National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for regular midgrade premium

  1. U.S. Motor Gasoline Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Formulation Grade: Gasoline, Average Regular Gasoline Midgrade Gasoline Premium Gasoline Conventional, Average Conventional Regular Conventional Midgrade Conventional Premium ...

  2. Fact #928: June 6, 2016 Price Difference between Regular and Premium

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gasoline Has Grown Each Year Since 2011 | Department of Energy 8: June 6, 2016 Price Difference between Regular and Premium Gasoline Has Grown Each Year Since 2011 Fact #928: June 6, 2016 Price Difference between Regular and Premium Gasoline Has Grown Each Year Since 2011 SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week Consumers have been paying less at the pump for both regular and premium gasoline since 2011, but the difference in price between unleaded premium and unleaded regular gasoline has been

  3. Fact #928: June 6, 2016 Price Difference between Regular and Premium Gasoline Has Grown Each Year Since 2011- Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file and dataset for Price Difference between Regular and Premium Gasoline Has Grown Each Year Since 2011

  4. When to Purchase Premium Efficiency Motors

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Premium Efficiency Motors Consider premium effciency motors for new motor procurements when specifying motor-driven equipment, repairing or rewinding failed standard effciency ...

  5. U.S. Sales for Resale, Total Refiner Motor Gasoline Sales Volumes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    NA NA NA NA NA NA 1983-2016 by Grade Regular NA NA NA NA NA NA 1983-2016 Midgrade NA NA NA NA NA NA 1988-2016 Premium NA NA NA NA NA NA 1983-2016 by Formulation Conventional NA NA NA NA NA NA 1994-2016 Oxygenated - - - - - - 1994-2016 Reformulated NA NA NA NA NA NA

  6. Field performance of a premium heating oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santa, T.; Jetter, S.

    1997-01-01

    As part of ongoing research to provide quality improvements to heating oil, Mobil Oil together with Santa Fuel conducted a field trial to investigate the performance of a new premium heating oil. This premium heating oil contains an additive system designed to minimize sludge related problems in the fuel delivery system of residential home heating systems. The additive used was similar to others reported at this and earlier BNL conferences, but was further developed to enhance its performance in oil heat systems. The premium heating oil was bulk additized and delivered to a subset of the customer base. The performance of this premium heating oil is discussed.

  7. Sandia Energy - Price Premiums for Solar Home Sales

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Price Premiums for Solar Home Sales Home Renewable Energy Energy Partnership News News & Events Photovoltaic Solar Systems Analysis Price Premiums for Solar Home Sales Previous...

  8. When to Purchase Premium Efficiency Motors | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    When to Purchase Premium Efficiency Motors Consider premium efficiency motors for new motor procurements when specifying motor-driven equipment, repairing or rewinding failed ...

  9. Premium Efficiency Motor Selection and Application Guide - A...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Premium Efficiency Motor Selection and Application Guide - A Handbook for Industry Premium Efficiency Motor Selection and Application Guide - A Handbook for Industry This handbook ...

  10. Avoid Nuisance Tripping with Premium Efficiency Motors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In most cases, upgrading to premium efficiency motors has no noticeable impact on the electrical system. However, in rare cases nuisance trips can occur during start-up. Addressing this topic requires an understanding of starting current.This tip sheet discusses how to avoid nuisance tripping with premium efficiency motors and provides suggested actions.

  11. Increasing Biofuel Deployment through Renewable Super Premium

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demonstration & Market Transformation Platform Tim Theiss, ORNL Bob McCormick, NREL Jeongwoo Han, ANL Increasing Biofuel Deployment through Renewable Super Premium 2015 Bioenergy Technologies Office Peer Review March 23, 2015 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office Project Goals are Aligned with DMT & BETO Goals 2025 CAFE Standards (U.S. EPA and U.S. NHTSA standards) FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS 70% NO x & PM, 85% NMOG < 10 ppm sulfur in gasoline (U.S. EPA Tier 3 regulations) EMISSIONS

  12. Premium Efficiency Motor Selection and Application Guide - A Handbook for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industry | Department of Energy Premium Efficiency Motor Selection and Application Guide - A Handbook for Industry Premium Efficiency Motor Selection and Application Guide - A Handbook for Industry This handbook informs new motor purchase decisions by identifying energy and cost savings that can come from replacing motors with premium efficiency units. The handbook provides an overview of current motor use in the industrial sector, including the development of motor efficiency standards,

  13. Solar Homes Sell for a Premium | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Homes Sell for a Premium Solar Homes Sell for a Premium Solar Homes Sell for a Premium Buying a solar energy system will likely increase your home's value. A recent study found that solar panels are viewed as upgrades, just like a renovated kitchen or a finished basement, and home buyers across the country have been willing to pay a premium of about $15,000 for a home with an average-sized solar array. Additionally, there is evidence homes with solar panels sell faster than those without.

  14. Solar Homes Sell for a Premium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Buying a solar energy system will likely increase your home’s value. A recent study found that solar panels are viewed as upgrades, just like a renovated kitchen or a finished basement, and home buyers across the country have been willing to pay a premium of about $15,000 for a home with an average-sized solar array. Additionally, there is evidence homes with solar panels sell faster than those without. In 2008, California homes with energy efficient features and PV were found to sell faster than homes that consume more energy. Keep in mind, these studies focused on homeowner-owned solar arrays.

  15. Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California, September 2008 | Department of Energy Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California, September 2008 Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California, September 2008 This 2008 report analyzes the economic and environmental performance of combined heat and power (CHP) systems in power interruption intolerant commercial facilities in California.Through a series of three case studies, key trade-offs are analyzed with regard to the

  16. CREAT A CONSORTIUM AND DEVELOP PREMIUM CARBON PRODUCTS FROM COAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John M. Andresen

    2003-08-01

    The Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory and matching funds from industry and academic institutions continued to excel in developing innovative technologies to use coal and coal-derived feedstocks to produce premium carbon product. During Budget Period 5, eleven projects were supported and sub-contracted were awarded to seven organizations. The CPCPC held two meetings and one tutorial at various locations during the year. Budget Period 5 was a time of growth for CPCPC in terms of number of proposals and funding requested from members, projects funded and participation during meetings. Although the membership was stable during the first part of Budget Period 5 an increase in new members was registered during the last months of the performance period.

  17. Guidance on Waivers of Premium Pay To Meet A Critical Need | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Guidance on Waivers of Premium Pay To Meet A Critical Need Guidance on Waivers of Premium Pay To Meet A Critical Need This document contains guidance on the waiver of the biweekly limit on premium pay for overtime work that is critical to an agency's mission Guidance on Waivers of Premium Pay To Meet A Critical Need (126.7 KB) Responsible Contacts Bruce Murray HR Policy Advisor E-mail bruce.murray@hq.doe.gov Phone 202-586-3372 More Documents & Publications Waiver of the Bi-Weekly

  18. Climate adaptation wedges: a case study of premium wine in the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Climate adaptation wedges: a case study of premium wine in the western United States Design and implementation of effective climate change adaptation activities requires ...

  19. DOE Premium Class Travel Report for FY 09 through FY 15 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Premium Class Travel Report for FY 09 through FY 15 DOE Premium Class Travel Report for FY 09 through FY 15 This report was provided to the FOIA office in response to several FOIA requests. DOEPremiumClassTravelReportsFY09-FY13.pdf (4.6 MB) DOE_PREMIUM_CLASS_TRAVEL_REPORTS_FY14.pdf (184.26 KB) DOE_PREMIUM_CLASS_TRAVEL_REPORTS_FY15.pdf (256.46 KB) More Documents & Publications ISSUANCE 2015-07-15: Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedure for Refrigerated Bottled or Canned

  20. X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Table 33. Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, and PAD District (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users...

  1. X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Table 33. Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, and PAD District (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users...

  2. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Table 33. Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, and PAD District (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users...

  3. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 39. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users...

  4. X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 39. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users...

  5. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users...

  6. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, and PAD District (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to...

  7. X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, and PAD District (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to...

  8. Price of Motor Gasoline Through Retail Outlets

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    & Stocks by State (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Data Series: Retail Price - Motor Gasoline Retail Price - Regular Gasoline Retail Price - Midgrade Gasoline Retail Price...

  9. Clean, premium-quality chars: Demineralized and carbon enriched

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.V.

    1992-01-03

    The goal of this project is to develop a bench-scale procedure to produce clean, desulfurized, premium-quality chars from the Illinois basin coals. This goal is achieved by utilizing the effective capabilty of smectites in combination with methane to manipulate the char yields. The major objectives are: to determine the optimum water- ground particle size for the maximum reduction of pyrite and minerals by the selective-bitumen agglomeration process; to evaluate the type of smectite and its interlamellar cation which enhances the premium-quality char yields; to find the mode of dispersion of smectites in clean coal which retards the agglomeration of char during mild gasification; to probe the conditions that maximize the desulfurized clean-char yields under a combination of methane+oxygen or helium+oxygen; to characterize and accomplish a material balance of chars, liquids, and gases produced during mild gasification; to identify the conditions which reject dehydrated smectites from char by the gravitational separation technique; and to determine the optimum seeding of chars with polymerized maltene for flammability and transportation.

  10. Users Handbook for the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vorres, K.S.

    1993-10-01

    This Users Handbook for the Argonne Premium Coal Samples provides the recipients of those samples with information that will enhance the value of the samples, to permit greater opportunities to compare their work with that of others, and aid in correlations that can improve the value to all users. It is hoped that this document will foster a spirit of cooperation and collaboration such that the field of basic coal chemistry may be a more efficient and rewarding endeavor for all who participate. The different sections are intended to stand alone. For this reason some of the information may be found in several places. The handbook is also intended to be a dynamic document, constantly subject to change through additions and improvements. Please feel free to write to the editor with your comments and suggestions.

  11. Regular, Postdoc and Student Hires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regular, Postdoc and Student Hires Employees and retirees are the building blocks of the Lab's success. Our employees get to contribute to the most pressing issues facing the nation. Contact Us (505) 667-4451, Option 5 Email The New Hire process, including the official pre-arrival period, does not begin until you receive and accept your written offer letter. Pre-Arrival New Hire Process Benefit Options For your convenience, download the New Employee App from iTunes (IOS devices) or Google Play

  12. EXC-12-0006- In the Matter of Premium Quality Lighting, Inc.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On July 27, 2012, OHA issued a decision granting an Application for Exception filed by Premium Quality Lighting, Inc. (PQL) for relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 430, Energy Conservation...

  13. Premium Efficiency Motor Selection And Application Guide: A Guidebook for Industry

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PREMIUM EFFICIENCY MOTOR SELECTION AND APPLICATION GUIDE A HANDBOOK FOR INDUSTRY PREMIUM EFFICIENCY MOTOR SELECTION AND APPLICATION GUIDE DISCLAIMER This publication was prepared by the Washington State University Energy Program for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Neither the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy, the Copper Development Association, the Washington State University Energy Program, the National Electrical Manufacturers

  14. Proposed premium diesel fuel spec elicits calls for tougher, better defined parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peckham, J.

    1998-01-01

    The debate over the definition of premium diesel fuel - what it is and what it should be - is heating up in industry circles. A number of automotive associations, additive makers and standards-setting organizations have jumped into the fray, and the fight is likely to turn volcanic when it comes down to deciding exactly what will constitute a premium diesel and how its properties will be measured. This story details some recent developments in and responses to the ongoing conflict. The Engine Manufacturers Association (EMA), representing 33 international diesel engine makers, recently launched a survey of U.S. diesel fuel marketers to see which ones will offer a fuel meeting EMA`s revised {open_quotes}FQP-1A{close_quotes} premium diesel fuel recommendations. Following the survey, EMA intends to publicize which companies offer such a fuel. The EMA premium fuel specifications are much tougher than the US standard ASTM D 975 fuel and tougher than the newly proposed {open_quotes}premium{close_quotes} diesel fuel from the National Conference of Weights & Measures (NCWM) task force. Earlier this year, Amoco became the first (and so far only) US refiner to offer a fuel meeting all the FQP specifications, but only in certain Midwest markets.

  15. An Investigation into Variational Nonlocal Regularization in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Regularization in Finite Deformational Elasticity. Authors: Foulk, James W., III ; Mota, Alejandro ; Ostien, Jakob ; O'Connor, Devin Publication Date: 2012-10-01 OSTI...

  16. Transport Code for Regular Triangular Geometry

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-06-09

    DIAMANT2 solves the two-dimensional static multigroup neutron transport equation in planar regular triangular geometry. Both regular and adjoint, inhomogeneous and homogeneous problems subject to vacuum, reflective or input specified boundary flux conditions are solved. Anisotropy is allowed for the scattering source. Volume and surface sources are allowed for inhomogeneous problems.

  17. Create a Consortium and Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Rusinko; John Andresen; Jennifer E. Hill; Harold H. Schobert; Bruce G. Miller

    2006-01-01

    The objective of these projects was to investigate alternative technologies for non-fuel uses of coal. Special emphasis was placed on developing premium carbon products from coal-derived feedstocks. A total of 14 projects, which are the 2003 Research Projects, are reported herein. These projects were categorized into three overall objectives. They are: (1) To explore new applications for the use of anthracite in order to improve its marketability; (2) To effectively minimize environmental damage caused by mercury emissions, CO{sub 2} emissions, and coal impounds; and (3) To continue to increase our understanding of coal properties and establish coal usage in non-fuel industries. Research was completed in laboratories throughout the United States. Most research was performed on a bench-scale level with the intent of scaling up if preliminary tests proved successful. These projects resulted in many potential applications for coal-derived feedstocks. These include: (1) Use of anthracite as a sorbent to capture CO{sub 2} emissions; (2) Use of anthracite-based carbon as a catalyst; (3) Use of processed anthracite in carbon electrodes and carbon black; (4) Use of raw coal refuse for producing activated carbon; (5) Reusable PACs to recycle captured mercury; (6) Use of combustion and gasification chars to capture mercury from coal-fired power plants; (7) Development of a synthetic coal tar enamel; (8) Use of alternative binder pitches in aluminum anodes; (9) Use of Solvent Extracted Carbon Ore (SECO) to fuel a carbon fuel cell; (10) Production of a low cost coal-derived turbostratic carbon powder for structural applications; (11) Production of high-value carbon fibers and foams via the co-processing of a low-cost coal extract pitch with well-dispersed carbon nanotubes; (12) Use of carbon from fly ash as metallurgical carbon; (13) Production of bulk carbon fiber for concrete reinforcement; and (14) Characterizing coal solvent extraction processes. Although some of the

  18. Benefits Summary - Term Appointments in Regular Job Class | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Term Appointments in Regular Job Class Download a brochure on benefits offered to term appointments in the regular job class (over 6 months). 2015 Long Term Appts. in Regular...

  19. Increasing Biofuel Deployment and Utilization through Development of Renewable Super Premium: Infrastructure Assessment

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Increasing Biofuel Deployment and Utilization through Development of Renewable Super Premium: Infrastructure Assessment K. Moriarty National Renewable Energy Laboratory M. Kass and T. Theiss Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5400-61684 November 2014 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National

  20. Selling Into the Sun: Price Premium Analysis of a Multi-State Dataset of Solar Homes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Homes with solar photovoltaic (PV) systems have multiplied in the United States recently, reaching more than half a million in 2014, in part due to plummeting PV costs and innovative financing options. As PV systems become an increasingly common feature of U.S. homes, the ability to assess the value of these homes appropriately will become increasingly important. At the same time, capturing the value of PV to homes will be important for facilitating a robust residential PV market. Appraisers and real estate agents have made strides toward valuing PV homes, and several limited studies have suggested the presence of PV home premiums; however, gaps remain in understanding these premiums for housing markets nationwide. To fill these gaps, researchers from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and their collaborators from other institutions conducted the most comprehensive PV home premium analysis to date. The study more than doubles the number of PV home sales previously analyzed, examines transactions in eight states, and spans the years 2002–2013. The results impart confidence that PV consistently adds value across a variety of states, housing and PV markets, and home types.

  1. A one-time opportunity to expand the market for premium efficiency motors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, F.; Tumidaj, L.; Hoernlein, D.; Coakley, S.

    1997-07-01

    A mid-Atlantic utility conducted a detailed research study on their motors market. The study showed that their motor loads come mostly from motors under 50 horsepower, and predominantly from industry. The proportion of premium-efficiency motor sales is very low relative to other areas which, unlike this utility's service territory, have a history of rebate programs. Most sales in this utility's territory are for replacement motors. Manufacturers are planning to create new lines of motors which meet the 1997 federal minimum motor-efficiency manufacturing standard, but are less efficient than premium motors. Few of these motors are on the market yet. The mandatory federal efficiency standard creates a unique, one-time situation where premium-efficiency motors will be a better-established and more familiar product among customers and vendors than less efficient motors. The utility has begun a motors rebate and technical assistance program which is intended to use this one-time opportunity to significantly expand the market for premium motors. Rebates are tied to the new Consortium for Energy Efficiency motor standards to ensure a common message to manufacturers among utilities. While the majority of premium motors available locally already meet the standard, this will encourage manufacturers to bring the rest of their offerings in line. Like many motors programs, this program will offer rebates, marketing, and technical assistance. However, the program design calls for a short-term (three year), very intense effort, including a rebate set at 100% of incremental cost, a short-term vendor bonus, and intensive marketing to large customers. Additionally, the large savings per motor in 1997 (when the baseline is inefficient standard motors) will justify a more generous payment in the first year. Many other US utility motor rebate programs have offered less generous incentives and used less intensive marketing, but have had only marginal impacts on markets (often 20

  2. Regular and chaotic behavior of multimode lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunner, W.; Fischer, R.; Paul, H.

    1985-01-01

    Results of recent numerical studies of the output characteristics of standing-wave lasers in cases of (1) large inhomogeneous line broadening dominating homogeneous line broadening and (2) purely homogeneous line broadening are presented. In dependence on such relevant parameters as homogeneous linewidth in relation to the mode spacing, inhomogeneous linewidth, and the lifetimes of the atomic levels, we found both regular and chaotic output characteristics in case (1), whereas in case (2) the behavior generally proved to be regular. This means that the laser system approaches a steady state characterized by constant amplitudes in the oscillating modes and phase locking. Besides the familiar types of amplitude-modulation and frequency-modulation phase locking, more-complex locking phenomena were also found to occur.

  3. A regular version of Smilansky model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barseghyan, Diana; Exner, Pavel; Nuclear Physics Institute ASCR, 25068 ?e near Prague

    2014-04-15

    We discuss a modification of Smilansky model in which a singular potential channel is replaced by a regular, below unbounded potential which shrinks as it becomes deeper. We demonstrate that, similarly to the original model, such a system exhibits a spectral transition with respect to the coupling constant, and determine the critical value above which a new spectral branch opens. The result is generalized to situations with multiple potential channels..

  4. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Task 6 -- Selective agglomeration laboratory research and engineering development for premium fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, N.; Jha, M.C.

    1997-06-27

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope included laboratory research and benchscale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2 t/hr process development unit (PDU). The project began in October, 1992, and is scheduled for completion by September 1997. This report represents the findings of Subtask 6.5 Selective Agglomeration Bench-Scale Testing and Process Scale-up. During this work, six project coals, namely Winifrede, Elkhorn No. 3, Sunnyside, Taggart, Indiana VII, and Hiawatha were processed in a 25 lb/hr continuous selective agglomeration bench-scale test unit.

  5. Premium Efficiency Motor Selection and Application Guide – A Handbook for Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert A. McCoy and John G. Douglass

    2014-02-01

    This handbook informs new motor purchase decisions by identifying energy and cost savings that can come from replacing motors with premium efficiency units. The handbook provides an overview of current motor use in the industrial sector, including the development of motor efficiency standards, currently available and emerging advanced efficiency motor technologies, and guidance on how to evaluate motor efficiency opportunities. It also several tips on getting the most out of industrial motors, such as how to avoid adverse motor interactions with electronic adjustable speed drives and how to ensure efficiency gains are not lost to undervoltage operation or excessive voltage unbalance.

  6. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.; Phillips, D.I.; Yoon, R.H.

    1997-04-25

    The goal of this project is engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. Its scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design and construction of a 2 t/h process development unit (PDU). Large lots of clean coal are to be produced in the PDU from three project coals. Investigation of the near-term applicability of the two advanced fine coal cleaning processes in an existing coal preparation plant is another goal of the project and is the subject of this report.

  7. Multichannel image regularization using anisotropic geodesic filtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grazzini, Jacopo A

    2010-01-01

    This paper extends a recent image-dependent regularization approach introduced in aiming at edge-preserving smoothing. For that purpose, geodesic distances equipped with a Riemannian metric need to be estimated in local neighbourhoods. By deriving an appropriate metric from the gradient structure tensor, the associated geodesic paths are constrained to follow salient features in images. Following, we design a generalized anisotropic geodesic filter; incorporating not only a measure of the edge strength, like in the original method, but also further directional information about the image structures. The proposed filter is particularly efficient at smoothing heterogeneous areas while preserving relevant structures in multichannel images.

  8. Engineering Development of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning for Premium Fuel Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smit, Frank J; Schields, Gene L; Jha, Mehesh C; Moro, Nick

    1997-09-26

    The ash in six common bituminous coals, Taggart, Winifrede, Elkhorn No. 3, Indiana VII, Sunnyside and Hiawatha, could be liberated by fine grinding to allow preparation of clean coal meeting premium fuel specifications (< 1- 2 lb/ MBtu ash and <0.6 lb/ MBtu sulfur) by laboratory and bench- scale column flotation or selective agglomeration. Over 2,100 tons of coal were cleaned in the PDU at feed rates between 2,500 and 6,000 lb/ h by Microcel™ column flotation and by selective agglomeration using recycled heptane as the bridging liquid. Parametric testing of each process and 72- hr productions runs were completed on each of the three test coals. The following results were achieved after optimization of the operating parameters: The primary objective was to develop the design base for commercial fine coal cleaning facilities for producing ultra- clean coals which can be converted into coal-water slurry premium fuel. The coal cleaning technologies to be developed were advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration, and the goal was to produce fuel meeting the following specifications.

  9. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1997-08-28

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope included laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction and operation of 2 t/hr process development unit (PDU). This report represents the findings of the PDU Advanced Column Flotation Testing and Evaluation phase of the program and includes a discussion of the design and construction of the PDU. Three compliance steam coals, Taggart, Indiana VII and Hiawatha, were processed in the PDU to determine performance and design parameters for commercial production of premium fuel by advanced flotation. Consistent, reliable performance of the PDU was demonstrated by 72-hr production runs on each of the test coals. Its capacity generally was limited by the dewatering capacity of the clean coal filters during the production runs rather than by the flotation capacity of the Microcel column. The residual concentrations of As, Pb, and Cl were reduced by at least 25% on a heating value basis from their concentrations in the test coals. The reduction in the concentrations of Be, Cd, Cr, Co, Mn, Hg, Ni and Se varied from coal to coal but the concentrations of most were greatly reduced from the concentrations in the ROM parent coals. The ash fusion temperatures of the Taggart and Indiana VII coals, and to a much lesser extent the Hiawatha coal, were decreased by the cleaning.

  10. ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM"PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norwood, Zack; Lipman, Timothy; Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris

    2010-06-01

    The effectiveness of combined heat and power (CHP) systems for power interruption intolerant,"premium power," facilities is the focus of this study. Through three real-world case studies and economic cost minimization modeling, the economic and environmental performance of"premium power" CHP is analyzed. The results of the analysis for a brewery, data center, and hospital lead to some interesting conclusions about CHP limited to the specific CHP technologies installed at those sites. Firstly, facilities with high heating loads prove to be the most appropriate for CHP installations from a purely economic standpoint. Secondly, waste heat driven thermal cooling systems are only economically attractive if the technology for these chillers can increase above the current best system efficiency. Thirdly, if the reliability of CHP systems proves to be as high as diesel generators they could replace these generators at little or no additional cost if the thermal to electric (relative) load of those facilities was already high enough to economically justify a CHP system. Lastly, in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, the modeled CHP systems provide some degree of decreased emissions, estimated at approximately 10percent for the hospital, the application with the highest relative thermal load in this case

  11. Chiral anomalies and zeta-function regularization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reuter, M.

    1985-03-15

    The zeta-function method for regularizing determinants is used to calculate the chiral anomalies of several field-theory models. In SU(N) gauge theories without ..gamma../sub 5/ couplings, the results of perturbation theory are obtained in an unambiguous manner for the full gauge theory as well as for the corresponding external-field problem. If axial-vector couplings are present, different anomalies occur for the two cases. The result for the full gauge theory is again uniquely determined; for its nongauge analog, however, ambiguities can arise. The connection between the basic path integral and the operator used to construct the heat kernel is investigated and the significance of its Hermiticity and gauge covariance are analyzed. The implications of the Wess-Zumino conditions are considered.

  12. Black hole mimickers: Regular versus singular behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zaslavskii, Oleg B.

    2008-07-15

    Black hole mimickers are possible alternatives to black holes; they would look observationally almost like black holes but would have no horizon. The properties in the near-horizon region where gravity is strong can be quite different for both types of objects, but at infinity it could be difficult to discern black holes from their mimickers. To disentangle this possible confusion, we examine the near-horizon properties, and their connection with far away asymptotic properties, of some candidates to black mimickers. We study spherically symmetric uncharged or charged but nonextremal objects, as well as spherically symmetric charged extremal objects. Within the uncharged or charged but nonextremal black hole mimickers, we study nonextremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, of which a subclass are called black foils, and gravastars. Within the charged extremal black hole mimickers we study extremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, quasi-black holes, and wormholes on the basis of quasi-black holes from Bonnor stars. We elucidate whether or not the objects belonging to these two classes remain regular in the near-horizon limit. The requirement of full regularity, i.e., finite curvature and absence of naked behavior, up to an arbitrary neighborhood of the gravitational radius of the object enables one to rule out potential mimickers in most of the cases. A list ranking the best black hole mimickers up to the worst, both nonextremal and extremal, is as follows: wormholes on the basis of extremal black holes or on the basis of quasi-black holes, quasi-black holes, wormholes on the basis of nonextremal black holes (black foils), and gravastars. Since in observational astrophysics it is difficult to find extremal configurations (the best mimickers in the ranking), whereas nonextremal configurations are really bad mimickers, the task of distinguishing black holes from their mimickers seems to

  13. Regularization scheme independence and unitarity in QCD cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catani, S.; Seymour, M.H.; Trocsanyi, Z.

    1997-06-01

    When calculating next-to-leading order QCD cross sections, divergences in intermediate steps of the calculation must be regularized. The final result is independent of the regularization scheme used, provided that it is unitary. In this paper we explore the relationship between regularization scheme independence and unitarity. We show how the regularization scheme dependence can be isolated in simple universal components, and how unitarity can be guaranteed for any regularization prescription that can consistently be introduced in one-loop amplitudes. Finally, we show how to derive transition rules between different schemes without having to do any loop calculations. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED PHYSICAL FINE COAL CLEANING FOR PREMIUM FUEL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1997-06-01

    Bechtel, together with Amax Research and Development Center (Amax R&D), has prepared this study which provides conceptual cost estimates for the production of premium quality coal-water slurry fuel (CWF) in a commercial plant. Two scenarios are presented, one using column flotation technology and the other the selective agglomeration to clean the coal to the required quality specifications. This study forms part of US Department of Energy program "Engineering Development of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning for Premium Fuel Applications," (Contract No. DE-AC22- 92PC92208), under Task 11, Project Final Report. The primary objective of the Department of Energy program is to develop the design base for prototype commercial advanced fine coal cleaning facilities capable of producing ultra-clean coals suitable for conversion to stable and highly loaded CWF. The fuels should contain less than 2 lb ash/MBtu (860 grams ash/GJ) of HHV and preferably less than 1 lb ash/MBtu (430 grams ash/GJ). The advanced fine coal cleaning technologies to be employed are advanced column froth flotation and selective agglomeration. It is further stipulated that operating conditions during the advanced cleaning process should recover not less than 80 percent of the carbon content (heating value) in the run-of-mine source coal. These goals for ultra-clean coal quality are to be met under the constraint that annualized coal production costs does not exceed $2.5 /MBtu ($ 2.37/GJ), including the mine mouth cost of the raw coal. A further objective of the program is to determine the distribution of a selected suite of eleven toxic trace elements between product CWF and the refuse stream of the cleaning processes. Laboratory, bench-scale and Process Development Unit (PDU) tests to evaluate advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration were completed earlier under this program with selected coal samples. A PDU with a capacity of 2 st/h was designed by Bechtel and installed at Amax R

  15. Wave dynamics of regular and chaotic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, S.W.

    1983-09-01

    In order to investigate general relationships between waves and rays in chaotic systems, I study the eigenfunctions and spectrum of a simple model, the two-dimensional Helmholtz equation in a stadium boundary, for which the rays are ergodic. Statistical measurements are performed so that the apparent randomness of the stadium modes can be quantitatively contrasted with the familiar regularities observed for the modes in a circular boundary (with integrable rays). The local spatial autocorrelation of the eigenfunctions is constructed in order to indirectly test theoretical predictions for the nature of the Wigner distribution corresponding to chaotic waves. A portion of the large-eigenvalue spectrum is computed and reported in an appendix; the probability distribution of successive level spacings is analyzed and compared with theoretical predictions. The two principal conclusions are: 1) waves associated with chaotic rays may exhibit randomly situated localized regions of high intensity; 2) the Wigner function for these waves may depart significantly from being uniformly distributed over the surface of constant frequency in the ray phase space.

  16. New Hire Process for Regular, Term, Postdocs and Students

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Hire Process New Hire Process for Regular, Term, Postdocs and Students Employees and retirees are the building blocks of the Lab's success. Our employees get to contribute to ...

  17. The interplay between regular and chaotic motion in nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotter, I.

    1987-04-01

    The regular motion of nucleons in the low-lying nuclear states and the chaotic motion in the compound nuclei are shown to arise from the interplay of conservative and dissipative forces in the open quantum mechanical nuclear system. The regularity at low level density is caused by self-organization in a conservative field of force. At high level density, chaoticity appears since information on the environment is transferred into the system by means of dissipative forces.

  18. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to

  19. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to

  20. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the

  1. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the

  2. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the

  3. Premium Fuel Production From Mining and Timber Waste Using Advanced Separation and Pelletizing Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honaker, R. Q.; Taulbee, D.; Parekh, B. K.; Tao, D.

    2005-12-05

    The Commonwealth of Kentucky is one of the leading states in the production of both coal and timber. As a result of mining and processing coal, an estimated 3 million tons of fine coal are disposed annually to waste-slurry impoundments with an additional 500 million tons stored at a number of disposal sites around the state due to past practices. Likewise, the Kentucky timber industry discards nearly 35,000 tons of sawdust on the production site due to unfavorable economics of transporting the material to industrial boilers for use as a fuel. With an average heating value of 6,700 Btu/lb, the monetary value of the energy disposed in the form of sawdust is approximately $490,000 annually. Since the two industries are typically in close proximity, one promising avenue is to selectively recover and dewater the fine-coal particles and then briquette them with sawdust to produce a high-value fuel. The benefits are i) a premium fuel product that is low in moisture and can be handled, transported, and utilized in existing infrastructure, thereby avoiding significant additional capital investment and ii) a reduction in the amount of fine-waste material produced by the two industries that must now be disposed at a significant financial and environmental price. As such, the goal of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of producing a premium fuel with a heating value greater than 10,000 Btu/lb from waste materials generated by the coal and timber industries. Laboratory and pilot-scale testing of the briquetting process indicated that the goal was successfully achieved. Low-ash briquettes containing 5% to 10% sawdust were produced with energy values that were well in excess of 12,000 Btu/lb. A major economic hurdle associated with commercially briquetting coal is binder cost. Approximately fifty binder formulations, both with and without lime, were subjected to an extensive laboratory evaluation to assess their relative technical and economical effectiveness as binding

  4. X-ray computed tomography using curvelet sparse regularization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wieczorek, Matthias Vogel, Jakob; Lasser, Tobias; Frikel, Jürgen; Demaret, Laurent; Eggl, Elena; Pfeiffer, Franz; Kopp, Felix; Noël, Peter B.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Reconstruction of x-ray computed tomography (CT) data remains a mathematically challenging problem in medical imaging. Complementing the standard analytical reconstruction methods, sparse regularization is growing in importance, as it allows inclusion of prior knowledge. The paper presents a method for sparse regularization based on the curvelet frame for the application to iterative reconstruction in x-ray computed tomography. Methods: In this work, the authors present an iterative reconstruction approach based on the alternating direction method of multipliers using curvelet sparse regularization. Results: Evaluation of the method is performed on a specifically crafted numerical phantom dataset to highlight the method’s strengths. Additional evaluation is performed on two real datasets from commercial scanners with different noise characteristics, a clinical bone sample acquired in a micro-CT and a human abdomen scanned in a diagnostic CT. The results clearly illustrate that curvelet sparse regularization has characteristic strengths. In particular, it improves the restoration and resolution of highly directional, high contrast features with smooth contrast variations. The authors also compare this approach to the popular technique of total variation and to traditional filtered backprojection. Conclusions: The authors conclude that curvelet sparse regularization is able to improve reconstruction quality by reducing noise while preserving highly directional features.

  5. Clean, premium-quality chars: Demineralized and carbon enriched. Quarterly report, September 1, 1991--Novemer 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.V.

    1992-01-03

    The goal of this project is to develop a bench-scale procedure to produce clean, desulfurized, premium-quality chars from the Illinois basin coals. This goal is achieved by utilizing the effective capabilty of smectites in combination with methane to manipulate the char yields. The major objectives are: to determine the optimum water- ground particle size for the maximum reduction of pyrite and minerals by the selective-bitumen agglomeration process; to evaluate the type of smectite and its interlamellar cation which enhances the premium-quality char yields; to find the mode of dispersion of smectites in clean coal which retards the agglomeration of char during mild gasification; to probe the conditions that maximize the desulfurized clean-char yields under a combination of methane+oxygen or helium+oxygen; to characterize and accomplish a material balance of chars, liquids, and gases produced during mild gasification; to identify the conditions which reject dehydrated smectites from char by the gravitational separation technique; and to determine the optimum seeding of chars with polymerized maltene for flammability and transportation.

  6. Regularities and symmetries of subsets of collective 0{sup +} states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonatsos, Dennis; McCutchan, E. A.; Casten, R. F.; Casperson, R. J.; Werner, V.; Williams, E.

    2009-09-15

    The energies of subsets of excited 0{sup +} states in geometric collective models are investigated and found to exhibit intriguing regularities. In models with an infinite square well potential, it is found that a single formula, dependent on only the number of dimensions, describes a subset of 0{sup +} states. The same behavior of a subset of 0{sup +} states is seen in the large boson number limit of the interacting boson approximation (IBA) model near the critical point of a first-order phase transition, in contrast to the fact that these 0{sup +} state energies exhibit a harmonic behavior in all three limiting symmetries of the IBA. Finally, the observed regularities in 0{sup +} energies are analyzed in terms of the underlying group theoretical framework of the different models.

  7. Regularities and symmetries of subsets of collective 0{sup+} states.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonatsos, D.; McCutchan, E. A.; Casten, R. F.; Casperson, R. J.; Werner, V.; Williams, E.; Physics; N.C.S.R.; Yale Univ.

    2009-09-01

    The energies of subsets of excited 0{sup +} states in geometric collective models are investigated and found to exhibit intriguing regularities. In models with an infinite square well potential, it is found that a single formula, dependent on only the number of dimensions, describes a subset of 0{sup +} states. The same behavior of a subset of 0{sup +} states is seen in the large boson number limit of the interacting boson approximation (IBA) model near the critical point of a first-order phase transition, in contrast to the fact that these 0{sup +} state energies exhibit a harmonic behavior in all three limiting symmetries of the IBA. Finally, the observed regularities in 0{sup +} energies are analyzed in terms of the underlying group theoretical framework of the different models.

  8. Regularities and symmetries of collective 0{sup+} states.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonatsos, D.; McCutchan, E. A.; Casten, R. F.; Casperson, R. J.; Werner, V.; Williams, E.; Physics; N.C.S.R.

    2009-01-01

    The energies of subsets of excited 0{sup +} states in geometric collective models are investigated and found to exhibit intriguing regularities. In models with an infinite square well potential, it is found that a single formula, dependent on only the number of dimensions, describes a subset of 0{sup +} states. The same behavior of a subset of 0{sup +} states is seen in the large boson number limit of the interacting boson approximation (IBA) model near the critical point of a first-order phase transition, in contrast to the fact that these 0{sup +} state energies exhibit a harmonic behavior in all three limiting symmetries of the IBA. Finally, the observed regularities in 0{sup +} energies are analyzed in terms of the underlying group theoretical framework of the different models.

  9. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1997-12-31

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2 t/hr process development unit (PDU). Accomplishments during the quarter are described on the following tasks and subtasks: Development of near-term applications (engineering development and dewatering studies); Engineering development of selective agglomeration (bench-scale testing and process scale-up); PDU and advanced column flotation module (coal selection and procurement and advanced flotation topical report); Selective agglomeration module (module operation and clean coal production with Hiawatha, Taggart, and Indiana 7 coals); Disposition of the PDU; and Project final report. Plans for next quarter are discussed and agglomeration results of the three tested coals are presented.

  10. Pre-Arrival for Regular, Postdoc and Student Hires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pre-Arrival for Regular, Postdoc and Student Hires Employees and retirees are the building blocks of the Lab's success. Our employees get to contribute to the most pressing issues facing the nation. Contact (505) 667-4451, Option 5 Email Information you should know prior to attending New Hire Orientation Before attending New Hire Orientation, ensure you have reviewed, signed, and returned your Offer Letter to a Human Resources (HR) Division Representative. Do NOT report to the New-Hire

  11. Trigonometric Pade approximants for functions with regularly decreasing Fourier coefficients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Labych, Yuliya A; Starovoitov, Alexander P [Gomel State University, Gomel (Belarus)

    2009-08-31

    Sufficient conditions describing the regular decrease of the coefficients of a Fourier series f(x)=a{sub 0}/2 + {sigma} a{sub n} cos kx are found which ensure that the trigonometric Pade approximants {pi}{sup t}{sub n,m}(x;f) converge to the function f in the uniform norm at a rate which coincides asymptotically with the highest possible one. The results obtained are applied to problems dealing with finding sharp constants for rational approximations. Bibliography: 31 titles.

  12. X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . August 1989 The Introduction of Unleaded Midgrade Gasoline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  13. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . August 1989 The Introduction of Unleaded Midgrade Gasoline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  14. X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . August 1989 The Introduction of Unleaded Midgrade Gasoline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  15. Regular perturbation solution of the Elenbaas-Heller equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, B.D.

    2006-02-01

    The Elenbaas-Heller equation is nondimensionalized and solved using regular perturbation theory to provide closed-form analytical solutions to describe structures of cylindrically symmetrical steady electric arc discharges with negligible radiant heat transfer. Based on available data, it is assumed that the electrical conductivity varies with the heat-flux potential in an Arrhenius fashion. The leading-order solution is equivalent to an asymptotic solution proposed by Kuiken [J. Appl. Phys. 58, 1833 (1991)]. Higher-order terms are also derived in the present paper, and it is shown that quantitatively accurate analytical solutions can be developed when higher-order terms are included. Analysis shows that appreciable Joule heating is restricted to an inner zone when a dimensionless parameter is large relative to unity, leading to arc-channel models suggested by previous investigators.

  16. Constructing a logical, regular axis topology from an irregular topology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faraj, Daniel A.

    2014-07-22

    Constructing a logical regular topology from an irregular topology including, for each axial dimension and recursively, for each compute node in a subcommunicator until returning to a first node: adding to a logical line of the axial dimension a neighbor specified in a nearest neighbor list; calling the added compute node; determining, by the called node, whether any neighbor in the node's nearest neighbor list is available to add to the logical line; if a neighbor in the called compute node's nearest neighbor list is available to add to the logical line, adding, by the called compute node to the logical line, any neighbor in the called compute node's nearest neighbor list for the axial dimension not already added to the logical line; and, if no neighbor in the called compute node's nearest neighbor list is available to add to the logical line, returning to the calling compute node.

  17. Constructing a logical, regular axis topology from an irregular topology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faraj, Daniel A.

    2014-07-01

    Constructing a logical regular topology from an irregular topology including, for each axial dimension and recursively, for each compute node in a subcommunicator until returning to a first node: adding to a logical line of the axial dimension a neighbor specified in a nearest neighbor list; calling the added compute node; determining, by the called node, whether any neighbor in the node's nearest neighbor list is available to add to the logical line; if a neighbor in the called compute node's nearest neighbor list is available to add to the logical line, adding, by the called compute node to the logical line, any neighbor in the called compute node's nearest neighbor list for the axial dimension not already added to the logical line; and, if no neighbor in the called compute node's nearest neighbor list is available to add to the logical line, returning to the calling compute node.

  18. International - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    083 2.040 2.060 2.021 2.059 2.100 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.083 2.040 2.060 2.021 2.059 2.100 2000-2016 Regular 1.950 1.911 1.930 1.891 1.931 1.968 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.950 1.911 1.930 1.891 1.931 1.968 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.238 2.200 2.221 2.176 2.213 2.254 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.238 2.200 2.221 2.176 2.213 2.254 2000-2016 Premium 2.526 2.467 2.489 2.456 2.487 2.540 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.526 2.467 2.489 2.456 2.487 2.540

    Projects published on Beta

  19. New York Times covers National Labs Race to Stop Iran

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    322 2.304 2.270 2.260 2.282 2.296 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.322 2.304 2.270 2.260 2.282 2.296 2000-2016 Regular 2.179 2.159 2.125 2.112 2.137 2.153 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.179 2.159 2.125 2.112 2.137 2.153 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.494 2.482 2.450 2.443 2.458 2.467 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.494 2.482 2.450 2.443 2.458 2.467 2000-2016 Premium 2.685 2.671 2.635 2.630 2.648 2.657 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.685 2.671 2.635 2.630 2.648 2.65

    437 2.419 2.384 2.374 2.380

  20. Boston Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    246 2.203 2.183 2.231 2.265 2.271 2003-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.246 2.203 2.183 2.231 2.265 2.271 2003-2016 Regular 2.138 2.092 2.064 2.130 2.160 2.163 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.138 2.092 2.064 2.130 2.160 2.163 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.388 2.357 2.355 2.356 2.404 2.411 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.388 2.357 2.355 2.356 2.404 2.411 2003-2016 Premium 2.585 2.553 2.548 2.555 2.597 2.618 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.585 2.553 2.548 2.555 2.597 2.618

  1. California Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    778 2.733 2.695 2.755 2.763 2.762 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.778 2.733 2.695 2.755 2.763 2.762 1995-2016 Regular 2.725 2.681 2.643 2.702 2.709 2.706 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.725 2.681 2.643 2.702 2.709 2.706 1995-2016 Midgrade 2.851 2.802 2.764 2.826 2.835 2.837 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.851 2.802 2.764 2.826 2.835 2.837 1995-2016 Premium 2.958 2.914 2.870 2.933 2.946 2.953 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.958 2.914 2.870 2.933 2.946 2.953 1995-2016 Diesel (On-Highway)

  2. Chicago Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    350 2.442 2.380 2.479 2.556 2.437 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.350 2.442 2.380 2.479 2.556 2.437 2000-2016 Regular 2.224 2.317 2.257 2.356 2.433 2.313 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.224 2.317 2.257 2.356 2.433 2.313 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.564 2.646 2.582 2.682 2.753 2.639 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.564 2.646 2.582 2.682 2.753 2.639 2000-2016 Premium 2.896 2.989 2.916 3.016 3.093 2.979 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.896 2.989 2.916 3.016 3.093 2.979 2000

  3. Cleveland Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    78 2.204 2.284 2.239 2.352 2.204 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.178 2.204 2.284 2.239 2.352 2.204 2003-2016 Regular 2.051 2.075 2.158 2.111 2.227 2.077 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.051 2.075 2.158 2.111 2.227 2.077 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.338 2.368 2.447 2.411 2.510 2.353 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.338 2.368 2.447 2.411 2.510 2.353 2003-2016 Premium 2.644 2.675 2.742 2.701 2.808 2.679 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.644 2.675 2.742 2.701 2.808 2.679 2003

  4. Colorado Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    218 2.179 2.167 2.211 2.290 2.290 2000-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.218 2.179 2.167 2.211 2.290 2.290 2000-2016 Regular 2.115 2.076 2.064 2.106 2.186 2.186 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.115 2.076 2.064 2.106 2.186 2.186 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.374 2.336 2.324 2.370 2.445 2.450 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.374 2.336 2.324 2.370 2.445 2.450 2000-2016 Premium 2.631 2.588 2.577 2.625 2.703 2.706 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.631 2.588 2.577 2.625 2.703 2.706 2000

  5. Denver Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    93 2.156 2.150 2.180 2.278 2.268 2000-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.193 2.156 2.150 2.180 2.278 2.268 2000-2016 Regular 2.082 2.047 2.039 2.069 2.168 2.157 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.082 2.047 2.039 2.069 2.168 2.157 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.365 2.323 2.321 2.355 2.443 2.438 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.365 2.323 2.321 2.355 2.443 2.438 2000-2016 Premium 2.624 2.578 2.580 2.608 2.706 2.703 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.624 2.578 2.580 2.608 2.706 2.703 2000

  6. Florida Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    169 2.144 2.199 2.238 2.323 2.340 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.169 2.144 2.199 2.238 2.323 2.340 2003-2016 Regular 2.014 1.989 2.044 2.082 2.171 2.189 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.014 1.989 2.044 2.082 2.171 2.189 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.301 2.278 2.333 2.374 2.460 2.457 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.301 2.278 2.333 2.374 2.460 2.457 2003-2016 Premium 2.579 2.550 2.607 2.646 2.718 2.743 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.579 2.550 2.607 2.646 2.718 2.743

  7. Oil & Gas Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ohio

    44 2.205 2.249 2.186 2.264 2.277 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.144 2.205 2.249 2.186 2.264 2.277 2003-2016 Regular 2.027 2.089 2.132 2.070 2.147 2.160 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.027 2.089 2.132 2.070 2.147 2.160 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.291 2.351 2.397 2.334 2.414 2.424 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.291 2.351 2.397 2.334 2.414 2.424 2003-2016 Premium 2.572 2.631 2.677 2.613 2.694 2.705 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.572 2.631 2.677 2.613 2.694 2.705 2003

    Department of

  8. California Institute of Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    846 2.778 2.733 2.695 2.755 2.763 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.846 2.778 2.733 2.695 2.755 2.763 1995-2016 Regular 2.792 2.725 2.681 2.643 2.702 2.709 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.792 2.725 2.681 2.643 2.702 2.709 1995-2016 Midgrade 2.918 2.851 2.802 2.764 2.826 2.835 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.918 2.851 2.802 2.764 2.826 2.835 1995-2016 Premium 3.029 2.958 2.914 2.870 2.933 2.946 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 3.029 2.958 2.914 2.870 2.933 2.946 1995-2016 Diesel (On-Highway)

  9. Chin Guok

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    339 2.350 2.442 2.380 2.479 2.556 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.339 2.350 2.442 2.380 2.479 2.556 2000-2016 Regular 2.215 2.224 2.317 2.257 2.356 2.433 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.215 2.224 2.317 2.257 2.356 2.433 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.549 2.564 2.646 2.582 2.682 2.753 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.549 2.564 2.646 2.582 2.682 2.753 2000-2016 Premium 2.877 2.896 2.989 2.916 3.016 3.093 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.877 2.896 2.989 2.916 3.016 3.093 2000

    Chin Guok About ESnet

  10. Houston Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    040 2.060 2.021 2.059 2.100 2.109 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.040 2.060 2.021 2.059 2.100 2.109 2000-2016 Regular 1.911 1.930 1.891 1.931 1.968 1.977 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.911 1.930 1.891 1.931 1.968 1.977 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.200 2.221 2.176 2.213 2.254 2.265 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.200 2.221 2.176 2.213 2.254 2.265 2000-2016 Premium 2.467 2.489 2.456 2.487 2.540 2.550 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.467 2.489 2.456 2.487 2.540 2.550

  11. Los Angeles Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    763 2.718 2.671 2.771 2.788 2.792 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.763 2.718 2.671 2.771 2.788 2.792 2000-2016 Regular 2.714 2.668 2.622 2.722 2.739 2.739 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.714 2.668 2.622 2.722 2.739 2.739 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.818 2.774 2.726 2.827 2.844 2.852 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.818 2.774 2.726 2.827 2.844 2.852 2000-2016 Premium 2.918 2.874 2.826 2.927 2.943 2.959 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.918 2.874 2.826 2.927 2.943 2.959

  12. Massachusetts Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    251 2.204 2.184 2.234 2.268 2.267 2003-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.251 2.204 2.184 2.234 2.268 2.267 2003-2016 Regular 2.144 2.093 2.065 2.132 2.161 2.158 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.144 2.093 2.065 2.132 2.161 2.158 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.383 2.350 2.352 2.356 2.403 2.402 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.383 2.350 2.352 2.356 2.403 2.402 2003-2016 Premium 2.570 2.533 2.531 2.543 2.587 2.597 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.570 2.533 2.531 2.543 2.587 2.597

  13. Miami Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    490 2.473 2.446 2.474 2.547 2.527 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.490 2.473 2.446 2.474 2.547 2.527 2003-2016 Regular 2.324 2.310 2.277 2.308 2.380 2.360 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.324 2.310 2.277 2.308 2.380 2.360 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.631 2.608 2.581 2.597 2.668 2.648 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.631 2.608 2.581 2.597 2.668 2.648 2003-2016 Premium 2.927 2.907 2.895 2.923 3.001 2.980 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.927 2.907 2.895 2.923 3.001 2.980 2003

  14. Minnesota Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    102 2.140 2.191 2.267 2.324 2.277 2000-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.102 2.140 2.191 2.267 2.324 2.277 2000-2016 Regular 2.039 2.079 2.130 2.207 2.264 2.217 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.039 2.079 2.130 2.207 2.264 2.217 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.178 2.216 2.266 2.343 2.400 2.350 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.178 2.216 2.266 2.343 2.400 2.350 2000-2016 Premium 2.421 2.453 2.501 2.572 2.626 2.579 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.421 2.453 2.501 2.572 2.626 2.579

  15. New York City Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    304 2.270 2.260 2.282 2.296 2.311 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.304 2.270 2.260 2.282 2.296 2.311 2000-2016 Regular 2.159 2.125 2.112 2.137 2.153 2.168 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.159 2.125 2.112 2.137 2.153 2.168 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.482 2.450 2.443 2.458 2.467 2.481 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.482 2.450 2.443 2.458 2.467 2.481 2000-2016 Premium 2.671 2.635 2.630 2.648 2.657 2.673 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.671 2.635 2.630 2.648 2.657 2.673

  16. Ohio Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    205 2.249 2.186 2.264 2.277 2.260 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.205 2.249 2.186 2.264 2.277 2.260 2003-2016 Regular 2.089 2.132 2.070 2.147 2.160 2.143 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.089 2.132 2.070 2.147 2.160 2.143 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.351 2.397 2.334 2.414 2.424 2.405 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.351 2.397 2.334 2.414 2.424 2.405 2003-2016 Premium 2.631 2.677 2.613 2.694 2.705 2.692 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.631 2.677 2.613 2.694 2.705 2.692 2003

  17. PADD 4 Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    340 2.314 2.301 2.314 2.347 2.352 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.340 2.314 2.301 2.314 2.347 2.352 1994-2016 Regular 2.252 2.226 2.214 2.229 2.263 2.267 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 2.252 2.226 2.214 2.229 2.263 2.267 1992-2016 Midgrade 2.451 2.427 2.410 2.415 2.443 2.450 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.451 2.427 2.410 2.415 2.443 2.450 1994-2016 Premium 2.666 2.640 2.626 2.637 2.667 2.676 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.666 2.640 2.626 2.637 2.667 2.676 1994-2016 Diesel (On-Highway)

  18. San Francisco Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    843 2.797 2.762 2.811 2.809 2.802 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.843 2.797 2.762 2.811 2.809 2.802 2000-2016 Regular 2.784 2.745 2.710 2.758 2.752 2.743 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.784 2.745 2.710 2.758 2.752 2.743 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.930 2.864 2.829 2.880 2.886 2.884 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.930 2.864 2.829 2.880 2.886 2.884 2000-2016 Premium 3.035 2.980 2.944 2.991 3.007 3.002 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 3.035 2.980 2.944 2.991 3.007 3.002

  19. Seattle Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    662 2.639 2.619 2.622 2.646 2.662 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.662 2.639 2.619 2.622 2.646 2.662 2003-2016 Regular 2.607 2.584 2.565 2.566 2.591 2.608 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.607 2.584 2.565 2.566 2.591 2.608 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.777 2.749 2.728 2.734 2.757 2.765 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.777 2.749 2.728 2.734 2.757 2.765 2003-2016 Premium 2.891 2.865 2.844 2.854 2.877 2.893 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.891 2.865 2.844 2.854 2.877 2.893

  20. U.S. Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Motor Gasoline Sales Volumes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    24,416.3 25,192.1 25,220.5 25,860.0 25,967.6 26,710.2 1983-2016 by Grade Regular 20,158.7 20,673.3 20,698.8 21,263.3 21,331.0 21,939.7 1983-2016 Midgrade 1,691.0 1,774.1 1,790.7 1,828.0 1,842.8 1,898.8 1988-2016 Premium 2,566.6 2,744.7 2,731.0 2,768.7 2,793.8 2,871.7 1983-2016 by Formulation Conventional 15,690.9 16,184.9 16,220.8 16,658.8 16,651.0 17,046.1 1994-2016 Oxygenated - - - - - - 1994-2016 Reformulated 8,725.5 9,007.1 8,999.7 9,201.2 9,316.6 9,664.1

  1. BoxLib Case Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    287 2.246 2.203 2.183 2.231 2.265 2003-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.287 2.246 2.203 2.183 2.231 2.265 2003-2016 Regular 2.178 2.138 2.092 2.064 2.130 2.160 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.178 2.138 2.092 2.064 2.130 2.160 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.437 2.388 2.357 2.355 2.356 2.404 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.437 2.388 2.357 2.355 2.356 2.404 2003-2016 Premium 2.626 2.585 2.553 2.548 2.555 2.597 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.626 2.585 2.553 2.548 2.555 2.59

    BoxLib Case Study BoxLib

  2. Sandia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    922 2.843 2.797 2.762 2.811 2.809 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.922 2.843 2.797 2.762 2.811 2.809 2000-2016 Regular 2.864 2.784 2.745 2.710 2.758 2.752 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.864 2.784 2.745 2.710 2.758 2.752 2000-2016 Midgrade 3.004 2.930 2.864 2.829 2.880 2.886 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 3.004 2.930 2.864 2.829 2.880 2.886 2000-2016 Premium 3.118 3.035 2.980 2.944 2.991 3.007 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 3.118 3.035 2.980 2.944 2.991 3.00

    Sandia grew out of America's

  3. Seawolf Manufacturing Challenge | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    691 2.662 2.639 2.619 2.622 2.646 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.691 2.662 2.639 2.619 2.622 2.646 2003-2016 Regular 2.636 2.607 2.584 2.565 2.566 2.591 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.636 2.607 2.584 2.565 2.566 2.591 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.803 2.777 2.749 2.728 2.734 2.757 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.803 2.777 2.749 2.728 2.734 2.757 2003-2016 Premium 2.919 2.891 2.865 2.844 2.854 2.877 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.919 2.891 2.865 2.844 2.854 2.87

    Seawolf Manufacturing ...

  4. Louis Stokes Midwest Center for Excellence | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    858 2.763 2.718 2.671 2.771 2.788 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.858 2.763 2.718 2.671 2.771 2.788 2000-2016 Regular 2.808 2.714 2.668 2.622 2.722 2.739 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.808 2.714 2.668 2.622 2.722 2.739 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.915 2.818 2.774 2.726 2.827 2.844 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.915 2.818 2.774 2.726 2.827 2.844 2000-2016 Premium 3.015 2.918 2.874 2.826 2.927 2.943 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 3.015 2.918 2.874 2.826 2.927 2.943

    Los alamos national

  5. Michael A. Mikolanis is a General Engineer with nearly 31 years of engineering a

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    531 2.490 2.473 2.446 2.474 2.547 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.531 2.490 2.473 2.446 2.474 2.547 2003-2016 Regular 2.361 2.324 2.310 2.277 2.308 2.380 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.361 2.324 2.310 2.277 2.308 2.380 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.685 2.631 2.608 2.581 2.597 2.668 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.685 2.631 2.608 2.581 2.597 2.668 2003-2016 Premium 2.975 2.927 2.907 2.895 2.923 3.001 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.975 2.927 2.907 2.895 2.923 3.001 2003

    Michael A. Mikolanis

  6. Regular black holes: Electrically charged solutions, Reissner-Nordstroem outside a de Sitter core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zanchin, Vilson T.

    2011-06-15

    To have the correct picture of a black hole as a whole, it is of crucial importance to understand its interior. The singularities that lurk inside the horizon of the usual Kerr-Newman family of black hole solutions signal an endpoint to the physical laws and, as such, should be substituted in one way or another. A proposal that has been around for sometime is to replace the singular region of the spacetime by a region containing some form of matter or false vacuum configuration that can also cohabit with the black hole interior. Black holes without singularities are called regular black holes. In the present work, regular black hole solutions are found within general relativity coupled to Maxwell's electromagnetism and charged matter. We show that there are objects which correspond to regular charged black holes, whose interior region is de Sitter, whose exterior region is Reissner-Nordstroem, and the boundary between both regions is made of an electrically charged spherically symmetric coat. There are several types of solutions: regular nonextremal black holes with a null matter boundary, regular nonextremal black holes with a timelike matter boundary, regular extremal black holes with a timelike matter boundary, and regular overcharged stars with a timelike matter boundary. The main physical and geometrical properties of such charged regular solutions are analyzed.

  7. On a regularization of a scalar conservation law with discontinuous coefficients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Chun

    2014-03-15

    This paper is devoted to a scalar conservation law with a linear flux function involving discontinuous coefficients. It is clear that the delta standing wave should be introduced into the Riemann solution in some nonclassical situation. In order to study the formation of delta standing wave, we consider a regularization of the discontinuous coefficient with the Helmholtz mollifier and then obtain a regularized system which depends on a regularization parameter ε > 0. The regularization mechanism is a nonlinear bending of characteristic curves that prevents their finite-time intersection. It is proved rigorously that the solutions of regularized system converge to the delta standing wave solution in the ε → 0 limit. Compared with the classical method of vanishing viscosity, here it is clear to see how the delta standing wave forms naturally along the characteristics.

  8. Regularization of soft-X-ray imaging in the DIII-D tokamak

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wingen, A.; Shafer, M. W.; Unterberg, E. A.; Hill, J. C.; Hillis, D. L.

    2015-03-02

    We developed an image inversion scheme for the soft X-ray imaging system (SXRIS) diagnostic at the DIII-D tokamak in order to obtain the local soft X-ray emission at a poloidal cross-section from the spatially line-integrated image taken by the SXRIS camera. The scheme uses the Tikhonov regularization method since the inversion problem is generally ill-posed. The regularization technique uses the generalized singular value decomposition to determine a solution that depends on a free regularization parameter. The latter has to be chosen carefully, and the so called {\\it L-curve} method to find the optimum regularization parameter is outlined. A representative testmore » image is used to study the properties of the inversion scheme with respect to inversion accuracy, amount/strength of regularization, image noise and image resolution. Moreover, the optimum inversion parameters are identified, while the L-curve method successfully computes the optimum regularization parameter. Noise is found to be the most limiting issue, but sufficient regularization is still possible at noise to signal ratios up to 10%-15%. Finally, the inversion scheme is applied to measured SXRIS data and the line-integrated SXRIS image is successfully inverted.« less

  9. Regularization of soft-X-ray imaging in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wingen, Andreas; Shafer, Morgan W; Unterberg, Ezekial A; Hill, Judith C; Hillis, Donald Lee

    2015-01-01

    An image inversion scheme for the soft X-ray imaging system (SXRIS) diagnostic at the DIII-D tokamak is developed to obtain the local soft X-ray emission at a poloidal cross-section from the spatially line-integrated image taken by the SXRIS camera. The scheme uses the Tikhonov regularization method since the inversion problem is generally ill-posed. The regularization technique uses the generalized singular value decomposition to determine a solution that depends on a free regularization parameter. The latter has to be chosen carefully, and the so called {\\it L-curve} method to find the optimum regularization parameter is outlined. A representative test image is used to study the properties of the inversion scheme with respect to inversion accuracy, amount/strength of regularization, image noise and image resolution. The optimum inversion parameters are identified, while the L-curve method successfully computes the optimum regularization parameter. Noise is found to be the most limiting issue, but sufficient regularization is still possible at noise to signal ratios up to 10%-15%. Finally, the inversion scheme is applied to measured SXRIS data and the line-integrated SXRIS image is successfully inverted.

  10. Engineering Development of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning for Premium Fuel Applications: Task 9 - Selective agglomeration Module Testing and Evaluation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, N.` Jha, M.C.

    1997-09-29

    The primary goal of this project was the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope included laboratory research and bench-scale testing of both processes on six coals to optimize the processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2 t/hr process development unit (PDU). The project began in October, 1992, and is scheduled for completion by September 1997. This report summarizes the findings of all the selective agglomeration (SA) test work performed with emphasis on the results of the PDU SA Module testing. Two light hydrocarbons, heptane and pentane, were tested as agglomerants in the laboratory research program which investigated two reactor design concepts: a conventional two-stage agglomeration circuit and a unitized reactor that combined the high- and low-shear operations in one vessel. The results were used to design and build a 25 lb/hr bench-scale unit with two-stage agglomeration. The unit also included a steam stripping and condensation circuit for recovery and recycle of heptane. It was tested on six coals to determine the optimum grind and other process conditions that resulted in the recovery of about 99% of the energy while producing low ash (1-2 lb/MBtu) products. The fineness of the grind was the most important variable with the D80 (80% passing size) varying in the 12 to 68 micron range. All the clean coals could be formulated into coal-water-slurry-fuels with acceptable properties. The bench-scale results were used for the conceptual and detailed design of the PDU SA Module which was integrated with the existing grinding and dewatering circuits. The PDU was operated for about 9 months. During the first three months, the shakedown testing was performed to fine tune the operation and control of various equipment. This was followed by parametric testing, optimization/confirmatory testing, and finally a

  11. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2003 through September 30, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andresen, John; Schobert, Harold; Miller, Bruce G

    2006-03-01

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) has been successfully operating the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by PSU, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with PSU responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes PSU and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. A second contract was executed with DOE NETL starting in October 2003 to continue the activities of CPCPC. An annual funding meeting was held in October 2003 and the council selected 10 projects for funding. Base funding for the projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the various subcontractors on March 1, 2004.

  12. Detecting regular sound changes in linguistics as events of concerted evolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hruschka, Daniel J.; Branford, Simon; Smith, Eric D.; Wilkins, Jon; Meade, Andrew; Pagel, Mark; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy

    2014-12-18

    Background: Concerted evolution is normally used to describe parallel changes at different sites in a genome, but it is also observed in languages where a specific phoneme changes to the same other phoneme in many words in the lexicona phenomenon known as regular sound change. We develop a general statistical model that can detect concerted changes in aligned sequence data and apply it to study regular sound changes in the Turkic language family. Results: Linguistic evolution, unlike the genetic substitutional process, is dominated by events of concerted evolutionary change. Our model identified more than 70 historical events of regular sound change that occurred throughout the evolution of the Turkic language family, while simultaneously inferring a dated phylogenetic tree. Including regular sound changes yielded an approximately 4-fold improvement in the characterization of linguistic change over a simpler model of sporadic change, improved phylogenetic inference, and returned more reliable and plausible dates for events on the phylogenies. The historical timings of the concerted changes closely follow a Poisson process model, and the sound transition networks derived from our model mirror linguistic expectations. Conclusions: We demonstrate that a model with no prior knowledge of complex concerted or regular changes can nevertheless infer the historical timings and genealogical placements of events of concerted change from the signals left in contemporary data. Our model can be applied wherever discrete elementssuch as genes, words, cultural trends, technologies, or morphological traitscan change in parallel within an organism or other evolving group.

  13. Inverse transport problem solvers based on regularized and compressive sensing techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Y.; Cao, L.; Wu, H.; Zhang, H.

    2012-07-01

    According to the direct exposure measurements from flash radiographic image, regularized-based method and compressive sensing (CS)-based method for inverse transport equation are presented. The linear absorption coefficients and interface locations of objects are reconstructed directly at the same time. With a large number of measurements, least-square method is utilized to complete the reconstruction. Owing to the ill-posedness of the inverse problems, regularized algorithm is employed. Tikhonov method is applied with an appropriate posterior regularization parameter to get a meaningful solution. However, it's always very costly to obtain enough measurements. With limited measurements, CS sparse reconstruction technique Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP) is applied to obtain the sparse coefficients by solving an optimization problem. This paper constructs and takes the forward projection matrix rather than Gauss matrix as measurement matrix. In the CS-based algorithm, Fourier expansion and wavelet expansion are adopted to convert an underdetermined system to a well-posed system. Simulations and numerical results of regularized method with appropriate regularization parameter and that of CS-based agree well with the reference value, furthermore, both methods avoid amplifying the noise. (authors)

  14. Regular, Postdocs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    convenience, download the New Employee App from iTunes (IOS devices) or Google Play (Android devices). You can access new hire information along with many other features such as...

  15. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce G

    2006-09-29

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University has been successfully managing the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by Penn State, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. Base funding for the selected projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. At the annual funding meeting held in October 2003, ten projects were selected for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2004. Nine of the ten 2004 projects were completed during the previous annual reporting period and their final reports were submitted with the previous annual report (i.e., 10/01/04-09/30/05). The final report for the remaining project, which was submitted during this reporting

  16. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce G

    2006-03-01

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) has been successfully operating the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by PSU, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with PSU responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes PSU and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. A second contract was executed with DOE NETL starting in October 2003 to continue the activities of CPCPC. An annual funding meeting was held in October 2003 and the council selected ten projects for funding. Base funding for the projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2004. Nine of the ten projects have been completed and the final reports for these 2004 projects are attached. An annual funding meeting was held in November 2004 and the council selected

  17. Detecting regular sound changes in linguistics as events of concerted evolution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hruschka, Daniel  J.; Branford, Simon; Smith, Eric  D.; Wilkins, Jon; Meade, Andrew; Pagel, Mark; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy

    2014-12-18

    Background: Concerted evolution is normally used to describe parallel changes at different sites in a genome, but it is also observed in languages where a specific phoneme changes to the same other phoneme in many words in the lexicon—a phenomenon known as regular sound change. We develop a general statistical model that can detect concerted changes in aligned sequence data and apply it to study regular sound changes in the Turkic language family. Results: Linguistic evolution, unlike the genetic substitutional process, is dominated by events of concerted evolutionary change. Our model identified more than 70 historical events of regular soundmore » change that occurred throughout the evolution of the Turkic language family, while simultaneously inferring a dated phylogenetic tree. Including regular sound changes yielded an approximately 4-fold improvement in the characterization of linguistic change over a simpler model of sporadic change, improved phylogenetic inference, and returned more reliable and plausible dates for events on the phylogenies. The historical timings of the concerted changes closely follow a Poisson process model, and the sound transition networks derived from our model mirror linguistic expectations. Conclusions: We demonstrate that a model with no prior knowledge of complex concerted or regular changes can nevertheless infer the historical timings and genealogical placements of events of concerted change from the signals left in contemporary data. Our model can be applied wherever discrete elements—such as genes, words, cultural trends, technologies, or morphological traits—can change in parallel within an organism or other evolving group.« less

  18. An Algorithm for Decomposition of the Charged Particle Scattering Cross Sections into Singular and Regular Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inanc, Feyzi

    2005-04-09

    Any radiography simulation effort that involves high energy photons should also address charged particle transport problem as well. The scattering cross sections with the charged particles, namely electrons and positrons, go through elastic and inelastic scattering interactions that are highly anisotropic. The conventional Boltzmann operator used in the transport computations can not represent the highly anisotropic scattering interactions. One way is to implement Fokker-Planck operators. The implementation of Fokker-Planck operators requires decomposition of scattering kernels into singular and regular components. This paper introduces an algorithm on how to decompose the elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections into singular and regular components and how to compute momentum transfer and stopping power coefficients from singular components.

  19. Minimum Fisher regularization of image reconstruction for infrared imaging bolometer on HL-2A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, J. M.; Liu, Y.; Li, W.; Lu, J.; Dong, Y. B.; Xia, Z. W.; Yi, P.; Yang, Q. W.

    2013-09-15

    An infrared imaging bolometer diagnostic has been developed recently for the HL-2A tokamak to measure the temporal and spatial distribution of plasma radiation. The three-dimensional tomography, reduced to a two-dimensional problem by the assumption of plasma radiation toroidal symmetry, has been performed. A three-dimensional geometry matrix is calculated with the one-dimensional pencil beam approximation. The solid angles viewed by the detector elements are taken into account in defining the chord brightness. And the local plasma emission is obtained by inverting the measured brightness with the minimum Fisher regularization method. A typical HL-2A plasma radiation model was chosen to optimize a regularization parameter on the criterion of generalized cross validation. Finally, this method was applied to HL-2A experiments, demonstrating the plasma radiated power density distribution in limiter and divertor discharges.

  20. Small black holes on branes: Is the horizon regular or singular?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasik, D.; Sahabandu, C.; Suranyi, P.; Wijewardhana, L.C.R.

    2004-09-15

    We investigate the following question: Consider a small mass, with {epsilon} (the ratio of the Schwarzschild radius and the bulk curvature length) much smaller than 1, that is confined to the TeV brane in the Randall-Sundrum I scenario. Does it form a black hole with a regular horizon, or a naked singularity? The metric is expanded in {epsilon} and the asymptotic form of the metric is given by the weak field approximation (linear in the mass). In first order of {epsilon} we show that the iteration of the weak field solution, which includes only integer powers of the mass, leads to a solution that has a singular horizon. We find a solution with a regular horizon but its asymptotic expansion in the mass also contains half integer powers.

  1. Determination of transit time distribution and Rabi frequency by applying regularized inverse on Ramsey spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Young-Ho; Lee, Soo Heyong; Park, Sang Eon; Lee, Ho Seong; Kwon, Taeg Yong [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-23

    The authors report on a method to determine the Rabi frequency and transit time distribution of atoms that are essential for proper operation of atomic beam frequency standards. Their method, which employs alternative regularized inverse on two Ramsey spectra measured at different microwave powers, can be used for the frequency standards with short Ramsey cavity as well as long ones. The authors demonstrate that uncertainty in Rabi frequency obtained from their method is 0.02%.

  2. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 13, October--December, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1996-01-31

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2-t/hr process development unit. During Quarter 13 (October--December 1995), testing of the GranuFlow dewatering process indicated a 3--4% reduction in cake moisture for screen-bowl and solid-bowl centrifuge products. The Orimulsion additions were also found to reduce the potential dustiness of the fine coal, as well as improve solids recovery in the screen-bowl centrifuge. Based on these results, Lady Dunn management now plans to use a screen bowl centrifuge to dewater their Microcel{trademark} column froth product. Subtask 3.3 testing, investigating a novel Hydrophobic Dewatering process (HD), continued this quarter. Continuing Subtask 6.4 work, investigating coal-water-slurry formulation, indicated that selective agglomeration products can be formulated into slurries with lower viscosities than advanced flotation products. Subtask 6.5 agglomeration bench-scale testing results indicate that a very fine grind is required to meet the 2 lb ash/MBtu product specification for the Winifrede coal, while the Hiawatha coal requires a grind in the 100- to 150-mesh topsize range. Detailed design work remaining involves the preparation and issuing of the final task report. Utilizing this detailed design, a construction bid package was prepared and submitted to three Colorado based contractors for quotes as part of Task 9.

  3. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 11, April--June, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1995-07-31

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design, and construction of a 2-t/hr process development unit (PDU). The PDU will then be operated to generate 200 tons of each of three project coals, by each process. During Quarter 11 (April--June, 1995), work continued on the Subtask 3.2 in-plant testing of the Microcel{trademark} flotation column at the Lady Dunn Preparation Plant with the installation and calibration of a refurbished 30-inch diameter column. The evaluation of toxic trace element data for column flotation samples continued, with preliminary analysis indicating that reasonably good mass balances were achieved for most elements, and that significant reductions in the concentration of many elements were observed from raw coal, to flotation feed, to flotation product samples. Significant progress was made on Subtask 6.5 selective agglomeration bench-scale testing. Data from this work indicates that project ash specifications can be met for all coals evaluated, and that the bulk of the bridging liquid (heptane) can be removed from the product for recycle to the process. The detailed design of the 2 t/hr selective agglomeration module progressed this quarter with the completion of several revisions of both the process flow, and the process piping and instrument diagrams. Procurement of coal for PDU operation began with the purchase of 800 tons of Taggart coal. Construction of the 2 t/hr PDU continued through this reporting quarter and is currently approximately 60% complete.

  4. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 12, July--September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1995-10-31

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design, and construction and operation of a 2-t/hr process development unit. The project began in October, 1992, and is scheduled for completion by June, 1997. During Quarter 12 (July--September 1995), work continued on the Subtask 3.2 in-plant testing of the Microcel{trademark} flotation column at Lady Dunn. Under Subtask 4.4, additional toxic trace element analysis of column flotation samples finalized the data set. Data analysis indicates that reasonably good mass balances were achieved for most elements. The final Subtask 6.3 Selective Agglomeration Process Optimization topical report was issued this quarter. Preliminary Subtask 6.4 work investigating coal-water-fuel slurry formulation indicated that selective agglomeration products formulate slurries with lower viscosities than advanced flotation products. Work continued on Subtask 6.5 agglomeration bench-scale testing. Results indicate that a 2 lb ash/MBtu product could be produced at a 100-mesh topsize with the Elkhorn No. 3 coal. The detailed design of the 2 t/hr selective agglomeration module neared completion this quarter with the completion of additional revisions of both the process flow, and the process piping and instrument diagrams. Construction of the 2 t/hr PDU and advanced flotation module was completed this quarter and startup and shakedown testing began.

  5. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 9, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1995-01-25

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design, and construction of a 2-t/hr process development unit (PDU). The PDU will then be operated to generate 200 ton lots of each of three project coals, by each process. The project began in October, 1992 and is scheduled for completion by March, 1997. During Quarter 9 (October--December, 1995), parametric and optimization testing was completed for the Taggart, Sunnyside, and Indiana VII coal using a 12-inch Microcel{trademark} flotation column. The detailed design of the 2-t/hr PDU grinding, flotation, and dewatering circuits neared completion with the specification of the major pieces of capital equipment to be purchased for these areas. Selective agglomeration test work investigated the properties of various industrial grades of heptane for use during bench- and PDU-scale testing. It was decided to use a hydrotreated grade of commercial heptane due to its low cost and low concentration of aromatic compounds. The final Subtask 6.4 CWF Formulation Studies Test Plan was issued. A draft version of the Subtask 6.5 Preliminary Design and Test Plan Report was also issued, discussing the progress made in the design of the bench-scale selective agglomeration unit. PDU construction work moved forward through the issuing of 26 request for quotations and 21 award packages for capital equipment.

  6. Texas Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,483.5 38,712.1 39,977.9 38,993.1 39,188.5 39,757.1 1983-2016 Regular 33,191.2 34,015.9 35,439.2 34,409.8 34,586.6 35,092.2 1983-2016 Conventional Regular 19,352.7 19,393.1 21,009.3 19,922.2 19,754.9 20,053.1 1993-2016 Oxygenated Regular - - - - - - 1993-2016 Reformulated Regular 13,838.4 14,622.8 14,429.9 14,487.6 14,831.7 15,039.1 1993-2016 Midgrade 527.7 554.7 557.6 562.3 569.5 568.7 1988-2016 Conventional Midgrade 243.2 251.3 247.1 253.6 257.4 258.6 1993-2016 Oxygenated Midgrade - - - - - -

  7. GPU-accelerated regularized iterative reconstruction for few-view cone beam CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matenine, Dmitri; Goussard, Yves

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The present work proposes an iterative reconstruction technique designed for x-ray transmission computed tomography (CT). The main objective is to provide a model-based solution to the cone-beam CT reconstruction problem, yielding accurate low-dose images via few-views acquisitions in clinically acceptable time frames. Methods: The proposed technique combines a modified ordered subsets convex (OSC) algorithm and the total variation minimization (TV) regularization technique and is called OSC-TV. The number of subsets of each OSC iteration follows a reduction pattern in order to ensure the best performance of the regularization method. Considering the high computational cost of the algorithm, it is implemented on a graphics processing unit, using parallelization to accelerate computations. Results: The reconstructions were performed on computer-simulated as well as human pelvic cone-beam CT projection data and image quality was assessed. In terms of convergence and image quality, OSC-TV performs well in reconstruction of low-dose cone-beam CT data obtained via a few-view acquisition protocol. It compares favorably to the few-view TV-regularized projections onto convex sets (POCS-TV) algorithm. It also appears to be a viable alternative to full-dataset filtered backprojection. Execution times are of 1–2 min and are compatible with the typical clinical workflow for nonreal-time applications. Conclusions: Considering the image quality and execution times, this method may be useful for reconstruction of low-dose clinical acquisitions. It may be of particular benefit to patients who undergo multiple acquisitions by reducing the overall imaging radiation dose and associated risks.

  8. Analytically calculating shading in regular arrays of sun-pointing collectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meller, Yosef

    2010-11-15

    A method is presented for deriving an algorithm for analytically calculating shading of sun-pointing solar collectors by other identical collectors in the field. The method is particularly suited to regularly-spaced collectors, with convex aperture shapes. Using this method, an algorithm suitable for circular-aperture collectors is derived. The algorithm is validated against results obtained using an existing algorithm, and an example for usage of the algorithm as a tool for validating assumptions of an existing algorithm is presented. (author)

  9. Regularization of Feedwater Flow Rate Evaluation for Venturi Meter Fouling Problem in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gribok, Andrei V.; Attieh, Ibrahim K.; Hines, J. Wesley; Uhrig, Robert E.

    2001-04-15

    Inferential sensing is a method that can be used to evaluate parameters of a physical system based on a set of measurements related to these parameters. The most common method of inferential sensing uses mathematical models to infer a parameter value from correlated sensor values. However, since inferential sensing is an inverse problem, it can produce inconsistent results due to minor perturbations in the data. This research shows that regularization can be used in inferential sensing to produce consistent results. Data from Florida Power Corporation's Crystal River nuclear power plant (NPP) are used to give an important example of monitoring NPP feedwater flow rate.

  10. Random matrix theory for mixed regular-chaotic dynamics in the super-extensive regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Hady, A. Abd; Abul-Magd, A. Y.

    2011-10-27

    We apply Tsallis's q-indexed nonextensive entropy to formulate a random matrix theory (RMT), which may be suitable for systems with mixed regular-chaotic dynamics. We consider the super-extensive regime of q<1. We obtain analytical expressions for the level-spacing distributions, which are strictly valid for 2 X2 random-matrix ensembles, as usually done in the standard RMT. We compare the results with spacing distributions, numerically calculated for random matrix ensembles describing a harmonic oscillator perturbed by Gaussian orthogonal and unitary ensembles.

  11. A hybrid inventory management system respondingto regular demand and surge demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohammad S. Roni; Mingzhou Jin; Sandra D. Eksioglu

    2014-06-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid policy for a stochastic inventory system facing regular demand and surge demand. The combination of two different demand patterns can be observed in many areas, such as healthcare inventory and humanitarian supply chain management. The surge demand has a lower arrival rate but higher demand volume per arrival. The solution approach proposed in this paper incorporates the level crossing method and mixed integer programming technique to optimize the hybrid inventory policy with both regular orders and emergency orders. The level crossing method is applied to obtain the equilibrium distributions of inventory levels under a given policy. The model is further transformed into a mixed integer program to identify an optimal hybrid policy. A sensitivity analysis is conducted to investigate the impact of parameters on the optimal inventory policy and minimum cost. Numerical results clearly show the benefit of using the proposed hybrid inventory model. The model and solution approach could help healthcare providers or humanitarian logistics providers in managing their emergency supplies in responding to surge demands.

  12. Premium Analyse Company Product Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the 34th Tritium Focus Group Meeting held in Idaho Falls, Idaho on September 23-25, 2014.

  13. Influence of the adatom diffusion on selective growth of GaN nanowire regular arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gotschke, T.; Schumann, T.; Limbach, F.; Calarco, R.; Stoica, T.

    2011-03-07

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on patterned Si/AlN/Si(111) substrates was used to obtain regular arrays of uniform-size GaN nanowires (NWs). The silicon top layer has been patterned with e-beam lithography, resulting in uniform arrays of holes with different diameters (d{sub h}) and periods (P). While the NW length is almost insensitive to the array parameters, the diameter increases significantly with d{sub h} and P till it saturates at P values higher than 800 nm. A diffusion induced model was used to explain the experimental results with an effective diffusion length of the adatoms on the Si, estimated to be about 400 nm.

  14. Bistability, regular self-pulsing, and chaos in lasers with external feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, R.; Glas, P.

    1985-01-01

    Steady states and dynamic behavior of the light field in a lasing medium contained in the cavity of a Fabry--Perot (FP) resonator are investigated theoretically. The FP resonator is optically coupled to an external resonator (ER), which reflects light back into the laser within a small frequency interval. It is assumed that the lasing threshold cannot be exceeded without feedback from the ER. The losses of the compound-cavity system depend on the light frequency's giving rise to dispersive bistable effects. The static hysteresis cycle as well as transients between its branches has been calculated. Moreover, various types of regular and chaotic self-pulsing that are due to the oscillation of several modes of the compound-cavity sysem have been found, depending on the ratio of longitudinal relaxation time T/sub 1/ to the photon round-trip time T. Finally, phase modulation and frequency chirping have been determined.

  15. Regularities of flame propagation in a tube under weightless conditions: stability investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samsonov, V.P.; Abrukov, S.A.; Kidin, N.I.

    1985-05-01

    In research devoted to the theoretical investigation of laminar flames during propagation in channels, one of the mandatory assumptions is the assumption about no gravity forces but until now the verification of the results of such work has been impossible because of the lack of experimental data on flame propagation under weightless conditions. This paper reports on experiments conducted to verify existing deductions and to do so the flame structure and certain regularities of its propagation in a half-open square tube under weightless conditions were investigated using a Schlieren method. Further, the evolution of the displacement of single perturbations on the flame surface to the wall was investigated by the method of a stroboscopic survey.

  16. Remarks on the regularity criteria of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics system in terms of two velocity field components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamazaki, Kazuo

    2014-03-15

    We study the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics system and obtain its regularity criteria in terms of only two velocity vector field components eliminating the condition on the third component completely. The proof consists of a new decomposition of the four nonlinear terms of the system and estimating a component of the magnetic vector field in terms of the same component of the velocity vector field. This result may be seen as a component reduction result of many previous works [C. He and Z. Xin, “On the regularity of weak solutions to the magnetohydrodynamic equations,” J. Differ. Equ. 213(2), 234–254 (2005); Y. Zhou, “Remarks on regularities for the 3D MHD equations,” Discrete Contin. Dyn. Syst. 12(5), 881–886 (2005)].

  17. Phillips-Tikhonov regularization with a priori information for neutron emission tomographic reconstruction on Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bielecki, J.; Scholz, M.; Drozdowicz, K.; Giacomelli, L.; Kiptily, V.; Kempenaars, M.; Conroy, S.; Craciunescu, T.; Collaboration: EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB

    2015-09-15

    A method of tomographic reconstruction of the neutron emissivity in the poloidal cross section of the Joint European Torus (JET, Culham, UK) tokamak was developed. Due to very limited data set (two projection angles, 19 lines of sight only) provided by the neutron emission profile monitor (KN3 neutron camera), the reconstruction is an ill-posed inverse problem. The aim of this work consists in making a contribution to the development of reliable plasma tomography reconstruction methods that could be routinely used at JET tokamak. The proposed method is based on Phillips-Tikhonov regularization and incorporates a priori knowledge of the shape of normalized neutron emissivity profile. For the purpose of the optimal selection of the regularization parameters, the shape of normalized neutron emissivity profile is approximated by the shape of normalized electron density profile measured by LIDAR or high resolution Thomson scattering JET diagnostics. In contrast with some previously developed methods of ill-posed plasma tomography reconstruction problem, the developed algorithms do not include any post-processing of the obtained solution and the physical constrains on the solution are imposed during the regularization process. The accuracy of the method is at first evaluated by several tests with synthetic data based on various plasma neutron emissivity models (phantoms). Then, the method is applied to the neutron emissivity reconstruction for JET D plasma discharge #85100. It is demonstrated that this method shows good performance and reliability and it can be routinely used for plasma neutron emissivity reconstruction on JET.

  18. Computer-aided detection of clustered microcalcifications in multiscale bilateral filtering regularized reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis volume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samala, Ravi K. Chan, Heang-Ping; Lu, Yao; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Wei, Jun; Helvie, Mark A.; Sahiner, Berkman

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Develop a computer-aided detection (CADe) system for clustered microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) volume enhanced with multiscale bilateral filtering (MSBF) regularization. Methods: With Institutional Review Board approval and written informed consent, two-view DBT of 154 breasts, of which 116 had biopsy-proven microcalcification (MC) clusters and 38 were free of MCs, was imaged with a General Electric GEN2 prototype DBT system. The DBT volumes were reconstructed with MSBF-regularized simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) that was designed to enhance MCs and reduce background noise while preserving the quality of other tissue structures. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of MCs was further improved with enhancement-modulated calcification response (EMCR) preprocessing, which combined multiscale Hessian response to enhance MCs by shape and bandpass filtering to remove the low-frequency structured background. MC candidates were then located in the EMCR volume using iterative thresholding and segmented by adaptive region growing. Two sets of potential MC objects, cluster centroid objects and MC seed objects, were generated and the CNR of each object was calculated. The number of candidates in each set was controlled based on the breast volume. Dynamic clustering around the centroid objects grouped the MC candidates to form clusters. Adaptive criteria were designed to reduce false positive (FP) clusters based on the size, CNR values and the number of MCs in the cluster, cluster shape, and cluster based maximum intensity projection. Free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) and jackknife alternative FROC (JAFROC) analyses were used to assess the performance and compare with that of a previous study. Results: Unpaired two-tailedt-test showed a significant increase (p < 0.0001) in the ratio of CNRs for MCs with and without MSBF regularization compared to similar ratios for FPs. For view-based detection, a

  19. Combined iterative reconstruction and image-domain decomposition for dual energy CT using total-variation regularization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xue; Niu, Tianye; Zhu, Lei

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Dual-energy CT (DECT) is being increasingly used for its capability of material decomposition and energy-selective imaging. A generic problem of DECT, however, is that the decomposition process is unstable in the sense that the relative magnitude of decomposed signals is reduced due to signal cancellation while the image noise is accumulating from the two CT images of independent scans. Direct image decomposition, therefore, leads to severe degradation of signal-to-noise ratio on the resultant images. Existing noise suppression techniques are typically implemented in DECT with the procedures of reconstruction and decomposition performed independently, which do not explore the statistical properties of decomposed images during the reconstruction for noise reduction. In this work, the authors propose an iterative approach that combines the reconstruction and the signal decomposition procedures to minimize the DECT image noise without noticeable loss of resolution. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated as an optimization problem, which balances the data fidelity and total variation of decomposed images in one framework, and the decomposition step is carried out iteratively together with reconstruction. The noise in the CT images from the proposed algorithm becomes well correlated even though the noise of the raw projections is independent on the two CT scans. Due to this feature, the proposed algorithm avoids noise accumulation during the decomposition process. The authors evaluate the method performance on noise suppression and spatial resolution using phantom studies and compare the algorithm with conventional denoising approaches as well as combined iterative reconstruction methods with different forms of regularization. Results: On the Catphan600 phantom, the proposed method outperforms the existing denoising methods on preserving spatial resolution at the same level of noise suppression, i.e., a reduction of noise standard deviation by one order

  20. U.S. Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    342,192.8 360,546.8 366,846.1 370,840.6 373,972.4 387,096.6 1983-2016 Regular 297,423.5 312,244.9 318,353.6 321,434.3 323,243.7 334,314.2 1983-2016 Conventional Regular 198,609.7 208,407.8 213,491.5 215,411.2 217,131.1 224,591.8 1993-2016 Oxygenated Regular - - - - - - 1993-2016 Reformulated Regular 98,813.7 103,837.1 104,862.2 106,023.1 106,112.6 109,722.4 1993-2016 Midgrade 6,485.2 6,688.6 6,842.0 7,005.2 7,157.2 7,483.4 1988-2016 Conventional Midgrade 4,022.1 4,126.1 4,220.5 4,325.3 4,405.4

  1. Zinc oxide modified with benzylphosphonic acids as transparent electrodes in regular and inverted organic solar cell structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lange, Ilja; Reiter, Sina; Kniepert, Juliane; Piersimoni, Fortunato; Brenner, Thomas; Neher, Dieter; Pätzel, Michael; Hildebrandt, Jana; Hecht, Stefan

    2015-03-16

    An approach is presented to modify the work function of solution-processed sol-gel derived zinc oxide (ZnO) over an exceptionally wide range of more than 2.3 eV. This approach relies on the formation of dense and homogeneous self-assembled monolayers based on phosphonic acids with different dipole moments. This allows us to apply ZnO as charge selective bottom electrodes in either regular or inverted solar cell structures, using poly(3-hexylthiophene):phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester as the active layer. These devices compete with or even surpass the performance of the reference on indium tin oxide/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate. Our findings highlight the potential of properly modified ZnO as electron or hole extracting electrodes in hybrid optoelectronic devices.

  2. High regularity of Z-DNA revealed by ultra high-resolution crystal structure at 0.55;#8201;Å

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brzezinski, Krzysztof; Brzuszkiewicz, Anna; Dauter, Miroslawa; Kubicki, Maciej; Jaskolski, Mariusz; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2011-12-02

    The crystal structure of a Z-DNA hexamer duplex d(CGCGCG){sub 2} determined at ultra high resolution of 0.55 {angstrom} and refined without restraints, displays a high degree of regularity and rigidity in its stereochemistry, in contrast to the more flexible B-DNA duplexes. The estimations of standard uncertainties of all individually refined parameters, obtained by full-matrix least-squares optimization, are comparable with values that are typical for small-molecule crystallography. The Z-DNA model generated with ultra high-resolution diffraction data can be used to revise the stereochemical restraints applied in lower resolution refinements. Detailed comparisons of the stereochemical library values with the present accurate Z-DNA parameters, shows in general a good agreement, but also reveals significant discrepancies in the description of guanine-sugar valence angles and in the geometry of the phosphate groups.

  3. Unexpected series of regular frequency spacing of δ Scuti stars in the non-asymptotic regime - I. The methodology

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Paparo, M.; Benko, J. M.; Hareter, M.; Guzik, J. A.

    2016-05-11

    In this study, a sequence search method was developed to search the regular frequency spacing in δ Scuti stars through visual inspection and an algorithmic search. We searched for sequences of quasi-equally spaced frequencies, containing at least four members per sequence, in 90 δ Scuti stars observed by CoRoT. We found an unexpectedly large number of independent series of regular frequency spacing in 77 δ Scuti stars (from one to eight sequences) in the non-asymptotic regime. We introduce the sequence search method presenting the sequences and echelle diagram of CoRoT 102675756 and the structure of the algorithmic search. Four sequencesmore » (echelle ridges) were found in the 5–21 d–1 region where the pairs of the sequences are shifted (between 0.5 and 0.59 d–1) by twice the value of the estimated rotational splitting frequency (0.269 d–1). The general conclusions for the whole sample are also presented in this paper. The statistics of the spacings derived by the sequence search method, by FT (Fourier transform of the frequencies), and the statistics of the shifts are also compared. In many stars more than one almost equally valid spacing appeared. The model frequencies of FG Vir and their rotationally split components were used to formulate the possible explanation that one spacing is the large separation while the other is the sum of the large separation and the rotational frequency. In CoRoT 102675756, the two spacings (2.249 and 1.977 d–1) are in better agreement with the sum of a possible 1.710 d–1 large separation and two or one times, respectively, the value of the rotational frequency.« less

  4. U.S. Refiner Sales to End Users (Average) Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sales Type: Sales to End Users, Average Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale, Average DTW Rack Bulk Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Formulation/ Grade Sales Type Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Conventional, Average 1.346 1.209 1.450 1.617 1.790 1.894 1994-2016 Conventional Regular 1.305 1.167 1.412 1.576 1.749 1.854 1994-2016 Conventional Midgrade 1.524 1.376 1.601 1.781

  5. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Gasoline, All Grades",7,"Monthly","6/2016","1/15/1983" ,"Data 2","Regular Gasoline",7,"Monthly","6/2016","1/15/1983" ,"Data 3","Midgrade

  6. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. refi ner motor gasoline prices by grade and sales type dollars per gallon excluding taxes Year month Regular Midgrade Sales to end users Sales for resale Sales to end users Sales for resale Through retail outlets Average[a] DTW Rack Bulk Average Through retail outlets Average[a] DTW Rack Bulk Average 1985 0.925 0.917 - - - 0.843 - - - - - - 1986 0.624 0.616 - - - 0.522 - - - - - - 1987 0.659 0.650 - - - 0.569 - - - - - - 1988 0.649 0.641 - - - 0.548 - - - - - - 1989 0.720 0.714 - - - 0.618

  7. Quantum Chaos generates Regularities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otsuka, Takaharu [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo (Japan); RIKEN (Japan); Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo (Japan); Shimizu, Noritaka [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo (Japan); RIKEN (Japan)

    2005-07-08

    The mechanism of the dominance (preponderance) of the 0+ ground state for random interactions is proposed to be the chaotic realization of the highest rotational symmetry. This is a consequence of a general principle on the chaos and symmetry that the highest symmetry is given to the ground state if sufficient mixing occurs in a chaotic way by a random interaction. Under this symmetry-realization mechanism, the ground-state parity and isospin can be predicted so that the positive parity is favored over the negative parity and the isospin T = 0 state is favored over higher isospin. It is further suggested how one can enhance the realization of highest symmetries within random interactions. Thus, chaos and symmetry are shown to be linked deeply.

  8. NON-RADIAL OSCILLATIONS IN M-GIANT SEMI-REGULAR VARIABLES: STELLAR MODELS AND KEPLER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stello, Dennis; Compton, Douglas L.; Bedding, Timothy R.; Kiss, Laszlo L.; Bellamy, Beau; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Kjeldsen, Hans; García, Rafael A.

    2014-06-10

    The success of asteroseismology relies heavily on our ability to identify the frequency patterns of stellar oscillation modes. For stars like the Sun this is relatively easy because the mode frequencies follow a regular pattern described by a well-founded asymptotic relation. When a solar-like star evolves off the main sequence and onto the red giant branch its structure changes dramatically, resulting in changes in the frequency pattern of the modes. We follow the evolution of the adiabatic frequency pattern from the main sequence to near the tip of the red giant branch for a series of models. We find a significant departure from the asymptotic relation for the non-radial modes near the red giant branch tip, resulting in a triplet frequency pattern. To support our investigation we analyze almost four years of Kepler data of the most luminous stars in the field (late K and early M type) and find that their frequency spectra indeed show a triplet pattern dominated by dipole modes even for the most luminous stars in our sample. Our identification explains previous results from ground-based observations reporting fine structure in the Petersen diagram and sub-ridges in the period-luminosity diagram. Finally, we find ''new ridges'' of non-radial modes with frequencies below the fundamental mode in our model calculations, and we speculate they are related to f modes.

  9. Chemical synthesis and optical characterization of regular and magic-sized CdS quantum dot nanocrystals using 1-dodecanethiol

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dickson, Rachel E.; Hu, Michael Z.

    2015-03-23

    In this study, cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles have been synthesized using a one-pot noninjection reaction procedure in solvent medium 1-octadecene. This approach used a cadmium salt and 1-dodecanethiol, an organic sulfur, as the cadmium and sulfur sources, respectively, along with a long-chain organic acid (myristic acid, lauric acid, or stearic acid). The acid has dual effects as a surface capping ligand and a solubility controlling agent as well. UV–Vis and photoluminescence (PL) spectrometry techniques were used to characterize the optical properties, along with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to identify the structure and size. Our newly developed synthesismore » procedure allowed for investigation of both regular and “magic-sized” CdS QDs by systematically controlling reaction parameters such as reactant type, reactant concentration, and reaction temperature. The organic sulfur (1-dodecanethiol) proved to be a useful sulfur source for synthesizing magic-sized CdS QDs, previously unreported. Several distinctive size regimes of magic-sized quantum dots (MSQDs), including Families 378 and 407, were successfully produced by controlling a small number of factors. Finally, the understanding of controlled Cd release in a MSQD formation mechanism is developed.« less

  10. Increasing Biofuel Deployment through Renewable Super Premium

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... - ORNL Dedicated RSP Vehicle Demonstration - ORNL Bob ... supply & demand for "alternative fuel" such as RSP (chicken & ... * PADD2 shows similar trends 34 | Bioenergy ...

  11. Avoid Nuisance Tripping with Premium Efficiency Motors

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    rotor value during acceleration until the motor approaches its operating speed. (Note: The ... LRC for specifc new motor models can be looked up in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) ...

  12. Premium Power Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Massachusetts Zip: 1845 Product: Specialises in the design and manufacture of high-density energy storage, utility service management and power quality systems. References:...

  13. Premium Power Corporation Smart Grid Demonstration Project |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    control, manufacturing and installation of seven 500-kW6-hour TransFlow 2000 energy storage systems in California, Massachusetts, and New York to lower peak energy demand and...

  14. SU-E-I-93: Improved Imaging Quality for Multislice Helical CT Via Sparsity Regularized Iterative Image Reconstruction Method Based On Tensor Framelet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, H; Guo, M; Lee, K; Li, R; Xing, L; Gao, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Inspired by compressive sensing, sparsity regularized iterative reconstruction method has been extensively studied. However, its utility pertinent to multislice helical 4D CT for radiotherapy with respect to imaging quality, dose, and time has not been thoroughly addressed. As the beginning of such an investigation, this work carries out the initial comparison of reconstructed imaging quality between sparsity regularized iterative method and analytic method through static phantom studies using a state-of-art 128-channel multi-slice Siemens helical CT scanner. Methods: In our iterative method, tensor framelet (TF) is chosen as the regularization method for its superior performance from total variation regularization in terms of reduced piecewise-constant artifacts and improved imaging quality that has been demonstrated in our prior work. On the other hand, X-ray transforms and its adjoints are computed on-the-fly through GPU implementation using our previous developed fast parallel algorithms with O(1) complexity per computing thread. For comparison, both FDK (approximate analytic method) and Katsevich algorithm (exact analytic method) are used for multislice helical CT image reconstruction. Results: The phantom experimental data with different imaging doses were acquired using a state-of-art 128-channel multi-slice Siemens helical CT scanner. The reconstructed image quality was compared between TF-based iterative method, FDK and Katsevich algorithm with the quantitative analysis for characterizing signal-to-noise ratio, image contrast, and spatial resolution of high-contrast and low-contrast objects. Conclusion: The experimental results suggest that our tensor framelet regularized iterative reconstruction algorithm improves the helical CT imaging quality from FDK and Katsevich algorithm for static experimental phantom studies that have been performed.

  15. High-speed tapping-mode atomic force microscopy using a Q-controlled regular cantilever acting as the actuator: Proof-of-principle experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balantekin, M.; Sat?r, S.; Torello, D.; De?ertekin, F. L.

    2014-12-15

    We present the proof-of-principle experiments of a high-speed actuation method to be used in tapping-mode atomic force microscopes (AFM). In this method, we do not employ a piezotube actuator to move the tip or the sample as in conventional AFM systems, but, we utilize a Q-controlled eigenmode of a cantilever to perform the fast actuation. We show that the actuation speed can be increased even with a regular cantilever.

  16. Simulation of Canopy CO2/H2O Fluxes for a Rubber (Hevea Brasiliensis) Plantation in Central Cambodia: The Effect of the Regular Spacing of Planted Trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumagai, Tomo'omi; Mudd, Ryan; Miyazawa, Yoshiyuki; Liu, Wen; Giambelluca, Thomas; Kobayashi, N.; Lim, Tiva Khan; Jomura, Mayuko; Matsumoto, Kazuho; Huang, Maoyi; Chen, Qi; Ziegler, Alan; Yin, Song

    2013-09-10

    We developed a soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) model applicable to simulating CO2 and H2O fluxes from the canopies of rubber plantations, which are characterized by distinct canopy clumping produced by regular spacing of plantation trees. Rubber (Hevea brasiliensis Mll. Arg.) plantations, which are rapidly expanding into both climatically optimal and sub-optimal environments throughout mainland Southeast Asia, potentially change the partitioning of water, energy, and carbon at multiple scales, compared with traditional land covers it is replacing. Describing the biosphere-atmosphere exchange in rubber plantations via SVAT modeling is therefore essential to understanding the impacts on environmental processes. The regular spacing of plantation trees creates a peculiar canopy structure that is not well represented in most SVAT models, which generally assumes a non-uniform spacing of vegetation. Herein we develop a SVAT model applicable to rubber plantation and an evaluation method for its canopy structure, and examine how the peculiar canopy structure of rubber plantations affects canopy CO2 and H2O exchanges. Model results are compared with measurements collected at a field site in central Cambodia. Our findings suggest that it is crucial to account for intensive canopy clumping in order to reproduce observed rubber plantation fluxes. These results suggest a potentially optimal spacing of rubber trees to produce high productivity and water use efficiency.

  17. Presentation Title, Arial Regular 29pt Sub title, Arial Regular...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anvil Cloud properties IntroductionProgram goals TWP-ICE Forcing data Models Updrafts Doppler radar velocity retrievals Polarimetric radar Microphysics retrievals The Centre...

  18. Retail Prices for Regular Gasoline

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    159 2.150 2.149 2.193 2.237 2.223 1990-2016 East Coast (PADD1) 2.100 2.066 2.075 2.126 2.172 2.173 1992-2016 New England (PADD 1A) 2.168 2.125 2.104 2.166 2.201 2.202 1993-2016 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 2.172 2.144 2.143 2.187 2.220 2.225 1993-2016 Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) 2.025 1.991 2.016 2.068 2.128 2.125 1993-2016 Midwest (PADD 2) 2.075 2.115 2.121 2.171 2.227 2.180 1992-2016 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 1.944 1.928 1.938 1.964 2.009 2.005 1992-2016 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) 2.252 2.226 2.214 2.229

  19. Experimental studies on heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of laminar flow through a circular tube fitted with regularly spaced helical screw-tape inserts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivashanmugam, P.; Suresh, S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620 015, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2007-02-15

    Experimental investigation of heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of circular tube fitted with full-length helical screw element of different twist ratio, and helical screw inserts with spacer length 100, 200, 300 and 400mm have been studied with uniform heat flux under laminar flow condition. The experimental data obtained are verified with those obtained from plain tube published data. The effect of spacer length on heat transfer augmentation and friction factor, and the effect of twist ratio on heat transfer augmentation and friction factor have been presented separately. The decrease in Nusselt number for the helical twist with spacer length is within 10% for each subsequent 100mm increase in spacer length. The decrease in friction factor is nearly two times lower than the full length helical twist at low Reynolds number, and four times lower than the full length helical twist at high Reynolds number for all twist ratio. The regularly spaced helical screw inserts can safely be used for heat transfer augmentation without much increase in pressure drop than full length helical screw inserts. (author)

  20. Scalar relativistic computations of nuclear magnetic shielding and g-shifts with the zeroth-order regular approximation and range-separated hybrid density functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aquino, Fredy W.; Govind, Niranjan; Autschbach, Jochen

    2011-10-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of NMR chemical shifts and molecular g-tensors with Gaussian-type orbitals are implemented via second-order energy derivatives within the scalar relativistic zeroth order regular approximation (ZORA) framework. Nonhybrid functionals, standard (global) hybrids, and range-separated (Coulomb-attenuated, long-range corrected) hybrid functionals are tested. Origin invariance of the results is ensured by use of gauge-including atomic orbital (GIAO) basis functions. The new implementation in the NWChem quantum chemistry package is verified by calculations of nuclear shielding constants for the heavy atoms in HX (X=F, Cl, Br, I, At) and H2X (X = O, S, Se, Te, Po), and Te chemical shifts in a number of tellurium compounds. The basis set and functional dependence of g-shifts is investigated for 14 radicals with light and heavy atoms. The problem of accurately predicting F NMR shielding in UF6-nCln, n = 1 to 6, is revisited. The results are sensitive to approximations in the density functionals, indicating a delicate balance of DFT self-interaction vs. correlation. For the uranium halides, the results with the range-separated functionals are mixed.

  1. A single expression for the solution of the one-dimensional transient conduction equation for the simple regular-shaped solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adebiyi, G.A.

    1995-05-01

    For transient conduction in certain simple regular-shaped solids, a dimensionless geometric parameter {omega} can be defined and used for writing the governing equations for each case as a single equation. Analytical solutions for the infinite slab, for a very long cylinder, and for a sphere are well known and can be found in several references including Carslaw and Jaeger (1947), Arpaci (1966), and Ozisik (1993). The solutions given are specific to each geometric shape. This article gives a single solution which can be applied to each of the three basic geometries by a mere substitution of the appropriate value of the geometric parameter {omega}. The Heisler charts (Heisler, 1947) provide solutions for each of the three basic geometries in a graphical form and can be found in several undergraduate heat transfer textbooks. A definite advantage of the single solution is that an appropriate algorithm based on the generalized solution can be written and incorporated into a computer program for transient conduction analysis involving any of the three basic geometries as an alternative to the use of separate equations.

  2. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. refi ner reformulated motor gasoline prices by grade and sales type dollars per gallon excluding taxes Year month Regular Midgrade Sales to end users Sales for resale Sales to end users Sales for resale Through retail outlets Average[a] DTW Rack Bulk Average Through retail outlets Average[a] DTW Rack Bulk Average 1994 0.764 0.758 0.720 0.569 0.543 0.638 0.879 0.873 0.770 0.628 W 0.728 1995 0.749 0.744 0.707 0.605 0.573 0.650 0.836 0.833 0.753 0.651 - 0.723 1996 0.834 0.830 0.788 0.698 0.677

  3. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. refi ner motor gasoline volumes by grade and sales type million gallons per day Year month Regular Midgrade Sales to end users Sales for resale Sales to end users Sales for resale Through retail outlets Total[a] DTW Rack Bulk Total Through retail outlets Total[a] DTW Rack Bulk Total 1985 26.2 29.9 - - - 119.7 - - - - - - 1986 30.9 34.7 - - - 127.0 - - - - - - 1987 32.7 36.1 - - - 141.9 - - - - - - 1988 34.2 37.3 - - - 153.6 - - - - - - 1989 34.3 36.8 - - - 155.7 4.9 5.1 - - - 16.4 1990 36.7

  4. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. refi ner conven onal motor gasoline prices by grade and sales type dollars per gallon excluding taxes Year month Regular Midgrade Sales to end users Sales for resale Sales to end users Sales for resale Through retail outlets Average[a] DTW Rack Bulk Average Through retail outlets Average[a] DTW Rack Bulk Average 1994 0.687 0.681 0.636 0.545 0.500 0.558 0.784 0.778 0.694 NA NA 0.627 1995 0.710 0.704 0.651 0.570 0.525 0.573 0.800 0.794 0.711 0.610 NA 0.637 1996 0.797 0.791 0.743 0.665 0.607

  5. Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    intolerant commercial facilities in California.Through a series of three case studies, ... located at the case study sites. chpcaliforniapremiumpower.pdf (1.13 MB) More ...

  6. dropletProbe Premium v1.201

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-07-06

    Selects locations of interest for liquid microjunction surface sampling coupled to a subsequent analysis is done in a user friendly way. That information is then transferred to instrument control softwares. In addition, readout of a laser sensor allows for robust probe-to-surface distance measurement. Furthermore, pictures taken by the software from a camera provides feedback to judge on successful microjunction sampling.

  7. Energy Conservation Tax Credits- Small Premium Projects (Personal)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy conservation projects include projects with investments for which the first year energy savings yields a simple payback period of greater than three years. Projects with a total cost of less...

  8. Energy Conservation Tax Credits- Small Premium Projects (Corporate)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy conservation projects include projects with investments for which the first year energy savings yields a simple payback period of greater than three years. Projects with a total cost of less...

  9. DOE_PREMIUM_CLASS_TRAVEL_REPORTS_FY14.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    May, 2016 DOE HQ Shuttle Bus Route and Schedule The DOE Shuttle Buses follow the same schedules between the two main Headquarters locations, Forrestal and Germantown. The buses start their routes at each Headquarters facility at the same times, see the schedule below. The subsequent stops at the other facilities are relative to the departure time of each route. Headquarters employees are reminded of the statutory provisions that authorize and limit the use of the shuttle bus service. Specific

  10. DOE_PREMIUM_CLASS_TRAVEL_REPORTS_FY15.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

  11. POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #31 - Procedures for Regularizing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    andor priority consideration for veterans' preference eligibles andor non-veterans' preference applicants under both Delegated Examining and Merit Promotion selection cases. ...

  12. Benefits Summary - Regular Employees | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that encourage a positive work-life balance. Some of these amenities include a 24-hour fitness center, yoga and Pilates classes, on-site bike share transportation, multiple cafes...

  13. Retail Prices for Regular Gasoline - Conventional Areas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    105 2.091 2.087 2.096 2.136 2.187 1990-2016 East Coast (PADD1) 2.095 2.081 2.048 2.069 2.118 2.173 1992-2016 New England (PADD 1A) 2.206 2.181 2.156 2.141 2.192 2.239 1993-2016 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 2.259 2.224 2.198 2.204 2.246 2.290 1993-2016 Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) 2.036 2.030 1.993 2.021 2.073 2.132 1993-2016 Midwest (PADD 2) 2.069 2.066 2.100 2.109 2.159 2.211 1992-2016 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 1.980 1.947 1.928 1.939 1.965 2.018 1992-2016 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) 2.264 2.252 2.226 2.214

  14. Retail Prices for Regular Gasoline - Reformulated Areas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    44 2.302 2.281 2.262 2.312 2.341 1994-2016 East Coast (PADD1) 2.162 2.130 2.097 2.086 2.138 2.171 1994-2016 New England (PADD 1A) 2.209 2.165 2.117 2.095 2.160 2.192 1994-2016 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 2.165 2.139 2.110 2.105 2.150 2.176 1994-2016 Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) 2.009 1.980 1.965 1.959 2.011 2.080 1994-2016 Midwest (PADD 2) 2.132 2.132 2.210 2.198 2.250 2.329 1994-2016 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 1.980 1.936 1.928 1.937 1.963 1.980 1994-2016 West Coast (PADD 5) 2.734 2.668 2.621 2.581 2.636

  15. Total-Variation Regularized Numerical Differentiation, Version...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    noise amplification. Licensing Status: Available for Express Licensing (?). This software is open source. To download, please visit the TVDif website. For more information,...

  16. H. R. 1652: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to extend for 5 years the energy investment credit for solar energy and geothermal property and to allow such credit against the entire regular tax and the alternative minimum tax, introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, March 22, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The amount of the allowable energy tax credit shall not exceed the net chapter 1 tax for any year. The net chapter 1 tax is defined as the sum of the regular tax liability and the tax imposed by section 55 of the Tax Code reduced by the sum of the credits allowable under this new section. The tax credit would apply until December 31, 1996.

  17. Migratory Birds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    65 2.164 2.204 2.208 2.259 2.313 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.153 2.152 2.186 2.193 2.243 2.294 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.242 2.242 2.320 2.304 2.360 2.436 1994-2016 Regular 2.078 2.075 2.115 2.121 2.171 2.227 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 2.069 2.066 2.100 2.109 2.159 2.211 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.132 2.132 2.210 2.198 2.250 2.329 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.323 2.328 2.361 2.361 2.411 2.461 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.304 2.309 2.337 2.339 2.387 2.434

  18. GyroSolé’ Harmonic Engine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    088 2.054 2.038 2.052 2.076 2.118 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.088 2.056 2.037 2.053 2.077 2.127 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.090 2.045 2.039 2.046 2.071 2.088 1994-2016 Regular 1.980 1.944 1.928 1.938 1.964 2.009 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 1.980 1.947 1.928 1.939 1.965 2.018 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.980 1.936 1.928 1.937 1.963 1.980 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.224 2.195 2.179 2.204 2.218 2.259 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.221 2.195 2.174 2.207 2.219 2.267

  19. West Coast less California Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    488 2.454 2.414 2.419 2.457 2.469 1998-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.553 2.526 2.492 2.493 2.529 2.539 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.180 2.111 2.043 2.065 2.115 2.140 1998-2016 Regular 2.421 2.387 2.347 2.352 2.391 2.401 1998-2016 Conventional Areas 2.490 2.462 2.428 2.430 2.467 2.473 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.090 2.020 1.953 1.975 2.025 2.051 1998-2016 Midgrade 2.623 2.587 2.548 2.551 2.596 2.612 1998-2016 Conventional Areas 2.688 2.660 2.626 2.626 2.670 2.685

  20. Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    263 2.244 2.210 2.221 2.270 2.314 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.240 2.227 2.193 2.215 2.266 2.318 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.301 2.271 2.238 2.230 2.276 2.308 1994-2016 Regular 2.120 2.100 2.066 2.075 2.126 2.172 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 2.095 2.081 2.048 2.069 2.118 2.173 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.162 2.130 2.097 2.086 2.138 2.171 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.395 2.378 2.345 2.364 2.407 2.451 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.358 2.346 2.313 2.344 2.395 2.442

  1. U.S. States - Maps - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 2.267 2.256 2.256 2.299 2.341 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.211 2.198 2.193 2.203 2.243 2.292 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.447 2.406 2.384 2.364 2.413 2.441 1994-2016 Regular 2.182 2.159 2.150 2.149 2.193 2.237 1990-2016 Conventional Areas 2.105 2.091 2.087 2.096 2.136 2.187 1990-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.344 2.302 2.281 2.262 2.312 2.341 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.434 2.413 2.398 2.401 2.441 2.481 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.345 2.335 2.325 2.340 2.378 2.424

  2. Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    310 2.283 2.283 2.326 2.357 2.361 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.346 2.321 2.326 2.371 2.412 2.405 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.288 2.260 2.256 2.298 2.323 2.334 1994-2016 Regular 2.172 2.144 2.143 2.187 2.220 2.225 1993-2016 Conventional Areas 2.224 2.198 2.204 2.246 2.290 2.285 1993-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.139 2.110 2.105 2.150 2.176 2.187 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.450 2.423 2.424 2.467 2.494 2.497 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.446 2.426 2.429 2.484 2.514 2.503

  3. East Coast (PADD 1) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    44 2.210 2.221 2.270 2.314 2.314 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.227 2.193 2.215 2.266 2.318 2.314 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.271 2.238 2.230 2.276 2.308 2.315 1994-2016 Regular 2.100 2.066 2.075 2.126 2.172 2.173 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 2.081 2.048 2.069 2.118 2.173 2.171 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.130 2.097 2.086 2.138 2.171 2.176 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.378 2.345 2.364 2.407 2.451 2.440 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.346 2.313 2.344 2.395 2.442 2.422

  4. U.S. Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Gasoline - All Grades 2.835 3.576 3.680 3.575 3.437 2.520 1993-2015 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.793 3.528 3.610 3.511 3.376 2.423 1994-2015 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.921 3.675 3.822 3.707 3.559 2.718 1994-2015 Regular 2.782 3.521 3.618 3.505 3.358 2.429 1990-2015 Conventional Areas 2.742 3.476 3.552 3.443 3.299 2.334 1990-2015 Reformulated Areas 2.864 3.616 3.757 3.635 3.481 2.629 1994-2015 Midgrade 2.902 3.644 3.756 3.663 3.539 2.645

  5. Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    054 2.038 2.052 2.076 2.118 2.113 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.056 2.037 2.053 2.077 2.127 2.113 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.045 2.039 2.046 2.071 2.088 2.115 1994-2016 Regular 1.944 1.928 1.938 1.964 2.009 2.005 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 1.947 1.928 1.939 1.965 2.018 2.005 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.936 1.928 1.937 1.963 1.980 2.005 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.195 2.179 2.204 2.218 2.259 2.251 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.195 2.174 2.207 2.219 2.267 2.247

  6. Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    84 2.149 2.175 2.227 2.284 2.281 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.187 2.150 2.179 2.231 2.287 2.284 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.156 2.138 2.133 2.181 2.249 2.245 1994-2016 Regular 2.025 1.991 2.016 2.068 2.128 2.125 1993-2016 Conventional Areas 2.030 1.993 2.021 2.073 2.132 2.130 1993-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.980 1.965 1.959 2.011 2.080 2.075 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.321 2.285 2.322 2.371 2.424 2.402 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.317 2.280 2.320 2.371 2.423 2.399

  7. Midwest (PADD 2) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    64 2.204 2.208 2.259 2.313 2.269 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.152 2.186 2.193 2.243 2.294 2.259 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.242 2.320 2.304 2.360 2.436 2.337 1994-2016 Regular 2.075 2.115 2.121 2.171 2.227 2.180 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 2.066 2.100 2.109 2.159 2.211 2.172 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.132 2.210 2.198 2.250 2.329 2.227 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.328 2.361 2.361 2.411 2.461 2.424 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.309 2.337 2.339 2.387 2.434 2.406

  8. New England (PADD 1A) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    79 2.237 2.219 2.270 2.305 2.309 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.286 2.261 2.246 2.294 2.336 2.346 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.278 2.231 2.212 2.264 2.298 2.299 1994-2016 Regular 2.168 2.125 2.104 2.166 2.201 2.202 1993-2016 Conventional Areas 2.181 2.156 2.141 2.192 2.239 2.248 1993-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.165 2.117 2.095 2.160 2.192 2.191 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.441 2.404 2.391 2.410 2.449 2.455 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.439 2.416 2.401 2.439 2.471 2.481

  9. New York Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    419 2.384 2.374 2.380 2.399 2.405 2000-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.340 2.313 2.304 2.320 2.358 2.359 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.487 2.445 2.434 2.433 2.434 2.444 2000-2016 Regular 2.296 2.262 2.253 2.260 2.279 2.284 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.232 2.204 2.195 2.212 2.252 2.251 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.355 2.315 2.304 2.303 2.303 2.313 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.559 2.521 2.506 2.509 2.527 2.536 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.453 2.424 2.413 2.418 2.461 2.465

  10. PADD 5 Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    677 2.635 2.596 2.637 2.656 2.660 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.553 2.526 2.492 2.493 2.529 2.539 1995-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.727 2.680 2.639 2.696 2.707 2.709 1995-2016 Regular 2.614 2.573 2.534 2.573 2.592 2.594 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 2.490 2.462 2.428 2.430 2.467 2.473 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.668 2.621 2.581 2.636 2.647 2.647 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.785 2.741 2.702 2.747 2.766 2.773 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.688 2.660 2.626 2.626 2.670 2.685

  11. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. refi ner reformulated motor gasoline volumes by grade and sales type million gallons per day Year month Regular Midgrade Sales to end users Sales for resale Sales to end users Sales for resale Through retail outlets Total[a] DTW Rack Bulk Total Through retail outlets Total[a] DTW Rack Bulk Total 1994 0.6 0.6 2.1 1.6 0.6 4.3 0.2 0.2 0.7 0.3 W 1.0 1995 7.8 8.1 20.7 W W 43.3 3.0 3.1 7.4 3.1 - 10.5 1996 10.7 11.1 26.1 20.5 8.0 54.6 3.3 3.4 7.9 3.3 W 11.3 1997 13.4 13.8 28.0 21.7 7.6 57.3 3.6

  12. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    refi ner conven onal motor gasoline volumes by grade and sales type million gallons per day Year month Regular Midgrade Sales to end users Sales for resale Sales to end users Sales for resale Through retail outlets Total[a] DTW Rack Bulk Total Through retail outlets Total[a] DTW Rack Bulk Total 1994 29.7 31.2 36.1 113.5 22.8 172.4 7.6 7.8 10.1 14.6 0.1 24.8 1995 24.0 25.3 19.4 105.1 26.0 150.5 6.0 6.3 5.1 13.6 0.1 18.7 1996 24.1 25.4 17.8 108.5 27.1 153.4 5.7 5.9 4.4 12.9 NA 17.3 1997 25.0 26.4

  13. Texas Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    063 2.049 2.057 2.081 2.113 2.117 2000-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.075 2.055 2.065 2.088 2.130 2.119 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.045 2.039 2.046 2.071 2.088 2.115 2000-2016 Regular 1.959 1.944 1.953 1.978 2.013 2.016 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 1.974 1.954 1.963 1.988 2.035 2.023 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.936 1.928 1.937 1.963 1.980 2.005 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.223 2.209 2.217 2.230 2.258 2.264 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.243 2.219 2.235 2.240 2.277 2.264

  14. U.S. Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 View History Gasoline - All Grades 2.071 2.216 2.371 2.467 2.345 2.284 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 1.996 2.129 2.303 2.405 2.263 2.226 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.223 2.390 2.509 2.593 2.512 2.402 1994-2016 Regular 1.969 2.113 2.268 2.366 2.239 2.178 1990-2016 Conventional Areas 1.895 2.027 2.199 2.303 2.157 2.119 1990-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.124 2.293 2.413 2.497 2.411 2.300 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.210 2.355 2.510 2.603

  15. U.S. Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    67 2.256 2.256 2.299 2.341 2.329 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.198 2.193 2.203 2.243 2.292 2.277 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.406 2.384 2.364 2.413 2.441 2.436 1994-2016 Regular 2.159 2.150 2.149 2.193 2.237 2.223 1990-2016 Conventional Areas 2.091 2.087 2.096 2.136 2.187 2.170 1990-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.302 2.281 2.262 2.312 2.341 2.333 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.413 2.398 2.401 2.441 2.481 2.468 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.335 2.325 2.340 2.378 2.424 2.405

  16. Lu Gan | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    92 2.184 2.149 2.175 2.227 2.284 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.193 2.187 2.150 2.179 2.231 2.287 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.182 2.156 2.138 2.133 2.181 2.249 1994-2016 Regular 2.033 2.025 1.991 2.016 2.068 2.128 1993-2016 Conventional Areas 2.036 2.030 1.993 2.021 2.073 2.132 1993-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.009 1.980 1.965 1.959 2.011 2.080 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.327 2.321 2.285 2.322 2.371 2.424 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.322 2.317 2.280 2.320 2.371 2.423

  17. Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norwood, Zack; Lipman, Tim; Marnay, Chris; Kammen, Dan

    2008-09-30

    This report analyzes the current economic and environmental performance of combined heat and power (CHP) systems in power interruption intolerant commercial facilities. Through a series of three case studies, key trade-offs are analyzed with regard to the provision of black-out ridethrough capability with the CHP systems and the resutling ability to avoid the need for at least some diesel backup generator capacity located at the case study sites. Each of the selected sites currently have a CHP or combined heating, cooling, and power (CCHP) system in addition to diesel backup generators. In all cases the CHP/CCHP system have a small fraction of the electrical capacity of the diesel generators. Although none of the selected sites currently have the ability to run the CHP systems as emergency backup power, all could be retrofitted to provide this blackout ride-through capability, and new CHP systems can be installed with this capability. The following three sites/systems were used for this analysis: (1) Sierra Nevada Brewery - Using 1MW of installed Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells operating on a combination of digestor gas (from the beer brewing process) and natural gas, this facility can produce electricty and heat for the brewery and attached bottling plant. The major thermal load on-site is to keep the brewing tanks at appropriate temperatures. (2) NetApp Data Center - Using 1.125 MW of Hess Microgen natural gas fired reciprocating engine-generators, with exhaust gas and jacket water heat recovery attached to over 300 tons of of adsorption chillers, this combined cooling and power system provides electricity and cooling to a data center with a 1,200 kW peak electrical load. (3) Kaiser Permanente Hayward Hospital - With 180kW of Tecogen natural gas fired reciprocating engine-generators this CHP system generates steam for space heating, and hot water for a city hospital. For all sites, similar assumptions are made about the economic and technological constraints of the power generation system. Using the Distributed Energy Resource Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we model three representative scenarios and find the optimal operation scheduling, yearly energy cost, and energy technology investments for each scenario below: Scenario 1 - Diesel generators and CHP/CCHP equipment as installed in the current facility. Scenario 1 represents a baseline forced investment in currently installed energy equipment. Scenario 2 - Existing CHP equipment installed with blackout ride-through capability to replace approximately the same capacity of diesel generators. In Scenario 2 the cost of the replaced diesel units is saved, however additional capital cost for the controls and switchgear for blackout ride-through capability is necessary. Scenario 3 - Fully optimized site analysis, allowing DER-CAM to specify the number of diesel and CHP/CCHP units (with blackout ride-through capability) that should be installed ignoring any constraints on backup generation. Scenario 3 allows DER-CAM to optimize scheduling and number of generation units from the currently available technologies at a particular site. The results of this analysis, using real data to model the optimal schedulding of hypothetical and actual CHP systems for a brewery, data center, and hospital, lead to some interesting conclusions. First, facilities with high heating loads will typically prove to be the most appropriate for CHP installation from a purely economic standpoint. Second, absorption/adsorption cooling systems may only be economically feasible if the technology for these chillers can increase above current best system efficiency. At a coefficient of performance (COP) of 0.8, for instance, an adsorption chiller paired with a natural gas generator with waste heat recovery at a facility with large cooling loads, like a data center, will cost no less on a yearly basis than purchasing electricity and natural gas directly from a utility. Third, at marginal additional cost, if the reliability of CHP systems proves to be at least as high as diesel generators (which we expect to be the case), the CHP system could replace the diesel generator at little or no additional cost. This is true if the thermal to electric (relative) load of those facilities was already high enough to economically justify a CHP system. Last, in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, the modeled CHP and CCHP systems provide some degree of decreased emissions relative to systems with less CHP installed. The emission reduction can be up to 10% in the optimized case (Scenario 3) in the application with the highest relative thermal load, in this case the hospital. Although these results should be qualified because they are only based on the three case studies, the general results and lessons learned are expected to be applicable across a broad range of potential and existing CCHP systems.

  18. Integrated hydroprocessing scheme for production of premium quality distillates and lubricants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, N.Y.; LaPierre, R.B.; Partridge, R.D.; Wong, S.S.

    1989-07-25

    This patent describes a method of upgrading a gas oil hydrocarbon feedstock into a naphtha product and a distillate product having a boiling range above that of the naptha product and below that of the gas oil and also having content of iso-paraffins. The method comprises hydrocracking the gas oil feedstock over a large pore size, aromatic selective hydrocracking catalyst having acidic functionality and hydrogenation-deydrogenation functionality, at a hydrogen pressure up to about 10,000 kPa and at a conversion below 50 percent to 650{sup 0}F.-products, to effects a removal of aromatic components by hydrocracking and to form the naptha product and a product boiling above the naptha product which is enriched in paraffinic components; separating the naptha product from the product enriched in paraffinic components; and hydroprocessing the product enriched in paraffinic components over a hydroprocessing catalyst comprising zeolite beta as an acidic component and a hydrogenation-dehydrogenation component, to produce a distillate boiling range product having an enhanced content of isoparaffinic components.

  19. Selling Into the Sun: Price Premium Analysis of a Multi-State...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Homes with solar photovoltaic (PV) systems have multiplied in the United States recently, ... of Residential and Non-Residential Photovoltaic Systems in the United States Smart ...

  20. DOE Premium Class Travel Report for FY 09 through FY 13 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Rule Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient Class 8 Highway Vehicle Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and San Mateo County Transit District -- Fuel ...

  1. Increasing Biofuel Deployment and Utilization through Development of Renewable Super Premium: Infrastructure Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, K.; Kass, M.; Theiss, T.

    2014-11-01

    A high octane fuel and specialized vehicle are under consideration as a market opportunity to meet federal requirements for renewable fuel use and fuel economy. Infrastructure is often cited as a barrier for the introduction of a new fuel. This report assesses infrastructure readiness for E25 (25% ethanol; 75% gasoline) and E25+ (more than 25% ethanol). Both above-ground and below-ground equipment are considered as are the current state of stations, codes and regulations, and materials compatibility.

  2. A premium price electricity market for the emerging biomass industry in the UK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kettle, R.

    1995-11-01

    The Non-Fossil Fuel Obligation (NFFO) is the means by which the UK Government creates an initial market for renewable sources of electricity. For the first time the third round of the competition for NFFO contracts included a band for {open_quote}energy crops and agricultural and forestry wastes{close_quote}. The NFFO Order which obliges the Regional Electricity Companies (RECs) in England and Wales to contract for a specified electricity generating capacity from renewable resources was made in December 1994. It required 19.06 MW of wood gasification capacity and 103.81 MW from other energy crops and agricultural and forestry wastes. The purpose of these Orders is to create an initial market so that in the not too distant future the most promising renewables can compete without financial support. This paper describes how these projects are expected to contribute to this policy. It also considers how the policy objective of convergence under successive Orders between the price paid under the NFFO and the market price for electricity might be accomplished.

  3. Integrated production/use of ultra low-ash coal, premium liquids and clean char

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, C.W.

    1991-01-01

    This integrated, multi-product approach for utilizing Illinois coal starts with the production of ultra low-ash coal and then converts it to high-vale, coal-derived, products. The ultra low-ash coal is produced by solubilizing coal in a phenolic solvent under ChemCoal{trademark} process conditions, separating the coal solution from insoluble ash, and then precipitating the clean coal by dilution of the solvent with methanol. Two major products, liquids and low-ash char, are then produced by mild gasification of the low-ash coal. The low ash-char is further upgraded to activated char, and/or an oxidized activated char which has catalytic properties. Characterization of products at each stage is part of this project.

  4. DOE Premium Class Travel Reports for FY 09 and FY 13

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Preliminary Plan for Retrospective Analysis of Existing Rules DOE Preliminary Plan for Retrospective Analysis of Existing Rules On January 18, 2011, the President issued Executive Order 13563, "Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review," to ensure that Federal regulations seek more affordable, less intrusive means to achieve policy goals, and that agencies give careful consideration to the benefits and costs of those regulations. Executive Order 13563

  5. Motor gasolines, summer 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelton, E.M.

    1980-02-01

    Analytical data for 2401 samples of motor gasoline, from service stations throughout the country, were collected and analyzed under agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center and the American Petroleum Institute. The samples represent the products of 48 companies, large and small, which manufacture and supply gasoline. These data are tabulated by groups according to brands (unlabeled) and grades for 17 marketing areas and districts into which the country is divided. A map included in this report, shows marketing areas, districts and sampling locations. The report also includes charts indicating the trends of selected properties of motor fuels since 1949. Twelve octane distribution percent charts for areas 1, 2, 3, and 4 for unleaded, regular, and premium grades of gasoline are presented in this report. The antiknock (octane) index ((R + M)/2) averages of gasoline sold in this country were 88.6, 89.3, and 93.7 unleaded, regular, and premium grades of gasolines, respectively.

  6. Scaling Up Coordinate Descent Algorithms for Large ?1 Regularization Problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scherrer, Chad; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Tewari, Ambuj; Haglin, David J.

    2012-07-03

    We present a generic framework for parallel coordinate descent (CD) algorithms that has as special cases the original sequential algorithms of Cyclic CD and Stochastic CD, as well as the recent parallel Shotgun algorithm of Bradley et al. We introduce two novel parallel algorithms that are also special cases---Thread-Greedy CD and Coloring-Based CD---and give performance measurements for an OpenMP implementation of these.

  7. GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM # 31 PROCEDURES FOR REGULARIZING ILLEGAL APPOINTMENT .pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    GSA and DOE Seek Innovative Building Technologies GSA and DOE Seek Innovative Building Technologies October 14, 2015 - 2:33pm Addthis GSA and DOE Seek Innovative Building Technologies To submit your technology, complete our request for information (RFI) by Friday, December 11, 2015. GSA's Green Proving Ground (GPG) program and DOE's High Impact Technology (HIT) Catalyst have issued a joint Request for Information calling for innovative emerging building technologies that can cost-effectively

  8. Detecting regular sound changes in linguistics as events of concerted...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    other evolving group. less Authors: Hruschka, Daniel J. 1 ; Branford, Simon 2 ; Smith, Eric D. 3 ; Wilkins, Jon 4 ; Meade, Andrew 2 ; Pagel, Mark 5 ; Bhattacharya,...

  9. Scaling Up Coordinate Descent Algorithms for Large ℓ1 Regularization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference ...

  10. A fast map-making preconditioner for regular scanning patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nss, Sigurd K.; Louis, Thibaut E-mail: thibaut.louis@astro.ox.ac.uk

    2014-08-01

    High-resolution Maximum Likelihood map-making of the Cosmic Microwave Background is usually performed using Conjugate Gradients with a preconditioner that ignores noise correlations. We here present a new preconditioner that approximates the map noise covariance as circulant, and show that this results in a speedup of up to 400% for a realistic scanning pattern from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. The improvement is especially large for polarized maps.

  11. POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #31- Procedures for Regularizing Illegal Appointments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of the Department’s ongoing effort to ensure the integrity of merit system principles (§5 USC 2301(b)) and to prevent the appearance of, or violation of any of the prohibited personnel...

  12. Kinder Morgan Central Florida Pipeline Ethanol Project

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    KINDER MORGAN CENTRAL FLORIDA PIPELINE ETHANOL PROJECT  In December 2008, Kinder Morgan began transporting commercial batches of denatured ethanol along with gasoline shipments in its 16-inch Central Florida Pipeline (CFPL) from Tampa to Orlando, making CFPL the first transmarket gasoline pipeline in the United States to do so. The 16-inch pipeline previously only transported regular and premium gasoline.  Kinder Morgan invested approximately $10 million to modify the line for ethanol

  13. Clean, premium-quality chars: Demineralized and carbon enriched. Quarterly report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.V.

    1992-08-01

    The interaction of methane, methane/oxygen, helium, and hydrogen with IBC-102 coal samples ({le} 2mg) has been investigated in a thermogravimetric reactor at 20{degrees}C--650{degrees}C. The results show that the reactive gases are converting some of the mineral matter of the coal into catalysts through chemical reactions (reduction or oxidation). Also, these gases (except He) dissolve in the softened coal. Added clays (kaolinite and Ca-montmorillonite) increase the reactivity of the coal. This higher reactivity may be attributed to the fact that clays may serve as catalysts for methane activation, may prevent the coal agglomeration, and/or may increase the number of active sites for the reaction by modification of the geometric structure of the coal surface. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) experiments show that clean coal (no mineral matter) devolatilizes at a lower temperature than raw coal. Also, the preoxidation at 150{degrees}C for 50 minutes results in a 13{degrees} lowering of the devolatilization temperature. ISDR-FTIR experiments suggest that phenol groups of the coal play an important role in the cross-linkage of the coal structure when thermally treated.

  14. Clean, premium-quality chars: Demineralized and carbon enriched. Technical report, December 1, 1992--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.V.; Malhotra, V.M.; Wiltowski, T.; Myszka, E.; Banerjee, D.

    1993-05-01

    The overall objective of this two-year project is to evaluate methods of preparing demineralized and carbon enriched chars from Illinois Basin coals. There are two processing steps: physical cleaning of the coal and devolatilization under different environments to form chars. Two different techniques were used: BET surface area analyzer and in-situ Diffuse Reflectance FTIR. Experiments were performed with coals IBC-101, 102, and 104 as received and after cleaning. It was found that the cleaning not only removes the minerals but has changed also the porous structure of the coals. DR-FTIR spectrums helped to explain the possible existing chemical bonds in the coal structure as well as their changes during drying and mild pyrolysis.

  15. Clean, premium-quality chars: Demineralized and carbon enriched. Final technical report, 1 September, 1992--31 August, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.V.; Malhotra, V.M.; Wiltowski, T.

    1993-12-31

    The overall objective of this two-year project was to evaluate methods of preparing demineralized and carbon enriched chars from Illinois Basin coals. The two processing steps, physical cleaning and devolatilization under different environments, led to the following results. Cleaning coal incompletely removes mineral matter which decreases catalytic activity and increases micropore structure. Water forms hydrogen bonds to oxygen functional groups in coal, and during drying, coals undergo structural changes which affect mild gasification. When methane reacts wit coal, devolatilization and carbon deposition occur, the rates of which depend on temperature and amount of ash. Thermal decomposition of IBC-101 coal starts at 300 C, which is much lower than previously believed, but maximum yields of liquids occur at 500 C for IBC-101 coal and at 550 C for IBC-102 coal. Aliphatic-to-aromatic ratios increase with increasing pyrolysis temperatures to 300 C and then decrease; therefore, liquids formed during gasification of 550 C or higher contain mainly aromatic compounds. Btu values of chars are higher after methane treatment than after helium treatment.

  16. Clean, premium-quality chars: Demineralized and carbon enriched. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.V.; Malhotra, V.M.; Wiltowski, T.; Myszka, E.

    1993-09-01

    The overall objective of this two-year project is to evaluate methods of preparing demineralized and carbon enriched chars from Illinois Basin coals. There are two processing steps: physical cleaning of the coal and devolatilization under different environments to form chars. Two differents techniques were used, in-situ Diffuse Reflectance FTIR measurements and BTU measurements. Experiments were performed with coals IBC-101, 102, and 104 as received and after cleaning. DR-FTIR spectrums helped to explain the possible existing chemical bonds in the coal structure as well as their changes during drying and mild pyrolysis. Drying coal causes hydrogen bonds between water and coal to be broken. Liquids produced above 500{degrees}C are much higher in aromatic content, thus, effectively reducing the concentration of aliphatic groups in the overall liquid yield. BTU values of coals after methane treatment are higher than after helium treatment.

  17. Clean, premium-quality chars: Demineralized and carbon enriched. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.V.; Malhotra, V.M.; Wiltowski, T.

    1992-12-31

    The overall objective of this two-year project is to evaluate methods of preparing demineralized and carbon enriched chars from Minois Basin coal. There are two processing steps: physical cleaning of the coal and devolatilization of coal under different environments (He, H{sub 2}, He/O{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2}) to form chars. Also, as-received and clean coal samples were mixed with hectorite, Ca-montmorillonite, and kaolinite to evaluate the potential effects of these clays on chars yield and agglomeration during devolatilization processes. Three different techniques were used: thermogravimetric analysis, differential thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and in-situ diffuse reflectance FTIR (ISDR-FTIR). Thermogravimetric measurements showed that reactive gases (except He) dissolve in the softened coal. Also, these gases convert some of the coal mineral matter into catalyst by chemical reduction and oxidation. Coal reactivity increases by adding clays because they may be catalyst for methane activation, may prevent coal agglomeration, and may modify the geometric structure of the coal surface. DSC measurements show that clean coal devolatilizes at a lower temperature than as-received sample and preoxidation lowers the devolatilization temperature. Additionally, kaolinite addition increase yields of chars from IBC-102 coal in He. In-situ diffuse reflectance FTIR experiments show that thermal decomposition of coal either increases -CH{sub 3}, content in char or alters the physical structure of -CH{sub 3}. Also, phenol groups of the coal play an important role in cross-linkage the coal structure when coal is thermally treated.

  18. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications: Subtask 3.3 - dewatering studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, R. H.; Phillips, D. I.; Sohn, S. M.; Luttrell, G. H.

    1996-10-01

    If successful, the novel Hydrophobic Dewatering (HD) process being developed in this project will be capable of efficiently removing moisture from fine coal without the expense and other related drawbacks associated with mechanical dewatering or thermal drying. In the HD process, a hydrophobic substance is added to a coal-water slurry to displace water from the surface of coal, while the spent hydrophobic substance is recovered for recycling. For this process to have commercialization potential, the amount of butane lost during the process must be small. Earlier testing revealed the ability of the hydrophobic dewatering process to reduce the moisture content of fine coal to a very low amount as well as the determination of potential butane losses by the adsorption of butane onto the coal surface. Work performed in this quarter showed that the state of oxidation affects the amount of butane adsorbed onto the surface of the coal and also affects the final moisture content. the remaining work will involve a preliminary flowsheet of a continuous bench-scale unit and a review of the economics of the system. 1 tab.

  19. Fuel Cell Tax Incentives: How Monetization Lowers the Government Outlay

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tax Incentives: How Monetization Lowers the Government Outlay By: Lee J. Peterson, Esq. Reznick Group, P.C. February 19, 2009 The Big Picture: Financing with Private Capital Income/Excise Tax Credits Depreciation Deductions - Regular and Accelerated Income Exclusions CREBS Income/Premium State Tax Credits Sales/Property Tax Exemptions Grants/Subsidies Rebates Buy-Downs Loan Guarantees REC Sales Tax-Exempt Debt Financing C F S B R T B R G Building Business Value February 19, 2009 1 § 45

  20. Domestic petroleum-product prices around the world. Survey: free market or government price controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-27

    In this issue, Energy Detente draws from their regular Western and Eastern Hemisphere Fuel Price/Tax Series, each produced monthly, and adds other survey data and analysis for a broad view of 48 countries around the world. They find that seven Latin American nations, including OPEC members Venezuela and Ecuador, are among the ten countries with lowest gasoline prices. In this Fourth Special Price Report, Energy Detente provides a first-time presentation of which prices are government-controlled, and which are free to respond to market forces. South Korea, with fixed prices since 1964, has the highest premium-grade gasoline price in our survey, US $5.38 per gallon. Paraguay, with prices fixed by PETROPAR, the national oil company, has the second highest premium gasoline price, US $4.21 per gallon. Nicaragua, also with government price controls, ranks third highest in the survey, with US $3.38 per gallon for premium gasoline. Kuwait shows the lowest price at US $0.55 per gallon. Several price changes from the previous survey reflect changes in currency exchange as all prices are converted to US dollars. The Energy Detente fuel price/tax series is presented for Western Hemisphere countries.

  1. Buying Clean Electricity | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to pay a small premium in exchange for electricity generated from clean, renewable ("green") energy sources. The premium covers the increased costs incurred by the power...

  2. Making Better Use of Ethanol as a Transportation Fuel With "Renewable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Making Better Use of Ethanol as a Transportation Fuel With "Renewable Super Premium" Making Better Use of Ethanol as a Transportation Fuel With "Renewable Super Premium" Breakout ...

  3. Indonesian fuel consumers shouldering development costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-08-22

    A graph shows how Indonesia's prices for regular and premium leaded gasolines and diesel fuel compare to the world average price, in US dollars per gallon: USA $0.28 lower for regular leaded gasoline, $0.30 lower for premium leaded, and $0.48 lower for diesel. Such proximity to world averages is of note in the context that Indonesia, a developing country with pressing needs for industrial and social development, does not internally provide the deep consumer subsidies that have long persisted in many such oil-producing countries. Although the other three countries shown on the graph have recently moved to cut internal fuel price subsidies, they still price these three important fuels more deeply below the world average than does Indonesia. A table details Indonesia's internal market price changes over time, by petroleum product. A chart tracks Indonesia's oil exports since 1966. The year of the first world oil price shock, 1973, shows a dramatic increase in exports, but that near-doubling was not repeated during the period of the second price shock, 1978-1979. As of 182, exports (by now including condensates) had fallen to pre-Arab Oil Embargo levels. This issue contains the fuel price/tax series and the principal industrial fuel prices for August 1984 for countries of the Western Hemisphere. Also, beginning with this issue, Energy Detente will appear only in English rather than both English and Spanish, as heretofore.

  4. Motor gasolines, summer 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelton, E.M.

    1981-02-01

    Analytical data for 2062 samples of motor gasoline were collected from service stations throughout the country and were analyzed in the laboratories of various refiners, motor manufacturers, and chemical companies. The data were submitted to the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center for study, necessary calculations, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). The samples represent the products of 48 companies, large and small, which manufacture and supply gasoline. These data are tabulated by groups according to brands (unlabeled) and grades for 17 marketing districts into which the country is divided. A map included in this report, shows marketing areas, districts and sampling locations. The report also includes charts indicating the trends of selected properties of motor fuels since 1949. Twelve octane distribution percent charts for areas 1, 2, 3, and 4 for unleaded, regular, and premium grades of gasoline are presented in this report. The anitknock (octane) index ((R + M)/2) averages of gasolines sold in this country were 87.8 for the unleaded below 90.0, 91.6 for the unleaded 90.0 and above, 88.9 for the regular, and 92.8 for the premium grades of gasoline.

  5. TUNABLE TENSOR VOTING FOR REGULARIZING PUNCTATE PATTERNS OFMEMBRANE-BOUND PROTEIN SIGNALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loss, Leandro; Bebis, George; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-04-29

    Membrane-bound protein, expressed in the basal-lateral region, is heterogeneous and an important endpoint for understanding biological processes. At the optical resolution, membrane-bound protein can be visualized as being diffused (e.g., E-cadherin), punctate (e.g., connexin), or simultaneously diffused and punctate as a result of sample preparation or conditioning. Furthermore, there is a significant amount of heterogeneity as a result of technical and biological variations. This paper aims at enhancing membrane-bound proteins that are expressed between epithelial cells so that quantitative analysis can be enabled on a cell-by-cell basis. We propose a method to detect and enhance membrane-bound protein signal from noisy images. More precisely, we build upon the tensor voting framework in order to produce an efficient method to detect and refine perceptually interesting linear structures in images. The novelty of the proposed method is in its iterative tuning of the tensor voting fields, which allows the concentration of the votes only over areas of interest. The method is shown to produce high quality enhancements of membrane-bound protein signals with combined punctate and diffused characteristics. Experimental results demonstrate the benefits of using tunable tensor voting for enhancing and differentiating cell-cell adhesion mediated by integral cell membrane protein.

  6. Regular oscillations and random motion of glass microspheres levitated by a single optical beam in air

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moore, Jeremy; Martin, Leopoldo L.; Maayani, Shai; Kim, Kyu Hyun; Chandrahalim, Hengky; Eichenfield, Matt; Martin, Inocencio R.; Carmon, Tal

    2016-02-03

    We experimentally reporton optical binding of many glass particles in air that levitate in a single optical beam. A diversity of particle sizes and shapes interact at long range in a single Gaussian beam. Our system dynamics span from oscillatory to random and dimensionality ranges from 1 to 3D. In conclusion, the low loss for the center of mass motion of the beads could allow this system to serve as a standard many body testbed, similar to what is done today with atoms, but at the mesoscopic scale.

  7. Energy optimization of a regular macromolecular crystallography beamline for ultra-high-resolution crystallography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenbaum, Gerd; Ginell, Stephan L.; Chen, Julian C.-H.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a practical method for operating existing undulator synchrotron beamlines at photon energies considerably higher than their standard operating range is described and applied at beamline 19-ID of the Structural Biology Center at the Advanced Photon Source enabling operation at 30 keV. Adjustments to the undulator spectrum were critical to enhance the 30 keV flux while reducing the lower- and higher-energy harmonic contamination. A Pd-coated mirror and Al attenuators acted as effective low- and high-bandpass filters. The resulting flux at 30 keV, although significantly lower than with X-ray optics designed and optimized for this energy, allowed for accuratemore » data collection on crystals of the small protein crambin to 0.38 Å resolution.« less

  8. Irregular-regular-irregular mixed mode oscillations in a glow discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, Sabuj Shaw, Pankaj Kumar Saha, Debajyoti Janaki, M. S. Iyengar, A. N. Sekar

    2015-05-15

    Floating potential fluctuations of a glow discharge plasma are found to exhibit different kinds of mixed mode oscillations. Power spectrum analysis reveals that with change in the nature of the mixed mode oscillation (MMO), there occurs a transfer of power between the different harmonics and subharmonics. The variation in the chaoticity of different types of mmo was observed with the study of Lyapunov exponents. Estimates of correlation dimension and the Hurst exponent suggest that these MMOs are of low dimensional nature with an anti persistent character. Numerical modeling also reflects the experimentally found transitions between the different MMOs.

  9. Regular and chaotic quantum dynamics in atom-diatom reactive collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gevorkyan, A. S., E-mail: g_ashot@sci.a [IIAP/IAPP NAS of Armenia (Armenia); Bogdanov, A. V., E-mail: bogdanov@csa.r [Institute for High Performance Computing and Information Systems (Russian Federation); Nyman, G., E-mail: nyman@chem.gu.s [University of Gothenburg, Department of Chemistry (Sweden)

    2008-05-15

    A new microirreversible 3D theory of quantum multichannel scattering in the three-body system is developed. The quantum approach is constructed on the generating trajectory tubes which allow taking into account influence of classical nonintegrability of the dynamical quantum system. When the volume of classical chaos in phase space is larger than the quantum cell in the corresponding quantum system, quantum chaos is generated. The probability of quantum transitions is constructed for this case. The collinear collision of the Li + (FH) {sup {yields}}(LiF) + H system is used for numerical illustration of a system generating quantum (wave) chaos.

  10. 87th regular meeting of the Rocky Mountain Coal Mining Institute: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finnie, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    Eleven papers are included in these proceedings. Topics include management of coal mining operations, improving mine health and safety, new technologies for longwall mining, coal haulage, coal drying, a demonstration of the LFC process, and state of the art in mining automation. All eleven papers have been processed for inclusion on the data base.

  11. Integrated production/use of ultra low-ash coal, premium liquids and clean char. [Quarterly] report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, C.W.

    1992-08-01

    The first step in the integrated, mufti-product approach for utilizing Illinois coal is the production of ultra low-ash coal. Subsequent steps convert low-ash coal to high-value, coal-derived, products. The ultra low-ash coal is produced by solubilizing coal in a phenolic solvent under ChemCoal{trademark} process conditions, separating the coal solution from insoluble ash, and then precipitating the clean coal by dilution of the solvent with methanol. Two major products, liquids and low-ash char, are then produced by mild gasification of the low-ash coal. The low ash-char is further upgraded to activated char, and/or an oxidized activated char which has catalytic properties. Characterization of products at each stage is part of this project.

  12. Integrated production/use of ultra low-ash coal, premium liquids and clean char. Technical report, September 1, 1991--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, C.W.

    1991-12-31

    This integrated, multi-product approach for utilizing Illinois coal starts with the production of ultra low-ash coal and then converts it to high-vale, coal-derived, products. The ultra low-ash coal is produced by solubilizing coal in a phenolic solvent under ChemCoal{trademark} process conditions, separating the coal solution from insoluble ash, and then precipitating the clean coal by dilution of the solvent with methanol. Two major products, liquids and low-ash char, are then produced by mild gasification of the low-ash coal. The low ash-char is further upgraded to activated char, and/or an oxidized activated char which has catalytic properties. Characterization of products at each stage is part of this project.

  13. Catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of unsaturated compounds consisting of alumina particles with a regular palladium distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beren Glyum, A.S.; Goranskaya, T.P.; Karel'skii, V.V.; Lakhman, L.I.; Mund, S.L.; Zolotukhin, V.E.

    1986-08-01

    A study was carried out on the possibility of preparation of heterogeneous palladium catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of unsaturated compounds with different distributions of the active component on ..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ granules. A regression equation was obtained relating the parameters of the preparation of these catalysts (palladium concentration in solution, temperature, impregnation time and pH) with the extent of the penetration of palladium into the support granule (l). A relationship was established between the parameters (l), palladium concentration in the catalyst, activity and selectivity in the hydrogenation of dienes in liquid pyrolysis products. The extremal curves for activity and selectivity are explained with the framework of a model taking account of the effect on the concentration of the active component, its dispersion, and the reaction conditions on the hydrogenation parameters.

  14. Regular oscillations and random motion of glass microspheres levitated by a single optical beam in air: Publisher’s note

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moore, Jeremy; Martin, Leopoldo L.; Maayani, Shai; Kim, Kyu Hyun; Chandrahalim, Hengky; Eichenfield, Matt; Martin, Inocencio R.; Carmon, Tal

    2016-02-19

    The publisher’s note amends a recent publication [Opt. Express 24(3), 2850–2857 (2016)] to include Acknowledgments.

  15. Formation of a regular domain structure in TGS–TGS + Cr crystals with a profile impurity distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belugina, N. V. Gainutdinov, R. V.; Tolstikhina, A. L.; Ivanova, E. S.; Kashevich, I. F.; Shut, V. N.; Mozzharov, S. E.

    2015-07-15

    A complex investigation of TGS–TGS + Cr crystals with a profile impurity distribution of chromium ions Cr{sup 3+} has been carried out at the macrolevel (measurement of dielectric properties by the method of nematic liquid crystals) and microlevel (domain structure according to atomic force microscopy data). It is established that periodic doped layers are formed only in individual growth pyramids in the regions where the polarization vector has a nonzero component along the normal to the growth faces rather than throughout the entire crystal volume. The domain configuration at the boundary of growth layers with different impurity compositions has been studied by piezoelectric force microscopy. The static unipolarity of layers with and without chromium impurity is approximately identical, whereas the domain-wall density in doped regions is higher than that in undoped ones by a factor of about 7.

  16. Numerical reconstruction of photon-number statistics from photocounting statistics: Regularization of an ill-posed problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starkov, V. N.; Semenov, A. A.; Gomonay, H. V.

    2009-07-15

    We demonstrate a practical possibility of loss compensation in measured photocounting statistics in the presence of dark counts and background radiation noise. It is shown that satisfactory results are obtained even in the case of low detection efficiency and large experimental errors.

  17. CONTRACTOR PURCHASING SYSTEM REVIEWS

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    * Infrequent use of competitive procurement * Frequent payment of transportation premium * Failure to take fast payment or quantity discounts Acquisition Guide ...

  18. Demand for superpremium needle cokes on upswing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acciarri, J.A.; Stockman, G.H. )

    1989-12-01

    The authors discuss how recent supply shortages of super-premium quality needle cokes, plus the expectation of increased shortfalls in the future, indicate that refiners should consider upgrading their operations to fill these demands. Calcined, super-premium needle cokes are currently selling for as much as $550/metric ton, fob producer, and increasing demand will continue the upward push of the past year. Needle coke, in its calcined form, is the major raw material in the manufacture of graphite electrodes. Used in steelmaking, graphite electrodes are the electrical conductors that supply the heat source, through arcing electrode column tips, to electric arc steel furnaces. Needle coke is commercially available in three grades - super premium, premium, and intermediate. Super premium is used to produce electrodes for the most severe electric arc furnace steelmaking applications, premium for electrodes destined to less severe operations, and intermediate for even less critical needs.

  19. Regulatory and Commercial Barriers to Introduction of Renewable Super

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Premium | Department of Energy Regulatory and Commercial Barriers to Introduction of Renewable Super Premium Regulatory and Commercial Barriers to Introduction of Renewable Super Premium Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2-B: End Use and Fuel Certification Robert McCormick, Principal Engineer in Fuels Performance, National Renewable Energy Laboratory b13_mccormick_2-b.pdf (974.85 KB) More Documents & Publications The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on

  20. SDG&E (Electric)- Energy Efficiency Business Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rebates are available for lighting improvements, refrigeration, natural gas technologies, food service or other improvements. Similarly, the Premium Cooling Efficiency Program provides prescriptive...

  1. WP-07-A-05A, Appendix A to the 2007 Supplemental Wholesale Power...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (rate) FY Fiscal Year (Oct-Sep) GAAP Generally Accepted Accounting Principles GEP Green Energy Premium GRSPs General Rate Schedule Provisions GSP Generation System Peak GTA...

  2. Windows and Building Envelope Research and Development: Roadmap...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... translucent panels Residential: R-7 ... modulating solar heat gain with installed cost premium targets of ... that results from installing exterior insulation ...

  3. Small Businesses Receive $2 Million to Advance HVAC Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Sheetak and Xergy are approaching water heating in entirely new ways, offering better performance while still placing a premium on affordability.

  4. MotorMaster+ International | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    volt amps (kVA) readings Edit and modify motor rewind efficiency loss defaults Determine ... a National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Premium efficiency motor. ...

  5. DOE Publishes Roadmap for New Biological Research for Energy and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Premium Class Travel Report for FY 09 through FY 15 DOE Premium Class Travel Report for FY 09 through FY 15 This report was provided to the FOIA office in response to several FOIA requests. DOEPremiumClassTravelReportsFY09-FY13.pdf (4.6 MB) DOE_PREMIUM_CLASS_TRAVEL_REPORTS_FY14.pdf (184.26 KB) DOE_PREMIUM_CLASS_TRAVEL_REPORTS_FY15.pdf (256.46 KB) More Documents & Publications ISSUANCE 2015-07-15: Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedure for Refrigerated Bottled or Canned

  6. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    exceeding normal levels by 40 and 18 percent, respectively (see Temperature Maps and Data). Storage Table More Storage Data Other Market Trends Premium of Natural Gas Liquids...

  7. Building America Update - July 9, 2015 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    You can also access new options such as heat pump clothes dryers, premium electricgas clothes dryers, condensing tank water heaters, doors, and ASHRAE 62.2-2013 mechanical ...

  8. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Agricultural Equipment, CustomOthers pending approval, Other EE, LED Lighting, Tankless Water Heater Energy Conservation Tax Credits- Small Premium Projects (Corporate) Energy...

  9. Norwich Public Utilities- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Norwich Public Utilities (NPU) provides rebates to its commercial, industrial, institutional, and agricultural customers for high-efficiency HVAC systems, premium efficiency electric motors,...

  10. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for commercial and industrial lighting, as well as industrial process upgrades, on a case-by-case basis. Eligible industrial processes upgrades include premium... Eligibility:...