 14,938 13,417 12,041 12,227 10,983 11,193 156,363 140,648 -10.1 Conventional W W W 9,096 6,224 W W W NA Oxygenated W W W 3,131 4,759 W W W NA

340

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 122,264 125,761 130,717 124,186 133,271 134,214 1,027,509 1,003,311 -2.8 Regular 111,432 114,120 119,281 113,226 121,327 121,927 921,308 911,855 -1.4 Conventional 111,432 114,120 119,281 113,226 121,327 121,927 921,308 911,855 -1.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,207 2,427 2,165 1,961 2,084 2,075 24,947 17,980 -28.2 Conventional 2,207 2,427 2,165 1,961 2,084 2,075 24,947 17,980 -28.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,625 9,214 9,271 8,999 9,860 10,212 81,254 73,476 -9.9 Conventional 8,625 9,214 9,271 8,999 9,860 10,212 81,254 73,476 -9.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

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341

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 129,173 130,014 136,995 146,328 138,917 138,134 1,134,129 1,190,909 5.0 Regular 115,901 117,816 123,792 131,286 124,315 123,994 1,007,880 1,070,185 6.2 Conventional W W W W 106,842 97,784 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W NA NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,369 3,143 3,307 3,864 3,807 3,494 34,533 31,413 -9.0 Conventional W W W W W 3,036 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,903 9,055 9,896 11,178 10,795 10,646 91,716 89,311 -2.6 Conventional W W W W W 9,255 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

342

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 128,837 126,103 120,513 123,768 109,386 109,792 222,431 219,178 -3.1 Regular 116,899 114,985 109,752 112,568 99,533 99,671 202,981 199,204 -3.5 Conventional 116,899 114,985 109,752 112,568 99,533 99,671 202,981 199,204 -3.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,482 1,405 1,347 1,331 1,199 1,209 2,526 2,408 -6.3 Conventional 1,482 1,405 1,347 1,331 1,199 1,209 2,526 2,408 -6.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,456 9,713 9,414 9,869 8,654 8,912 16,924 17,566 2.1 Conventional 10,456 9,713 9,414 9,869 8,654 8,912 16,924 17,566 2.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

343

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 616,068 545,541 567,208 520,002 553,717 547,365 532,203 547,365 2.8 Regular 499,355 452,103 468,190 426,231 451,348 449,556 428,774 449,556 4.8 Conventional 109,285 92,595 96,551 84,706 90,958 89,377 90,155 89,377 -0.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 390,070 359,508 371,639 341,525 360,390 360,179 338,619 360,179 6.4 Midgrade 38,243 30,416 31,258 29,317 32,045 31,119 35,132 31,119 -11.4 Conventional 6,876 4,820 4,956 4,291 4,765 4,641 5,644 4,641 -17.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 31,367 25,596 26,302 25,026 27,280 26,478 29,488 26,478 -10.2 Premium 78,470 63,022 67,760 64,454 70,324 66,690 68,297 66,690 -2.4

344

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 477,845 534,207 506,958 545,539 557,326 573,489 3,900,691 3,703,267 -5.1 Regular 417,336 468,021 446,104 480,482 489,993 502,342 3,322,506 3,249,914 -2.2 Conventional 84,544 94,827 88,991 98,590 106,317 114,517 656,106 675,090 2.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 332,792 373,194 357,113 381,892 383,676 387,825 2,666,400 2,574,824 -3.4 Midgrade 17,890 19,431 18,128 19,540 20,189 22,415 176,861 136,538 -22.8 Conventional 2,324 2,536 2,220 2,548 2,831 3,551 24,936 18,336 -26.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 15,566 16,895 15,908 16,992 17,358 18,864 151,925 118,202 -22.2 Premium 42,619 46,755 42,726 45,517 47,144 48,732 401,324 316,815 -21.1

345

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type Definitions Key Terms Definition Bulk Sales Wholesale sales of gasoline in individual transactions which exceed the size of a truckload. Dealer Tank Wagon Sales (DTW) Wholesale sales of gasoline priced on a delivered basis to a retail outlet. Gas Plant Operator Any firm, including a gas plant owner, which operates a gas plant and keeps the gas plant records. A gas plant is a facility in which natural gas liquids are separated from natural gas or in which natural gas liquids are fractionated or otherwise separated into natural gas liquid products or both. For the purposes of this survey, gas plant operator data are contained in the refiner categories. Gasoline Grades The classification of gasoline by octane ratings. Each type of gasoline (conventional and reformulated) is classified by three grades - regular, midgrade, and premium. Note: gasoline sales are reported by grade in accordance with their classification at the time of sale. In general, automotive octane requirements are lower at high altitudes. Therefore, in some areas of the United States, such as the Rocky Mountain States, the octane ratings for the gasoline grades may be 2 or more octane points lower.

346

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 130,014 136,995 146,328 138,917 138,012 127,840 1,262,237 1,318,627 4.5 Regular 117,816 123,792 131,286 124,315 123,729 113,744 1,123,018 1,183,664 5.4 Conventional W W W 106,842 W 82,411 W W NA Oxygenated W W W NA W 31,333 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,143 3,307 3,864 3,807 3,502 3,436 38,117 34,857 -8.6 Conventional W W W W W 2,415 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 1,021 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,055 9,896 11,178 10,795 10,781 10,660 101,102 100,106 -1.0 Conventional W W W W W 7,732 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 2,928 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

347

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 138,012 128,012 123,940 125,772 118,909 110,142 241,764 229,051 -5.3 Regular 123,729 113,898 110,947 112,956 106,914 97,810 216,687 204,724 -5.5 Conventional W 82,565 66,529 67,457 106,914 97,810 145,946 204,724 40.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,502 3,435 3,352 3,268 3,106 3,096 6,990 6,202 -11.3 Conventional W 2,414 1,661 1,559 3,106 3,096 3,430 6,202 80.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,781 10,679 9,641 9,548 8,889 9,236 18,087 18,125 0.2 Conventional W 7,751 5,240 5,150 8,889 9,236 11,371 18,125 59.4

348

U.S. Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Motor Gasoline Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Sales Type: Sales to End Users, Total Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale, Total DTW Rack Bulk Sales Type: Sales to End Users, Total Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale, Total DTW Rack Bulk Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Sales Type Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Motor Gasoline 28,179.6 24,384.0 24,143.9 23,567.1 24,120.5 23,282.9 1983-2013 by Grade Regular 23,757.8 20,526.5 20,356.1 19,806.6 20,240.9 19,586.1 1983-2013 Midgrade 1,876.1 1,545.0 1,534.8 1,527.0 1,561.5 1,484.7 1988-2013 Premium 2,545.7 2,312.4 2,252.9 2,233.5 2,318.1 2,212.1 1983-2013 by Formulation Conventional 16,716.2 14,277.3 13,878.1 13,588.6 14,053.9 13,516.9 1994-2013 Oxygenated - - - - - - 1994-2013

349

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 445,136 487,348 483,146 517,898 526,837 544,494 3,452,178 3,490,458 1.6 Regular 351,420 383,984 383,622 416,870 424,735 433,577 2,688,078 2,776,901 3.8 Conventional 74,126 79,461 76,131 87,574 90,924 100,689 567,435 590,033 4.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 277,294 304,523 307,491 329,296 333,811 332,888 2,120,643 2,186,868 3.6 Midgrade 33,798 37,107 36,183 38,726 38,791 40,503 292,358 262,766 -9.7 Conventional 5,103 5,418 4,848 5,549 5,989 7,314 45,558 39,927 -11.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 28,695 31,689 31,335 33,177 32,802 33,189 246,800 222,839 -9.3 Premium 59,918 66,257 63,341 62,302 63,311 70,414 471,742 450,791 -4.0

350

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 135,052 139,789 134,234 138,886 144,986 126,240 1,172,127 1,181,956 0.8 Regular 117,278 120,111 114,632 118,057 122,577 107,025 1,008,435 1,010,047 0.2 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,845 6,196 6,170 6,572 7,047 6,066 56,889 55,524 -2.4 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,929 13,482 13,432 14,257 15,362 13,149 106,803 116,385 9.0 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

351

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 125,772 118,909 110,150 125,199 124,695 128,126 630,535 607,079 -3.7 Regular 112,956 106,914 97,816 112,243 112,510 115,820 566,798 545,303 -3.8 Conventional 67,457 106,914 97,816 112,243 112,510 115,820 W 545,303 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,268 3,106 3,096 3,056 2,958 2,859 16,941 15,075 -11.0 Conventional 1,559 3,106 3,096 3,056 2,958 2,859 W 15,075 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,548 8,889 9,238 9,900 9,227 9,447 46,796 46,701 -0.2 Conventional 5,150 8,889 9,238 9,900 9,227 9,447 W 46,701 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

352

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 137,219 136,075 139,236 130,776 128,461 125,271 1,420,301 1,393,097 -2.2 Regular 117,700 117,117 118,534 113,616 111,521 108,520 1,184,245 1,197,671 0.8 Conventional W W W W 82,755 62,396 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 28,766 46,124 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,744 6,728 7,311 6,170 6,296 6,420 89,020 71,098 -20.4 Conventional W W W W 4,406 3,840 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 1,890 2,580 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,775 12,230 13,391 10,990 10,644 10,331 147,036 124,328 -15.7 Conventional W W W W 7,778 5,564 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 2,866 4,767 W W NA

353

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 130,385 114,483 117,639 115,793 109,751 116,793 362,769 342,337 -5.6 Regular 109,801 96,041 99,099 98,040 94,445 103,581 310,367 296,066 -4.6 Conventional 80,782 59,921 61,268 60,258 59,465 W 201,931 W NA Oxygenated 29,019 36,120 37,831 37,782 34,980 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,616 6,121 6,193 5,943 5,467 4,464 17,628 15,874 -10.0 Conventional 4,628 3,531 3,743 3,737 3,554 W 11,795 W NA Oxygenated 1,988 2,590 2,450 2,206 1,913 W 5,833 W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 13,968 12,321 12,347 11,810 9,839 8,748 34,774 30,397 -12.6 Conventional 9,980 7,264 7,339 6,945 5,907 W 22,352 W NA

354

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 528,784 556,220 507,903 477,845 534,207 506,959 2,103,768 2,026,914 -3.7 Regular 460,881 485,119 445,636 417,336 468,021 446,104 1,790,450 1,777,097 -0.7 Conventional 88,528 93,937 87,304 84,544 94,827 88,991 348,511 355,666 2.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 372,353 391,182 358,332 332,792 373,194 357,113 1,441,939 1,421,431 -1.4 Midgrade 19,560 21,299 18,945 17,890 19,431 18,129 96,007 74,395 -22.5 Conventional 2,410 2,604 2,326 2,324 2,536 2,221 12,613 9,407 -25.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 17,150 18,695 16,619 15,566 16,895 15,908 83,394 64,988 -22.1 Premium 48,343 49,802 43,322 42,619 46,755 42,726 217,311 175,422 -19.3

355

A regularized spectral algorithm for Hidden Markov Models with applications in computer vision  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A regularized spectral algorithm for Hidden Markov Models with applications in computer vision H a regularized algorithm for learning HMMs in the spectral framework, whose computations have no local minima. Compared with recently proposed spectral algorithms for HMMs, our method is guaranteed to produce

Minh, Ha Quang

356

2.5D Building Modeling by Discovering Global Regularities Qian-Yi Zhou  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2.5D Building Modeling by Discovering Global Regularities Qian-Yi Zhou University of Southern@graphics.usc.edu Abstract We introduce global regularities in the 2.5D building modeling problem, to reflect the orientation of both geometry and human judge- ment. 1. Introduction Building modeling is a critical problem of 3D

Shahabi, Cyrus

357

Regular and irregular cycling near a heteroclinic C M Postlethwaite and J H P Dawes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the same parameter values, as can combinations of regular and irregular cycling. Analytic resultsRegular and irregular cycling near a heteroclinic network C M Postlethwaite and J H P Dawes DAMTP.Postlethwaite@damtp.cam.ac.uk Abstract. Heteroclinic networks are invariant sets containing more than one heteroclinic cycle

Dawes, Jon

358

HAMILTON DECOMPOSITIONS OF REGULAR EXPANDERS: A PROOF OF KELLY'S CONJECTURE FOR LARGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HAMILTON DECOMPOSITIONS OF REGULAR EXPANDERS: A PROOF OF KELLY'S CONJECTURE FOR LARGE TOURNAMENTS DANIELA K¨UHN AND DERYK OSTHUS Abstract. A long-standing conjecture of Kelly states that every regular as well as Alon, Gutin and Krivelevich. 1. Introduction 1.1. Kelly's conjecture. A graph or digraph G has

Kühn, Daniela

359

Outfix-Free Regular Languages and Prime Outfix-Free Decomposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Outfix-Free Regular Languages and Prime Outfix-Free Decomposition Yo-Sub Han and Derick Wood and a set X of strings is outfix-free if no string in X is an outfix of any other string in X. We examine the outfix-free regular languages. Based on the properties of outfix strings, we develop a polynomial

Han, Yo-Sub

360

HAMILTON DECOMPOSITIONS OF REGULAR TOURNAMENTS DANIELA KUHN, DERYK OSTHUS AND ANDREW TREGLOWN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HAMILTON DECOMPOSITIONS OF REGULAR TOURNAMENTS DANIELA K¨UHN, DERYK OSTHUS AND ANDREW TREGLOWN into edge-disjoint Hamilton cycles. More precisely, for each > 0 every regular tournament G of sufficiently large order n contains at least (1/2 - )n edge-disjoint Hamilton cycles. This gives an approximate

Osthus, Deryk

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Lead-position dependent regular oscillations and random fluctuations of conductance in graphene quantum dots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lead-position dependent regular oscillations and random fluctuations of conductance in graphene.1088/0953-8984/25/8/085502 Lead-position dependent regular oscillations and random fluctuations of conductance in graphene quantum, for graphene quantum dots, the conductance variations with the lead positions. Since for graphene the types

Lai, Ying-Cheng

362

Heat kernels on metric measure spaces with regular volume Alexander Grigor'yan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat kernels on metric measure spaces with regular volume growth Alexander Grigor'yan Department In this survey we study heat kernel estimates of self-similar type on metric mea- sure spaces with regular volume and phrases. Heat kernel, metric measure space, maximum principle, heat semigroup Contents 1 Introduction 2 1

Grigor'yan, Alexander

363

Heat kernels on metric measure spaces with regular volume Alexander Grigor'yan #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat kernels on metric measure spaces with regular volume growth Alexander Grigor'yan # Department In this survey we study heat kernel estimates of self­similar type on metric mea­ sure spaces with regular volume and phrases. Heat kernel, metric measure space, maximum principle, heat semigroup Contents 1 Introduction 2 1

Grigor'yan, Alexander

364

Foundations of Regular Variation N. H. Bingham and A. J. Ostaszewski (London)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

must satisfy the Cauchy func- tional equation g(µ) = g()g(µ) , µ > 0. (CFE) Subject to a mild regularity condition, (CFE) forces g to be a power: g() = > 0. () Then f is said to be regularly varying property, (CFE) implies (), but not in general. See BGT §§1.1, 1.2; for background on the Cauchy functional

Haase, Markus

365

Regular black holes: Electrically charged solutions, Reissner-Nordstroem outside a de Sitter core  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To have the correct picture of a black hole as a whole, it is of crucial importance to understand its interior. The singularities that lurk inside the horizon of the usual Kerr-Newman family of black hole solutions signal an endpoint to the physical laws and, as such, should be substituted in one way or another. A proposal that has been around for sometime is to replace the singular region of the spacetime by a region containing some form of matter or false vacuum configuration that can also cohabit with the black hole interior. Black holes without singularities are called regular black holes. In the present work, regular black hole solutions are found within general relativity coupled to Maxwell's electromagnetism and charged matter. We show that there are objects which correspond to regular charged black holes, whose interior region is de Sitter, whose exterior region is Reissner-Nordstroem, and the boundary between both regions is made of an electrically charged spherically symmetric coat. There are several types of solutions: regular nonextremal black holes with a null matter boundary, regular nonextremal black holes with a timelike matter boundary, regular extremal black holes with a timelike matter boundary, and regular overcharged stars with a timelike matter boundary. The main physical and geometrical properties of such charged regular solutions are analyzed.

Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zanchin, Vilson T. [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica - CENTRA, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico - IST, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa - UTL, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Rua Santa Adelia, 166, 09210-170, Santo Andre, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Coordenadoria de Astronomia e Astrofisica, Observatorio Nacional-MCT, Rua General Jose Cristino 77, 20921-400 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Weakly regular T2 symmetric spacetimes. The future causal geometry of Gowdy spaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the future asymptotic behavior of Gowdy spacetimes on T3, when the metric satisfies weak regularity conditions, so that the metric coefficients (in suitable coordinates) are only in the Sobolev space H1 or have even weaker regularity. The authors recently introduced this class of spacetimes in the broader context of T2 symmetric spacetimes and established the existence of a global foliation by spacelike hypersurfaces when the time function is chosen to be the area of the surfaces of symmetry. In the present paper, we identify the global causal geometry of these spacetimes and, in particular, establish that weakly regular Gowdy spacetimes are future causally geodesically complete. This result extends a theorem by Ringstr\\"om for metrics with sufficiently high regularity. We emphasize that our proof of the energy decay is based on an energy functional inspired by the Gowdy-to-Ernst transformation. In order to establish the geodesic completeness property, we prove a higher regularity property concerning the metric coefficients along timelike curves and we provide a novel analysis of the geodesic equation for Gowdy spacetimes, which does not require high-order regularity estimates. Even when sufficient regularity is assumed, our proof provides an alternative and shorter proof of the energy decay and of the geodesic completeness property for Gowdy spacetimes.

Philippe G. LeFloch; Jacques Smulevici

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

367

Solving Regular Tree Grammar Based Constraints Yanhong A. Liu Ning Li Scott D. Stoller  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solving Regular Tree Grammar Based Constraints Yanhong A. Liu Ning Li Scott D. Stoller July 2000 and is then simpli ed according to a set of simpli cation rules to produce the solution. Usually, the constraints

Stoller, Scott

368

Timing in the Absence of Supraspinal Input: Effects of Temporally Regular Stimulation on Spinal Plasticity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prior work has shown that spinal neurons are capable of discriminating between temporally regular and temporally irregular stimulation. These effects have been observed using an in vivo assay of spinal plasticity based on an instrumental learning...

Lee, Kuan Hsien

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

369

A discrete L-curve for the regularization of ill-posed inverse problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 23, 2012 ... The L-curve criterium is a popular tool for choosing good regularized solutions, when the data noise norm is not a priori known. In this work, we...

Germana Landi

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

370

Enhancement of spatiotemporal regularity in an optimal window of random coupling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of a lattice of coupled chaotic maps whose coupling connections are dynamically rewired to random sites with probability p; namely, at any instance of time, with probability p a regular link is switched to a random one. In a range of weak coupling, where spatiotemporal chaos exists for regular lattices (i.e., for p=0), we find that p>0 yields synchronized periodic orbits. Further, we observe that this regularity occurs over a window of p values, beyond which the basin of attraction of the synchronized cycle shrinks to zero. Thus we have evidence of an optimal range of randomness in coupling connections, where spatiotemporal regularity is efficiently obtained. This is in contrast to the commonly observed monotonic increase of synchronization with increasing p, as seen, for instance, in the strong-coupling regime of the very same system.

Swarup Poria; Manish Dev Shrimali; Sudeshna Sinha

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

371

Regular domain structure in a lithium niobate crystalPeriod stabilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High stability of the period and homogeneity of a regular domain structure was attained in Nd: Mg: LiNbO3 crystals grown from melt with an excess of lithium oxide by the Czochralski method along the... ...

I. I. Naumova; N. F. Evlanova; S. A. Blokhin; T. O. Chaplina

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Regularization and improved interpretation of linear data mappings and adaptive distance measures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regularization and improved interpretation of linear data mappings and adaptive distance measures dimensional data sets linear transformations are not necessarily uniquely determined, though, and alternative learning algorithms. Principal component analysis (PCA) is a good example of a standard technique

Biehl, Michael

373

852revision:2006-11-30modified:2006-12-03 More on regular reduced products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regarding ultra- powers is centered on the regular ultrafilters. Also at the time of Keisler's question GCH-11-30modified:2006-12-03 Proof. For k = 1, 2 let Mk = Mk, Pk i i

Shelah, Saharon

374

BEYOND LEBESGUE AND BAIRE: GENERIC REGULAR N. H. BINGHAM and A. J. OSTASZEWSKI (London)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

must satisfy the Cauchy func- tional equation g(µ) = g()g(µ) , µ > 0. (CFE) Subject to a mild regularity condition, (CFE) forces g to be a power: g() = > 0. () Then f is said to be regul

Haase, Markus

375

Resolution independent curved seams in clothing animation using a regular particle grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a method for representing seams in clothing animation, and its application in simulation level of detail. Specifically we consider cloth represented as a regular grid of particles connected by spring-dampers, and a seam specified by a...

Foshee, Jacob Wesley

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

High density quark matter in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with dimensional versus cutoff regularization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate color superconducting phase at high density in the extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model for two-flavor quarks. Because of the nonrenormalizability of the model, physical observables may depend on the regularization procedure; that is why we apply two types of regularization, the cutoff and the dimensional one to evaluate the phase structure, the equation of state, and the relationship between the mass and the radius of a dense star. To obtain the phase structure we evaluate the minimum of the effective potential at finite temperature and chemical potential. The stress tensor is calculated to derive the equation of state. Solving the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation, we show the relationship between the mass and the radius of a dense star. The dependence on the regularization is found not to be small, interestingly. The dimensional regularization predicts color superconductivity phase at rather large values of {mu} (in agreement with perturbative QCD in contrast to the cutoff regularization), in the larger temperature interval, the existence of heavier and larger quark stars.

Fujihara, T.; Kimura, D.; Inagaki, T.; Kvinikhidze, A. [Department of Physics, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Information Media Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan); A. Razmadze Mathematical Institute of Georgian Academy of Sciences, M. Alexidze Str. 1, 380093 Tbilisi (Georgia)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

First-order quantum phase transitions: test ground for emergent chaoticity, regularity and persisting symmetries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a comprehensive analysis of the emerging order and chaos and enduring symmetries, accompanying a generic (high-barrier) first-order quantum phase transition (QPT). The interacting boson model Hamiltonian employed, describes a QPT between spherical and deformed shapes, associated with its U(5) and SU(3) dynamical symmetry limits. A classical analysis of the intrinsic dynamics reveals a rich but simply-divided phase space structure with a H\\'enon-Heiles type of chaotic dynamics ascribed to the spherical minimum and a robustly regular dynamics ascribed to the deformed minimum. The simple pattern of mixed but well-separated dynamics persists in the coexistence region and traces the crossing of the two minima in the Landau potential. A quantum analysis discloses a number of regular low-energy U(5)-like multiplets in the spherical region, and regular SU(3)-like rotational bands extending to high energies and angular momenta, in the deformed region. These two kinds of regular subsets of states retain their identity amidst a complicated environment of other states and both occur in the coexistence region. A symmetry analysis of their wave functions shows that they are associated with partial U(5) dynamical symmetry (PDS) and SU(3) quasi-dynamical symmetry (QDS), respectively. The pattern of mixed but well-separated dynamics and the PDS or QDS characterization of the remaining regularity, appear to be robust throughout the QPT. Effects of kinetic collective rotational terms, which may disrupt this simple pattern, are considered.

M. Macek; A. Leviatan

2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

378

Corrected form of the first law of thermodynamics for regular black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show by explicit computations that there is a superficial inconsistency between the conventional first law of black hole thermodynamics and Bekenstein-Hawking area law for three types of regular black holes. The corrected form of the first law for these regular black holes is given. The derivation relies on the general structure of the energy-momentum tensor of the matter fields. When the black hole mass parameter $M$ is included in the energy-momentum tensor, the conventional form of the first law should be modified with an extra factor. In this case, the black hole mass $M$ can no longer be considered as the internal energy of the regular black holes.

Meng-Sen Ma; Ren Zhao

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

379

Corrected form of the first law of thermodynamics for regular black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show by explicit computations that there is a superficial inconsistency between the conventional first law of black hole thermodynamics and Bekenstein-Hawking area law for three types of regular black holes. The corrected form of the first law for these regular black holes is given. The derivation relies on the general structure of the energy-momentum tensor of the matter fields. When the black hole mass parameter $M$ is included in the energy-momentum tensor, the conventional form of the first law should be modified with an extra factor. In this case, the black hole mass $M$ can no longer be considered as the internal energy of the regular black holes.

Ma, Meng-Sen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Development and application of material and energy balance regularities for renewable energy resources. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The characterization of renewable energy resources is necessary in order to make mass and energy balances for processes which use these substances. This work is concerned with the identification of regularities associated with organic compounds and renewable energy resources. The carbon weight fraction, the reductance degree or equivalents of available electrons per gram atom carbon, the heat of combustion per gram equivalent of available electrons, and the free energy of combustion per gram equivalent of available electrons are investigated. Values of these regularities are reported for organic compounds and renewable resources. 31 references, 4 figures, 48 tables.

Erickson, L.E.; Patel, S.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Regularized energy-dependent solar flare hard x-ray spectral index  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The deduction from solar flare X-ray photon spectroscopic data of the energy dependent model-independent spectral index is considered as an inverse problem. Using the well developed regularization approach we analyze the energy dependency of spectral index for a high resolution energy spectrum provided by Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The regularization technique produces much smoother derivatives while avoiding additional errors typical of finite differences. It is shown that observations imply a spectral index varying significantly with energy, in a way that also varies with time as the flare progresses. The implications of these findings are discussed in the solar flare context.

Eduard P. Kontar; Alexander L. MacKinnon

2005-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

382

Energy Contents of a Class of Regular Black Hole Solutions in Teleparallel Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we discuss the energy-momentum problem in the realm of teleparallel gravity. The energy-momentum distribution for a class of regular black holes coupled with a non-linear electrodynamics source is investigated by using Hamiltonian approach of teleparallel theory. The generalized regular black hole contains two specific parameters $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$ (a sort of dipole and quadrupole of non-linear source) on which the energy distribution depends. It is interesting to mention here that our results exactly coincide with different energy-momentum prescriptions in General Relativity.

M. Sharif; Abdul Jawad

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

383

Robust joint full-waveform inversion of time-lapse seismic data sets with total-variation regularization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a technique for reconstructing subsurface velocity model changes from time-lapse seismic survey data using full-waveform inversion (FWI). The technique is based on simultaneously inverting multiple survey vintages, with model difference regularization using the total variation (TV) seminorm. We compare the new TV-regularized time-lapse FWI with the $L_2$-regularized joint inversion proposed in our earlier work, using synthetic data sets that exhibit survey repeatability issues. The results demonstrate clear advantages of the proposed TV-regularized joint inversion over alternatives methods for recovering production-induced model changes that are due to both fluid substitution and geomechanical effects.

Maharramov, Musa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

On viscosity solutions of certain Hamilton-Jacobi equations: Regularity results and generalized Sard's Theorems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On viscosity solutions of certain Hamilton-Jacobi equations: Regularity results and generalized prove that any viscosity solution of the corresponding Hamilton-Jacobi equation on the manifold M). Moreover, we prove that, under additional assumptions and in low dimension, any viscosity solution

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

385

Extending Automated Compositional Verification to the Full Class of Omega-Regular Languages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Farzan1 , Yu-Fang Chen2 , Edmund M. Clarke1 , Yih-Kuen Tsay2 , and Bow-Yaw Wang3 1 Carnegie Mellon, 10]. Most compositional techniques advocate proving properties of a system by checking properties], system be- haviors and their requirements are formalized as regular languages. Assumptions in premises

Wang, Bow-Yaw

386

On Regular Graphs Optimally Labeled with a Condition at Distance Two  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For positive integers $j \\geq k$, the $\\lambda_{j,k}$-number of graph G is the smallest span among all integer labelings of V(G) such that vertices at distance two receive labels which differ by at least k and adjacent vertices ... Keywords: $L(j, k)$-labeling, prism, regular graph

John P. Georges; David W. Mauro

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Generalized regularization techniques with constraints for the analysis of solar bremsstrahlung X-ray spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generalized regularization techniques with constraints for the analysis of solar bremsstrahlung X of Physics & Astronomy, The University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ, UK Abstract. Hard X-ray spectra in solar flares provide knowledge of the electron spectrum that results from acceleration and propagation in the solar

Piana, Michele

388

Regularized reconstruction of the differential emission measure from solar flare hard X-ray spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regularized reconstruction of the differential emission measure from solar flare hard X-ray spectra for solar flare hard X-rays, it is currently unclear whether the electron distribution responsible between (T) and J( ). However, in the last years, two issues have made this inversion problem more

Piana, Michele

389

Streamline Regularization for Large Discontinuous Motion of Sea Ice , C. A. Geiger1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Streamline Regularization for Large Discontinuous Motion of Sea Ice M. Thomas1 , C. A. Geiger1 , P the sea ice on the po- lar ocean surfaces serve as thermal regulators for the planet. The variable thickness and dynamic nature of the sea ice is intimately connected with the thermal reg- ulation

Geiger, Cathleen

390

Technical Reports Ultra-low Dose Lung CT Perfusion Regularized by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­regularized reconstruction (PSRR) method was proposed to reduce radiation dose and applied to lung perfusion studies. Normal and ultra-low-dose lung computed tomographic perfusion studies were compared in terms of the estimation in radiation dose is achievable using PSRR without compromising quantitative computed tomographic measurements

Virginia Tech

391

Hamilton Cycles Containing Randomly Selected Edges in Random Regular Graphs \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hamilton Cycles Containing Randomly Selected Edges in Random Regular Graphs \\Lambda R. W. Robinson oriented root edges have been randomly specified for the cycle to contain. The Hamilton cycle must be orientable to agree with all of the orientations on the j root edges. It is shown that the requisite Hamilton

Robinson, Robert W.

392

REGULAR ARTICLE The Sunk-cost Effect as an Optimal Rate-maximizing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REGULAR ARTICLE The Sunk-cost Effect as an Optimal Rate-maximizing Behavior Theodore P. Pavlic, but it also explains apparently irrational behaviors like the sunk-cost effect. When a forager is sure to foraging theoretic explanations of the sunk-cost effect (Arkes and Blumer 1985; Arkes and Ayton 1999

393

Exploring regular fabrics to optimize the performance-cost trade-off  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While advances in semiconductor technologies have pushed achievable scale and performance to phenomenal limits for ICs, nanoscale physical realities dictate IC production based on what we can afford. We believe that IC design and manufacturing can be ... Keywords: cost, integrated circuits, performance, regularity

L. Pileggi; H. Schmit; A. J. Strojwas; P. Gopalakrishnan; V. Kheterpal; A. Koorapaty; C. Patel; V. Rovner; K. Y. Tong

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

A REGULARIZATION METHOD FOR THE NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF ELLIPTIC BOUNDARY CONTROL PROBLEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, they are validated by comparing the regularization technique with standard numerical codes based on the discretize, the restriction to N = 2 is more or less needed, again. It is well known that the numerical treatment of state complicates the numerical treatment of the problems. On the other hand, in the analysis one is faced with some

Tröltzsch, Fredi

395

Adaptive Rest Condition Potentials: First and Second Order Edge-Preserving Regularization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Gto. Mexico 36020 {mrivera,jlm}@cimat.mx http://www.cimat.mx/mrivera #12;Abstract A new regularization formulation for inverse problems in computer vision and image processing is introduced, which allows one processing, have been published [5]­[27]. These methods have demonstrated their performance in detecting

Rivera, Mariano

396

Efficient HalfQuadratic Regularization with Granularity Control Mariano Rivera and Jose L. Marroquin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Marroquin Centro de Investigacion en Matematicas A.C. Apdo. Postal 402, Guanajuato, Gto. Mexico 36020 email Algorithms. 1 INTRODUCTION In the fields of image processing, image analysis and computer vision, one deals the structure of f need to be introduced in the reconstruction process. The regularized solution f is computed

Rivera, Mariano

397

ADAPTIVE REGULARIZED SELF-CONSISTENT FIELD ITERATION WITH EXACT HESSIAN FOR ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE CALCULATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

18, 65K10, 65F15, 90C26, 90C30 1. Introduction. Electronic structure calculations have becomeADAPTIVE REGULARIZED SELF-CONSISTENT FIELD ITERATION WITH EXACT HESSIAN FOR ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE CALCULATION ZAIWEN WEN, ANDRE MILZAREK, MICHAEL ULBRICH, AND HONGCHAO ZHANG� Abstract. The self

Ulbrich, Michael

398

Absorption of planar massless scalar waves by Bardeen regular black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accretion of fields by black holes is a subject of great interest in physics. It is known that accretion plays a fundamental role in active galactic nuclei and in the evolution of black holes. Accretion of fundamental fields is often related to the study of absorption cross section. Basically all black holes for which absorption of fields has been studied so far present singularities. However, even within general relativity, it is possible to construct regular black holes: objects with event horizons but without singularities. Many physically motivated regular black hole solutions have been proposed in the past years, demanding the understanding of their absorption properties. We study the absorption of planar massless scalar waves by Bardeen regular black holes. We compare the absorption cross section of Bardeen and Reissner--Nordstr\\"om black holes, showing that the former always have a bigger absorption cross section for fixed values of the field frequency and of the normalized black hole charge. We also show that it is possible for a Bardeen black hole to have the same high-frequency absorption cross section of a Reissner--Nordstr\\"om black hole. Our results suggest that, in mid-to-high-frequency regimes, regular black holes can have compatible properties with black holes with singularities, as far as absorption is concerned.

Caio F. B. Macedo; Lus C. B. Crispino

2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

399

Volume 106A, number 4 PHYSICS LETTERS 3 December 1984 MULTIPRESSURE REGULARIZATION FOR MULTIPHASE FLOW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g., viscous dissipation [2], numerical f~tltering [3], surface tension [4], bubble inertia [5 of multiple pressures. This formalism is used to find Lyapunov stability conditions for the regularized system to the presence of the single pressure and, thus, the Lyapunov stability of stationary flows is prevented [8

Holm, Darryl D.

400

Kinematics measurements of regular, irregular, and rogue waves by PIV/LDV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waves. A series of experiments were conducted in a 2-D wave tank at Texas A&M University to measure wave velocities and accelerations using LDV and PIV systems. The wave crests of regular and rogue waves are the focus of this study. With the measured...

Choi, Hae-Jin

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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401

A NEW LOOK AT REGULAR VARIATION N. H. BINGHAM, Imperial College and LSE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) The limit function g must satisfy the Cauchy functional equation g( ) = g( )g( ) 8 ; > 0: (CFE) Subject to a mild regularity condition, (CFE) forces g to be a power: g( ) = 8 > 0: ( ) #12;Then f is said, if f is measurable or Baire, (CFE) implies ( ), but not in general. The basic foundational question

Haase, Markus

402

Spaceflight Now + Premium video content for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to provide a status report on efforts to understand and fix the external tank foam insulation problems

Arizona, University of

403

Worksheet 3.5 In an earlier worksheet we looked at annuities --saving money by making regular investments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Worksheet 3.5 Loans In an earlier worksheet we looked at annuities -- saving money by making regular investments into an account earning interest, and taking the money out at the end. With a small change, we can now analyze loans -- receiving money at the beginning, and paying it back with regular

Lee, Carl

404

ELECTRON FLUX SPECTRAL IMAGING OF SOLAR FLARES THROUGH REGULARIZED ANALYSIS OF HARD X-RAY SOURCE VISIBILITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRON FLUX SPECTRAL IMAGING OF SOLAR FLARES THROUGH REGULARIZED ANALYSIS OF HARD X-RAY SOURCE a new method for imaging spectroscopy analysis of hard X-ray emission during solar flares. The method.e., the two-dimensional spatial Fourier transforms of the spectral image) to obtain smoothed (regularized

Piana, Michele

405

Add-ons for Lattice Boltzmann Methods: Regularization, Filtering and Robert A. Brownlee, Jeremy Levesley, David Packwood, Alexander N. Gorban  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Add-ons for Lattice Boltzmann Methods: Regularization, Filtering and Limiters Robert A. Brownlee, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK Abstract: We describe how regularization of lattice Boltzmann methods can be achieved-Driven Cavity. 1. INTRODUCTION Lattice Boltzmann Methods (LBM) are a class of discrete computational schemes

Jensen, Max

406

Pauli-Villars regularization of field theories on the light front  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four-dimensional quantum field theories generally require regularization to be well defined. This can be done in various ways, but here we focus on Pauli-Villars (PV) regularization and apply it to nonperturbative calculations of bound states. The philosophy is to introduce enough PV fields to the Lagrangian to regulate the theory perturbatively, including preservation of symmetries, and assume that this is sufficient for the nonperturbative case. The numerical methods usually necessary for nonperturbative bound-state problems are then applied to a finite theory that has the original symmetries. The bound-state problem is formulated as a mass eigenvalue problem in terms of the light-front Hamiltonian. Applications to quantum electrodynamics are discussed.

Hiller, John R. [Department of Physics, University of Minnesota-Duluth, Duluth, Minnesota 55812 (United States)

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

407

Electromechanical Mode On-line Estimation using Regularized Robust RLS Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper proposes a regularized robust recursive least squares (R3LS) method for on-line estimation of power-system electromechanical modes based on synchronized phasor measurement unit (PMU) data. The proposed method utilizes an autoregressive moving average exogenous (ARMAX) model to account for typical measurement data, which includes low-level pseudo-random probing, ambient, and ringdown data.? A robust objective function is utilized to reduce the negative influence from non-typical data, which include outliers and missing data. A dy-namic regularization method is introduced to help include a priori knowledge about the system and reduce the influence of under-determined problems. Based on a 17-machine simulation model, it is shown through the Monte-Carlo method that the proposed R3LS method can estimate and track electromechanical modes by effectively using combined typical and non-typical measurement data.

Zhou, Ning; Trudnowski, Daniel J.; Pierre, John W.; Mittelstadt, William

2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

408

Pumping Lemma for Regular Sets: Let D = (Q, , , q0, F) be a DFA.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pumping Lemma for Regular Sets: Let D = (Q, , , q0, F) be a DFA. Let n = |Q|. Let w L(D) s.t. |w: Pumping Lemma CS250: Discrete Math for Computer Science #12;proof: Let w L(D), |w| n, w = w1, w2 F Thus, xykz L(D) for k = 0, 1, 2, . . . L30: Pumping Lemma CS250: Discrete Math for Computer

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

409

Regimes of nonlinear depletion and regularity in the 3D Navier-Stokes equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The periodic $3D$ Navier-Stokes equations are analyzed in terms of dimensionless, scaled, $L^{2m}$-norms of vorticity $D_{m}$ ($1 \\leq m < \\infty$). The first in this hierarchy, $D_{1}$, is the global enstrophy. Three regimes naturally occur in the $D_{1}-D_{m}$ plane. Solutions in the first regime, which lie between two concave curves, are shown to be regular, owing to strong nonlinear depletion. Moreover, numerical experiments have suggested, so far, that all dynamics lie in this heavily depleted regime \\cite{DGGKPV13}\\,; new numerical evidence for this is presented. Estimates for the dimension of a global attractor and a corresponding inertial range are given for this regime. However, two more regimes can theoretically exist. In the second, which lies between the upper concave curve and a line, the depletion is insufficient to regularize solutions, so no more than Leray's weak solutions exist. In the third, which lies above this line, solutions are regular, but correspond to extreme initial conditions. The paper ends with a discussion on the possibility of transition between these regimes.

John D. Gibbon; Diego A. Donzis; Anupam Gupta; Robert M. Kerr; Rahul Pandit; Dario Vincenzi

2014-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

410

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 477,184 488,726 508,081 505,973 534,828 527,749 3,962,855 3,962,202 0.4 Regular 428,557 437,307 450,215 447,456 473,795 466,268 3,538,594 3,530,339 0.2 Conventional 88,943 93,114 96,168 96,218 109,084 109,271 709,994 768,217 8.6 Reformulated 339,614 344,193 354,047 351,238 364,711 356,997 2,828,600 2,762,122 -1.9 Midgrade 7,978 7,840 8,971 9,184 10,273 11,401 71,752 70,884 -0.8 Conventional 886 867 1,110 1,165 1,477 1,528 8,479 8,790 4.1 Reformulated 7,092 6,973 7,861 8,019 8,796 9,873 63,273 62,094 -1.5 Premium 40,649 43,579 48,895 49,333 50,760 50,080 352,509 360,979 2.8 Conventional 4,051 5,033 5,533 6,005 7,577 7,698 41,356 44,248 7.4

411

East Coast (PADD 1) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

482 3.472 3.480 3.511 3.538 3.512 1993-2014 482 3.472 3.480 3.511 3.538 3.512 1993-2014 All Grades - Conventional Areas 3.457 3.438 3.442 3.471 3.511 3.488 1994-2014 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 3.522 3.529 3.542 3.577 3.581 3.550 1994-2014 Regular 3.382 3.373 3.380 3.413 3.438 3.410 1992-2014 Conventional Areas 3.359 3.339 3.343 3.372 3.410 3.386 1992-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.419 3.428 3.440 3.480 3.484 3.450 1994-2014 Midgrade 3.566 3.554 3.565 3.590 3.622 3.598 1994-2014 Conventional Areas 3.525 3.507 3.515 3.539 3.582 3.559 1994-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.642 3.644 3.659 3.687 3.695 3.670 1994-2014 Premium 3.755 3.746 3.754 3.782 3.811 3.789 1994-2014 Conventional Areas 3.733 3.716 3.720 3.751 3.797 3.778 1994-2014 Reformulated Areas

412

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 545,243 516,781 489,227 521,195 509,790 537,109 2,651,921 2,574,102 -3.6 Regular 484,800 460,826 436,427 466,083 455,431 480,922 2,335,213 2,299,689 -2.2 Conventional 86,614 83,587 78,014 80,359 76,766 85,994 456,739 404,720 -12.0 Reformulated 398,186 377,239 358,413 385,724 378,665 394,928 1,878,474 1,894,969 0.2 Midgrade 15,820 14,583 13,721 14,439 13,806 14,609 96,239 71,158 -26.5 Conventional 1,866 1,811 1,687 1,655 1,546 1,755 10,779 8,454 -22.1 Reformulated 13,954 12,772 12,034 12,784 12,260 12,854 85,460 62,704 -27.1 Premium 44,623 41,372 39,079 40,673 40,553 41,578 220,469 203,255 -8.4 Conventional 4,124 4,122 3,923 3,518 3,283 4,525 25,407 19,371 -24.3

413

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 545,873 535,318 570,912 554,479 515,841 536,797 5,221,463 5,248,933 0.5 Regular 482,797 472,316 501,830 486,959 455,816 475,306 4,644,530 4,652,233 0.2 Conventional 92,772 93,610 105,171 101,191 92,476 93,591 909,817 908,568 -0.1 Reformulated 390,025 378,706 396,659 385,768 363,340 381,715 3,734,713 3,743,665 0.2 Midgrade 12,002 11,743 13,508 13,014 10,972 11,192 123,210 113,848 -7.6 Conventional 1,267 1,335 1,653 1,636 1,284 1,223 13,027 12,688 -2.6 Reformulated 10,735 10,408 11,855 11,378 9,688 9,969 110,183 101,160 -8.2 Premium 51,074 51,259 55,574 54,506 49,053 50,299 453,723 482,852 6.4 Conventional 5,704 6,255 7,563 7,460 6,229 5,636 54,078 56,706 4.9

414

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 554,479 515,841 536,199 510,224 545,228 503,893 501,742 503,893 0.4 Regular 486,959 455,816 474,668 453,976 487,995 452,544 449,222 452,544 0.7 Conventional 101,191 92,476 93,958 87,267 92,950 87,949 84,317 87,949 4.3 Reformulated 385,768 363,340 380,710 366,709 395,045 364,595 364,905 364,595 -0.1 Midgrade 13,014 10,972 11,173 10,401 10,787 9,652 10,528 9,652 -8.3 Conventional 1,636 1,284 1,244 1,061 1,144 1,072 1,118 1,072 -4.1 Reformulated 11,378 9,688 9,929 9,340 9,643 8,580 9,410 8,580 -8.8 Premium 54,506 49,053 50,358 45,847 46,446 41,697 41,992 41,697 -0.7 Conventional 7,460 6,229 5,648 4,458 4,797 4,774 4,867 4,774 -1.9

415

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 489,227 521,195 509,790 537,109 530,520 540,898 3,771,210 3,645,520 -3.8 Regular 436,427 466,083 455,431 480,922 475,729 482,398 3,314,032 3,257,816 -2.2 Conventional 78,014 80,359 76,766 85,994 88,242 92,325 657,727 585,287 -11.4 Reformulated 358,413 385,724 378,665 394,928 387,487 390,073 2,656,305 2,672,529 0.1 Midgrade 13,721 14,439 13,806 14,609 14,166 14,682 135,928 100,006 -26.8 Conventional 1,687 1,655 1,546 1,755 1,810 2,224 16,541 12,488 -24.9 Reformulated 12,034 12,784 12,260 12,854 12,356 12,458 119,387 87,518 -27.0 Premium 39,079 40,673 40,553 41,578 40,625 43,818 321,250 287,698 -10.9 Conventional 3,923 3,518 3,283 4,525 4,912 6,558 39,405 30,841 -22.1

416

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,268 130,385 114,483 117,639 115,793 108,960 234,443 224,753 -4.1 Regular 107,051 109,801 96,041 99,099 98,040 93,563 200,031 191,603 -4.2 Conventional W 80,782 59,921 61,268 60,258 59,242 110,164 119,500 8.5 Oxygenated W 29,019 36,120 37,831 37,782 34,321 89,867 72,103 -19.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,066 6,616 6,121 6,193 5,943 5,563 11,618 11,506 -1.0 Conventional W 4,628 3,531 3,743 3,737 3,601 6,444 7,338 13.9 Oxygenated W 1,988 2,590 2,450 2,206 1,962 5,174 4,168 -19.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 13,151 13,968 12,321 12,347 11,810 9,834 22,794 21,644 -5.0 Conventional W 9,980 7,264 7,339 6,945 5,950 11,957 12,895 7.8

417

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 130,776 128,461 125,271 127,361 115,819 112,032 211,293 227,851 9.7 Regular 113,616 111,521 108,520 109,905 99,816 96,825 176,425 196,641 13.3 Conventional W 82,755 62,396 62,355 55,542 52,002 96,559 107,544 13.3 Oxygenated W 28,766 46,124 47,550 44,274 44,823 79,866 89,097 13.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,170 6,296 6,420 6,738 5,913 5,466 12,859 11,379 -10.0 Conventional W 4,406 3,840 3,681 3,428 2,905 6,696 6,333 -3.8 Oxygenated W 1,890 2,580 3,057 2,485 2,561 6,163 5,046 -16.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,990 10,644 10,331 10,718 10,090 9,741 22,009 19,831 -8.4 Conventional W 7,778 5,564 5,846 5,492 5,029 12,000 10,521 -10.8

418

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 511,759 545,873 535,318 570,912 554,479 504,662 4,679,723 4,700,957 0.5 Regular 455,817 482,797 472,316 501,830 486,959 444,611 4,162,499 4,165,722 0.1 Conventional 82,811 92,772 93,610 105,171 101,191 92,476 813,171 814,977 0.2 Reformulated 373,006 390,025 378,706 396,659 385,768 352,135 3,349,328 3,350,745 0.0 Midgrade 10,750 12,002 11,743 13,508 13,014 10,972 111,169 102,656 -7.7 Conventional 1,076 1,267 1,335 1,653 1,636 1,284 11,682 11,465 -1.9 Reformulated 9,674 10,735 10,408 11,855 11,378 9,688 99,487 91,191 -8.3 Premium 45,192 51,074 51,259 55,574 54,506 49,079 406,055 432,579 6.5 Conventional 4,340 5,704 6,255 7,563 7,460 6,229 48,685 51,070 4.9

419

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 525,369 540,605 483,593 520,563 494,955 496,452 6,205,152 5,958,418 -4.2 Regular 465,025 479,996 431,332 467,394 442,377 445,406 5,566,313 5,325,103 -4.6 Conventional 105,415 107,232 90,415 98,631 89,489 89,443 1,075,211 1,077,972 0.0 Reformulated 359,610 372,764 340,917 368,763 352,888 355,963 4,491,102 4,247,131 -5.7 Midgrade 10,553 10,741 9,011 8,844 8,424 8,190 111,551 106,221 -5.0 Conventional 1,534 1,499 1,234 1,015 881 903 12,771 12,512 -2.3 Reformulated 9,019 9,242 7,777 7,829 7,543 7,287 98,780 93,709 -5.4 Premium 49,791 49,868 43,250 44,325 44,154 42,856 527,288 527,094 -0.3 Conventional 7,421 7,295 5,452 4,696 4,075 4,150 60,633 59,729 -1.8

420

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 477,504 513,866 505,064 537,904 531,489 559,956 3,658,226 3,644,009 0.1 Regular 427,980 459,449 450,035 478,044 472,425 495,131 3,270,331 3,247,264 -0.2 Conventional 76,972 78,976 77,280 86,287 87,590 98,816 588,865 588,095 0.3 Reformulated 351,008 380,473 372,755 391,757 384,835 396,315 2,681,466 2,659,169 -0.4 Midgrade 10,578 11,416 11,399 12,602 12,126 13,409 100,080 82,938 -16.7 Conventional 1,067 1,017 1,015 1,213 1,222 1,506 12,473 8,164 -34.2 Reformulated 9,511 10,399 10,384 11,389 10,904 11,903 87,607 74,774 -14.2 Premium 38,946 43,001 43,630 47,258 46,938 51,416 287,815 313,807 9.5 Conventional 4,409 4,171 3,918 4,969 5,179 6,521 29,892 33,859 13.8

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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421

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 510,224 545,228 504,188 468,539 525,697 489,817 1,989,713 1,988,241 -0.1 Regular 453,976 487,995 452,854 420,289 474,090 442,037 1,777,209 1,789,270 0.7 Conventional 87,267 92,950 87,933 82,130 86,201 79,755 329,757 336,019 1.9 Reformulated 366,709 395,045 364,921 338,159 387,889 362,282 1,447,452 1,453,251 0.4 Midgrade 10,401 10,787 9,657 8,794 9,247 8,908 41,417 36,606 -11.6 Conventional 1,061 1,144 1,073 974 1,072 828 4,290 3,947 -8.0 Reformulated 9,340 9,643 8,584 7,820 8,175 8,080 37,127 32,659 -12.0 Premium 45,847 46,446 41,677 39,456 42,360 38,872 171,087 162,365 -5.1 Conventional 4,458 4,797 4,769 4,624 4,327 3,180 17,859 16,900 -5.4

422

PADD 5 Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

531 3.526 3.538 3.581 3.602 3.581 1993-2014 531 3.526 3.538 3.581 3.602 3.581 1993-2014 All Grades - Conventional Areas 3.395 3.386 3.384 3.401 3.423 3.420 1995-2014 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 3.587 3.582 3.600 3.654 3.675 3.647 1995-2014 Regular 3.477 3.472 3.483 3.526 3.547 3.526 1992-2014 Conventional Areas 3.343 3.335 3.333 3.351 3.371 3.367 1992-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.535 3.531 3.549 3.603 3.624 3.595 1994-2014 Midgrade 3.618 3.611 3.626 3.668 3.690 3.669 1994-2014 Conventional Areas 3.479 3.471 3.470 3.483 3.510 3.508 1995-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.660 3.654 3.673 3.725 3.746 3.718 1995-2014 Premium 3.730 3.721 3.736 3.777 3.799 3.782 1994-2014 Conventional Areas 3.633 3.619 3.617 3.632 3.655 3.659 1995-2014 Reformulated Areas

423

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 500,104 552,735 501,742 458,980 517,232 511,792 2,014,660 1,989,746 -1.2 Regular 446,048 494,340 449,222 410,544 461,626 455,851 1,801,664 1,777,243 -1.4 Conventional 85,392 94,289 84,317 77,736 84,893 82,810 315,402 329,756 4.6 Reformulated 360,656 400,051 364,905 332,808 376,733 373,041 1,486,262 1,447,487 -2.6 Midgrade 11,012 12,002 10,528 9,477 10,662 10,750 44,801 41,417 -7.6 Conventional 1,076 1,232 1,118 1,011 1,085 1,076 4,223 4,290 1.6 Reformulated 9,936 10,770 9,410 8,466 9,577 9,674 40,578 37,127 -8.5 Premium 43,044 46,393 41,992 38,959 44,944 45,191 168,195 171,086 1.7 Conventional 4,329 4,866 4,867 4,290 4,362 4,339 17,190 17,858 3.9

424

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 516,779 557,147 554,647 565,098 582,461 528,605 4,825,437 4,882,732 1.2 Regular 456,628 489,804 487,006 492,384 506,031 460,477 4,229,249 4,281,111 1.2 Conventional 86,101 95,676 96,645 104,206 108,037 94,740 896,393 860,367 -4.0 Reformulated 370,527 394,128 390,361 388,178 397,994 365,737 3,332,856 3,420,744 2.6 Midgrade 18,846 20,575 20,136 22,106 22,313 19,450 178,204 180,244 1.1 Conventional 1,889 2,237 2,429 3,291 3,257 2,452 25,004 22,208 -11.2 Reformulated 16,957 18,338 17,707 18,815 19,056 16,998 153,200 158,036 3.2 Premium 41,305 46,768 47,505 50,608 54,117 48,678 417,984 421,377 0.8 Conventional 3,908 5,672 6,306 7,624 8,451 6,308 51,466 54,096 5.1

425

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 552,735 501,742 458,980 517,232 511,759 545,879 2,552,564 2,535,592 -0.7 Regular 494,340 449,222 410,544 461,626 455,817 482,803 2,279,708 2,260,012 -0.9 Conventional 94,289 84,317 77,736 84,893 82,811 92,778 401,689 422,535 5.2 Reformulated 400,051 364,905 332,808 376,733 373,006 390,025 1,878,019 1,837,477 -2.2 Midgrade 12,002 10,528 9,477 10,662 10,750 12,002 57,403 53,419 -6.9 Conventional 1,232 1,118 1,011 1,085 1,076 1,267 5,436 5,557 2.2 Reformulated 10,770 9,410 8,466 9,577 9,674 10,735 51,967 47,862 -7.9 Premium 46,393 41,992 38,959 44,944 45,192 51,074 215,453 222,161 3.1 Conventional 4,866 4,867 4,290 4,362 4,340 5,704 22,159 23,563 6.3

426

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 528,605 557,695 520,035 545,243 516,781 489,628 1,035,384 1,006,409 -4.4 Regular 460,477 489,668 461,374 484,800 460,826 436,768 909,165 897,594 -2.9 Conventional 94,740 95,190 83,614 86,614 83,587 78,016 182,367 161,603 -12.9 Reformulated 365,737 394,478 377,760 398,186 377,239 358,752 726,798 735,991 -0.4 Midgrade 19,450 19,638 15,520 15,820 14,583 13,740 37,550 28,323 -25.8 Conventional 2,452 2,171 1,810 1,866 1,811 1,689 4,511 3,500 -23.7 Reformulated 16,998 17,467 13,710 13,954 12,772 12,051 33,039 24,823 -26.1 Premium 48,678 48,389 43,141 44,623 41,372 39,120 88,669 80,492 -10.7 Conventional 6,308 5,115 3,745 4,124 4,122 3,915 10,904 8,037 -27.5

427

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 488,726 508,081 505,973 534,828 527,726 470,883 4,446,448 4,433,062 0.1 Regular 437,307 450,215 447,456 473,795 466,249 416,430 3,969,926 3,946,750 -0.2 Conventional 93,114 96,168 96,218 109,084 109,271 92,643 800,409 860,860 7.9 Reformulated 344,193 354,047 351,238 364,711 356,978 323,787 3,169,517 3,085,890 -2.3 Midgrade 7,840 8,971 9,184 10,273 11,401 9,430 80,763 80,314 -0.2 Conventional 867 1,110 1,165 1,477 1,528 962 9,713 9,752 0.8 Reformulated 6,973 7,861 8,019 8,796 9,873 8,468 71,050 70,562 -0.3 Premium 43,579 48,895 49,333 50,760 50,076 45,023 395,759 405,998 3.0 Conventional 5,033 5,533 6,005 7,577 7,698 5,642 46,808 49,890 7.0

428

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 137,146 123,384 123,443 132,857 118,555 116,724 219,370 235,279 9.1 Regular 121,321 108,630 108,923 116,372 104,022 102,400 191,501 206,422 9.6 Conventional 93,225 80,733 66,084 71,011 61,295 61,892 W 123,187 NA Oxygenated NA NA 42,839 45,361 42,727 40,508 W 83,235 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,305 4,157 4,294 4,477 4,122 3,873 8,695 7,995 -6.5 Conventional 3,682 2,831 2,131 2,141 1,960 1,899 4,402 3,859 -10.8 Oxygenated NA 1,326 2,163 2,336 2,162 1,974 4,293 4,136 -2.0 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,520 10,597 10,226 12,008 10,411 10,451 19,174 20,862 10.6 Conventional 9,730 7,507 5,628 6,833 5,562 5,907 W 11,469 NA

429

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 536,199 510,224 545,228 504,188 468,539 525,861 1,477,954 1,498,588 1.4 Regular 474,668 453,976 487,995 452,854 420,289 474,253 1,321,392 1,347,396 2.0 Conventional 93,958 87,267 92,950 87,933 82,130 86,196 246,946 256,259 3.8 Reformulated 380,710 366,709 395,045 364,921 338,159 388,057 1,074,446 1,091,137 1.6 Midgrade 11,173 10,401 10,787 9,657 8,794 9,247 30,667 27,698 -9.7 Conventional 1,244 1,061 1,144 1,073 974 1,072 3,214 3,119 -3.0 Reformulated 9,929 9,340 9,643 8,584 7,820 8,175 27,453 24,579 -10.5 Premium 50,358 45,847 46,446 41,677 39,456 42,361 125,895 123,494 -1.9 Conventional 5,648 4,458 4,797 4,769 4,624 4,327 13,519 13,720 1.5

430

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 554,647 565,098 582,461 528,605 557,695 525,542 5,908,190 5,965,969 1.0 Regular 487,006 492,384 506,031 460,477 489,668 466,116 5,177,160 5,236,895 1.2 Conventional 96,645 104,206 108,037 94,740 95,190 87,664 1,090,486 1,043,221 -4.3 Reformulated 390,361 388,178 397,994 365,737 394,478 378,452 4,086,674 4,193,674 2.6 Midgrade 20,136 22,106 22,313 19,450 19,638 17,539 215,999 217,421 0.7 Conventional 2,429 3,291 3,257 2,452 2,171 1,955 29,788 26,334 -11.6 Reformulated 17,707 18,815 19,056 16,998 17,467 15,584 186,211 191,087 2.6 Premium 47,505 50,608 54,117 48,678 48,389 41,887 515,031 511,653 -0.7 Conventional 6,306 7,624 8,451 6,308 5,115 4,064 62,186 63,275 1.8

431

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 129,343 121,892 120,530 123,655 110,788 128,326 359,261 362,769 1.0 Regular 111,742 104,683 102,740 105,511 94,520 110,336 309,607 310,367 0.2 Conventional 82,134 58,559 54,646 56,780 53,384 91,767 W 201,931 NA Oxygenated 29,608 46,124 48,094 48,731 41,136 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,099 6,003 6,178 6,168 5,450 6,010 18,048 17,628 -2.3 Conventional 4,303 3,324 3,547 3,392 3,052 5,351 12,487 11,795 -5.5 Oxygenated 1,796 2,679 2,631 2,776 2,398 659 5,561 5,833 4.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,502 11,206 11,612 11,976 10,818 11,980 31,606 34,774 10.0 Conventional 8,321 6,003 6,254 6,016 5,941 10,395 21,080 22,352 6.0

432

West Coast less California Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

350 3.348 3.344 3.369 3.393 3.392 1998-2014 350 3.348 3.344 3.369 3.393 3.392 1998-2014 All Grades - Conventional Areas 3.395 3.386 3.384 3.401 3.423 3.420 2000-2014 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 3.138 3.162 3.155 3.214 3.252 3.258 1998-2014 Regular 3.298 3.295 3.292 3.317 3.341 3.338 1998-2014 Conventional Areas 3.343 3.335 3.333 3.351 3.371 3.367 2000-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.078 3.104 3.097 3.155 3.194 3.201 1998-2014 Midgrade 3.435 3.432 3.430 3.451 3.481 3.477 1998-2014 Conventional Areas 3.479 3.471 3.470 3.483 3.510 3.508 2000-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.238 3.257 3.249 3.309 3.348 3.336 1998-2014 Premium 3.589 3.582 3.578 3.602 3.627 3.632 1998-2014 Conventional Areas 3.633 3.619 3.617 3.632 3.655 3.659 2000-2014 Reformulated Areas

433

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 569,198 524,985 539,891 500,104 552,735 501,831 518,226 501,831 -3.2 Regular 503,215 464,377 480,311 446,048 494,340 449,225 464,200 449,225 -3.2 Conventional 99,772 92,058 92,622 85,392 94,289 84,320 82,174 84,320 2.6 Reformulated 403,443 372,319 387,689 360,656 400,051 364,905 382,026 364,905 -4.5 Midgrade 13,608 12,539 12,031 11,012 12,002 10,528 11,408 10,528 -7.7 Conventional 1,596 1,443 1,327 1,076 1,232 1,118 1,124 1,118 -0.5 Reformulated 12,012 11,096 10,704 9,936 10,770 9,410 10,284 9,410 -8.5 Premium 52,375 48,069 47,549 43,044 46,393 42,078 42,618 42,078 -1.3 Conventional 6,948 5,905 5,118 4,329 4,866 4,953 4,692 4,953 5.6

434

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 557,695 520,035 545,243 516,781 489,227 521,195 1,577,995 1,527,203 -4.3 Regular 489,668 461,374 484,800 460,826 436,427 466,083 1,388,781 1,363,336 -2.9 Conventional 95,190 83,614 86,614 83,587 78,014 80,359 274,962 241,960 -13.0 Reformulated 394,478 377,760 398,186 377,239 358,413 385,724 1,113,819 1,121,376 -0.4 Midgrade 19,638 15,520 15,820 14,583 13,721 14,439 56,818 42,743 -25.6 Conventional 2,171 1,810 1,866 1,811 1,687 1,655 6,653 5,153 -23.4 Reformulated 17,467 13,710 13,954 12,772 12,034 12,784 50,165 37,590 -25.9 Premium 48,389 43,141 44,623 41,372 39,079 40,673 132,396 121,124 -9.5 Conventional 5,115 3,745 4,124 4,122 3,923 3,518 15,827 11,563 -27.7

435

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 524,985 539,891 500,104 552,735 501,742 458,981 995,730 960,723 -3.5 Regular 464,377 480,311 446,048 494,340 449,222 410,545 892,180 859,767 -3.6 Conventional 92,058 92,622 85,392 94,289 84,317 77,737 159,146 162,054 1.8 Reformulated 372,319 387,689 360,656 400,051 364,905 332,808 733,034 697,713 -4.8 Midgrade 12,539 12,031 11,012 12,002 10,528 9,477 21,986 20,005 -9.0 Conventional 1,443 1,327 1,076 1,232 1,118 1,011 2,191 2,129 -2.8 Reformulated 11,096 10,704 9,936 10,770 9,410 8,466 19,795 17,876 -9.7 Premium 48,069 47,549 43,044 46,393 41,992 38,959 81,564 80,951 -0.8 Conventional 5,905 5,118 4,329 4,866 4,867 4,290 9,101 9,157 0.6

436

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 599,006 620,268 593,499 520,531 538,385 528,786 6,181,688 6,088,568 -1.2 Regular 509,217 528,976 510,745 455,324 471,622 460,881 5,185,942 5,227,852 1.1 Conventional 102,726 109,423 112,413 91,948 94,093 88,528 1,046,473 1,045,484 0.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 406,491 419,553 398,332 363,376 377,529 372,353 4,139,469 4,182,368 1.3 Midgrade 26,755 28,590 26,103 20,551 19,614 19,562 310,470 261,788 -15.4 Conventional 3,852 4,918 4,404 2,717 2,378 2,412 46,593 36,524 -21.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 22,903 23,672 21,699 17,834 17,236 17,150 263,877 225,264 -14.4 Premium 63,034 62,702 56,651 44,656 47,149 48,343 685,276 598,928 -12.3

437

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 505,064 537,904 531,489 559,954 569,198 523,453 4,726,915 4,736,658 0.6 Regular 450,035 478,044 472,425 495,129 503,215 462,540 4,225,340 4,213,017 0.1 Conventional 77,280 86,287 87,590 98,814 99,772 88,499 772,443 776,364 0.9 Reformulated 372,755 391,757 384,835 396,315 403,443 374,041 3,452,897 3,436,653 -0.1 Midgrade 11,399 12,602 12,126 13,409 13,608 12,079 125,860 108,625 -13.4 Conventional 1,015 1,213 1,222 1,506 1,596 1,335 15,669 11,095 -28.9 Reformulated 10,384 11,389 10,904 11,903 12,012 10,744 110,191 97,530 -11.2 Premium 43,630 47,258 46,938 51,416 52,375 48,834 375,715 415,016 10.9 Conventional 3,918 4,969 5,179 6,521 6,948 5,748 41,306 46,555 13.1

438

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 537,904 531,489 559,954 569,198 524,985 539,825 5,277,557 5,278,015 0.3 Regular 478,044 472,425 495,129 503,215 464,377 480,245 4,719,270 4,695,099 -0.2 Conventional 86,287 87,590 98,814 99,772 92,058 92,622 862,495 872,545 1.5 Reformulated 391,757 384,835 396,315 403,443 372,319 387,623 3,856,775 3,822,554 -0.6 Midgrade 12,602 12,126 13,409 13,608 12,539 12,031 137,818 121,116 -11.8 Conventional 1,213 1,222 1,506 1,596 1,443 1,327 16,815 12,530 -25.2 Reformulated 11,389 10,904 11,903 12,012 11,096 10,704 121,003 108,586 -10.0 Premium 47,258 46,938 51,416 52,375 48,069 47,549 420,469 461,800 10.2 Conventional 4,969 5,179 6,521 6,948 5,905 5,118 45,838 51,830 13.4

439

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,428 129,343 121,892 120,530 123,655 110,535 229,006 234,190 2.3 Regular 110,212 111,742 104,683 102,740 105,511 94,243 197,814 199,754 1.0 Conventional W 82,134 58,559 54,646 56,780 53,107 108,728 109,887 1.1 Oxygenated W 29,608 46,124 48,094 48,731 41,136 89,086 89,867 0.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,841 6,099 6,003 6,178 6,168 5,450 11,337 11,618 2.5 Conventional W 4,303 3,324 3,547 3,392 3,052 6,291 6,444 2.4 Oxygenated W 1,796 2,679 2,631 2,776 2,398 5,046 5,174 2.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,375 11,502 11,206 11,612 11,976 10,842 19,855 22,818 14.9 Conventional W 8,321 6,003 6,254 6,016 5,965 10,545 11,981 13.6

440

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 486,281 514,984 510,456 551,226 555,511 521,124 4,712,136 4,638,006 -1.6 Regular 438,981 464,593 456,541 491,127 496,300 466,275 4,176,927 4,161,050 -0.4 Conventional 79,247 91,426 91,994 101,237 103,140 92,473 814,977 815,781 0.1 Reformulated 359,734 373,167 364,547 389,890 393,160 373,802 3,361,950 3,345,269 -0.5 Midgrade 8,730 8,929 9,211 10,823 10,283 9,258 102,656 84,932 -17.3 Conventional 823 1,012 1,125 1,410 1,439 1,091 11,465 10,019 -12.6 Reformulated 7,907 7,917 8,086 9,413 8,844 8,167 91,191 74,913 -17.9 Premium 38,570 41,462 44,704 49,276 48,928 45,591 432,553 392,024 -9.4 Conventional 3,180 4,587 5,631 7,191 7,090 5,477 51,070 46,876 -8.2

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441

Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

267 3.312 3.445 3.432 3.407 3.379 1993-2013 267 3.312 3.445 3.432 3.407 3.379 1993-2013 All Grades - Conventional Areas 3.272 3.313 3.446 3.433 3.409 3.381 1994-2013 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 3.215 3.295 3.432 3.420 3.392 3.356 1994-2013 Regular 3.159 3.203 3.338 3.325 3.300 3.270 1993-2013 Conventional Areas 3.165 3.206 3.341 3.327 3.303 3.274 1993-2013 Reformulated Areas 3.093 3.176 3.311 3.301 3.270 3.235 1994-2013 Midgrade 3.365 3.408 3.535 3.524 3.499 3.474 1994-2013 Conventional Areas 3.366 3.407 3.533 3.521 3.496 3.473 1994-2013 Reformulated Areas 3.354 3.426 3.561 3.550 3.526 3.489 1994-2013 Premium 3.558 3.605 3.735 3.726 3.699 3.675 1994-2013 Conventional Areas 3.561 3.605 3.734 3.726 3.698 3.675 1994-2013 Reformulated Areas

442

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 458,980 517,232 511,759 545,873 535,318 568,027 3,597,826 3,638,931 1.1 Regular 410,544 461,626 455,817 482,797 472,316 499,626 3,206,158 3,231,948 0.8 Conventional 77,736 84,893 82,811 92,772 93,610 105,170 613,913 621,309 1.2 Reformulated 332,808 376,733 373,006 390,025 378,706 394,456 2,592,245 2,610,639 0.7 Midgrade 9,477 10,662 10,750 12,002 11,743 13,261 84,697 78,423 -7.4 Conventional 1,011 1,085 1,076 1,267 1,335 1,653 8,488 8,545 0.7 Reformulated 8,466 9,577 9,674 10,735 10,408 11,608 76,209 69,878 -8.3 Premium 38,959 44,944 45,192 51,074 51,259 55,140 306,971 328,560 7.0 Conventional 4,290 4,362 4,340 5,704 6,255 7,563 35,140 37,381 6.4

443

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 501,742 458,980 517,232 511,759 545,873 535,318 3,042,040 3,070,904 0.9 Regular 449,222 410,544 461,626 455,817 482,797 472,316 2,715,031 2,732,322 0.6 Conventional 84,317 77,736 84,893 82,811 92,772 93,610 513,467 516,139 0.5 Reformulated 364,905 332,808 376,733 373,006 390,025 378,706 2,201,564 2,216,183 0.7 Midgrade 10,528 9,477 10,662 10,750 12,002 11,743 70,703 65,162 -7.8 Conventional 1,118 1,011 1,085 1,076 1,267 1,335 6,857 6,892 0.5 Reformulated 9,410 8,466 9,577 9,674 10,735 10,408 63,846 58,270 -8.7 Premium 41,992 38,959 44,944 45,192 51,074 51,259 256,306 273,420 6.7 Conventional 4,867 4,290 4,362 4,340 5,704 6,255 28,572 29,818 4.4

444

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 537,109 530,520 540,898 555,627 513,590 551,236 5,439,184 5,265,973 -3.5 Regular 480,922 475,729 482,398 495,544 460,050 494,566 4,769,194 4,707,976 -1.6 Conventional 85,994 88,242 92,325 98,019 85,817 90,273 955,696 859,396 -10.4 Reformulated 394,928 387,487 390,073 397,525 374,233 404,293 3,813,498 3,848,580 0.6 Midgrade 14,609 14,166 14,682 14,063 11,714 11,949 195,726 137,732 -29.9 Conventional 1,755 1,810 2,224 1,989 1,208 1,147 24,447 16,832 -31.4 Reformulated 12,854 12,356 12,458 12,074 10,506 10,802 171,279 120,900 -29.6 Premium 41,578 40,625 43,818 46,020 41,826 44,721 474,264 420,265 -11.7 Conventional 4,525 4,912 6,558 6,625 4,768 4,541 59,363 46,775 -21.5

445

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 499,935 542,611 516,779 557,147 554,647 565,098 3,710,136 3,771,666 1.7 Regular 438,673 479,616 456,628 489,804 487,006 492,384 3,254,350 3,314,603 1.9 Conventional 89,836 92,595 86,101 95,676 96,645 104,206 676,728 657,590 -2.8 Reformulated 348,837 387,021 370,527 394,128 390,361 388,178 2,577,622 2,657,013 3.1 Midgrade 18,187 19,268 18,846 20,575 20,136 22,106 136,920 138,481 1.1 Conventional 2,263 2,142 1,889 2,237 2,429 3,291 18,709 16,499 -11.8 Reformulated 15,924 17,126 16,957 18,338 17,707 18,815 118,211 121,982 3.2 Premium 43,075 43,727 41,305 46,768 47,505 50,608 318,866 318,582 -0.1 Conventional 5,759 4,923 3,908 5,672 6,306 7,624 37,639 39,337 4.5

446

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 542,611 516,779 557,147 554,647 565,098 582,468 4,285,709 4,354,134 1.6 Regular 479,616 456,628 489,804 487,006 492,384 506,038 3,757,974 3,820,641 1.7 Conventional 92,595 86,101 95,676 96,645 104,206 108,040 794,237 765,630 -3.6 Reformulated 387,021 370,527 394,128 390,361 388,178 397,998 2,963,737 3,055,011 3.1 Midgrade 19,268 18,846 20,575 20,136 22,106 22,313 159,156 160,794 1.0 Conventional 2,142 1,889 2,237 2,429 3,291 3,257 22,323 19,756 -11.5 Reformulated 17,126 16,957 18,338 17,707 18,815 19,056 136,833 141,038 3.1 Premium 43,727 41,305 46,768 47,505 50,608 54,117 368,579 372,699 1.1 Conventional 4,923 3,908 5,672 6,306 7,624 8,451 45,324 47,788 5.4

447

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 600,331 607,637 544,776 585,964 544,609 569,610 6,231,572 6,612,576 6.1 Regular 474,800 481,922 433,667 470,192 438,253 458,980 4,959,542 5,284,355 6.5 Conventional 107,710 110,970 91,845 98,835 90,774 95,236 1,056,509 1,117,226 5.7 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 367,090 370,952 341,822 371,357 347,479 363,744 3,903,033 4,167,129 6.8 Midgrade 41,258 41,734 35,957 37,629 35,045 36,676 450,664 436,007 -3.3 Conventional 7,552 7,706 5,748 5,973 5,333 5,568 69,760 69,873 0.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 33,706 34,028 30,209 31,656 29,712 31,108 380,904 366,134 -3.9 Premium 84,273 83,981 75,152 78,143 71,311 73,954 821,366 892,214 8.6

448

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 578,792 575,573 533,235 558,038 523,217 547,836 6,634,088 6,446,469 -2.8 Regular 505,930 503,624 465,652 488,216 458,192 482,095 5,702,420 5,651,281 -0.9 Conventional 115,384 117,509 101,392 101,392 92,553 97,112 1,136,078 1,185,915 4.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 390,546 386,115 364,260 386,824 365,639 384,983 4,566,342 4,465,366 -2.2 Midgrade 22,411 22,431 18,855 19,366 18,587 18,972 284,225 234,745 -17.4 Conventional 3,825 3,614 2,661 2,583 2,209 2,335 39,464 32,012 -18.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 18,586 18,817 16,194 16,783 16,378 16,637 244,761 202,733 -17.2 Premium 50,451 49,518 48,728 50,456 46,438 46,769 647,443 560,443 -13.4

449

New York Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

722 3.734 3.749 3.774 3.785 3.741 2000-2014 722 3.734 3.749 3.774 3.785 3.741 2000-2014 All Grades - Conventional Areas 3.730 3.734 3.735 3.757 3.768 3.749 2000-2014 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 3.716 3.735 3.761 3.789 3.799 3.734 2000-2014 Regular 3.618 3.635 3.649 3.679 3.690 3.644 2000-2014 Conventional Areas 3.638 3.647 3.649 3.672 3.683 3.661 2000-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.600 3.624 3.650 3.686 3.697 3.629 2000-2014 Midgrade 3.853 3.858 3.875 3.889 3.898 3.860 2000-2014 Conventional Areas 3.826 3.831 3.833 3.847 3.853 3.843 2000-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.870 3.875 3.902 3.916 3.928 3.871 2000-2014 Premium 3.984 3.988 4.001 4.016 4.025 3.988 2000-2014 Conventional Areas 3.986 3.979 3.975 3.998 4.008 3.997 2000-2014 Reformulated Areas

450

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 557,326 578,792 575,573 533,235 558,038 526,589 6,078,816 5,902,005 -2.9 Regular 489,993 505,930 503,624 465,652 488,216 460,951 5,218,190 5,171,945 -0.9 Conventional 106,317 115,384 117,509 101,392 101,392 95,048 1,042,317 1,091,298 4.7 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 383,676 390,546 386,115 364,260 386,824 365,903 4,175,873 4,080,647 -2.3 Midgrade 20,189 22,411 22,431 18,855 19,366 18,344 262,910 215,530 -18.0 Conventional 2,831 3,825 3,614 2,661 2,583 2,349 36,855 29,817 -19.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 17,358 18,586 18,817 16,194 16,783 15,995 226,055 185,713 -17.8 Premium 47,144 50,451 49,518 48,728 50,456 47,294 597,716 514,530 -13.9

451

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 575,573 533,235 558,038 523,217 546,228 521,614 507,903 521,614 2.7 Regular 503,624 465,652 488,216 458,192 480,634 458,169 445,636 458,169 2.8 Conventional 117,509 101,392 101,392 92,553 95,604 93,933 87,304 93,933 7.6 Reformulated 386,115 364,260 386,824 365,639 385,030 364,236 358,332 364,236 1.6 Midgrade 22,431 18,855 19,366 18,587 19,274 18,113 18,945 18,113 -4.4 Conventional 3,614 2,661 2,583 2,209 2,216 2,276 2,326 2,276 -2.1 Reformulated 18,817 16,194 16,783 16,378 17,058 15,837 16,619 15,837 -4.7 Premium 49,518 48,728 50,456 46,438 46,320 45,332 43,322 45,332 4.6 Conventional 7,685 6,074 5,976 4,770 4,840 5,124 4,574 5,124 12.0

452

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 509,790 537,109 530,520 540,898 555,627 513,590 4,881,867 4,714,737 -3.8 Regular 455,431 480,922 475,729 482,398 495,544 460,050 4,279,978 4,213,410 -1.9 Conventional 76,766 85,994 88,242 92,325 98,019 85,817 860,581 769,123 -11.0 Reformulated 378,665 394,928 387,487 390,073 397,525 374,233 3,419,397 3,444,287 0.4 Midgrade 13,806 14,609 14,166 14,682 14,063 11,714 176,576 125,783 -29.0 Conventional 1,546 1,755 1,810 2,224 1,989 1,208 22,272 15,685 -29.8 Reformulated 12,260 12,854 12,356 12,458 12,074 10,506 154,304 110,098 -28.9 Premium 40,553 41,578 40,625 43,818 46,020 41,826 425,313 375,544 -12.0 Conventional 3,283 4,525 4,912 6,558 6,625 4,768 54,233 42,234 -22.4

453

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 557,147 554,647 565,098 582,461 528,605 557,688 5,384,282 5,440,420 1.0 Regular 489,804 487,006 492,384 506,031 460,477 489,668 4,718,267 4,770,779 1.1 Conventional 95,676 96,645 104,206 108,037 94,740 95,190 997,859 955,557 -4.2 Reformulated 394,128 390,361 388,178 397,994 365,737 394,478 3,720,408 3,815,222 2.5 Midgrade 20,575 20,136 22,106 22,313 19,450 19,638 197,575 199,882 1.2 Conventional 2,237 2,429 3,291 3,257 2,452 2,171 27,582 24,379 -11.6 Reformulated 18,338 17,707 18,815 19,056 16,998 17,467 169,993 175,503 3.2 Premium 46,768 47,505 50,608 54,117 48,678 48,382 468,440 469,759 0.3 Conventional 5,672 6,306 7,624 8,451 6,308 5,115 57,431 59,211 3.1

454

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 540,605 483,593 520,563 494,955 496,452 492,765 461,105 492,765 6.9 Regular 479,996 431,332 467,394 442,377 445,406 442,844 414,239 442,844 6.9 Conventional 107,232 90,415 98,631 89,489 89,443 92,274 77,162 92,274 19.6 Reformulated 372,764 340,917 368,763 352,888 355,963 350,570 337,077 350,570 4.0 Midgrade 10,741 9,011 8,844 8,424 8,190 7,995 7,806 7,995 2.4 Conventional 1,499 1,234 1,015 881 903 921 832 921 10.7 Reformulated 9,242 7,777 7,829 7,543 7,287 7,074 6,974 7,074 1.4 Premium 49,868 43,250 44,325 44,154 42,856 41,926 39,060 41,926 7.3 Conventional 7,295 5,452 4,696 4,075 4,150 4,510 3,926 4,510 14.9 Reformulated 42,573 37,798 39,629 40,079 38,706 37,416 35,134 37,416 6.5

455

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 504,188 468,539 525,697 486,281 514,984 510,460 3,070,904 3,010,149 -2.0 Regular 452,854 420,289 474,090 438,981 464,593 456,545 2,732,322 2,707,352 -0.9 Conventional 87,933 82,130 86,201 79,247 91,426 91,994 516,139 518,931 0.5 Reformulated 364,921 338,159 387,889 359,734 373,167 364,551 2,216,183 2,188,421 -1.3 Midgrade 9,657 8,794 9,247 8,730 8,929 9,211 65,162 54,568 -16.3 Conventional 1,073 974 1,072 823 1,012 1,125 6,892 6,079 -11.8 Reformulated 8,584 7,820 8,175 7,907 7,917 8,086 58,270 48,489 -16.8 Premium 41,677 39,456 42,360 38,570 41,462 44,704 273,420 248,229 -9.2 Conventional 4,769 4,624 4,327 3,180 4,587 5,631 29,818 27,118 -9.1

456

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 468,539 525,697 486,281 514,984 510,456 539,730 3,641,816 3,549,875 -2.5 Regular 420,289 474,090 438,981 464,593 456,541 480,557 3,234,152 3,187,905 -1.4 Conventional 82,130 86,201 79,247 91,426 91,994 100,987 621,310 619,918 -0.2 Reformulated 338,159 387,889 359,734 373,167 364,547 379,570 2,612,842 2,567,987 -1.7 Midgrade 8,794 9,247 8,730 8,929 9,211 10,757 78,670 65,325 -17.0 Conventional 974 1,072 823 1,012 1,125 1,410 8,545 7,489 -12.4 Reformulated 7,820 8,175 7,907 7,917 8,086 9,347 70,125 57,836 -17.5 Premium 39,456 42,360 38,570 41,462 44,704 48,416 328,994 296,645 -9.8 Conventional 4,624 4,327 3,180 4,587 5,631 7,186 37,381 34,304 -8.2

457

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 514,984 510,456 551,226 555,511 521,124 530,824 5,248,335 5,168,830 -1.5 Regular 464,593 456,541 491,127 496,300 466,275 475,566 4,651,595 4,636,616 -0.3 Conventional 91,426 91,994 101,237 103,140 92,473 93,940 908,935 909,721 0.1 Reformulated 373,167 364,547 389,890 393,160 373,802 381,626 3,742,660 3,726,895 -0.4 Midgrade 8,929 9,211 10,823 10,283 9,258 9,151 113,829 94,083 -17.3 Conventional 1,012 1,125 1,410 1,439 1,091 1,006 12,709 11,025 -13.3 Reformulated 7,917 8,086 9,413 8,844 8,167 8,145 101,120 83,058 -17.9 Premium 41,462 44,704 49,276 48,928 45,591 46,107 482,911 438,131 -9.3 Conventional 4,587 5,631 7,191 7,090 5,477 5,328 56,718 52,204 -8.0

458

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 530,520 540,898 555,627 513,590 550,648 515,104 5,958,970 5,780,489 -3.3 Regular 475,729 482,398 495,544 460,050 493,937 461,524 5,230,297 5,168,871 -1.5 Conventional 88,242 92,325 98,019 85,817 90,049 81,016 1,039,287 940,188 -9.8 Reformulated 387,487 390,073 397,525 374,233 403,888 380,508 4,191,010 4,228,683 0.6 Midgrade 14,166 14,682 14,063 11,714 11,956 11,129 211,240 148,868 -29.7 Conventional 1,810 2,224 1,989 1,208 1,145 948 26,259 17,778 -32.5 Reformulated 12,356 12,458 12,074 10,506 10,811 10,181 184,981 131,090 -29.3 Premium 40,625 43,818 46,020 41,826 44,755 42,451 517,433 462,750 -10.8 Conventional 4,912 6,558 6,625 4,768 4,532 3,788 63,113 50,554 -20.1

459

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 517,232 511,759 545,873 535,318 570,912 554,479 4,153,719 4,196,295 1.0 Regular 461,626 455,817 482,797 472,316 501,830 486,959 3,697,205 3,721,111 0.6 Conventional 84,893 82,811 92,772 93,610 105,171 101,191 717,215 722,501 0.7 Reformulated 376,733 373,006 390,025 378,706 396,659 385,768 2,979,990 2,998,610 0.6 Midgrade 10,662 10,750 12,002 11,743 13,508 13,014 98,623 91,684 -7.0 Conventional 1,085 1,076 1,267 1,335 1,653 1,636 10,227 10,181 -0.4 Reformulated 9,577 9,674 10,735 10,408 11,855 11,378 88,396 81,503 -7.8 Premium 44,944 45,192 51,074 51,259 55,574 54,506 357,891 383,500 7.2 Conventional 4,362 4,340 5,704 6,255 7,563 7,460 42,458 44,841 5.6

460

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 3.124 3.139 3.197 3.200 3.185 1993-2014 80 3.124 3.139 3.197 3.200 3.185 1993-2014 All Grades - Conventional Areas 3.176 3.127 3.126 3.186 3.190 3.181 1994-2014 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 3.196 3.115 3.183 3.232 3.233 3.198 1994-2014 Regular 3.104 3.047 3.061 3.117 3.123 3.108 1992-2014 Conventional Areas 3.102 3.053 3.051 3.109 3.115 3.106 1992-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.110 3.030 3.096 3.146 3.149 3.113 1994-2014 Midgrade 3.278 3.223 3.242 3.299 3.299 3.285 1994-2014 Conventional Areas 3.263 3.216 3.217 3.280 3.280 3.273 1994-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.326 3.246 3.323 3.362 3.359 3.326 1994-2014 Premium 3.455 3.401 3.417 3.479 3.476 3.462 1994-2014 Conventional Areas 3.445 3.399 3.399 3.464 3.462 3.454 1994-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.487 3.408 3.475 3.528 3.522 3.489 1994-2014

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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461

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 513,866 505,064 537,904 531,489 559,954 567,413 4,213,504 4,211,420 0.4 Regular 459,449 450,035 478,044 472,425 495,129 501,603 3,765,490 3,748,865 0.0 Conventional 78,976 77,280 86,287 87,590 98,814 99,772 686,739 687,865 0.6 Reformulated 380,473 372,755 391,757 384,835 396,315 401,831 3,078,751 3,061,000 -0.2 Midgrade 11,416 11,399 12,602 12,126 13,409 13,588 114,147 96,526 -15.1 Conventional 1,017 1,015 1,213 1,222 1,506 1,596 14,464 9,760 -32.2 Reformulated 10,399 10,384 11,389 10,904 11,903 11,992 99,683 86,766 -12.6 Premium 43,001 43,630 47,258 46,938 51,416 52,222 333,867 366,029 10.1 Conventional 4,171 3,918 4,969 5,179 6,521 6,948 36,528 40,807 12.2

462

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 546,228 535,449 499,935 542,611 516,779 555,434 2,572,452 2,650,208 3.0 Regular 480,634 470,492 438,673 479,616 456,628 488,091 2,257,579 2,333,500 3.4 Conventional 95,604 92,531 89,836 92,595 86,101 95,676 454,256 456,739 0.5 Reformulated 385,030 377,961 348,837 387,021 370,527 392,415 1,803,323 1,876,761 4.1 Midgrade 19,274 19,363 18,187 19,268 18,846 20,575 93,934 96,239 2.5 Conventional 2,216 2,248 2,263 2,142 1,889 2,237 11,954 10,779 -9.8 Reformulated 17,058 17,115 15,924 17,126 16,957 18,338 81,980 85,460 4.2 Premium 46,320 45,594 43,075 43,727 41,305 46,768 220,939 220,469 -0.2 Conventional 4,840 5,145 5,759 4,923 3,908 5,672 23,598 25,407 7.7

463

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 535,318 570,912 554,479 515,841 536,199 508,811 5,721,571 5,757,146 0.6 Regular 472,316 501,830 486,959 455,816 474,668 452,725 5,090,580 5,104,320 0.3 Conventional 93,610 105,171 101,191 92,476 93,958 87,267 995,211 996,202 0.1 Reformulated 378,706 396,659 385,768 363,340 380,710 365,458 4,095,369 4,108,118 0.3 Midgrade 11,743 13,508 13,014 10,972 11,173 10,388 134,223 124,217 -7.5 Conventional 1,335 1,653 1,636 1,284 1,244 1,061 14,104 13,770 -2.4 Reformulated 10,408 11,855 11,378 9,688 9,929 9,327 120,119 110,447 -8.1 Premium 51,259 55,574 54,506 49,053 50,358 45,698 496,768 528,609 6.4 Conventional 6,255 7,563 7,460 6,229 5,648 4,458 58,408 61,176 4.7

464

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 520,035 545,243 516,781 489,227 521,195 509,790 2,094,774 2,036,993 -3.6 Regular 461,374 484,800 460,826 436,427 466,083 455,431 1,845,409 1,818,767 -2.3 Conventional 83,614 86,614 83,587 78,014 80,359 76,766 361,063 318,726 -12.5 Reformulated 377,760 398,186 377,239 358,413 385,724 378,665 1,484,346 1,500,041 0.2 Midgrade 15,520 15,820 14,583 13,721 14,439 13,806 75,664 56,549 -25.9 Conventional 1,810 1,866 1,811 1,687 1,655 1,546 8,542 6,699 -22.2 Reformulated 13,710 13,954 12,772 12,034 12,784 12,260 67,122 49,850 -26.3 Premium 43,141 44,623 41,372 39,079 40,673 40,553 173,701 161,677 -7.7 Conventional 3,745 4,124 4,122 3,923 3,518 3,283 19,735 14,846 -25.4

465

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 545,228 504,188 468,539 525,697 486,281 514,984 2,535,586 2,499,689 -1.4 Regular 487,995 452,854 420,289 474,090 438,981 464,593 2,260,006 2,250,807 -0.4 Conventional 92,950 87,933 82,130 86,201 79,247 91,426 422,529 426,937 1.0 Reformulated 395,045 364,921 338,159 387,889 359,734 373,167 1,837,477 1,823,870 -0.7 Midgrade 10,787 9,657 8,794 9,247 8,730 8,929 53,419 45,357 -15.1 Conventional 1,144 1,073 974 1,072 823 1,012 5,557 4,954 -10.9 Reformulated 9,643 8,584 7,820 8,175 7,907 7,917 47,862 40,403 -15.6 Premium 46,446 41,677 39,456 42,360 38,570 41,462 222,161 203,525 -8.4 Conventional 4,797 4,769 4,624 4,327 3,180 4,587 23,563 21,487 -8.8

466

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 514,161 520,326 525,369 540,605 483,593 520,563 5,165,107 4,967,011 -4.2 Regular 457,986 462,591 465,025 479,996 431,332 467,394 4,633,156 4,437,320 -4.5 Conventional 90,064 98,380 105,415 107,232 90,415 98,631 906,359 899,040 -1.1 Reformulated 367,922 364,211 359,610 372,764 340,917 368,763 3,726,797 3,538,280 -5.4 Midgrade 9,199 9,495 10,553 10,741 9,011 8,844 94,042 89,607 -5.0 Conventional 1,071 1,194 1,534 1,499 1,234 1,015 10,984 10,728 -2.7 Reformulated 8,128 8,301 9,019 9,242 7,777 7,829 83,058 78,879 -5.3 Premium 46,976 48,240 49,791 49,868 43,250 44,325 437,909 440,084 0.2 Conventional 5,291 5,945 7,421 7,295 5,452 4,696 51,982 51,504 -1.2

467

New England (PADD 1A) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

71 3.585 3.598 3.624 3.633 3.610 1993-2014 71 3.585 3.598 3.624 3.633 3.610 1993-2014 All Grades - Conventional Areas 3.578 3.578 3.588 3.629 3.626 3.613 1994-2014 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 3.570 3.586 3.601 3.622 3.634 3.609 1994-2014 Regular 3.494 3.508 3.520 3.548 3.556 3.530 1993-2014 Conventional Areas 3.501 3.501 3.511 3.555 3.552 3.535 1993-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.493 3.510 3.522 3.547 3.557 3.529 1994-2014 Midgrade 3.682 3.695 3.716 3.731 3.746 3.730 1994-2014 Conventional Areas 3.685 3.684 3.695 3.727 3.724 3.720 1994-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.681 3.697 3.721 3.733 3.751 3.733 1994-2014 Premium 3.829 3.840 3.858 3.875 3.889 3.872 1994-2014 Conventional Areas 3.846 3.849 3.857 3.892 3.891 3.884 1994-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.825 3.837 3.858 3.871 3.888 3.869 1994-2014

468

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 446,330 487,514 467,445 514,161 520,326 525,369 3,561,371 3,422,250 -4.4 Regular 400,799 438,269 419,689 457,986 462,591 465,025 3,198,475 3,058,598 -4.8 Conventional 75,965 79,443 76,333 90,064 98,380 105,415 620,168 602,762 -3.3 Reformulated 324,834 358,826 343,356 367,922 364,211 359,610 2,578,307 2,455,836 -5.2 Midgrade 7,543 8,274 8,141 9,199 9,495 10,553 65,391 61,011 -7.1 Conventional 793 806 750 1,071 1,194 1,534 7,489 6,980 -7.2 Reformulated 6,750 7,468 7,391 8,128 8,301 9,019 57,902 54,031 -7.1 Premium 37,988 40,971 39,615 46,976 48,240 49,791 297,505 302,641 1.2 Conventional 3,956 3,932 3,590 5,291 5,945 7,421 34,309 34,061 -1.2

469

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 540,301 564,932 507,854 551,005 519,384 532,887 5,983,641 6,162,327 3.3 Regular 430,015 447,094 403,797 439,428 413,569 424,196 4,678,248 4,901,423 5.1 Conventional 99,358 103,625 85,392 90,979 84,964 85,917 1,007,838 1,039,579 3.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 330,657 343,469 318,405 348,449 328,605 338,279 3,670,410 3,861,844 5.5 Midgrade 40,369 42,027 36,317 37,629 34,336 34,882 494,595 447,823 -9.2 Conventional 7,246 7,514 5,617 5,829 5,231 5,343 77,503 69,393 -10.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 33,123 34,513 30,700 31,800 29,105 29,539 417,092 378,430 -9.0 Premium 69,917 75,811 67,740 73,948 71,479 73,809 810,798 813,081 0.6

470

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 467,445 514,161 520,326 525,369 540,605 484,485 4,638,006 4,447,340 -4.5 Regular 419,689 457,986 462,591 465,025 479,996 432,224 4,161,050 3,970,818 -4.9 Conventional 76,333 90,064 98,380 105,415 107,232 91,307 815,781 801,301 -2.1 Reformulated 343,356 367,922 364,211 359,610 372,764 340,917 3,345,269 3,169,517 -5.6 Midgrade 8,141 9,199 9,495 10,553 10,741 9,011 84,932 80,763 -5.3 Conventional 750 1,071 1,194 1,534 1,499 1,234 10,019 9,713 -3.4 Reformulated 7,391 8,128 8,301 9,019 9,242 7,777 74,913 71,050 -5.5 Premium 39,615 46,976 48,240 49,791 49,868 43,250 392,024 395,759 0.6 Conventional 3,590 5,291 5,945 7,421 7,295 5,452 46,876 46,808 -0.5

471

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 565,098 582,461 528,605 557,695 520,035 545,266 6,454,418 6,505,728 0.8 Regular 492,384 506,031 460,477 489,668 461,374 484,820 5,657,794 5,716,973 1.0 Conventional 104,206 108,037 94,740 95,190 83,614 86,614 1,186,090 1,125,785 -5.1 Reformulated 388,178 397,994 365,737 394,478 377,760 398,206 4,471,704 4,591,188 2.7 Midgrade 22,106 22,313 19,450 19,638 15,520 15,822 235,038 231,224 -1.6 Conventional 3,291 3,257 2,452 2,171 1,810 1,868 32,004 28,057 -12.3 Reformulated 18,815 19,056 16,998 17,467 13,710 13,954 203,034 203,167 0.1 Premium 50,608 54,117 48,678 48,389 43,141 44,624 561,586 557,531 -0.7 Conventional 7,624 8,451 6,308 5,115 3,745 4,124 67,026 67,080 0.1

472

Texas Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

034 3.066 3.217 3.198 3.179 3.120 2000-2013 034 3.066 3.217 3.198 3.179 3.120 2000-2013 All Grades - Conventional Areas 3.034 3.051 3.204 3.184 3.168 3.123 2000-2013 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 3.035 3.088 3.237 3.219 3.196 3.115 2000-2013 Regular 2.959 2.989 3.146 3.125 3.108 3.048 2000-2013 Conventional Areas 2.967 2.985 3.142 3.119 3.107 3.059 2000-2013 Reformulated Areas 2.946 2.996 3.152 3.133 3.110 3.030 2000-2013 Midgrade 3.149 3.186 3.320 3.305 3.284 3.226 2000-2013 Conventional Areas 3.130 3.153 3.286 3.275 3.254 3.212 2000-2013 Reformulated Areas 3.177 3.234 3.368 3.346 3.326 3.246 2000-2013 Premium 3.312 3.346 3.483 3.472 3.443 3.389 2000-2013 Conventional Areas 3.295 3.309 3.452 3.440 3.411 3.376 2000-2013 Reformulated Areas

473

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 514,054 550,377 518,226 477,504 513,866 505,080 2,036,993 2,014,676 -0.3 Regular 460,528 491,662 464,200 427,980 459,449 450,036 1,818,767 1,801,665 -0.1 Conventional 80,032 90,649 82,174 76,972 78,976 77,281 318,726 315,403 -0.2 Reformulated 380,496 401,013 382,026 351,008 380,473 372,755 1,500,041 1,486,262 -0.1 Midgrade 11,129 12,327 11,408 10,578 11,416 11,399 56,549 44,801 -20.1 Conventional 948 1,239 1,124 1,067 1,017 1,009 6,699 4,217 -36.5 Reformulated 10,181 11,088 10,284 9,511 10,399 10,390 49,850 40,584 -17.9 Premium 42,397 46,388 42,618 38,946 43,001 43,645 161,677 168,210 4.9 Conventional 3,734 4,536 4,692 4,409 4,171 3,914 14,846 17,186 16.7

474

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 550,377 518,226 477,504 513,866 505,064 534,056 2,574,102 2,548,716 -0.3 Regular 491,662 464,200 427,980 459,449 450,035 474,188 2,299,689 2,275,852 -0.4 Conventional 90,649 82,174 76,972 78,976 77,280 86,603 404,720 402,005 0.0 Reformulated 401,013 382,026 351,008 380,473 372,755 387,585 1,894,969 1,873,847 -0.5 Midgrade 12,327 11,408 10,578 11,416 11,399 12,587 71,158 57,388 -18.8 Conventional 1,239 1,124 1,067 1,017 1,015 1,198 8,454 5,421 -35.5 Reformulated 11,088 10,284 9,511 10,399 10,384 11,389 62,704 51,967 -16.6 Premium 46,388 42,618 38,946 43,001 43,630 47,281 203,255 215,476 6.7 Conventional 4,536 4,692 4,409 4,171 3,918 4,992 19,371 22,182 15.3

475

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 142,976 125,585 133,383 132,214 134,901 129,045 118,555 129,045 8.8 Regular 127,337 112,647 119,751 117,558 119,426 114,771 104,022 114,771 10.3 Conventional W 91,370 82,252 69,032 69,189 64,626 61,295 64,626 5.4 Oxygenated W 21,277 37,499 48,526 50,237 50,145 42,727 50,145 17.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,977 3,370 3,629 3,715 3,919 3,705 4,122 3,705 -10.1 Conventional W W 2,182 1,558 1,636 1,625 1,960 1,625 -17.1 Oxygenated W W 1,447 2,157 2,283 2,080 2,162 2,080 -3.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,662 9,568 10,003 10,941 11,556 10,569 10,411 10,569 1.5 Conventional W W 6,316 5,317 5,622 4,950 5,562 4,950 -11.0

476

Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

00 3.439 3.518 3.537 3.548 3.555 1993-2013 00 3.439 3.518 3.537 3.548 3.555 1993-2013 All Grades - Conventional Areas 3.456 3.492 3.551 3.571 3.589 3.592 1994-2013 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 3.365 3.406 3.498 3.516 3.523 3.533 1994-2013 Regular 3.295 3.341 3.423 3.441 3.447 3.457 1993-2013 Conventional Areas 3.371 3.411 3.471 3.496 3.509 3.514 1993-2013 Reformulated Areas 3.247 3.297 3.393 3.407 3.408 3.421 1994-2013 Midgrade 3.491 3.518 3.592 3.617 3.634 3.636 1994-2013 Conventional Areas 3.484 3.524 3.581 3.592 3.609 3.611 1994-2013 Reformulated Areas 3.496 3.514 3.598 3.632 3.649 3.651 1994-2013 Premium 3.663 3.684 3.760 3.779 3.800 3.805 1994-2013 Conventional Areas 3.700 3.721 3.781 3.791 3.820 3.818 1994-2013 Reformulated Areas 3.641 3.662 3.748 3.772 3.789 3.797 1994-2013

477

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 488,726 508,081 505,973 534,828 527,726 470,883 4,446,448 4,433,062 0.1 Regular 437,307 450,215 447,456 473,795 466,249 416,430 3,969,926 3,946,750 -0.2 Conventional 93,114 96,168 96,218 109,084 109,271 92,643 800,409 860,860 7.9 Reformulated 344,193 354,047 351,238 364,711 356,978 323,787 3,169,517 3,085,890 -2.3 Midgrade 7,840 8,971 9,184 10,273 11,401 9,430 80,763 80,314 -0.2 Conventional 867 1,110 1,165 1,477 1,528 962 9,713 9,752 0.8 Reformulated 6,973 7,861 8,019 8,796 9,873 8,468 71,050 70,562 -0.3 Premium 43,579 48,895 49,333 50,760 50,076 45,023 395,759 405,998 3.0 Conventional 5,033 5,533 6,005 7,577 7,698 5,642 46,808 49,890 7.0

478

CIS 262 Fall 2013: Solutions to Homework 6 One direction is easy; Left Reset Turing machine can obviously be simulated by a regular Turing machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

machine can obviously be simulated by a regular Turing machine: Moving the head to right is the same. A regular Turing machine can simulate Reset by moving its head to the left-hand end of the tape denoted by a dotted character. Now we will show that Left Reset machine can simulate regular TM. Again moving the head

Plotkin, Joshua B.

479

Dark fleshed varieties (Bing type) in regular type, light fleshed varieties (Rainier type) in italics Sweet Cherries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dark fleshed varieties (Bing type) in regular type, light fleshed varieties (Rainier type and Royalton. For more information about these and other varieties, visit our web site at www

480

Solving Regular Tree Grammar Based Constraints ? Yanhong A. Liu 1 , Ning Li 2 , and Scott D. Stoller 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solving Regular Tree Grammar Based Constraints ? Yanhong A. Liu 1 , Ning Li 2 , and Scott D and is then simpli#12;ed according to a set of simpli#12;cation rules to produce the solution. Usually

Liu, Yanhong Annie

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 29, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2010 365 Data Specific Spatially Varying Regularization for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 29, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2010 365 Data Specific Spatially Varying Regularization for Multimodal Fluorescence Molecular Tomography Damon Hyde*, Eric L. Miller, Dana H. Brooks, and Vasilis Ntziachristos Abstract--Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) allows

Miller, Eric

482

$C^{1,\\alpha}$-Regularity of energy minimizing maps from a 2-dimentional domain into a Finsler space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show $C^{1,\\alpha}$-regularity for energy minimizing maps from a 2-dimensional Riemannian manifold into a Finsler space $(\\R^n, F)$ with a Finsler structure $F(u,X)$.

Tachikawa, Atsushi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Multiperiod Refinery Planning Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;7 Example 1: 5 crudes, 4 weeks Produce fuel gas, regular gasoline, premium gasoline, distillate, fuel oil seconds (94% NLP, 6% MIP) #12;8 Example 2: 8 crudes, 6 weeks Produce fuel gas, regular gasoline, premium gasoline, distillate, fuel oil and treated residu Optimal solution ($1000's) Profit 3641.3 Sales 33790

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

484

Compressed Wannier modes found from an $L_1$ regularized energy functional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a method for calculating Wannier functions of periodic solids directly from a modified variational principle for the energy, subject to the requirement that the Wannier functions are orthogonal to all their translations ("shift-orthogonality"). Localization is achieved by adding an $L_1$ regularization term to the energy functional. This approach results in "compressed" Wannier modes with compact support, where one parameter $\\mu$ controls the trade-off between the accuracy of the total energy and the size of the support of the Wannier modes. Efficient algorithms for shift-orthogonalization and solution of the variational minimization problem are demonstrated.

Farzin Barekat; Ke Yin; Russel E. Caflisch; Stanley J. Osher; Rongjie Lai; Vidvuds Ozolins

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

485

Divergence form nonlinear nonsmooth parabolic equations with locally arbitrary growth conditions and nonlinear maximal regularity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a generalization of our prior work on the compact fixed point theory for the elliptic Rosseland-type equations. We obtain the maximum principle without the technical Steklov techniques. Inspired by the Rosseland equation in the conduction-radiation coupled heat transfer, we use the locally arbitrary growth conditions instead of the common global restricted growth conditions. Its physical meaning is: the absolute temperature should be positive and bounded. There exists a fixed point for the linearized map (compact and continuous in $L^2$) in a closed convex set. We also consider the nonlinear maximal regularity in Sobolev space.

Qiao-fu Zhang

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

486

A hybrid inventory management system respondingto regular demand and surge demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper proposes a hybrid policy for a stochastic inventory system facing regular demand and surge demand. The combination of two different demand patterns can be observed in many areas, such as healthcare inventory and humanitarian supply chain management. The surge demand has a lower arrival rate but higher demand volume per arrival. The solution approach proposed in this paper incorporates the level crossing method and mixed integer programming technique to optimize the hybrid inventory policy with both regular orders and emergency orders. The level crossing method is applied to obtain the equilibrium distributions of inventory levels under a given policy. The model is further transformed into a mixed integer program to identify an optimal hybrid policy. A sensitivity analysis is conducted to investigate the impact of parameters on the optimal inventory policy and minimum cost. Numerical results clearly show the benefit of using the proposed hybrid inventory model. The model and solution approach could help healthcare providers or humanitarian logistics providers in managing their emergency supplies in responding to surge demands.

Mohammad S. Roni; Mingzhou Jin; Sandra D. Eksioglu

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank The Argonne Premium Coal (APC) Sample Bank can supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The sample bank consists of eight coals, including lignite, subbituminous coal, high volatile, medium by a variety of techniques. Five-gallon carboys hold about 80% of the batch in reserve for filling more

Maranas, Costas

488

A Hybrid N-Body Code Incorporating Algorithmic Regularization and Post-Newtonian Forces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a novel N-body code designed for simulations of the central regions of galaxies containing massive black holes. The code incorporates Mikkola's 'algorithmic' chain regularization scheme including post-Newtonian terms up to PN2.5 order. Stars moving beyond the chain are advanced using a fourth-order integrator with forces computed on a GRAPE board. Performance tests confirm that the hybrid code achieves better energy conservation, in less elapsed time, than the standard scheme and that it reproduces the orbits of stars tightly bound to the black hole with high precision. The hybrid code is applied to two sample problems: the effect of finite-N gravitational fluctuations on the orbits of the S-stars; and inspiral of an intermediate-mass black hole into the galactic center.

S. Harfst; A. Gualandris; D. Merritt; S. Mikkola

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

489

Topological regularization and self-duality in four-dimensional anti-de Sitter gravity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is shown that the addition of a topological invariant (Gauss-Bonnet term) to the anti-de Sitter gravity action in four dimensions recovers the standard regularization given by the holographic renormalization procedure. This crucial step makes possible the inclusion of an odd parity invariant (Pontryagin term) whose coupling is fixed by demanding an asymptotic (anti) self-dual condition on the Weyl tensor. This argument allows one to find the dual point of the theory where the holographic stress tensor is related to the boundary Cotton tensor as T{sub j}{sup i}={+-}(l{sup 2}/8{pi}G)C{sub j}{sup i}, which has been observed in recent literature in solitonic solutions and hydrodynamic models. A general procedure to generate the counterterm series for anti-de Sitter gravity in any even dimension from the corresponding Euler term is also briefly discussed.

Miskovic, Olivera; Olea, Rodrigo [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Casilla 4059, Valparaiso (Chile); Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Casilla 4059, Valparaiso (Chile) and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut Am Muehlenberg 1, 14476 Golm (Germany)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

490

Renormalization of lattice-regularized quantum gravity models II. The case of causal dynamical triangulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The causal dynamical triangulations approach aims to construct a quantum theory of gravity as the continuum limit of a lattice-regularized model of dynamical geometry. A renormalization group scheme--in concert with finite size scaling analysis--is essential to this aim. Formulating and implementing such a scheme in the present context raises novel and notable conceptual and technical problems. I explored these problems, and, building on standard techniques, suggested potential solutions in the first paper of this two-part series. As an application of these solutions, I now propose a renormalization group scheme for causal dynamical triangulations. This scheme differs significantly from that studied recently by Ambjorn, Gorlich, Jurkiewicz, Kreienbuehl, and Loll.

Joshua H. Cooperman

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

491

Internal and external dynamics in language: Evidence from verb regularity in a historical corpus of English  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human languages are rule governed, but almost invariably these rules have exceptions in the form of irregularities. Since rules in language are efficient and productive, the persistence of irregularity is an anomaly. How does irregularity linger in the face of internal (endogenous) and external (exogenous) pressures to conform to a rule? Here we address this problem by taking a detailed look at simple past tense verbs in the Corpus of Historical American English. The data show that the language is open, with many new verbs entering. At the same time, existing verbs might tend to regularize or irregularize as a consequence of internal dynamics, but overall, the amount of irregularity sustained by the language stays roughly constant over time. Despite continuous vocabulary growth, and presumably, an attendant increase in expressive power, there is no corresponding growth in irregularity. We analyze the set of irregulars, showing they may adhere to a set of minority rules, allowing for increased stability of irr...

Cuskley, Christine F; Castellano, Claudio; Colaiori, Francesca; Loreto, Vittorio; Tria, Francesca

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Competing ordered structures formed by particles with a regular tetrahedral patch decoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the ordered equilibrium structures of patchy particles where the patches are located on the surface of the colloid such that they form a regular tetrahedron. Using optimization techniques based on ideas of evolutionary algorithms we identify possible candidate structures. We retain not only the energetically most favourable lattices but also include a few energetically less favourable particle arrangements (i.e., local minima on the enthalpy landscape). Using suitably developed Monte Carlo based simulations techniques in an NPT ensemble we evaluate the thermodynamic properties of these candidate structures along selected isobars and isotherms and identify thereby the respective ranges of stability. We demonstrate on a quantitative level that the equilibrium structures at a given state point result from a delicate compromise between entropy, energy (i.e., the lattice sum) and packing.

G. Doppelbauer; E. G. Noya; E. Bianchi; G. Kahl

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

493

DLINK DWL1000AP 802.11B Wireless LAN Access Point 11Mbps Best Deal On Earth! Regular price: $399.00  

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D­LINK DWL­1000AP 802.11B Wireless LAN Access Point 11Mbps Best Deal On Earth! Regular price: $399.00 Sale price: $234.00 DWL­120> D­LINK 11Mbps LAN USB Adapter NEW LOWER PRICE!! Regular price: $199.00 Sale price: $158.00 D­Link DWL­500 Wireless LAN PCI Card 11Mbps New Lower Price!! Regular price: $199

Wilkerson, Clarence

494

Computational Science Technical Note CSTN-110 Interactive visualisation of spins and clusters in regular and small-world Ising  

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in regular and small-world Ising models with CUDA on GPUs A. Leist and D. P. Playne and K. A. Hawick 2010 understanding of computational simulation models such as the 2-D and 3-D Ising system with small-world link; OpenGL; visualisation; simulation; Ising model; lattice; transparency; instrumentation BiBTeX reference

Hawick, Ken

495

Regularity criteria and uniform estimates for the Boussinesq system with the temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal diffusivity  

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In this paper we establish some regularity criteria for the 3D Boussinesq system with the temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal diffusivity. We also obtain some uniform estimates for the corresponding 2D case when the fluid viscosity coefficient is a positive constant.

Jishan Fan; Fucai Li; Gen Nakamura

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

496

ON THE REGULARIZATION OF SENSE AND SPACE-RIP IN PARALLEL MR IMAGING W. Scott Hoge1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON THE REGULARIZATION OF SENSE AND SPACE-RIP IN PARALLEL MR IMAGING W. Scott Hoge1 , Dana H. Brooks in low coil sensitivity regions. 1. INTRODUCTION In pursuit of achieving reduced MR image acquisition2 , Bruno Madore1 , and Walid Kyriakos1 (1) Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital

Banks, David

497

(DOI: will be inserted by hand later) A regularization approach for the analysis of RHESSI X-ray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and acceptance should be inserted later Abstract. The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI for the bremsstrahlung cross-section. Key words. solar flares ­ X-rays ­ inverse problems ­ regularization 1. Introduction RHESSI (Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopy Imager) is an imaging spectroscope providing two

Piana, Michele

498

Points of general relativistic shock wave interaction are regularity singularities where spacetime is not locally flat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...their analysis is feasible, standard Schwarzschild coordinates (SSCs; a general spherically...regular shock wave interaction in Standard Schwarzschild coordinates In this paper, we restrict...outline the proof of theorem 7.1, which mirrors the constructive proof of Israel's...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 58:497510 (2007) Regularized, Fast, and Robust Analytical Q-Ball Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mathematical simplification of the Funk­Radon trans- form which approximates the ODF. We prove a new corollary); fiber trac- tography, orientation distribution function (ODF); regularization; Funk Radon transform Odyssée Project Team, INRIA/ENPC/ENS, INRIA Sophia Antipolis, France 2 Division of Engineering and Applied

Chen, Yiling

500

3D REGULARIZED VELOCITY FROM 3D DOPPLER RADIAL VELOCITY X. Chen, J.L. Barron, R.E. Mercer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D REGULARIZED VELOCITY FROM 3D DOPPLER RADIAL VELOCITY X. Chen, J.L. Barron, R.E. Mercer Dept, Ontario, M3H 5T4 Paul.Joe@ec.gc.ca ABSTRACT The recent availability of sequences of 3D Doppler radial velocity datasets provides sufficient information to estimate the 3D velocity of Doppler storms. We present

Barron, John