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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Price spread between regular and premium gasoline has changed over ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, ... more cost savings result from reducing octane levels for premium gasoline blendstock ...

2

South Dakota Gasoline Midgrade Bulk Sales (Volume) by Refiners ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

South Dakota Gasoline Midgrade Bulk Sales (Volume) by Refiners (Thousand Gallons per Day) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9;

3

Refiner Prices of Gasoline, All Grades - Sales to End Users  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product/ Sales Type: Gasoline, All Grades - Sales to End Users (U.S. only) Gasoline, All Grades - Through Retail Outlets Gasoline, All Grades - Other End Users Gasoline, All Grades - Sales for Resale Gasoline, All Grades - DTW (U.S. only) Gasoline, All Grades - Rack (U.S. only) Gasoline, All Grades - Bulk (U.S. only) Regular Gasoline - Sales to End Users (U.S. only) Regular Gasoline - Through Retail Outlets Regular Gasoline - Other End Users Regular Gasoline - Sales for Resale Regular Gasoline - DTW (U.S. only) Regular Gasoline - Rack (U.S. only) Regular Gasoline - Bulk (U.S. only) Midgrade Gasoline - Sales to End Users (U.S. only) Midgrade Gasoline - Through Retail Outlets Midgrade Gasoline - Other End Users Midgrade Gasoline - Sales for Resale Midgrade Gasoline - DTW (U.S. only) Midgrade Gasoline - Rack (U.S. only) Midgrade Gasoline - Bulk (U.S. only) Premium - Sales to End Users (U.S. only) Premium Gasoline - Through Retail Outlets Premium Gasoline - Other End Users Premium Gasoline - Sales for Resale Premium Gasoline - DTW (U.S. only) Premium Gasoline - Rack (U.S. only) Premium Gasoline - Bulk (U.S. only) Period: Monthly Annual

4

Price spread between regular and premium gasoline has changed ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power plant ... period coincides with increased blending of ethanol into the motor gasoline ... savings result from reducing octane levels ...

5

The Declining U.S. Equity Premium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study demonstrates U.S. equity premium declined significantly during the three decades. study calculates equity premium a variation a formula the classic Gordon stock valuation model. calculation includes bond yield, stock dividend yield, expected dividend growth rate, which this formulation change over study calculates premium several measures aggregate U.S. stock portfolio and several assumptions about bond yields stock dividends basically same result. premium averaged about percentage points during 1926--70 about percentage point that. This result is shown to reasonable by demonstrating roughly equal returns investments stocks consol bonds same duration would have earned between 1982 and 1999, years when equity premium is estimated views expressed herein those of authors and necessarily of Federal Reserve Bank Minneapolis Federal Reserve System. Historically, investors holding corporate equities have earned a premium, extra return holding equities instead of bonds, which more predictable returns. Es- timates equity premium in United States erage around 4 percentage points past centu- (Siegel 1998) around 7 percentage points 1926 period (Center Research in Security Prices). historical size of U.S. equity premium puz- economists since mid-1980s. Economists sumed size premium is primarily a measure compensation investors demand taking extra risk inherent equity investments. stan- dard asset pricing model which incorporates assump- been able account equity premium large 4 percentage points; with reasonable levels risk aversion and other standard assumptions, model pre- dicts instead a premium around 0.25 percentage point (Mehra Prescott 1985, Hansen and Jagannathan 1991). This discrepancy between data and theory come known as equity premium puzzle. puzzle some fruitful w...

Ravi Jagannathan; Ellen McGrattan; Anna Scherbina

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Premium Power Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Massachusetts Zip 1845 Product Specialises in the design and manufacture of high-density energy storage, utility service management and power quality systems. References Premium...

7

Microsoft Word - medicare-premium-rates.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

*subject to graduated eligibility Graduated Eligibility Graduated Eligibility is applicable to medical and dental premiums and defines what portion of the employer contribution you...

8

Understanding Premium Power Grades: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For many utility customers, quality of power has become as important as reliability of power, and providing this required quality serves as the basis of a premium power offering. This report addresses the key technical and economic issues related to premium power grades that utilities, regulators, and end users need to understand to make informed decisions.

2000-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

9

Microsoft Word - medicare-premium-rates.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

*subject *subject to graduated eligibility Graduated Eligibility Graduated Eligibility is applicable to medical and dental premiums and defines what portion of the employer contribution you are responsible for based on your years of service upon retirement. For example, if you have 15 years of service upon retirement, you would pay the full retiree premium for your medical and dental coverage, as well as 25% of the employer contribution. With 20 years of service upon retirement, you would only pay the retiree premium. Years o f Service % of Employer Contribution LANL pays % of Employer Contribution Retiree Pays 10 50% 50% 11 55% 45% 12 60% 40% 13 65% 35% 14 70% 30% 15 75% 25% 16 80% 20% 17 85% 15% 18 90% 10% 19 95% 5% 20+ 100% 0% 2014 Monthly Medical Premiums for

10

Oil prices and government bond risk premiums Herv Alexandre*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil prices and government bond risk premiums By Hervé Alexandre*º Antonin de Benoist * Abstract : This article analyses the impact of oil price on bond risk premiums issued by emerging economies. No empirical study has yet focussed on the effects of the oil price on government bond risk premiums. We develop

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

11

Why Do Inner City Residents Pay Higher Premiums? The Determinants of Automobile Insurance Premiums  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

insurance companies for each zip code in the city of Lossame demographic profile for every zip code: a 25-year old,insurance premium for each zip code is the average of quotes

Ong, Paul M.; Stoll, Michael A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

The Chemical Analysis of Argonne Premium Coal Samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Chemical Analysis of Argonne Premium Coal Samples U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY BULLETIN 2144 #12 OFFICE, WASHINGTON : 1997 The Chemical Analysis of Argonne Premium Coal Samples Edited by Curtis A.S. Geological Survey for the chemical characterization of coal and a comparison of the results

Laughlin, Robert B.

13

Energy Conservation Tax Credits - Small Premium Projects (Corporate) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conservation Tax Credits - Small Premium Projects Conservation Tax Credits - Small Premium Projects (Corporate) Energy Conservation Tax Credits - Small Premium Projects (Corporate) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Local Government Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Insulation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Solar Maximum Rebate 35% of qualifying project costs The sum of all incentives, grants, credits, or other public funds may not exceed total project costs Program Info Start Date 2011 State Oregon Program Type Corporate Tax Credit

14

Energy Conservation Tax Credits - Small Premium Projects (Personal) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Conservation Tax Credits - Small Premium Projects (Personal) Energy Conservation Tax Credits - Small Premium Projects (Personal) Energy Conservation Tax Credits - Small Premium Projects (Personal) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Insulation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Solar Maximum Rebate 35% of qualifying project costs The sum of all incentives, grants, credits, or other public funds may not exceed total project costs Program Info Start Date 2011 State Oregon Program Type

15

Managing risk in premium fruit and vegetable supply chains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production planning in premium fresh produce supply chains is challenging due to the uncertainty of both supply and demand. A two-stage planning algorithm using mixed integer linear programming and Monte Carlo simulation ...

Merrill, Joshua Matthew

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM "PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat and power; distributed generation; premium powerand operation of distributed generation, combined heat andcost combination of distributed generation technologies that

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Conservation Behavior: From Voluntary Restraint to a Voluntary Price Premium*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

predictions of the model in an empirical study of household electricity consumption with introduction of a price-premium, green-electricity program. We ...nd evidence of voluntary restraint and its relation or public transportation whenever you can, to park your car one extra day per week, to obey the speed limit

18

PREMIUMS PAID FOR GREEN GENERATION IN THE APX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PREMIUMS PAID FOR GREEN GENERATION PREMIUMS PAID FOR GREEN GENERATION IN THE APX GREEN POWER MARKET Janis C. Pepper Enertron Consultants / APX pepper@enertroncons.com 650-949-5719 Presented at Windpower 2000 May 1, 2000 Abstract Automated Power Exchange (APX) operates markets that allow buyers and sellers of electricity to do business with each other easily, efficiently, and directly. The APX Green Power Market opened on March 30, 1998 with the start of the restructured electricity market in California, providing a wholesale marketplace for buyers and sellers of renewable power to transact. Those renewable energy plants that are no longer under utility contracts, and new merchant renewable plants, are selling through this market. The overwhelming majority of green buyers and green sellers operating in the California market use the APX Green Power Market. APX

19

CREAT A CONSORTIUM AND DEVELOP PREMIUM CARBON PRODUCTS FROM COAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory and matching funds from industry and academic institutions continued to excel in developing innovative technologies to use coal and coal-derived feedstocks to produce premium carbon product. During Budget Period 5, eleven projects were supported and sub-contracted were awarded to seven organizations. The CPCPC held two meetings and one tutorial at various locations during the year. Budget Period 5 was a time of growth for CPCPC in terms of number of proposals and funding requested from members, projects funded and participation during meetings. Although the membership was stable during the first part of Budget Period 5 an increase in new members was registered during the last months of the performance period.

John M. Andresen

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Workers Remittances, Resident FCAs and Kerb Premium: A Cointegration Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper employs Johansens model selection and maximum likelihood cointegration technique to analyze the relationship among workers remittances, kerb premium and resident FCAs for Pakistan during July 1993 to December 2001. The results suggest that these variables are cointegrated from July 1993 to April 1998. However, the relationship was jolted by the two-tier exchange rate regime, freezing of FCAs and subsequent tightening of foreign exchange regulations following the nuclear tests. In addition, the causal relationship is found to flow (i) from kerb premium to remittances from the Gulf and (ii) from remittances to resident FCAs prior to nuclear tests. After that, the causal relationships reverse for the Gulf and other region. The results also indicate that higher kerb premium has a detrimental effect on remittances. The findings of this paper have implications for the future economic reforms particularly in the area of the monetary, trade, exchange and payments reforms in Pakistan with special emphasis on enhancing remittances from expatriate Pakistanis. Views expressed in this working paper are those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of the State Bank of Pakistan. Comments and suggestions are welcome by the

Zulfiqar Hyder; Zulfiqar Hyder

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Distributed Resources Premium Power Solutions: Market Analysis and Business Case for Distributed Resources-Based Premium Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been postulated that distributed resources (DR) can solve power quality and reliability problems. While the application generation and storage technologies is quite common for providing premium power, extracting DR benefits from these installations, whether existing or future, is less well developed. This report analyzes different DR applications and options for improving power quality and reliability at end user facilities. In this analysis, DR-capable technologies refer to generator and storage ...

2003-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

22

Regular Object Types  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regular expression types have been proposed as a foundation for statically typed processing of XML and similar forms of tree-structured data. To date, however, regular expression types have been explored in special-purpose languages (e.g., XDuce, CDuce, and XQuery) with type systems designed around regular expression types "from the ground up." The goal of the Xtatic language is to bring regular expression types to a broad audience by offering them as a lightweight extension of a popular object-oriented language, C#. We develop...

Vladimir Gapeyev; Benjamin C. Pierce

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Clean, premium-quality chars: Demineralized and carbon enriched  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop a bench-scale procedure to produce clean, desulfurized, premium-quality chars from the Illinois basin coals. This goal is achieved by utilizing the effective capabilty of smectites in combination with methane to manipulate the char yields. The major objectives are: to determine the optimum water- ground particle size for the maximum reduction of pyrite and minerals by the selective-bitumen agglomeration process; to evaluate the type of smectite and its interlamellar cation which enhances the premium-quality char yields; to find the mode of dispersion of smectites in clean coal which retards the agglomeration of char during mild gasification; to probe the conditions that maximize the desulfurized clean-char yields under a combination of methane+oxygen or helium+oxygen; to characterize and accomplish a material balance of chars, liquids, and gases produced during mild gasification; to identify the conditions which reject dehydrated smectites from char by the gravitational separation technique; and to determine the optimum seeding of chars with polymerized maltene for flammability and transportation.

Smith, G.V.

1992-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

24

Retail Prices for Midgrade Gasoline - Reformulated Areas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cities : Boston: 3.809: 3.767: 3.712: 3.687: 3.648: 3.615: 2003-2013: Chicago: 3.885: 3.829: 3.739: 3.662: 3.673: 3.669: 2000-2013: Houston: 3.516: 3.432: 3.384: 3 ...

25

Retail Prices for Midgrade Gasoline - Reformulated Areas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cities : Boston: 2.836: 3.302: 2.431: 2.868: 3.672: 3.816: 2003-2012: Chicago: 3.051: 3.520: 2.571: 3.053 : 2000-2010: Houston: 2.721: 3.218: 2.317: 2.744 : 2000-2010 ...

26

Retail Prices for Midgrade Gasoline - Conventional Areas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cities : Cleveland: 3.547: 3.625: 3.496: 3.382: 3.455: 3.485: 2003-2013: Denver: 3.676: 3.652: 3.598: 3.547: 3.505: 3.469: 2000-2013: Miami: 3.883: 3.842: 3.805: 3 ...

27

Retail Prices for Midgrade Gasoline - Conventional Areas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cities : Cleveland: 2.864: 3.277: 2.432: 2.856: 3.595: 3.697: 2003-2012: Denver: 2.890: 3.278: 2.358: 2.773 : 2000-2010: Miami: 2.991: 3.519: 2.597: 3.006: 3.792: 3 ...

28

Premium Power Corporation Smart Grid Demonstration Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corporation Smart Grid Demonstration Project Corporation Smart Grid Demonstration Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Premium Power Corporation Country United States Headquarters Location North Reading, Massachusetts Recovery Act Funding $7,320,000.00 Total Project Value $16,080,554.00 Coordinates 42.5750939°, -71.0786653° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

29

U.S. Sales to End Users Prices for Motor Gasoline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales Type: Sales to End Users, Average Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale, Average DTW Rack Bulk Sales Type: Sales to End Users, Average Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale, Average DTW Rack Bulk Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Formulation/ Grade Sales Type Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gasoline, Average - - - - - - 1983-2013 Regular Gasoline - - - - - - 1983-2013 Midgrade Gasoline - - - - - - 1988-2013 Premium Gasoline - - - - - - 1983-2013 Conventional, Average - - - - - - 1994-2013 Conventional Regular - - - - - - 1994-2013 Conventional Midgrade - - - - - - 1994-2013 Conventional Premium - - - - - - 1994-2013 Oxygenated, Average 1994-2006 Oxygenated Regular

30

EXC-12-0006 - In the Matter of Premium Quality Lighting, Inc. | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 - In the Matter of Premium Quality Lighting, Inc. 6 - In the Matter of Premium Quality Lighting, Inc. EXC-12-0006 - In the Matter of Premium Quality Lighting, Inc. On July 27, 2012, OHA issued a decision granting an Application for Exception filed by Premium Quality Lighting, Inc. (PQL) for relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 430, Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps (Lighting Efficiency Standards). In its exception request, PQL asserted that it will suffer a serious hardship, gross inequity and an unfair distribution of burdens if required to adhere to the new Lighting Efficiency Standards, effective July 14, 2012 (2009 Final Rule), with respect to its 700 series T8 General Service

31

Regularized nonsymmetric correspondence analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonsymmetric correspondence analysis (NSCA) is designed to analyze two-way contingency tables in which rows and columns assume an asymmetric role, e.g., columns depend on rows, but not vice versa. A ridge type of regularization was incorporated into ...

Yoshio Takane; Sunho Jung

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Isotope dilution study of exchangeable oxygen in premium coal samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A difficulty with improving the ability to quantitate water in coal is that truly independent methods do not always exist. The true value of any analytical parameter is always easier to determine if totally independent methods exist to determine that parameter. This paper describes the possibility of using a simple isotope dilution technique to determine the water content of coal and presents a comparison of these isotope dilution measurements with classical results for the set of Argonne coals from the premium coal sample program. Isotope dilution is a widely used analytical method and has been applied to the analysis of water in matrices as diverse as chicken fat, living humans, and coal. Virtually all of these applications involved the use of deuterium as the diluted isotope. This poses some problems if the sample contains a significant amount of exchangeable organic hydrogen and one is interested in discriminating exchangeable organic hydrogen from water. This is a potential problem in the coal system. To avoid this potential problem /sup 18/O was used as the diluted isotope in this work.

Finseth, D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Mortgage default and student outcomes, the solar home price premium, and the magnitude of housing price declines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effect of falling home prices on small business borrowing,2 Understanding the Solar Home Price Premium: Electricitysocial influences on price, Journal of Political Economy,

Dastrup, Samuel R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Mortgage default and student outcomes, the solar home price premium, and the magnitude of housing price declines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Home Price Premium: Electricity Generation and Greenof solar photovoltaic electricity production, UCEI Workinghas California?s residential electricity consumption been so

Dastrup, Samuel R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Create a Consortium and Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of these projects was to investigate alternative technologies for non-fuel uses of coal. Special emphasis was placed on developing premium carbon products from coal-derived feedstocks. A total of 14 projects, which are the 2003 Research Projects, are reported herein. These projects were categorized into three overall objectives. They are: (1) To explore new applications for the use of anthracite in order to improve its marketability; (2) To effectively minimize environmental damage caused by mercury emissions, CO{sub 2} emissions, and coal impounds; and (3) To continue to increase our understanding of coal properties and establish coal usage in non-fuel industries. Research was completed in laboratories throughout the United States. Most research was performed on a bench-scale level with the intent of scaling up if preliminary tests proved successful. These projects resulted in many potential applications for coal-derived feedstocks. These include: (1) Use of anthracite as a sorbent to capture CO{sub 2} emissions; (2) Use of anthracite-based carbon as a catalyst; (3) Use of processed anthracite in carbon electrodes and carbon black; (4) Use of raw coal refuse for producing activated carbon; (5) Reusable PACs to recycle captured mercury; (6) Use of combustion and gasification chars to capture mercury from coal-fired power plants; (7) Development of a synthetic coal tar enamel; (8) Use of alternative binder pitches in aluminum anodes; (9) Use of Solvent Extracted Carbon Ore (SECO) to fuel a carbon fuel cell; (10) Production of a low cost coal-derived turbostratic carbon powder for structural applications; (11) Production of high-value carbon fibers and foams via the co-processing of a low-cost coal extract pitch with well-dispersed carbon nanotubes; (12) Use of carbon from fly ash as metallurgical carbon; (13) Production of bulk carbon fiber for concrete reinforcement; and (14) Characterizing coal solvent extraction processes. Although some of the projects funded did not meet their original goals, the overall objectives of the CPCPC were completed as many new applications for coal-derived feedstocks have been researched. Future research in many of these areas is necessary before implementation into industry.

Frank Rusinko; John Andresen; Jennifer E. Hill; Harold H. Schobert; Bruce G. Miller

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Guidance on Waivers of Premium Pay To Meet A Critical Need  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on Waivers of Premium Pay on Waivers of Premium Pay To Meet A Critical Need (9/5/08) Background: 5 CFR $550.106(b)(l) provides that the bi-weekly limit on premium pay be waived for overtime work that is critical to an agency's mission. Criteria: DOE has established the following criteria for making these determinations. Requests must address these criteria. 1. The work must directly affect a Departmental element's core business activity. 2. The work must be urgent and unavoidable, i.e., it cannot be delayed or extended over a longer period of time. 3. Additional human resources with the expertise needed cannot be added due to the immediacy of the business need. 4. No other appropriate compensation option is available. Approval Process: Requests are to be addressed to the Director, Office of Human Capital Management and

37

Offering Premium Power to Select Customer Segments: Using Distributed Resources for Distribution Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric sector restructuring will likely lead to increased opportunities for distributed resources (DR) technologies and solutions. In particular, distribution utilities may be able to use DR to provide innovative services that can help increase customer value and open new sources of revenue. Using DR to offer premium power services to customers with special sensitivity to power quality disturbances is one such opportunity.

2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

38

Fuzzy-probabilistic multi agent system for breast cancer risk assessment and insurance premium assignment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present an agent-based system for distributed risk assessment of breast cancer development employing fuzzy and probabilistic computing. The proposed fuzzy multi agent system consists of multiple fuzzy agents that benefit from fuzzy ... Keywords: Breast cancer, Fuzzy probability, Fuzzy-probabilistic multi agent system, Insurance premium, Uncertainty

Farzaneh Tatari; Mohammad-R. Akbarzadeh-T; Ahmad Sabahi

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Physics of Regularized Image Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because the Ising Model reproduces surface physics, regularized image processing also reproduces these effects, either as restorations of lost information or as...

40

U.S. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Motor Gasoline 376,636.4 362,968.6 362,798.5 365,247.6 354,951.9 347,234.5 1983-2012 Regular 320,735.1 314,030.5 313,098.1 315,643.3 309,398.0 301,510.3 1983-2012 Conventional Regular 216,075 207,958.8 208,347.1 210,638.4 204,350.9 200,785.6 1994-2012 Oxygenated Regular - - - - - - 1994-2012 Reformulated Regular 104,660 106,071.7 104,751.1 105,004.9 105,047.1 100,724.7 1994-2012 Midgrade 20,282.6 18,229.4 16,706.5 15,633.9 13,707.6 13,500.5 1989-2012 Conventional Midgrade 14,369.3 13,559.2 12,537.8 11,971.8 10,521.2 10,550.0 1994-2012 Oxygenated Midgrade - - - - - - 1994-2012 Reformulated Midgrade 5,913.4 4,670.2 4,168.7 3,662.1 3,186.4 2,950.5 1994-2012 Premium

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Microsoft Word - 2014 Non-Med retiree premiums_30Sept13UH  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Monthly Premiums 4 Monthly Premiums for Retirees Without Medicare Medical Plans* PPO Single Adult + Children Two Adults Family RET LANS Gross RET LANS Gross RET LANS Gross RET LANS Gross $123 $521 $644 $221 $939 $1,160 $258 $1,096 $1,354 $356 $1,509 $1,865 HDHP Single Adult + Children Two Adults Family RET LANS Gross RET LANS Gross RET LANS Gross RET LANS Gross $88 $523 $611 $158 $943 $1,101 $185 $1,100 $1,285 $255 $1,514 $1,769 Dental, Vision, and Legal Insurance Dental Insurance* Vision Insurance Legal Insurance Self $43.11 $9.82 $10.73 Adult + Child(ren) $87.79 $19.85 $14.37 Two Adults $80.46 $19.65 $14.37 Family $143.66 $24.57 $15.59 *Graduated Eligibility

42

Gas Mileage of 2014 Vehicles by Dodge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Dodge Vehicles 4 Dodge Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 2014 Dodge Avenger 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2014 Dodge Avenger 21 City 24 Combined 30 Highway 2014 Dodge Avenger 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic 6-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2014 Dodge Avenger 20 City 24 Combined 31 Highway 2014 Dodge Avenger 6 cyl, 3.6 L, Automatic 6-spd, Regular Gas or E85 Compare 2014 Dodge Avenger Gas 19 City 22 Combined 29 Highway E85 14 City 16 Combined 21 Highway 2014 Dodge Challenger 6 cyl, 3.6 L, Automatic 5-spd, Midgrade Gasoline Compare 2014 Dodge Challenger 18 City 21 Combined 27 Highway 2014 Dodge Challenger 8 cyl, 5.7 L, Automatic 5-spd, Midgrade Gasoline Compare 2014 Dodge Challenger 15 City 18 Combined 25 Highway 2014 Dodge Challenger 8 cyl, 5.7 L, Manual 6-spd, Premium Gasoline

43

A Comprehensive Look at the Empirical Performance of Equity Premium Prediction, working paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Given the historically high equity premium, is it now a good time to invest in the stock market? Economists have suggested a whole range of variables that investors could or should use to predict: dividend price ratios, dividend yields, earnings-price ratios, dividend payout ratios, net issuing ratios, book-market ratios, interest rates (in various guises), and consumptionbased macroeconomic ratios (cay). The typical paper reports that the variable predicted well in an in-sample regression, implying forecasting ability. Our paper explores the out-of-sample performance of these variables, and finds that not a single one would have helped a real-world investor outpredicting the then-prevailing historical equity premium mean. Most would have outright hurt. Therefore, we find that, for all practical purposes, the equity premium has not been predictable, and any belief about whether the stock market is now too high or too low has to be based on theoretical prior, not on the empirically variables we have explored.

Amit Goyal; Ivo Welch

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

E_n-regularity implies E_(n-1)-regularity.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vorst and latter Dayton-Weibel proved that K_n-regularity implies K_(n-1)-regularity. In this note we generalize this result from (commutative) rings to differential graded categories and from algebraic K-theory to any functor which is Morita invariant, continuous, and localizing. As an application, we show that the above implication also holds for schemes. Along the way, we extend Bass' fundamental theorem to this broader setting and prove a Nisnevich descent result which is of independent interest

Goncalo Tabuada

45

Premium Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... this trend and add between 10 and 20 points of market share to ... thin-film solar cells; proton exchange (PEM) and solid oxide (SOFC) membrane fuel ...

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

46

PREMIUM POWER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (12) General industry consensus is that when the price per watt ... of electricity over its design life (equivalent to 1700 kg of coal), thereby eliminating ...

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

47

Premium Pay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in lieu of overtime pay) an equal amount of time off (hour for hour or quarter hours increments thereof) from his or her scheduled tour of duty. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

48

www.uce3.berkeley.edu Understanding the Solar Home Price Premium: Electricity Generation and Green Social Status  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study uses a large sample of homes in the San Diego area to provide some of the first capitalization estimates of the resale value of homes with solar panels as compared to comparable homes without solar panels. While the residential solar home market continues to grow, there is surprisingly little direct evidence on the market capitalization effect. We find evidence using both hedonics and a repeat sales index approach that solar panels are capitalized at roughly a 3 % premium. This premium is larger in communities with more registered Prius hybrid vehicles and in communities featuring a larger share of college graduates. 1

Samuel Dastrop; Joshua Graff Zivin; Dora L. Costa; Matthew E. Kahn; Samuel Dastrup; Joshua Graff Zivin; Dora L. Costa; Matthew E. Kahn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

LBNL-6484E Exploring California PV Home Premiums Ben Hoen, Geoffrey T. Klise, Joshua Graff-Zivin, Mark  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

484E 484E Exploring California PV Home Premiums Ben Hoen, Geoffrey T. Klise, Joshua Graff-Zivin, Mark Thayer, Joachim Seel and Ryan Wiser Environmental Energy Technologies Division December 2013 Download from: http://emp.lbl.gov/publications/exploring-california-pv-home-premiums This research builds on work published in 2011 entitled "An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California," LBNL- 4476E, which can be downloaded here: http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/emp/reports/lbnl-

50

E N E R G Y O U T R E A C H F A C T S H E E T Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E N E R G Y O U T R E A C H F A C T S H E E T Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank Background Program Overview T The Argonne Premium Coal (APC) Sample Bank can supply researchers with highly uniform, well-protected coal samples unexposed to oxygen. Researchers investigating coal structure, properties, and behavior

Maranas, Costas

51

South Dakota Midgrade Gasoline Prices - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Values shown for the ...

52

AN ALTERNATIVE TO THE HIGH-RISK-DRIVER THEORY: ADVERSE SELECTION INDUCED BY PER-CAR PREMIUMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the puzzle: automobile insurers experience the most liability, collision, and uninsured motorist (UM) claims per 100 insured carsand therefore charge the highest premiumsfor cars from the low-income zip codes of both rural and urban areas. But this fact seems to contradict general insurance theory which says that people with minimum insurance should be

Patrick Butler Ph. D

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Some Tauberian theorems for regularly generated sequences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we establish some Tauberian theorems for the Abel summability method in terms of regularly generated sequences which generalizes some results obtained in Canak and Totur [I. Canak, U. Totur, A note on Tauberian theorems for regularly generated ... Keywords: Abel summability method, General control modulo, Moderate oscillation, Regularly generated sequences, Slow oscillation

?brahim anak; Ferhat Hasekiler; Duygu Kebapc?

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

REGULARITY FOR A DOUBLY NONLINEAR PARABOLIC EQUATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REGULARITY FOR A DOUBLY NONLINEAR PARABOLIC EQUATION JUHA KINNUNEN Abstract. This survey focuses on regularity results for certain degenerate doubly nonlinear parabolic equations in the case when the Lebesgue This note focuses on the regularity of nonnegative weak solutions to the doubly nonlinear parabolic equation

Kinnunen, Juha

55

Regularities and their relations to error bounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we mainly study various notions of regularity for a finite collection {C1,?,Cm} of closed convex subsets of a Banach space X and their relations with other fundamental concepts. ... Keywords: error bound, graph, linearly regular, multifunction, normal cone, positive linear functional, property (G), regular, strong CHIP, tangent cone

Kung Fu Ng; Wei Hong Yang

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED PHYSICAL FINE COAL CLEANING FOR PREMIUM FUEL APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Bechtel, together with Amax Research and Development Center (Amax R&D), has prepared this study which provides conceptual cost estimates for the production of premium quality coal-water slurry fuel (CWF) in a commercial plant. Two scenarios are presented, one using column flotation technology and the other the selective agglomeration to clean the coal to the required quality specifications. This study forms part of US Department of Energy program ?Engineering Development of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning for Premium Fuel Applications,? (Contract No. DE-AC22- 92PC92208), under Task 11, Project Final Report. The primary objective of the Department of Energy program is to develop the design base for prototype commercial advanced fine coal cleaning facilities capable of producing ultra-clean coals suitable for conversion to stable and highly loaded CWF. The fuels should contain less than 2 lb ash/MBtu (860 grams ash/GJ) of HHV and preferably less than 1 lb ash/MBtu (430 grams ash/GJ). The advanced fine coal cleaning technologies to be employed are advanced column froth flotation and selective agglomeration. It is further stipulated that operating conditions during the advanced cleaning process should recover not less than 80 percent of the carbon content (heating value) in the run-of-mine source coal. These goals for ultra-clean coal quality are to be met under the constraint that annualized coal production costs does not exceed $2.5 /MBtu ($ 2.37/GJ), including the mine mouth cost of the raw coal. A further objective of the program is to determine the distribution of a selected suite of eleven toxic trace elements between product CWF and the refuse stream of the cleaning processes. Laboratory, bench-scale and Process Development Unit (PDU) tests to evaluate advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration were completed earlier under this program with selected coal samples. A PDU with a capacity of 2 st/h was designed by Bechtel and installed at Amax R&D, Golden, Colorado by Entech Global for process evaluation tests. The tests successfully demonstrated the capability of advanced column flotation as well as selective agglomeration to produce ultra-clean coal at specified levels of purity and recovery efficiency. Test results and the experience gained during the operation of the PDU have provided valuable insights into the processes studied. Based on the design data obtained from the test work and a set of project design criteria, two sets of conceptual designs for commercial CWF production plants have been developed, one using column flotation and the other using selective agglomeration process. Using these designs, Capital as well as Operating and Maintenance (O&M) cost estimates for the plants have been compiled. These estimates have then been used to derive the annualized cost of production of premium CWF on a commercial scale. Further, a series of sensitivity analysis have been completed to evaluate the effects of variations in selected cost components and process parameters on the overall economics of premium fuel production

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Energy Distribution of a Charged Regular  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the energy distribution of a charged regular black hole by using the energy-momentum complexes of Einstein and Mller.

Black Hole; I. Radinschi

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Metric regularity and systems of generalized equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the variational analysis community, the importance of this feature of Milyutin's extension of ..... There exist strong relations between regularity properties. 11...

59

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type" Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Gasoline, All Grades",7,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Data 2","Regular Gasoline",7,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Data 3","Midgrade Gasoline",7,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1986" ,"Data 4","Premium Gasoline",7,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014"

60

Energy Storage Application Brief -- Case History for Large Flywheel System: Piller -- Flywheel Energy Storage Systems for Premium Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Piller of Middleton, New York produces premium power systems for power quality and uninterruptible power supply (UPS) applications. An entire family of products is commercially available in a variety of system and circuit configurations for industrial use. These products are beneficial because they are highly reliable and protect from voltage sags. The energy storage components of these systems uses mature, conventional flywheel technology. This technology review describes the various applications of the...

1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Canonical Forms for Symmetric and Regular Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Matrices associated with symmetric and regular structures can be arranged into certain block patterns known as Canonical forms. Using such forms, the decomposition of structural matrices into block diagonal forms, is considerably simplified. In this ... Keywords: 15A18, 74S05, Block diagonalization, Decomposition, Group theory, Matrix canonical form, Regular structure, Symmetric structure

Ali Kaveh; H. Fazli

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Optimal regularity for the Signorini problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove under general assumptions that solutions of the thin obstacle or Signorini problem in any space dimension achieve the optimal regularity $C^{1,1/2}$. This improves the known optimal regularity results by allowing the thin obstacle to be defined in an arbitrary $C^{1,\\beta}$ hypersurface, $\\beta>1/2$, additionally, our proof covers any linear elliptic operator in divergence form with smooth coefficients. The main ingredients of the proof are a version of Almgren's monotonicity formula and the optimal regularity of global solutions.

Guillen, Nestor

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

66

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Climate adaptation wedges: a case study of premium wine in the western United States  

SciTech Connect

Design and implementation of effective climate change adaptation activities requires quantitative assessment of the impacts that are likely to occur without adaptation, as well as the fraction of impact that can be avoided through each activity. Here we present a quantitative framework inspired by the greenhouse gas stabilization wedges of Pacala and Socolow. In our proposed framework, the damage avoided by each adaptation activity creates an 'adaptation wedge' relative to the loss that would occur without that adaptation activity. We use premium winegrape suitability in the western United States as an illustrative case study, focusing on the near-term period that covers the years 2000 39. We find that the projected warming over this period results in the loss of suitable winegrape area throughout much of California, including most counties in the high-value North Coast and Central Coast regions. However, in quantifying adaptation wedges for individual high-value counties, we find that a large adaptation wedge can be captured by increasing the severe heat tolerance, including elimination of the 50% loss projected by the end of the 2030 9 period in the North Coast region, and reduction of the projected loss in the Central Coast region from 30% to less than 15%. Increased severe heat tolerance can capture an even larger adaptation wedge in the Pacific Northwest, including conversion of a projected loss of more than 30% in the Columbia Valley region of Washington to a projected gain of more than 150%. We also find that warming projected over the near-term decades has the potential to alter the quality of winegrapes produced in the western US, and we discuss potential actions that could create adaptation wedges given these potential changes in quality. While the present effort represents an initial exploration of one aspect of one industry, the climate adaptation wedge framework could be used to quantitatively evaluate the opportunities and limits of climate adaptation within and across a broad range of natural and human systems.

Diffenbaugh, Noah [Stanford University; White, Michael A [Utah State University (USU); Jones, Gregory V [Southern Oregon University, Ashland, OR; Ashfaq, Moetasim [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Premium Fuel Production From Mining and Timber Waste Using Advanced Separation and Pelletizing Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Commonwealth of Kentucky is one of the leading states in the production of both coal and timber. As a result of mining and processing coal, an estimated 3 million tons of fine coal are disposed annually to waste-slurry impoundments with an additional 500 million tons stored at a number of disposal sites around the state due to past practices. Likewise, the Kentucky timber industry discards nearly 35,000 tons of sawdust on the production site due to unfavorable economics of transporting the material to industrial boilers for use as a fuel. With an average heating value of 6,700 Btu/lb, the monetary value of the energy disposed in the form of sawdust is approximately $490,000 annually. Since the two industries are typically in close proximity, one promising avenue is to selectively recover and dewater the fine-coal particles and then briquette them with sawdust to produce a high-value fuel. The benefits are i) a premium fuel product that is low in moisture and can be handled, transported, and utilized in existing infrastructure, thereby avoiding significant additional capital investment and ii) a reduction in the amount of fine-waste material produced by the two industries that must now be disposed at a significant financial and environmental price. As such, the goal of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of producing a premium fuel with a heating value greater than 10,000 Btu/lb from waste materials generated by the coal and timber industries. Laboratory and pilot-scale testing of the briquetting process indicated that the goal was successfully achieved. Low-ash briquettes containing 5% to 10% sawdust were produced with energy values that were well in excess of 12,000 Btu/lb. A major economic hurdle associated with commercially briquetting coal is binder cost. Approximately fifty binder formulations, both with and without lime, were subjected to an extensive laboratory evaluation to assess their relative technical and economical effectiveness as binding agents for the briquetting of 90% coal and 10% sawdust blends. Guar gum, wheat starch, and a multi-component formulation were identified as most cost-effective for the production of briquettes targeted for the pulverized-coal market with costs being around $8 per ton of the coal-sawdust blend. REAX/lime and a second multi-component formulation were identified as the most cost-effective for the production of briquettes targeted for the stoker-coal market. Various sources of sawdust generated from different wood types were also investigated to determine their chemical properties and to evaluate their relative performance when briquetted with clean coal to form a premium fuel. The highest heating values, approaching 7,000 Btu/lb, were obtained from oak. Sawdusts from higher-density, red oak, white oak, hickory, and beech trees provided higher quality briquettes relative to their lower-density counterparts. In addition to sawdust type, a number of other parameters were evaluated to characterize their impact on briquette properties. The parameters that exhibited the greatest impact on briquette performance were binder concentration; sawdust concentration and particle size; cure temperature; and ash content. Parameters that had the least impact on briquette properties, at least over the ranges studied, were moisture content, briquetting force, and briquetting dwell time. The continuous production of briquettes from a blend of coal and sawdust was evaluated using a 200 lbs/hr Komarek Model B-100 briquetter. The heating values of briquettes produced by the unit exceeded the goal of the project by a large margin. A significant observation was the role of feed moisture on the stability of the mass flow rate through the briquetter and on briquette strength. Excessive feed moisture levels caused inconsistent or stoppage of material flow through the feed hopper and resulted in the production of variable-quality briquettes. Obviously, the limit on feed moisture content has a significant impact on the economics of coal-sawdust briquetting since it will ultimately dictate dew

Honaker, R. Q.; Taulbee, D.; Parekh, B. K.; Tao, D.

2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

70

An Optimal Algorithm for Purging Regular Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A joint application of four optimizing transformations for purging imperative programselimination of useless statements, unwinding of degenerate loops, removal from loops, and removal from branch statementsis considered. A model of regular ...

D. L. Uvarov

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Regularized Robust Coding for Face Recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently the sparse representation based classification (SRC) has been proposed for robust face recognition (FR). In SRC, the testing image is coded as a sparse linear combination of the training samples, and the representation fidelity is measured by the l2-norm or l1-norm of the coding residual. Such a sparse coding model assumes that the coding residual follows Gaussian or Laplacian distribution, which may not be effective enough to describe the coding residual in practical FR systems. Meanwhile, the sparsity constraint on the coding coefficients makes SRC's computational cost very high. In this paper, we propose a new face coding model, namely regularized robust coding (RRC), which could robustly regress a given signal with regularized regression coefficients. By assuming that the coding residual and the coding coefficient are respectively independent and identically distributed, the RRC seeks for a maximum a posterior solution of the coding problem. An iteratively reweighted regularized robust coding (IR...

Meng, Yang; Jian, Yang; Zhang, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Clean, premium-quality chars: Demineralized and carbon enriched. Quarterly report, September 1, 1991--Novemer 30, 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop a bench-scale procedure to produce clean, desulfurized, premium-quality chars from the Illinois basin coals. This goal is achieved by utilizing the effective capabilty of smectites in combination with methane to manipulate the char yields. The major objectives are: to determine the optimum water- ground particle size for the maximum reduction of pyrite and minerals by the selective-bitumen agglomeration process; to evaluate the type of smectite and its interlamellar cation which enhances the premium-quality char yields; to find the mode of dispersion of smectites in clean coal which retards the agglomeration of char during mild gasification; to probe the conditions that maximize the desulfurized clean-char yields under a combination of methane+oxygen or helium+oxygen; to characterize and accomplish a material balance of chars, liquids, and gases produced during mild gasification; to identify the conditions which reject dehydrated smectites from char by the gravitational separation technique; and to determine the optimum seeding of chars with polymerized maltene for flammability and transportation.

Smith, G.V.

1992-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

73

California Center for Population Research On-Line Working Paper SeriesUnderstanding the Solar Home Price Premium: Electricity Generation and Green Social Status  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study uses a large sample of homes in the San Diego area to provide some of the first capitalization estimates of the resale value of homes with solar panels as compared to comparable homes without solar panels. While the residential solar home market continues to grow, there is surprisingly little direct evidence on the market capitalization effect. We find evidence using both hedonics and a repeat sales index approach that solar panels are capitalized at roughly a 3 % premium. This premium is larger in communities with more registered Prius hybrid vehicles and in communities featuring a larger share of college graduates. 1

Samuel Dastrup; Joshua Graff Zivin; Dora L. Costa; Matthew E. Kahn; Samuel Dastrup; Joshua Graff Zivin; Dora L. Costa; Matthew E. Kahn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

U.S. Motor Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Motor Gasoline Regular Gasoline Midgrade Gasoline Premium Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Oxygenated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Product: Motor Gasoline Regular Gasoline Midgrade Gasoline Premium Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Oxygenated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Sales Type Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Sales to End Users, Total 28,179.6 24,384.0 24,143.9 23,567.1 24,120.5 23,282.9 1983-2013 Through Retail Outlets 26,507.1 22,632.7 22,641.3 22,038.2 22,474.5 21,660.0 1983-2013 Sales for Resale, Total NA NA NA NA NA NA 1983-2013 DTW 24,954.1 29,704.3 30,138.3 29,222.8 30,011.9 28,880.3 1994-2013 Rack 236,373.7 242,166.6 243,892.5 243,789.7 248,761.4 237,431.5 1994-2013

75

Price of Motor Gasoline Through Retail Outlets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prices, Sales Volumes & Stocks by State Prices, Sales Volumes & Stocks by State (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Data Series: Retail Price - Motor Gasoline Retail Price - Regular Gasoline Retail Price - Midgrade Gasoline Retail Price - Premium Gasoline Retail Price - Aviation Gasoline Retail Price - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Retail Price - Propane Retail Price - Kerosene Retail Price - No. 1 Distillate Retail Price - No. 2 Distillate Retail Price - No. 2 Fuel Oil Retail Price - No. 2 Diesel Fuel Retail Price - No. 4 Fuel Oil Prime Supplier Sales - Motor Gasoline Prime Supplier Sales - Regular Gasoline Prime Supplier Sales - Midgrade Gasoline Prime Supplier Sales - Premium Gasoline Prime Supplier Sales - Aviation Gasoline Prime Supplier Sales - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Prime Supplier Sales - Propane (Consumer Grade) Prime Supplier Sales - Kerosene Prime Supplier Sales - No. 1 Distillate Prime Supplier Sales - No. 2 Distillate Prime Supplier Sales - No. 2 Fuel Oil Prime Supplier Sales - No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prime Supplier Sales - No. 4 Fuel Oil Prime Supplier Sales - Residual Fuel Oil Stocks - Finished Motor Gasoline Stocks - Reformulated Gasoline Stocks - Conventional Gasoline Stocks - Motor Gasoline Blending Components Stocks - Kerosene Stocks - Distillate Fuel Oil Stocks - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Sulfur Stocks - Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Stocks - Distillate F.O., Greater 500 ppm Sulfur Stocks - Residual Fuel Oil Stocks - Propane/Propylene Period: Monthly Annual

76

UNDERCOMPRESSIVE SHOCK WAVES AND THE DAFERMOS REGULARIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNDERCOMPRESSIVE SHOCK WAVES AND THE DAFERMOS REGULARIZATION STEPHEN SCHECTER Abstract solutions that include only shock waves. Shock waves are required to satisfy the viscous profile criterion for a given viscosity (B(u)u x ) x . Undercompressive shock waves are allowed. We also show that all

77

Covariance regularization in inverse space - Optimization Online  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 1, 2009 ... In the present paper, we propose an alternative method for the regularization of ...... in white). The enlarged area in panel corresponds to the dashed square in panel (a) and the ...... 33'? ads 3,6;. With Eq. (92), the ?rst term...

78

Regularity of nuclear structure under random interactions  

SciTech Connect

In this contribution I present a brief introduction to simplicity out of complexity in nuclear structure, specifically, the regularity of nuclear structure under random interactions. I exemplify such simplicity by two examples: spin-zero ground state dominance and positive parity ground state dominance in even-even nuclei. Then I discuss two recent results of nuclear structure in the presence of random interactions, in collaboration with Prof. Arima. Firstly I discuss sd bosons under random interactions, with the focus on excited states in the yrast band. We find a few regular patterns in these excited levels. Secondly I discuss our recent efforts towards obtaining eigenvalues without diagonalizing the full matrices of the nuclear shell model Hamiltonian.

Zhao, Y. M. [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

79

Charged fermions tunneling from regular black holes  

SciTech Connect

We study Hawking radiation of charged fermions as a tunneling process from charged regular black holes, i.e., the Bardeen and ABGB black holes. For this purpose, we apply the semiclassical WKB approximation to the general covariant Dirac equation for charged particles and evaluate the tunneling probabilities. We recover the Hawking temperature corresponding to these charged regular black holes. Further, we consider the back-reaction effects of the emitted spin particles from black holes and calculate their corresponding quantum corrections to the radiation spectrum. We find that this radiation spectrum is not purely thermal due to the energy and charge conservation but has some corrections. In the absence of charge, e = 0, our results are consistent with those already present in the literature.

Sharif, M., E-mail: msharif.math@pu.edu.pk; Javed, W., E-mail: wajihajaved84@yahoo.com [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics (Pakistan)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Chaos regularization of quantum tunneling rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantum tunneling rates through a barrier separating two-dimensional, symmetric, double-well potentials are shown to depend on the classical dynamics of the billiard trajectories in each well and, hence, on the shape of the wells. For shapes that lead to regular (integrable) classical dynamics the tunneling rates fluctuate greatly with eigenenergies of the states sometimes by over two orders of magnitude. Contrarily, shapes that lead to completely chaotic trajectories lead to tunneling rates whose fluctuations are greatly reduced, a phenomenon we call regularization of tunneling rates. We show that a random-plane-wave theory of tunneling accounts for the mean tunneling rates and the small fluctuation variances for the chaotic systems.

Pecora, Louis M.; Wu Dongho [Materials Physics and Sensors, US Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Lee, Hoshik [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 (United States); Antonsen, Thomas; Lee, Ming-Jer; Ott, Edward [Physics and Electrical Engineering Departments, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

PREMIUM ENERGY FOR LACTEC INSTITUTE FOR TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT LACTEC R&D DPT. CURITIBA, STATE OF PARANA. BRAZIL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On April 2002 a 200KW Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) Power Plant. was installed at LACTEC Institute For Technology Development, Research and Development facilities. The power plant installed at LACTEC site is the second of its kind in the Southern Hemisphere. Its presence, not only contributed to the creation of a Fuel Cell Stationary Power market for Brazil and the rest of the region, but increased the knowledge about fuel cell technology, and marked the point of entry as a reference for the education of a new generation of applied scientists. On its first year the power plant has operated 8,558 hours achieving an availability factor of 97% and supplying 730.50MWh of premium energy. As a second regional experience with fuel cell technology, we expect this report about LACTEC PACFC power plant performance, applications and cost-benefit evaluation will provide relevant information for future regional investments on this technology.

Silvio Vedovatto

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4  

SciTech Connect

This project is a major step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal-water slurry fuel (CWF) can be produced from selected coals and that this premium fuel will be a cost-effective replacement for oil and natural gas now fueling some of the industrial and utility boilers in the United States. The replacement of oil and gas with CWF can only be realized if retrofit costs are kept to a minimum and retrofit boiler emissions meet national goals for clean air. These concerns establish the specifications for maximum ash and sulfur levels and combustion properties of the CWF. This cost-share contract is a 48-month program which started on September 30, 1992. This report discusses the technical progress made during the 4th quarter of the project from July 1 to September 30, 1993.

Smit, F.J.; Hogsett, R.F.; Jha, M.C.

1993-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

83

A regularization approach to hydrofacies delineation  

SciTech Connect

We consider an inverse problem of identifying complex internal structures of composite (geological) materials from sparse measurements of system parameters and system states. Two conceptual frameworks for identifying internal boundaries between constitutive materials in a composite are considered. A sequential approach relies on support vector machines, nearest neighbor classifiers, or geostatistics to reconstruct boundaries from measurements of system parameters and then uses system states data to refine the reconstruction. A joint approach inverts the two data sets simultaneously by employing a regularization approach.

Wohlberg, Brendt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tartakovsky, Daniel [UNIV OF CALIFORNIA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Regular black hole in three dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We find a new black hole in three dimensional anti-de Sitter space by introducing an anisotropic perfect fluid inspired by the noncommutative black hole. This is a regular black hole with two horizons. We compare thermodynamics of this black hole with that of non-rotating BTZ black hole. The first-law of thermodynamics is not compatible with the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy.

Yun Soo Myung; Myungseok Yoon

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Regular Functors and Relative Realizability Categories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relative realizability toposes that Awodey, Birkedal and Scott introduced in [1] satisfy a universal property that involves regular functors to other categories. We use this universal property to define what relative realizability categories are, when based on other categories than of the topos of sets. This paper explains the property and gives a construction for relative realizability categories that works for arbitrary base Heyting categories. The universal property shows us some new geometric morphisms to relative realizability toposes too. 1

Wouter Pieter Stekelenburg

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

l1 regularization in infinite dimensional feature spaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss the problem of fitting l1 regularized prediction models in infinite (possibly non-countable) dimensional feature spaces. Our main contributions are: a. Deriving a generalization of l1 regularization ...

Saharon Rosset; Grzegorz Swirszcz; Nathan Srebro; Ji Zhu

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

System regularities in design of experiments and their applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation documents a meta-analysis of 113 data sets from published factorial experiments. The study quantifies regularities observed among main effects and multi-factor interactions. Such regularities are critical ...

Li, Xiang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Wait-free Regular Storage from Byzantine Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a simple, efficient, and self-contained construction of a wait-free regular register from Byzantine storage components. Our construction utilizes a novel building block, called 1-regular register, which can be ...

Abraham, Ittai

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

89

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 39. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users...

90

untitled  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7 Table 33. Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, and PAD District (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users...

91

Compact models with regular charge distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We model a compact relativistic body with anisotropic pressures in the presence of an electric field. The equation of state is barotropic with a linear relationship between the radial pressure and the energy density. Simple exact models of the Einstein-Maxwell equations are generated. A graphical analysis indicates that the matter and electromagnetic variables are well behaved. In particular the proper charge density is regular for certain parameter values at the stellar centre unlike earlier anisotropic models in the presence of charge. We show that the electric field affects the mass of stellar objects and the observed mass for a particular binary pulsar is regained. Our models contain previous results of anisotropic charged matter with a linear equation of state for special parameter values.

P. Mafa Takisa; S. D. Maharaj

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

CO2 Isotherms Measured on Moisture-Equilbrated Argonne Premium Coals at 550C and 15 Mpa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sorption isotherms, which describe the coals gas storage capacity, are important for estimating the carbon sequestration potential of coal seams. The DOE-NETL initiated a second inter-laboratory isotherm comparison of coals where CO2 sorption isotherms were collected on moisture-equilibrated coals at temperatures and pressures relevant to CO2 sequestration. Each laboratory used the same coal samples and followed the same general procedure; however, each laboratory used their own apparatus and isotherm measurement technique. This study investigated the inter-laboratory reproducibility of carbon dioxide isotherm measurements on moisture-equilibrated Argonne premium coal samples (Pocahontas #3, Illinois #6, and Beulah Zap). Six independent laboratories provided isotherm data on the three moisture-equilibrated coal samples at 55oC and pressures up to 15 MPa. Agreement among the laboratories was good up to 8 MPa. At the higher pressures, the data among the laboratories diverged significantly for two of the laboratories and coincided reasonably well for four of the laboratories. This work provides guidance for estimating the reproducibility that might be expected when comparing published sorption isotherms on moisture-equilibrated coals from different laboratories.

Goodman, A.L.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

*Corresponding Author. The Contributions of Economic Fundamentals and Risk Premium to Movements in Exchange Rates: A State-Space Decomposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been a puzzle in the literature that fundamental variables do not help forecast the future exchange rate change better than the random walk benchmark. Recently Engel and West (2005, 2006) show that such a result can be explained by the present value model of the exchange rate if the discount factor for the expectation of future fundamental variables is close to one and the fundamental variables are I(1). In this work we propose a novel approach to offer an empirical evaluation of these exchange rate models. We develop a state-space framework in which the expectations of the fundamentals growth and the risk premium are modeled as latent factors and then are integrated into a stylized present value model of the exchange rate. This approach allows us not only to directly estimate the discount factor but also to study the expectation dynamics that are important in evaluating these exchange rate models. We estimate these models using a century of data for the US and UK. One of our major findings is that the discount factor is indeed very close to unity, lending support to Engel and West (2005, 2006). Furthermore, the estimated expectation dynamics suggest that the expected future fundamentals may explain a large portion of the exchange rate movement. We postulate two major reasons for why fundamentals have

Nathan S. Balke; Jun Ma; Mark E. Wohar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Energy Distribution of a Charged Regular Black Hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the energy distribution of a charged regular black hole by using the energy-momentum complexes of Einstein and M{\\o}ller.

Irina Radinschi

2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

95

Nested (2,r)-regular graphs and their network properties.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A graph G is a (t, r)-regular graph if every collection of t independent vertices is collectively adjacent to exactly r vertices. If a graph (more)

Brooks, Josh Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

On Global Regularity of 2D Generalized Magnetohydrodynamic Equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we study the global regularity of 2D generalized magnetohydrodynamic equations (2D GMHD), in which the dissipation terms are $- \

Tran, Chuong V; Zhai, Zhichun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Subtyping algorithm of regular tree grammars with disjoint production rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most type systems of statically typed XML processing languages are implemented based on regular expression types, where subtyping reduces to checking inclusion between tree automata, which is not efficient enough. The paper proposes the regular tree ... Keywords: XML, algorithm, subtyping, tree grammar

Lei Chen; Haiming Chen

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Regularity results for the Primitive Equations of the ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the linear Primitive Equations of the ocean in the three dimensional space, with horizontal periodic and vertical Dirichlet boundary conditions. Thanks to Fourier transforms we are able to calculate explicitly the pressure term. We then state existence, unicity and regularity results for the linear time-depending Primitive Equations, with low-regularity right-hand side.

Nodet, Malle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Regularity results for the Primitive Equations of the ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the linear Primitive Equations of the ocean in the three dimensional space, with horizontal periodic and vertical Dirichlet boundary conditions. Thanks to Fourier transforms we are able to calculate explicitly the pressure term. We then state existence, unicity and regularity results for the linear time-depending Primitive Equations, with low-regularity right-hand side.

Malle Nodet

2008-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

100

Local Linear Convergence of Approximate Projections onto Regularized Sets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The numerical properties of algorithms for finding the intersection of sets depend to some extent on the regularity of the sets, but even more importantly on the regularity of the intersection. The alternating projection algorithm of von Neumann has been shown to converge locally at a linear rate dependent on the regularity modulus of the intersection. In many applications, however, the sets in question come from inexact measurements that are matched to idealized models. It is unlikely that any such problems in applications will enjoy metrically regular intersection, let alone set intersection. We explore a regularization strategy that generates an intersection with the desired regularity properties. The regularization, however, can lead to a significant increase in computational complexity. In a further refinement, we investigate and prove linear convergence of an approximate alternating projection algorithm. The analysis provides a regularization strategy that fits naturally with many ill-posed inverse problems, and a mathematically sound stopping criterion for extrapolated, approximate algorithms. The theory is demonstrated on the phase retrieval problem with experimental data. The conventional early termination applied in practice to unregularized, consistent problems in diffraction imaging can be justified fully in the framework of this analysis providing, for the first time, proof of convergence of alternating approximate projections for finite dimensional, consistent phase retrieval problems.

D. Russell Luke

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Efficient approximate Regularized Least Squares by Toeplitz matrix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Machine Learning based on the Regularized Least Squares (RLS) model requires one to solve a system of linear equations. Direct-solution methods exhibit predictable complexity and storage, but often prove impractical for large-scale problems; iterative ... Keywords: Digital signal processor, Large-scale learning, Levinson-Trench-Zohar algorithm, Regularized Least Squares, Resources limited device, Toeplitz matrix

Sergio Decherchi; Paolo Gastaldo; Rodolfo Zunino

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

U.S. Refiner Sales to End Users (Average) Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales Type: Sales to End Users, Average Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale, Average DTW Rack Bulk Sales Type: Sales to End Users, Average Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale, Average DTW Rack Bulk Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Formulation/ Grade Sales Type Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Conventional, Average 3.030 3.137 3.122 3.063 3.042 2.972 1994-2013 Conventional Regular 3.005 3.116 3.102 3.040 3.017 2.948 1994-2013 Conventional Midgrade 3.167 3.256 3.239 3.200 3.193 3.121 1994-2013 Conventional Premium 3.269 3.354 3.327 3.291 3.274 3.203 1994-2013 Oxygenated, Average - - - - - - 1994-2013 Oxygenated Regular - - - - - - 1994-2013 Oxygenated Midgrade - - - - - - 1994-2013

103

CLASSIFICATION OF LATTICE-REGULAR LATTICE CONVEX POLYTOPES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. In this paper for any dimension n we give a complete description of lattice convex polytopes in R n that are regular with respect to the group of affine transformations preserving the lattice. Contents

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

CLASSIFICATION OF LATTICE-REGULAR LATTICE CONVEX POLYTOPES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. In this paper for any dimension n we give a complete list of lattice convex polytopes in R n that are regular with respect to the group of affine transformations preserving the lattice. Contents

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Regular zeros of quadratic maps and their application  

SciTech Connect

Sufficient conditions for the existence of regular zeros of quadratic maps are obtained. Their applications are indicated to certain problems of analysis related to the inverse function theorem in a neighbourhood of an abnormal point. Bibliography: 13 titles.

Arutyunov, Aram V; Karamzin, Dmitry Yu

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

Parametrized regular infinite games and higher-order pushdown strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given a set P of natural numbers, we consider infinite games where the winning condition is a regular ?-language parametrized by P. In this context, an ?-word, representing a play, has letters consisting of three components: The ...

Paul Hnsch; Michaela Slaats; Wolfgang Thomas

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Fast Rates for Regularized Least-squares Algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a theoretical analysis of generalization performances of regularized least-squares on reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces for supervised learning. We show that the concept of effective dimension of an integral ...

Caponnetto, Andrea

2005-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

108

On electric resistances for distance-regular graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the behavior of electric potentials on distance-regular graphs, and extend some results of a prior paper. Our main result, Theorem 4, shows(together with Corollary 3) that if distance is measured by the electric resistance between points then all points are close to being equidistant on a distance-regular graph with large valency. A number of auxiliary results are also presented.

Koolen, Jack; Park, Jongyook

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Engineering Development of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning for Premium Fuel Applications: Task 9 - Selective agglomeration Module Testing and Evaluation.  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this project was the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope included laboratory research and bench-scale testing of both processes on six coals to optimize the processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2 t/hr process development unit (PDU). The project began in October, 1992, and is scheduled for completion by September 1997. This report summarizes the findings of all the selective agglomeration (SA) test work performed with emphasis on the results of the PDU SA Module testing. Two light hydrocarbons, heptane and pentane, were tested as agglomerants in the laboratory research program which investigated two reactor design concepts: a conventional two-stage agglomeration circuit and a unitized reactor that combined the high- and low-shear operations in one vessel. The results were used to design and build a 25 lb/hr bench-scale unit with two-stage agglomeration. The unit also included a steam stripping and condensation circuit for recovery and recycle of heptane. It was tested on six coals to determine the optimum grind and other process conditions that resulted in the recovery of about 99% of the energy while producing low ash (1-2 lb/MBtu) products. The fineness of the grind was the most important variable with the D80 (80% passing size) varying in the 12 to 68 micron range. All the clean coals could be formulated into coal-water-slurry-fuels with acceptable properties. The bench-scale results were used for the conceptual and detailed design of the PDU SA Module which was integrated with the existing grinding and dewatering circuits. The PDU was operated for about 9 months. During the first three months, the shakedown testing was performed to fine tune the operation and control of various equipment. This was followed by parametric testing, optimization/confirmatory testing, and finally a 72-hour round the clock production run for each of the three project coals (Hiawatha, Taggart, and Indiana VII). The parametric testing results confirmed that the Taggart coal ground to a D80 of 30 microns could be cleaned to 1 lb ash/MBtu, whereas the Hiawatha and Indiana Vil coals had to be ground to D80s of 40 and 20 microns, respectively, to be cleaned to 2 lb ash/MBtu. The percent solids, residence time, shear intensity (impeller tip speed and energy input per unit volume), and heptane dosage were the main variables that affected successful operation (phase inversion or microagglomerate formation in the high-shear reactor and their growth to 2-3 mm in size during low shear). Downward inclination of the vibrating screen and adequate spray water helped produce the low ash products. Btu recoveries were consistently greater than 98%. Two-stage steam stripping achieved about 99% heptane recovery for recycle to the process. Residual hydrocarbon concentrations were in the 3000 to 5000 ppm range on a dry solids basis.

Moro, N.` Jha, M.C.

1997-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

110

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Prices of Petroleum Products U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 76 Table 31. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Premium All Grades Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Other End Users a Through Retail Outlets Other End Users a Through Retail Outlets Other End Users a Through Retail Outlets Other End Users a United States September 2013 .......... 3.032 2.796 2.757 3.231 3.092 2.861 3.346 3.078 3.064 3.076 2.818 2.792

111

Gas Mileage Tips - Driving More Efficiently  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Driving More Efficiently Driving More Efficiently Personalize Fuel Prices Select the fuel type and enter your fuel price to personalize savings estimates. Regular Midgrade Premium Diesel E85 CNG LPG $ 3.33 /gal Save My Prices Use Default Prices Click "Save My Prices" to apply your prices to other pages, or click "Use Default Prices" use national average prices. Drive Sensibly frustrated driver Aggressive driving (speeding, rapid acceleration and braking) wastes gas. It can lower your gas mileage by 33% at highway speeds and by 5% around town. Sensible driving is also safer for you and others, so you may save more than gas money. Fuel Economy Benefit: 5%-33% Equivalent Gasoline Savings: $0.17-$1.10/gallon Observe the Speed Limit (New Information) Graph showing MPG decreases rapidly at speeds above 50 mph

112

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Retail Gasoline and Diesel Surveys Retail Gasoline and Diesel Surveys Definitions Key Terms Definition Conventional Area Any area that does not require the sale of reformulated gasoline. All types of finished motor gasoline may be sold in this area. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the reformulated gasoline category. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Note: this survey designates all motor gasoline collected within a conventional area as conventional gasoline (see conventional area). Gasoline Grades The classification of gasoline by octane ratings. Each type of gasoline (conventional and reformulated) is classified by three grades - regular, midgrade, and premium. Note: gasoline sales are reported by grade in accordance with their classification at the time of sale. In general, automotive octane requirements are lower at high altitudes. Therefore, in some areas of the United States, such as the Rocky Mountain States, the octane ratings for the gasoline grades may be 2 or more octane points lower.

113

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2003 through September 30, 2004  

SciTech Connect

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) has been successfully operating the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by PSU, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with PSU responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes PSU and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. A second contract was executed with DOE NETL starting in October 2003 to continue the activities of CPCPC. An annual funding meeting was held in October 2003 and the council selected 10 projects for funding. Base funding for the projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the various subcontractors on March 1, 2004.

Andresen, John; Schobert, Harold; Miller, Bruce G

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

On Regularization Parameters Estimation in Edge---Preserving Image Reconstruction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The image restoration problem is a well known ill-posed inverse problem. Thus, to solve it some regularization techniques are necessary. By these techniques the solution of the problem is defined as the minimum of an energy function. This function is ...

Ivan Gerace; Francesca Martinelli

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Finsleroid-regular space. Landsberg-to-Berwald implication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By performing required evaluations, we show that in the Finsleroid-regular space the Landsberg-space condition just degenerates to the Berwald-space condition (at any dimension number $N\\ge2$). Simple and clear expository representations are obtained. Due comparisons with the Finsleroid-Finsler space are indicated. Keywords: Finsler metrics, spray coefficients, curvature tensors.

Asanov, G S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

A modular NFA architecture for regular expression matching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a non-deterministic finite automata (NFA) based architecture for regexp scanners on FPGA, called CES: the Character Class with Constraint Repetition (CCR) based regExp Scanner. CES is designed to realize a new MIN-MAX counting algorithm, which ... Keywords: FPGA, NFA, character class constraint repetition, overlapped matching, regular expression

Hao Wang; Shi Pu; Gabriel Knezek; Jyh-Charn Liu

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Wind and Turbulence in a Sparse but Regular Plant Canopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind velocity statistics from several points within a regular but sparse array of clumped corn plants are analyzed, with each clump consisting of 12 plants, having a mean height of 1.6 m and a collective leaf area of about 2.75 m2 and occupying ...

Andree Tuzet; John D. Wilson

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Wait-free regular storage from Byzantine components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the problem of implementing a wait-free regular register from storage components prone to Byzantine faults. We present a simple, efficient, and self-contained construction of such a register. Our construction utilizes a novel building block, ... Keywords: Distributed computing

Ittai Abraham; Gregory Chockler; Idit Keidar; Dahlia Malkhi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

A descent method for nonsmooth variational inequalities via regularization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we propose a descent method for solving variational inequality problems where the underlying operator is nonsmooth, locally Lipschitz, and monotone over a closed, convex feasible set. The idea is to combine a descent method for variational ... Keywords: Tikhonov-Browder regularization, descent method, gap function, nonsmooth mapping, variational inequality

Barbara Panicucci; Massimo Pappalardo; Mauro Passacantando

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2005  

SciTech Connect

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) has been successfully operating the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by PSU, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with PSU responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes PSU and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. A second contract was executed with DOE NETL starting in October 2003 to continue the activities of CPCPC. An annual funding meeting was held in October 2003 and the council selected ten projects for funding. Base funding for the projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2004. Nine of the ten projects have been completed and the final reports for these 2004 projects are attached. An annual funding meeting was held in November 2004 and the council selected eleven projects for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2005. Three additional projects were selected for funding during the April 2005 tutorial/funding meeting. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on July 1, 2005.

Miller, Bruce G

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University has been successfully managing the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by Penn State, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. Base funding for the selected projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. At the annual funding meeting held in October 2003, ten projects were selected for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2004. Nine of the ten 2004 projects were completed during the previous annual reporting period and their final reports were submitted with the previous annual report (i.e., 10/01/04-09/30/05). The final report for the remaining project, which was submitted during this reporting period (i.e., 10/01/05-09/30/06), is attached. At the annual funding meeting held in November 2004, eleven projects were selected for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2005. Three additional projects were selected for funding during the April 2005 tutorial/funding meeting. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on July 1, 2005. Of these fourteen 2005 projects, eleven have been completed and the final reports are attached. An annual funding meeting was held in November 2005 and the council selected five projects for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2006, except for one that started October 1, 2006.

Miller, Bruce G

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

122

Regular Scanning Tunneling Microscope Tips can be Intrinsically Chiral  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report our discovery that regular scanning tunneling microscope tips can themselves be chiral. This chirality leads to differences in electron tunneling efficiencies through left- and right-handed molecules, and, when using the tip to electrically excite molecular rotation, large differences in rotation rate were observed which correlated with molecular chirality. As scanning tunneling microscopy is a widely used technique, this result may have unforeseen consequences for the measurement of asymmetric surface phenomena in a variety of important fields.

Tierney, Heather L.; Murphy, Colin J.; Sykes, E. Charles H. [Department of Chemistry, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts 02155-5813 (United States)

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

123

Five lectures on optimal transportation: Geometry, regularity and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this series of lectures we introduce the Monge-Kantorovich problem of optimally transporting one distribution of mass onto another, where optimality is measured against a cost function c(x,y). Connections to geometry, inequalities, and partial differential equations will be discussed, focusing in particular on recent developments in the regularity theory for Monge-Ampere type equations. An application to microeconomics will also be described, which amounts to finding the equilibrium price distribution for a monopolist marketing a multidimensional line of products to a population of anonymous agents whose preferences are known only statistically.

Guillen, Nestor

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Gravitation and regular Universe without dark energy and dark matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that isotropic cosmology in the Riemann-Cartan spacetime allows to solve the problem of cosmological singularity as well as the problems of invisible matter components - dark energy and dark matter. All cosmological models filled with usual gravitating matter satisfying energy dominance conditions are regular with respect to energy density, spacetime metrics and the Hubble parameter. At asymptotics cosmological solutions of spatially flat models describe accelerating Universe without dark energy and dark matter, and quantitatively their behaviour is identical to that of standard cosmological \\Lambda CDM-model.

A. V. Minkevich

2011-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

125

Thin-shell wormholes from regular charged black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate a new thin-shell wormhole constructed by surgically grafting two regular charged black holes arising from the action using nonlinear electrodynamics coupled to general relativity. The stress-energy components within the shell violate the null and weak energy conditions but obey the strong energy condition. We study the stability in two ways: (i) taking a specific equation of state at the throat and (ii) analyzing the stability to linearized spherically symmetric perturbations about a static equilibrium solution. Various other aspects of this thin-shell wormhole are also analyzed.

F. Rahaman; K A Rahman; Sk. A Rakib; Peter K. F. Kuhfittig

2009-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

126

What do I pay for in a gallon of regular gasoline? - FAQ - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

What do I pay for in a gallon of regular gasoline? The national average retail price of a gallon of regular gasoline in October 2013 was $3.34.

127

What was the highest U.S. average retail price of regular ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

What was the highest U.S. average retail price of regular gasoline? According to EIAs weekly survey, the U.S. average retail price of regular ...

128

GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION METHODS FOR GRAVITATIONAL LENS SYSTEMS WITH REGULARIZED SOURCES  

SciTech Connect

Several approaches exist to model gravitational lens systems. In this study, we apply global optimization methods to find the optimal set of lens parameters using a genetic algorithm. We treat the full optimization procedure as a two-step process: an analytical description of the source plane intensity distribution is used to find an initial approximation to the optimal lens parameters; the second stage of the optimization uses a pixelated source plane with the semilinear method to determine an optimal source. Regularization is handled by means of an iterative method and the generalized cross validation (GCV) and unbiased predictive risk estimator (UPRE) functions that are commonly used in standard image deconvolution problems. This approach simultaneously estimates the optimal regularization parameter and the number of degrees of freedom in the source. Using the GCV and UPRE functions, we are able to justify an estimation of the number of source degrees of freedom found in previous work. We test our approach by applying our code to a subset of the lens systems included in the SLACS survey.

Rogers, Adam; Fiege, Jason D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T-2N2 (Canada)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

S1/2 Regularization Methods and Fixed Point Algorithms for Affine ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... H. Guo, and Y. Wang et al, Representation of ?1/2 regularizer among ?q (0 phase diagram, Acta Autom.

130

$C^{1,\\al}$ regularity of solutions to parabolic Monge-Amp\\'ere equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study interior $C^{1, \\al}$ regularity of viscosity solutions of the parabolic Monge-Amp\\'ere equation

Daskalopoulos, Panagiota

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Smoothness criteria for Navier-Stokes equations in terms of regularity along the steam lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article is devoted to a regularity criteria for solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations in terms of regularity along the stream lines. More precisely, we prove that a suitable weak solution for the Navier-Stokes equations is regular under some constraint on the second derivative of |u| along the stream lines.

Chan, Chi Hin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Automated Regularization Parameter Selection in Multi-Scale Total Variation Models for Image Restoration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-scale total variation models for image restoration are introduced. The models utilize a spatially dependent regularization parameter in order to enhance image regions containing details while still sufficiently smoothing homogeneous features. The ... Keywords: Hierarchical decomposition, Local variance estimator, Order statistics, Primal-dual method, Semismooth Newton method, Spatially dependent regularization parameter, Total variation regularization

Yiqiu Dong; Michael Hintermller; M. Monserrat Rincon-Camacho

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Gas Mileage of 2013 Vehicles by Dodge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Dodge Vehicles 3 Dodge Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 2013 Dodge Avenger 6 cyl, 3.6 L, Automatic 6-spd, Regular Gas or E85 Compare 2013 Dodge Avenger Gas 19 City 22 Combined 29 Highway E85 14 City 16 Combined 21 Highway 2013 Dodge Avenger 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic 6-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2013 Dodge Avenger View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 20 City 23 Combined 31 Highway 2013 Dodge Avenger 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2013 Dodge Avenger 21 City 24 Combined 29 Highway 2013 Dodge Challenger 8 cyl, 5.7 L, Automatic 5-spd, Midgrade Gasoline Compare 2013 Dodge Challenger 16 City 19 Combined 25 Highway 2013 Dodge Challenger 6 cyl, 3.6 L, Automatic 5-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2013 Dodge Challenger 18 City 21 Combined 27 Highway 2013 Dodge Challenger 8 cyl, 5.7 L, Manual 6-spd, Premium Gasoline

134

Efficient Decompositional Model-Checking for Regular Timing Diagrams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a growing need to make verification tools easier to use. A solution that does not require redesigning the tool is to construct front-ends providing specification notations that are close to those used in practice. Timing diagrams are such a widely used graphical notation, one that is often more appealing than a "linear" textual notation. This paper introduces a class of timing diagrams called Regular Timing Diagrams (RTDs). RTDs have a precise syntax and a formal semantics that is simple and corresponds to common usage. In addition, RTDs have an inherent compositional structure, which is exploited to provide an efficient algorithm for model-checking an RTD with respect to a system description. The algorithm has time complexity that is a small polynomial in the size of the diagram and linear in the size of the structure. We demonstrate the applicability of our algorithms by verifying that a master-slave system satisfies its specification RTDs.

Nina Amla; E. Allen Emerson; Kedar S. Namjoshi

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Small particle limits in a regularized Laplacian random growth model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a regularized version of Hastings-Levitov planar random growth that models clusters formed by the aggregation of diffusing particles. In this model, the growing clusters are defined in terms of iterated slit maps whose capacities are given by c_n=c|\\Phi_{n-1}'(e^{\\sigma+i\\theta_n})|^{-\\alpha}, \\alpha \\geq 0, where c>0 is the capacity of the first particle, {\\Phi_n}_n are the composed conformal maps defining the clusters of the evolution, {\\theta_n}_n are independent uniform angles determining the positions at which particles are attached, and \\sigma>0 is a regularization parameter which we take to depend on c. We prove that under an appropriate rescaling of time, in the limit as c converges to 0, the clusters converge to growing disks with deterministic capacities, provided that \\sigma does not converge to 0 too fast. We then establish scaling limits for the harmonic measure flow, showing that by letting \\alpha tend to 0 at different rates it converges to either the Brownian web on the circle, a stopped version of the Brownian web on the circle, or the identity map. As the harmonic measure flow is closely related to the internal branching structure within the cluster, the above three cases intuitively correspond to the number of infinite branches in the model being either 1, a random number whose distribution we obtain, or unbounded, in the limit as c converges to 0. We also present several findings based on simulations of the model with parameter choices not covered by our rigorous analysis.

Fredrik Johansson Viklund; Alan Sola; Amanda Turner

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

136

Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by Grade, Sales Type, and PAD District (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales...

137

X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales...

138

untitled  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type (Million Gallons per Day) Year Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users...

139

Premium Power Industrial Park Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is intended to provide insights on the consideration, design, and implementation of power quality (PQ) parks -- business parks where superb electric power quality, reliability, and availability (QRA) are optimized for the businesses within the park.

2002-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

140

Regularized perturbative series for the ionization potential of atomic ions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study N-electron atoms with nuclear charge Z. It is well known that, in the cationic (Z > N) high-Z region, the atom behaves as a weakly interacting system. The anionic (Z < N) regime, on the other hand, is characterized by an instability threshold at $Z \\lesssim N-1$ below which the atom spontaneously emits an electron. We construct a regularized perturbative series (RPS) for the ionization potential of ions in an isoelectronic sequence that exactly reproduces both, the large Z and the Z near $Z_c$ limits. The large-Z expansion coefficients are analytically computed from perturbation theory, whereas the slope of the energy curve at Z=N-1 is computed from a kind of zero-range forces theory that uses as input the electron affinity and the covalent radius of the neutral atom with N-1 electrons. Relativistic effects at the level of first-order perturbation theory in the one-particle Hamiltonian are considered. Our RPS results are compared with numbers from the NIST database.

Gil, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Rotor-Router Model on Regular Trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rotor-router model is a deterministic analogue of random walk. It can be used to define a deterministic growth model analogous to internal DLA. We show that if the initial rotor configuration is acyclic, then the set of occupied sites for rotor-router aggregation on an infinite regular tree is a perfect ball whenever it can be. This is proved by defining the rotor-router group of a graph, which we show is isomorphic to the sandpile group. We also address the question of recurrence and transience: We give two rotor configurations on the infinite ternary tree, one for which chips exactly alternate escaping to infinity with returning to the origin, and one for which every chip returns to the origin. We also characterize the possible "escape sequences" for the ternary tree, that is, binary words $a_1 ... a_n$ for which there exists a rotor configuration so that the $k$-th chip escapes to infinity if and only if $a_k=1$.

Landau, Itamar

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

The Rotor-Router Model on Regular Trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rotor-router model is a deterministic analogue of random walk. It can be used to define a deterministic growth model analogous to internal DLA. We show that the set of occupied sites for this model on an infinite regular tree is a perfect ball whenever it can be, provided the initial rotor configuration is acyclic (that is, no two neighboring vertices have rotors pointing to one another). This is proved by defining the rotor-router group of a graph, which we show is isomorphic to the sandpile group. We also address the question of recurrence and transience: We give two rotor configurations on the infinite ternary tree, one for which chips exactly alternate escaping to infinity with returning to the origin, and one for which every chip returns to the origin. Further, we characterize the possible escape sequences for the ternary tree, that is, binary words a1... an for which there exists a rotor configuration so that the k-th chip escapes to infinity if and only if ak = 1. 1

Itamar L; Lionel Levine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

The Rotor-Router Model on Regular Trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rotor-router model is a deterministic analogue of random walk. It can be used to define a deterministic growth model analogous to internal DLA. We show that the set of occupied sites for this model on an infinite regular tree is a perfect ball whenever it can be, provided the initial rotor configuration is acyclic (that is, no two neighboring vertices have rotors pointing to one another). This is proved by defining the rotor-router group of a graph, which we show is isomorphic to the sandpile group. We also address the question of recurrence and transience: We give two rotor configurations on the infinite ternary tree, one for which chips exactly alternate escaping to infinity with returning to the origin, and one for which every chip returns to the origin. Further, we characterize the possible escape sequences for the ternary tree, that is, binary words a1... an for which there exists a rotor configuration so that the k-th chip escapes to infinity if and only if ak = 1.

Itamar Landau; Lionel Levine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Figure 10. U.S. Average Retail Regular Motor Gasoline and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Average Retail Regular Motor Gasoline and On-Highway Diesel Fuel Prices, January 2013 to Present ... Including Taxes) Title: Weekly Petroleum ...

145

On implementing provenance-aware regular path queries with relational query engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of graphs is growing rapidly in social networks, semantic web, biological databases, scientific workflow provenance, and other areas. Regular Path Queries (RPQs) can be seen as a core graph query language to answer pattern-based reachability queries. ... Keywords: datalog, graph querying, regular path queries

Saumen Dey; Vctor Cuevas-Vicenttn; Sven Khler; Eric Gribkoff; Michael Wang; Bertram Ludscher

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Cleaning random d-regular graphs with brushes using a degree-greedy algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the recently introduced model for cleaning a graph with brushes, we use a degree-greedy algorithm to clean a random d-regular graph on n vertices (with dn even). We then use a differential equations method to find the (asymptotic) ... Keywords: cleaning process, degree--greedy algorithm, differential equations method, random d-regular graphs

Margaret-Ellen Messinger; Pawe? Pra?at; Richard J. Nowakowski; Nicholas Wormald

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Numerical Regularized Moment Method of Arbitrary Order for Boltzmann-BGK Equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce a numerical method for solving Grad's moment equations or regularized moment equations for an arbitrary order of moments. In our algorithm, we do not explicitly need the moment equations. Instead, we directly start from the Boltzmann equation ... Keywords: Boltzmann-BGK equation, Grad's moment method, regularized moment-equations

Zhenning Cai; Ruo Li

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Outfix-Free Regular Languages and Prime Outfix-Free Decomposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outfix-Free Regular Languages and Prime Outfix-Free Decomposition Yo-Sub Han and Derick Wood and a set X of strings is outfix-free if no string in X is an outfix of any other string in X. We examine the outfix-free regular languages. Based on the properties of outfix strings, we develop a polynomial

Han, Yo-Sub

149

A modified smoothing and regularized Newton method for monotone second-order cone complementarity problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a globally and quadratically convergent Newton-type algorithm for solving monotone second-order cone complementarity problems (denoted by SOCCPs). This algorithm is based on smoothing and regularization techniques by incorporating ... Keywords: Convergence analysis, Numerical results, Regularization, Second-order cone complementarity problem, Smoothing method

Linjie Chen; Changfeng Ma

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Nonet meson properties in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with dimensional versus cutoff regularization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with a Kobayashi-Maskawa-'t Hooft term is one low energy effective theory of QCD which includes the U{sub A}(1) anomaly. We investigate nonet meson properties in this model with three flavors of quarks. We employ two types of regularizations, the dimensional and sharp cutoff ones. The model parameters are fixed phenomenologically for each regularization. Evaluating the kaon decay constant, the {eta} meson mass and the topological susceptibility, we show the regularization dependence of the results and discuss the applicability of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model.

Inagaki, T.; Kimura, D.; Kohyama, H.; Kvinikhidze, A. [Information Media Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan); Learning Support Center, Hiroshima Shudo University, Hiroshima, 731-3195 (Japan); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China) and Physics Division, National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China) and Department of Physics, Chung-Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); A. Razmadze Mathematical Institute of Georgian Academy of Sciences, M. Alexidze Str. 1, 380093 Tbilisi (Georgia)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Computing minimal separating DFAs and regular invariants using SAT and SMT solvers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop a generic technique to compute minimal separating DFAs (deterministic finite automata) and regular invariants. Our technique works by expressing the desired properties of a solution in terms of logical formulae and using SAT or SMT solvers ...

Daniel Neider

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

A NOTE ON THE REGULARITY OF SOLUTIONS OF INFINITE DIMENSIONAL RICCATI EQUATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note is concerned with the regularity of solutions of algebraic Riccati equations arising from infinite dimensional LQR and LQG control problems. We show that distributed parameter systems described by certain parabolic partial differential equations ...

John A. Burns; Belinda B. King

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Enhancement of spatiotemporal regularity in an optimal window of random coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of a lattice of coupled chaotic maps whose coupling connections are dynamically rewired to random sites with probability p, namely at any instance of time, with probability p a regular link is switched to a random one. In a range of weak coupling, where spatiotemporal chaos exists for regular lattices (i.e. for p = 0), we find that p > 0 yields synchronized periodic orbits. Further we observe that this regularity occurs over a window of p values, beyond which the basin of attraction of the synchronized cycle shrinks to zero. Thus we have evidence of an optimal range of randomness in coupling connections, where spatiotemporal regularity is efficiently obtained. This is in contrast to the commonly observed monotonic increase of synchronization with increasing p, as seen for instance, in the strong coupling regime of the very same system.

Swarup Poria; Manish Dev Shrimali; Sudeshna Sinha

2008-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

154

A Fourth-Order-Centered Finite-Volume Scheme for Regular Hexagonal Grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fourth-order-centered operators on regular hexagonal grids with the ZM-grid arrangement are described. The finite-volume method is used and operators are defined at hexagonal cell centers. The gradient operator is calculated from 12 surrounding ...

Hiroaki Miura

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Gravitational fields with sources, regular black holes, quasiblack holes, and analogue black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss recent developments in gravitational fields with sources, regular black holes, quasiblack holes, and analogue black holes, related to the talks presented at the corresponding Parallel Session AT3 of the 13th Marcel Grossmann Meeting.

Lemos, Jos P S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Outfix-free regular languages and prime outfix-free decomposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A string x is an outfix of a string y if there is a string w such that x1wx2 = y, wherex = x1x2 and a set X of strings is outfix-free if no string in X is an outfix of any other string in X. We examine the outfix-free regular languages. Based on the properties of outfix strings, we develop a polynomial-time algorithm that determines the outfix-freeness of regular languages. We consider two cases: A language is given as a set of strings and a language is given by an acyclic deterministic finite-state automaton. Furthermore, we investigate the prime outfix-free decomposition of outfix-free regular languages and design a linear-time prime outfix-free decomposition algorithm for outfix-free regular languages. We demonstrate the uniqueness of prime outfix-free decomposition.

Yo-sub Han; Derick Wood

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Electromagnetic wave propagation with negative phase velocity in regular black holes  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the propagation of electromagnetic plane waves with negative phase velocity in regular black holes. For this purpose, we consider the Bardeen model as a nonlinear magnetic monopole and the Bardeen model coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics with a cosmological constant. It turns out that the region outside the event horizon of each regular black hole does not support negative phase velocity propagation, while its possibility in the region inside the event horizon is discussed.

Sharif, M., E-mail: msharif.math@pu.edu.pk; Manzoor, R., E-mail: rubabmanzoor9@yahoo.com [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics (Pakistan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

High density quark matter in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with dimensional versus cutoff regularization  

SciTech Connect

We investigate color superconducting phase at high density in the extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model for two-flavor quarks. Because of the nonrenormalizability of the model, physical observables may depend on the regularization procedure; that is why we apply two types of regularization, the cutoff and the dimensional one to evaluate the phase structure, the equation of state, and the relationship between the mass and the radius of a dense star. To obtain the phase structure we evaluate the minimum of the effective potential at finite temperature and chemical potential. The stress tensor is calculated to derive the equation of state. Solving the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation, we show the relationship between the mass and the radius of a dense star. The dependence on the regularization is found not to be small, interestingly. The dimensional regularization predicts color superconductivity phase at rather large values of {mu} (in agreement with perturbative QCD in contrast to the cutoff regularization), in the larger temperature interval, the existence of heavier and larger quark stars.

Fujihara, T.; Kimura, D.; Inagaki, T.; Kvinikhidze, A. [Department of Physics, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Information Media Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan); A. Razmadze Mathematical Institute of Georgian Academy of Sciences, M. Alexidze Str. 1, 380093 Tbilisi (Georgia)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Energy Contents of a Class of Regular Black Hole Solutions in Teleparallel Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we discuss the energy-momentum problem in the realm of teleparallel gravity. The energy-momentum distribution for a class of regular black holes coupled with a non-linear electrodynamics source is investigated by using Hamiltonian approach of teleparallel theory. The generalized regular black hole contains two specific parameters $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$ (a sort of dipole and quadrupole of non-linear source) on which the energy distribution depends. It is interesting to mention here that our results exactly coincide with different energy-momentum prescriptions in General Relativity.

M. Sharif; Abdul Jawad

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

160

The geometric $?$-function in curved space-time under operator regularization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, I compare the generators of the renormalization group flow, or the geometric $\\beta$-functions for dimensional regularization and operator regularization. I then extend the analysis to show that the geometric $\\beta$-function for a scalar field theory on a closed compact Riemannian manifold is defined on the entire manifold. I then extend the analysis to find the generator of the renormalization group flow for a conformal scalar-field theories on the same manifolds. The geometric $\\beta$-function in this case is not defined.

Susama Agarwala

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Regularized energy-dependent solar flare hard x-ray spectral index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The deduction from solar flare X-ray photon spectroscopic data of the energy dependent model-independent spectral index is considered as an inverse problem. Using the well developed regularization approach we analyze the energy dependency of spectral index for a high resolution energy spectrum provided by Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The regularization technique produces much smoother derivatives while avoiding additional errors typical of finite differences. It is shown that observations imply a spectral index varying significantly with energy, in a way that also varies with time as the flare progresses. The implications of these findings are discussed in the solar flare context.

Eduard P. Kontar; Alexander L. MacKinnon

2005-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

162

Regular Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...The structure of a binary solid solution is shown schematically in Fig. 13. Three types of interatomic bonds

163

Regularized Latent Semantic Indexing: A New Approach to Large-Scale Topic Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topic modeling provides a powerful way to analyze the content of a collection of documents. It has become a popular tool in many research areas, such as text mining, information retrieval, natural language processing, and other related fields. In real-world ... Keywords: Topic modeling, distributed learning, online learning, regularization, sparse methods

Quan Wang; Jun Xu; Hang Li; Nick Craswell

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Laplacian regularized D-optimal design for active learning and its application to image retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In increasingly many cases of interest in computer vision and pattern recognition, one is often confronted with the situation where data size is very large. Usually, the labels are expensive and the challenge is, thus, to determine which unlabeled samples ... Keywords: active learning, experimental design, image retrieval, regularization

Xiaofei He

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Simplified and Regular Physical Parameterizations for Incremental Four-Dimensional Variational Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of physical parameterizations has been developed for inclusion in incremental four-dimensional variational assimilation (4D-Var). The goal for this physical package is that it be simple, regular (for the efficiency of the minimization in 4D-...

Marta Janiskov; Jean-Nol Thpaut; Jean-Franois Geleyn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Shrinkage-based regularization tests for high-dimensional data with application to gene set analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional multivariate tests such as Hotelling's test or Wilk's test are designed for classical problems, where the number of observations is much larger than the dimension of the variables. For high-dimensional data, however, this assumption cannot ... Keywords: Feature selection, Gene set analysis, High dimensionality, MANOVA, Power, Regularization

Yanfeng Shen; Zhengyan Lin; Jun Zhu

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A modified Tikhonov regularization method for a spherically symmetric three-dimensional inverse heat conduction problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with a spherically symmetric three-dimensional inverse heat conduction problem of determining the internal surface temperature distribution of a hollow sphere from the measured data at a fixed location inside it. This is an ill-posed ... Keywords: Error estimate, Ill-posed problem, Regularization, Spherically symmetric inverse heat conduction problem

Wei Cheng; Chu-Li Fu; Zhi Qian

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

A novel compound regularization and fast algorithm for compressive sensing deconvolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compressive Sensing Deconvolution (CS-Deconvolution) is a new challenge problem encountered in a wide variety of image processing fields. Since CS is more efficient for sparse signals, in our scheme, the input image is firstly sparse represented by curvelet ... Keywords: Compound regularization, Compressive sensing, Deconvolution from incomplete measurements, Variable splitting

Liang Xiao, Jun Shao, Lili Huang, Zhihui Wei

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Regular Article: On the Spectra of Certain Graphs Arising from Finite Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cayley graphs on a subgroup ofGL(3,p),p>3 a prime, are defined and their properties, particularly their spectra, studied. It is shown that these graphs are connected, vertex-transitive, nonbipartite, and regular, and their degrees are computed. The eigenvalues ...

Nancy Tufts Allen

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Distribution of Entropy of Bardeen Regular Black Hole with Corrected State Density  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider corrections to all orders in the Planck length on the quantum state density, and calculate the statistical entropy of the scalar field on the background of the Bardeen regular black hole numerically. We obtain the distribution of entropy which is inside the horizon of black hole and the contribution of the vicinity of horizon takes a great part of the whole entropy.

Hai Huang; Juhua Chen; Yongjiu Wang

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

171

Reporting Exact and Approximate Regular Expression Matches Eugene W. Myers \\Lambda Paulo Oliva y Katia Guimar~aes z  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accepted standard, e.g. Perl [WS91], Tcl/Tk [Ous94], and the IEEE Posix standard [IEE92], for exact regular

Oliva, Paulo

172

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Hawaii Motor Gasoline 36,063 37,112 34,945 37,474 37,458 32,636 328,239 321,814 -1.6 Regular 28,208 28,918 27,272 29,299 29,242 25,225 259,624 251,473 -2.8 Conventional 28,208 28,918 27,272 29,299 29,242 25,225 259,624 251,473 -2.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,046 2,141 1,997 2,159 2,181 2,006 18,071 18,741 4.1 Conventional 2,046 2,141 1,997 2,159 2,181 2,006 18,071 18,741 4.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 5,809 6,053 5,676 6,016 6,035 5,405 50,544 51,600 2.5 Conventional 5,809 6,053 5,676 6,016 6,035 5,405 50,544 51,600 2.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

173

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 564,932 507,854 551,005 519,384 532,551 507,718 485,599 507,718 4.6 Regular 447,094 403,797 439,428 413,569 423,893 404,806 382,693 404,806 5.8 Conventional 103,625 85,392 90,979 84,964 85,820 86,657 81,128 86,657 6.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 343,469 318,405 348,449 328,605 338,073 318,149 301,565 318,149 5.5 Midgrade 42,027 36,317 37,629 34,336 34,877 33,300 37,658 33,300 -11.6 Conventional 7,514 5,617 5,829 5,231 5,343 5,318 5,706 5,318 -6.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 34,513 30,700 31,800 29,105 29,534 27,982 31,952 27,982 -12.4 Premium 75,811 67,740 73,948 71,479 73,781 69,612 65,248 69,612 6.7

174

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 113,930 111,114 105,103 116,335 119,409 126,351 579,196 578,312 0.5 Regular 103,132 100,685 95,316 105,221 107,403 113,871 527,693 522,496 -0.3 Conventional 103,132 100,685 95,316 105,221 107,403 113,871 527,693 522,496 -0.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,252 1,145 1,088 1,265 1,280 1,320 6,249 6,098 -1.8 Conventional 1,252 1,145 1,088 1,265 1,280 1,320 6,249 6,098 -1.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,546 9,284 8,699 9,849 10,726 11,160 45,254 49,718 10.6 Conventional 9,546 9,284 8,699 9,849 10,726 11,160 45,254 49,718 10.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

175

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 113,104 109,327 121,653 124,202 126,203 128,935 744,685 723,424 -2.9 Regular 103,250 99,731 111,406 113,853 115,311 118,200 674,972 661,751 -2.0 Conventional 103,250 99,731 111,406 113,853 115,311 118,200 674,972 661,751 -2.0 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,231 1,295 1,424 1,390 1,394 1,443 10,075 8,177 -18.8 Conventional 1,231 1,295 1,424 1,390 1,394 1,443 10,075 8,177 -18.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,623 8,301 8,823 8,959 9,498 9,292 59,638 53,496 -10.3 Conventional 8,623 8,301 8,823 8,959 9,498 9,292 59,638 53,496 -10.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

176

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 137,441 135,583 140,679 145,648 126,428 128,134 1,285,114 1,300,085 1.5 Regular 117,996 117,302 120,112 124,098 110,212 110,732 1,107,420 1,119,353 1.4 Conventional W W W W W 82,137 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 28,595 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,550 6,371 6,780 7,144 5,841 6,030 64,184 62,850 -1.8 Conventional W W W W W 4,303 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 1,727 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,895 11,910 13,787 14,406 10,375 11,372 113,510 117,882 4.2 Conventional W W W W W 8,321 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 3,051 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

177

Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

03 03 Table A1. Refiner/Reseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD District and State, 1984-Present (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Year Regular Midgrade Premium All Grades Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale United States 1984 ...................................... 93.2 84.9 NA NA 101.8 92.4 92.0 83.8 1985 ...................................... 93.3 84.9 NA NA 102.3 92.8 92.4 84.1 1986 ...................................... 63.6 52.9 NA NA 74.6 61.7 64.2 53.8 1987 ...................................... 67.0 57.2 NA NA 78.8 67.4 68.4 59.2 1988 ...................................... 66.1 55.1 NA NA 79.4 67.5 68.6 58.0 1989 ......................................

178

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 520,531 538,385 528,784 556,220 507,903 477,845 1,020,860 985,748 -3.4 Regular 455,324 471,622 460,881 485,119 445,636 417,336 862,074 862,972 0.1 Conventional 91,948 94,093 88,528 93,937 87,304 84,544 173,511 171,848 -1.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 363,376 377,529 372,353 391,182 358,332 332,792 688,563 691,124 0.4 Midgrade 20,551 19,614 19,560 21,299 18,945 17,890 48,782 36,835 -24.5 Conventional 2,717 2,378 2,410 2,604 2,326 2,324 6,916 4,650 -32.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 17,834 17,236 17,150 18,695 16,619 15,566 41,866 32,185 -23.1 Premium 44,656 47,149 48,343 49,802 43,322 42,619 110,004 85,941 -21.9

179

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 487,348 483,146 517,898 526,837 540,301 557,239 3,986,053 4,043,504 1.9 Regular 383,984 383,622 416,870 424,735 430,015 441,753 3,105,550 3,215,092 4.0 Conventional 79,461 76,131 87,574 90,924 99,358 101,228 664,227 689,930 4.3 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 304,523 307,491 329,296 333,811 330,657 340,525 2,441,323 2,525,162 3.9 Midgrade 37,107 36,183 38,726 38,791 40,369 41,572 336,457 304,204 -9.2 Conventional 5,418 4,848 5,549 5,989 7,246 7,464 53,868 47,323 -11.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 31,689 31,335 33,177 32,802 33,123 34,108 282,589 256,881 -8.7 Premium 66,257 63,341 62,302 63,311 69,917 73,914 544,046 524,208 -3.2

180

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 139,212 139,507 142,185 127,373 129,849 123,032 1,448,714 1,408,240 -2.8 Regular 125,667 124,434 126,339 113,384 116,510 111,050 1,300,022 1,262,690 -2.9 Conventional 125,667 124,434 126,339 113,384 116,510 111,050 W 1,262,690 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,031 3,341 3,503 2,965 3,032 2,728 37,887 33,675 -11.1 Conventional 3,031 3,341 3,503 2,965 3,032 2,728 W 33,675 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,514 11,732 12,343 11,024 10,307 9,254 110,805 111,875 1.0 Conventional 10,514 11,732 12,343 11,024 10,307 9,254 W 111,875 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 125,199 124,695 128,129 139,212 139,507 144,488 1,055,712 1,030,289 -2.4 Regular 112,243 112,510 115,823 125,667 124,434 128,593 948,829 924,000 -2.6 Conventional 112,243 112,510 115,823 125,667 124,434 128,593 W 924,000 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,056 2,958 2,859 3,031 3,341 3,519 27,613 24,966 -9.6 Conventional 3,056 2,958 2,859 3,031 3,341 3,519 W 24,966 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,900 9,227 9,447 10,514 11,732 12,376 79,270 81,323 2.6 Conventional 9,900 9,227 9,447 10,514 11,732 12,376 W 81,323 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

182

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 528,923 525,025 566,449 559,488 600,331 607,207 4,119,105 4,367,187 6.0 Regular 423,574 425,312 453,084 445,690 474,800 481,685 3,277,121 3,483,026 6.3 Conventional 84,785 84,632 94,055 93,600 107,710 111,156 707,603 740,722 4.7 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 338,789 340,680 359,029 352,090 367,090 370,529 2,569,518 2,742,304 6.7 Midgrade 35,018 33,447 37,392 37,061 41,258 41,537 307,502 290,503 -5.5 Conventional 5,126 4,880 5,763 5,927 7,552 7,706 47,726 47,251 -1.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 29,892 28,567 31,629 31,134 33,706 33,831 259,776 243,252 -6.4 Premium 70,331 66,266 75,973 76,737 84,273 83,985 534,482 593,658 11.1

183

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 505,168 518,672 519,911 533,875 490,623 514,004 4,928,031 4,972,135 0.6 Regular 393,423 410,259 408,078 417,472 385,329 405,977 3,588,437 3,885,955 7.9 Conventional 84,129 87,896 94,215 96,792 88,190 92,351 711,279 844,595 18.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 309,294 322,363 313,863 320,680 297,139 313,626 2,877,158 3,041,360 5.4 Midgrade 42,058 42,183 43,082 44,099 39,487 40,182 495,955 413,804 -16.8 Conventional 6,834 6,874 7,724 8,310 6,437 6,068 75,985 66,449 -12.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 35,224 35,309 35,358 35,789 33,050 34,114 419,970 347,355 -17.6 Premium 69,687 66,230 68,751 72,304 65,807 67,845 843,639 672,376 -20.6

184

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 514,004 485,038 507,317 485,599 445,136 487,354 1,417,244 1,418,089 1.2 Regular 405,977 381,467 399,305 382,693 351,420 383,987 1,094,386 1,118,100 3.3 Conventional 92,351 79,597 83,245 81,128 74,126 79,461 228,824 234,715 3.7 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 313,626 301,870 316,060 301,565 277,294 304,526 865,562 883,385 3.2 Midgrade 40,182 38,304 40,249 37,658 33,798 37,109 124,594 108,565 -11.9 Conventional 6,068 5,346 5,771 5,706 5,103 5,418 18,939 16,227 -13.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 34,114 32,958 34,478 31,952 28,695 31,691 105,655 92,338 -11.6 Premium 67,845 65,267 67,763 65,248 59,918 66,258 198,264 191,424 -2.4

185

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 519,911 533,875 490,623 514,004 485,038 507,934 5,935,217 5,965,107 0.2 Regular 408,078 417,472 385,329 405,977 381,467 399,925 4,344,611 4,667,347 7.1 Conventional 94,215 96,792 88,190 92,351 79,597 83,473 874,137 1,007,665 15.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 313,863 320,680 297,139 313,626 301,870 316,452 3,470,474 3,659,682 5.2 Midgrade 43,082 44,099 39,487 40,182 38,304 40,176 591,701 492,284 -17.0 Conventional 7,724 8,310 6,437 6,068 5,346 5,794 90,790 77,589 -14.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 35,358 35,789 33,050 34,114 32,958 34,382 500,911 414,695 -17.4 Premium 68,751 72,304 65,807 67,845 65,267 67,833 998,905 805,476 -19.6

186

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 110,992 117,088 108,674 122,452 125,233 131,002 611,640 604,449 -0.5 Regular 100,387 106,414 98,792 111,102 113,305 118,166 555,375 547,779 -0.7 Conventional 100,387 106,414 98,792 111,102 113,305 118,166 555,375 547,779 -0.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,792 1,666 1,581 1,792 1,815 1,879 11,860 8,733 -25.9 Conventional 1,792 1,666 1,581 1,792 1,815 1,879 11,860 8,733 -25.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,813 9,008 8,301 9,558 10,113 10,957 44,405 47,937 8.7 Conventional 8,813 9,008 8,301 9,558 10,113 10,957 44,405 47,937 8.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

187

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 115,793 109,751 115,008 129,009 135,752 136,659 771,844 741,972 -3.9 Regular 98,040 94,445 102,049 114,076 117,825 118,360 662,388 644,795 -2.7 Conventional 60,258 59,465 W 98,123 W W W W NA Oxygenated 37,782 34,980 W 15,953 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,943 5,467 4,397 4,632 5,351 5,458 35,839 31,248 -12.8 Conventional 3,737 3,554 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,206 1,913 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,810 9,839 8,562 10,301 12,576 12,841 73,617 65,929 -10.4 Conventional 6,945 5,907 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,865 3,932 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

188

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 123,940 125,772 118,909 110,150 125,199 124,695 500,521 478,953 -4.3 Regular 110,947 112,956 106,914 97,816 112,243 112,510 448,982 429,483 -4.3 Conventional 66,529 67,457 106,914 97,816 112,243 112,510 W 429,483 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,352 3,268 3,106 3,096 3,056 2,958 13,798 12,216 -11.5 Conventional 1,661 1,559 3,106 3,096 3,056 2,958 W 12,216 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,641 9,548 8,889 9,238 9,900 9,227 37,741 37,254 -1.3 Conventional 5,240 5,150 8,889 9,238 9,900 9,227 W 37,254 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

189

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 146,328 138,917 138,012 128,012 123,940 125,772 1,517,105 1,568,511 3.4 Regular 131,286 124,315 123,729 113,898 110,947 112,956 1,350,867 1,407,721 4.2 Conventional W 106,842 W 82,565 66,529 67,457 W W NA Oxygenated W NA W 31,333 44,418 45,499 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,864 3,807 3,502 3,435 3,352 3,268 45,545 41,476 -8.9 Conventional W W W 2,414 1,661 1,559 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 1,021 1,691 1,709 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,178 10,795 10,781 10,679 9,641 9,548 120,693 119,314 -1.1 Conventional W W W 7,751 5,240 5,150 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 2,928 4,401 4,398 W W NA

190

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 464,879 461,983 490,382 472,638 505,168 518,666 2,929,735 2,913,716 -1.1 Regular 352,395 353,719 388,272 371,031 393,423 410,243 2,105,292 2,269,083 7.2 Conventional 74,146 77,773 76,905 72,198 84,129 87,896 366,432 473,047 28.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 278,249 275,946 311,367 298,833 309,294 322,347 W 1,796,036 NA Midgrade 42,713 41,541 40,340 38,119 42,058 42,260 W 247,031 NA Conventional 6,825 6,665 5,449 5,263 6,834 6,874 40,254 37,910 -6.3 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 35,888 34,876 34,891 32,856 35,224 35,386 W 209,121 NA Premium 69,771 66,723 61,770 63,488 69,687 66,163 W 397,602 NA

191

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 532,203 485,311 533,762 523,744 573,398 570,002 3,159,649 3,218,420 1.9 Regular 428,774 397,921 441,388 432,090 465,864 461,379 2,526,541 2,627,416 4.0 Conventional 90,155 82,287 89,054 86,165 94,205 97,033 521,856 538,899 3.3 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 338,619 315,634 352,334 345,925 371,659 364,346 2,004,685 2,088,517 4.2 Midgrade 35,132 30,039 31,738 30,510 34,242 34,518 207,708 196,179 -5.6 Conventional 5,644 4,734 4,484 4,179 5,204 5,452 31,993 29,697 -7.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 29,488 25,305 27,254 26,331 29,038 29,066 175,715 166,482 -5.3 Premium 68,297 57,351 60,636 61,144 73,292 74,105 425,400 394,825 -7.2

192

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,911 137,441 135,583 140,679 145,648 126,428 1,156,653 1,171,951 1.7 Regular 109,294 117,996 117,302 120,112 124,098 110,212 995,899 1,008,621 1.6 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,086 6,550 6,371 6,780 7,144 5,841 57,888 56,820 -1.5 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,531 12,895 11,910 13,787 14,406 10,375 102,866 106,510 3.9 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

193

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 138,917 138,012 128,012 123,940 125,772 118,479 121,056 118,479 -2.1 Regular 124,315 123,729 113,898 110,947 112,956 106,713 108,545 106,713 -1.7 Conventional 106,842 W 82,565 66,529 67,457 106,713 73,017 106,713 46.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,807 3,502 3,435 3,352 3,268 2,959 3,612 2,959 -18.1 Conventional W W 2,414 1,661 1,559 2,959 1,812 2,959 63.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,795 10,781 10,679 9,641 9,548 8,807 8,899 8,807 -1.0 Conventional W W 7,751 5,240 5,150 8,807 5,550 8,807 58.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

194

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 129,584 129,173 130,014 136,995 146,328 147,395 1,009,994 1,061,253 5.1 Regular 116,394 115,901 117,816 123,792 131,286 132,073 896,468 953,949 6.4 Conventional W W W W W 114,438 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,439 3,369 3,143 3,307 3,864 3,905 30,978 28,017 -9.6 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,751 9,903 9,055 9,896 11,178 11,417 82,548 79,287 -4.0 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

195

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 461,105 446,330 487,514 467,445 514,161 520,326 3,010,145 2,896,881 -4.3 Regular 414,239 400,799 438,269 419,689 457,986 462,591 2,707,348 2,593,573 -4.7 Conventional 77,162 75,965 79,443 76,333 90,064 98,380 518,931 497,347 -4.7 Reformulated 337,077 324,834 358,826 343,356 367,922 364,211 2,188,417 2,096,226 -4.7 Midgrade 7,806 7,543 8,274 8,141 9,199 9,495 54,568 50,458 -8.0 Conventional 832 793 806 750 1,071 1,194 6,079 5,446 -10.9 Reformulated 6,974 6,750 7,468 7,391 8,128 8,301 48,489 45,012 -7.7 Premium 39,060 37,988 40,971 39,615 46,976 48,240 248,229 252,850 1.3 Conventional 3,926 3,956 3,932 3,590 5,291 5,945 27,118 26,640 -2.3

196

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 511,860 469,410 527,337 464,879 461,983 466,311 1,432,770 1,393,173 -3.8 Regular 381,794 351,762 397,163 352,395 353,719 370,831 1,016,897 1,076,945 4.7 Conventional 85,363 77,639 84,422 74,146 77,773 72,960 145,115 224,879 53.3 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 296,431 274,123 312,741 278,249 275,946 297,871 871,782 852,066 -3.3 Midgrade 50,511 45,003 49,862 42,713 41,541 37,312 147,343 121,566 -18.4 Conventional 8,326 7,099 7,742 6,825 6,665 5,174 15,916 18,664 16.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 42,185 37,904 42,120 35,888 34,876 32,138 131,427 102,902 -22.6 Premium 79,555 72,645 80,312 69,771 66,723 58,168 268,530 194,662 -28.3

197

Connecticut Prices, Sales Volumes & Stocks  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

- - - - - - 1986-2013 - - - - - - 1986-2013 Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel (Refiner Sales) W W W W W W 1984-2013 Kerosene (Refiner Sales) - W W - - NA 1984-2013 No. 1 Distillate (Refiner Sales) - - - - - - 1984-2013 No. 2 Distillate - - - - - - 1983-2013 No. 2 Fuel Oil (Residential) - - - - - - 1983-2013 No. 2 Diesel Fuel (Retail Outlets) - - - - - - 1994-2013 No. 4 Fuel Oil (Refiner Sales) W W W W W NA 1993-2013 Prime Supplier Sales Volumes (Thousand Gallons per Day) Motor Gasoline 3,969.5 4,012.0 3,982.9 4,034.9 3,938.4 3,955.8 1983-2013 Regular 3,431.9 3,470.2 3,458.0 3,486.5 3,382.7 3,432.7 1983-2013 Midgrade 62.5 64.9 67.3 73.9 67.8 57.4 1988-2013 Premium 475.0 476.9 457.6 474.5 487.9 465.7 1983-2013 Aviation Gasoline 2.7 4.1 3.0 6.1 3.4 3.5 1983-2013

198

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 116,747 127,703 122,936 133,205 139,935 140,080 857,910 899,161 5.3 Regular 102,420 113,498 110,833 118,938 124,805 124,098 755,633 798,614 6.2 Conventional 61,912 91,743 W 99,124 W 103,850 W W NA Oxygenated 40,508 21,755 W 19,814 W 20,248 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,874 3,705 3,183 3,610 3,716 3,909 29,154 26,119 -10.0 Conventional 1,900 3,187 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 1,974 518 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,453 10,500 8,920 10,657 11,414 12,073 73,123 74,428 2.3 Conventional 5,909 8,746 7,806 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,544 NA 1,114 W W W W W NA

199

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,458 126,327 130,524 133,704 122,163 124,443 1,251,722 1,216,357 -3.1 Regular 115,160 114,987 117,633 120,719 110,769 113,333 1,140,752 1,105,134 -3.4 Conventional 115,160 114,987 117,633 120,719 110,769 113,333 1,140,752 1,105,134 -3.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,340 1,281 1,456 1,562 1,304 1,307 14,306 13,159 -8.3 Conventional 1,340 1,281 1,456 1,562 1,304 1,307 14,306 13,159 -8.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,958 10,059 11,435 11,423 10,090 9,803 96,664 98,064 1.1 Conventional 9,958 10,059 11,435 11,423 10,090 9,803 96,664 98,064 1.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

200

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 125,045 119,493 110,992 117,088 108,674 122,452 355,162 348,214 -0.9 Regular 114,124 108,458 100,387 106,414 98,792 111,102 321,974 316,308 -0.7 Conventional 114,124 108,458 100,387 106,414 98,792 111,102 321,974 316,308 -0.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,731 1,769 1,792 1,666 1,581 1,792 7,268 5,039 -29.9 Conventional 1,731 1,769 1,792 1,666 1,581 1,792 7,268 5,039 -29.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,190 9,266 8,813 9,008 8,301 9,558 25,920 26,867 4.8 Conventional 9,190 9,266 8,813 9,008 8,301 9,558 25,920 26,867 4.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

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201

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 519,384 532,551 507,798 471,966 528,923 525,127 1,901,229 2,033,814 7.0 Regular 413,569 423,893 404,830 374,051 423,574 425,403 1,501,719 1,627,858 8.4 Conventional 84,964 85,820 86,681 78,103 84,785 84,662 310,846 334,231 7.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 328,605 338,073 318,149 295,948 338,789 340,741 1,190,873 1,293,627 8.6 Midgrade 34,336 34,877 33,314 31,476 35,018 33,448 144,746 133,256 -7.9 Conventional 5,231 5,343 5,332 4,965 5,126 4,880 21,075 20,303 -3.7 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 29,105 29,534 27,982 26,511 29,892 28,568 123,671 112,953 -8.7 Premium 71,479 73,781 69,654 66,439 70,331 66,276 254,764 272,700 7.0

202

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Premium All Grades Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Other End Users a Through Retail Outlets Other End Users a Through Retail Outlets Other End Users a Through Retail Outlets Other End Users a United States January ............................... 133.0 134.5 122.5 144.3 151.2 130.9 156.6 154.7 142.4 135.8 136.5 124.6 February ............................. 144.1 134.4 131.2 157.8 149.6 135.7 170.5 155.1 153.2 147.2 136.1 133.3 March .................................. 147.6 140.2 137.7 160.3 152.1 143.3 172.4 159.9 158.0

203

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 123,768 109,386 109,777 115,509 118,066 126,458 594,489 579,196 -3.2 Regular 112,568 99,533 99,656 105,682 107,662 115,160 543,551 527,693 -3.6 Conventional 112,568 99,533 99,656 105,682 107,662 115,160 543,551 527,693 -3.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,331 1,199 1,209 1,246 1,255 1,340 6,734 6,249 -7.8 Conventional 1,331 1,199 1,209 1,246 1,255 1,340 6,734 6,249 -7.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,869 8,654 8,912 8,581 9,149 9,958 44,204 45,254 1.7 Conventional 9,869 8,654 8,912 8,581 9,149 9,958 44,204 45,254 1.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

204

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 139,507 142,185 127,373 129,849 123,027 124,397 1,574,756 1,532,632 -2.7 Regular 124,434 126,339 113,384 116,510 111,045 112,374 1,413,225 1,375,059 -2.7 Conventional 124,434 126,339 113,384 116,510 111,045 112,374 W 1,375,059 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,341 3,503 2,965 3,032 2,728 2,694 41,174 36,369 -11.7 Conventional 3,341 3,503 2,965 3,032 2,728 2,694 W 36,369 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,732 12,343 11,024 10,307 9,254 9,329 120,357 121,204 0.7 Conventional 11,732 12,343 11,024 10,307 9,254 9,329 W 121,204 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

205

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 490,382 472,638 505,168 518,672 519,911 532,719 3,939,380 3,966,352 0.3 Regular 388,272 371,031 393,423 410,259 408,078 416,243 2,850,677 3,093,420 8.1 Conventional 76,905 72,198 84,129 87,896 94,215 96,116 544,853 663,378 21.3 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 311,367 298,833 309,294 322,363 313,863 320,127 2,305,824 2,430,042 5.0 Midgrade 40,340 38,119 42,058 42,183 43,082 44,172 399,285 334,208 -16.6 Conventional 5,449 5,263 6,834 6,874 7,724 8,288 59,695 53,922 -10.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 34,891 32,856 35,224 35,309 35,358 35,884 339,590 280,286 -17.8 Premium 61,770 63,488 69,687 66,230 68,751 72,304 689,418 538,724 -22.2

206

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 109,327 121,653 124,202 126,203 128,935 134,724 891,067 858,148 -3.7 Regular 99,731 111,406 113,853 115,311 118,200 121,899 806,662 783,650 -2.9 Conventional 99,731 111,406 113,853 115,311 118,200 121,899 806,662 783,650 -2.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,295 1,424 1,390 1,394 1,443 1,617 11,994 9,794 -18.3 Conventional 1,295 1,424 1,390 1,394 1,443 1,617 11,994 9,794 -18.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,301 8,823 8,959 9,498 9,292 11,208 72,411 64,704 -10.6 Conventional 8,301 8,823 8,959 9,498 9,292 11,208 72,411 64,704 -10.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

207

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 525,232 495,628 551,143 531,765 584,325 598,426 3,292,306 3,286,519 0.4 Regular 443,125 418,949 470,196 458,180 500,637 509,217 2,752,381 2,800,304 2.3 Conventional 89,276 84,235 89,770 85,230 97,842 102,726 542,072 549,079 1.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 353,849 334,714 380,426 372,950 402,795 406,491 2,210,309 2,251,225 2.4 Midgrade 25,145 23,637 24,880 22,345 24,606 26,175 169,802 146,788 -13.1 Conventional 3,520 3,396 3,187 2,510 3,230 3,852 24,221 19,695 -18.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 21,625 20,241 21,693 19,835 21,376 22,323 145,581 127,093 -12.2 Premium 56,962 53,042 56,067 51,240 59,082 63,034 370,123 339,427 -7.8

208

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 130,255 126,911 137,441 135,583 140,679 148,423 1,025,877 1,048,298 2.6 Regular 111,793 109,294 117,996 117,302 120,112 126,586 882,283 900,897 2.5 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,711 6,086 6,550 6,371 6,780 7,144 51,718 50,979 -1.0 Conventional 6,196 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 515 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,751 11,531 12,895 11,910 13,787 14,693 91,876 96,422 5.4 Conventional 10,535 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 1,216 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

209

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 128,012 123,940 125,772 118,909 110,150 125,387 371,348 354,446 -4.6 Regular 113,898 110,947 112,956 106,914 97,816 112,428 333,081 317,158 -4.8 Conventional 82,565 66,529 67,457 106,914 97,816 112,428 W 317,158 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,435 3,352 3,268 3,106 3,096 3,056 10,429 9,258 -11.2 Conventional 2,414 1,661 1,559 3,106 3,096 3,056 W 9,258 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,679 9,641 9,548 8,889 9,238 9,903 27,838 28,030 0.7 Conventional 7,751 5,240 5,150 8,889 9,238 9,903 W 28,030 NA

210

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 129,220 103,710 107,583 128,992 122,068 133,706 605,163 596,059 -2.2 Regular 106,433 87,146 89,279 112,686 106,242 115,310 498,211 510,663 1.8 Conventional 58,414 47,766 48,793 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 48,019 39,380 40,486 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – W – NA Midgrade 8,430 6,076 6,783 6,276 5,802 6,492 42,016 31,429 -25.7 Conventional 4,377 3,128 3,568 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,053 2,948 3,215 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 14,357 10,488 11,521 10,030 10,024 11,904 W 53,967 NA Conventional 7,564 5,684 6,316 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 6,793 4,804 5,205 W W W W W NA

211

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 533,762 523,744 573,398 571,866 610,670 616,068 4,361,461 4,447,022 2.0 Regular 441,388 432,090 465,864 462,449 488,921 499,355 3,478,596 3,616,762 4.0 Conventional 89,054 86,165 94,205 96,905 106,748 109,285 737,049 754,804 2.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 352,334 345,925 371,659 365,544 382,173 390,070 2,741,547 2,861,958 4.4 Midgrade 31,738 30,510 34,242 34,914 38,917 38,243 290,107 273,735 -5.6 Conventional 4,484 4,179 5,204 5,476 6,910 6,876 47,058 43,507 -7.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 27,254 26,331 29,038 29,438 32,007 31,367 243,049 230,228 -5.3 Premium 60,636 61,144 73,292 74,503 82,832 78,470 592,758 556,525 -6.1

212

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 127,373 129,849 123,027 124,392 117,292 115,450 229,059 232,742 -0.1 Regular 113,384 116,510 111,045 112,370 106,132 104,278 204,730 210,410 1.1 Conventional 113,384 116,510 111,045 112,370 106,132 104,278 204,730 210,410 1.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,965 3,032 2,728 2,693 2,570 2,474 6,202 5,044 -20.0 Conventional 2,965 3,032 2,728 2,693 2,570 2,474 6,202 5,044 -20.0 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,024 10,307 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,698 18,127 17,288 -6.2 Conventional 11,024 10,307 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,698 18,127 17,288 -6.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

213

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 469,410 527,337 464,879 461,983 490,382 472,644 1,908,159 1,889,888 -1.8 Regular 351,762 397,163 352,395 353,719 388,272 371,037 1,362,156 1,465,423 6.7 Conventional 77,639 84,422 74,146 77,773 76,905 72,195 207,716 301,019 43.7 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 274,123 312,741 278,249 275,946 311,367 298,842 1,154,440 1,164,404 0.0 Midgrade 45,003 49,862 42,713 41,541 40,340 38,118 196,036 162,712 -17.7 Conventional 7,099 7,742 6,825 6,665 5,449 5,263 22,130 24,202 8.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 37,904 42,120 35,888 34,876 34,891 32,855 W 138,510 NA Premium 72,645 80,312 69,771 66,723 61,770 63,489 349,967 261,753 -25.8

214

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 513,590 550,648 514,054 550,377 518,226 477,497 1,006,008 995,723 0.7 Regular 460,050 493,937 460,528 491,662 464,200 427,973 897,253 892,173 1.1 Conventional 85,817 90,049 80,032 90,649 82,174 76,970 161,601 159,144 0.1 Reformulated 374,233 403,888 380,496 401,013 382,026 351,003 735,652 733,029 1.3 Midgrade 11,714 11,956 11,129 12,327 11,408 10,578 28,304 21,986 -21.0 Conventional 1,208 1,145 948 1,239 1,124 1,067 3,498 2,191 -36.3 Reformulated 10,506 10,811 10,181 11,088 10,284 9,511 24,806 19,795 -18.8 Premium 41,826 44,755 42,397 46,388 42,618 38,946 80,451 81,564 3.1 Conventional 4,768 4,532 3,734 4,536 4,692 4,409 8,045 9,101 15.0

215

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 134,691 134,417 146,382 143,657 132,937 131,479 1,272,690 1,299,140 2.1 Regular 121,891 121,352 131,690 129,325 120,067 118,905 1,150,389 1,174,959 2.1 Conventional 121,891 121,352 131,690 129,325 120,067 118,905 1,150,389 1,174,959 2.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,760 1,750 1,919 1,903 1,721 1,668 18,321 17,286 -5.6 Conventional 1,760 1,750 1,919 1,903 1,721 1,668 18,321 17,286 -5.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,040 11,315 12,773 12,429 11,149 10,906 103,980 106,895 2.8 Conventional 11,040 11,315 12,773 12,429 11,149 10,906 103,980 106,895 2.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

216

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,103 120,513 123,768 109,386 109,777 115,509 344,084 334,672 -3.8 Regular 114,985 109,752 112,568 99,533 99,656 105,616 314,387 304,805 -4.1 Conventional 114,985 109,752 112,568 99,533 99,656 105,616 314,387 304,805 -4.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,405 1,347 1,331 1,199 1,209 1,312 3,950 3,720 -6.9 Conventional 1,405 1,347 1,331 1,199 1,209 1,312 3,950 3,720 -6.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,713 9,414 9,869 8,654 8,912 8,581 25,747 26,147 0.4 Conventional 9,713 9,414 9,869 8,654 8,912 8,581 25,747 26,147 0.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

217

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 128,992 122,068 133,706 137,219 136,075 142,541 1,034,843 1,011,894 -2.6 Regular 112,686 106,242 115,310 117,700 117,117 121,620 859,427 867,100 0.5 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,276 5,802 6,492 6,744 6,728 7,311 66,751 52,212 -22.1 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,030 10,024 11,904 12,775 12,230 13,610 108,665 92,582 -15.1 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

218

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 107,583 128,992 122,068 133,706 137,219 132,842 895,949 866,120 -3.8 Regular 89,279 112,686 106,242 115,310 117,700 114,094 741,958 742,457 -0.4 Conventional 48,793 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 40,486 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,783 6,276 5,802 6,492 6,744 6,728 58,709 44,901 -23.9 Conventional 3,568 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 3,215 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,521 10,030 10,024 11,904 12,775 12,020 95,282 78,762 -17.7 Conventional 6,316 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 5,205 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

219

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 119,737 113,339 129,220 103,710 107,583 119,248 373,849 330,541 -12.6 Regular 99,178 93,150 106,433 87,146 89,279 102,540 306,715 278,965 -10.0 Conventional 72,818 53,121 58,414 47,766 48,793 85,366 W 181,925 NA Oxygenated 26,360 40,029 48,019 39,380 40,486 17,174 W 97,040 NA Reformulated – – – – – – W – NA Midgrade 7,656 7,437 8,430 6,076 6,783 6,467 26,108 19,326 -26.8 Conventional 5,046 3,943 4,377 3,128 3,568 5,419 W 12,115 NA Oxygenated 2,610 3,494 4,053 2,948 3,215 1,048 W 7,211 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,903 12,752 14,357 10,488 11,521 10,241 W 32,250 NA Conventional 9,375 7,016 7,564 5,684 6,316 8,973 W 20,973 NA

220

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 149,898 143,203 131,902 130,122 116,547 121,960 1,567,974 1,531,719 -2.3 Regular 128,881 124,038 114,896 112,836 100,676 105,782 1,337,161 1,328,190 -0.7 Conventional W W W 85,371 61,541 W W W NA Oxygenated W W W 27,465 39,135 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,079 5,748 4,965 5,059 4,888 4,985 74,450 62,881 -15.5 Conventional W W W 3,614 2,496 2,445 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 1,445 2,392 2,540 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 14,938 13,417 12,041 12,227 10,983 11,193 156,363 140,648 -10.1 Conventional W W W 9,096 6,224 W W W NA Oxygenated W W W 3,131 4,759 W W W NA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 119,409 126,351 129,240 138,077 140,629 120,215 1,091,914 1,106,473 1.7 Regular 107,403 113,871 116,502 123,871 126,317 107,784 991,801 996,970 0.9 Conventional 107,403 113,871 116,502 123,871 126,317 107,784 991,801 996,970 0.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,280 1,320 1,356 1,530 1,491 1,224 11,852 11,699 -0.9 Conventional 1,280 1,320 1,356 1,530 1,491 1,224 11,852 11,699 -0.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,726 11,160 11,382 12,676 12,821 11,207 88,261 97,804 11.2 Conventional 10,726 11,160 11,382 12,676 12,821 11,207 88,261 97,804 11.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

222

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 483,146 517,898 526,837 540,301 564,932 507,854 4,476,666 4,559,051 2.2 Regular 383,622 416,870 424,735 430,015 447,094 403,797 3,490,879 3,624,230 4.2 Conventional 76,131 87,574 90,924 99,358 103,625 85,392 752,417 777,719 3.7 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 307,491 329,296 333,811 330,657 343,469 318,405 2,738,462 2,846,511 4.3 Midgrade 36,183 38,726 38,791 40,369 42,027 36,317 375,934 340,976 -9.0 Conventional 4,848 5,549 5,989 7,246 7,514 5,617 60,295 52,990 -11.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 31,335 33,177 32,802 33,123 34,513 30,700 315,639 287,986 -8.4 Premium 63,341 62,302 63,311 69,917 75,811 67,740 609,853 593,845 -2.3

223

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 103,710 107,583 128,992 122,068 133,706 136,216 727,503 732,275 0.1 Regular 87,146 89,279 112,686 106,242 115,310 117,202 598,517 627,865 4.3 Conventional 47,766 48,793 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 39,380 40,486 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – W – NA Midgrade 6,076 6,783 6,276 5,802 6,492 6,793 50,651 38,222 -25.0 Conventional 3,128 3,568 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,948 3,215 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,488 11,521 10,030 10,024 11,904 12,221 W 66,188 NA Conventional 5,684 6,316 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,804 5,205 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

224

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 507,854 551,005 519,384 532,551 507,798 473,140 930,735 980,938 5.4 Regular 403,797 439,428 413,569 423,893 404,830 375,054 734,113 779,884 6.2 Conventional 85,392 90,979 84,964 85,820 86,681 79,490 155,254 166,171 7.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 318,405 348,449 328,605 338,073 318,149 295,564 578,859 613,713 6.0 Midgrade 36,317 37,629 34,336 34,877 33,314 31,586 71,456 64,900 -9.2 Conventional 5,617 5,829 5,231 5,343 5,332 4,984 10,809 10,316 -4.6 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 30,700 31,800 29,105 29,534 27,982 26,602 60,647 54,584 -10.0 Premium 67,740 73,948 71,479 73,781 69,654 66,500 125,166 136,154 8.8

225

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 133,706 137,219 136,075 139,236 130,776 128,461 1,295,616 1,267,826 -2.5 Regular 115,310 117,700 117,117 118,534 113,616 111,521 1,079,234 1,089,151 0.6 Conventional W W W W W 82,755 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 28,766 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,492 6,744 6,728 7,311 6,170 6,296 81,920 64,678 -21.3 Conventional W W W W W 4,406 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 1,890 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,904 12,775 12,230 13,391 10,990 10,644 134,462 113,997 -15.5 Conventional W W W W W 7,778 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 2,866 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

226

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 522,909 496,923 511,860 469,410 527,337 464,928 480,036 464,928 -3.1 Regular 383,811 368,609 381,794 351,762 397,163 352,437 339,080 352,437 3.9 Conventional 89,198 83,179 85,363 77,639 84,422 74,152 49,126 74,152 50.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 294,613 285,430 296,431 274,123 312,741 278,285 289,954 278,285 -4.0 Midgrade 53,258 49,512 50,511 45,003 49,862 42,715 49,981 42,715 -14.5 Conventional 9,746 8,535 8,326 7,099 7,742 6,825 5,463 6,825 24.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 43,512 40,977 42,185 37,904 42,120 35,890 44,518 35,890 -19.4 Premium 85,840 78,802 79,555 72,645 80,312 69,776 90,975 69,776 -23.3

227

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 121,599 126,592 126,169 141,479 140,449 137,146 1,173,202 1,140,517 -3.1 Regular 107,152 113,569 111,791 124,284 123,026 121,321 1,018,510 1,004,959 -1.7 Conventional W W W W W 93,225 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,106 3,739 3,923 4,403 4,610 4,305 47,837 38,143 -20.6 Conventional W W W W W 3,682 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,341 9,284 10,455 12,792 12,813 11,520 106,855 97,415 -9.2 Conventional W W W W W 9,730 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

228

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 115,008 129,009 135,752 132,774 149,898 146,040 1,057,561 1,034,025 -2.2 Regular 102,049 114,076 117,825 114,646 128,881 126,677 904,267 896,639 -0.8 Conventional W 98,123 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W 15,953 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,397 4,632 5,351 5,367 6,079 5,748 49,203 42,984 -12.6 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,562 10,301 12,576 12,761 14,938 13,615 104,091 94,402 -9.3 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

229

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 532,551 507,798 471,966 528,923 525,025 563,267 2,419,127 2,596,979 7.4 Regular 423,893 404,830 374,051 423,574 425,312 450,585 1,918,589 2,078,352 8.3 Conventional 85,820 86,681 78,103 84,785 84,632 94,085 398,420 428,286 7.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 338,073 318,149 295,948 338,789 340,680 356,500 1,520,169 1,650,066 8.5 Midgrade 34,877 33,314 31,476 35,018 33,447 37,176 183,472 170,431 -7.1 Conventional 5,343 5,332 4,965 5,126 4,880 5,761 26,624 26,064 -2.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 29,534 27,982 26,511 29,892 28,567 31,415 156,848 144,367 -8.0 Premium 73,781 69,654 66,439 70,331 66,266 75,506 317,066 348,196 9.8

230

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 496,452 488,936 430,725 477,184 488,726 508,061 2,376,555 2,393,632 1.4 Regular 445,406 439,340 387,401 428,557 437,307 450,215 2,130,982 2,142,820 1.2 Conventional 89,443 92,274 83,145 88,943 93,114 96,168 398,967 453,644 14.5 Reformulated 355,963 347,066 304,256 339,614 344,193 354,047 1,732,015 1,689,176 -1.8 Midgrade 8,190 7,994 7,243 7,978 7,840 8,951 40,963 40,006 -1.7 Conventional 903 921 836 886 867 1,111 4,252 4,621 9.4 Reformulated 7,287 7,073 6,407 7,092 6,973 7,840 36,711 35,385 -3.0 Premium 42,856 41,602 36,081 40,649 43,579 48,895 204,610 210,806 3.7 Conventional 4,150 4,510 3,841 4,051 5,033 5,533 20,695 22,968 11.7

231

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 106,552 112,818 127,713 121,599 126,592 126,169 738,087 721,443 -2.8 Regular 92,915 98,586 112,315 107,152 113,569 111,791 641,081 636,328 -1.3 Conventional W 61,721 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W 36,865 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,270 4,425 4,362 4,106 3,739 3,923 31,157 24,825 -20.8 Conventional 2,157 2,245 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,113 2,180 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,367 9,807 11,036 10,341 9,284 10,455 65,849 60,290 -8.9 Conventional W 5,377 9,727 W W W W W NA Oxygenated W 4,430 1,309 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

232

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 555,511 521,124 527,101 509,281 530,764 461,105 504,188 461,105 -8.5 Regular 496,300 466,275 472,106 456,590 476,567 414,239 452,854 414,239 -8.5 Conventional 103,140 92,473 90,578 83,269 85,583 77,162 87,933 77,162 -12.2 Reformulated 393,160 373,802 381,528 373,321 390,984 337,077 364,921 337,077 -7.6 Midgrade 10,283 9,258 9,110 8,696 8,813 7,806 9,657 7,806 -19.2 Conventional 1,439 1,091 965 882 905 832 1,073 832 -22.5 Reformulated 8,844 8,167 8,145 7,814 7,908 6,974 8,584 6,974 -18.8 Premium 48,928 45,591 45,885 43,995 45,384 39,060 41,677 39,060 -6.3 Conventional 7,090 5,477 5,106 4,337 4,314 3,926 4,769 3,926 -17.7

233

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 113,339 129,220 103,710 107,583 128,992 122,057 485,992 462,342 -5.7 Regular 93,150 106,433 87,146 89,279 112,686 106,233 400,133 395,344 -2.0 Conventional 53,121 58,414 47,766 48,793 W W W W NA Oxygenated 40,029 48,019 39,380 40,486 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – W – NA Midgrade 7,437 8,430 6,076 6,783 6,276 5,802 33,765 24,937 -26.8 Conventional 3,943 4,377 3,128 3,568 W W W W NA Oxygenated 3,494 4,053 2,948 3,215 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,752 14,357 10,488 11,521 10,030 10,022 W 42,061 NA Conventional 7,016 7,564 5,684 6,316 W W W W NA Oxygenated 5,736 6,793 4,804 5,205 W W W W NA

234

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 131,902 130,122 116,547 121,960 106,552 112,814 225,544 219,366 -4.4 Regular 114,896 112,836 100,676 105,782 92,915 98,582 192,485 191,497 -2.2 Conventional W 85,371 61,541 W W 61,717 119,723 W NA Oxygenated W 27,465 39,135 W W 36,865 72,762 W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,965 5,059 4,888 4,985 4,270 4,425 11,410 8,695 -25.1 Conventional W 3,614 2,496 2,445 2,157 2,245 7,291 4,402 -40.6 Oxygenated W 1,445 2,392 2,540 2,113 2,180 4,119 4,293 2.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,041 12,227 10,983 11,193 9,367 9,807 21,649 19,174 -12.9 Conventional W 9,096 6,224 W W 5,377 12,852 W NA

235

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Definitions Key Terms Definition Bulk Sales Wholesale sales of gasoline in individual transactions which exceed the size of a truckload. Dealer Tank Wagon Sales (DTW) Wholesale sales of gasoline priced on a delivered basis to a retail outlet. Gas Plant Operator Any firm, including a gas plant owner, which operates a gas plant and keeps the gas plant records. A gas plant is a facility in which natural gas liquids are separated from natural gas or in which natural gas liquids are fractionated or otherwise separated into natural gas liquid products or both. For the purposes of this survey, gas plant operator data are contained in the refiner categories. Gasoline Grades The classification of gasoline by octane ratings. Each type of gasoline (conventional and reformulated) is classified by three grades - regular, midgrade, and premium. Note: gasoline sales are reported by grade in accordance with their classification at the time of sale. In general, automotive octane requirements are lower at high altitudes. Therefore, in some areas of the United States, such as the Rocky Mountain States, the octane ratings for the gasoline grades may be 2 or more octane points lower.

236

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 116,937 123,361 112,056 110,080 126,845 126,596 473,447 475,577 0.4 Regular 105,946 112,014 101,850 99,730 115,120 115,029 429,613 431,729 0.5 Conventional 105,946 112,014 101,850 99,730 115,120 115,029 429,613 431,729 0.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,727 1,817 1,577 1,542 1,756 1,690 6,854 6,565 -4.2 Conventional 1,727 1,817 1,577 1,542 1,756 1,690 6,854 6,565 -4.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,264 9,530 8,629 8,808 9,969 9,877 36,980 37,283 0.8 Conventional 9,264 9,530 8,629 8,808 9,969 9,877 36,980 37,283 0.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

237

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 114,483 117,639 115,793 109,751 115,008 123,438 497,821 463,990 -6.8 Regular 96,041 99,099 98,040 94,445 102,049 108,904 427,645 403,438 -5.7 Conventional 59,921 61,268 60,258 59,465 W W W W NA Oxygenated 36,120 37,831 37,782 34,980 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,121 6,193 5,943 5,467 4,397 4,764 23,473 20,571 -12.4 Conventional 3,531 3,743 3,737 3,554 W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,590 2,450 2,206 1,913 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,321 12,347 11,810 9,839 8,562 9,770 46,703 39,981 -14.4 Conventional 7,264 7,339 6,945 5,907 W W W W NA Oxygenated 5,057 5,008 4,865 3,932 W W W W NA

238

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 485,599 445,136 487,348 483,146 517,898 526,698 2,913,722 2,945,825 1.7 Regular 382,693 351,420 383,984 383,622 416,870 424,633 2,269,099 2,343,222 3.8 Conventional 81,128 74,126 79,461 76,131 87,574 90,822 473,047 489,242 4.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 301,565 277,294 304,523 307,491 329,296 333,811 1,796,052 1,853,980 3.8 Midgrade 37,658 33,798 37,107 36,183 38,726 38,776 246,954 222,248 -9.5 Conventional 5,706 5,103 5,418 4,848 5,549 5,974 37,910 32,598 -13.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 31,952 28,695 31,689 31,335 33,177 32,802 209,044 189,650 -8.8 Premium 65,248 59,918 66,257 63,341 62,302 63,289 397,669 380,355 -3.8

239

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 129,009 135,752 132,774 149,898 143,203 131,902 1,185,472 1,163,090 -1.9 Regular 114,076 117,825 114,646 128,881 124,038 114,896 1,012,987 1,008,896 -0.4 Conventional 98,123 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 15,953 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,632 5,351 5,367 6,079 5,748 4,965 55,269 47,949 -13.2 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,301 12,576 12,761 14,938 13,417 12,041 117,216 106,245 -9.4 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

240

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 141,479 140,449 137,146 123,384 123,443 132,860 1,541,831 1,520,204 -1.7 Regular 124,284 123,026 121,321 108,630 108,923 116,374 1,337,804 1,338,886 -0.2 Conventional W W 93,225 80,733 66,084 71,013 W W NA Oxygenated W W NA NA 42,839 45,361 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,403 4,610 4,305 4,157 4,294 4,477 62,769 51,071 -18.9 Conventional W W 3,682 2,831 2,131 2,141 W W NA Oxygenated W W NA 1,326 2,163 2,336 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,792 12,813 11,520 10,597 10,226 12,009 141,258 130,247 -8.0 Conventional W W 9,730 7,507 5,628 6,834 W W NA Oxygenated W W NA 3,090 4,598 5,175 W W NA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 121,960 106,552 112,818 127,713 121,599 126,564 605,313 595,246 -2.3 Regular 105,782 92,915 98,586 112,315 107,152 113,546 526,435 524,514 -1.0 Conventional W W 61,721 W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W 36,865 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,985 4,270 4,425 4,362 4,106 3,734 25,790 20,897 -19.5 Conventional 2,445 2,157 2,245 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,540 2,113 2,180 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,193 9,367 9,807 11,036 10,341 9,284 53,088 49,835 -6.7 Conventional W W 5,377 9,727 W W W W NA Oxygenated W W 4,430 1,309 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

242

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 125,808 119,737 113,339 129,220 103,710 107,583 240,789 211,293 -13.7 Regular 104,798 99,178 93,150 106,433 87,146 89,279 197,956 176,425 -12.4 Conventional W 72,818 53,121 58,414 47,766 48,793 W 96,559 NA Oxygenated W 26,360 40,029 48,019 39,380 40,486 81,481 79,866 -3.6 Reformulated – – – – – [–] W – NA Midgrade 7,653 7,656 7,437 8,430 6,076 6,783 16,533 12,859 -23.5 Conventional W 5,046 3,943 4,377 3,128 3,568 8,292 6,696 -20.6 Oxygenated W 2,610 3,494 4,053 2,948 3,215 8,241 6,163 -26.5 Reformulated – – – – – [–] – – – Premium 13,357 12,903 12,752 14,357 10,488 11,521 W 22,009 NA

243

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 110,080 126,845 126,596 134,691 134,417 146,382 877,080 891,067 1.6 Regular 99,730 115,120 115,029 121,891 121,352 131,690 793,415 806,662 1.7 Conventional 99,730 115,120 115,029 121,891 121,352 131,690 793,415 806,662 1.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,542 1,756 1,690 1,760 1,750 1,919 12,683 11,994 -5.4 Conventional 1,542 1,756 1,690 1,760 1,750 1,919 12,683 11,994 -5.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,808 9,969 9,877 11,040 11,315 12,773 70,982 72,411 2.0 Conventional 8,808 9,969 9,877 11,040 11,315 12,773 70,982 72,411 2.0 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

244

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 125,271 127,361 115,819 113,187 130,255 126,993 462,353 486,254 6.0 Regular 108,520 109,905 99,816 97,998 111,793 109,367 395,353 418,974 6.9 Conventional 62,396 62,355 55,542 53,186 W W W W NA Oxygenated 46,124 47,550 44,274 44,812 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,420 6,738 5,913 5,424 6,711 6,086 24,937 24,134 -2.4 Conventional 3,840 3,681 3,428 2,863 6,196 W W W NA Oxygenated 2,580 3,057 2,485 2,561 515 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,331 10,718 10,090 9,765 11,751 11,540 42,063 43,146 3.4 Conventional 5,564 5,846 5,492 5,053 10,535 W W W NA Oxygenated 4,767 4,872 4,598 4,712 1,216 W W W NA

245

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 122,068 133,706 137,219 136,075 139,236 130,776 1,168,496 1,139,365 -2.8 Regular 106,242 115,310 117,700 117,117 118,534 113,616 972,177 977,630 0.2 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,802 6,492 6,744 6,728 7,311 6,170 74,458 58,382 -21.9 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,024 11,904 12,775 12,230 13,391 10,990 121,861 103,353 -15.5 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

246

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 506,958 545,539 557,326 578,792 575,573 533,235 5,013,394 4,817,378 -3.9 Regular 446,104 480,482 489,993 505,930 503,624 465,652 4,287,269 4,222,778 -1.5 Conventional 88,991 98,590 106,317 115,384 117,509 101,392 860,025 894,858 4.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 357,113 381,892 383,676 390,546 386,115 364,260 3,427,244 3,327,920 -2.9 Midgrade 18,128 19,540 20,189 22,411 22,431 18,855 223,642 177,820 -20.5 Conventional 2,220 2,548 2,831 3,825 3,614 2,661 32,067 24,885 -22.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 15,908 16,992 17,358 18,586 18,817 16,194 191,575 152,935 -20.2 Premium 42,726 45,517 47,144 50,451 49,518 48,728 502,483 416,780 -17.1

247

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 127,713 121,599 126,592 126,169 141,479 140,449 1,041,300 1,003,371 -4.0 Regular 112,315 107,152 113,569 111,791 124,284 123,026 903,614 883,638 -2.6 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,362 4,106 3,739 3,923 4,403 4,610 42,872 33,838 -21.4 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,036 10,341 9,284 10,455 12,792 12,813 94,814 85,895 -9.8 Conventional 9,727 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 1,309 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

248

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,169 141,479 140,449 137,146 123,384 121,162 1,419,871 1,385,063 -2.7 Regular 111,791 124,284 123,026 121,321 108,630 106,804 1,232,022 1,220,393 -1.2 Conventional W W W 93,225 80,733 64,938 W W NA Oxygenated W W W NA NA 41,866 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,923 4,403 4,610 4,305 4,157 4,284 57,784 46,584 -19.6 Conventional W W W 3,682 2,831 2,130 W W NA Oxygenated W W W NA 1,326 2,154 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,455 12,792 12,813 11,520 10,597 10,074 130,065 118,086 -9.5 Conventional W W W 9,730 7,507 5,559 W W NA Oxygenated W W W NA 3,090 4,515 W W NA

249

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 517,898 526,837 540,301 564,932 507,854 551,003 4,990,670 5,110,054 2.7 Regular 416,870 424,735 430,015 447,094 403,797 439,426 3,896,856 4,063,656 4.6 Conventional 87,574 90,924 99,358 103,625 85,392 90,977 844,768 868,696 3.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 329,296 333,811 330,657 343,469 318,405 348,449 3,052,088 3,194,960 5.0 Midgrade 38,726 38,791 40,369 42,027 36,317 37,629 416,116 378,605 -8.7 Conventional 5,549 5,989 7,246 7,514 5,617 5,829 66,363 58,819 -11.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 33,177 32,802 33,123 34,513 30,700 31,800 349,753 319,786 -8.3 Premium 62,302 63,311 69,917 75,811 67,740 73,948 677,698 667,793 -1.1

250

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 580,742 556,122 584,646 525,232 495,628 553,048 1,617,006 1,573,908 -1.6 Regular 492,401 473,300 495,194 443,125 418,949 471,700 1,338,260 1,333,774 0.8 Conventional 99,633 93,097 97,753 89,276 84,235 92,353 265,100 265,864 1.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 392,768 380,203 397,441 353,849 334,714 379,347 1,073,160 1,067,910 0.6 Midgrade 27,555 24,969 26,978 25,145 23,637 25,345 87,880 74,127 -14.7 Conventional 4,083 3,397 3,613 3,520 3,396 3,436 12,677 10,352 -17.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 23,472 21,572 23,365 21,625 20,241 21,909 75,203 63,775 -14.3 Premium 60,786 57,853 62,474 56,962 53,042 56,003 190,866 166,007 -12.1

251

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 124,695 128,129 139,212 139,507 142,185 127,373 1,195,427 1,155,359 -3.4 Regular 112,510 115,823 125,667 124,434 126,339 113,384 1,074,003 1,035,130 -3.6 Conventional 112,510 115,823 125,667 124,434 126,339 113,384 W 1,035,130 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,958 2,859 3,031 3,341 3,503 2,965 31,059 27,915 -10.1 Conventional 2,958 2,859 3,031 3,341 3,503 2,965 W 27,915 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,227 9,447 10,514 11,732 12,343 11,024 90,365 92,314 2.2 Conventional 9,227 9,447 10,514 11,732 12,343 11,024 W 92,314 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

252

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 122,936 133,205 139,935 139,701 142,976 125,846 1,131,379 1,167,604 3.6 Regular 110,833 118,938 124,805 123,746 127,337 112,893 995,838 1,038,492 4.7 Conventional W 99,124 W 103,498 W 91,616 W W NA Oxygenated W 19,814 W 20,248 W 21,277 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,183 3,610 3,716 3,912 3,977 3,371 38,032 33,470 -11.7 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,920 10,657 11,414 12,043 11,662 9,582 97,509 95,642 -1.6 Conventional 7,806 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 1,114 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

253

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 119,409 126,351 129,240 138,077 140,629 120,215 1,091,914 1,106,473 1.7 Regular 107,403 113,871 116,502 123,871 126,317 107,784 991,801 996,970 0.9 Conventional 107,403 113,871 116,502 123,871 126,317 107,784 991,801 996,970 0.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,280 1,320 1,356 1,530 1,491 1,224 11,852 11,699 -0.9 Conventional 1,280 1,320 1,356 1,530 1,491 1,224 11,852 11,699 -0.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,726 11,160 11,382 12,676 12,821 11,207 88,261 97,804 11.2 Conventional 10,726 11,160 11,382 12,676 12,821 11,207 88,261 97,804 11.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

254

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 143,657 132,937 131,479 120,805 126,608 113,004 112,056 113,004 0.8 Regular 129,325 120,067 118,905 109,582 114,523 103,156 101,850 103,156 1.3 Conventional 129,325 120,067 118,905 109,582 114,523 103,156 101,850 103,156 1.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,903 1,721 1,668 1,545 1,739 1,231 1,577 1,231 -21.9 Conventional 1,903 1,721 1,668 1,545 1,739 1,231 1,577 1,231 -21.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,429 11,149 10,906 9,678 10,346 8,617 8,629 8,617 -0.1 Conventional 12,429 11,149 10,906 9,678 10,346 8,617 8,629 8,617 -0.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

255

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 119,493 110,992 117,088 108,674 122,452 125,233 480,923 473,447 -0.7 Regular 108,458 100,387 106,414 98,792 111,102 113,305 436,094 429,613 -0.7 Conventional 108,458 100,387 106,414 98,792 111,102 113,305 436,094 429,613 -0.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,769 1,792 1,666 1,581 1,792 1,815 9,695 6,854 -28.7 Conventional 1,769 1,792 1,666 1,581 1,792 1,815 9,695 6,854 -28.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,266 8,813 9,008 8,301 9,558 10,113 35,134 36,980 6.1 Conventional 9,266 8,813 9,008 8,301 9,558 10,113 35,134 36,980 6.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

256

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 551,005 519,384 532,551 507,798 471,966 528,669 1,418,083 1,508,433 6.4 Regular 439,428 413,569 423,893 404,830 374,051 423,343 1,118,097 1,202,224 7.5 Conventional 90,979 84,964 85,820 86,681 78,103 85,079 234,715 249,863 6.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 348,449 328,605 338,073 318,149 295,948 338,264 883,382 952,361 7.8 Midgrade 37,629 34,336 34,877 33,314 31,476 35,066 108,563 99,856 -8.0 Conventional 5,829 5,231 5,343 5,332 4,965 5,145 16,227 15,442 -4.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 31,800 29,105 29,534 27,982 26,511 29,921 92,336 84,414 -8.6 Premium 73,948 71,479 73,781 69,654 66,439 70,260 191,423 206,353 7.8

257

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 111,114 105,103 116,335 119,409 126,351 129,240 705,523 707,552 0.8 Regular 100,685 95,316 105,221 107,403 113,871 116,502 642,680 638,998 0.0 Conventional 100,685 95,316 105,221 107,403 113,871 116,502 642,680 638,998 0.0 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,145 1,088 1,265 1,280 1,320 1,356 7,530 7,454 -0.5 Conventional 1,145 1,088 1,265 1,280 1,320 1,356 7,530 7,454 -0.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,284 8,699 9,849 10,726 11,160 11,382 55,313 61,100 11.1 Conventional 9,284 8,699 9,849 10,726 11,160 11,382 55,313 61,100 11.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

258

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 135,752 132,774 149,898 143,203 131,902 125,448 1,317,924 1,288,538 -2.2 Regular 117,825 114,646 128,881 124,038 114,896 108,917 1,125,200 1,117,813 -0.7 Conventional W W W W W 86,345 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 22,572 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,351 5,367 6,079 5,748 4,965 4,740 61,812 52,689 -14.8 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,576 12,761 14,938 13,417 12,041 11,791 130,912 118,036 -9.8 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

259

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 118,909 110,150 125,199 124,695 128,129 139,212 767,530 746,294 -2.8 Regular 106,914 97,816 112,243 112,510 115,823 125,667 690,590 670,973 -2.8 Conventional 106,914 97,816 112,243 112,510 115,823 125,667 W 670,973 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,106 3,096 3,056 2,958 2,859 3,031 20,248 18,106 -10.6 Conventional 3,106 3,096 3,056 2,958 2,859 3,031 W 18,106 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,889 9,238 9,900 9,227 9,447 10,514 56,692 57,215 0.9 Conventional 8,889 9,238 9,900 9,227 9,447 10,514 W 57,215 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

260

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 127,703 122,936 133,205 139,935 139,701 142,976 998,548 1,041,758 4.8 Regular 113,498 110,833 118,938 124,805 123,746 127,337 878,533 925,599 5.8 Conventional 91,743 W 99,124 W 103,498 W W W NA Oxygenated 21,755 W 19,814 W 20,248 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,705 3,183 3,610 3,716 3,912 3,977 33,818 30,099 -10.6 Conventional 3,187 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 518 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,500 8,920 10,657 11,414 12,043 11,662 86,197 86,060 0.3 Conventional 8,746 7,806 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated NA 1,114 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

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261

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 520,563 494,955 496,452 488,936 430,725 476,239 1,394,949 1,395,900 1.2 Regular 467,394 442,377 445,406 439,340 387,401 427,559 1,253,307 1,254,300 1.2 Conventional 98,631 89,489 89,443 92,274 83,145 88,569 232,570 263,988 14.8 Reformulated 368,763 352,888 355,963 347,066 304,256 338,990 1,020,737 990,312 -1.9 Midgrade 8,844 8,424 8,190 7,994 7,243 7,992 23,623 23,229 -0.6 Conventional 1,015 881 903 921 836 886 2,431 2,643 9.9 Reformulated 7,829 7,543 7,287 7,073 6,407 7,106 21,192 20,586 -1.8 Premium 44,325 44,154 42,856 41,602 36,081 40,688 118,019 118,371 1.4 Conventional 4,696 4,075 4,150 4,510 3,841 4,051 11,814 12,402 6.1

262

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 545,541 567,208 520,002 553,717 553,949 505,933 1,017,514 1,059,882 2.4 Regular 452,103 468,190 426,231 451,348 455,314 417,681 826,695 872,995 3.8 Conventional 92,595 96,551 84,706 90,958 89,720 83,902 172,442 173,622 -1.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 359,508 371,639 341,525 360,390 365,594 333,779 654,253 699,373 5.1 Midgrade 30,416 31,258 29,317 32,045 31,218 27,952 65,171 59,170 -10.7 Conventional 4,820 4,956 4,291 4,765 4,659 4,089 10,378 8,748 -17.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 25,596 26,302 25,026 27,280 26,559 23,863 54,793 50,422 -9.5 Premium 63,022 67,760 64,454 70,324 67,417 60,300 125,648 127,717 0.0

263

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 507,798 471,966 528,923 525,025 566,449 561,919 2,945,964 3,162,080 7.3 Regular 404,830 374,051 423,574 425,312 453,084 447,496 2,343,324 2,528,347 7.9 Conventional 86,681 78,103 84,785 84,632 94,055 93,656 489,344 521,912 6.7 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 318,149 295,948 338,789 340,680 359,029 353,840 1,853,980 2,006,435 8.2 Midgrade 33,314 31,476 35,018 33,447 37,392 37,173 222,263 207,820 -6.5 Conventional 5,332 4,965 5,126 4,880 5,763 5,925 32,613 31,991 -1.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 27,982 26,511 29,892 28,567 31,629 31,248 189,650 175,829 -7.3 Premium 69,654 66,439 70,331 66,266 75,973 77,250 380,377 425,913 12.0

264

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 139,935 139,701 142,976 125,585 133,383 132,214 1,375,367 1,432,940 4.5 Regular 124,805 123,746 127,337 112,647 119,751 117,558 1,210,807 1,275,555 5.7 Conventional W 103,498 W 91,370 82,252 69,032 W W NA Oxygenated W 20,248 W 21,277 37,499 48,526 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,716 3,912 3,977 3,370 3,629 3,715 46,503 40,813 -12.0 Conventional W W W W 2,182 1,558 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 1,447 2,157 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,414 12,043 11,662 9,568 10,003 10,941 118,057 116,572 -1.0 Conventional W W W W 6,316 5,317 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 3,687 5,624 W W NA

265

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 120,530 123,655 110,788 128,326 135,052 144,606 623,613 642,427 3.0 Regular 102,740 105,511 94,520 110,336 117,278 124,693 536,897 552,338 2.9 Conventional 54,646 56,780 53,384 91,767 W W W W NA Oxygenated 48,094 48,731 41,136 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,178 6,168 5,450 6,010 5,845 6,363 30,684 29,836 -2.8 Conventional 3,547 3,392 3,052 5,351 W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,631 2,776 2,398 659 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,612 11,976 10,818 11,980 11,929 13,550 56,032 60,253 7.5 Conventional 6,254 6,016 5,941 10,395 W W W W NA Oxygenated 5,358 5,960 4,877 1,585 W W W W NA

266

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 124,392 117,292 115,606 122,264 125,761 130,716 607,082 611,639 0.1 Regular 112,370 106,132 104,410 111,432 114,120 119,277 545,306 555,371 1.2 Conventional 112,370 106,132 104,410 111,432 114,120 119,277 545,306 555,371 1.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,693 2,570 2,491 2,207 2,427 2,168 15,075 11,863 -21.8 Conventional 2,693 2,570 2,491 2,207 2,427 2,168 15,075 11,863 -21.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,329 8,590 8,705 8,625 9,214 9,271 46,701 44,405 -5.5 Conventional 9,329 8,590 8,705 8,625 9,214 9,271 46,701 44,405 -5.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

267

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 488,936 430,725 477,184 488,726 508,081 505,974 2,896,881 2,899,626 0.6 Regular 439,340 387,401 428,557 437,307 450,215 447,456 2,593,573 2,590,276 0.4 Conventional 92,274 83,145 88,943 93,114 96,168 96,218 497,347 549,862 11.2 Reformulated 347,066 304,256 339,614 344,193 354,047 351,238 2,096,226 2,040,414 -2.1 Midgrade 7,994 7,243 7,978 7,840 8,971 9,185 50,458 49,211 -1.9 Conventional 921 836 886 867 1,110 1,165 5,446 5,785 6.8 Reformulated 7,073 6,407 7,092 6,973 7,861 8,020 45,012 43,426 -3.0 Premium 41,602 36,081 40,649 43,579 48,895 49,333 252,850 260,139 3.5 Conventional 4,510 3,841 4,051 5,033 5,533 6,005 26,640 28,973 9.4

268

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 118,555 116,747 127,703 122,936 133,205 140,007 721,443 759,153 5.8 Regular 104,022 102,420 113,498 110,833 118,938 124,871 636,328 674,582 6.6 Conventional 61,295 61,912 91,743 W 99,124 W W W NA Oxygenated 42,727 40,508 21,755 W 19,814 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,122 3,874 3,705 3,183 3,610 3,716 24,825 22,210 -10.0 Conventional 1,960 1,900 3,187 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,162 1,974 518 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,411 10,453 10,500 8,920 10,657 11,420 60,290 62,361 4.0 Conventional 5,562 5,909 8,746 7,806 W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,849 4,544 NA 1,114 W W W W NA

269

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 515,841 536,199 510,224 545,228 504,188 468,538 960,722 972,726 1.2 Regular 455,816 474,668 453,976 487,995 452,854 420,289 859,766 873,143 1.6 Conventional 92,476 93,958 87,267 92,950 87,933 82,130 162,053 170,063 4.9 Reformulated 363,340 380,710 366,709 395,045 364,921 338,159 697,713 703,080 0.8 Midgrade 10,972 11,173 10,401 10,787 9,657 8,794 20,005 18,451 -7.8 Conventional 1,284 1,244 1,061 1,144 1,073 974 2,129 2,047 -3.9 Reformulated 9,688 9,929 9,340 9,643 8,584 7,820 17,876 16,404 -8.2 Premium 49,053 50,358 45,847 46,446 41,677 39,455 80,951 81,132 0.2 Conventional 6,229 5,648 4,458 4,797 4,769 4,624 9,157 9,393 2.6

270

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 509,281 530,764 461,105 446,330 487,514 467,445 1,984,705 1,862,394 -6.9 Regular 456,590 476,567 414,239 400,799 438,269 419,689 1,786,214 1,672,996 -7.1 Conventional 83,269 85,583 77,162 75,965 79,443 76,333 335,511 308,903 -8.7 Reformulated 373,321 390,984 337,077 324,834 358,826 343,356 1,450,703 1,364,093 -6.7 Midgrade 8,696 8,813 7,806 7,543 8,274 8,141 36,428 31,764 -13.5 Conventional 882 905 832 793 806 750 3,942 3,181 -20.0 Reformulated 7,814 7,908 6,974 6,750 7,468 7,391 32,486 28,583 -12.7 Premium 43,995 45,384 39,060 37,988 40,971 39,615 162,063 157,634 -3.5 Conventional 4,337 4,314 3,926 3,956 3,932 3,590 16,900 15,404 -9.6

271

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 133,205 139,935 139,701 142,976 125,585 133,383 1,255,313 1,300,726 4.0 Regular 118,938 124,805 123,746 127,337 112,647 119,751 1,104,865 1,157,997 5.2 Conventional 99,124 W 103,498 W 91,370 82,252 W W NA Oxygenated 19,814 W 20,248 W 21,277 37,499 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,610 3,716 3,912 3,977 3,370 3,629 42,259 37,098 -11.9 Conventional W W W W W 2,182 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 1,447 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,657 11,414 12,043 11,662 9,568 10,003 108,189 105,631 -2.0 Conventional W W W W W 6,316 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 3,687 W W NA

272

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine Maine Motor Gasoline 59,884 62,599 63,465 72,088 72,911 59,813 503,187 554,952 10.7 Regular 56,559 59,138 59,685 67,043 67,739 56,214 474,245 523,059 10.7 Conventional 56,559 59,138 59,685 67,043 67,739 56,214 474,245 523,059 10.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 490 701 745 1,037 1,017 571 5,636 5,995 6.8 Conventional 490 701 745 1,037 1,017 571 5,636 5,995 6.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 2,835 2,760 3,035 4,008 4,155 3,028 23,306 25,898 11.5 Conventional 2,835 2,760 3,035 4,008 4,155 3,028 23,306 25,898 11.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W No. 1 Distillate W W W W W W W W NA

273

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 544,776 585,964 544,609 570,066 532,203 487,119 979,764 1,019,322 4.0 Regular 433,667 470,192 438,253 459,523 428,774 399,696 778,881 828,470 6.4 Conventional 91,845 98,835 90,774 95,486 90,155 83,021 164,784 173,176 5.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 341,822 371,357 347,479 364,037 338,619 316,675 614,097 655,294 6.7 Midgrade 35,957 37,629 35,045 36,612 35,132 29,913 64,790 65,045 0.4 Conventional 5,748 5,973 5,333 5,575 5,644 4,757 10,297 10,401 1.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 30,209 31,656 29,712 31,037 29,488 25,156 54,493 54,644 0.3 Premium 75,152 78,143 71,311 73,931 68,297 57,510 136,093 125,807 -7.6

274

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 523,744 573,398 571,866 610,670 616,068 545,544 4,908,400 4,992,566 1.7 Regular 432,090 465,864 462,449 488,921 499,355 452,096 3,914,132 4,068,858 4.0 Conventional 86,165 94,205 96,905 106,748 109,285 92,588 829,429 847,392 2.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 345,925 371,659 365,544 382,173 390,070 359,508 3,084,703 3,221,466 4.4 Midgrade 30,510 34,242 34,914 38,917 38,243 30,421 326,185 304,156 -6.8 Conventional 4,179 5,204 5,476 6,910 6,876 4,825 52,810 48,332 -8.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 26,331 29,038 29,438 32,007 31,367 25,596 273,375 255,824 -6.4 Premium 61,144 73,292 74,503 82,832 78,470 63,027 668,083 619,552 -7.3

275

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,592 126,169 141,479 140,449 137,146 135,752 1,303,324 1,276,269 -2.4 Regular 113,569 111,791 124,284 123,026 121,321 119,328 1,131,346 1,124,287 -0.9 Conventional W W W W 93,225 80,733 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W NA NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,739 3,923 4,403 4,610 4,305 4,642 52,896 42,785 -19.4 Conventional W W W W 3,682 2,831 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W NA NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,284 10,455 12,792 12,813 11,520 11,782 119,082 109,197 -8.6 Conventional W W W W 9,730 7,507 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W NA NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

276

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 115,819 113,187 130,255 126,911 137,441 135,583 733,278 759,196 4.1 Regular 99,816 97,998 111,793 109,294 117,996 117,302 628,363 654,199 4.7 Conventional 55,542 53,186 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 44,274 44,812 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,913 5,424 6,711 6,086 6,550 6,371 38,173 37,055 -2.4 Conventional 3,428 2,863 6,196 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,485 2,561 515 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,090 9,765 11,751 11,531 12,895 11,910 66,742 67,942 2.4 Conventional 5,492 5,053 10,535 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,598 4,712 1,216 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

277

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 128,129 139,212 139,507 142,185 127,373 129,846 1,324,158 1,285,205 -2.9 Regular 115,823 125,667 124,434 126,339 113,384 116,508 1,188,541 1,151,638 -3.1 Conventional 115,823 125,667 124,434 126,339 113,384 116,508 W 1,151,638 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,859 3,031 3,341 3,503 2,965 3,032 34,516 30,947 -10.3 Conventional 2,859 3,031 3,341 3,503 2,965 3,032 W 30,947 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,447 10,514 11,732 12,343 11,024 10,306 101,101 102,620 1.5 Conventional 9,447 10,514 11,732 12,343 11,024 10,306 W 102,620 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

278

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 132,857 118,555 116,747 127,703 122,936 133,838 595,274 619,779 4.8 Regular 116,372 104,022 102,420 113,498 110,833 119,514 524,537 550,287 5.6 Conventional 71,011 61,295 61,912 91,743 W W W W NA Oxygenated 45,361 42,727 40,508 21,755 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,477 4,122 3,874 3,705 3,183 3,612 20,902 18,496 -10.9 Conventional 2,141 1,960 1,900 3,187 W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,336 2,162 1,974 518 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,008 10,411 10,453 10,500 8,920 10,712 49,835 50,996 3.0 Conventional 6,833 5,562 5,909 8,746 7,806 9,328 W 37,351 NA Oxygenated 5,175 4,849 4,544 NA 1,114 NA W W NA

279

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 129,849 123,027 124,392 117,292 115,606 122,264 354,258 355,162 -0.8 Regular 116,510 111,045 112,370 106,132 104,410 111,432 316,973 321,974 0.5 Conventional 116,510 111,045 112,370 106,132 104,410 111,432 316,973 321,974 0.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,032 2,728 2,693 2,570 2,491 2,207 9,258 7,268 -22.4 Conventional 3,032 2,728 2,693 2,570 2,491 2,207 9,258 7,268 -22.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,307 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,705 8,625 28,027 25,920 -8.5 Conventional 10,307 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,705 8,625 28,027 25,920 -8.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

280

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 142,185 127,373 129,849 123,027 124,392 117,292 118,909 117,292 -1.4 Regular 126,339 113,384 116,510 111,045 112,370 106,132 106,914 106,132 -0.7 Conventional 126,339 113,384 116,510 111,045 112,370 106,132 106,914 106,132 -0.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,503 2,965 3,032 2,728 2,693 2,570 3,106 2,570 -17.3 Conventional 3,503 2,965 3,032 2,728 2,693 2,570 3,106 2,570 -17.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,343 11,024 10,307 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,889 8,590 -3.4 Conventional 12,343 11,024 10,307 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,889 8,590 -3.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 113,187 130,255 126,911 137,441 135,583 140,693 886,641 899,889 2.0 Regular 97,998 111,793 109,294 117,996 117,302 120,126 763,749 774,325 1.9 Conventional 53,186 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 44,812 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,424 6,711 6,086 6,550 6,371 6,780 44,407 43,835 -0.8 Conventional 2,863 6,196 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,561 515 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,765 11,751 11,531 12,895 11,910 13,787 78,485 81,729 4.6 Conventional 5,053 10,535 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,712 1,216 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

282

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 559,488 600,331 607,637 544,776 585,964 544,609 5,699,021 6,042,966 6.0 Regular 445,690 474,800 481,922 433,667 470,192 438,253 4,535,649 4,825,375 6.4 Conventional 93,600 107,710 110,970 91,845 98,835 90,774 970,689 1,021,990 5.3 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 352,090 367,090 370,952 341,822 371,357 347,479 3,564,960 3,803,385 6.7 Midgrade 37,061 41,258 41,734 35,957 37,629 35,045 415,787 399,331 -4.0 Conventional 5,927 7,552 7,706 5,748 5,973 5,333 64,417 64,305 -0.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 31,134 33,706 34,028 30,209 31,656 29,712 351,370 335,026 -4.7 Premium 76,737 84,273 83,981 75,152 78,143 71,311 747,585 818,260 9.5

283

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 128,461 125,271 127,361 115,819 113,187 130,255 340,285 359,261 6.7 Regular 111,521 108,520 109,905 99,816 97,998 111,793 289,111 309,607 8.3 Conventional 82,755 62,396 62,355 55,542 53,186 W W W NA Oxygenated 28,766 46,124 47,550 44,274 44,812 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,296 6,420 6,738 5,913 5,424 6,711 19,135 18,048 -4.6 Conventional 4,406 3,840 3,681 3,428 2,863 6,196 W 12,487 NA Oxygenated 1,890 2,580 3,057 2,485 2,561 515 W 5,561 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,644 10,331 10,718 10,090 9,765 11,751 32,039 31,606 -0.3 Conventional 7,778 5,564 5,846 5,492 5,053 10,535 W 21,080 NA

284

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 112,818 127,713 121,599 126,592 126,169 141,479 898,097 862,922 -4.4 Regular 98,586 112,315 107,152 113,569 111,791 124,284 779,576 760,612 -2.9 Conventional 61,721 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 36,865 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,425 4,362 4,106 3,739 3,923 4,403 37,124 29,228 -21.6 Conventional 2,245 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,180 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,807 11,036 10,341 9,284 10,455 12,792 81,397 73,082 -10.6 Conventional 5,377 9,727 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,430 1,309 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

285

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 140,449 137,146 123,384 123,443 132,857 118,557 106,552 118,557 11.3 Regular 123,026 121,321 108,630 108,923 116,372 104,014 92,915 104,014 11.9 Conventional W 93,225 80,733 66,084 71,011 61,319 W 61,319 NA Oxygenated W NA NA 42,839 45,361 42,695 W 42,695 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,610 4,305 4,157 4,294 4,477 4,123 4,270 4,123 -3.4 Conventional W 3,682 2,831 2,131 2,141 1,960 2,157 1,960 -9.1 Oxygenated W NA 1,326 2,163 2,336 2,163 2,113 2,163 2.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,813 11,520 10,597 10,226 12,008 10,420 9,367 10,420 11.2 Conventional W 9,730 7,507 5,628 6,833 5,565 W 5,565 NA

286

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 127,361 115,819 113,187 130,255 126,911 137,441 596,059 623,613 5.3 Regular 109,905 99,816 97,998 111,793 109,294 117,996 510,663 536,897 5.8 Conventional 62,355 55,542 53,186 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 47,550 44,274 44,812 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,738 5,913 5,424 6,711 6,086 6,550 31,429 30,684 -1.7 Conventional 3,681 3,428 2,863 6,196 W W W W NA Oxygenated 3,057 2,485 2,561 515 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,718 10,090 9,765 11,751 11,531 12,895 53,967 56,032 4.5 Conventional 5,846 5,492 5,053 10,535 W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,872 4,598 4,712 1,216 W W W W NA

287

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 132,214 134,901 121,056 120,708 129,584 129,173 485,941 500,521 3.0 Regular 117,558 119,426 108,545 108,142 116,394 115,901 430,773 448,982 4.2 Conventional 69,032 69,189 73,017 72,929 W W W W NA Oxygenated 48,526 50,237 35,528 35,213 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,715 3,919 3,612 3,378 3,439 3,369 14,884 13,798 -7.3 Conventional 1,558 1,636 1,812 1,618 W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,157 2,283 1,800 1,760 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,941 11,556 8,899 9,188 9,751 9,903 40,284 37,741 -6.3 Conventional 5,317 5,622 5,550 5,821 W W 28,023 W NA Oxygenated 5,624 5,934 3,349 3,367 W W W W NA

288

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 116,335 119,409 126,351 129,240 138,077 140,629 969,751 986,258 2.1 Regular 105,221 107,403 113,871 116,502 123,871 126,317 881,032 889,186 1.3 Conventional 105,221 107,403 113,871 116,502 123,871 126,317 881,032 889,186 1.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,265 1,280 1,320 1,356 1,530 1,491 10,548 10,475 -0.3 Conventional 1,265 1,280 1,320 1,356 1,530 1,491 10,548 10,475 -0.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,849 10,726 11,160 11,382 12,676 12,821 78,171 86,597 11.2 Conventional 9,849 10,726 11,160 11,382 12,676 12,821 78,171 86,597 11.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

289

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 124,202 126,203 128,935 134,724 138,634 128,837 1,167,661 1,125,619 -3.6 Regular 113,853 115,311 118,200 121,899 125,218 116,899 1,056,054 1,025,767 -2.9 Conventional 113,853 115,311 118,200 121,899 125,218 116,899 1,056,054 1,025,767 -2.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,390 1,394 1,443 1,617 1,625 1,482 15,618 12,901 -17.4 Conventional 1,390 1,394 1,443 1,617 1,625 1,482 15,618 12,901 -17.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,959 9,498 9,292 11,208 11,791 10,456 95,989 86,951 -9.4 Conventional 8,959 9,498 9,292 11,208 11,791 10,456 95,989 86,951 -9.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

290

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 140,679 145,648 126,428 129,343 121,892 120,906 1,539,831 1,544,092 0.6 Regular 120,112 124,098 110,212 111,742 104,683 103,096 1,327,866 1,328,142 0.3 Conventional W W W 82,134 58,559 55,021 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 29,608 46,124 48,075 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,780 7,144 5,841 6,099 6,003 6,181 77,342 75,103 -2.6 Conventional W W W 4,303 3,324 3,551 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 1,796 2,679 2,630 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 13,787 14,406 10,375 11,502 11,206 11,629 134,623 140,847 4.9 Conventional W W W 8,321 6,003 6,272 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 3,181 5,203 5,357 W W NA

291

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 507,176 555,881 533,257 569,990 572,053 597,002 3,826,569 3,889,308 1.2 Regular 418,716 464,230 446,469 482,419 485,233 501,270 3,113,783 3,253,651 4.0 Conventional 84,937 90,443 84,959 94,986 97,027 107,337 645,598 649,409 0.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 333,779 373,787 361,510 387,433 388,206 393,933 2,468,185 2,604,242 5.0 Midgrade 27,962 28,700 27,413 27,894 26,615 29,730 234,918 199,532 -15.5 Conventional 4,099 3,919 3,612 3,973 3,959 5,242 36,600 29,463 -19.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 23,863 24,781 23,801 23,921 22,656 24,488 198,318 170,069 -14.6 Premium 60,498 62,951 59,375 59,677 60,205 66,002 477,868 436,125 -9.2

292

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 124,186 133,338 134,214 120,819 125,045 116,740 1,407,938 1,365,982 -3.3 Regular 113,226 121,394 121,927 109,859 114,124 106,063 1,262,370 1,241,968 -1.9 Conventional 113,226 121,394 121,927 109,859 114,124 106,063 1,262,370 1,241,968 -1.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,961 2,082 2,075 1,769 1,731 1,651 33,741 23,129 -31.7 Conventional 1,961 2,082 2,075 1,769 1,731 1,651 33,741 23,129 -31.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,999 9,862 10,212 9,191 9,190 9,026 111,827 100,885 -10.1 Conventional 8,999 9,862 10,212 9,191 9,190 9,026 111,827 100,885 -10.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

293

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 122,163 124,443 117,552 113,930 111,114 105,113 219,163 216,227 0.3 Regular 110,769 113,333 106,683 103,132 100,685 95,323 199,189 196,008 0.1 Conventional 110,769 113,333 106,683 103,132 100,685 95,323 199,189 196,008 0.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,304 1,307 1,223 1,252 1,145 1,089 2,408 2,234 -5.7 Conventional 1,304 1,307 1,223 1,252 1,145 1,089 2,408 2,234 -5.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,090 9,803 9,646 9,546 9,284 8,701 17,566 17,985 4.1 Conventional 10,090 9,803 9,646 9,546 9,284 8,701 17,566 17,985 4.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

294

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 128,935 134,724 138,634 128,837 126,103 120,512 1,419,945 1,372,234 -3.4 Regular 118,200 121,899 125,218 116,899 114,985 109,751 1,284,541 1,250,503 -2.6 Conventional 118,200 121,899 125,218 116,899 114,985 109,751 1,284,541 1,250,503 -2.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,443 1,617 1,625 1,482 1,405 1,347 18,831 15,653 -16.9 Conventional 1,443 1,617 1,625 1,482 1,405 1,347 18,831 15,653 -16.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,292 11,208 11,791 10,456 9,713 9,414 116,573 106,078 -9.0 Conventional 9,292 11,208 11,791 10,456 9,713 9,414 116,573 106,078 -9.0 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

295

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 525,025 566,449 559,488 600,331 607,637 544,776 4,626,959 4,912,393 6.2 Regular 425,312 453,084 445,690 474,800 481,922 433,667 3,680,918 3,916,930 6.4 Conventional 84,632 94,055 93,600 107,710 110,970 91,845 792,995 832,381 5.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 340,680 359,029 352,090 367,090 370,952 341,822 2,887,923 3,084,549 6.8 Midgrade 33,447 37,392 37,061 41,258 41,734 35,957 343,819 326,657 -5.0 Conventional 4,880 5,763 5,927 7,552 7,706 5,748 53,343 52,999 -0.6 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 28,567 31,629 31,134 33,706 34,028 30,209 290,476 273,658 -5.8 Premium 66,266 75,973 76,737 84,273 83,981 75,152 602,222 668,806 11.1

296

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 120,819 125,045 119,493 110,992 117,088 108,674 232,898 225,762 -1.4 Regular 109,859 114,124 108,458 100,387 106,414 98,792 210,542 205,206 -0.9 Conventional 109,859 114,124 108,458 100,387 106,414 98,792 210,542 205,206 -0.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,769 1,731 1,769 1,792 1,666 1,581 5,061 3,247 -34.8 Conventional 1,769 1,731 1,769 1,792 1,666 1,581 5,061 3,247 -34.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,191 9,190 9,266 8,813 9,008 8,301 17,295 17,309 1.8 Conventional 9,191 9,190 9,266 8,813 9,008 8,301 17,295 17,309 1.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

297

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 139,236 130,776 128,461 125,271 127,361 115,330 103,710 115,330 11.2 Regular 118,534 113,616 111,521 108,520 109,905 99,406 87,146 99,406 14.1 Conventional W W 82,755 62,396 62,355 55,132 47,766 55,132 15.4 Oxygenated W W 28,766 46,124 47,550 44,274 39,380 44,274 12.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 7,311 6,170 6,296 6,420 6,738 5,913 6,076 5,913 -2.7 Conventional W W 4,406 3,840 3,681 3,428 3,128 3,428 9.6 Oxygenated W W 1,890 2,580 3,057 2,485 2,948 2,485 -15.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 13,391 10,990 10,644 10,331 10,718 10,011 10,488 10,011 -4.5 Conventional W W 7,778 5,564 5,846 5,413 5,684 5,413 -4.8

298

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 136,622 125,808 119,737 113,339 129,220 103,695 122,818 103,695 -15.6 Regular 113,449 104,798 99,178 93,150 106,433 87,131 101,479 87,131 -14.1 Conventional W W 72,818 53,121 58,414 47,751 W 47,751 NA Oxygenated W W 26,360 40,029 48,019 39,380 40,988 39,380 -3.9 Reformulated – – – – – – W – NA Midgrade 8,750 7,653 7,656 7,437 8,430 6,076 8,163 6,076 -25.6 Conventional W W 5,046 3,943 4,377 3,128 4,088 3,128 -23.5 Oxygenated W W 2,610 3,494 4,053 2,948 4,075 2,948 -27.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 14,423 13,357 12,903 12,752 14,357 10,488 W 10,488 NA Conventional W W 9,375 7,016 7,564 5,684 W 5,684 NA

299

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 139,789 134,234 138,886 144,986 126,268 128,894 1,303,091 1,310,878 0.6 Regular 120,111 114,632 118,057 122,577 107,051 108,435 1,121,359 1,118,508 -0.3 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,196 6,170 6,572 7,047 6,066 6,586 62,974 62,110 -1.4 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 13,482 13,432 14,257 15,362 13,151 13,873 118,758 130,260 9.7 Conventional W W W W W 9,885 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 3,988 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

300

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prime Supplier Sales Volume Prime Supplier Sales Volume Definitions Key Terms Definition Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Finished Aviation Gasoline A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifications are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Gasoline Grades The classification of gasoline by octane ratings. Each type of gasoline (conventional and reformulated) is classified by three grades - regular, midgrade, and premium. Note: gasoline sales are reported by grade in accordance with their classification at the time of sale. In general, automotive octane requirements are lower at high altitudes. Therefore, in some areas of the United States, such as the Rocky Mountain States, the octane ratings for the gasoline grades may be 2 or more octane points lower.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 566,449 559,488 600,331 607,637 544,776 583,133 5,178,870 5,495,526 6.1 Regular 453,084 445,690 474,800 481,922 433,667 468,135 4,121,313 4,385,065 6.4 Conventional 94,055 93,600 107,710 110,970 91,845 98,333 884,958 930,714 5.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 359,029 352,090 367,090 370,952 341,822 369,802 3,236,355 3,454,351 6.7 Midgrade 37,392 37,061 41,258 41,734 35,957 37,398 381,451 364,055 -4.6 Conventional 5,763 5,927 7,552 7,706 5,748 5,948 59,186 58,947 -0.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 31,629 31,134 33,706 34,028 30,209 31,450 322,265 305,108 -5.3 Premium 75,973 76,737 84,273 83,981 75,152 77,600 676,106 746,406 10.4

302

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 138,886 144,986 126,268 130,385 114,483 116,987 1,552,270 1,543,839 -0.5 Regular 118,057 122,577 107,051 109,801 96,041 98,109 1,334,794 1,314,024 -1.6 Conventional W W W 80,782 59,921 60,892 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 29,019 36,120 37,217 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,572 7,047 6,066 6,616 6,121 6,286 75,413 74,547 -1.1 Conventional W W W 4,628 3,531 3,646 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 1,988 2,590 2,640 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 14,257 15,362 13,151 13,968 12,321 12,592 142,063 155,268 9.3 Conventional W W W 9,980 7,264 7,439 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 3,988 5,057 5,153 W W NA

303

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 130,717 124,186 133,338 134,214 120,819 125,138 1,284,739 1,249,335 -3.1 Regular 119,281 113,226 121,394 121,927 109,859 114,199 1,151,189 1,135,980 -1.6 Conventional 119,281 113,226 121,394 121,927 109,859 114,199 1,151,189 1,135,980 -1.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,165 1,961 2,082 2,075 1,769 1,730 30,987 21,477 -30.9 Conventional 2,165 1,961 2,082 2,075 1,769 1,730 30,987 21,477 -30.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,271 8,999 9,862 10,212 9,191 9,209 102,563 91,878 -10.7 Conventional 9,271 8,999 9,862 10,212 9,191 9,209 102,563 91,878 -10.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

304

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 128,326 135,052 139,789 134,234 138,886 143,748 1,045,772 1,054,478 0.8 Regular 110,336 117,278 120,111 114,632 118,057 121,427 898,749 901,872 0.3 Conventional 91,767 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,010 5,845 6,196 6,170 6,572 6,994 50,970 49,405 -3.1 Conventional 5,351 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 659 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,980 11,929 13,482 13,432 14,257 15,327 96,053 103,201 7.4 Conventional 10,395 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 1,585 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

305

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 115,606 122,264 125,761 130,717 124,186 133,338 885,337 869,164 -2.3 Regular 104,410 111,432 114,120 119,281 113,226 121,394 795,000 789,995 -1.1 Conventional 104,410 111,432 114,120 119,281 113,226 121,394 795,000 789,995 -1.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,491 2,207 2,427 2,165 1,961 2,082 21,429 15,903 -26.1 Conventional 2,491 2,207 2,427 2,165 1,961 2,082 21,429 15,903 -26.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,705 8,625 9,214 9,271 8,999 9,862 68,908 63,266 -8.6 Conventional 8,705 8,625 9,214 9,271 8,999 9,862 68,908 63,266 -8.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

306

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 117,292 115,606 122,264 125,761 130,717 124,184 746,294 735,824 -1.9 Regular 106,132 104,410 111,432 114,120 119,281 113,224 670,973 668,599 -0.9 Conventional 106,132 104,410 111,432 114,120 119,281 113,224 670,973 668,599 -0.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,570 2,491 2,207 2,427 2,165 1,961 18,106 13,821 -24.1 Conventional 2,570 2,491 2,207 2,427 2,165 1,961 18,106 13,821 -24.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,590 8,705 8,625 9,214 9,271 8,999 57,215 53,404 -7.2 Conventional 8,590 8,705 8,625 9,214 9,271 8,999 57,215 53,404 -7.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

307

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Refiner/Reseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD District Refiner/Reseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD District and State, 1986-Present (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Year Regular Midgrade Premium All Grades Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale United States 1986 ...................................... 63.6 52.9 NA NA 74.6 61.7 64.2 53.8 1987 ...................................... 67.0 57.2 NA NA 78.8 67.4 68.4 59.2 1988 ...................................... 66.1 55.1 NA NA 79.4 67.5 68.6 58.0 1989 ...................................... 73.7 62.3 80.2 69.1 88.3 75.2 77.3 65.8 1990 ...................................... 87.2 76.2 93.6 82.3 100.1 87.7 90.1 78.9 1991 ......................................

308

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 117,088 108,674 122,452 125,233 130,653 131,907 735,826 736,007 0.6 Regular 106,414 98,792 111,102 113,305 117,817 118,961 668,601 666,391 0.2 Conventional 106,414 98,792 111,102 113,305 117,817 118,961 668,601 666,391 0.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,666 1,581 1,792 1,815 1,879 1,869 13,821 10,602 -22.9 Conventional 1,666 1,581 1,792 1,815 1,879 1,869 13,821 10,602 -22.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,008 8,301 9,558 10,113 10,957 11,077 53,404 59,014 11.1 Conventional 9,008 8,301 9,558 10,113 10,957 11,077 53,404 59,014 11.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

309

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 123,027 124,392 117,292 115,606 122,264 125,733 478,953 480,895 -0.4 Regular 111,045 112,370 106,132 104,410 111,432 114,092 429,483 436,066 0.7 Conventional 111,045 112,370 106,132 104,410 111,432 114,092 429,483 436,066 0.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,728 2,693 2,570 2,491 2,207 2,427 12,216 9,695 -21.3 Conventional 2,728 2,693 2,570 2,491 2,207 2,427 12,216 9,695 -21.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,705 8,625 9,214 37,254 35,134 -6.5 Conventional 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,705 8,625 9,214 37,254 35,134 -6.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

310

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 534,207 506,958 545,539 557,326 578,792 590,558 4,493,513 4,299,128 -4.3 Regular 468,021 446,104 480,482 489,993 505,930 516,633 3,832,579 3,770,135 -1.6 Conventional 94,827 88,991 98,590 106,317 115,384 116,082 768,268 792,039 3.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 373,194 357,113 381,892 383,676 390,546 400,551 3,064,311 2,978,096 -2.8 Midgrade 19,431 18,128 19,540 20,189 22,411 21,871 203,031 158,405 -22.0 Conventional 2,536 2,220 2,548 2,831 3,825 3,711 29,340 22,321 -23.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 16,895 15,908 16,992 17,358 18,586 18,160 173,691 136,084 -21.7 Premium 46,755 42,726 45,517 47,144 50,451 52,054 457,903 370,588 -19.1

311

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 115,509 118,066 126,458 126,327 130,524 133,704 996,782 969,751 -3.1 Regular 105,682 107,662 115,160 114,987 117,633 120,719 908,868 881,032 -3.5 Conventional 105,682 107,662 115,160 114,987 117,633 120,719 908,868 881,032 -3.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,246 1,255 1,340 1,281 1,456 1,562 11,419 10,548 -8.0 Conventional 1,246 1,255 1,340 1,281 1,456 1,562 11,419 10,548 -8.0 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,581 9,149 9,958 10,059 11,435 11,423 76,495 78,171 1.8 Conventional 8,581 9,149 9,958 10,059 11,435 11,423 76,495 78,171 1.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

312

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 507,903 477,845 534,207 506,958 545,539 544,735 3,287,099 3,117,187 -5.2 Regular 445,636 417,336 468,021 446,104 480,482 478,313 2,800,304 2,735,892 -2.3 Conventional 87,304 84,544 94,827 88,991 98,590 102,228 549,079 556,484 1.3 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 358,332 332,792 373,194 357,113 381,892 376,085 2,251,225 2,179,408 -3.2 Midgrade 18,945 17,890 19,431 18,128 19,540 19,980 147,368 113,914 -22.7 Conventional 2,326 2,324 2,536 2,220 2,548 2,831 19,695 14,785 -24.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 16,619 15,566 16,895 15,908 16,992 17,149 127,673 99,129 -22.4 Premium 43,322 42,619 46,755 42,726 45,517 46,442 339,427 267,381 -21.2

313

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 121,892 120,530 123,655 110,788 128,326 136,041 486,172 498,810 2.6 Regular 104,683 102,740 105,511 94,520 110,336 118,228 418,901 428,595 2.3 Conventional 58,559 54,646 56,780 53,384 91,767 W W W NA Oxygenated 46,124 48,094 48,731 41,136 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,003 6,178 6,168 5,450 6,010 5,882 24,134 23,510 -2.6 Conventional 3,324 3,547 3,392 3,052 5,351 W W W NA Oxygenated 2,679 2,631 2,776 2,398 659 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,206 11,612 11,976 10,818 11,980 11,931 43,137 46,705 8.3 Conventional 6,003 6,254 6,016 5,941 10,395 W W W NA

314

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 145,648 126,428 129,343 121,892 120,530 122,643 115,819 122,643 5.9 Regular 124,098 110,212 111,742 104,683 102,740 104,593 99,816 104,593 4.8 Conventional W W 82,134 58,559 54,646 55,813 55,542 55,813 0.5 Oxygenated W W 29,608 46,124 48,094 48,780 44,274 48,780 10.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 7,144 5,841 6,099 6,003 6,178 6,152 5,913 6,152 4.0 Conventional W W 4,303 3,324 3,547 3,374 3,428 3,374 -1.6 Oxygenated W W 1,796 2,679 2,631 2,778 2,485 2,778 11.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 14,406 10,375 11,502 11,206 11,612 11,898 10,090 11,898 17.9 Conventional W W 8,321 6,003 6,254 5,934 5,492 5,934 8.0

315

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,327 130,524 133,704 122,163 124,443 117,552 1,372,235 1,333,909 -3.1 Regular 114,987 117,633 120,719 110,769 113,333 106,683 1,250,504 1,211,817 -3.4 Conventional 114,987 117,633 120,719 110,769 113,333 106,683 1,250,504 1,211,817 -3.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,281 1,456 1,562 1,304 1,307 1,223 15,653 14,382 -8.4 Conventional 1,281 1,456 1,562 1,304 1,307 1,223 15,653 14,382 -8.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,059 11,435 11,423 10,090 9,803 9,646 106,078 107,710 1.2 Conventional 10,059 11,435 11,423 10,090 9,803 9,646 106,078 107,710 1.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

316

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 490,623 514,004 485,038 507,317 485,599 444,938 926,862 930,537 2.1 Regular 385,329 405,977 381,467 399,305 382,693 351,486 706,114 734,179 5.7 Conventional 88,190 92,351 79,597 83,245 81,128 74,126 151,919 155,254 3.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 297,139 313,626 301,870 316,060 301,565 277,360 554,195 578,925 6.2 Midgrade 39,487 40,182 38,304 40,249 37,658 33,573 84,254 71,231 -14.0 Conventional 6,437 6,068 5,346 5,771 5,706 5,103 13,490 10,809 -18.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 33,050 34,114 32,958 34,478 31,952 28,470 70,764 60,422 -13.2 Premium 65,807 67,845 65,267 67,763 65,248 59,879 136,494 125,127 -6.8

317

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 123,384 123,443 132,857 118,555 116,747 127,700 347,083 363,002 5.7 Regular 108,630 108,923 116,372 104,022 102,420 113,498 303,816 319,940 6.5 Conventional 80,733 66,084 71,011 61,295 61,912 91,743 W 214,950 NA Oxygenated NA 42,839 45,361 42,727 40,508 21,755 W 104,990 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,157 4,294 4,477 4,122 3,874 3,704 13,057 11,700 -9.4 Conventional 2,831 2,131 2,141 1,960 1,900 3,186 W 7,046 NA Oxygenated 1,326 2,163 2,336 2,162 1,974 518 W 4,654 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,597 10,226 12,008 10,411 10,453 10,498 30,210 31,362 5.0 Conventional 7,507 5,628 6,833 5,562 5,909 8,744 W 20,215 NA

318

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 523,217 546,228 535,449 499,935 542,611 516,779 2,026,913 2,094,774 3.3 Regular 458,192 480,634 470,492 438,673 479,616 456,628 1,777,097 1,845,409 3.8 Conventional 92,553 95,604 92,531 89,836 92,595 86,101 355,666 361,063 1.5 Reformulated 365,639 385,030 377,961 348,837 387,021 370,527 1,421,431 1,484,346 4.4 Midgrade 18,587 19,274 19,363 18,187 19,268 18,846 74,394 75,664 1.7 Conventional 2,209 2,216 2,248 2,263 2,142 1,889 9,406 8,542 -9.2 Reformulated 16,378 17,058 17,115 15,924 17,126 16,957 64,988 67,122 3.3 Premium 46,438 46,320 45,594 43,075 43,727 41,305 175,422 173,701 -1.0

319

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,203 128,935 134,724 138,634 128,837 126,103 1,299,140 1,251,722 -3.6 Regular 115,311 118,200 121,899 125,218 116,899 114,985 1,174,959 1,140,752 -2.9 Conventional 115,311 118,200 121,899 125,218 116,899 114,985 1,174,959 1,140,752 -2.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,394 1,443 1,617 1,625 1,482 1,405 17,286 14,306 -17.2 Conventional 1,394 1,443 1,617 1,625 1,482 1,405 17,286 14,306 -17.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,498 9,292 11,208 11,791 10,456 9,713 106,895 96,664 -9.6 Conventional 9,498 9,292 11,208 11,791 10,456 9,713 106,895 96,664 -9.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

320

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 110,788 128,326 135,052 139,789 134,234 138,886 899,875 910,730 1.2 Regular 94,520 110,336 117,278 120,111 114,632 118,057 774,311 780,445 0.8 Conventional 53,384 91,767 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 41,136 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,450 6,010 5,845 6,196 6,170 6,572 43,835 42,411 -3.2 Conventional 3,052 5,351 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,398 659 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,818 11,980 11,929 13,482 13,432 14,257 81,729 87,874 7.5 Conventional 5,941 10,395 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,877 1,585 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

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321

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 530,764 461,105 446,330 487,514 467,445 514,161 2,499,689 2,376,555 -5.6 Regular 476,567 414,239 400,799 438,269 419,689 457,986 2,250,807 2,130,982 -5.9 Conventional 85,583 77,162 75,965 79,443 76,333 90,064 426,937 398,967 -7.2 Reformulated 390,984 337,077 324,834 358,826 343,356 367,922 1,823,870 1,732,015 -5.7 Midgrade 8,813 7,806 7,543 8,274 8,141 9,199 45,357 40,963 -10.3 Conventional 905 832 793 806 750 1,071 4,954 4,252 -14.7 Reformulated 7,908 6,974 6,750 7,468 7,391 8,128 40,403 36,711 -9.7 Premium 45,384 39,060 37,988 40,971 39,615 46,976 203,525 204,610 -0.1 Conventional 4,314 3,926 3,956 3,932 3,590 5,291 21,487 20,695 -4.3

322

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 521,124 527,101 509,281 530,764 461,105 446,180 972,727 907,285 -8.3 Regular 466,275 472,106 456,590 476,567 414,239 400,649 873,143 814,888 -8.2 Conventional 92,473 90,578 83,269 85,583 77,162 75,815 170,063 152,977 -11.5 Reformulated 373,802 381,528 373,321 390,984 337,077 324,834 703,080 661,911 -7.4 Midgrade 9,258 9,110 8,696 8,813 7,806 7,543 18,451 15,349 -18.2 Conventional 1,091 965 882 905 832 793 2,047 1,625 -21.9 Reformulated 8,167 8,145 7,814 7,908 6,974 6,750 16,404 13,724 -17.7 Premium 45,591 45,885 43,995 45,384 39,060 37,988 81,133 77,048 -6.6 Conventional 5,477 5,106 4,337 4,314 3,926 3,956 9,393 7,882 -17.5

323

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 136,075 139,236 130,776 128,461 125,271 127,346 1,558,358 1,520,443 -2.7 Regular 117,117 118,534 113,616 111,521 108,520 109,826 1,300,368 1,307,497 0.3 Conventional W W W 82,755 62,396 62,276 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 28,766 46,124 47,550 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,728 7,311 6,170 6,296 6,420 6,738 97,184 77,836 -20.1 Conventional W W W 4,406 3,840 3,681 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 1,890 2,580 3,057 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,230 13,391 10,990 10,644 10,331 10,782 160,806 135,110 -16.2 Conventional W W W 7,778 5,564 5,910 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 2,866 4,767 4,872 W W NA

324

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 117,639 115,793 109,751 115,008 129,009 136,249 637,610 605,810 -5.0 Regular 99,099 98,040 94,445 102,049 114,076 118,315 547,756 526,925 -3.8 Conventional 61,268 60,258 59,465 W 98,123 100,786 W W NA Oxygenated 37,831 37,782 34,980 W 15,953 17,529 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,193 5,943 5,467 4,397 4,632 5,351 29,669 25,790 -13.1 Conventional 3,743 3,737 3,554 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,450 2,206 1,913 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,347 11,810 9,839 8,562 10,301 12,583 60,185 53,095 -11.8 Conventional 7,339 6,945 5,907 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 5,008 4,865 3,932 W W W W W NA

325

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 123,655 110,788 128,326 135,052 139,789 134,994 759,196 772,604 1.8 Regular 105,511 94,520 110,336 117,278 120,111 115,386 654,199 663,142 1.4 Conventional 56,780 53,384 91,767 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 48,731 41,136 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,168 5,450 6,010 5,845 6,196 6,170 37,055 35,839 -3.3 Conventional 3,392 3,052 5,351 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,776 2,398 659 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,976 10,818 11,980 11,929 13,482 13,438 67,942 73,623 8.4 Conventional 6,016 5,941 10,395 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 5,960 4,877 1,585 W W W W W NA

326

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 555,627 513,590 550,648 514,054 550,377 517,805 516,781 517,805 0.2 Regular 495,544 460,050 493,937 460,528 491,662 463,776 460,826 463,776 0.6 Conventional 98,019 85,817 90,049 80,032 90,649 86,635 83,587 86,635 3.6 Reformulated 397,525 374,233 403,888 380,496 401,013 377,141 377,239 377,141 0.0 Midgrade 14,063 11,714 11,956 11,129 12,327 11,408 14,583 11,408 -21.8 Conventional 1,989 1,208 1,145 948 1,239 1,122 1,811 1,122 -38.0 Reformulated 12,074 10,506 10,811 10,181 11,088 10,286 12,772 10,286 -19.5 Premium 46,020 41,826 44,755 42,397 46,388 42,621 41,372 42,621 3.0 Conventional 6,625 4,768 4,532 3,734 4,536 5,020 4,122 5,020 21.8

327

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 485,038 507,317 485,599 445,136 487,348 483,146 1,889,882 1,901,229 1.4 Regular 381,467 399,305 382,693 351,420 383,984 383,622 1,465,417 1,501,719 3.3 Conventional 79,597 83,245 81,128 74,126 79,461 76,131 301,022 310,846 4.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 301,870 316,060 301,565 277,294 304,523 307,491 1,164,395 1,190,873 3.1 Midgrade 38,304 40,249 37,658 33,798 37,107 36,183 162,713 144,746 -10.3 Conventional 5,346 5,771 5,706 5,103 5,418 4,848 24,202 21,075 -12.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 32,958 34,478 31,952 28,695 31,689 31,335 138,511 123,671 -10.0 Premium 65,267 67,763 65,248 59,918 66,257 63,341 261,752 254,764 -1.9

328

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 518,672 519,911 533,875 490,623 514,004 485,038 5,401,348 5,457,173 0.7 Regular 410,259 408,078 417,472 385,329 405,977 381,467 3,942,774 4,267,422 7.9 Conventional 87,896 94,215 96,792 88,190 92,351 79,597 788,969 924,192 16.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 322,363 313,863 320,680 297,139 313,626 301,870 3,153,805 3,343,230 5.7 Midgrade 42,183 43,082 44,099 39,487 40,182 38,304 541,340 452,108 -16.7 Conventional 6,874 7,724 8,310 6,437 6,068 5,346 83,053 71,795 -13.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 35,309 35,358 35,789 33,050 34,114 32,958 458,287 380,313 -17.3 Premium 66,230 68,751 72,304 65,807 67,845 65,267 917,234 737,643 -19.8

329

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 134,234 138,886 144,986 126,268 130,385 114,483 1,428,284 1,426,852 -0.1 Regular 114,632 118,057 122,577 107,051 109,801 96,041 1,228,882 1,215,915 -1.1 Conventional W W W W 80,782 59,921 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 29,019 36,120 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,170 6,572 7,047 6,066 6,616 6,121 69,107 68,261 -1.2 Conventional W W W W 4,628 3,531 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 1,988 2,590 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 13,432 14,257 15,362 13,151 13,968 12,321 130,295 142,676 9.5 Conventional W W W W 9,980 7,264 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 3,988 5,057 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

330

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 143,203 131,902 130,122 116,547 121,960 106,552 115,793 106,552 -8.0 Regular 124,038 114,896 112,836 100,676 105,782 92,915 98,040 92,915 -5.2 Conventional W W 85,371 61,541 W W 60,258 W NA Oxygenated W W 27,465 39,135 W W 37,782 W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,748 4,965 5,059 4,888 4,985 4,270 5,943 4,270 -28.2 Conventional W W 3,614 2,496 2,445 2,157 3,737 2,157 -42.3 Oxygenated W W 1,445 2,392 2,540 2,113 2,206 2,113 -4.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 13,417 12,041 12,227 10,983 11,193 9,367 11,810 9,367 -20.7 Conventional W W 9,096 6,224 W W 6,945 W NA Oxygenated W W 3,131 4,759 W W 4,865 W NA

331

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 135,583 140,679 145,648 126,428 129,343 122,337 1,410,385 1,423,631 1.2 Regular 117,302 120,112 124,098 110,212 111,742 105,054 1,215,940 1,225,417 1.1 Conventional W W W W 82,134 58,930 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 29,608 46,124 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,371 6,780 7,144 5,841 6,099 6,003 70,604 68,922 -2.1 Conventional W W W W 4,303 3,324 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 1,796 2,679 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,910 13,787 14,406 10,375 11,502 11,280 123,841 129,292 4.7 Conventional W W W W 8,321 6,064 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 3,181 5,216 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

332

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 461,983 490,382 472,638 505,168 518,672 520,748 3,417,154 3,434,470 0.0 Regular 353,719 388,272 371,031 393,423 410,259 408,801 2,466,016 2,677,900 8.1 Conventional 77,773 76,905 72,198 84,129 87,896 94,206 454,002 567,253 24.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 275,946 311,367 298,833 309,294 322,363 314,595 2,012,014 2,110,647 4.4 Midgrade 41,541 40,340 38,119 42,058 42,183 43,139 346,783 290,093 -16.7 Conventional 6,665 5,449 5,263 6,834 6,874 7,701 49,839 45,611 -8.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 34,876 34,891 32,856 35,224 35,309 35,438 296,944 244,482 -18.1 Premium 66,723 61,770 63,488 69,687 66,230 68,808 604,355 466,477 -23.2

333

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,608 113,104 109,327 121,653 124,202 126,203 610,268 594,489 -2.6 Regular 114,523 103,250 99,731 111,406 113,853 115,311 553,620 543,551 -1.8 Conventional 114,523 103,250 99,731 111,406 113,853 115,311 553,620 543,551 -1.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,739 1,231 1,295 1,424 1,390 1,394 8,325 6,734 -19.1 Conventional 1,739 1,231 1,295 1,424 1,390 1,394 8,325 6,734 -19.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,346 8,623 8,301 8,823 8,959 9,498 48,323 44,204 -8.5 Conventional 10,346 8,623 8,301 8,823 8,959 9,498 48,323 44,204 -8.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

334

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 494,955 496,452 488,936 430,725 477,184 488,871 1,862,394 1,885,716 2.1 Regular 442,377 445,406 439,340 387,401 428,557 437,307 1,672,996 1,692,605 2.0 Conventional 89,489 89,443 92,274 83,145 88,943 93,114 308,903 357,476 16.7 Reformulated 352,888 355,963 347,066 304,256 339,614 344,193 1,364,093 1,335,129 -1.3 Midgrade 8,424 8,190 7,994 7,243 7,978 7,985 31,764 31,200 -1.0 Conventional 881 903 921 836 886 1,012 3,181 3,655 15.9 Reformulated 7,543 7,287 7,073 6,407 7,092 6,973 28,583 27,545 -2.8 Premium 44,154 42,856 41,602 36,081 40,649 43,579 157,634 161,911 3.6 Conventional 4,075 4,150 4,510 3,841 4,051 5,033 15,404 17,435 14.1

335

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 139,701 142,976 125,585 133,383 132,214 134,904 1,503,924 1,567,844 4.5 Regular 123,746 127,337 112,647 119,751 117,558 119,426 1,323,450 1,394,981 5.7 Conventional 103,498 W 91,370 82,252 69,032 69,189 W W NA Oxygenated 20,248 W 21,277 37,499 48,526 50,237 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,912 3,977 3,370 3,629 3,715 3,922 50,922 44,735 -11.9 Conventional W W W 2,182 1,558 1,639 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 1,447 2,157 2,283 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,043 11,662 9,568 10,003 10,941 11,556 129,552 128,128 -0.8 Conventional W W W 6,316 5,317 5,622 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 3,687 5,624 5,934 W W NA

336

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 134,901 121,056 120,708 129,584 129,173 130,155 619,146 630,676 1.9 Regular 119,426 108,545 108,142 116,394 115,901 117,951 549,711 566,933 3.1 Conventional 69,189 73,017 72,929 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 50,237 35,528 35,213 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,919 3,612 3,378 3,439 3,369 3,135 18,494 16,933 -8.4 Conventional 1,636 1,812 1,618 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,283 1,800 1,760 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,556 8,899 9,188 9,751 9,903 9,069 50,941 46,810 -8.1 Conventional 5,622 5,550 5,821 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 5,934 3,349 3,367 W W W W W NA

337

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 132,774 149,898 143,203 131,902 130,122 116,547 1,442,448 1,409,759 -2.3 Regular 114,646 128,881 124,038 114,896 112,836 100,676 1,230,848 1,222,408 -0.7 Conventional W W W W 85,371 61,541 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 27,465 39,135 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,367 6,079 5,748 4,965 5,059 4,888 68,060 57,896 -14.9 Conventional W W W W 3,614 2,496 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 1,445 2,392 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,761 14,938 13,417 12,041 12,227 10,983 143,540 129,455 -9.8 Conventional W W W W 9,096 6,224 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 3,131 4,759 W W NA

338

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 130,122 116,547 121,960 106,552 112,818 127,713 340,552 347,083 0.8 Regular 112,836 100,676 105,782 92,915 98,586 112,315 294,534 303,816 2.0 Conventional 85,371 61,541 W W 61,721 W W W NA Oxygenated 27,465 39,135 W W 36,865 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,059 4,888 4,985 4,270 4,425 4,362 15,807 13,057 -18.3 Conventional 3,614 2,496 2,445 2,157 2,245 W W W NA Oxygenated 1,445 2,392 2,540 2,113 2,180 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,227 10,983 11,193 9,367 9,807 11,036 30,211 30,210 -1.1 Conventional 9,096 6,224 W W 5,377 9,727 W W NA Oxygenated 3,131 4,759 W W 4,430 1,309 W W NA

339

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 472,638 505,168 518,672 519,911 533,875 490,499 4,425,394 4,458,007 0.4 Regular 371,031 393,423 410,259 408,078 417,472 385,260 3,212,404 3,479,909 7.9 Conventional 72,198 84,129 87,896 94,215 96,792 88,126 626,721 752,180 19.6 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 298,833 309,294 322,363 313,863 320,680 297,134 2,585,683 2,727,729 5.1 Midgrade 38,119 42,058 42,183 43,082 44,099 39,436 447,025 373,571 -16.7 Conventional 5,263 6,834 6,874 7,724 8,310 6,391 67,954 60,335 -11.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 32,856 35,224 35,309 35,358 35,789 33,045 379,071 313,236 -17.7 Premium 63,488 69,687 66,230 68,751 72,304 65,803 765,965 604,527 -21.4

340

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 471,966 528,923 525,025 566,449 559,488 597,880 3,486,265 3,757,529 7.8 Regular 374,051 423,574 425,312 453,084 445,690 473,265 2,773,339 2,999,806 8.2 Conventional 78,103 84,785 84,632 94,055 93,600 107,210 588,702 629,066 6.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 295,948 338,789 340,680 359,029 352,090 366,055 2,184,637 2,370,740 8.5 Midgrade 31,476 35,018 33,447 37,392 37,061 40,905 262,632 248,613 -5.3 Conventional 4,965 5,126 4,880 5,763 5,927 7,511 39,859 39,504 -0.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 26,511 29,892 28,567 31,629 31,134 33,394 222,773 209,109 -6.1 Premium 66,439 70,331 66,266 75,973 76,737 83,710 450,294 509,110 13.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 122,264 125,761 130,717 124,186 133,271 134,214 1,027,509 1,003,311 -2.8 Regular 111,432 114,120 119,281 113,226 121,327 121,927 921,308 911,855 -1.4 Conventional 111,432 114,120 119,281 113,226 121,327 121,927 921,308 911,855 -1.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,207 2,427 2,165 1,961 2,084 2,075 24,947 17,980 -28.2 Conventional 2,207 2,427 2,165 1,961 2,084 2,075 24,947 17,980 -28.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,625 9,214 9,271 8,999 9,860 10,212 81,254 73,476 -9.9 Conventional 8,625 9,214 9,271 8,999 9,860 10,212 81,254 73,476 -9.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

342

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 129,173 130,014 136,995 146,328 138,917 138,134 1,134,129 1,190,909 5.0 Regular 115,901 117,816 123,792 131,286 124,315 123,994 1,007,880 1,070,185 6.2 Conventional W W W W 106,842 97,784 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W NA NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,369 3,143 3,307 3,864 3,807 3,494 34,533 31,413 -9.0 Conventional W W W W W 3,036 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,903 9,055 9,896 11,178 10,795 10,646 91,716 89,311 -2.6 Conventional W W W W W 9,255 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

343

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 128,837 126,103 120,513 123,768 109,386 109,792 222,431 219,178 -3.1 Regular 116,899 114,985 109,752 112,568 99,533 99,671 202,981 199,204 -3.5 Conventional 116,899 114,985 109,752 112,568 99,533 99,671 202,981 199,204 -3.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,482 1,405 1,347 1,331 1,199 1,209 2,526 2,408 -6.3 Conventional 1,482 1,405 1,347 1,331 1,199 1,209 2,526 2,408 -6.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,456 9,713 9,414 9,869 8,654 8,912 16,924 17,566 2.1 Conventional 10,456 9,713 9,414 9,869 8,654 8,912 16,924 17,566 2.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

344

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 616,068 545,541 567,208 520,002 553,717 547,365 532,203 547,365 2.8 Regular 499,355 452,103 468,190 426,231 451,348 449,556 428,774 449,556 4.8 Conventional 109,285 92,595 96,551 84,706 90,958 89,377 90,155 89,377 -0.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 390,070 359,508 371,639 341,525 360,390 360,179 338,619 360,179 6.4 Midgrade 38,243 30,416 31,258 29,317 32,045 31,119 35,132 31,119 -11.4 Conventional 6,876 4,820 4,956 4,291 4,765 4,641 5,644 4,641 -17.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 31,367 25,596 26,302 25,026 27,280 26,478 29,488 26,478 -10.2 Premium 78,470 63,022 67,760 64,454 70,324 66,690 68,297 66,690 -2.4

345

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 477,845 534,207 506,958 545,539 557,326 573,489 3,900,691 3,703,267 -5.1 Regular 417,336 468,021 446,104 480,482 489,993 502,342 3,322,506 3,249,914 -2.2 Conventional 84,544 94,827 88,991 98,590 106,317 114,517 656,106 675,090 2.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 332,792 373,194 357,113 381,892 383,676 387,825 2,666,400 2,574,824 -3.4 Midgrade 17,890 19,431 18,128 19,540 20,189 22,415 176,861 136,538 -22.8 Conventional 2,324 2,536 2,220 2,548 2,831 3,551 24,936 18,336 -26.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 15,566 16,895 15,908 16,992 17,358 18,864 151,925 118,202 -22.2 Premium 42,619 46,755 42,726 45,517 47,144 48,732 401,324 316,815 -21.1

346

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type Definitions Key Terms Definition Bulk Sales Wholesale sales of gasoline in individual transactions which exceed the size of a truckload. Dealer Tank Wagon Sales (DTW) Wholesale sales of gasoline priced on a delivered basis to a retail outlet. Gas Plant Operator Any firm, including a gas plant owner, which operates a gas plant and keeps the gas plant records. A gas plant is a facility in which natural gas liquids are separated from natural gas or in which natural gas liquids are fractionated or otherwise separated into natural gas liquid products or both. For the purposes of this survey, gas plant operator data are contained in the refiner categories. Gasoline Grades The classification of gasoline by octane ratings. Each type of gasoline (conventional and reformulated) is classified by three grades - regular, midgrade, and premium. Note: gasoline sales are reported by grade in accordance with their classification at the time of sale. In general, automotive octane requirements are lower at high altitudes. Therefore, in some areas of the United States, such as the Rocky Mountain States, the octane ratings for the gasoline grades may be 2 or more octane points lower.

347

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 130,014 136,995 146,328 138,917 138,012 127,840 1,262,237 1,318,627 4.5 Regular 117,816 123,792 131,286 124,315 123,729 113,744 1,123,018 1,183,664 5.4 Conventional W W W 106,842 W 82,411 W W NA Oxygenated W W W NA W 31,333 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,143 3,307 3,864 3,807 3,502 3,436 38,117 34,857 -8.6 Conventional W W W W W 2,415 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 1,021 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,055 9,896 11,178 10,795 10,781 10,660 101,102 100,106 -1.0 Conventional W W W W W 7,732 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 2,928 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

348

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 138,012 128,012 123,940 125,772 118,909 110,142 241,764 229,051 -5.3 Regular 123,729 113,898 110,947 112,956 106,914 97,810 216,687 204,724 -5.5 Conventional W 82,565 66,529 67,457 106,914 97,810 145,946 204,724 40.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,502 3,435 3,352 3,268 3,106 3,096 6,990 6,202 -11.3 Conventional W 2,414 1,661 1,559 3,106 3,096 3,430 6,202 80.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,781 10,679 9,641 9,548 8,889 9,236 18,087 18,125 0.2 Conventional W 7,751 5,240 5,150 8,889 9,236 11,371 18,125 59.4

349

U.S. Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Motor Gasoline Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Sales Type: Sales to End Users, Total Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale, Total DTW Rack Bulk Sales Type: Sales to End Users, Total Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale, Total DTW Rack Bulk Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Sales Type Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Motor Gasoline 28,179.6 24,384.0 24,143.9 23,567.1 24,120.5 23,282.9 1983-2013 by Grade Regular 23,757.8 20,526.5 20,356.1 19,806.6 20,240.9 19,586.1 1983-2013 Midgrade 1,876.1 1,545.0 1,534.8 1,527.0 1,561.5 1,484.7 1988-2013 Premium 2,545.7 2,312.4 2,252.9 2,233.5 2,318.1 2,212.1 1983-2013 by Formulation Conventional 16,716.2 14,277.3 13,878.1 13,588.6 14,053.9 13,516.9 1994-2013 Oxygenated - - - - - - 1994-2013

350

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 445,136 487,348 483,146 517,898 526,837 544,494 3,452,178 3,490,458 1.6 Regular 351,420 383,984 383,622 416,870 424,735 433,577 2,688,078 2,776,901 3.8 Conventional 74,126 79,461 76,131 87,574 90,924 100,689 567,435 590,033 4.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 277,294 304,523 307,491 329,296 333,811 332,888 2,120,643 2,186,868 3.6 Midgrade 33,798 37,107 36,183 38,726 38,791 40,503 292,358 262,766 -9.7 Conventional 5,103 5,418 4,848 5,549 5,989 7,314 45,558 39,927 -11.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 28,695 31,689 31,335 33,177 32,802 33,189 246,800 222,839 -9.3 Premium 59,918 66,257 63,341 62,302 63,311 70,414 471,742 450,791 -4.0

351

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 135,052 139,789 134,234 138,886 144,986 126,240 1,172,127 1,181,956 0.8 Regular 117,278 120,111 114,632 118,057 122,577 107,025 1,008,435 1,010,047 0.2 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,845 6,196 6,170 6,572 7,047 6,066 56,889 55,524 -2.4 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,929 13,482 13,432 14,257 15,362 13,149 106,803 116,385 9.0 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

352

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 125,772 118,909 110,150 125,199 124,695 128,126 630,535 607,079 -3.7 Regular 112,956 106,914 97,816 112,243 112,510 115,820 566,798 545,303 -3.8 Conventional 67,457 106,914 97,816 112,243 112,510 115,820 W 545,303 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,268 3,106 3,096 3,056 2,958 2,859 16,941 15,075 -11.0 Conventional 1,559 3,106 3,096 3,056 2,958 2,859 W 15,075 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,548 8,889 9,238 9,900 9,227 9,447 46,796 46,701 -0.2 Conventional 5,150 8,889 9,238 9,900 9,227 9,447 W 46,701 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

353

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 137,219 136,075 139,236 130,776 128,461 125,271 1,420,301 1,393,097 -2.2 Regular 117,700 117,117 118,534 113,616 111,521 108,520 1,184,245 1,197,671 0.8 Conventional W W W W 82,755 62,396 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 28,766 46,124 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,744 6,728 7,311 6,170 6,296 6,420 89,020 71,098 -20.4 Conventional W W W W 4,406 3,840 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 1,890 2,580 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,775 12,230 13,391 10,990 10,644 10,331 147,036 124,328 -15.7 Conventional W W W W 7,778 5,564 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 2,866 4,767 W W NA

354

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 130,385 114,483 117,639 115,793 109,751 116,793 362,769 342,337 -5.6 Regular 109,801 96,041 99,099 98,040 94,445 103,581 310,367 296,066 -4.6 Conventional 80,782 59,921 61,268 60,258 59,465 W 201,931 W NA Oxygenated 29,019 36,120 37,831 37,782 34,980 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,616 6,121 6,193 5,943 5,467 4,464 17,628 15,874 -10.0 Conventional 4,628 3,531 3,743 3,737 3,554 W 11,795 W NA Oxygenated 1,988 2,590 2,450 2,206 1,913 W 5,833 W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 13,968 12,321 12,347 11,810 9,839 8,748 34,774 30,397 -12.6 Conventional 9,980 7,264 7,339 6,945 5,907 W 22,352 W NA

355

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 528,784 556,220 507,903 477,845 534,207 506,959 2,103,768 2,026,914 -3.7 Regular 460,881 485,119 445,636 417,336 468,021 446,104 1,790,450 1,777,097 -0.7 Conventional 88,528 93,937 87,304 84,544 94,827 88,991 348,511 355,666 2.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 372,353 391,182 358,332 332,792 373,194 357,113 1,441,939 1,421,431 -1.4 Midgrade 19,560 21,299 18,945 17,890 19,431 18,129 96,007 74,395 -22.5 Conventional 2,410 2,604 2,326 2,324 2,536 2,221 12,613 9,407 -25.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 17,150 18,695 16,619 15,566 16,895 15,908 83,394 64,988 -22.1 Premium 48,343 49,802 43,322 42,619 46,755 42,726 217,311 175,422 -19.3

356

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

All Grades, Areas and Formulations" All Grades, Areas and Formulations" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Regular Conventional",20,"Weekly","12/16/2013","8/20/1990" ,"Data 2","Regular Reformulated",18,"Weekly","12/16/2013","11/28/1994" ,"Data 3","Regular All Areas All Formulations",28,"Weekly","12/16/2013","8/20/1990" ,"Data 4","Midgrade Conventional",20,"Weekly","12/16/2013","11/28/1994" ,"Data 5","Midgrade Reformulated",18,"Weekly","12/16/2013","11/28/1994"

357

Second-order robust regularization cost function for detecting and reconstructing phase discontinuities  

SciTech Connect

We propose a robust method for computing discontinuous phase maps from a fringe pattern with carrier frequency. Our algorithm is based on the minimization of an edge-preserving regularized cost function, specifically, on a robust regularized potential that uses a paradigm called the plate with adaptive rest condition, i.e., a second-order edge-preserving potential. Given that the proposed cost function is not convex, our method uses as its initial point an overly smoothed phase computed with a standard fringe analysis method and then reconstructs the phase discontinuities. Although the method is general purpose, it is introduced in the context of interferometric gauge-block calibration. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated by numerical experiments with both synthetic and real data.

Galvan, Carlos; Rivera, Mariano

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

358

Tensor-based formulation and nuclear norm regularization for multi-energy computed tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of energy selective, photon counting X-ray detectors allows for a wide range of new possibilities in the area of computed tomographic image formation. Under the assumption of perfect energy resolution, here we propose a tensor-based iterative algorithm that simultaneously reconstructs the X-ray attenuation distribution for each energy. We use a multi-linear image model rather than a more standard "stacked vector" representation in order to develop novel tensor-based regularizers. Specifically, we model the multi-spectral unknown as a 3-way tensor where the first two dimensions are space and the third dimension is energy. This approach allows for the design of tensor nuclear norm regularizers, which like its two dimensional counterpart, is a convex function of the multi-spectral unknown. The solution to the resulting convex optimization problem is obtained using an alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) approach. Simulation results shows that the generalized tensor nuclear norm can ...

Semerci, Oguz; Kilmer, Misha E; Miller, Eric L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

How does Casimir energy fall? IV. Gravitational interaction of regularized quantum vacuum energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several years ago we demonstrated that the Casimir energy for perfectly reflecting and imperfectly reflecting parallel plates gravitated normally, that is, obeyed the equivalence principle. At that time the divergences in the theory were treated only formally, without proper regularization, and the coupling to gravity was limited to the canonical energy-momentum-stress tensor. Here we strengthen the result by removing both of those limitations. We consider, as a toy model, massless scalar fields interacting with semitransparent ($\\delta$-function) potentials defining parallel plates, which become Dirichlet plates for strong coupling. We insert space and time point-split regulation parameters, and obtain well-defined contributions to the self- energy of each plate, and the interaction energy between the plates. (This self-energy does not vanish even in the conformally-coupled, strong-coupled limit.) We also compute the local energy density, which requires regularization near the plates. In general, the energy ...

Milton, K A; Fulling, S A; Parashar, Prachi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Exploring the role of model parameters and regularization procedures in the thermodynamics of the PNJL model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The equation of state and the critical behavior around the critical end point are studied in the context of the Polyakov--Nambu--Jona--Lasinio model. We prove that a convenient choice of the model parameters is crucial to get the correct description of isentropic trajectories. The physical relevance of the effects of the regularization procedure is insured by the agreement with general thermodynamic requirements. The results are compared with simple thermodynamic expectations and lattice data.

M. C. Ruivo; Pedro Costa; H. Hansen; C. A. de Sousa

2010-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Energy Distribution of a Regular Class of Exact Black Hole Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present the expressions for the energy of a regular class of exact black hole solutions of Einstein's equations coupled with a nonlinear electrodynamics source. We calculate the energy distribution using the Einstein, Weinberg and M{\\o}ller prescriptions. We make a discussion of the results in function of two specific parameters, a sort of dipole and quadrupole moments of the nonlinear source $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$, and in addition a study of some particular cases is performed.

I-Ching Yang; Chi-Long Lin; I. Radinschi

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

362

On the regularity of the conditional distribution of the sample mean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the hypothesis of regularity of the conditional distribution of the empiric average of a finite sample of IID random variables, given all the sample "fluctuations", which appeared in our earlier manuscript |1] in the context of the eigenvalue concentration analysis for multi-particle random operators, is satisfied for a class of probability distributions with piecewise-constant or sufficiently smooth probability density. It extends the well-known property of Gausssian IID samples.

Victor Chulaevsky

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

363

{pi} and {sigma} mesons at finite temperature and density in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with dimensional regularization  

SciTech Connect

Dynamical symmetry breaking and meson masses are studied in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model at finite temperature and chemical potential using dimensional regularization. Since the model is not renormalizable in four space-time dimensions, physical results and parameters depend on the regularization method. Following the imaginary-time formalism, we introduce the temperature T and the chemical potential {mu}. The parameters of the model are fixed by calculating the pion mass and decay constant in dimensional regularization at T={mu}=0.

Inagaki, T.; Kimura, D.; Kvinikhidze, A. [Information Media Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); A. Razmadze Mathematical Institute of Georgian Academy of Sciences, Tbilisi (Georgia)

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Motion of test particles in a regular black hole space--time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the motion of test particles in the regular black hole space-time given by Ay\\'{o}n-Beato and Garc\\'{\\i}a in Phys. Rev. Lett. 80:5056 (1998). The complete set of orbits for neutral and weakly charged test particles is discussed, including for neutral particles the extreme and over-extreme metric. We also derive the analytical solutions for the equation of motion of neutral test particles in a parametric form and consider a post-Schwarzschild expansion of the periastron shift to second order in the charge.

Alberto Garcia; Eva Hackmann; Jutta Kunz; Claus Lmmerzahl; Alfredo Macias

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

365

Global regularity of wave maps VI. Abstract theory of minimal-energy blowup solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the previous papers in this series, the global regularity conjecture for wave maps from two-dimensional Minkowski space $\\R^{1+2}$ to hyperbolic space $\\H^m$ was reduced to the problem of constructing a minimal-energy blowup solution which is almost periodic modulo symmetries in the event that the conjecture fails. In this paper, we show that this problem can be reduced further, to that of showing that solutions at the critical energy which are either frequency-delocalised, spatially-dispersed, or spatially-delocalised have bounded ``entropy''. These latter facts will be demonstrated in the final paper in this series.

Tao, Terence

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The Mimetic Finite Element Method and the Virtual Element Method for elliptic problems with arbitrary regularity.  

SciTech Connect

We develop and analyze a new family of virtual element methods on unstructured polygonal meshes for the diffusion problem in primal form, that use arbitrarily regular discrete spaces V{sub h} {contained_in} C{sup {alpha}} {element_of} N. The degrees of freedom are (a) solution and derivative values of various degree at suitable nodes and (b) solution moments inside polygons. The convergence of the method is proven theoretically and an optimal error estimate is derived. The connection with the Mimetic Finite Difference method is also discussed. Numerical experiments confirm the convergence rate that is expected from the theory.

Manzini, Gianmarco [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

367

Regularization of singular terms in $N\\bar{N}$ potential model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest a method of singular terms regularization in potential model of $N\\bar{N}$ interaction. This method is free from any uncertainties, related to the usual cut-off procedure and based on the fact, that in the presence of sufficiently strong short-range annihilation $N$ and $\\bar{N}$ never approach close enough to each other. The effect of mentioned singular terms of OBE potential, modified by annihilation is shown to be repulsive. The obtained results for S- and P-wave scattering lengths are in agreement with existing theoretical models.

O. D. Dalkarov A. Yu. Voronin

2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

368

Application of real rock pore-threat statistics to a regular pore network model  

SciTech Connect

This work reports the application of real rock statistical data to a previously developed regular pore network model in an attempt to produce an accurate simulation tool with low computational overhead. A core plug from the St. Peter Sandstone formation in Indiana was scanned with a high resolution micro CT scanner. The pore-throat statistics of the three-dimensional reconstructed rock were extracted and the distribution of the pore-throat sizes was applied to the regular pore network model. In order to keep the equivalent model regular, only the throat area or the throat radius was varied. Ten realizations of randomly distributed throat sizes were generated to simulate the drainage process and relative permeability was calculated and compared with the experimentally determined values of the original rock sample. The numerical and experimental procedures are explained in detail and the performance of the model in relation to the experimental data is discussed and analyzed. Petrophysical properties such as relative permeability are important in many applied fields such as production of petroleum fluids, enhanced oil recovery, carbon dioxide sequestration, ground water flow, etc. Relative permeability data are used for a wide range of conventional reservoir engineering calculations and in numerical reservoir simulation. Two-phase oil water relative permeability data are generated on the same core plug from both pore network model and experimental procedure. The shape and size of the relative permeability curves were compared and analyzed and good match has been observed for wetting phase relative permeability but for non-wetting phase, simulation results were found to be deviated from the experimental ones. Efforts to determine petrophysical properties of rocks using numerical techniques are to eliminate the necessity of regular core analysis, which can be time consuming and expensive. So a numerical technique is expected to be fast and to produce reliable results. In applied engineering, sometimes quick result with reasonable accuracy is acceptable than the more time consuming results. Present work is an effort to check the accuracy and validity of a previously developed pore network model for obtaining important petrophysical properties of rocks based on cutting-sized sample data.

Rakibul, M.; Sarker, H.; McIntyre, D.; Ferer, M.; Siddiqui, S.; Bromhal. G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Application of real rock pore-throat statistics to a regular pore network model  

SciTech Connect

This work reports the application of real rock statistical data to a previously developed regular pore network model in an attempt to produce an accurate simulation tool with low computational overhead. A core plug from the St. Peter Sandstone formation in Indiana was scanned with a high resolution micro CT scanner. The pore-throat statistics of the three-dimensional reconstructed rock were extracted and the distribution of the pore-throat sizes was applied to the regular pore network model. In order to keep the equivalent model regular, only the throat area or the throat radius was varied. Ten realizations of randomly distributed throat sizes were generated to simulate the drainage process and relative permeability was calculated and compared with the experimentally determined values of the original rock sample. The numerical and experimental procedures are explained in detail and the performance of the model in relation to the experimental data is discussed and analyzed. Petrophysical properties such as relative permeability are important in many applied fields such as production of petroleum fluids, enhanced oil recovery, carbon dioxide sequestration, ground water flow, etc. Relative permeability data are used for a wide range of conventional reservoir engineering calculations and in numerical reservoir simulation. Two-phase oil water relative permeability data are generated on the same core plug from both pore network model and experimental procedure. The shape and size of the relative permeability curves were compared and analyzed and good match has been observed for wetting phase relative permeability but for non-wetting phase, simulation results were found to be deviated from the experimental ones. Efforts to determine petrophysical properties of rocks using numerical techniques are to eliminate the necessity of regular core analysis, which can be time consuming and expensive. So a numerical technique is expected to be fast and to produce reliable results. In applied engineering, sometimes quick result with reasonable accuracy is acceptable than the more time consuming results. Present work is an effort to check the accuracy and validity of a previously developed pore network model for obtaining important petrophysical properties of rocks based on cutting-sized sample data. Introduction

Sarker, M.R.; McIntyre, D.; Ferer, M.; Siddigui, S.; Bromhal. G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Analytically calculating shading in regular arrays of sun-pointing collectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for deriving an algorithm for analytically calculating shading of sun-pointing solar collectors by other identical collectors in the field. The method is particularly suited to regularly-spaced collectors, with convex aperture shapes. Using this method, an algorithm suitable for circular-aperture collectors is derived. The algorithm is validated against results obtained using an existing algorithm, and an example for usage of the algorithm as a tool for validating assumptions of an existing algorithm is presented. (author)

Meller, Yosef [Tel Aviv University, Faculty of Engineering, School of Mechanical Engineering, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Represents Premium Diesel WG Company Classification ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ExxonMobil Producer yes *July07 Gardner, KW Fuels Quality Manager kwgardner@exxonmobil.com (703) 846-5400 (703) 846-4831 ...

2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

372

Per-Mile Premiums for Auto Insurance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Social Cost of Motor-vehicle Use In the United States, Based on 1990-1991, June 1997, Institute of Transportation

Edlin, Aaron S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Retail Prices for Premium Gasoline - Reformulated Areas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cities : Boston: 3.926: 3.889: 3.832: 3.808: 3.766: 3.736: 2003-2013: Chicago: 4.070: 4.020: 3.928: 3.846: 3.863: 3.853: 2000-2013: Houston: 3.671: 3.597: 3.546: 3 ...

374

Retail Prices for Premium Gasoline - Conventional Areas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cities : Cleveland: 3.891: 3.771: 3.675: 3.758: 3.628: 3.514: 2003-2013: Denver: 3.811: 3.823: 3.811: 3.787: 3.732: 3.685: 2000-2013: Miami: 4.096: 4.078: 4.045: 4 ...

375

Retail Prices for Premium Gasoline - Conventional Areas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cities : Cleveland: 2.972: 3.384: 2.540: 2.962: 3.705: 3.809: 2003-2012: Denver: 2.997: 3.388: 2.468: 2.885 : 2000-2010: Miami: 3.098: 3.626: 2.701: 3.106: 3.891: 4 ...

376

Retail Prices for Premium Gasoline - Reformulated Areas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cities : Boston: 2.942: 3.407: 2.535: 2.976: 3.789: 3.939: 2003-2012: Chicago: 3.154: 3.623: 2.675: 3.158 : 2000-2010: Houston: 2.831: 3.341: 2.438: 2.870 : 2000-2010 ...

377

Monotone and Conservative Cascade Remapping between Spherical Grids (CaRS): Regular LatitudeLongitude and Cubed-Sphere Grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-order monotone and conservative cascade remapping algorithm between spherical grids (CaRS) is developed. This algorithm is specifically designed to remap between the cubed-sphere and regular latitudelongitude grids. The remapping approach ...

Peter H. Lauritzen; Ramachandran D. Nair

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

An investigation of temporal regularization techniques for dynamic PET reconstructions using temporal splines  

SciTech Connect

The use of a temporal B-spline basis for the reconstruction of dynamic positron emission tomography data was investigated. Maximum likelihood (ML) reconstructions using an expectation maximization framework and maximum A-posteriori (MAP) reconstructions using the generalized expectation maximization framework were evaluated. Different parameters of the B-spline basis of such as order, number of basis functions and knot placing were investigated in a reconstruction task using simulated dynamic list-mode data. We found that a higher order basis reduced both the bias and variance. Using a higher number of basis functions in the modeling of the time activity curves (TACs) allowed the algorithm to model faster changes of the TACs, however, the TACs became noisier. We have compared ML, Gaussian postsmoothed ML and MAP reconstructions. The noise level in the ML reconstructions was controlled by varying the number of basis functions. The MAP algorithm penalized the integrated squared curvature of the reconstructed TAC. The postsmoothed ML was always outperformed in terms of bias and variance properties by the MAP and ML reconstructions. A simple adaptive knot placing strategy was also developed and evaluated. It is based on an arc length redistribution scheme during the reconstruction. The free knot reconstruction allowed a more accurate reconstruction while reducing the noise level especially for fast changing TACs such as blood input functions. Limiting the number of temporal basis functions combined with the adaptive knot placing strategy is in this case advantageous for regularization purposes when compared to the other regularization techniques.

Verhaeghe, Jeroen; D'Asseler, Yves; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Staelens, Steven; Lemahieu, Ignace [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, Medical Image and Signal Processing Group, Ghent University, Ghent, 9000 (Belgium)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Urban modeling based on segmentation and regularization of airborne lidar point clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an approach to process raw lidar 3-D point clouds over urban area and extract terrain, buildings and other urban features. In the initial step, non-ground points are separated from ground points using a one dimensional filtering process based on the slope between two consecutive points in the point cloud and the terrain elevation in the vicinity of the points. In the next step, the non-ground point dataset is processed to segment individual buildings. This is accomplished by using a 3-D regional growing approach. At the end of this step, each lidar point is attributed to a building. The first step towards building reconstruction is to obtain an approximate footprint of the building, which is accomplished by extracting the points on the building boundary by a modified convex hull algorithm. Once the footprint boundary points are found, their edges are regularized by using a least squares model to form the final building shape. Mathematic formulation of 3D region growing and boundary regularization is presented. Tests results of reconstructed buildings over complex urban areas are reported. 1.

Aparajithan Sampath; Jie Shan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Influence of the adatom diffusion on selective growth of GaN nanowire regular arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on patterned Si/AlN/Si(111) substrates was used to obtain regular arrays of uniform-size GaN nanowires (NWs). The silicon top layer has been patterned with e-beam lithography, resulting in uniform arrays of holes with different diameters (d{sub h}) and periods (P). While the NW length is almost insensitive to the array parameters, the diameter increases significantly with d{sub h} and P till it saturates at P values higher than 800 nm. A diffusion induced model was used to explain the experimental results with an effective diffusion length of the adatoms on the Si, estimated to be about 400 nm.

Gotschke, T.; Schumann, T.; Limbach, F.; Calarco, R. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Research Centre Juelich GmbH and JARA-Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (FIT), 52425 Juelich (Germany); Paul-Drude-Institut fuer Festkoerperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Stoica, T. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Research Centre Juelich GmbH and JARA-Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (FIT), 52425 Juelich (Germany)

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Levi-Civita regularization and geodesic flows for the `curved' Kepler problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce the regularization Levi-Civita parameter for the `curved Kepler', i.e., motion under the `Kepler-Coulomb' potential in a configuration space with any constant curvature and metric of any signature type. Consistent use of this parameter allows to solve the problem of motion (orbit shape and time evolution along the orbit), thereby extending the use of the Levi-Civita parameter beyond the usual Kepler problem in a flat Euclidean configuration space. A `universal' description, where all relations are applicable to the motions in any space and with any energy follow from our approach, with no need to discuss separately the cases where the configuration space is flat or where energy vanishes. We also discuss the connection of this `curved Kepler' problem with a geodesic flow. The well known results by Moser, Osipov and Belbruno are shown to hold essentially unchanged beyond the flat Euclidean configuration space. `Curved' Kepler motions with a fixed value of the constant of motion $\\sigma:=-(2E - \\kappa_1\\kappa_2 J^2)$ on any curved configuration space with constant curvature $\\kappa_1$ and metric of signature type $\\kappa_2$ can be identified with the geodesic flow on a space with curvature $\\sigma$ and metric of the same signature type.

Leonor Garcia-Gutierrez; Mariano Santander

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

382

FLIC: A translator for same-source parallel implementation of regular grid applications  

SciTech Connect

FLIC, a Fortran loop and index converter, is a parser-based source translation tool that automates the conversion of program loops and array indices for distributed-memory parallel computers. This conversion is important in the implementation of gridded models on distributed memory because it allows for decomposition and shrinking of model data structures. FLIC does not provide the parallel services itself, but rather provides an automated and transparent mapping of the source code to calls or directives of the user`s choice of run-time systems or parallel libraries. The amount of user-supplied input required by FLIC to direct the conversion is small enough to fit as command line arguments for the tool. The tool requires no additional statements, comments, or directives in the source code, thus avoiding the pervasiveness and intrusiveness imposed by directives-based preprocessors and parallelizing compilers. FLIC is lightweight and suitable for use as a precompiler and facilitates a same-source approach to operability on diverse computer architectures. FLIC is targeted to new or existing applications that employ regular gridded domains, such as weather models, that will be parallelized by data-domain decomposition.

Michalakes, J.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Quantum Structure of Field Theory and Standard Model Based on Infinity-free Loop Regularization/Renormalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To understand better the quantum structure of field theory and standard model in particle physics, it is necessary to investigate carefully the divergence structure in quantum field theories (QFTs) and work out a consistent framework to avoid infinities. The divergence has got us into trouble since developing quantum electrodynamics in 1930s, its treatment via the renormalization scheme is satisfied not by all physicists, like Dirac and Feynman who have made serious criticisms. The renormalization group analysis reveals that QFTs can in general be defined fundamentally with the meaningful energy scale that has some physical significance, which motivates us to develop a new symmetry-preserving and infinity-free regularization scheme called loop regularization (LORE). A simple regularization prescription in LORE is realized based on a manifest postulation that a loop divergence with a power counting dimension larger than and equal to the space-time dimension must vanish. The LORE method is achieved without modifying original theory and leads the divergent Feynman loop integrals well-defined to maintain the divergence structure and meanwhile preserve basic symmetries of original theory. The crucial point in LORE is the presence of two intrinsic energy scales which play the roles of ultraviolet cut-off $M_c$ and infrared cut-off $\\mu_s$ to avoid infinities. The key concept in LORE is the introduction of irreducible loop integrals (ILIs) on which the regularization prescription acts, which leads to a set of gauge invariance consistency conditions between the regularized tensor-type and scalar-type ILIs. The evaluation of ILIs with ultraviolet-divergence-preserving (UVDP) parametrization naturally leads to Bjorken-Drell's analogy between Feynman diagrams and electric circuits. The LORE method has been shown to be applicable to both underlying and effective QFTs.

Yue-Liang Wu

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

384

Full length article: Multiresolution wavelet denoising for ultra-wideband time-of-arrival estimation with regularized least squares  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improving accuracy in wireless localization and ranging is a challenging task which often demands an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Impulsive ultra-wideband (UWB) technology is a promising signaling alternative that is capable of high-resolution ... Keywords: Channel estimation, Discrete wavelet transform (DWT), Impulse radio (IR), Ranging, Regularized least squares (RLS), Time-of-arrival (ToA) estimation, Ultra-wideband (UWB), Wavelet denoising (WD)

Ted C. -K. Liu; Xiaodai Dong; Wu-Sheng Lu

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 504,188 468,539 525,697 486,281 514,984 510,460 3,070,904 3,010,149 -2.0 Regular 452,854 420,289 474,090 438,981 464,593 456,545 2,732,322 2,707,352 -0.9 Conventional 87,933 82,130 86,201 79,247 91,426 91,994 516,139 518,931 0.5 Reformulated 364,921 338,159 387,889 359,734 373,167 364,551 2,216,183 2,188,421 -1.3 Midgrade 9,657 8,794 9,247 8,730 8,929 9,211 65,162 54,568 -16.3 Conventional 1,073 974 1,072 823 1,012 1,125 6,892 6,079 -11.8 Reformulated 8,584 7,820 8,175 7,907 7,917 8,086 58,270 48,489 -16.8 Premium 41,677 39,456 42,360 38,570 41,462 44,704 273,420 248,229 -9.2 Conventional 4,769 4,624 4,327 3,180 4,587 5,631 29,818 27,118 -9.1

386

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 468,539 525,697 486,281 514,984 510,456 539,730 3,641,816 3,549,875 -2.5 Regular 420,289 474,090 438,981 464,593 456,541 480,557 3,234,152 3,187,905 -1.4 Conventional 82,130 86,201 79,247 91,426 91,994 100,987 621,310 619,918 -0.2 Reformulated 338,159 387,889 359,734 373,167 364,547 379,570 2,612,842 2,567,987 -1.7 Midgrade 8,794 9,247 8,730 8,929 9,211 10,757 78,670 65,325 -17.0 Conventional 974 1,072 823 1,012 1,125 1,410 8,545 7,489 -12.4 Reformulated 7,820 8,175 7,907 7,917 8,086 9,347 70,125 57,836 -17.5 Premium 39,456 42,360 38,570 41,462 44,704 48,416 328,994 296,645 -9.8 Conventional 4,624 4,327 3,180 4,587 5,631 7,186 37,381 34,304 -8.2

387

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 514,984 510,456 551,226 555,511 521,124 530,824 5,248,335 5,168,830 -1.5 Regular 464,593 456,541 491,127 496,300 466,275 475,566 4,651,595 4,636,616 -0.3 Conventional 91,426 91,994 101,237 103,140 92,473 93,940 908,935 909,721 0.1 Reformulated 373,167 364,547 389,890 393,160 373,802 381,626 3,742,660 3,726,895 -0.4 Midgrade 8,929 9,211 10,823 10,283 9,258 9,151 113,829 94,083 -17.3 Conventional 1,012 1,125 1,410 1,439 1,091 1,006 12,709 11,025 -13.3 Reformulated 7,917 8,086 9,413 8,844 8,167 8,145 101,120 83,058 -17.9 Premium 41,462 44,704 49,276 48,928 45,591 46,107 482,911 438,131 -9.3 Conventional 4,587 5,631 7,191 7,090 5,477 5,328 56,718 52,204 -8.0

388

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 530,520 540,898 555,627 513,590 550,648 515,104 5,958,970 5,780,489 -3.3 Regular 475,729 482,398 495,544 460,050 493,937 461,524 5,230,297 5,168,871 -1.5 Conventional 88,242 92,325 98,019 85,817 90,049 81,016 1,039,287 940,188 -9.8 Reformulated 387,487 390,073 397,525 374,233 403,888 380,508 4,191,010 4,228,683 0.6 Midgrade 14,166 14,682 14,063 11,714 11,956 11,129 211,240 148,868 -29.7 Conventional 1,810 2,224 1,989 1,208 1,145 948 26,259 17,778 -32.5 Reformulated 12,356 12,458 12,074 10,506 10,811 10,181 184,981 131,090 -29.3 Premium 40,625 43,818 46,020 41,826 44,755 42,451 517,433 462,750 -10.8 Conventional 4,912 6,558 6,625 4,768 4,532 3,788 63,113 50,554 -20.1

389

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 517,232 511,759 545,873 535,318 570,912 554,479 4,153,719 4,196,295 1.0 Regular 461,626 455,817 482,797 472,316 501,830 486,959 3,697,205 3,721,111 0.6 Conventional 84,893 82,811 92,772 93,610 105,171 101,191 717,215 722,501 0.7 Reformulated 376,733 373,006 390,025 378,706 396,659 385,768 2,979,990 2,998,610 0.6 Midgrade 10,662 10,750 12,002 11,743 13,508 13,014 98,623 91,684 -7.0 Conventional 1,085 1,076 1,267 1,335 1,653 1,636 10,227 10,181 -0.4 Reformulated 9,577 9,674 10,735 10,408 11,855 11,378 88,396 81,503 -7.8 Premium 44,944 45,192 51,074 51,259 55,574 54,506 357,891 383,500 7.2 Conventional 4,362 4,340 5,704 6,255 7,563 7,460 42,458 44,841 5.6

390

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 3.124 3.139 3.197 3.200 3.185 1993-2014 80 3.124 3.139 3.197 3.200 3.185 1993-2014 All Grades - Conventional Areas 3.176 3.127 3.126 3.186 3.190 3.181 1994-2014 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 3.196 3.115 3.183 3.232 3.233 3.198 1994-2014 Regular 3.104 3.047 3.061 3.117 3.123 3.108 1992-2014 Conventional Areas 3.102 3.053 3.051 3.109 3.115 3.106 1992-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.110 3.030 3.096 3.146 3.149 3.113 1994-2014 Midgrade 3.278 3.223 3.242 3.299 3.299 3.285 1994-2014 Conventional Areas 3.263 3.216 3.217 3.280 3.280 3.273 1994-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.326 3.246 3.323 3.362 3.359 3.326 1994-2014 Premium 3.455 3.401 3.417 3.479 3.476 3.462 1994-2014 Conventional Areas 3.445 3.399 3.399 3.464 3.462 3.454 1994-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.487 3.408 3.475 3.528 3.522 3.489 1994-2014

391

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 513,866 505,064 537,904 531,489 559,954 567,413 4,213,504 4,211,420 0.4 Regular 459,449 450,035 478,044 472,425 495,129 501,603 3,765,490 3,748,865 0.0 Conventional 78,976 77,280 86,287 87,590 98,814 99,772 686,739 687,865 0.6 Reformulated 380,473 372,755 391,757 384,835 396,315 401,831 3,078,751 3,061,000 -0.2 Midgrade 11,416 11,399 12,602 12,126 13,409 13,588 114,147 96,526 -15.1 Conventional 1,017 1,015 1,213 1,222 1,506 1,596 14,464 9,760 -32.2 Reformulated 10,399 10,384 11,389 10,904 11,903 11,992 99,683 86,766 -12.6 Premium 43,001 43,630 47,258 46,938 51,416 52,222 333,867 366,029 10.1 Conventional 4,171 3,918 4,969 5,179 6,521 6,948 36,528 40,807 12.2

392

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 546,228 535,449 499,935 542,611 516,779 555,434 2,572,452 2,650,208 3.0 Regular 480,634 470,492 438,673 479,616 456,628 488,091 2,257,579 2,333,500 3.4 Conventional 95,604 92,531 89,836 92,595 86,101 95,676 454,256 456,739 0.5 Reformulated 385,030 377,961 348,837 387,021 370,527 392,415 1,803,323 1,876,761 4.1 Midgrade 19,274 19,363 18,187 19,268 18,846 20,575 93,934 96,239 2.5 Conventional 2,216 2,248 2,263 2,142 1,889 2,237 11,954 10,779 -9.8 Reformulated 17,058 17,115 15,924 17,126 16,957 18,338 81,980 85,460 4.2 Premium 46,320 45,594 43,075 43,727 41,305 46,768 220,939 220,469 -0.2 Conventional 4,840 5,145 5,759 4,923 3,908 5,672 23,598 25,407 7.7

393

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 535,318 570,912 554,479 515,841 536,199 508,811 5,721,571 5,757,146 0.6 Regular 472,316 501,830 486,959 455,816 474,668 452,725 5,090,580 5,104,320 0.3 Conventional 93,610 105,171 101,191 92,476 93,958 87,267 995,211 996,202 0.1 Reformulated 378,706 396,659 385,768 363,340 380,710 365,458 4,095,369 4,108,118 0.3 Midgrade 11,743 13,508 13,014 10,972 11,173 10,388 134,223 124,217 -7.5 Conventional 1,335 1,653 1,636 1,284 1,244 1,061 14,104 13,770 -2.4 Reformulated 10,408 11,855 11,378 9,688 9,929 9,327 120,119 110,447 -8.1 Premium 51,259 55,574 54,506 49,053 50,358 45,698 496,768 528,609 6.4 Conventional 6,255 7,563 7,460 6,229 5,648 4,458 58,408 61,176 4.7

394

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 520,035 545,243 516,781 489,227 521,195 509,790 2,094,774 2,036,993 -3.6 Regular 461,374 484,800 460,826 436,427 466,083 455,431 1,845,409 1,818,767 -2.3 Conventional 83,614 86,614 83,587 78,014 80,359 76,766 361,063 318,726 -12.5 Reformulated 377,760 398,186 377,239 358,413 385,724 378,665 1,484,346 1,500,041 0.2 Midgrade 15,520 15,820 14,583 13,721 14,439 13,806 75,664 56,549 -25.9 Conventional 1,810 1,866 1,811 1,687 1,655 1,546 8,542 6,699 -22.2 Reformulated 13,710 13,954 12,772 12,034 12,784 12,260 67,122 49,850 -26.3 Premium 43,141 44,623 41,372 39,079 40,673 40,553 173,701 161,677 -7.7 Conventional 3,745 4,124 4,122 3,923 3,518 3,283 19,735 14,846 -25.4

395

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 545,228 504,188 468,539 525,697 486,281 514,984 2,535,586 2,499,689 -1.4 Regular 487,995 452,854 420,289 474,090 438,981 464,593 2,260,006 2,250,807 -0.4 Conventional 92,950 87,933 82,130 86,201 79,247 91,426 422,529 426,937 1.0 Reformulated 395,045 364,921 338,159 387,889 359,734 373,167 1,837,477 1,823,870 -0.7 Midgrade 10,787 9,657 8,794 9,247 8,730 8,929 53,419 45,357 -15.1 Conventional 1,144 1,073 974 1,072 823 1,012 5,557 4,954 -10.9 Reformulated 9,643 8,584 7,820 8,175 7,907 7,917 47,862 40,403 -15.6 Premium 46,446 41,677 39,456 42,360 38,570 41,462 222,161 203,525 -8.4 Conventional 4,797 4,769 4,624 4,327 3,180 4,587 23,563 21,487 -8.8

396

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 514,161 520,326 525,369 540,605 483,593 520,563 5,165,107 4,967,011 -4.2 Regular 457,986 462,591 465,025 479,996 431,332 467,394 4,633,156 4,437,320 -4.5 Conventional 90,064 98,380 105,415 107,232 90,415 98,631 906,359 899,040 -1.1 Reformulated 367,922 364,211 359,610 372,764 340,917 368,763 3,726,797 3,538,280 -5.4 Midgrade 9,199 9,495 10,553 10,741 9,011 8,844 94,042 89,607 -5.0 Conventional 1,071 1,194 1,534 1,499 1,234 1,015 10,984 10,728 -2.7 Reformulated 8,128 8,301 9,019 9,242 7,777 7,829 83,058 78,879 -5.3 Premium 46,976 48,240 49,791 49,868 43,250 44,325 437,909 440,084 0.2 Conventional 5,291 5,945 7,421 7,295 5,452 4,696 51,982 51,504 -1.2

397

New England (PADD 1A) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

71 3.585 3.598 3.624 3.633 3.610 1993-2014 71 3.585 3.598 3.624 3.633 3.610 1993-2014 All Grades - Conventional Areas 3.578 3.578 3.588 3.629 3.626 3.613 1994-2014 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 3.570 3.586 3.601 3.622 3.634 3.609 1994-2014 Regular 3.494 3.508 3.520 3.548 3.556 3.530 1993-2014 Conventional Areas 3.501 3.501 3.511 3.555 3.552 3.535 1993-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.493 3.510 3.522 3.547 3.557 3.529 1994-2014 Midgrade 3.682 3.695 3.716 3.731 3.746 3.730 1994-2014 Conventional Areas 3.685 3.684 3.695 3.727 3.724 3.720 1994-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.681 3.697 3.721 3.733 3.751 3.733 1994-2014 Premium 3.829 3.840 3.858 3.875 3.889 3.872 1994-2014 Conventional Areas 3.846 3.849 3.857 3.892 3.891 3.884 1994-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.825 3.837 3.858 3.871 3.888 3.869 1994-2014

398

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 446,330 487,514 467,445 514,161 520,326 525,369 3,561,371 3,422,250 -4.4 Regular 400,799 438,269 419,689 457,986 462,591 465,025 3,198,475 3,058,598 -4.8 Conventional 75,965 79,443 76,333 90,064 98,380 105,415 620,168 602,762 -3.3 Reformulated 324,834 358,826 343,356 367,922 364,211 359,610 2,578,307 2,455,836 -5.2 Midgrade 7,543 8,274 8,141 9,199 9,495 10,553 65,391 61,011 -7.1 Conventional 793 806 750 1,071 1,194 1,534 7,489 6,980 -7.2 Reformulated 6,750 7,468 7,391 8,128 8,301 9,019 57,902 54,031 -7.1 Premium 37,988 40,971 39,615 46,976 48,240 49,791 297,505 302,641 1.2 Conventional 3,956 3,932 3,590 5,291 5,945 7,421 34,309 34,061 -1.2

399

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 540,301 564,932 507,854 551,005 519,384 532,887 5,983,641 6,162,327 3.3 Regular 430,015 447,094 403,797 439,428 413,569 424,196 4,678,248 4,901,423 5.1 Conventional 99,358 103,625 85,392 90,979 84,964 85,917 1,007,838 1,039,579 3.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 330,657 343,469 318,405 348,449 328,605 338,279 3,670,410 3,861,844 5.5 Midgrade 40,369 42,027 36,317 37,629 34,336 34,882 494,595 447,823 -9.2 Conventional 7,246 7,514 5,617 5,829 5,231 5,343 77,503 69,393 -10.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 33,123 34,513 30,700 31,800 29,105 29,539 417,092 378,430 -9.0 Premium 69,917 75,811 67,740 73,948 71,479 73,809 810,798 813,081 0.6

400

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 467,445 514,161 520,326 525,369 540,605 484,485 4,638,006 4,447,340 -4.5 Regular 419,689 457,986 462,591 465,025 479,996 432,224 4,161,050 3,970,818 -4.9 Conventional 76,333 90,064 98,380 105,415 107,232 91,307 815,781 801,301 -2.1 Reformulated 343,356 367,922 364,211 359,610 372,764 340,917 3,345,269 3,169,517 -5.6 Midgrade 8,141 9,199 9,495 10,553 10,741 9,011 84,932 80,763 -5.3 Conventional 750 1,071 1,194 1,534 1,499 1,234 10,019 9,713 -3.4 Reformulated 7,391 8,128 8,301 9,019 9,242 7,777 74,913 71,050 -5.5 Premium 39,615 46,976 48,240 49,791 49,868 43,250 392,024 395,759 0.6 Conventional 3,590 5,291 5,945 7,421 7,295 5,452 46,876 46,808 -0.5

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401

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 565,098 582,461 528,605 557,695 520,035 545,266 6,454,418 6,505,728 0.8 Regular 492,384 506,031 460,477 489,668 461,374 484,820 5,657,794 5,716,973 1.0 Conventional 104,206 108,037 94,740 95,190 83,614 86,614 1,186,090 1,125,785 -5.1 Reformulated 388,178 397,994 365,737 394,478 377,760 398,206 4,471,704 4,591,188 2.7 Midgrade 22,106 22,313 19,450 19,638 15,520 15,822 235,038 231,224 -1.6 Conventional 3,291 3,257 2,452 2,171 1,810 1,868 32,004 28,057 -12.3 Reformulated 18,815 19,056 16,998 17,467 13,710 13,954 203,034 203,167 0.1 Premium 50,608 54,117 48,678 48,389 43,141 44,624 561,586 557,531 -0.7 Conventional 7,624 8,451 6,308 5,115 3,745 4,124 67,026 67,080 0.1

402

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 477,184 488,726 508,081 505,973 534,828 527,749 3,962,855 3,962,202 0.4 Regular 428,557 437,307 450,215 447,456 473,795 466,268 3,538,594 3,530,339 0.2 Conventional 88,943 93,114 96,168 96,218 109,084 109,271 709,994 768,217 8.6 Reformulated 339,614 344,193 354,047 351,238 364,711 356,997 2,828,600 2,762,122 -1.9 Midgrade 7,978 7,840 8,971 9,184 10,273 11,401 71,752 70,884 -0.8 Conventional 886 867 1,110 1,165 1,477 1,528 8,479 8,790 4.1 Reformulated 7,092 6,973 7,861 8,019 8,796 9,873 63,273 62,094 -1.5 Premium 40,649 43,579 48,895 49,333 50,760 50,080 352,509 360,979 2.8 Conventional 4,051 5,033 5,533 6,005 7,577 7,698 41,356 44,248 7.4

403

East Coast (PADD 1) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

482 3.472 3.480 3.511 3.538 3.512 1993-2014 482 3.472 3.480 3.511 3.538 3.512 1993-2014 All Grades - Conventional Areas 3.457 3.438 3.442 3.471 3.511 3.488 1994-2014 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 3.522 3.529 3.542 3.577 3.581 3.550 1994-2014 Regular 3.382 3.373 3.380 3.413 3.438 3.410 1992-2014 Conventional Areas 3.359 3.339 3.343 3.372 3.410 3.386 1992-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.419 3.428 3.440 3.480 3.484 3.450 1994-2014 Midgrade 3.566 3.554 3.565 3.590 3.622 3.598 1994-2014 Conventional Areas 3.525 3.507 3.515 3.539 3.582 3.559 1994-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.642 3.644 3.659 3.687 3.695 3.670 1994-2014 Premium 3.755 3.746 3.754 3.782 3.811 3.789 1994-2014 Conventional Areas 3.733 3.716 3.720 3.751 3.797 3.778 1994-2014 Reformulated Areas

404

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 545,243 516,781 489,227 521,195 509,790 537,109 2,651,921 2,574,102 -3.6 Regular 484,800 460,826 436,427 466,083 455,431 480,922 2,335,213 2,299,689 -2.2 Conventional 86,614 83,587 78,014 80,359 76,766 85,994 456,739 404,720 -12.0 Reformulated 398,186 377,239 358,413 385,724 378,665 394,928 1,878,474 1,894,969 0.2 Midgrade 15,820 14,583 13,721 14,439 13,806 14,609 96,239 71,158 -26.5 Conventional 1,866 1,811 1,687 1,655 1,546 1,755 10,779 8,454 -22.1 Reformulated 13,954 12,772 12,034 12,784 12,260 12,854 85,460 62,704 -27.1 Premium 44,623 41,372 39,079 40,673 40,553 41,578 220,469 203,255 -8.4 Conventional 4,124 4,122 3,923 3,518 3,283 4,525 25,407 19,371 -24.3

405

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 545,873 535,318 570,912 554,479 515,841 536,797 5,221,463 5,248,933 0.5 Regular 482,797 472,316 501,830 486,959 455,816 475,306 4,644,530 4,652,233 0.2 Conventional 92,772 93,610 105,171 101,191 92,476 93,591 909,817 908,568 -0.1 Reformulated 390,025 378,706 396,659 385,768 363,340 381,715 3,734,713 3,743,665 0.2 Midgrade 12,002 11,743 13,508 13,014 10,972 11,192 123,210 113,848 -7.6 Conventional 1,267 1,335 1,653 1,636 1,284 1,223 13,027 12,688 -2.6 Reformulated 10,735 10,408 11,855 11,378 9,688 9,969 110,183 101,160 -8.2 Premium 51,074 51,259 55,574 54,506 49,053 50,299 453,723 482,852 6.4 Conventional 5,704 6,255 7,563 7,460 6,229 5,636 54,078 56,706 4.9

406

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 554,479 515,841 536,199 510,224 545,228 503,893 501,742 503,893 0.4 Regular 486,959 455,816 474,668 453,976 487,995 452,544 449,222 452,544 0.7 Conventional 101,191 92,476 93,958 87,267 92,950 87,949 84,317 87,949 4.3 Reformulated 385,768 363,340 380,710 366,709 395,045 364,595 364,905 364,595 -0.1 Midgrade 13,014 10,972 11,173 10,401 10,787 9,652 10,528 9,652 -8.3 Conventional 1,636 1,284 1,244 1,061 1,144 1,072 1,118 1,072 -4.1 Reformulated 11,378 9,688 9,929 9,340 9,643 8,580 9,410 8,580 -8.8 Premium 54,506 49,053 50,358 45,847 46,446 41,697 41,992 41,697 -0.7 Conventional 7,460 6,229 5,648 4,458 4,797 4,774 4,867 4,774 -1.9

407

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 489,227 521,195 509,790 537,109 530,520 540,898 3,771,210 3,645,520 -3.8 Regular 436,427 466,083 455,431 480,922 475,729 482,398 3,314,032 3,257,816 -2.2 Conventional 78,014 80,359 76,766 85,994 88,242 92,325 657,727 585,287 -11.4 Reformulated 358,413 385,724 378,665 394,928 387,487 390,073 2,656,305 2,672,529 0.1 Midgrade 13,721 14,439 13,806 14,609 14,166 14,682 135,928 100,006 -26.8 Conventional 1,687 1,655 1,546 1,755 1,810 2,224 16,541 12,488 -24.9 Reformulated 12,034 12,784 12,260 12,854 12,356 12,458 119,387 87,518 -27.0 Premium 39,079 40,673 40,553 41,578 40,625 43,818 321,250 287,698 -10.9 Conventional 3,923 3,518 3,283 4,525 4,912 6,558 39,405 30,841 -22.1

408

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,268 130,385 114,483 117,639 115,793 108,960 234,443 224,753 -4.1 Regular 107,051 109,801 96,041 99,099 98,040 93,563 200,031 191,603 -4.2 Conventional W 80,782 59,921 61,268 60,258 59,242 110,164 119,500 8.5 Oxygenated W 29,019 36,120 37,831 37,782 34,321 89,867 72,103 -19.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,066 6,616 6,121 6,193 5,943 5,563 11,618 11,506 -1.0 Conventional W 4,628 3,531 3,743 3,737 3,601 6,444 7,338 13.9 Oxygenated W 1,988 2,590 2,450 2,206 1,962 5,174 4,168 -19.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 13,151 13,968 12,321 12,347 11,810 9,834 22,794 21,644 -5.0 Conventional W 9,980 7,264 7,339 6,945 5,950 11,957 12,895 7.8

409

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 130,776 128,461 125,271 127,361 115,819 112,032 211,293 227,851 9.7 Regular 113,616 111,521 108,520 109,905 99,816 96,825 176,425 196,641 13.3 Conventional W 82,755 62,396 62,355 55,542 52,002 96,559 107,544 13.3 Oxygenated W 28,766 46,124 47,550 44,274 44,823 79,866 89,097 13.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,170 6,296 6,420 6,738 5,913 5,466 12,859 11,379 -10.0 Conventional W 4,406 3,840 3,681 3,428 2,905 6,696 6,333 -3.8 Oxygenated W 1,890 2,580 3,057 2,485 2,561 6,163 5,046 -16.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,990 10,644 10,331 10,718 10,090 9,741 22,009 19,831 -8.4 Conventional W 7,778 5,564 5,846 5,492 5,029 12,000 10,521 -10.8

410

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 511,759 545,873 535,318 570,912 554,479 504,662 4,679,723 4,700,957 0.5 Regular 455,817 482,797 472,316 501,830 486,959 444,611 4,162,499 4,165,722 0.1 Conventional 82,811 92,772 93,610 105,171 101,191 92,476 813,171 814,977 0.2 Reformulated 373,006 390,025 378,706 396,659 385,768 352,135 3,349,328 3,350,745 0.0 Midgrade 10,750 12,002 11,743 13,508 13,014 10,972 111,169 102,656 -7.7 Conventional 1,076 1,267 1,335 1,653 1,636 1,284 11,682 11,465 -1.9 Reformulated 9,674 10,735 10,408 11,855 11,378 9,688 99,487 91,191 -8.3 Premium 45,192 51,074 51,259 55,574 54,506 49,079 406,055 432,579 6.5 Conventional 4,340 5,704 6,255 7,563 7,460 6,229 48,685 51,070 4.9

411

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 525,369 540,605 483,593 520,563 494,955 496,452 6,205,152 5,958,418 -4.2 Regular 465,025 479,996 431,332 467,394 442,377 445,406 5,566,313 5,325,103 -4.6 Conventional 105,415 107,232 90,415 98,631 89,489 89,443 1,075,211 1,077,972 0.0 Reformulated 359,610 372,764 340,917 368,763 352,888 355,963 4,491,102 4,247,131 -5.7 Midgrade 10,553 10,741 9,011 8,844 8,424 8,190 111,551 106,221 -5.0 Conventional 1,534 1,499 1,234 1,015 881 903 12,771 12,512 -2.3 Reformulated 9,019 9,242 7,777 7,829 7,543 7,287 98,780 93,709 -5.4 Premium 49,791 49,868 43,250 44,325 44,154 42,856 527,288 527,094 -0.3 Conventional 7,421 7,295 5,452 4,696 4,075 4,150 60,633 59,729 -1.8

412

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 477,504 513,866 505,064 537,904 531,489 559,956 3,658,226 3,644,009 0.1 Regular 427,980 459,449 450,035 478,044 472,425 495,131 3,270,331 3,247,264 -0.2 Conventional 76,972 78,976 77,280 86,287 87,590 98,816 588,865 588,095 0.3 Reformulated 351,008 380,473 372,755 391,757 384,835 396,315 2,681,466 2,659,169 -0.4 Midgrade 10,578 11,416 11,399 12,602 12,126 13,409 100,080 82,938 -16.7 Conventional 1,067 1,017 1,015 1,213 1,222 1,506 12,473 8,164 -34.2 Reformulated 9,511 10,399 10,384 11,389 10,904 11,903 87,607 74,774 -14.2 Premium 38,946 43,001 43,630 47,258 46,938 51,416 287,815 313,807 9.5 Conventional 4,409 4,171 3,918 4,969 5,179 6,521 29,892 33,859 13.8

413

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 510,224 545,228 504,188 468,539 525,697 489,817 1,989,713 1,988,241 -0.1 Regular 453,976 487,995 452,854 420,289 474,090 442,037 1,777,209 1,789,270 0.7 Conventional 87,267 92,950 87,933 82,130 86,201 79,755 329,757 336,019 1.9 Reformulated 366,709 395,045 364,921 338,159 387,889 362,282 1,447,452 1,453,251 0.4 Midgrade 10,401 10,787 9,657 8,794 9,247 8,908 41,417 36,606 -11.6 Conventional 1,061 1,144 1,073 974 1,072 828 4,290 3,947 -8.0 Reformulated 9,340 9,643 8,584 7,820 8,175 8,080 37,127 32,659 -12.0 Premium 45,847 46,446 41,677 39,456 42,360 38,872 171,087 162,365 -5.1 Conventional 4,458 4,797 4,769 4,624 4,327 3,180 17,859 16,900 -5.4

414

PADD 5 Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

531 3.526 3.538 3.581 3.602 3.581 1993-2014 531 3.526 3.538 3.581 3.602 3.581 1993-2014 All Grades - Conventional Areas 3.395 3.386 3.384 3.401 3.423 3.420 1995-2014 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 3.587 3.582 3.600 3.654 3.675 3.647 1995-2014 Regular 3.477 3.472 3.483 3.526 3.547 3.526 1992-2014 Conventional Areas 3.343 3.335 3.333 3.351 3.371 3.367 1992-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.535 3.531 3.549 3.603 3.624 3.595 1994-2014 Midgrade 3.618 3.611 3.626 3.668 3.690 3.669 1994-2014 Conventional Areas 3.479 3.471 3.470 3.483 3.510 3.508 1995-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.660 3.654 3.673 3.725 3.746 3.718 1995-2014 Premium 3.730 3.721 3.736 3.777 3.799 3.782 1994-2014 Conventional Areas 3.633 3.619 3.617 3.632 3.655 3.659 1995-2014 Reformulated Areas

415

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 500,104 552,735 501,742 458,980 517,232 511,792 2,014,660 1,989,746 -1.2 Regular 446,048 494,340 449,222 410,544 461,626 455,851 1,801,664 1,777,243 -1.4 Conventional 85,392 94,289 84,317 77,736 84,893 82,810 315,402 329,756 4.6 Reformulated 360,656 400,051 364,905 332,808 376,733 373,041 1,486,262 1,447,487 -2.6 Midgrade 11,012 12,002 10,528 9,477 10,662 10,750 44,801 41,417 -7.6 Conventional 1,076 1,232 1,118 1,011 1,085 1,076 4,223 4,290 1.6 Reformulated 9,936 10,770 9,410 8,466 9,577 9,674 40,578 37,127 -8.5 Premium 43,044 46,393 41,992 38,959 44,944 45,191 168,195 171,086 1.7 Conventional 4,329 4,866 4,867 4,290 4,362 4,339 17,190 17,858 3.9

416

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 516,779 557,147 554,647 565,098 582,461 528,605 4,825,437 4,882,732 1.2 Regular 456,628 489,804 487,006 492,384 506,031 460,477 4,229,249 4,281,111 1.2 Conventional 86,101 95,676 96,645 104,206 108,037 94,740 896,393 860,367 -4.0 Reformulated 370,527 394,128 390,361 388,178 397,994 365,737 3,332,856 3,420,744 2.6 Midgrade 18,846 20,575 20,136 22,106 22,313 19,450 178,204 180,244 1.1 Conventional 1,889 2,237 2,429 3,291 3,257 2,452 25,004 22,208 -11.2 Reformulated 16,957 18,338 17,707 18,815 19,056 16,998 153,200 158,036 3.2 Premium 41,305 46,768 47,505 50,608 54,117 48,678 417,984 421,377 0.8 Conventional 3,908 5,672 6,306 7,624 8,451 6,308 51,466 54,096 5.1

417

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 552,735 501,742 458,980 517,232 511,759 545,879 2,552,564 2,535,592 -0.7 Regular 494,340 449,222 410,544 461,626 455,817 482,803 2,279,708 2,260,012 -0.9 Conventional 94,289 84,317 77,736 84,893 82,811 92,778 401,689 422,535 5.2 Reformulated 400,051 364,905 332,808 376,733 373,006 390,025 1,878,019 1,837,477 -2.2 Midgrade 12,002 10,528 9,477 10,662 10,750 12,002 57,403 53,419 -6.9 Conventional 1,232 1,118 1,011 1,085 1,076 1,267 5,436 5,557 2.2 Reformulated 10,770 9,410 8,466 9,577 9,674 10,735 51,967 47,862 -7.9 Premium 46,393 41,992 38,959 44,944 45,192 51,074 215,453 222,161 3.1 Conventional 4,866 4,867 4,290 4,362 4,340 5,704 22,159 23,563 6.3

418

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 528,605 557,695 520,035 545,243 516,781 489,628 1,035,384 1,006,409 -4.4 Regular 460,477 489,668 461,374 484,800 460,826 436,768 909,165 897,594 -2.9 Conventional 94,740 95,190 83,614 86,614 83,587 78,016 182,367 161,603 -12.9 Reformulated 365,737 394,478 377,760 398,186 377,239 358,752 726,798 735,991 -0.4 Midgrade 19,450 19,638 15,520 15,820 14,583 13,740 37,550 28,323 -25.8 Conventional 2,452 2,171 1,810 1,866 1,811 1,689 4,511 3,500 -23.7 Reformulated 16,998 17,467 13,710 13,954 12,772 12,051 33,039 24,823 -26.1 Premium 48,678 48,389 43,141 44,623 41,372 39,120 88,669 80,492 -10.7 Conventional 6,308 5,115 3,745 4,124 4,122 3,915 10,904 8,037 -27.5

419

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 488,726 508,081 505,973 534,828 527,726 470,883 4,446,448 4,433,062 0.1 Regular 437,307 450,215 447,456 473,795 466,249 416,430 3,969,926 3,946,750 -0.2 Conventional 93,114 96,168 96,218 109,084 109,271 92,643 800,409 860,860 7.9 Reformulated 344,193 354,047 351,238 364,711 356,978 323,787 3,169,517 3,085,890 -2.3 Midgrade 7,840 8,971 9,184 10,273 11,401 9,430 80,763 80,314 -0.2 Conventional 867 1,110 1,165 1,477 1,528 962 9,713 9,752 0.8 Reformulated 6,973 7,861 8,019 8,796 9,873 8,468 71,050 70,562 -0.3 Premium 43,579 48,895 49,333 50,760 50,076 45,023 395,759 405,998 3.0 Conventional 5,033 5,533 6,005 7,577 7,698 5,642 46,808 49,890 7.0

420

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 137,146 123,384 123,443 132,857 118,555 116,724 219,370 235,279 9.1 Regular 121,321 108,630 108,923 116,372 104,022 102,400 191,501 206,422 9.6 Conventional 93,225 80,733 66,084 71,011 61,295 61,892 W 123,187 NA Oxygenated NA NA 42,839 45,361 42,727 40,508 W 83,235 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,305 4,157 4,294 4,477 4,122 3,873 8,695 7,995 -6.5 Conventional 3,682 2,831 2,131 2,141 1,960 1,899 4,402 3,859 -10.8 Oxygenated NA 1,326 2,163 2,336 2,162 1,974 4,293 4,136 -2.0 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,520 10,597 10,226 12,008 10,411 10,451 19,174 20,862 10.6 Conventional 9,730 7,507 5,628 6,833 5,562 5,907 W 11,469 NA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 536,199 510,224 545,228 504,188 468,539 525,861 1,477,954 1,498,588 1.4 Regular 474,668 453,976 487,995 452,854 420,289 474,253 1,321,392 1,347,396 2.0 Conventional 93,958 87,267 92,950 87,933 82,130 86,196 246,946 256,259 3.8 Reformulated 380,710 366,709 395,045 364,921 338,159 388,057 1,074,446 1,091,137 1.6 Midgrade 11,173 10,401 10,787 9,657 8,794 9,247 30,667 27,698 -9.7 Conventional 1,244 1,061 1,144 1,073 974 1,072 3,214 3,119 -3.0 Reformulated 9,929 9,340 9,643 8,584 7,820 8,175 27,453 24,579 -10.5 Premium 50,358 45,847 46,446 41,677 39,456 42,361 125,895 123,494 -1.9 Conventional 5,648 4,458 4,797 4,769 4,624 4,327 13,519 13,720 1.5

422

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 554,647 565,098 582,461 528,605 557,695 525,542 5,908,190 5,965,969 1.0 Regular 487,006 492,384 506,031 460,477 489,668 466,116 5,177,160 5,236,895 1.2 Conventional 96,645 104,206 108,037 94,740 95,190 87,664 1,090,486 1,043,221 -4.3 Reformulated 390,361 388,178 397,994 365,737 394,478 378,452 4,086,674 4,193,674 2.6 Midgrade 20,136 22,106 22,313 19,450 19,638 17,539 215,999 217,421 0.7 Conventional 2,429 3,291 3,257 2,452 2,171 1,955 29,788 26,334 -11.6 Reformulated 17,707 18,815 19,056 16,998 17,467 15,584 186,211 191,087 2.6 Premium 47,505 50,608 54,117 48,678 48,389 41,887 515,031 511,653 -0.7 Conventional 6,306 7,624 8,451 6,308 5,115 4,064 62,186 63,275 1.8

423

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 129,343 121,892 120,530 123,655 110,788 128,326 359,261 362,769 1.0 Regular 111,742 104,683 102,740 105,511 94,520 110,336 309,607 310,367 0.2 Conventional 82,134 58,559 54,646 56,780 53,384 91,767 W 201,931 NA Oxygenated 29,608 46,124 48,094 48,731 41,136 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,099 6,003 6,178 6,168 5,450 6,010 18,048 17,628 -2.3 Conventional 4,303 3,324 3,547 3,392 3,052 5,351 12,487 11,795 -5.5 Oxygenated 1,796 2,679 2,631 2,776 2,398 659 5,561 5,833 4.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,502 11,206 11,612 11,976 10,818 11,980 31,606 34,774 10.0 Conventional 8,321 6,003 6,254 6,016 5,941 10,395 21,080 22,352 6.0

424

West Coast less California Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

350 3.348 3.344 3.369 3.393 3.392 1998-2014 350 3.348 3.344 3.369 3.393 3.392 1998-2014 All Grades - Conventional Areas 3.395 3.386 3.384 3.401 3.423 3.420 2000-2014 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 3.138 3.162 3.155 3.214 3.252 3.258 1998-2014 Regular 3.298 3.295 3.292 3.317 3.341 3.338 1998-2014 Conventional Areas 3.343 3.335 3.333 3.351 3.371 3.367 2000-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.078 3.104 3.097 3.155 3.194 3.201 1998-2014 Midgrade 3.435 3.432 3.430 3.451 3.481 3.477 1998-2014 Conventional Areas 3.479 3.471 3.470 3.483 3.510 3.508 2000-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.238 3.257 3.249 3.309 3.348 3.336 1998-2014 Premium 3.589 3.582 3.578 3.602 3.627 3.632 1998-2014 Conventional Areas 3.633 3.619 3.617 3.632 3.655 3.659 2000-2014 Reformulated Areas

425

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 569,198 524,985 539,891 500,104 552,735 501,831 518,226 501,831 -3.2 Regular 503,215 464,377 480,311 446,048 494,340 449,225 464,200 449,225 -3.2 Conventional 99,772 92,058 92,622 85,392 94,289 84,320 82,174 84,320 2.6 Reformulated 403,443 372,319 387,689 360,656 400,051 364,905 382,026 364,905 -4.5 Midgrade 13,608 12,539 12,031 11,012 12,002 10,528 11,408 10,528 -7.7 Conventional 1,596 1,443 1,327 1,076 1,232 1,118 1,124 1,118 -0.5 Reformulated 12,012 11,096 10,704 9,936 10,770 9,410 10,284 9,410 -8.5 Premium 52,375 48,069 47,549 43,044 46,393 42,078 42,618 42,078 -1.3 Conventional 6,948 5,905 5,118 4,329 4,866 4,953 4,692 4,953 5.6

426

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 557,695 520,035 545,243 516,781 489,227 521,195 1,577,995 1,527,203 -4.3 Regular 489,668 461,374 484,800 460,826 436,427 466,083 1,388,781 1,363,336 -2.9 Conventional 95,190 83,614 86,614 83,587 78,014 80,359 274,962 241,960 -13.0 Reformulated 394,478 377,760 398,186 377,239 358,413 385,724 1,113,819 1,121,376 -0.4 Midgrade 19,638 15,520 15,820 14,583 13,721 14,439 56,818 42,743 -25.6 Conventional 2,171 1,810 1,866 1,811 1,687 1,655 6,653 5,153 -23.4 Reformulated 17,467 13,710 13,954 12,772 12,034 12,784 50,165 37,590 -25.9 Premium 48,389 43,141 44,623 41,372 39,079 40,673 132,396 121,124 -9.5 Conventional 5,115 3,745 4,124 4,122 3,923 3,518 15,827 11,563 -27.7

427

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 524,985 539,891 500,104 552,735 501,742 458,981 995,730 960,723 -3.5 Regular 464,377 480,311 446,048 494,340 449,222 410,545 892,180 859,767 -3.6 Conventional 92,058 92,622 85,392 94,289 84,317 77,737 159,146 162,054 1.8 Reformulated 372,319 387,689 360,656 400,051 364,905 332,808 733,034 697,713 -4.8 Midgrade 12,539 12,031 11,012 12,002 10,528 9,477 21,986 20,005 -9.0 Conventional 1,443 1,327 1,076 1,232 1,118 1,011 2,191 2,129 -2.8 Reformulated 11,096 10,704 9,936 10,770 9,410 8,466 19,795 17,876 -9.7 Premium 48,069 47,549 43,044 46,393 41,992 38,959 81,564 80,951 -0.8 Conventional 5,905 5,118 4,329 4,866 4,867 4,290 9,101 9,157 0.6

428

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 599,006 620,268 593,499 520,531 538,385 528,786 6,181,688 6,088,568 -1.2 Regular 509,217 528,976 510,745 455,324 471,622 460,881 5,185,942 5,227,852 1.1 Conventional 102,726 109,423 112,413 91,948 94,093 88,528 1,046,473 1,045,484 0.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 406,491 419,553 398,332 363,376 377,529 372,353 4,139,469 4,182,368 1.3 Midgrade 26,755 28,590 26,103 20,551 19,614 19,562 310,470 261,788 -15.4 Conventional 3,852 4,918 4,404 2,717 2,378 2,412 46,593 36,524 -21.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 22,903 23,672 21,699 17,834 17,236 17,150 263,877 225,264 -14.4 Premium 63,034 62,702 56,651 44,656 47,149 48,343 685,276 598,928 -12.3

429

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 505,064 537,904 531,489 559,954 569,198 523,453 4,726,915 4,736,658 0.6 Regular 450,035 478,044 472,425 495,129 503,215 462,540 4,225,340 4,213,017 0.1 Conventional 77,280 86,287 87,590 98,814 99,772 88,499 772,443 776,364 0.9 Reformulated 372,755 391,757 384,835 396,315 403,443 374,041 3,452,897 3,436,653 -0.1 Midgrade 11,399 12,602 12,126 13,409 13,608 12,079 125,860 108,625 -13.4 Conventional 1,015 1,213 1,222 1,506 1,596 1,335 15,669 11,095 -28.9 Reformulated 10,384 11,389 10,904 11,903 12,012 10,744 110,191 97,530 -11.2 Premium 43,630 47,258 46,938 51,416 52,375 48,834 375,715 415,016 10.9 Conventional 3,918 4,969 5,179 6,521 6,948 5,748 41,306 46,555 13.1

430

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 537,904 531,489 559,954 569,198 524,985 539,825 5,277,557 5,278,015 0.3 Regular 478,044 472,425 495,129 503,215 464,377 480,245 4,719,270 4,695,099 -0.2 Conventional 86,287 87,590 98,814 99,772 92,058 92,622 862,495 872,545 1.5 Reformulated 391,757 384,835 396,315 403,443 372,319 387,623 3,856,775 3,822,554 -0.6 Midgrade 12,602 12,126 13,409 13,608 12,539 12,031 137,818 121,116 -11.8 Conventional 1,213 1,222 1,506 1,596 1,443 1,327 16,815 12,530 -25.2 Reformulated 11,389 10,904 11,903 12,012 11,096 10,704 121,003 108,586 -10.0 Premium 47,258 46,938 51,416 52,375 48,069 47,549 420,469 461,800 10.2 Conventional 4,969 5,179 6,521 6,948 5,905 5,118 45,838 51,830 13.4

431

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,428 129,343 121,892 120,530 123,655 110,535 229,006 234,190 2.3 Regular 110,212 111,742 104,683 102,740 105,511 94,243 197,814 199,754 1.0 Conventional W 82,134 58,559 54,646 56,780 53,107 108,728 109,887 1.1 Oxygenated W 29,608 46,124 48,094 48,731 41,136 89,086 89,867 0.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,841 6,099 6,003 6,178 6,168 5,450 11,337 11,618 2.5 Conventional W 4,303 3,324 3,547 3,392 3,052 6,291 6,444 2.4 Oxygenated W 1,796 2,679 2,631 2,776 2,398 5,046 5,174 2.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,375 11,502 11,206 11,612 11,976 10,842 19,855 22,818 14.9 Conventional W 8,321 6,003 6,254 6,016 5,965 10,545 11,981 13.6

432

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 486,281 514,984 510,456 551,226 555,511 521,124 4,712,136 4,638,006 -1.6 Regular 438,981 464,593 456,541 491,127 496,300 466,275 4,176,927 4,161,050 -0.4 Conventional 79,247 91,426 91,994 101,237 103,140 92,473 814,977 815,781 0.1 Reformulated 359,734 373,167 364,547 389,890 393,160 373,802 3,361,950 3,345,269 -0.5 Midgrade 8,730 8,929 9,211 10,823 10,283 9,258 102,656 84,932 -17.3 Conventional 823 1,012 1,125 1,410 1,439 1,091 11,465 10,019 -12.6 Reformulated 7,907 7,917 8,086 9,413 8,844 8,167 91,191 74,913 -17.9 Premium 38,570 41,462 44,704 49,276 48,928 45,591 432,553 392,024 -9.4 Conventional 3,180 4,587 5,631 7,191 7,090 5,477 51,070 46,876 -8.2

433

Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

267 3.312 3.445 3.432 3.407 3.379 1993-2013 267 3.312 3.445 3.432 3.407 3.379 1993-2013 All Grades - Conventional Areas 3.272 3.313 3.446 3.433 3.409 3.381 1994-2013 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 3.215 3.295 3.432 3.420 3.392 3.356 1994-2013 Regular 3.159 3.203 3.338 3.325 3.300 3.270 1993-2013 Conventional Areas 3.165 3.206 3.341 3.327 3.303 3.274 1993-2013 Reformulated Areas 3.093 3.176 3.311 3.301 3.270 3.235 1994-2013 Midgrade 3.365 3.408 3.535 3.524 3.499 3.474 1994-2013 Conventional Areas 3.366 3.407 3.533 3.521 3.496 3.473 1994-2013 Reformulated Areas 3.354 3.426 3.561 3.550 3.526 3.489 1994-2013 Premium 3.558 3.605 3.735 3.726 3.699 3.675 1994-2013 Conventional Areas 3.561 3.605 3.734 3.726 3.698 3.675 1994-2013 Reformulated Areas

434

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 458,980 517,232 511,759 545,873 535,318 568,027 3,597,826 3,638,931 1.1 Regular 410,544 461,626 455,817 482,797 472,316 499,626 3,206,158 3,231,948 0.8 Conventional 77,736 84,893 82,811 92,772 93,610 105,170 613,913 621,309 1.2 Reformulated 332,808 376,733 373,006 390,025 378,706 394,456 2,592,245 2,610,639 0.7 Midgrade 9,477 10,662 10,750 12,002 11,743 13,261 84,697 78,423 -7.4 Conventional 1,011 1,085 1,076 1,267 1,335 1,653 8,488 8,545 0.7 Reformulated 8,466 9,577 9,674 10,735 10,408 11,608 76,209 69,878 -8.3 Premium 38,959 44,944 45,192 51,074 51,259 55,140 306,971 328,560 7.0 Conventional 4,290 4,362 4,340 5,704 6,255 7,563 35,140 37,381 6.4

435

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 501,742 458,980 517,232 511,759 545,873 535,318 3,042,040 3,070,904 0.9 Regular 449,222 410,544 461,626 455,817 482,797 472,316 2,715,031 2,732,322 0.6 Conventional 84,317 77,736 84,893 82,811 92,772 93,610 513,467 516,139 0.5 Reformulated 364,905 332,808 376,733 373,006 390,025 378,706 2,201,564 2,216,183 0.7 Midgrade 10,528 9,477 10,662 10,750 12,002 11,743 70,703 65,162 -7.8 Conventional 1,118 1,011 1,085 1,076 1,267 1,335 6,857 6,892 0.5 Reformulated 9,410 8,466 9,577 9,674 10,735 10,408 63,846 58,270 -8.7 Premium 41,992 38,959 44,944 45,192 51,074 51,259 256,306 273,420 6.7 Conventional 4,867 4,290 4,362 4,340 5,704 6,255 28,572 29,818 4.4

436

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 537,109 530,520 540,898 555,627 513,590 551,236 5,439,184 5,265,973 -3.5 Regular 480,922 475,729 482,398 495,544 460,050 494,566 4,769,194 4,707,976 -1.6 Conventional 85,994 88,242 92,325 98,019 85,817 90,273 955,696 859,396 -10.4 Reformulated 394,928 387,487 390,073 397,525 374,233 404,293 3,813,498 3,848,580 0.6 Midgrade 14,609 14,166 14,682 14,063 11,714 11,949 195,726 137,732 -29.9 Conventional 1,755 1,810 2,224 1,989 1,208 1,147 24,447 16,832 -31.4 Reformulated 12,854 12,356 12,458 12,074 10,506 10,802 171,279 120,900 -29.6 Premium 41,578 40,625 43,818 46,020 41,826 44,721 474,264 420,265 -11.7 Conventional 4,525 4,912 6,558 6,625 4,768 4,541 59,363 46,775 -21.5

437

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 499,935 542,611 516,779 557,147 554,647 565,098 3,710,136 3,771,666 1.7 Regular 438,673 479,616 456,628 489,804 487,006 492,384 3,254,350 3,314,603 1.9 Conventional 89,836 92,595 86,101 95,676 96,645 104,206 676,728 657,590 -2.8 Reformulated 348,837 387,021 370,527 394,128 390,361 388,178 2,577,622 2,657,013 3.1 Midgrade 18,187 19,268 18,846 20,575 20,136 22,106 136,920 138,481 1.1 Conventional 2,263 2,142 1,889 2,237 2,429 3,291 18,709 16,499 -11.8 Reformulated 15,924 17,126 16,957 18,338 17,707 18,815 118,211 121,982 3.2 Premium 43,075 43,727 41,305 46,768 47,505 50,608 318,866 318,582 -0.1 Conventional 5,759 4,923 3,908 5,672 6,306 7,624 37,639 39,337 4.5

438

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 542,611 516,779 557,147 554,647 565,098 582,468 4,285,709 4,354,134 1.6 Regular 479,616 456,628 489,804 487,006 492,384 506,038 3,757,974 3,820,641 1.7 Conventional 92,595 86,101 95,676 96,645 104,206 108,040 794,237 765,630 -3.6 Reformulated 387,021 370,527 394,128 390,361 388,178 397,998 2,963,737 3,055,011 3.1 Midgrade 19,268 18,846 20,575 20,136 22,106 22,313 159,156 160,794 1.0 Conventional 2,142 1,889 2,237 2,429 3,291 3,257 22,323 19,756 -11.5 Reformulated 17,126 16,957 18,338 17,707 18,815 19,056 136,833 141,038 3.1 Premium 43,727 41,305 46,768 47,505 50,608 54,117 368,579 372,699 1.1 Conventional 4,923 3,908 5,672 6,306 7,624 8,451 45,324 47,788 5.4

439

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 600,331 607,637 544,776 585,964 544,609 569,610 6,231,572 6,612,576 6.1 Regular 474,800 481,922 433,667 470,192 438,253 458,980 4,959,542 5,284,355 6.5 Conventional 107,710 110,970 91,845 98,835 90,774 95,236 1,056,509 1,117,226 5.7 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 367,090 370,952 341,822 371,357 347,479 363,744 3,903,033 4,167,129 6.8 Midgrade 41,258 41,734 35,957 37,629 35,045 36,676 450,664 436,007 -3.3 Conventional 7,552 7,706 5,748 5,973 5,333 5,568 69,760 69,873 0.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 33,706 34,028 30,209 31,656 29,712 31,108 380,904 366,134 -3.9 Premium 84,273 83,981 75,152 78,143 71,311 73,954 821,366 892,214 8.6

440

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 578,792 575,573 533,235 558,038 523,217 547,836 6,634,088 6,446,469 -2.8 Regular 505,930 503,624 465,652 488,216 458,192 482,095 5,702,420 5,651,281 -0.9 Conventional 115,384 117,509 101,392 101,392 92,553 97,112 1,136,078 1,185,915 4.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 390,546 386,115 364,260 386,824 365,639 384,983 4,566,342 4,465,366 -2.2 Midgrade 22,411 22,431 18,855 19,366 18,587 18,972 284,225 234,745 -17.4 Conventional 3,825 3,614 2,661 2,583 2,209 2,335 39,464 32,012 -18.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 18,586 18,817 16,194 16,783 16,378 16,637 244,761 202,733 -17.2 Premium 50,451 49,518 48,728 50,456 46,438 46,769 647,443 560,443 -13.4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

New York Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

722 3.734 3.749 3.774 3.785 3.741 2000-2014 722 3.734 3.749 3.774 3.785 3.741 2000-2014 All Grades - Conventional Areas 3.730 3.734 3.735 3.757 3.768 3.749 2000-2014 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 3.716 3.735 3.761 3.789 3.799 3.734 2000-2014 Regular 3.618 3.635 3.649 3.679 3.690 3.644 2000-2014 Conventional Areas 3.638 3.647 3.649 3.672 3.683 3.661 2000-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.600 3.624 3.650 3.686 3.697 3.629 2000-2014 Midgrade 3.853 3.858 3.875 3.889 3.898 3.860 2000-2014 Conventional Areas 3.826 3.831 3.833 3.847 3.853 3.843 2000-2014 Reformulated Areas 3.870 3.875 3.902 3.916 3.928 3.871 2000-2014 Premium 3.984 3.988 4.001 4.016 4.025 3.988 2000-2014 Conventional Areas 3.986 3.979 3.975 3.998 4.008 3.997 2000-2014 Reformulated Areas

442

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 557,326 578,792 575,573 533,235 558,038 526,589 6,078,816 5,902,005 -2.9 Regular 489,993 505,930 503,624 465,652 488,216 460,951 5,218,190 5,171,945 -0.9 Conventional 106,317 115,384 117,509 101,392 101,392 95,048 1,042,317 1,091,298 4.7 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 383,676 390,546 386,115 364,260 386,824 365,903 4,175,873 4,080,647 -2.3 Midgrade 20,189 22,411 22,431 18,855 19,366 18,344 262,910 215,530 -18.0 Conventional 2,831 3,825 3,614 2,661 2,583 2,349 36,855 29,817 -19.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 17,358 18,586 18,817 16,194 16,783 15,995 226,055 185,713 -17.8 Premium 47,144 50,451 49,518 48,728 50,456 47,294 597,716 514,530 -13.9

443

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 575,573 533,235 558,038 523,217 546,228 521,614 507,903 521,614 2.7 Regular 503,624 465,652 488,216 458,192 480,634 458,169 445,636 458,169 2.8 Conventional 117,509 101,392 101,392 92,553 95,604 93,933 87,304 93,933 7.6 Reformulated 386,115 364,260 386,824 365,639 385,030 364,236 358,332 364,236 1.6 Midgrade 22,431 18,855 19,366 18,587 19,274 18,113 18,945 18,113 -4.4 Conventional 3,614 2,661 2,583 2,209 2,216 2,276 2,326 2,276 -2.1 Reformulated 18,817 16,194 16,783 16,378 17,058 15,837 16,619 15,837 -4.7 Premium 49,518 48,728 50,456 46,438 46,320 45,332 43,322 45,332 4.6 Conventional 7,685 6,074 5,976 4,770 4,840 5,124 4,574 5,124 12.0

444

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 509,790 537,109 530,520 540,898 555,627 513,590 4,881,867 4,714,737 -3.8 Regular 455,431 480,922 475,729 482,398 495,544 460,050 4,279,978 4,213,410 -1.9 Conventional 76,766 85,994 88,242 92,325 98,019 85,817 860,581 769,123 -11.0 Reformulated 378,665 394,928 387,487 390,073 397,525 374,233 3,419,397 3,444,287 0.4 Midgrade 13,806 14,609 14,166 14,682 14,063 11,714 176,576 125,783 -29.0 Conventional 1,546 1,755 1,810 2,224 1,989 1,208 22,272 15,685 -29.8 Reformulated 12,260 12,854 12,356 12,458 12,074 10,506 154,304 110,098 -28.9 Premium 40,553 41,578 40,625 43,818 46,020 41,826 425,313 375,544 -12.0 Conventional 3,283 4,525 4,912 6,558 6,625 4,768 54,233 42,234 -22.4

445

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 557,147 554,647 565,098 582,461 528,605 557,688 5,384,282 5,440,420 1.0 Regular 489,804 487,006 492,384 506,031 460,477 489,668 4,718,267 4,770,779 1.1 Conventional 95,676 96,645 104,206 108,037 94,740 95,190 997,859 955,557 -4.2 Reformulated 394,128 390,361 388,178 397,994 365,737 394,478 3,720,408 3,815,222 2.5 Midgrade 20,575 20,136 22,106 22,313 19,450 19,638 197,575 199,882 1.2 Conventional 2,237 2,429 3,291 3,257 2,452 2,171 27,582 24,379 -11.6 Reformulated 18,338 17,707 18,815 19,056 16,998 17,467 169,993 175,503 3.2 Premium 46,768 47,505 50,608 54,117 48,678 48,382 468,440 469,759 0.3 Conventional 5,672 6,306 7,624 8,451 6,308 5,115 57,431 59,211 3.1

446

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 540,605 483,593 520,563 494,955 496,452 492,765 461,105 492,765 6.9 Regular 479,996 431,332 467,394 442,377 445,406 442,844 414,239 442,844 6.9 Conventional 107,232 90,415 98,631 89,489 89,443 92,274 77,162 92,274 19.6 Reformulated 372,764 340,917 368,763 352,888 355,963 350,570 337,077 350,570 4.0 Midgrade 10,741 9,011 8,844 8,424 8,190 7,995 7,806 7,995 2.4 Conventional 1,499 1,234 1,015 881 903 921 832 921 10.7 Reformulated 9,242 7,777 7,829 7,543 7,287 7,074 6,974 7,074 1.4 Premium 49,868 43,250 44,325 44,154 42,856 41,926 39,060 41,926 7.3 Conventional 7,295 5,452 4,696 4,075 4,150 4,510 3,926 4,510 14.9 Reformulated 42,573 37,798 39,629 40,079 38,706 37,416 35,134 37,416 6.5

447

Texas Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

034 3.066 3.217 3.198 3.179 3.120 2000-2013 034 3.066 3.217 3.198 3.179 3.120 2000-2013 All Grades - Conventional Areas 3.034 3.051 3.204 3.184 3.168 3.123 2000-2013 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 3.035 3.088 3.237 3.219 3.196 3.115 2000-2013 Regular 2.959 2.989 3.146 3.125 3.108 3.048 2000-2013 Conventional Areas 2.967 2.985 3.142 3.119 3.107 3.059 2000-2013 Reformulated Areas 2.946 2.996 3.152 3.133 3.110 3.030 2000-2013 Midgrade 3.149 3.186 3.320 3.305 3.284 3.226 2000-2013 Conventional Areas 3.130 3.153 3.286 3.275 3.254 3.212 2000-2013 Reformulated Areas 3.177 3.234 3.368 3.346 3.326 3.246 2000-2013 Premium 3.312 3.346 3.483 3.472 3.443 3.389 2000-2013 Conventional Areas 3.295 3.309 3.452 3.440 3.411 3.376 2000-2013 Reformulated Areas

448

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 514,054 550,377 518,226 477,504 513,866 505,080 2,036,993 2,014,676 -0.3 Regular 460,528 491,662 464,200 427,980 459,449 450,036 1,818,767 1,801,665 -0.1 Conventional 80,032 90,649 82,174 76,972 78,976 77,281 318,726 315,403 -0.2 Reformulated 380,496 401,013 382,026 351,008 380,473 372,755 1,500,041 1,486,262 -0.1 Midgrade 11,129 12,327 11,408 10,578 11,416 11,399 56,549 44,801 -20.1 Conventional 948 1,239 1,124 1,067 1,017 1,009 6,699 4,217 -36.5 Reformulated 10,181 11,088 10,284 9,511 10,399 10,390 49,850 40,584 -17.9 Premium 42,397 46,388 42,618 38,946 43,001 43,645 161,677 168,210 4.9 Conventional 3,734 4,536 4,692 4,409 4,171 3,914 14,846 17,186 16.7

449

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 550,377 518,226 477,504 513,866 505,064 534,056 2,574,102 2,548,716 -0.3 Regular 491,662 464,200 427,980 459,449 450,035 474,188 2,299,689 2,275,852 -0.4 Conventional 90,649 82,174 76,972 78,976 77,280 86,603 404,720 402,005 0.0 Reformulated 401,013 382,026 351,008 380,473 372,755 387,585 1,894,969 1,873,847 -0.5 Midgrade 12,327 11,408 10,578 11,416 11,399 12,587 71,158 57,388 -18.8 Conventional 1,239 1,124 1,067 1,017 1,015 1,198 8,454 5,421 -35.5 Reformulated 11,088 10,284 9,511 10,399 10,384 11,389 62,704 51,967 -16.6 Premium 46,388 42,618 38,946 43,001 43,630 47,281 203,255 215,476 6.7 Conventional 4,536 4,692 4,409 4,171 3,918 4,992 19,371 22,182 15.3

450

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 142,976 125,585 133,383 132,214 134,901 129,045 118,555 129,045 8.8 Regular 127,337 112,647 119,751 117,558 119,426 114,771 104,022 114,771 10.3 Conventional W 91,370 82,252 69,032 69,189 64,626 61,295 64,626 5.4 Oxygenated W 21,277 37,499 48,526 50,237 50,145 42,727 50,145 17.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,977 3,370 3,629 3,715 3,919 3,705 4,122 3,705 -10.1 Conventional W W 2,182 1,558 1,636 1,625 1,960 1,625 -17.1 Oxygenated W W 1,447 2,157 2,283 2,080 2,162 2,080 -3.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,662 9,568 10,003 10,941 11,556 10,569 10,411 10,569 1.5 Conventional W W 6,316 5,317 5,622 4,950 5,562 4,950 -11.0

451

Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

00 3.439 3.518 3.537 3.548 3.555 1993-2013 00 3.439 3.518 3.537 3.548 3.555 1993-2013 All Grades - Conventional Areas 3.456 3.492 3.551 3.571 3.589 3.592 1994-2013 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 3.365 3.406 3.498 3.516 3.523 3.533 1994-2013 Regular 3.295 3.341 3.423 3.441 3.447 3.457 1993-2013 Conventional Areas 3.371 3.411 3.471 3.496 3.509 3.514 1993-2013 Reformulated Areas 3.247 3.297 3.393 3.407 3.408 3.421 1994-2013 Midgrade 3.491 3.518 3.592 3.617 3.634 3.636 1994-2013 Conventional Areas 3.484 3.524 3.581 3.592 3.609 3.611 1994-2013 Reformulated Areas 3.496 3.514 3.598 3.632 3.649 3.651 1994-2013 Premium 3.663 3.684 3.760 3.779 3.800 3.805 1994-2013 Conventional Areas 3.700 3.721 3.781 3.791 3.820 3.818 1994-2013 Reformulated Areas 3.641 3.662 3.748 3.772 3.789 3.797 1994-2013

452

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 488,726 508,081 505,973 534,828 527,726 470,883 4,446,448 4,433,062 0.1 Regular 437,307 450,215 447,456 473,795 466,249 416,430 3,969,926 3,946,750 -0.2 Conventional 93,114 96,168 96,218 109,084 109,271 92,643 800,409 860,860 7.9 Reformulated 344,193 354,047 351,238 364,711 356,978 323,787 3,169,517 3,085,890 -2.3 Midgrade 7,840 8,971 9,184 10,273 11,401 9,430 80,763 80,314 -0.2 Conventional 867 1,110 1,165 1,477 1,528 962 9,713 9,752 0.8 Reformulated 6,973 7,861 8,019 8,796 9,873 8,468 71,050 70,562 -0.3 Premium 43,579 48,895 49,333 50,760 50,076 45,023 395,759 405,998 3.0 Conventional 5,033 5,533 6,005 7,577 7,698 5,642 46,808 49,890 7.0

453

How parameters and regularization affect the Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model phase diagram and thermodynamic quantities  

SciTech Connect

We explore the phase diagram and the critical behavior of QCD thermodynamic quantities in the context of the so-called Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. We show that this improved field theoretical model is a successful candidate for studying the equation of state and the critical behavior around the critical endpoint. We argue that a convenient choice of the model parameters is crucial to get the correct description of isentropic trajectories. The effects of the regularization procedure in several thermodynamic quantities is also analyzed. The results are compared with simple thermodynamic expectations and lattice data.

Costa, P. [Centro de Fisica Computacional, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, P-3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal) and E.S.T.G., Instituto Politecnico de Leiria, Morro do Lena-Alto do Vieiro, 2411-901 Leiria (Portugal); Hansen, H. [IPNL, Universite de Lyon/Universite Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue E.Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Ruivo, M. C.; Sousa, C. A. de [Centro de Fisica Computacional, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, P-3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Regular pattern formation through the retraction and pinch-off of edges during solid-state dewetting of patterned single crystal films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the formation of regular patterns of metal lines via solid-state dewetting of lithographically patterned single-crystal Ni(110) films with square and cross shapes. During the solid-state dewetting, valleys develop ...

Ye, Jongpil

455

SUPPLEMENT TO THE PAPER: Separating the regular and irregular energy levels and their statistics in Hamiltonian system with mixed classical dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a technical supplement to the above mentioned paper we present 192 consecutive eigenstates for the Robnik billiard with the shape parameter $\\lambda=0.15$ from 10,001st to 10,192nd, by showing the plots in the configuration space and in the phase space. The latter is smoothed projection of the Wigner function onto the surface of section. By comparison with the classical SOS plots we thus examine all eigenstates and classify them in regular and irregular: There are 70 regular states and 122 irregular states, thus giving the estimate of the relative measure of the regular component $\\rho_1=0.365$, which is in excellent agreement with the classical value $\\rho_1=0.360$ calculated and reported by Prosen and Robnik (1993).

Baowen Li; Marko Robnik

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

A regularized simplex method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

European Journal of Operational Research 101, 328-342. [24] Sagastizbal, C. and M. Solodov (2012). Solving generation expansion problems with environ-.

457

Nonparametric Sparsity and Regularization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we are interested in the problems of supervised learning and variable selection when the input-output dependence is described by a nonlinear function depending on a few variables. Our goal is to consider a ...

Rosasco, Lorenzo Andrea

458

Diagnosabilities of Regular Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we study diagnosabilities of multiprocessor systems under two diagnosis models: the PMC model and the comparison model. In each model, we further consider two different diagnosis strategies: the precise diagnosis strategy proposed by Preparata ... Keywords: Diagnosis, diagnosis by comparison, hypercube, multiprocessor system, pessimistic diagnosis strategy, PMC model, precise diagnosis strategy.

Guey-Yun Chang; Gerard J. Chang; Gen-Huey Chen

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Utah Premium Gasoline Retail Sales by Refiners (Thousand Gallons ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1983: 3.9: 3.3: 3.8: 3.8: 5.0: 5.3: 5.5: 6.2: 6.1: 5.6: 5.7: 5.1: 1984: W: W: W: W: W: W: 42.5: 19.5: 17.8: 18.1 ...

460

Retail Prices for Premium Gasoline - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3.456: 2000-2013: Washington: 4.154: 4.090: 4.110: 4.058: 3.976: 3.781: 2003-2013: Cities : Boston: 3.805: 3.834: 3.924: 3.983: 3.917: 3.755: 2003-2013: Chicago: 4 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade premium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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461

Rising College Premiums in Mexico: How Important Is Trade?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trade and investment liberalisation, nancial crisis, andR. , 2000. Trade liberalisation and wage inequality: Lessons

Mehta, Aashish; Acuna, Belinda

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

The Control Premium: A Preference for Payoff Autonomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Part 4, we will pass around an answer key for the Quizzes.On the answer key, you will write down the identificationroom you will return the answer key, with the identification

Owens, David; Grossman , Zachary; Fackler , Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Montana Premium Gasoline Prices - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Gasoline Prices by Formulation, Grade, Sales Type (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) ... History; Sales to End Users, Average: 2.518: 2.929: 2.085: ...

464

Business Driven Information Systems with Premium Content Card, 2 edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Baltzan and Phillips approach in Business Driven Information Systems discusses various business initiatives first and how technology supports those initiatives second. The premise for this unique approach is that business initiatives drive technology ...

Paige Baltzan; Amy Phillips

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Energy Conservation Tax Credits - Small Premium Projects (Personal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System Size Projects must cost less than 20,000 Equipment Requirements First year energy savings must yield a simple payback period of greater than 3 years. Start Date 2011...

466

Energy Conservation Tax Credits - Small Premium Projects (Corporate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System Size Projects must cost less than 20,000 Equipment Requirements First year energy savings must yield a simple payback period of greater than 3 years. Start Date 2011...

467

Consistency and Advantage of Loop Regularization Method Merging with Bjorken-Drell's Analogy Between Feynman Diagrams and Electrical Circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The consistency of loop regularization (LORE) method is explored in multiloop calculations. A key concept of the LORE method is the introduction of irreducible loop integrals (ILIs) which are evaluated from the Feynman diagrams by adopting the Feynman parametrization and ultraviolet-divergence-preserving(UVDP) parametrization. It is then inevitable for the ILIs to encounter the divergences in the UVDP parameter space due to the generic overlapping divergences in the 4-dimensional momentum space. By computing the so-called $\\alpha\\beta\\gamma$ integrals arising from two loop Feynman diagrams, we show how to deal with the divergences in the parameter space with the LORE method. By identifying the divergences in the UVDP parameter space to those in the subdiagrams, we arrive at the Bjorken-Drell's analogy between Feynman diagrams and electrical circuits. The UVDP parameters are shown to correspond to the conductance or resistance in the electrical circuits, and the divergence in Feynman diagrams is ascribed to the infinite conductance or zero resistance. In particular, the sets of conditions required to eliminate the overlapping momentum integrals for obtaining the ILIs are found to be associated with the conservations of electric voltages, and the momentum conservations correspond to the conservations of electrical currents, which are known as the Kirchhoff's laws in the electrical circuits analogy. As an application to the massive scalar $\\phi^4$ theory, it enables us to obtain the well-known logarithmic running of the coupling constant and the consistent power-law running of the scalar mass at two loop level. Especially, we present an explicit demonstration on the general procedure of applying the LORE method to the multiloop calculations of Feynman diagrams when merging with the advantage of Bjorken-Drell's circuit analogy.

Da Huang; Yue-Liang Wu

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

468

Chemical stratification in the atmosphere of Ap star HD 133792. Regularized solution of the vertical inversion problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High spectral resolution studies of cool Ap stars reveal conspicuous anomalies of the shape and strength of many absorption lines. This is a signature of large atmospheric chemical gradients produced by the selective radiative levitation and gravitational settling of chemical species. Here we present a new approach to mapping the vertical chemical structures in stellar atmospheres. We have developed a regularized chemical inversion procedure that uses all information available in high-resolution stellar spectra. The new technique for the first time allowed us to recover chemical profiles without making a priori assumptions about the shape of chemical distributions. We have derived average abundances and applied the vertical inversion procedure to the high-resolution VLT UVES spectra of the weakly magnetic, cool Ap star HD 133792. Our analysis yielded improved estimates of the atmospheric parameters of HD 133792. We show that this star has negligible vsini and the mean magnetic field modulus =1.1+/-0.1 kG. We have derived average abundances for 43 ions and obtained vertical distributions of Ca, Si, Mg, Fe, Cr, and Sr. All these elements except Mg show high overabundance in the deep layers and solar or sub-solar composition in the upper atmosphere of HD 133792. In contrast, the Mg abundance increases with height. We find that transition from the metal-enhanced to metal-depleted zones typically occurs in a rather narrow range of depths in the atmosphere of HD 133792. Based on the derived photospheric abundances, we conclude that HD 133792 belongs to the rare group of evolved cool Ap stars, which possesses very large Fe-peak enhancement, but lacks a prominent overabundance of the rare-earth elements.

O. Kochukhov; V. Tsymbal; T. Ryabchikova; V. Makaganyk; S. Bagnulo

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

469

Dynamical localization of chaotic eigenstates in the mixed-type systems: spectral statistics in a billiard system after separation of regular and chaotic eigenstates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the quantum mechanics of a billiard (Robnik 1983) in the regime of mixed-type classical phase space (the shape parameter \\lambda=0.15) at very high-lying eigenstates, starting at about 1.000.000th eigenstate and including the consecutive 587654 eigenstates. By calculating the normalized Poincar\\'e Husimi functions of the eigenstates and comparing them with the classical phase space structure, we introduce the overlap criterion which enables us to separate with great accuracy and reliability the regular and chaotic eigenstates, and the corresponding energies. The chaotic eigenstates appear all to be dynamically localized, meaning that they do not occupy unformly the entire available chaotic classical phase space component, but are localized on a proper subset. We find with unprecedented precision and statistical significance that the level spacing distribution of the regular levels obeys the Poisson statistics, and the chaotic ones obey the Brody statistics, as anticipated in a recent paper by Batisti\\'c and Robnik (2010), where the entire spectrum was found to obey the BRB statistics. There are no effects of dynamical tunneling in this regime, due to the high energies, as they decay exponentially with the inverse effective Planck constant which is proportional to the square root of the energy.

Benjamin Batisti?; Marko Robnik

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

470

Low-fat diet and regular, supervised physical exercise in patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease: reduction of stress-induced myocardial ischemia  

SciTech Connect

The effects of physical exercise and normalization of serum lipoproteins on stress-induced myocardial ischemia were studied in 18 patients with coronary artery disease, stable angina pectoris, and mild hypercholesterolemia (total serum cholesterol 242 +/- 32 mg/dl). These patients underwent a combined regimen of low-fat/low-cholesterol diet and regular, supervised physical exercise at high intensity for 12 months. At 1 year serum lipoproteins has been lowered to ideal levels (serum cholesterol 202 +/- 31 mg/dl, low-density lipoproteins 130 +/- 30 mg/dl, very low-density lipoproteins 22 +/- 15 mg/dl, serum triglycerides 105 (69 to 304) mg/dl) and physical work capacity was improved by 21% (p less than .01). No significant effect was noted on high-density lipoproteins, probably as a result of the low-fat/high-carbohydrate diet. Stress-induced myocardial ischemia, as assessed by thallium-201 scintigraphy, was decreased by 54% (p less than .05) despite higher myocardial oxygen consumption. Eighteen patients matched for age and severity of coronary artery disease served as a control group and ''usual medical care'' was rendered by their private physicians. No significant changes with respect to serum lipoproteins, physical work capacity, maximal rate-pressure product, or stress-induced myocardial ischemia were observed in this group. These data indicate that regular physical exercise at high intensity, lowered body weight, and normalization of serum lipoproteins may alleviate compromised myocardial perfusion during stress.

Schuler, G.; Schlierf, G.; Wirth, A.; Mautner, H.P.; Scheurlen, H.; Thumm, M.; Roth, H.; Schwarz, F.; Kohlmeier, M.; Mehmel, H.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Retail Prices for Regular Gasoline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

194 3.219 3.293 3.272 3.269 3.239 1990-2013 194 3.219 3.293 3.272 3.269 3.239 1990-2013 East Coast (PADD1) 3.243 3.282 3.386 3.389 3.382 3.373 1992-2013 New England (PADD 1A) 3.393 3.396 3.453 3.475 3.494 3.508 1993-2013 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 3.295 3.341 3.423 3.441 3.447 3.457 1993-2013 Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) 3.159 3.203 3.338 3.325 3.300 3.270 1993-2013 Midwest (PADD 2) 3.074 3.126 3.191 3.121 3.132 3.079 1992-2013 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 2.978 3.004 3.140 3.124 3.104 3.047 1992-2013 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) 3.227 3.183 3.145 3.113 3.077 3.055 1992-2013 West Coast (PADD 5) 3.507 3.467 3.457 3.475 3.477 3.472 1992-2013 West Coast less California 3.342 3.306 3.302 3.300 3.298 3.295 1998-2013 States California 3.603 3.560 3.547 3.576 3.580 3.574 2000-2013

472

regularized sequential quadratic programming methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 2, 2011 ... ?Department of Mathematics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, ... 0511766 and DMS-0915220, and by Department of Energy grant...

473

EXACT REGULARIZATION OF LINEAR PROGRAMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 26, 2005 ... instead appealing to Lagrange duality theory. ..... lpi-reactor. 2.0e+ .... A new result in the theory and computation of the least-norm solution of a.

474

Trace Norm Regularization - Optimization Online  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

areas such as machine learning, data mining, computer vision, and ...... The AUC (the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve) can be interpreted...

475

On the Aliasing and Resolving Power of Sea Level Low-Pass Filtered onto a Regular Grid from Along-Track Altimeter Data of Uncoordinated Satellites: The Smoothing Strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that smoothing (low-pass filtering) along-track altimeter data of uncoordinated satellites onto a regular spacetime grid helps reduce the overall energy level of the aliasing from the aliasing levels of the individual satellites. The ...

Chang-Kou Tai

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Thermodynamic Equilibrium-Driven Formation of Single-Sized Nanocrystals: Reaction Media Tuning CdSe Magic-Sized versus Regular Quantum Dots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A concept for the fundamental science of nanoparticle synthesis, thermodynamic equilibrium-driven formation of colloidal single-sized nanoparticle ensembles, is proposed and demonstrated in this manuscript, which addresses the controlled formation of CdSe magic-sized and regular quantum dots (MSQDs and RQDs). During formation, the former are magic-sized nuclei without further growth in size, while the latter experience nucleation and growth. Both MSQDs and RQDs exhibit bandgap emission, while the former have homogeneous spectra broadening only and the latter both homogeneous and inhomogeneous spectra broadening. The former are single-sized and the latter have size distribution. With continuous and homogeneous nucleation, the thermodynamically driven formation of MSQDs was realized via our one-pot noninjection approach, which features highly synthetic reproducibility and large-scale capability. With the proper tuning of the synthetic parameters, such as the nature of the reaction medium, that affect the thermodynamic equilibria, various CdSe MSQDs and RQDs were synthesized discriminately under otherwise identical synthetic formulation and reaction conditions; the reaction media were noncoordinating 1-octadecene, coordinating trioctylphosphine, and mixtures of the two. The nature of Cd precursors, affected also by the reaction media, plays a major role in the formation of MSQDs versus RQDs. The present investigation on the thermodynamically driven formation of CdSe single-sized nanoparticles via tuning of the reaction medium, mainly, brings novel insights into the formation mechanism and into the surface ligands of the resulting colloidal nanocrystals. More importantly, the present study provides novel experimental design and approaches to single-sized nanoparticles desired for various applications.

Yu, Kui [SIMS, NRC of Canada; Hu, Michael Z. [ORNL; Wang, Ruibing [SIMS, NRC of Canada; Le Piolet, Mickael [SIMS, NRC of Canada; Frotey, Marion [SIMS, NRC of Canada; Zaman, Md. Badruz [SIMS, NRC of Canada; Wu, Xiaohua [IMS, NRC of Canada; Leek, Donald M. [SIMS, NRC of Canada; Tao, Ye [IMS, NRC of Canada; Wilkinson, Diana [SIMS, NRC of Canada; Li, Chunsheng [National Research Council of Canada

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Gas Mileage of 1986 Vehicles by Dodge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Dodge Vehicles 6 Dodge Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 1986 Dodge 600 4 cyl, 2.2 L, Automatic 3-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1986 Dodge 600 21 City 22 Combined 24 Highway 1986 Dodge 600 4 cyl, 2.2 L, Automatic 3-spd, Premium Gasoline Compare 1986 Dodge 600 18 City 19 Combined 22 Highway 1986 Dodge 600 4 cyl, 2.5 L, Automatic 3-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1986 Dodge 600 20 City 21 Combined 23 Highway 1986 Dodge 600 Convertible 4 cyl, 2.2 L, Automatic 3-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1986 Dodge 600 Convertible 21 City 22 Combined 24 Highway 1986 Dodge 600 Convertible 4 cyl, 2.2 L, Automatic 3-spd, Premium Gasoline Compare 1986 Dodge 600 Convertible 18 City 19 Combined 22 Highway 1986 Dodge 600 Convertible 4 cyl, 2.2 L, Manual 5-spd, Premium Gasoline Compare 1986 Dodge 600 Convertible 18

478

Gas Mileage of 1995 Vehicles by Chevrolet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Chevrolet Vehicles 5 Chevrolet Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 1995 Chevrolet Astro 2WD (cargo) 6 cyl, 4.3 L, Automatic 4-spd, Premium Gasoline Compare 1995 Chevrolet Astro 2WD (cargo) View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 15 City 17 Combined 20 Highway 1995 Chevrolet Astro 2WD (passenger) 6 cyl, 4.3 L, Automatic 4-spd, Premium Gasoline Compare 1995 Chevrolet Astro 2WD (passenger) View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 15 City 16 Combined 19 Highway 1995 Chevrolet Astro AWD (cargo) 6 cyl, 4.3 L, Automatic 4-spd, Premium Gasoline Compare 1995 Chevrolet Astro AWD (cargo) 15 City 16 Combined 20 Highway 1995 Chevrolet Astro AWD (passenger) 6 cyl, 4.3 L, Automatic 4-spd, Premium Gasoline Compare 1995 Chevrolet Astro AWD (passenger) 14 City 15 Combined 17 Highway 1995 Chevrolet Beretta 4 cyl, 2.2 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular Gasoline

479

Creating and Implementing a Regularized Monitoring and EnforcementSystem for China's Mandatory Standards and Energy Information Label forAppliances  

SciTech Connect

China has developed a comprehensive program of energy efficiency standards and labels for household appliances. In 1989, China first launched its minimum energy performance standards (MEPS), which are now applied to an extensive list of products. In 1998, China launched a voluntary energy endorsement label, which has grown to cover both energy-saving and water-saving products. And, in 2005, China launched a mandatory energy information label that initially covered two products. CLASP has assisted China in developing 11 minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) for 9 products and endorsement labels for 11 products including: refrigerators; air conditioners; televisions; printers; computers; monitors; fax machines; copiers; DVD/VCD players; external power supplies; and set-top boxes. CLASP has also assisted China in the development of the mandatory energy information label. Increasingly, attention is being placed on maximum energy savings from China's standards and labeling (S&L) efforts in order to meet the recently announced goal of reducing China's energy intensity by 20 percent by 2010 with an interim objective of 4 percent in 2006. China's mandatory standards system is heavily focused on the technical requirements for efficiency performance, but historically, it has lacked administrative and personnel capacity to undertake monitoring and enforcement of these legally binding standards. Similarly, resources for monitoring and enforcement have been quite limited. As a consequence, compliance to both the mandatory standards and the mandatory energy information label is uneven with the potential and likely result of lost energy savings. Thus, a major area for improvement, which could significantly increase overall energy savings, is the creation and implementation of a regularized monitoring system for tracking the compliance to, and enforcement of, mandatory standards and the energy information label in China. CLASP has been working with the China National Institute of Standardization (CNIS), the China Administration for Quality, Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ) and relevant stakeholders in the industry to develop a stronger system of monitoring and enforcement. In November 2005, CNIS and LBNL (a CLASP implementing partner) with funding from the Energy Foundation jointly organized an international workshop to present the international best practices in S&L monitoring and enforcement. Currently, CNIS is developing a guideline for monitoring and enforcement for appliance standards. With support from METI, CLASP has been able to expand the on-going collaboration with CNIS to include enforcement needs for the mandatory energy information label and to accelerate the progress of the project to develop a more robust monitoring and enforcement for S&L programs in China. This expanded effort has included: (1) Holding an enforcement and monitoring roadmap planning workshop with key S&L stakeholders; (2) Interviews with S&L stakeholders on the need and scope of national compliance tests; (3) Research on past enforcement activities; (4) An analysis of compliance data from the mandatory energy information labeling program; (5) Interviews with stakeholders on the need and scope of testing infrastructure; and (6) Development of a roadmap for future activities. This report summarizes the findings of these activities and identifies the progress that China is making, and can make, toward developing a stronger system of monitoring and enforcement (M&E). In sum, it outlines a vision of moving forward with more vigorous M&E in China.

Lin, Jiang

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Gas Mileage of 1994 Vehicles by Chevrolet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Chevrolet Vehicles 4 Chevrolet Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 1994 Chevrolet Astro 2WD (cargo) 6 cyl, 4.3 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1994 Chevrolet Astro 2WD (cargo) 15 City 17 Combined 20 Highway 1994 Chevrolet Astro 2WD (cargo) 6 cyl, 4.3 L, Automatic 4-spd, Premium Gasoline Compare 1994 Chevrolet Astro 2WD (cargo) 15 City 17 Combined 20 Highway 1994 Chevrolet Astro 2WD (passenger) 6 cyl, 4.3 L, Automatic 4-spd, Premium Gasoline Compare 1994 Chevrolet Astro 2WD (passenger) 14 City 16 Combined 19 Highway 1994 Chevrolet Astro 2WD (passenger) 6 cyl, 4.3 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1994 Chevrolet Astro 2WD (passenger) View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 15 City 16 Combined 20 Highway 1994 Chevrolet Astro AWD (cargo) 6 cyl, 4.3 L, Automatic 4-spd, Premium Gasoline

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481

Gas Mileage of 1993 Vehicles by Chevrolet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Chevrolet Vehicles 3 Chevrolet Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 1993 Chevrolet Astro 2WD (cargo) 6 cyl, 4.3 L, Automatic 4-spd, Premium Gasoline Compare 1993 Chevrolet Astro 2WD (cargo) 15 City 17 Combined 21 Highway 1993 Chevrolet Astro 2WD (cargo) 6 cyl, 4.3 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1993 Chevrolet Astro 2WD (cargo) 15 City 17 Combined 20 Highway 1993 Chevrolet Astro 2WD (passenger) 6 cyl, 4.3 L, Automatic 4-spd, Premium Gasoline Compare 1993 Chevrolet Astro 2WD (passenger) 14 City 16 Combined 19 Highway 1993 Chevrolet Astro 2WD (passenger) 6 cyl, 4.3 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1993 Chevrolet Astro 2WD (passenger) 15 City 17 Combined 20 Highway 1993 Chevrolet Astro AWD (cargo) 6 cyl, 4.3 L, Automatic 4-spd, Premium Gasoline Compare 1993 Chevrolet Astro AWD (cargo) 14

482

New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Access 2007, Comprehensive, Premium Video Edition, 1st edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Market leading text, NEW PERSPECTIVES ON MICRSOFT OFFICE ACCESS 2007 now comes with video! The tutorial videos focus on the most important or difficult concepts and skills, helping you better engage in and retain information. With the text's critical ...

Joseph J. Adamski; Kathy T. Finnegan

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Investigations into the Robustness of Sustainable Real Estate Premiums and Commercial Real Estate Econometrics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation consists of three papers, all using CoStar Group, Inc. Commercial Real Estate (CRE) data. The first two papers explore Sustainable Real Estate (Energy (more)

Robinson, Spenser J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

TY RPRT T1 Exploring California PV Home Premiums A1 Ben Hoen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TY RPRT TY RPRT T1 Wind Technologies Market Report A1 Ryan H Wiser A1 Mark Bolinger ED Galen L Barbose ED Na m Darghouth ED Ben Hoen ED Andrew D Mills ED Samantha Weaver ED Kevin Porter ED Michael Buckley ED Sari Fink ED Frank Oteri ED Suzanne Tegen U2 LBNL E TY RPRT T1 A Spatial Hedonic Analysis of the Effects of Wind Energy Facilities on Surrounding Property Values in the United States A1 Ben Hoen A1 Jason P Brown A1 Thomas Jackson A1 Ryan H Wiser A1 Mark Thayer A1 Peter Cappers AB p Previous research on the effects of wind energy facilities on surrounding home values has been limited by small samples of relevant home sale data and the inability to account adequately for confounding home value factors and spatial dependence in the data This study helps

485

Reconnecting Money to Inflation: The Role of the External Finance Premium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of monetary policy. The Bank of England also places a less prominent weight on money, not least because ?nancial liberalisation and changing payment technologies have masked the in?ationary signal from growth in observed money aggregates.1 However, at the same...

Chadha, Jagjit S; Corrado, Luisa; Holly, Sean

486

ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM "PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secondly, waste heat driven thermal cooling systems are onlyelectricity and thermal energy for cooling and heatingrecovery and cooling technologies, including the thermal-

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

A Habit-Based Explanation of the Exchange Rate Risk Premium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a model that reproduces the uncovered interest rate parity puzzle. Investors have preferences with external habits. Countercyclical risk premia and procyclical real interest rates arise endogenously. ...

Verdelhan, Adrien Frederic

488

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes the current economic and environmental performance of combined heat and power (CHP) systems in power interruption intolerant commercial facilities. Through a series of three case studies, key trade-offs are analyzed with regard to the provision of black-out ridethrough capability with the CHP systems and the resutling ability to avoid the need for at least some diesel backup generator capacity located at the case study sites. Each of the selected sites currently have a CHP or combined heating, cooling, and power (CCHP) system in addition to diesel backup generators. In all cases the CHP/CCHP system have a small fraction of the electrical capacity of the diesel generators. Although none of the selected sites currently have the ability to run the CHP systems as emergency backup power, all could be retrofitted to provide this blackout ride-through capability, and new CHP systems can be installed with this capability. The following three sites/systems were used for this analysis: (1) Sierra Nevada Brewery - Using 1MW of installed Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells operating on a combination of digestor gas (from the beer brewing process) and natural gas, this facility can produce electricty and heat for the brewery and attached bottling plant. The major thermal load on-site is to keep the brewing tanks at appropriate temperatures. (2) NetApp Data Center - Using 1.125 MW of Hess Microgen natural gas fired reciprocating engine-generators, with exhaust gas and jacket water heat recovery attached to over 300 tons of of adsorption chillers, this combined cooling and power system provides electricity and cooling to a data center with a 1,200 kW peak electrical load. (3) Kaiser Permanente Hayward Hospital - With 180kW of Tecogen natural gas fired reciprocating engine-generators this CHP system generates steam for space heating, and hot water for a city hospital. For all sites, similar assumptions are made about the economic and technological constraints of the power generation system. Using the Distributed Energy Resource Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we model three representative scenarios and find the optimal operation scheduling, yearly energy cost, and energy technology investments for each scenario below: Scenario 1 - Diesel generators and CHP/CCHP equipment as installed in the current facility. Scenario 1 represents a baseline forced investment in currently installed energy equipment. Scenario 2 - Existing CHP equipment installed with blackout ride-through capability to replace approximately the same capacity of diesel generators. In Scenario 2 the cost of the replaced diesel units is saved, however additional capital cost for the controls and switchgear for blackout ride-through capability is necessary. Scenario 3 - Fully optimized site analysis, allowing DER-CAM to specify the number of diesel and CHP/CCHP units (with blackout ride-through capability) that should be installed ignoring any constraints on backup generation. Scenario 3 allows DER-CAM to optimize scheduling and number of generation units from the currently available technologies at a particular site. The results of this analysis, using real data to model the optimal schedulding of hypothetical and actual CHP systems for a brewery, data center, and hospital, lead to some interesting conclusions. First, facilities with high heating loads will typically prove to be the most appropriate for CHP installation from a purely economic standpoint. Second, absorption/adsorption cooling systems may only be economically feasible if the technology for these chillers can increase above current best system efficiency. At a coefficient of performance (COP) of 0.8, for instance, an adsorption chiller paired with a natural gas generator with waste heat recovery at a facility with large cooling loads, like a data center, will cost no less on a yearly basis than purchasing electricity and natural gas directly from a utility. Third, at marginal additional cost, if the reliability of CHP systems proves to be at

Norwood, Zack; Lipman, Tim; Marnay, Chris; Kammen, Dan

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

489

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies on Microgrid Viability: An Investigation forother benefits to the CHP or microgrid system host site. See

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM "PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study ofother benefits to the CHP or microgrid system host site. Seecapability in a CERTS Microgrid configuration in reference [

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and operation of distributed generation, combined heat andcost combination of distributed generation technologies thatdesires to install distributed generation to minimize the

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM "PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

customers default electricity tariff, natural gas prices,NetApp electricity prices are based on utility tariffs intariffs during the weekends (as compared to the weekdays) results in the CCP system remaining always off, as purchase of electricity

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

August 2002. PG&E electricity tariffs. http://www.pge.com/May 2008. PG&E electricity tariffs. http://www.pge.com/customers default electricity tariff, natural gas prices,

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM "PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. Edwards, J. : Distributed Energy Resources CustomerC. Siddiqui, A. : Distributed Energy Resources On-SiteStadler, M. : The Distributed Energy Resources Costumer

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compared to adsorption/absorption chiller systems. Expensiveonsite (without absorption chiller offset) Effectiveonsite (includes absorption chiller offset) Heating Load

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM "PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to adsorption/absorption chiller systems. So, facilitiesabsorption / published in the International Journal of Distributed Energy Resources, vol 6(2),1 Apr-Jun 2010 adsorption chiller);

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pdf/E-20.pdf, May 2008. PG&E natural gas tariffs. http://pdf/G-NT.pdf, May 2008. PG&E natural gas tariffs. http://than less expensive natural gas fired reciprocating engine

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498