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1

Retail Prices for Midgrade Gasoline - Conventional Areas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cities : Cleveland: 3.547: 3.625: 3.496: 3.382: 3.455: 3.485: 2003-2013: Denver: 3.676: 3.652: 3.598: 3.547: 3.505: 3.469: 2000-2013: Miami: 3.883: 3.842: 3.805: 3 ...

2

Retail Prices for Midgrade Gasoline - Conventional Areas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cities : Cleveland: 2.864: 3.277: 2.432: 2.856: 3.595: 3.697: 2003-2012: Denver: 2.890: 3.278: 2.358: 2.773 : 2000-2010: Miami: 2.991: 3.519: 2.597: 3.006: 3.792: 3 ...

3

South Dakota Gasoline Midgrade Bulk Sales (Volume) by Refiners ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

South Dakota Gasoline Midgrade Bulk Sales (Volume) by Refiners (Thousand Gallons per Day) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9;

4

Retail Prices for Regular Gasoline - Conventional Areas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

208 3.165 3.198 3.264 3.261 3.267 1990-2014 208 3.165 3.198 3.264 3.261 3.267 1990-2014 East Coast (PADD1) 3.359 3.339 3.343 3.372 3.410 3.386 1992-2014 New England (PADD 1A) 3.501 3.501 3.511 3.555 3.552 3.535 1993-2014 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 3.509 3.514 3.523 3.570 3.618 3.594 1993-2014 Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) 3.303 3.274 3.276 3.298 3.335 3.311 1993-2014 Midwest (PADD 2) 3.124 3.058 3.140 3.251 3.203 3.239 1992-2014 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 3.102 3.053 3.051 3.109 3.115 3.106 1992-2014 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) 3.077 3.055 3.055 3.100 3.120 3.148 1992-2014 West Coast (PADD 5) 3.343 3.335 3.333 3.351 3.371 3.367 1992-2014 West Coast less California 3.343 3.335 3.333 3.351 3.371 3.367 2000-2014 States Colorado 3.050 3.015 3.035 3.126 3.166 3.188 2000-2014

5

Retail Prices for Midgrade Gasoline - Reformulated Areas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cities : Boston: 3.809: 3.767: 3.712: 3.687: 3.648: 3.615: 2003-2013: Chicago: 3.885: 3.829: 3.739: 3.662: 3.673: 3.669: 2000-2013: Houston: 3.516: 3.432: 3.384: 3 ...

6

Retail Prices for Midgrade Gasoline - Reformulated Areas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cities : Boston: 2.836: 3.302: 2.431: 2.868: 3.672: 3.816: 2003-2012: Chicago: 3.051: 3.520: 2.571: 3.053 : 2000-2010: Houston: 2.721: 3.218: 2.317: 2.744 : 2000-2010 ...

7

Regular Object Types  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regular expression types have been proposed as a foundation for statically typed processing of XML and similar forms of tree-structured data. To date, however, regular expression types have been explored in special-purpose languages (e.g., XDuce, CDuce, and XQuery) with type systems designed around regular expression types "from the ground up." The goal of the Xtatic language is to bring regular expression types to a broad audience by offering them as a lightweight extension of a popular object-oriented language, C#. We develop...

Vladimir Gapeyev; Benjamin C. Pierce

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Regularized nonsymmetric correspondence analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonsymmetric correspondence analysis (NSCA) is designed to analyze two-way contingency tables in which rows and columns assume an asymmetric role, e.g., columns depend on rows, but not vice versa. A ridge type of regularization was incorporated into ...

Yoshio Takane; Sunho Jung

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

HEADQUARTERS & CONVENTION CENTER FLOORPLANS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyber Caf. Moscone West Convention. Center. Lobby. General Poster Session. Moscone West Convention. Center. Exhibit Hall. Employment Referral. Center.

10

Physics of Regularized Image Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because the Ising Model reproduces surface physics, regularized image processing also reproduces these effects, either as restorations of lost information or as...

11

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

All Grades, Areas and Formulations" All Grades, Areas and Formulations" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Regular Conventional",20,"Weekly","12/16/2013","8/20/1990" ,"Data 2","Regular Reformulated",18,"Weekly","12/16/2013","11/28/1994" ,"Data 3","Regular All Areas All Formulations",28,"Weekly","12/16/2013","8/20/1990" ,"Data 4","Midgrade Conventional",20,"Weekly","12/16/2013","11/28/1994" ,"Data 5","Midgrade Reformulated",18,"Weekly","12/16/2013","11/28/1994"

12

Local Linear Convergence of Approximate Projections onto Regularized Sets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The numerical properties of algorithms for finding the intersection of sets depend to some extent on the regularity of the sets, but even more importantly on the regularity of the intersection. The alternating projection algorithm of von Neumann has been shown to converge locally at a linear rate dependent on the regularity modulus of the intersection. In many applications, however, the sets in question come from inexact measurements that are matched to idealized models. It is unlikely that any such problems in applications will enjoy metrically regular intersection, let alone set intersection. We explore a regularization strategy that generates an intersection with the desired regularity properties. The regularization, however, can lead to a significant increase in computational complexity. In a further refinement, we investigate and prove linear convergence of an approximate alternating projection algorithm. The analysis provides a regularization strategy that fits naturally with many ill-posed inverse problems, and a mathematically sound stopping criterion for extrapolated, approximate algorithms. The theory is demonstrated on the phase retrieval problem with experimental data. The conventional early termination applied in practice to unregularized, consistent problems in diffraction imaging can be justified fully in the framework of this analysis providing, for the first time, proof of convergence of alternating approximate projections for finite dimensional, consistent phase retrieval problems.

D. Russell Luke

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

13

Conventional Storage Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Conventional storage water heaters remain the most popular type of water heating system for homes and buildings.

14

E_n-regularity implies E_(n-1)-regularity.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vorst and latter Dayton-Weibel proved that K_n-regularity implies K_(n-1)-regularity. In this note we generalize this result from (commutative) rings to differential graded categories and from algebraic K-theory to any functor which is Morita invariant, continuous, and localizing. As an application, we show that the above implication also holds for schemes. Along the way, we extend Bass' fundamental theorem to this broader setting and prove a Nisnevich descent result which is of independent interest

Goncalo Tabuada

15

Aging in American Convents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schuster. Snowdon, David 2001 Aging with Grace: What the Nunreligion, devotion, and aging. CSW JAN09 update tocAging in American Convents FIELDWORK REPORT by Anna I.

Corwin, Anna I.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

South Dakota Midgrade Gasoline Prices - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Values shown for the ...

17

Regularities and their relations to error bounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we mainly study various notions of regularity for a finite collection {C1,?,Cm} of closed convex subsets of a Banach space X and their relations with other fundamental concepts. ... Keywords: error bound, graph, linearly regular, multifunction, normal cone, positive linear functional, property (G), regular, strong CHIP, tangent cone

Kung Fu Ng; Wei Hong Yang

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Some Tauberian theorems for regularly generated sequences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we establish some Tauberian theorems for the Abel summability method in terms of regularly generated sequences which generalizes some results obtained in Canak and Totur [I. Canak, U. Totur, A note on Tauberian theorems for regularly generated ... Keywords: Abel summability method, General control modulo, Moderate oscillation, Regularly generated sequences, Slow oscillation

?brahim anak; Ferhat Hasekiler; Duygu Kebapc?

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

REGULARITY FOR A DOUBLY NONLINEAR PARABOLIC EQUATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REGULARITY FOR A DOUBLY NONLINEAR PARABOLIC EQUATION JUHA KINNUNEN Abstract. This survey focuses on regularity results for certain degenerate doubly nonlinear parabolic equations in the case when the Lebesgue This note focuses on the regularity of nonnegative weak solutions to the doubly nonlinear parabolic equation

Kinnunen, Juha

20

Conventional Hydropower Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the DOE Water Power Program's conventional hydropower research and development efforts.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Energy Distribution of a Charged Regular  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the energy distribution of a charged regular black hole by using the energy-momentum complexes of Einstein and Mller.

Black Hole; I. Radinschi

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Metric regularity and systems of generalized equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the variational analysis community, the importance of this feature of Milyutin's extension of ..... There exist strong relations between regularity properties. 11...

23

U.S. Sales to End Users Prices for Motor Gasoline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales Type: Sales to End Users, Average Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale, Average DTW Rack Bulk Sales Type: Sales to End Users, Average Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale, Average DTW Rack Bulk Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Formulation/ Grade Sales Type Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Gasoline, Average - - - - - - 1983-2013 Regular Gasoline - - - - - - 1983-2013 Midgrade Gasoline - - - - - - 1988-2013 Premium Gasoline - - - - - - 1983-2013 Conventional, Average - - - - - - 1994-2013 Conventional Regular - - - - - - 1994-2013 Conventional Midgrade - - - - - - 1994-2013 Conventional Premium - - - - - - 1994-2013 Oxygenated, Average 1994-2006 Oxygenated Regular

24

Canonical Forms for Symmetric and Regular Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Matrices associated with symmetric and regular structures can be arranged into certain block patterns known as Canonical forms. Using such forms, the decomposition of structural matrices into block diagonal forms, is considerably simplified. In this ... Keywords: 15A18, 74S05, Block diagonalization, Decomposition, Group theory, Matrix canonical form, Regular structure, Symmetric structure

Ali Kaveh; H. Fazli

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

U.S. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Motor Gasoline 376,636.4 362,968.6 362,798.5 365,247.6 354,951.9 347,234.5 1983-2012 Regular 320,735.1 314,030.5 313,098.1 315,643.3 309,398.0 301,510.3 1983-2012 Conventional Regular 216,075 207,958.8 208,347.1 210,638.4 204,350.9 200,785.6 1994-2012 Oxygenated Regular - - - - - - 1994-2012 Reformulated Regular 104,660 106,071.7 104,751.1 105,004.9 105,047.1 100,724.7 1994-2012 Midgrade 20,282.6 18,229.4 16,706.5 15,633.9 13,707.6 13,500.5 1989-2012 Conventional Midgrade 14,369.3 13,559.2 12,537.8 11,971.8 10,521.2 10,550.0 1994-2012 Oxygenated Midgrade - - - - - - 1994-2012 Reformulated Midgrade 5,913.4 4,670.2 4,168.7 3,662.1 3,186.4 2,950.5 1994-2012 Premium

26

Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Million Gallons per Day) Year Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Total a DTW Rack Bulk Total Through Retail Outlets Total a DTW Rack Bulk Total 1994 ................................ 29.7 31.2 36.1 113.5 22.8 172.4 7.6 7.8 10.1 14.6 0.1 24.8 1995 January ....................... 18.5 19.6 13.2 88.3 22.4 123.8 4.9 5.1 3.8 W W 15.1 February ..................... 21.7 23.1 18.6 98.4 23.3 140.2 5.7 5.9 5.2 W W 18.0 March .......................... 23.5 24.8 21.2 103.4 25.1 149.7 6.2 6.5 5.4 W W 19.0 April ............................ 25.9 27.2 22.5 103.9 23.8 150.3 6.4 6.6 5.6 W W 19.1 May ............................. 27.0 28.3 23.1 111.4 25.0 159.5 6.4 6.6 5.8 W W 20.0 June ............................ 28.0 29.3 23.6 116.2 29.3 169.0 6.6 6.8 5.9 W W 20.6

27

Purpose GIS Naming Conventions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document describes guidelines for naming of GIS-related folders, files, attribute tables, and fields for the North Coast and Cascades Network (NCCN) and helps to fulfill the requirements for GIS deliverables developed as part of Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) Program natural resource studies. The primary objective of this document is to improve GIS data quality and usability by establishing a consistent file naming convention for working and final shared, geo-referenced data sets within the NCCN. These guidelines propose clear filename creation methods in order to minimize confusion, errors, and unnecessary support when GIS data are exchanged among users. Two competing objectives need to be balanced: to make a dataset name easily understood and as short as possible for use in various software systems. Longer field names, sometimes resulting from long dataset names and sometimes created by users, are often truncated during data exchange or format conversion, which could unintentionally create non-unique field names. These guidelines will: promote consistency in GIS layer and attribute (variable or field) naming provide guidance to data stewards and data contributors advance a clearer understanding of the information in the files, tables and fields via appropriate

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Optimal regularity for the Signorini problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove under general assumptions that solutions of the thin obstacle or Signorini problem in any space dimension achieve the optimal regularity $C^{1,1/2}$. This improves the known optimal regularity results by allowing the thin obstacle to be defined in an arbitrary $C^{1,\\beta}$ hypersurface, $\\beta>1/2$, additionally, our proof covers any linear elliptic operator in divergence form with smooth coefficients. The main ingredients of the proof are a version of Almgren's monotonicity formula and the optimal regularity of global solutions.

Guillen, Nestor

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

An Optimal Algorithm for Purging Regular Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A joint application of four optimizing transformations for purging imperative programselimination of useless statements, unwinding of degenerate loops, removal from loops, and removal from branch statementsis considered. A model of regular ...

D. L. Uvarov

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Conventional Hydropower Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy conducts research on conventional hydropower technologies to increase generation and improve existing means of generating hydroelectricity.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Regularized Robust Coding for Face Recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently the sparse representation based classification (SRC) has been proposed for robust face recognition (FR). In SRC, the testing image is coded as a sparse linear combination of the training samples, and the representation fidelity is measured by the l2-norm or l1-norm of the coding residual. Such a sparse coding model assumes that the coding residual follows Gaussian or Laplacian distribution, which may not be effective enough to describe the coding residual in practical FR systems. Meanwhile, the sparsity constraint on the coding coefficients makes SRC's computational cost very high. In this paper, we propose a new face coding model, namely regularized robust coding (RRC), which could robustly regress a given signal with regularized regression coefficients. By assuming that the coding residual and the coding coefficient are respectively independent and identically distributed, the RRC seeks for a maximum a posterior solution of the coding problem. An iteratively reweighted regularized robust coding (IR...

Meng, Yang; Jian, Yang; Zhang, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

UNDERCOMPRESSIVE SHOCK WAVES AND THE DAFERMOS REGULARIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNDERCOMPRESSIVE SHOCK WAVES AND THE DAFERMOS REGULARIZATION STEPHEN SCHECTER Abstract solutions that include only shock waves. Shock waves are required to satisfy the viscous profile criterion for a given viscosity (B(u)u x ) x . Undercompressive shock waves are allowed. We also show that all

33

Covariance regularization in inverse space - Optimization Online  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 1, 2009 ... In the present paper, we propose an alternative method for the regularization of ...... in white). The enlarged area in panel corresponds to the dashed square in panel (a) and the ...... 33'? ads 3,6;. With Eq. (92), the ?rst term...

34

Regularity of nuclear structure under random interactions  

SciTech Connect

In this contribution I present a brief introduction to simplicity out of complexity in nuclear structure, specifically, the regularity of nuclear structure under random interactions. I exemplify such simplicity by two examples: spin-zero ground state dominance and positive parity ground state dominance in even-even nuclei. Then I discuss two recent results of nuclear structure in the presence of random interactions, in collaboration with Prof. Arima. Firstly I discuss sd bosons under random interactions, with the focus on excited states in the yrast band. We find a few regular patterns in these excited levels. Secondly I discuss our recent efforts towards obtaining eigenvalues without diagonalizing the full matrices of the nuclear shell model Hamiltonian.

Zhao, Y. M. [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

35

Chaos regularization of quantum tunneling rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantum tunneling rates through a barrier separating two-dimensional, symmetric, double-well potentials are shown to depend on the classical dynamics of the billiard trajectories in each well and, hence, on the shape of the wells. For shapes that lead to regular (integrable) classical dynamics the tunneling rates fluctuate greatly with eigenenergies of the states sometimes by over two orders of magnitude. Contrarily, shapes that lead to completely chaotic trajectories lead to tunneling rates whose fluctuations are greatly reduced, a phenomenon we call regularization of tunneling rates. We show that a random-plane-wave theory of tunneling accounts for the mean tunneling rates and the small fluctuation variances for the chaotic systems.

Pecora, Louis M.; Wu Dongho [Materials Physics and Sensors, US Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Lee, Hoshik [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 (United States); Antonsen, Thomas; Lee, Ming-Jer; Ott, Edward [Physics and Electrical Engineering Departments, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Charged fermions tunneling from regular black holes  

SciTech Connect

We study Hawking radiation of charged fermions as a tunneling process from charged regular black holes, i.e., the Bardeen and ABGB black holes. For this purpose, we apply the semiclassical WKB approximation to the general covariant Dirac equation for charged particles and evaluate the tunneling probabilities. We recover the Hawking temperature corresponding to these charged regular black holes. Further, we consider the back-reaction effects of the emitted spin particles from black holes and calculate their corresponding quantum corrections to the radiation spectrum. We find that this radiation spectrum is not purely thermal due to the energy and charge conservation but has some corrections. In the absence of charge, e = 0, our results are consistent with those already present in the literature.

Sharif, M., E-mail: msharif.math@pu.edu.pk; Javed, W., E-mail: wajihajaved84@yahoo.com [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics (Pakistan)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Regular Functors and Relative Realizability Categories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relative realizability toposes that Awodey, Birkedal and Scott introduced in [1] satisfy a universal property that involves regular functors to other categories. We use this universal property to define what relative realizability categories are, when based on other categories than of the topos of sets. This paper explains the property and gives a construction for relative realizability categories that works for arbitrary base Heyting categories. The universal property shows us some new geometric morphisms to relative realizability toposes too. 1

Wouter Pieter Stekelenburg

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

A regularization approach to hydrofacies delineation  

SciTech Connect

We consider an inverse problem of identifying complex internal structures of composite (geological) materials from sparse measurements of system parameters and system states. Two conceptual frameworks for identifying internal boundaries between constitutive materials in a composite are considered. A sequential approach relies on support vector machines, nearest neighbor classifiers, or geostatistics to reconstruct boundaries from measurements of system parameters and then uses system states data to refine the reconstruction. A joint approach inverts the two data sets simultaneously by employing a regularization approach.

Wohlberg, Brendt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tartakovsky, Daniel [UNIV OF CALIFORNIA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Regular black hole in three dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We find a new black hole in three dimensional anti-de Sitter space by introducing an anisotropic perfect fluid inspired by the noncommutative black hole. This is a regular black hole with two horizons. We compare thermodynamics of this black hole with that of non-rotating BTZ black hole. The first-law of thermodynamics is not compatible with the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy.

Yun Soo Myung; Myungseok Yoon

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Hydroelectric Conventional | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydroelectric Conventional Hydroelectric Conventional Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

System regularities in design of experiments and their applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation documents a meta-analysis of 113 data sets from published factorial experiments. The study quantifies regularities observed among main effects and multi-factor interactions. Such regularities are critical ...

Li, Xiang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

l1 regularization in infinite dimensional feature spaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss the problem of fitting l1 regularized prediction models in infinite (possibly non-countable) dimensional feature spaces. Our main contributions are: a. Deriving a generalization of l1 regularization ...

Saharon Rosset; Grzegorz Swirszcz; Nathan Srebro; Ji Zhu

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Wait-free Regular Storage from Byzantine Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a simple, efficient, and self-contained construction of a wait-free regular register from Byzantine storage components. Our construction utilizes a novel building block, called 1-regular register, which can be ...

Abraham, Ittai

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

44

ISG X-Conventional Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WG-4 Conventional Facilities Home Conventional Facilities Conf. room (Bldg. 281) Corvin, Enomoto, Kuchler Tuesday, June 17 13:00 - 15:30 GM-Vibration WG1 & WG4 -TT Bldg 214 15:30 - 16:00 Break Orange Room 16:00 - 18:00 GM-Vibration WG1 & WG4 - FA, TM Bldg 214 18:00 Adjourn Wednesday, June 18 09:00 -12:00 Status - Japan, California, Illinois, HI CF Bldg 281 13:00 - 15:30 California Warm Mechanical Design CF Bldg 281 15:30 - 16:00 Break to Plenary Orange Room 18:00 Adjourn to BBQ Slac Cafeteria 18:30 BBQ Dinner Picnic Area Thursday, June 19 09:00 - 12:00 Drawing, Design & Cost Estimates CF Bldg 281 13:00 - 15:30 FY' 2004 Planning - Plans CF Bldg 281 15:30 - 16:00 Break to Plenary Orange Room 18:00 Adjourn

45

Compact models with regular charge distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We model a compact relativistic body with anisotropic pressures in the presence of an electric field. The equation of state is barotropic with a linear relationship between the radial pressure and the energy density. Simple exact models of the Einstein-Maxwell equations are generated. A graphical analysis indicates that the matter and electromagnetic variables are well behaved. In particular the proper charge density is regular for certain parameter values at the stellar centre unlike earlier anisotropic models in the presence of charge. We show that the electric field affects the mass of stellar objects and the observed mass for a particular binary pulsar is regained. Our models contain previous results of anisotropic charged matter with a linear equation of state for special parameter values.

P. Mafa Takisa; S. D. Maharaj

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 39. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users...

47

untitled  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7 Table 33. Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, and PAD District (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users...

48

Implementing the chemical weapons convention  

SciTech Connect

In 1993, as the CWC ratification process was beginning, concerns arose that the complexity of integrating the CWC with national law could cause each nation to implement the Convention without regard to what other nations were doing, thereby causing inconsistencies among States as to how the CWC would be carried out. As a result, the author's colleagues and the author prepared the Manual for National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention and presented it to each national delegation at the December 1993 meeting of the Preparatory Commission in The Hague. During its preparation, the Committee of CWC Legal Experts, a group of distinguished international jurists, law professors, legally-trained diplomats, government officials, and Parliamentarians from every region of the world, including Central Europe, reviewed the Manual. In February 1998, they finished the second edition of the Manual in order to update it in light of developments since the CWC entered into force on 29 April 1997. The Manual tries to increase understanding of the Convention by identifying its obligations and suggesting methods of meeting them. Education about CWC obligations and available alternatives to comply with these requirements can facilitate national response that are consistent among States Parties. Thus, the Manual offers options that can strengthen international realization of the Convention's goals if States Parties act compatibly in implementing them. Equally important, it is intended to build confidence that the legal issues raised by the Convention are finite and addressable. They are now nearing competition of an internet version of this document so that interested persons can access it electronically and can view the full text of all of the national implementing legislation it cites. The internet address, or URL, for the internet version of the Manual is http: //www.cwc.ard.gov. This paper draws from the Manual. It comparatively addresses approximately thirty implementing issues, showing how various States Parties have enacted measures that are responsive to CWC obligations. It is intended to highlight the issues that States Parties must address and to identify trends among States Parties that might be useful to States that have not yet made crucial decisions as to how to resolve key matters. At various points in the text, country names are listed in parenthesis to identify pieces of national legislation that demonstrate the point in the text. It should not be inferred that nations not listed have not addressed the point or have taken a different position. In some cases, a nation's position is explained in somewhat more depth to give specific detail to an assertion in the text. Attached to this paper is a chart which illustrates how States Parties in the Central European region as well as the United States respond to the issues raised. Obviously, in preparing such a chart, many subtle provisions in national legislation must be simplified. The point of the chart is to portray, on a few pages, the major trends of legislation.

Kellman, B.; Tanzman, E. A.

1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

49

Energy Distribution of a Charged Regular Black Hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the energy distribution of a charged regular black hole by using the energy-momentum complexes of Einstein and M{\\o}ller.

Irina Radinschi

2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

50

Nested (2,r)-regular graphs and their network properties.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A graph G is a (t, r)-regular graph if every collection of t independent vertices is collectively adjacent to exactly r vertices. If a graph (more)

Brooks, Josh Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

On Global Regularity of 2D Generalized Magnetohydrodynamic Equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we study the global regularity of 2D generalized magnetohydrodynamic equations (2D GMHD), in which the dissipation terms are $- \

Tran, Chuong V; Zhai, Zhichun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Conventional Storage Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conventional Storage Water Heaters Conventional Storage Water Heaters July 30, 2013 - 3:39pm Addthis Illustration showing the components of a storage water heater. On top of the...

53

NIST Exhibits at the BIO International Convention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The BIO International Convention is the largest global event for ... key networking and partnering opportunities, and provides insights and inspiration ...

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

54

Subtyping algorithm of regular tree grammars with disjoint production rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most type systems of statically typed XML processing languages are implemented based on regular expression types, where subtyping reduces to checking inclusion between tree automata, which is not efficient enough. The paper proposes the regular tree ... Keywords: XML, algorithm, subtyping, tree grammar

Lei Chen; Haiming Chen

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Efficient approximate Regularized Least Squares by Toeplitz matrix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Machine Learning based on the Regularized Least Squares (RLS) model requires one to solve a system of linear equations. Direct-solution methods exhibit predictable complexity and storage, but often prove impractical for large-scale problems; iterative ... Keywords: Digital signal processor, Large-scale learning, Levinson-Trench-Zohar algorithm, Regularized Least Squares, Resources limited device, Toeplitz matrix

Sergio Decherchi; Paolo Gastaldo; Rodolfo Zunino

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Regularity results for the Primitive Equations of the ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the linear Primitive Equations of the ocean in the three dimensional space, with horizontal periodic and vertical Dirichlet boundary conditions. Thanks to Fourier transforms we are able to calculate explicitly the pressure term. We then state existence, unicity and regularity results for the linear time-depending Primitive Equations, with low-regularity right-hand side.

Nodet, Malle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Regularity results for the Primitive Equations of the ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the linear Primitive Equations of the ocean in the three dimensional space, with horizontal periodic and vertical Dirichlet boundary conditions. Thanks to Fourier transforms we are able to calculate explicitly the pressure term. We then state existence, unicity and regularity results for the linear time-depending Primitive Equations, with low-regularity right-hand side.

Malle Nodet

2008-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

58

AFN Annual Convention | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AFN Annual Convention AFN Annual Convention AFN Annual Convention October 23, 2014 8:00AM AKDT to October 25, 2014 5:00PM AKDT Anchorage, Alaska The Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. Delegates are elected on a population formula of one representative per 25 Native residents in the area and delegate participation rates at the annual convention typically exceed 95%. Each year, the AFN Convention draws between 4,000-5,000 attendees. The proceedings are broadcast live via television, radio and webcast reaching a diverse audience from Barrow to Ketchikan, from the Aleutian Chain to the Canadian border. During the convention, the entire state of Alaska is blanketed with discussion on current events and issues. International

59

Energy Basics: Conventional Storage Water Heaters  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

heater can range from 20 to hundreds of gallons. Conventional storage water heater fuel sources include natural gas, propane, fuel oil, and electricity. Natural gas and...

60

TUTORIALS: Introduction to Conventional Transmission Electron ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... The link provided accesses the web site for the text, Introduction to Conventional Transmission Electron Microscopy by Marc DeGraef. The site...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Energy Forum on "Conventional Energy (Oil, Gas, and Coal) Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian...

62

Regular zeros of quadratic maps and their application  

SciTech Connect

Sufficient conditions for the existence of regular zeros of quadratic maps are obtained. Their applications are indicated to certain problems of analysis related to the inverse function theorem in a neighbourhood of an abnormal point. Bibliography: 13 titles.

Arutyunov, Aram V; Karamzin, Dmitry Yu

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

63

CLASSIFICATION OF LATTICE-REGULAR LATTICE CONVEX POLYTOPES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. In this paper for any dimension n we give a complete description of lattice convex polytopes in R n that are regular with respect to the group of affine transformations preserving the lattice. Contents

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

CLASSIFICATION OF LATTICE-REGULAR LATTICE CONVEX POLYTOPES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. In this paper for any dimension n we give a complete list of lattice convex polytopes in R n that are regular with respect to the group of affine transformations preserving the lattice. Contents

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Parametrized regular infinite games and higher-order pushdown strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given a set P of natural numbers, we consider infinite games where the winning condition is a regular ?-language parametrized by P. In this context, an ?-word, representing a play, has letters consisting of three components: The ...

Paul Hnsch; Michaela Slaats; Wolfgang Thomas

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Fast Rates for Regularized Least-squares Algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a theoretical analysis of generalization performances of regularized least-squares on reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces for supervised learning. We show that the concept of effective dimension of an integral ...

Caponnetto, Andrea

2005-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

67

On electric resistances for distance-regular graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the behavior of electric potentials on distance-regular graphs, and extend some results of a prior paper. Our main result, Theorem 4, shows(together with Corollary 3) that if distance is measured by the electric resistance between points then all points are close to being equidistant on a distance-regular graph with large valency. A number of auxiliary results are also presented.

Koolen, Jack; Park, Jongyook

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Random testing of C calling conventions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a C compiler, function calls are difficult to implement correctly because they must respect a platform-specific calling convention. But they are governed by a simple invariant: parameters passed to a function must be received unaltered. A violation ... Keywords: C, calling convention, compiler, composition, consistency, random testing

Christian Lindig

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

NCAI Annual Convention | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Convention Annual Convention NCAI Annual Convention October 21, 2012 8:00AM PDT to October 26, 2012 5:00PM PDT Sacramento, California The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) and the California tribes will host the organization's 69th Annual Convention & Marketplace in Sacramento, California this October. The national meeting will serve as the beginning of a yearlong celebration of the organization's 70 years of work since it was founded in 1944. This year's Annual Convention will also host a Constitutional review. Over the course of six days, events and celebrations will focus on the rights and sovereignty of American Indian and Alaska Native tribes. Throughout the week NCAI will convene it's General Assembly, educational breakout sessions, and cultural celebrations, all with the purpose of

70

NREL: Energy Analysis: Impacts of Conventional Generators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts on Conventional Generators Impacts on Conventional Generators Impacts of Renewable Electricity Generation on Efficiency and Emissions of Conventional Generators With increasing penetration of wind and solar generation, conventional fossil-fired power plants may be required to adjust their output level, start up, or shut down more frequently to accommodate the variability and uncertainty of these technologies. These operational changes can negatively impact plant efficiency and emissions. NREL's analyses are focused on understanding and quantifying the emissions and costs associated with these operational changes. NREL's impacts of renewable electricity generation on conventional generators analyses show that: While the emissions impacts of generator cycling and part-loading can be significant (e.g., combined cycle generators), these impacts are

71

Alaska Federation of Natives Annual Convention  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. Delegates are elected on a population formula of one...

72

Social instruments for robust convention emergence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the notion of Social Instruments as mechanisms that facilitate the emergence of conventions from repeated interactions between members of a society. Specifically, we focus on two social instruments: rewiring and observation. Our main goal ...

Daniel Villatoro; Jordi Sabater-Mir; Sandip Sen

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

2013 Alaska Federation of Natives Convention  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. Delegates are elected on a population formula of one...

74

On Regularization Parameters Estimation in Edge---Preserving Image Reconstruction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The image restoration problem is a well known ill-posed inverse problem. Thus, to solve it some regularization techniques are necessary. By these techniques the solution of the problem is defined as the minimum of an energy function. This function is ...

Ivan Gerace; Francesca Martinelli

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A descent method for nonsmooth variational inequalities via regularization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we propose a descent method for solving variational inequality problems where the underlying operator is nonsmooth, locally Lipschitz, and monotone over a closed, convex feasible set. The idea is to combine a descent method for variational ... Keywords: Tikhonov-Browder regularization, descent method, gap function, nonsmooth mapping, variational inequality

Barbara Panicucci; Massimo Pappalardo; Mauro Passacantando

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Finsleroid-regular space. Landsberg-to-Berwald implication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By performing required evaluations, we show that in the Finsleroid-regular space the Landsberg-space condition just degenerates to the Berwald-space condition (at any dimension number $N\\ge2$). Simple and clear expository representations are obtained. Due comparisons with the Finsleroid-Finsler space are indicated. Keywords: Finsler metrics, spray coefficients, curvature tensors.

Asanov, G S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Wait-free regular storage from Byzantine components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the problem of implementing a wait-free regular register from storage components prone to Byzantine faults. We present a simple, efficient, and self-contained construction of such a register. Our construction utilizes a novel building block, ... Keywords: Distributed computing

Ittai Abraham; Gregory Chockler; Idit Keidar; Dahlia Malkhi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Wind and Turbulence in a Sparse but Regular Plant Canopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind velocity statistics from several points within a regular but sparse array of clumped corn plants are analyzed, with each clump consisting of 12 plants, having a mean height of 1.6 m and a collective leaf area of about 2.75 m2 and occupying ...

Andree Tuzet; John D. Wilson

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

A modular NFA architecture for regular expression matching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a non-deterministic finite automata (NFA) based architecture for regexp scanners on FPGA, called CES: the Character Class with Constraint Repetition (CCR) based regExp Scanner. CES is designed to realize a new MIN-MAX counting algorithm, which ... Keywords: FPGA, NFA, character class constraint repetition, overlapped matching, regular expression

Hao Wang; Shi Pu; Gabriel Knezek; Jyh-Charn Liu

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Application of real rock pore-threat statistics to a regular pore network model  

SciTech Connect

This work reports the application of real rock statistical data to a previously developed regular pore network model in an attempt to produce an accurate simulation tool with low computational overhead. A core plug from the St. Peter Sandstone formation in Indiana was scanned with a high resolution micro CT scanner. The pore-throat statistics of the three-dimensional reconstructed rock were extracted and the distribution of the pore-throat sizes was applied to the regular pore network model. In order to keep the equivalent model regular, only the throat area or the throat radius was varied. Ten realizations of randomly distributed throat sizes were generated to simulate the drainage process and relative permeability was calculated and compared with the experimentally determined values of the original rock sample. The numerical and experimental procedures are explained in detail and the performance of the model in relation to the experimental data is discussed and analyzed. Petrophysical properties such as relative permeability are important in many applied fields such as production of petroleum fluids, enhanced oil recovery, carbon dioxide sequestration, ground water flow, etc. Relative permeability data are used for a wide range of conventional reservoir engineering calculations and in numerical reservoir simulation. Two-phase oil water relative permeability data are generated on the same core plug from both pore network model and experimental procedure. The shape and size of the relative permeability curves were compared and analyzed and good match has been observed for wetting phase relative permeability but for non-wetting phase, simulation results were found to be deviated from the experimental ones. Efforts to determine petrophysical properties of rocks using numerical techniques are to eliminate the necessity of regular core analysis, which can be time consuming and expensive. So a numerical technique is expected to be fast and to produce reliable results. In applied engineering, sometimes quick result with reasonable accuracy is acceptable than the more time consuming results. Present work is an effort to check the accuracy and validity of a previously developed pore network model for obtaining important petrophysical properties of rocks based on cutting-sized sample data.

Rakibul, M.; Sarker, H.; McIntyre, D.; Ferer, M.; Siddiqui, S.; Bromhal. G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Application of real rock pore-throat statistics to a regular pore network model  

SciTech Connect

This work reports the application of real rock statistical data to a previously developed regular pore network model in an attempt to produce an accurate simulation tool with low computational overhead. A core plug from the St. Peter Sandstone formation in Indiana was scanned with a high resolution micro CT scanner. The pore-throat statistics of the three-dimensional reconstructed rock were extracted and the distribution of the pore-throat sizes was applied to the regular pore network model. In order to keep the equivalent model regular, only the throat area or the throat radius was varied. Ten realizations of randomly distributed throat sizes were generated to simulate the drainage process and relative permeability was calculated and compared with the experimentally determined values of the original rock sample. The numerical and experimental procedures are explained in detail and the performance of the model in relation to the experimental data is discussed and analyzed. Petrophysical properties such as relative permeability are important in many applied fields such as production of petroleum fluids, enhanced oil recovery, carbon dioxide sequestration, ground water flow, etc. Relative permeability data are used for a wide range of conventional reservoir engineering calculations and in numerical reservoir simulation. Two-phase oil water relative permeability data are generated on the same core plug from both pore network model and experimental procedure. The shape and size of the relative permeability curves were compared and analyzed and good match has been observed for wetting phase relative permeability but for non-wetting phase, simulation results were found to be deviated from the experimental ones. Efforts to determine petrophysical properties of rocks using numerical techniques are to eliminate the necessity of regular core analysis, which can be time consuming and expensive. So a numerical technique is expected to be fast and to produce reliable results. In applied engineering, sometimes quick result with reasonable accuracy is acceptable than the more time consuming results. Present work is an effort to check the accuracy and validity of a previously developed pore network model for obtaining important petrophysical properties of rocks based on cutting-sized sample data. Introduction

Sarker, M.R.; McIntyre, D.; Ferer, M.; Siddigui, S.; Bromhal. G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Conventional Medical Screening Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conventional Medical Screening Program Conventional Medical Screening Program Conventional Medical Screening Program Medical screening is a strategy used to identify diseases or conditions in a select population at an early stage, often before signs and symptoms develop, and to refer individuals with suspicious findings to their personal physician or a specialist for further testing, diagnosis, and treatment. The program is not intended to serve as a substitute for routine medical exams through an individual's personal physician. The medical screening exam offered by the FWP evaluates an employee's health as it relates to their potential occupational exposures to hazardous agents. The FWP uses a customized medical screening protocol that was developed by a team of independent physicians specializing in occupational

83

Regular Scanning Tunneling Microscope Tips can be Intrinsically Chiral  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report our discovery that regular scanning tunneling microscope tips can themselves be chiral. This chirality leads to differences in electron tunneling efficiencies through left- and right-handed molecules, and, when using the tip to electrically excite molecular rotation, large differences in rotation rate were observed which correlated with molecular chirality. As scanning tunneling microscopy is a widely used technique, this result may have unforeseen consequences for the measurement of asymmetric surface phenomena in a variety of important fields.

Tierney, Heather L.; Murphy, Colin J.; Sykes, E. Charles H. [Department of Chemistry, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts 02155-5813 (United States)

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

84

Refiner Prices of Gasoline, All Grades - Sales to End Users  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product/ Sales Type: Gasoline, All Grades - Sales to End Users (U.S. only) Gasoline, All Grades - Through Retail Outlets Gasoline, All Grades - Other End Users Gasoline, All Grades - Sales for Resale Gasoline, All Grades - DTW (U.S. only) Gasoline, All Grades - Rack (U.S. only) Gasoline, All Grades - Bulk (U.S. only) Regular Gasoline - Sales to End Users (U.S. only) Regular Gasoline - Through Retail Outlets Regular Gasoline - Other End Users Regular Gasoline - Sales for Resale Regular Gasoline - DTW (U.S. only) Regular Gasoline - Rack (U.S. only) Regular Gasoline - Bulk (U.S. only) Midgrade Gasoline - Sales to End Users (U.S. only) Midgrade Gasoline - Through Retail Outlets Midgrade Gasoline - Other End Users Midgrade Gasoline - Sales for Resale Midgrade Gasoline - DTW (U.S. only) Midgrade Gasoline - Rack (U.S. only) Midgrade Gasoline - Bulk (U.S. only) Premium - Sales to End Users (U.S. only) Premium Gasoline - Through Retail Outlets Premium Gasoline - Other End Users Premium Gasoline - Sales for Resale Premium Gasoline - DTW (U.S. only) Premium Gasoline - Rack (U.S. only) Premium Gasoline - Bulk (U.S. only) Period: Monthly Annual

85

The Simla Convention 1914: A Chinese Puzzle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

initials in Tibetan. But since initalling is not only difficult but also impolite in Tibetan usage, the Tibetan plenipotentiary Lonchen Shatra put his full signature, describing his lineage even. After the signature, the British delegate put a note... officials in India, particularly, Olaf Car'oe and Hugh Richardson, advised strongly for the inclusion of the Simla Convention in the forthcoming edition of Aitchison's Treaties. The relevant volume had, however, been printed off. The print was called...

Sinha, Nirmal Chandra

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics July 30, 2013 - 3:39pm Addthis Illustration showing the components of a storage water heater. On...

87

Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation on...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation on Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Comments by the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) on Convention on...

88

Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation Contingent...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation Contingent Cost Allocation Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation Contingent Cost Allocation DOE published a...

89

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent...

90

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #648: November 8, 2010 Conventional...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8: November 8, 2010 Conventional and Alternative Fuel Prices to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 648: November 8, 2010 Conventional and Alternative Fuel...

91

Five lectures on optimal transportation: Geometry, regularity and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this series of lectures we introduce the Monge-Kantorovich problem of optimally transporting one distribution of mass onto another, where optimality is measured against a cost function c(x,y). Connections to geometry, inequalities, and partial differential equations will be discussed, focusing in particular on recent developments in the regularity theory for Monge-Ampere type equations. An application to microeconomics will also be described, which amounts to finding the equilibrium price distribution for a monopolist marketing a multidimensional line of products to a population of anonymous agents whose preferences are known only statistically.

Guillen, Nestor

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Gravitation and regular Universe without dark energy and dark matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that isotropic cosmology in the Riemann-Cartan spacetime allows to solve the problem of cosmological singularity as well as the problems of invisible matter components - dark energy and dark matter. All cosmological models filled with usual gravitating matter satisfying energy dominance conditions are regular with respect to energy density, spacetime metrics and the Hubble parameter. At asymptotics cosmological solutions of spatially flat models describe accelerating Universe without dark energy and dark matter, and quantitatively their behaviour is identical to that of standard cosmological \\Lambda CDM-model.

A. V. Minkevich

2011-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

93

Thin-shell wormholes from regular charged black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate a new thin-shell wormhole constructed by surgically grafting two regular charged black holes arising from the action using nonlinear electrodynamics coupled to general relativity. The stress-energy components within the shell violate the null and weak energy conditions but obey the strong energy condition. We study the stability in two ways: (i) taking a specific equation of state at the throat and (ii) analyzing the stability to linearized spherically symmetric perturbations about a static equilibrium solution. Various other aspects of this thin-shell wormhole are also analyzed.

F. Rahaman; K A Rahman; Sk. A Rakib; Peter K. F. Kuhfittig

2009-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

94

Standardizing Naming Conventions in Radiation Oncology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to report on the development of a standardized target and organ-at-risk naming convention for use in radiation therapy and to present the nomenclature for structure naming for interinstitutional data sharing, clinical trial repositories, integrated multi-institutional collaborative databases, and quality control centers. This taxonomy should also enable improved plan benchmarking between clinical institutions and vendors and facilitation of automated treatment plan quality control. Materials and Methods: The Advanced Technology Consortium, Washington University in St. Louis, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, and the Clinical Trials RT QA Harmonization Group collaborated in creating this new naming convention. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements guidelines have been used to create standardized nomenclature for target volumes (clinical target volume, internal target volume, planning target volume, etc.), organs at risk, and planning organ-at-risk volumes in radiation therapy. The nomenclature also includes rules for specifying laterality and margins for various structures. The naming rules distinguish tumor and nodal planning target volumes, with correspondence to their respective tumor/nodal clinical target volumes. It also provides rules for basic structure naming, as well as an option for more detailed names. Names of nonstandard structures used mainly for plan optimization or evaluation (rings, islands of dose avoidance, islands where additional dose is needed [dose painting]) are identified separately. Results: In addition to its use in 16 ongoing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group advanced technology clinical trial protocols and several new European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer protocols, a pilot version of this naming convention has been evaluated using patient data sets with varying treatment sites. All structures in these data sets were satisfactorily identified using this nomenclature. Conclusions: Use of standardized naming conventions is important to facilitate comparison of dosimetry across patient datasets. The guidelines presented here will facilitate international acceptance across a wide range of efforts, including groups organizing clinical trials, Radiation Oncology Institute, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise, Radiation Oncology domain (IHE-RO), and Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM).

Santanam, Lakshmi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Hurkmans, Coen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Brame, Scott; Straube, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Galvin, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tripuraneni, Prabhakar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Scripps Clinic, LaJolla, CA (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bosch, Walter, E-mail: wbosch@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Advanced Technology Consortium, Image-guided Therapy QA Center, St. Louis, MO (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Retail Gasoline and Diesel Surveys Retail Gasoline and Diesel Surveys Definitions Key Terms Definition Conventional Area Any area that does not require the sale of reformulated gasoline. All types of finished motor gasoline may be sold in this area. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the reformulated gasoline category. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Note: this survey designates all motor gasoline collected within a conventional area as conventional gasoline (see conventional area). Gasoline Grades The classification of gasoline by octane ratings. Each type of gasoline (conventional and reformulated) is classified by three grades - regular, midgrade, and premium. Note: gasoline sales are reported by grade in accordance with their classification at the time of sale. In general, automotive octane requirements are lower at high altitudes. Therefore, in some areas of the United States, such as the Rocky Mountain States, the octane ratings for the gasoline grades may be 2 or more octane points lower.

96

U.S. Refiner Sales to End Users (Average) Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales Type: Sales to End Users, Average Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale, Average DTW Rack Bulk Sales Type: Sales to End Users, Average Through Retail Outlets Sales for Resale, Average DTW Rack Bulk Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Formulation/ Grade Sales Type Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Conventional, Average 3.030 3.137 3.122 3.063 3.042 2.972 1994-2013 Conventional Regular 3.005 3.116 3.102 3.040 3.017 2.948 1994-2013 Conventional Midgrade 3.167 3.256 3.239 3.200 3.193 3.121 1994-2013 Conventional Premium 3.269 3.354 3.327 3.291 3.274 3.203 1994-2013 Oxygenated, Average - - - - - - 1994-2013 Oxygenated Regular - - - - - - 1994-2013 Oxygenated Midgrade - - - - - - 1994-2013

97

What was the highest U.S. average retail price of regular ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

What was the highest U.S. average retail price of regular gasoline? According to EIAs weekly survey, the U.S. average retail price of regular ...

98

What do I pay for in a gallon of regular gasoline? - FAQ - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

What do I pay for in a gallon of regular gasoline? The national average retail price of a gallon of regular gasoline in October 2013 was $3.34.

99

GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION METHODS FOR GRAVITATIONAL LENS SYSTEMS WITH REGULARIZED SOURCES  

SciTech Connect

Several approaches exist to model gravitational lens systems. In this study, we apply global optimization methods to find the optimal set of lens parameters using a genetic algorithm. We treat the full optimization procedure as a two-step process: an analytical description of the source plane intensity distribution is used to find an initial approximation to the optimal lens parameters; the second stage of the optimization uses a pixelated source plane with the semilinear method to determine an optimal source. Regularization is handled by means of an iterative method and the generalized cross validation (GCV) and unbiased predictive risk estimator (UPRE) functions that are commonly used in standard image deconvolution problems. This approach simultaneously estimates the optimal regularization parameter and the number of degrees of freedom in the source. Using the GCV and UPRE functions, we are able to justify an estimation of the number of source degrees of freedom found in previous work. We test our approach by applying our code to a subset of the lens systems included in the SLACS survey.

Rogers, Adam; Fiege, Jason D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T-2N2 (Canada)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

The Chemical Weapons Convention -- Legal issues  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) offers a unique challenge to the US system of constitutional law. Its promise of eliminating what is the most purely genocidal type of weapon from the world`s arsenals as well as of destroying the facilities for producing these weapons, brings with it a set of novel legal issues. The reservations about the CWC expressed by US business people are rooted in concern about safeguarding confidential business information and protecting the constitutional right to privacy. The chief worry is that international verification inspectors will misuse their power to enter commercial property and that trade secrets or other private information will be compromised as a result. It has been charged that the Convention is probably unconstitutional. The author categorically disagrees with that view and is aware of no scholarly writing that supports it. The purpose of this presentation is to show that CWC verification activities can be implemented in the US consistently with the traditional constitutional regard for commercial and individual privacy. First, he very briefly reviews the types of verification inspections that the CWC permits, as well as some of its specific privacy protections. Second, he explains how the Fourth Amendment right to privacy works in the context of CWC verification inspections. Finally, he reviews how verification inspections can be integrated into these constitutional requirements in the SU through a federal implementing statute.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

S1/2 Regularization Methods and Fixed Point Algorithms for Affine ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... H. Guo, and Y. Wang et al, Representation of ?1/2 regularizer among ?q (0 phase diagram, Acta Autom.

102

$C^{1,\\al}$ regularity of solutions to parabolic Monge-Amp\\'ere equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study interior $C^{1, \\al}$ regularity of viscosity solutions of the parabolic Monge-Amp\\'ere equation

Daskalopoulos, Panagiota

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Automated Regularization Parameter Selection in Multi-Scale Total Variation Models for Image Restoration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-scale total variation models for image restoration are introduced. The models utilize a spatially dependent regularization parameter in order to enhance image regions containing details while still sufficiently smoothing homogeneous features. The ... Keywords: Hierarchical decomposition, Local variance estimator, Order statistics, Primal-dual method, Semismooth Newton method, Spatially dependent regularization parameter, Total variation regularization

Yiqiu Dong; Michael Hintermller; M. Monserrat Rincon-Camacho

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Smoothness criteria for Navier-Stokes equations in terms of regularity along the steam lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article is devoted to a regularity criteria for solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations in terms of regularity along the stream lines. More precisely, we prove that a suitable weak solution for the Navier-Stokes equations is regular under some constraint on the second derivative of |u| along the stream lines.

Chan, Chi Hin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Thermal Storage with Conventional Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The newly opened Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia, PA; Exxon's Computer Facility at Florham Park, NJ; The Center Square Building in Philadelphia, are success stories for demand shifting through thermal storage. These buildings employ a simple thermal energy storage system that already exists in almost every structure - concrete. Thermal storage calculations simulate sub-cooling of a building's structure during unoccupied times. During occupied times, the sub-cooled concrete reduces peak cooling demand, thereby lowering demand and saving money. In addition, significant savings are possible in the first cost of chilled water equipment, and the smaller chillers run at peak capacity and efficiency during a greater portion of their run time. The building, controlled by an Energy Management and Control System (EMCS), "learns" from past experience how to run the building efficiently. The result is an optimized balance between energy cost and comfort.

Kieninger, R. T.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Efficient Decompositional Model-Checking for Regular Timing Diagrams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a growing need to make verification tools easier to use. A solution that does not require redesigning the tool is to construct front-ends providing specification notations that are close to those used in practice. Timing diagrams are such a widely used graphical notation, one that is often more appealing than a "linear" textual notation. This paper introduces a class of timing diagrams called Regular Timing Diagrams (RTDs). RTDs have a precise syntax and a formal semantics that is simple and corresponds to common usage. In addition, RTDs have an inherent compositional structure, which is exploited to provide an efficient algorithm for model-checking an RTD with respect to a system description. The algorithm has time complexity that is a small polynomial in the size of the diagram and linear in the size of the structure. We demonstrate the applicability of our algorithms by verifying that a master-slave system satisfies its specification RTDs.

Nina Amla; E. Allen Emerson; Kedar S. Namjoshi

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Small particle limits in a regularized Laplacian random growth model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a regularized version of Hastings-Levitov planar random growth that models clusters formed by the aggregation of diffusing particles. In this model, the growing clusters are defined in terms of iterated slit maps whose capacities are given by c_n=c|\\Phi_{n-1}'(e^{\\sigma+i\\theta_n})|^{-\\alpha}, \\alpha \\geq 0, where c>0 is the capacity of the first particle, {\\Phi_n}_n are the composed conformal maps defining the clusters of the evolution, {\\theta_n}_n are independent uniform angles determining the positions at which particles are attached, and \\sigma>0 is a regularization parameter which we take to depend on c. We prove that under an appropriate rescaling of time, in the limit as c converges to 0, the clusters converge to growing disks with deterministic capacities, provided that \\sigma does not converge to 0 too fast. We then establish scaling limits for the harmonic measure flow, showing that by letting \\alpha tend to 0 at different rates it converges to either the Brownian web on the circle, a stopped version of the Brownian web on the circle, or the identity map. As the harmonic measure flow is closely related to the internal branching structure within the cluster, the above three cases intuitively correspond to the number of infinite branches in the model being either 1, a random number whose distribution we obtain, or unbounded, in the limit as c converges to 0. We also present several findings based on simulations of the model with parameter choices not covered by our rigorous analysis.

Fredrik Johansson Viklund; Alan Sola; Amanda Turner

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

108

Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Comments by International Group on Nuclear Liability (CIGNL), in response to U.S. Department of Energy Notice of Inquiry on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, 75 Fed. Reg. 43945 (Jul. 27, 2010) and 75 Fed. Reg. 51986 (Aug. 24, 2010). Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation More Documents & Publications DOE Notice of Inquiry on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) Contingent Cost Allocation - March 2, 2011 Meeting

109

The Effect of CO2 Pricing on Conventional and Non- Conventional Oil Supply and Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assumes that nonconventional crude oil enters the market when conventional oil supply alone is unable to meet demand, and the social cost of CO2 is included in the calculation of the oil rent at that time. The results reveal the effect of a CO2 tax set...

Mjean, Aurlie; Hope, Chris

110

NIST Exhibits at the 2013 BIO International Convention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The BIO International Convention is the largest global event for ... key networking and partnering opportunities, and provides insights and inspiration ...

2013-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

111

U.S. Conventional Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conventional Gasoline Oxygenated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes...

112

The Rotor-Router Model on Regular Trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rotor-router model is a deterministic analogue of random walk. It can be used to define a deterministic growth model analogous to internal DLA. We show that if the initial rotor configuration is acyclic, then the set of occupied sites for rotor-router aggregation on an infinite regular tree is a perfect ball whenever it can be. This is proved by defining the rotor-router group of a graph, which we show is isomorphic to the sandpile group. We also address the question of recurrence and transience: We give two rotor configurations on the infinite ternary tree, one for which chips exactly alternate escaping to infinity with returning to the origin, and one for which every chip returns to the origin. We also characterize the possible "escape sequences" for the ternary tree, that is, binary words $a_1 ... a_n$ for which there exists a rotor configuration so that the $k$-th chip escapes to infinity if and only if $a_k=1$.

Landau, Itamar

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

The Rotor-Router Model on Regular Trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rotor-router model is a deterministic analogue of random walk. It can be used to define a deterministic growth model analogous to internal DLA. We show that the set of occupied sites for this model on an infinite regular tree is a perfect ball whenever it can be, provided the initial rotor configuration is acyclic (that is, no two neighboring vertices have rotors pointing to one another). This is proved by defining the rotor-router group of a graph, which we show is isomorphic to the sandpile group. We also address the question of recurrence and transience: We give two rotor configurations on the infinite ternary tree, one for which chips exactly alternate escaping to infinity with returning to the origin, and one for which every chip returns to the origin. Further, we characterize the possible escape sequences for the ternary tree, that is, binary words a1... an for which there exists a rotor configuration so that the k-th chip escapes to infinity if and only if ak = 1. 1

Itamar L; Lionel Levine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

The Rotor-Router Model on Regular Trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rotor-router model is a deterministic analogue of random walk. It can be used to define a deterministic growth model analogous to internal DLA. We show that the set of occupied sites for this model on an infinite regular tree is a perfect ball whenever it can be, provided the initial rotor configuration is acyclic (that is, no two neighboring vertices have rotors pointing to one another). This is proved by defining the rotor-router group of a graph, which we show is isomorphic to the sandpile group. We also address the question of recurrence and transience: We give two rotor configurations on the infinite ternary tree, one for which chips exactly alternate escaping to infinity with returning to the origin, and one for which every chip returns to the origin. Further, we characterize the possible escape sequences for the ternary tree, that is, binary words a1... an for which there exists a rotor configuration so that the k-th chip escapes to infinity if and only if ak = 1.

Itamar Landau; Lionel Levine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Regularized perturbative series for the ionization potential of atomic ions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study N-electron atoms with nuclear charge Z. It is well known that, in the cationic (Z > N) high-Z region, the atom behaves as a weakly interacting system. The anionic (Z < N) regime, on the other hand, is characterized by an instability threshold at $Z \\lesssim N-1$ below which the atom spontaneously emits an electron. We construct a regularized perturbative series (RPS) for the ionization potential of ions in an isoelectronic sequence that exactly reproduces both, the large Z and the Z near $Z_c$ limits. The large-Z expansion coefficients are analytically computed from perturbation theory, whereas the slope of the energy curve at Z=N-1 is computed from a kind of zero-range forces theory that uses as input the electron affinity and the covalent radius of the neutral atom with N-1 electrons. Relativistic effects at the level of first-order perturbation theory in the one-particle Hamiltonian are considered. Our RPS results are compared with numbers from the NIST database.

Gil, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by Grade, Sales Type, and PAD District (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales...

117

X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales...

118

untitled  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type (Million Gallons per Day) Year Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users...

119

Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd VNCPPL | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd VNCPPL Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd VNCPPL Jump to: navigation, search Name Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd. (VNCPPL) Place Krishna Dist, Andhra Pradesh, India Zip 521 157 Sector Biomass Product AP-based, biomass project developers References Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd. (VNCPPL)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd. (VNCPPL) is a company located in Krishna Dist, Andhra Pradesh, India . References ↑ "Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd. (VNCPPL)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Veeraiah_Non_Conventional_Power_Projects_Ltd_VNCPPL&oldid=352749"

120

Figure 10. U.S. Average Retail Regular Motor Gasoline and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Average Retail Regular Motor Gasoline and On-Highway Diesel Fuel Prices, January 2013 to Present ... Including Taxes) Title: Weekly Petroleum ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ENERGY STAR Success Story San Diego Convention Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Success Story ENERGY STAR Success Story San Diego Convention Center Since opening 20 years ago, San Diego's bayside convention facility has been a green industry leader and continues to receive accolades for environmental stewardship. The San Diego Convention Center Corporation (SDCCC) joined the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) ENERGY STAR program as a partner in 2008. Using the EPA's online energy management and tracking tool, Portfolio Manager, the SDCCC tracked its energy consumption and has improved the facility's overall performance. Since then, the San Diego Convention Center has become a model for other convention and meeting facilities demonstrating the value of benchmarking to improve efficiency and to save money. . The Convention Center is managed and marketed by the SDCCC, a non-profit public

122

Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Comments by International Group on Nuclear Liability (CIGNL), in response to U.S. Department of Energy Notice of Inquiry on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, 75 Fed. Reg. 43945 (Jul. 27, 2010) and 75 Fed. Reg. 51986 (Aug. 24, 2010). Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation More Documents & Publications CIGNLCommentsDOECSCRulemaking11-30-10.doc DOE Notice of Inquiry on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) Contingent Cost Allocation - March 2, 2011 Meeting

123

U.S. Motor Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Motor Gasoline Regular Gasoline Midgrade Gasoline Premium Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Oxygenated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Product: Motor Gasoline Regular Gasoline Midgrade Gasoline Premium Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Oxygenated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Sales Type Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Sales to End Users, Total 28,179.6 24,384.0 24,143.9 23,567.1 24,120.5 23,282.9 1983-2013 Through Retail Outlets 26,507.1 22,632.7 22,641.3 22,038.2 22,474.5 21,660.0 1983-2013 Sales for Resale, Total NA NA NA NA NA NA 1983-2013 DTW 24,954.1 29,704.3 30,138.3 29,222.8 30,011.9 28,880.3 1994-2013 Rack 236,373.7 242,166.6 243,892.5 243,789.7 248,761.4 237,431.5 1994-2013

124

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 All Sellers Sales Prices for Selected Petroleum Products, 2010 Motor Gasoline, Selected Grades Distillate Fuel Oil, Residual Fuel Oil, and Propane 170 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 2 Includes oxygenated motor gasoline. 3 > 15 and <= 500 parts per million. 4 > 500 parts per million. - - = Not applicable. Note: Data are preliminary. Source: Table 5.23. 2.32 2.29 2.27 2.36 2.39 2.36 2.54 2.17 2.15 2.13 2.19 2.20 2.18 2.35 All Finished Unleaded Unleaded Unleaded Unleaded Unleaded Unleaded 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 Dollars¹ per Gallon (Excluding Taxes) To Resellers To End Users Midgrade Conventional 2 Midgrade Regular Reformulated Regular Conventional

125

DOE Notice of Inquiry on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notice of Inquiry on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) Contingent Cost Allocation - March 2, 2011 Meeting with CIGNL DOE Notice of Inquiry on...

126

Microstructures and Textures Comparison of Conventional and High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

D12: Effects of Heating Rate on the Phase Transformation Temperature of .... of Conventional and High Niobium API 5L X80 Line Pipe Steel Using EBSD.

127

Properties of Conventionally Alloyed and Powder Alloyed Nano ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Properties of Conventionally Alloyed and Powder Alloyed Nano-Crystalline Titanium Consolidated Via Spark Plasma Sintering. Author(s)...

128

Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Comments by International Group on Nuclear Liability (CIGNL), in response...

129

Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Second National Report for the Joint...

130

Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Fourth National Report for the Joint...

131

Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Third National Report for the Joint...

132

Conventional methods for removing sulfur and other contaminants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conventional methods for removing sulfur and other contaminants from syngas typically rely on chemical or physical absorption processes operating at low temperatures. When cooled...

133

Characterizing Structural Controls of EGS-Candidate and Conventional...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Controls of EGS-Candidate and Conventional Geothermal Reservoirs in the Great Basin: Developing Successful Exploration Strategies in Extended Terranes Project Type Topic 1...

134

REGULAR ARTICLE Simulating the adoption of fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Supply security and environmental concerns associated with oil call for an introduction of hydrogen as a transport fuel. To date, scenario studies of infrastructure build-up and sales of fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) are driven by cost estimates and technological feasibility assumptions, indicating that there is a chicken and egg problem: Car producers do not offer FCVs as long as there are no hydrogen filling stations, and infrastructure will not be set up unless there is a significant number of FCVs on the road. This diffusion barrier is often used as an argument for a major (public) infrastructure program, neglecting the fact that the automobile market is highly competitive and car producers, consumers, and filling station operators form an interdependent dynamic system, where taxes influence technology choice. In this paper, an agent-based model is used that captures the main interdependencies to simulate possible diffusion paths of FCVs. The results suggest that a tax on conventional cars can successfully promote diffusion even without a major infrastructure program. However, consumers and individual producers are affected differently by the tax, indicating that differently strong resistance towards

Malte Schwoon; Er Jager; Marco Janssen; Marco Valente; Financial International; Max Planck; M. Schwoon; M. Schwoon

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

On implementing provenance-aware regular path queries with relational query engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of graphs is growing rapidly in social networks, semantic web, biological databases, scientific workflow provenance, and other areas. Regular Path Queries (RPQs) can be seen as a core graph query language to answer pattern-based reachability queries. ... Keywords: datalog, graph querying, regular path queries

Saumen Dey; Vctor Cuevas-Vicenttn; Sven Khler; Eric Gribkoff; Michael Wang; Bertram Ludscher

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Cleaning random d-regular graphs with brushes using a degree-greedy algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the recently introduced model for cleaning a graph with brushes, we use a degree-greedy algorithm to clean a random d-regular graph on n vertices (with dn even). We then use a differential equations method to find the (asymptotic) ... Keywords: cleaning process, degree--greedy algorithm, differential equations method, random d-regular graphs

Margaret-Ellen Messinger; Pawe? Pra?at; Richard J. Nowakowski; Nicholas Wormald

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Numerical Regularized Moment Method of Arbitrary Order for Boltzmann-BGK Equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce a numerical method for solving Grad's moment equations or regularized moment equations for an arbitrary order of moments. In our algorithm, we do not explicitly need the moment equations. Instead, we directly start from the Boltzmann equation ... Keywords: Boltzmann-BGK equation, Grad's moment method, regularized moment-equations

Zhenning Cai; Ruo Li

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Outfix-Free Regular Languages and Prime Outfix-Free Decomposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outfix-Free Regular Languages and Prime Outfix-Free Decomposition Yo-Sub Han and Derick Wood and a set X of strings is outfix-free if no string in X is an outfix of any other string in X. We examine the outfix-free regular languages. Based on the properties of outfix strings, we develop a polynomial

Han, Yo-Sub

139

A modified smoothing and regularized Newton method for monotone second-order cone complementarity problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a globally and quadratically convergent Newton-type algorithm for solving monotone second-order cone complementarity problems (denoted by SOCCPs). This algorithm is based on smoothing and regularization techniques by incorporating ... Keywords: Convergence analysis, Numerical results, Regularization, Second-order cone complementarity problem, Smoothing method

Linjie Chen; Changfeng Ma

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian Country Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian Country March 1, 2012 Las Vegas, Nevada Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino The Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Energy Forum on "Conventional Energy (Oil, Gas, and Coal) Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian Country" was held March 1, 2012, in Las Vegas, Nevada. The forum focused on recent trends, existing successful partnerships, and perspectives on the future of conventional energy and how tribal business interests are evolving to meet the interests and needs of new tribal energy economies. The forucm provided an opportunity for tribal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Nonet meson properties in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with dimensional versus cutoff regularization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with a Kobayashi-Maskawa-'t Hooft term is one low energy effective theory of QCD which includes the U{sub A}(1) anomaly. We investigate nonet meson properties in this model with three flavors of quarks. We employ two types of regularizations, the dimensional and sharp cutoff ones. The model parameters are fixed phenomenologically for each regularization. Evaluating the kaon decay constant, the {eta} meson mass and the topological susceptibility, we show the regularization dependence of the results and discuss the applicability of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model.

Inagaki, T.; Kimura, D.; Kohyama, H.; Kvinikhidze, A. [Information Media Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan); Learning Support Center, Hiroshima Shudo University, Hiroshima, 731-3195 (Japan); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China) and Physics Division, National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China) and Department of Physics, Chung-Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); A. Razmadze Mathematical Institute of Georgian Academy of Sciences, M. Alexidze Str. 1, 380093 Tbilisi (Georgia)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Computing minimal separating DFAs and regular invariants using SAT and SMT solvers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop a generic technique to compute minimal separating DFAs (deterministic finite automata) and regular invariants. Our technique works by expressing the desired properties of a solution in terms of logical formulae and using SAT or SMT solvers ...

Daniel Neider

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

A Fourth-Order-Centered Finite-Volume Scheme for Regular Hexagonal Grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fourth-order-centered operators on regular hexagonal grids with the ZM-grid arrangement are described. The finite-volume method is used and operators are defined at hexagonal cell centers. The gradient operator is calculated from 12 surrounding ...

Hiroaki Miura

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Gravitational fields with sources, regular black holes, quasiblack holes, and analogue black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss recent developments in gravitational fields with sources, regular black holes, quasiblack holes, and analogue black holes, related to the talks presented at the corresponding Parallel Session AT3 of the 13th Marcel Grossmann Meeting.

Lemos, Jos P S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Outfix-free regular languages and prime outfix-free decomposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A string x is an outfix of a string y if there is a string w such that x1wx2 = y, wherex = x1x2 and a set X of strings is outfix-free if no string in X is an outfix of any other string in X. We examine the outfix-free regular languages. Based on the properties of outfix strings, we develop a polynomial-time algorithm that determines the outfix-freeness of regular languages. We consider two cases: A language is given as a set of strings and a language is given by an acyclic deterministic finite-state automaton. Furthermore, we investigate the prime outfix-free decomposition of outfix-free regular languages and design a linear-time prime outfix-free decomposition algorithm for outfix-free regular languages. We demonstrate the uniqueness of prime outfix-free decomposition.

Yo-sub Han; Derick Wood

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

A NOTE ON THE REGULARITY OF SOLUTIONS OF INFINITE DIMENSIONAL RICCATI EQUATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note is concerned with the regularity of solutions of algebraic Riccati equations arising from infinite dimensional LQR and LQG control problems. We show that distributed parameter systems described by certain parabolic partial differential equations ...

John A. Burns; Belinda B. King

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Enhancement of spatiotemporal regularity in an optimal window of random coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of a lattice of coupled chaotic maps whose coupling connections are dynamically rewired to random sites with probability p, namely at any instance of time, with probability p a regular link is switched to a random one. In a range of weak coupling, where spatiotemporal chaos exists for regular lattices (i.e. for p = 0), we find that p > 0 yields synchronized periodic orbits. Further we observe that this regularity occurs over a window of p values, beyond which the basin of attraction of the synchronized cycle shrinks to zero. Thus we have evidence of an optimal range of randomness in coupling connections, where spatiotemporal regularity is efficiently obtained. This is in contrast to the commonly observed monotonic increase of synchronization with increasing p, as seen for instance, in the strong coupling regime of the very same system.

Swarup Poria; Manish Dev Shrimali; Sudeshna Sinha

2008-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

148

Convention on Supplementary Compensation Notice of Inquiry and Public  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Convention on Supplementary Compensation Notice of Inquiry and Convention on Supplementary Compensation Notice of Inquiry and Public Comments Convention on Supplementary Compensation Notice of Inquiry and Public Comments In an effort to assist the Department of Energy in its development of regulations pursuant to section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), the DOE General Counsel's office issued a Notice of Inquiry (NOI) in July 2010. The Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) provides for a global nuclear liability regime assuring prompt and equitable compensation in the event of certain nuclear incidents, and features the creation of an international fund to supplement the amount of compensation available for nuclear damage resulting from such incidents. Section 934 of the EISA authorizes the Secretary of Energy to

149

2012 Alaska Federation of Natives Convention | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaska Federation of Natives Convention Alaska Federation of Natives Convention 2012 Alaska Federation of Natives Convention October 18, 2012 - 12:49pm Addthis Anchorage, Alaska October 18 - 20, 2012 During the Alaska Federation of Natives Convention held October 18-20 in Anchorage, the DOE Office of Indian Energy and the EERE Tribal Energy Program presented a preconference workshop entitled "Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency for Alaska Native Community Development." The workshop was designed to help tribal leaders and staff understand the range of energy efficiency and renewable energy opportunities that exist in their remote communities, and also covered project development and financing for clean energy projects. Download the Alaska workshop presentations. Addthis Related Articles

150

Atlantic City Convention Center Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Convention Center Solar Power Plant Convention Center Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Atlantic City Convention Center Solar Power Plant Facility Atlantic City Convention Center Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer Pepco Energy Services Location Atlantic City, New Jersey Coordinates 39.3642834°, -74.4229266° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.3642834,"lon":-74.4229266,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

151

Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention March 13, 2012 - 6:47pm Addthis The National Indian Gaming Association (NIGA) 2012 tradeshow and convention will take place April 1-4, 2012, in San Diego, California. The event features seminars and trainings and other activities. Be sure to visit the Office of Indian Energy booth! Learn more on the NIGA website. Addthis Related Articles Energy Savings Performance Contract Case Studies Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Byron Washom, Director of Strategic Energy Initiatives at the University of California at San Diego, poses with an electric vehicle and some of the solar panels that cover UCSD's campus.| Photo courtesy of UCSD Q&A With Byron Washom of the University of California at San Diego

152

A Comparison of Conventional Distributed Computing Environments and Computational Grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years novel distributed computing environments termed grids have emerged. Superficially, grids are considered successors to, and more sophisticated and powerful versions of, conventional distributed environments. This paper investigates the ...

Zsolt Nmeth; Vaidy S. Sunderam

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Passive solar potential of a conventional home. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A conventional home not designed for passive solar heating was found to use an average of 61% less natural gas for space heating when compared to four similarly used control homes of identical design during the 1979-1980 heating season in Fort Collins, Colorado. The significant savings are attributed to: (1) passive solar gain through conventional windows; (2) optimum orientation of the home placing windows and doors away from prevailing winds; (3) the use of low-cost insulating window shutters; (4) conventional winterization; and (5) energy-conscious life-styles of the occupants. The payback period for the minor investment made by the owners of the demonstration home was estimated to be approximately two years. The results demonstrate that passive solar has a much greater potential in a conventional home than is currently believed and suggest that all future homes be oriented and constructed for maximum solar exposure.

Waterman, E.L.

1981-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

A state estimator including conventional and synchronized phasor measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an effective weighted least square formulation for the solution of the state estimation problem, considering conventional as well as synchronized phasor measurements. The proposed algorithm is based on a reference-free formulation, ...

George N. Korres; Nikolaos M. Manousakis

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Actors, coalitions and the framework convention on climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examines the political processes through which the Framework Convention on Climate Change was negotiated and the initial efforts of the United States, the Netherlands, and Japan to adopt national policies and ...

Sewell, Granville C

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Livermore team successfully leads important test of a conventional warhead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

102813_dod 102813_dod 10/28/2013 Livermore team successfully leads important test of a conventional warhead for the DoD Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov LLNL served as technical lead and integrator on an important test to assess a new conventional warhead designed by the Lab. Dave Hare, Livermore's program manager of the test, called it an "unequivocal success." Below is the press release from the Department of Defense Defense Department successfully conducts warhead sled test The Defense Department announced recently the successful testing of an advanced conventional precision effects warhead, a critical part of a national effort to establish a conventional prompt strike capability. This capability will contribute to the country's ability to defend its interests

157

File:EIA-conventional-gas.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

conventional-gas.pdf conventional-gas.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Natural Gas Production in Conventional Fields, Lower 48 States Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 3.25 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Natural Gas Production in Conventional Fields, Lower 48 States Sources Energy Information Administration Related Technologies Natural Gas Creation Date 2009-04-08 Extent National Countries United States UN Region Northern America File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 17:54, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 17:54, 20 December 2010 1,650 × 1,275 (3.25 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

158

Results from Case Studies of Conventional Hydroelectric Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed plant performance analyses for three conventional hydroelectric plants were conducted using unit and plant performance characteristics and 1-minute plant operational data from 2008, 2009, and 2010. This report describes results from detailed performance analyses that evaluated reductions in overall plant efficiencies under a variety of operation-related and market-related conditions for the plants. Results show that the non-market operation of the conventional plant exhibited more efficient ...

2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

159

The All Superconducting Substation: A Comparison with a Conventional Substation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional substations today are quite similar in appearance to those of 50 years ago. However, substation components, efficiency, and safety have improved considerably in that time. If the improvements are to continue, different technologies will be required in the future. Superconducting devices such as transformers and cables are under development at present and may provide more efficient and more reliable service than conventional components. This report describes the effects of substituting superc...

2000-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

160

Dynamic Phase Structures in the Evolution of Conventions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes an agent-based model of a finite group of agents in a single population who each choose which convention to advocate, and which convention to practice. Influences or dependencies in agents choice exists in the form of guru effects and what others practice. With payoffs being dependent on cumulative rewards or actual standings in society, we illustrate the evolutionary dynamics of the phase structure of each group in the population via simulations.

Azhar, A K M; Ruzlan, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Electromagnetic wave propagation with negative phase velocity in regular black holes  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the propagation of electromagnetic plane waves with negative phase velocity in regular black holes. For this purpose, we consider the Bardeen model as a nonlinear magnetic monopole and the Bardeen model coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics with a cosmological constant. It turns out that the region outside the event horizon of each regular black hole does not support negative phase velocity propagation, while its possibility in the region inside the event horizon is discussed.

Sharif, M., E-mail: msharif.math@pu.edu.pk; Manzoor, R., E-mail: rubabmanzoor9@yahoo.com [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics (Pakistan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Price of Motor Gasoline Through Retail Outlets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prices, Sales Volumes & Stocks by State Prices, Sales Volumes & Stocks by State (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Data Series: Retail Price - Motor Gasoline Retail Price - Regular Gasoline Retail Price - Midgrade Gasoline Retail Price - Premium Gasoline Retail Price - Aviation Gasoline Retail Price - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Retail Price - Propane Retail Price - Kerosene Retail Price - No. 1 Distillate Retail Price - No. 2 Distillate Retail Price - No. 2 Fuel Oil Retail Price - No. 2 Diesel Fuel Retail Price - No. 4 Fuel Oil Prime Supplier Sales - Motor Gasoline Prime Supplier Sales - Regular Gasoline Prime Supplier Sales - Midgrade Gasoline Prime Supplier Sales - Premium Gasoline Prime Supplier Sales - Aviation Gasoline Prime Supplier Sales - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Prime Supplier Sales - Propane (Consumer Grade) Prime Supplier Sales - Kerosene Prime Supplier Sales - No. 1 Distillate Prime Supplier Sales - No. 2 Distillate Prime Supplier Sales - No. 2 Fuel Oil Prime Supplier Sales - No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prime Supplier Sales - No. 4 Fuel Oil Prime Supplier Sales - Residual Fuel Oil Stocks - Finished Motor Gasoline Stocks - Reformulated Gasoline Stocks - Conventional Gasoline Stocks - Motor Gasoline Blending Components Stocks - Kerosene Stocks - Distillate Fuel Oil Stocks - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Sulfur Stocks - Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Stocks - Distillate F.O., Greater 500 ppm Sulfur Stocks - Residual Fuel Oil Stocks - Propane/Propylene Period: Monthly Annual

163

EPRG WORKING PAPER The Effect of CO2 Pricing on Conventional and Non-Conventional Oil Supply and Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What would be the effect of CO2 pricing on global oil supply and demand? This paper introduces a model describing the interaction between conventional and non-conventional oil supply in a Hotelling framework and under CO2 constraints. The model assumes that nonconventional crude oil enters the market when conventional oil supply alone is unable to meet demand, and the social cost of CO2 is included in the calculation of the oil rent at that time. The results reveal the effect of a CO2 tax set at the social cost of CO2 on oil price and demand and the uncertainty associated with the time when conventional oil production might become unable to meet demand. The results show that a tax on CO2 emissions associated with fuel use would reduce oil demand despite the effect of lower future rents, and would delay the time when conventional oil supply is unable to satisfy demand. More precisely, between 81 and 99 % of the CO2 tax is carried into the oil price despite the counter-balancing effect of the reduced rent. A CO2 tax on fuel use set at the social cost of CO2 would delay by 25 years the time when conventional oil production is unable to meet oil demand, from 2019 to 2044 (mean value). The results show that this date is very sensitive to the price elasticity of demand and the demand growth rate, which shows the great potential of demand-side measures to smooth the transition towards low-carbon liquid fuel alternatives. www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk EPRG WORKING PAPER Keywords JEL Classification Oil supply and demand; Conventional and non-conventional oil; CO2 pricing; Social cost of CO2.

Aurlie Mjean; Chris Hope; Aurlie Mjean; Chris Hope

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

High density quark matter in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with dimensional versus cutoff regularization  

SciTech Connect

We investigate color superconducting phase at high density in the extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model for two-flavor quarks. Because of the nonrenormalizability of the model, physical observables may depend on the regularization procedure; that is why we apply two types of regularization, the cutoff and the dimensional one to evaluate the phase structure, the equation of state, and the relationship between the mass and the radius of a dense star. To obtain the phase structure we evaluate the minimum of the effective potential at finite temperature and chemical potential. The stress tensor is calculated to derive the equation of state. Solving the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation, we show the relationship between the mass and the radius of a dense star. The dependence on the regularization is found not to be small, interestingly. The dimensional regularization predicts color superconductivity phase at rather large values of {mu} (in agreement with perturbative QCD in contrast to the cutoff regularization), in the larger temperature interval, the existence of heavier and larger quark stars.

Fujihara, T.; Kimura, D.; Inagaki, T.; Kvinikhidze, A. [Department of Physics, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Information Media Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan); A. Razmadze Mathematical Institute of Georgian Academy of Sciences, M. Alexidze Str. 1, 380093 Tbilisi (Georgia)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

ENERGY STAR Success Story: San Diego Convention Center | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

San Diego Convention Center San Diego Convention Center Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

166

ENERGY STAR Success Story: The Virginia Beach Convention Center | ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Success Story: The Virginia Beach Convention Center ENERGY STAR Success Story: The Virginia Beach Convention Center Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

167

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prime Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products for Local Consumption U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 136 Table 45. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Conventional Reformulated Total Conventional Reformulated Total United States September 2013 .................... 201,282.1 98,460.8 299,742.8 8,017.2 2,616.4 10,633.6 August 2013 .......................... 208,707.3 102,892.1 311,599.3 10,270.0 2,819.0 13,089.0 September 2012 .................... 196,290.3 100,372.7 296,663.0 10,079.6 2,892.5 12,972.1 PAD District I September 2013 ....................

168

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 45. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, Table 45. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Conventional Reformulated Total Conventional Reformulated Total United States January ......................................... 193,913.6 101,158.7 295,072.4 12,103.1 4,068.6 16,171.7 February ....................................... 202,937.6 103,842.9 306,780.5 12,634.4 4,206.6 16,841.0 March ............................................ 202,463.3 104,047.5 306,510.7 12,412.3 4,259.0 16,671.3 April .............................................. 208,995.2 106,254.4 315,249.7 13,123.0 4,223.9 17,346.9 May ............................................... 212,676.2 105,948.7

169

The Numerical Simulation of Conventional Ground Coalbed Methane Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The migration, accumulation, and production of coalbed methane (CBM) are absolutely different from the conventional natural gas. The mechanism of the migration and production of CBM are researched and the geological model of CBM reservoir simulation ... Keywords: coalbed methane, numerical simulation, desportion-diffusion, two phase flow, fully implicit finite difference

Lin Xiaoying; Liu Guowei; Su Xianbo

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Appendix IV. Risks Associated with Conventional Uranium Milling Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as in situ leaching (ISL) mining operations, to provide a more complete picture of uranium production. While this report focuses on the impacts associated with conventional surface and underground uranium mines Radioactive Materials from Uranium Mining. Volume 1: Mining and Reclamation Background" by U.S. EPA (2006

171

Nuclear Proliferation and the Deterrence of Conventional War: Justin Pollard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Proliferation and the Deterrence of Conventional War: A Proposal Justin Pollard April 2009) Introduction It seems counterintuitive to think that the spread of nuclear weapons could make the world a safer of ubiquitous nuclear armament is a more dangerous and unstable one. Certainly, a weapon of the nuclear

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

172

Energy Contents of a Class of Regular Black Hole Solutions in Teleparallel Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we discuss the energy-momentum problem in the realm of teleparallel gravity. The energy-momentum distribution for a class of regular black holes coupled with a non-linear electrodynamics source is investigated by using Hamiltonian approach of teleparallel theory. The generalized regular black hole contains two specific parameters $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$ (a sort of dipole and quadrupole of non-linear source) on which the energy distribution depends. It is interesting to mention here that our results exactly coincide with different energy-momentum prescriptions in General Relativity.

M. Sharif; Abdul Jawad

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

173

Regularized energy-dependent solar flare hard x-ray spectral index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The deduction from solar flare X-ray photon spectroscopic data of the energy dependent model-independent spectral index is considered as an inverse problem. Using the well developed regularization approach we analyze the energy dependency of spectral index for a high resolution energy spectrum provided by Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The regularization technique produces much smoother derivatives while avoiding additional errors typical of finite differences. It is shown that observations imply a spectral index varying significantly with energy, in a way that also varies with time as the flare progresses. The implications of these findings are discussed in the solar flare context.

Eduard P. Kontar; Alexander L. MacKinnon

2005-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

174

The geometric $?$-function in curved space-time under operator regularization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, I compare the generators of the renormalization group flow, or the geometric $\\beta$-functions for dimensional regularization and operator regularization. I then extend the analysis to show that the geometric $\\beta$-function for a scalar field theory on a closed compact Riemannian manifold is defined on the entire manifold. I then extend the analysis to find the generator of the renormalization group flow for a conformal scalar-field theories on the same manifolds. The geometric $\\beta$-function in this case is not defined.

Susama Agarwala

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

175

Regular Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...The structure of a binary solid solution is shown schematically in Fig. 13. Three types of interatomic bonds

176

Regularized Latent Semantic Indexing: A New Approach to Large-Scale Topic Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topic modeling provides a powerful way to analyze the content of a collection of documents. It has become a popular tool in many research areas, such as text mining, information retrieval, natural language processing, and other related fields. In real-world ... Keywords: Topic modeling, distributed learning, online learning, regularization, sparse methods

Quan Wang; Jun Xu; Hang Li; Nick Craswell

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Laplacian regularized D-optimal design for active learning and its application to image retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In increasingly many cases of interest in computer vision and pattern recognition, one is often confronted with the situation where data size is very large. Usually, the labels are expensive and the challenge is, thus, to determine which unlabeled samples ... Keywords: active learning, experimental design, image retrieval, regularization

Xiaofei He

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Distribution of Entropy of Bardeen Regular Black Hole with Corrected State Density  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider corrections to all orders in the Planck length on the quantum state density, and calculate the statistical entropy of the scalar field on the background of the Bardeen regular black hole numerically. We obtain the distribution of entropy which is inside the horizon of black hole and the contribution of the vicinity of horizon takes a great part of the whole entropy.

Hai Huang; Juhua Chen; Yongjiu Wang

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

179

Simplified and Regular Physical Parameterizations for Incremental Four-Dimensional Variational Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of physical parameterizations has been developed for inclusion in incremental four-dimensional variational assimilation (4D-Var). The goal for this physical package is that it be simple, regular (for the efficiency of the minimization in 4D-...

Marta Janiskov; Jean-Nol Thpaut; Jean-Franois Geleyn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Shrinkage-based regularization tests for high-dimensional data with application to gene set analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional multivariate tests such as Hotelling's test or Wilk's test are designed for classical problems, where the number of observations is much larger than the dimension of the variables. For high-dimensional data, however, this assumption cannot ... Keywords: Feature selection, Gene set analysis, High dimensionality, MANOVA, Power, Regularization

Yanfeng Shen; Zhengyan Lin; Jun Zhu

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A modified Tikhonov regularization method for a spherically symmetric three-dimensional inverse heat conduction problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with a spherically symmetric three-dimensional inverse heat conduction problem of determining the internal surface temperature distribution of a hollow sphere from the measured data at a fixed location inside it. This is an ill-posed ... Keywords: Error estimate, Ill-posed problem, Regularization, Spherically symmetric inverse heat conduction problem

Wei Cheng; Chu-Li Fu; Zhi Qian

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

A novel compound regularization and fast algorithm for compressive sensing deconvolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compressive Sensing Deconvolution (CS-Deconvolution) is a new challenge problem encountered in a wide variety of image processing fields. Since CS is more efficient for sparse signals, in our scheme, the input image is firstly sparse represented by curvelet ... Keywords: Compound regularization, Compressive sensing, Deconvolution from incomplete measurements, Variable splitting

Liang Xiao, Jun Shao, Lili Huang, Zhihui Wei

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Regular Article: On the Spectra of Certain Graphs Arising from Finite Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cayley graphs on a subgroup ofGL(3,p),p>3 a prime, are defined and their properties, particularly their spectra, studied. It is shown that these graphs are connected, vertex-transitive, nonbipartite, and regular, and their degrees are computed. The eigenvalues ...

Nancy Tufts Allen

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Conventional Positron Target for a Tesla Formatted Beam  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 SLAC-TN-03-072 November 2003 Abstract This note documents a set of expressions used to explore the issue of whether or not it is reasonable to consider a conventional positron source for a Tesla formatted beam. The critical issue is that of energy deposition in the conversion target and the comparison of the induced stress with the ultimate tensile strength of the target material. Since the length of the incident beam pulse is large in comparison to the ratio of beam size to the speed of sound, the concurrent pressure pulse dissipates in a time short compared to the overall pulse duration and one is left with only the Conventional Positron Target for a Tesla Formatted Beam John C. Sheppard Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

185

ENERGY STAR Success Story VA Beach Convention Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STAR Success Story: STAR Success Story: The Virginia Beach Convention Center Located in Virginia's most populous city, the Virginia Beach Convention Center (VBCC) comprises more than 516,000 square feet and typically hosts 400 events a year. Fully opened in 2007, the VBCC has served as the anchor for the successful revitalization of Virginia Beach's old beach district. With historical references and maritime themes integrated into the structure's modern design, the Center features many technological advances that make it a prime location for meetings, conferences, and trade shows. However, even with a newly constructed building, the VBCC has demonstrated an important energy management principle: all buildings, regardless of their age and building systems they employ, can reduce energy consumption, save money, and offset greenhouse gas

186

Government of Canada Initiatives in Support of the Joint Convention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Government of Canada strongly supported international efforts to bring into force the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (the Joint Convention), and was the second country to ratify it. The Joint Convention places a number of obligations on Contracting Parties aimed at achieving and maintaining a high level of safety worldwide in spent fuel and radioactive waste management, ensuring that effective defenses against potential hazards are in place during all management stages, preventing accidents with radiological consequences and mitigating their consequences should they occur. In addition to establishing and maintaining a modem regulatory framework and an independent regulatory body through the 2000 Nuclear Safety and Control Act, the Government of Canada has implemented a number of initiatives that address its responsibilities and serve to further enhance Canada's compliance with the Joint Convention. For nuclear fuel waste, the Government of Canada brought into force the Nuclear Fuel Waste Act in 2002 to require waste owners to develop, fund, organize and implement a long-term solution for Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The Act clearly reserves for Government the decision on the solution to be implemented in the best interests of Canadians, as well as oversight to ensure that waste owners are fulfilling their responsibilities. In the case of low-level radioactive waste, long-term solutions are being developed to ensure the protection of health, safety, and the environment, both now and in the future. Regarding uranium mine and mill tailings, current operators have state-of-the-art waste management facilities in place. The Government of Canada works with provincial governments to ensure that any potential abandoned or legacy mines sites where no owner can be held responsible are safely decommissioned and managed over the long term. (authors)

Brown, P.A.; Metcalfe, D.E. [Natural Resources Canada, 580 Booth Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0E4 (Canada); Lojk, R. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, 280 Slater Street, P.O. Box 1046, Station B, Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5S9 (Canada)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Reporting Exact and Approximate Regular Expression Matches Eugene W. Myers \\Lambda Paulo Oliva y Katia Guimar~aes z  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accepted standard, e.g. Perl [WS91], Tcl/Tk [Ous94], and the IEEE Posix standard [IEE92], for exact regular

Oliva, Paulo

188

Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics July 30, 2013 - 3:39pm Addthis Illustration showing the components of a storage water heater. On top of the tank are two thin pipes; one pipe is the hot water outlet, and the other is the cold water inlet. A large pipe in the middle is called a vent pipe. A pressure/temperature relief valve is also on top of the tank and is connected to an open pipe that runs down the side of the tank. Another valve near the bottom of the outside of the tank is the thermostat and gas valve. A cutout shows the parts inside the tank, which include a large tube called a flue tube/heat exchanger. Inside this tube is a jagged insert called a flue baffle. Beside the flue tube/heat exchanger is a thin tube called the anode rod. At the bottom of the tank is a gas burner, and beneath the burner are combustion air openings.

189

Manual for national implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention  

SciTech Connect

The Convention on the Prohibition on the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on their Destruction, opened for signature, January 13, 1993, in Paris, France (CWC), is an unprecedented multilateral effort to eradicate an entire category of weapons of mass destruction and assure their continued absence through international verification. The CWC has been signed by over 150 nations, and is expected to enter into force in 1995. With its far-reaching system to verify compliance, the CWC presages a new foundation for international security based neither on fear nor on trust, but on the rule of law. A central feature of the CWC is that it requires each State Party to take implementing measures to make the Convention operative. The CWC goes beyond all prior arms control treaties in this regard. For this approach to succeed, and to inspire the eradication of other categories of mass destruction weaponry, coordination and planning are vital to harmonize CWC national implementation among States Parties. This Manual for National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention is designed to assist States Parties, duly taking into account the distinctive aspects of their legal systems, in maximizing CWC enforcement consistent with their national legal obligations.

Kellman, B. [DePaul Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Tanzman, E.A.; Gualtieri, D.S.; Grimes, S.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Quantifying the Uncertainty in Estimates of World Conventional Oil Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since Hubbert proposed the "peak oil" concept to forecast ultimate recovery of crude oil for the U.S. and the world, there have been countless debates over the timing of peak world conventional oil production rate and ultimate recovery. From review of the literature, forecasts were grouped into those that are like Hubbert's with an imminent peak, and those that do not predict an imminent peak. Both groups have bases for their positions. Viewpoints from the two groups are polarized and the rhetoric is pointed and sometimes personal. A big reason for the large divide between the two groups is the failure of both to acknowledge the significant uncertainty in their estimates. Although some authors attempt to quantify uncertainty, most use deterministic methods and present single values, with no ranges. This research proposes that those that do attempt to quantify uncertainty underestimate it significantly. The objective of this thesis is to rigorously quantify the uncertainty in estimates of ultimate world conventional oil production and time to peak rate. Two different methodologies are used. The first is a regression technique based on historical production data using Hubbert's model and the other methodology uses mathematical models. However, I conduct the analysis probabilistically, considering errors in both the data and the model, which results in likelihood probability distributions for world conventional oil production and time to peak rate. In the second method, I use a multiple-experts analysis to combine estimates from the multitude of papers presented in the literature, yielding an overall distribution of estimated world conventional oil production. Giving due consideration to uncertainty, Hubbert-type mathematical modeling results in large uncertainty ranges that encompass both groups of forecasts (imminent peak and no imminent peak). These ranges are consistent with those from the multiple-experts analysis. In short, the industry does not have enough information at this time to say with any reliability what the ultimate world conventional oil production will be. It could peak soon, somewhere in the distant future, or somewhere in between. It would be wise to consider all of these possible outcomes in planning and making decisions regarding capital investment and formulation of energy policy.

Tien, Chih-Ming

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Characterizing Structural Controls of EGS-Candidate and Conventional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Controls of EGS-Candidate and Conventional Controls of EGS-Candidate and Conventional Geothermal Reservoirs in the Great Basin: Developing Successful Exploration Strategies in Extended Terranes Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Characterizing Structural Controls of EGS-Candidate and Conventional Geothermal Reservoirs in the Great Basin: Developing Successful Exploration Strategies in Extended Terranes Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geophysical Exploration Technologies Project Description The project group proposes to systematically assess the structural controls of geothermal systems in the Great Basin and adjacent regions. Phase I (Year 1) involves a broad inventory of structural settings of geothermal systems in the Great Basin, Walker Lane, and southern Cascades, with the aim of developing conceptual structural models and a structural catalogue of the most favorable structural environments. The regional stress field will be used to evaluate slip tendency on faults in the various tectonic provinces and thus determine which faults are most likely to accommodate dilation and slip in each setting. This overview will permit selection of representative sites (5 or 6 total) for more detailed studies in Phases II and III (Years 2-3). Sites will be selected on the basis of quality of exposure, apparent potential for geothermal development, and general type of system, so that all major types of systems can be evaluated and compared in this project (e.g., magmatic vs. nonmagmatic). The detailed investigations will include geologic mapping, kinematic analysis, stress determinations, gravity surveys, integration of available geophysical data, slip tendency analysis, and 3D modeling. In Year 3, the detailed studies will be completed and data synthesized to a) compare structural controls in various tectonic settings, b) complete the structural catalogue, and c) apply knowledge to exploration strategies and selection of drilling sites.

192

Tensor-based formulation and nuclear norm regularization for multi-energy computed tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of energy selective, photon counting X-ray detectors allows for a wide range of new possibilities in the area of computed tomographic image formation. Under the assumption of perfect energy resolution, here we propose a tensor-based iterative algorithm that simultaneously reconstructs the X-ray attenuation distribution for each energy. We use a multi-linear image model rather than a more standard "stacked vector" representation in order to develop novel tensor-based regularizers. Specifically, we model the multi-spectral unknown as a 3-way tensor where the first two dimensions are space and the third dimension is energy. This approach allows for the design of tensor nuclear norm regularizers, which like its two dimensional counterpart, is a convex function of the multi-spectral unknown. The solution to the resulting convex optimization problem is obtained using an alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) approach. Simulation results shows that the generalized tensor nuclear norm can ...

Semerci, Oguz; Kilmer, Misha E; Miller, Eric L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Second-order robust regularization cost function for detecting and reconstructing phase discontinuities  

SciTech Connect

We propose a robust method for computing discontinuous phase maps from a fringe pattern with carrier frequency. Our algorithm is based on the minimization of an edge-preserving regularized cost function, specifically, on a robust regularized potential that uses a paradigm called the plate with adaptive rest condition, i.e., a second-order edge-preserving potential. Given that the proposed cost function is not convex, our method uses as its initial point an overly smoothed phase computed with a standard fringe analysis method and then reconstructs the phase discontinuities. Although the method is general purpose, it is introduced in the context of interferometric gauge-block calibration. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated by numerical experiments with both synthetic and real data.

Galvan, Carlos; Rivera, Mariano

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

194

How does Casimir energy fall? IV. Gravitational interaction of regularized quantum vacuum energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several years ago we demonstrated that the Casimir energy for perfectly reflecting and imperfectly reflecting parallel plates gravitated normally, that is, obeyed the equivalence principle. At that time the divergences in the theory were treated only formally, without proper regularization, and the coupling to gravity was limited to the canonical energy-momentum-stress tensor. Here we strengthen the result by removing both of those limitations. We consider, as a toy model, massless scalar fields interacting with semitransparent ($\\delta$-function) potentials defining parallel plates, which become Dirichlet plates for strong coupling. We insert space and time point-split regulation parameters, and obtain well-defined contributions to the self- energy of each plate, and the interaction energy between the plates. (This self-energy does not vanish even in the conformally-coupled, strong-coupled limit.) We also compute the local energy density, which requires regularization near the plates. In general, the energy ...

Milton, K A; Fulling, S A; Parashar, Prachi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Demilitarization and disposal technologies for conventional munitions and energetic materials  

SciTech Connect

Technologies for the demilitarization and disposal of conventional munitions and energetic materials are presented. A hazard separation system has been developed to remove hazardous subcomponents before processing. Electronic component materials separation processes have been developed that provide for demilitarization as well as the efficient recycling of materials. Energetic materials demilitarization and disposal using plasma arc and molten metal technologies are currently being investigated. These regulatory compliant technologies will allow the recycling of materials and will also provide a waste form suitable for final disposal.

Lemieux, A.A.; Wheelis, W.T.; Blankenship, D.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Energy Distribution of a Regular Class of Exact Black Hole Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present the expressions for the energy of a regular class of exact black hole solutions of Einstein's equations coupled with a nonlinear electrodynamics source. We calculate the energy distribution using the Einstein, Weinberg and M{\\o}ller prescriptions. We make a discussion of the results in function of two specific parameters, a sort of dipole and quadrupole moments of the nonlinear source $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$, and in addition a study of some particular cases is performed.

I-Ching Yang; Chi-Long Lin; I. Radinschi

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

197

On the regularity of the conditional distribution of the sample mean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the hypothesis of regularity of the conditional distribution of the empiric average of a finite sample of IID random variables, given all the sample "fluctuations", which appeared in our earlier manuscript |1] in the context of the eigenvalue concentration analysis for multi-particle random operators, is satisfied for a class of probability distributions with piecewise-constant or sufficiently smooth probability density. It extends the well-known property of Gausssian IID samples.

Victor Chulaevsky

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

198

Exploring the role of model parameters and regularization procedures in the thermodynamics of the PNJL model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The equation of state and the critical behavior around the critical end point are studied in the context of the Polyakov--Nambu--Jona--Lasinio model. We prove that a convenient choice of the model parameters is crucial to get the correct description of isentropic trajectories. The physical relevance of the effects of the regularization procedure is insured by the agreement with general thermodynamic requirements. The results are compared with simple thermodynamic expectations and lattice data.

M. C. Ruivo; Pedro Costa; H. Hansen; C. A. de Sousa

2010-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

199

Comparison of conventional and airless abrasive blasting techniques  

SciTech Connect

A comparison of conventional and airless abrasive blasting techniques used to prepare steel surfaces (e.g., North Sea oil facilities, offshore structures, e.g., storage tanks, and land-based oil terminals) for corrosion protection shows the advantages of the Autoblast automatic abrasive blasting machine over the conventional air-blasting machine. Autoblast is based on the principle of a paddle type wheel, revolving at high speed, being continuously fed with abrasive, which is propelled off the wheel onto the work surface by centrifugal force in such a manner and at such an angle that the abrasive is reclaimed, cleaned and returned to the wheel for reuse. All this is done within a totally enclosed, self-propelled, highly maneuverable vehicle. The machine also incorporates a separator to remove dust and refuse, which is passed through a dust collector to allow the machine to operate 98% free of pollution. The production rate of Autoblast machines varies from about 20 sq m/man-hour on offshore platforms with confined areas, to 80 sq m/man-hour on newly constructed storage tanks.

Tighe, J.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Generalized Error Analysis for Conventional and Remote Reference Magnetotellurics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An error analysis which applies to both conventional and remote reference magnetotelluric impedance and tipper estimates is developed based on the assumption that noise in the field measurements is governed by a complex normal distribution. Under the assumed model of noise it is shown that the theoretical expressions for the variances and covariances derived recently by Gamble et al (1979b) specifically for remote reference estimates apply to conventional estimates as well. However, calculations are biased if the impedance or tipper functions are biased. The impedance and tipper functions are calculated as ratios of two random functions of noisy field measurements. The expressions for the variances and covariances account for noise in both the numerator and denominator of the estimates. They are useful provided the probability that the magnitude of the random error in the denominator exceeds the magnitude of its expected value is small. Expressions for the bias errors of the impedance and tipper functions are obtained in order to assess the relative contributions of random and bias errors to the man squared error of the estimates. The relative magnitude of both random and bias errors depends on the noise level and on the values of the sample coherencies between various pairs of the field measurements used to compute a particular estimate.

Stodt, John A.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Residential space heating cost: geothermal vs conventional systems  

SciTech Connect

The operating characteristics and economies of several representative space heating systems are analyzed. The analysis techniques used may be applied to a larger variety of systems than considered herein, thereby making this document more useful to the residential developer, heating and ventilating contractor, or homeowner considering geothermal space heating. These analyses are based on the use of geothermal water at temperatures as low as 120/sup 0/F in forced air systems and 140/sup 0/F in baseboard convection and radiant floor panel systems. This investigation indicates the baseboard convection system is likely to be the most economical type of geothermal space heating system when geothermal water of at least 140/sup 0/F is available. Heat pumps utilizing water near 70/sup 0/F, with negligible water costs, are economically feasible and they are particularly attractive when space cooling is included in system designs. Generally, procurement and installation costs for similar geothermal and conventional space heating systems are about equal, so geothermal space heating is cost competitive when the unit cost of geothermal energy is less than or equal to the unit cost of conventional energy. Guides are provided for estimating the unit cost of geothermal energy for cases where a geothermal resource is known to exist but has not been developed for use in residential space heating.

Engen, I.A.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

S&TR | Stardust Results Challenge Astronomical Convention  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Staff Staff Article title: Stardust Results Challenge Astronomical Convention; article blurb: A Livermore team has discovered plenty of surprises in the first samples captured from a comet. Graphic of artist's conception of Stardust spacecraft. Photo of John Bradley at the Johnson Space Center. An artist's conception shows the Stardust spacecraft approaching Comet Wild 2. The spacecraft's cometary particle collector, filled with lightweight aerogel glass foam, is shown extended. The spacecraft is flanked by two solar panels. (Image courtesy of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA].) In the lower right photo, John Bradley gives the thumbs-up sign after scientists opened the Stardust sample return capsule in the clean room facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

203

Master EM Project Definition Rating Index - Traditional (Conventional) Definitions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17 Master EM Project Definition Rating Index - Traditional (Conventional) Definitions The following definitions describe the criteria required to achieve a maximum rating or maturity value of 5. It should be assumed that maturity values of 1-5 represent a subjective assessment of the quality of definition and/or the degree to which the end-state or maximum criteria have been met, or the product has been completed in accordance with the definition of maturity values. Rating Element Criteria for Maximum Rating COST A1 Cost Estimate A cost estimate has been developed and formally approved by DOE and is the basis for the cost baselines. The cost estimate is a reasonable approximation of Total Project Costs, and covers all phases of the project. The estimate is prepared in

204

CBTL Design Case Summary Conventional Feedstock Supply System - Woody  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conventional woody feedstock design has been developed that represents supply system technologies, costs, and logistics that are achievable today for supplying woody biomass as a blendstock with coal for energy production. Efforts are made to identify bottlenecks and optimize the efficiency and capacities of this supply system, within the constraints and consideration of existing local feedstock supplies, equipment, and permitting requirements. The feedstock supply system logistics operations encompass all of the activities necessary to move woody biomass from the production location to the conversion reactor ready for blending and insertion. This supply system includes operations that are currently available such that costs and logistics are reasonable and reliable. The system modeled for this research project includes the use of the slash stream since it is a more conservative analysis and represents the material actually used in the experimental part of the project.

Christopher T. Wright; Erin M. Searcy

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Pseudogap in a thin film of a conventional superconductor.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A superconducting state is characterized by the gap in the electronic density of states, which vanishes at the superconducting transition temperature T{sub c}. It was discovered that in high-temperature superconductors, a noticeable depression in the density of states, the pseudogap, still remains even at temperatures above T{sub c}. Here, we show that a pseudogap exists in a conventional superconductor, ultrathin titanium nitride films, over a wide range of temperatures above T{sub c}. Our study reveals that this pseudogap state is induced by superconducting fluctuations and favoured by two-dimensionality and by the proximity to the transition to the insulating state. A general character of the observed phenomenon provides a powerful tool to discriminate between fluctuations as the origin of the pseudogap state and other contributions in the layered high-temperature superconductor compounds.

Sacepe, B.; Chapelier, C.; Baturina, T. I.; Vinokur, V. M.; Baklanov, M. R.; Sanquer, M. (Materials Science Division); (CEA-INAC/UJF-Grenoble); (A.V. Rzhanov Inst. Semiconductor Physics); (IMEC)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

CBTL Design Case Summary Conventional Feedstock Supply System - Herbaceous  

SciTech Connect

A conventional bale feedstock design has been established that represents supply system technologies, costs, and logistics that are achievable today for supplying herbaceous feedstocks as a blendstock with coal for energy production. Efforts are made to identify bottlenecks and optimize the efficiency and capacities of this supply system, within the constraints of existing local feedstock supplies, equipment, and permitting requirements. The feedstock supply system logistics operations encompass all of the activities necessary to move herbaceous biomass feedstock from the production location to the conversion reactor ready for blending and insertion. This supply system includes operations that are currently available such that costs and logistics are reasonable and reliable. The system modeled for this research project includes the uses of field-dried corn stover or switchgrass as a feedstock to annually supply an 800,000 DM ton conversion facility.

Christopher T. Wright; Erin M. Searcy

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Pushing towards the ET sensitivity using 'conventional' technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, the design study `Einstein gravitational wave Telescope' (ET) has been funded within the European FP7 framework. The ambitious goal of this project is to provide a conceptual design of a detector with a hundred times better sensitivity than currently operating instruments. It is expected that this will require the development and implementation of new technologies, which go beyond the concepts employed for the first and second detector generations. However, it is a very interesting and educational exercise to imagine a Michelson interferometer in which conventional technologies have been pushed to - or maybe beyond - their limits to reach the envisaged sensitivity for the Einstein Telescope. In this document we present a first sketchy analysis of what modifications and improvements are necessary to go, step-by-step, from second generation gravitational wave detectors to the Einstein Telescope.

Stefan Hild; Simon Chelkowski; Andreas Freise

2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

208

Feasibility of Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Recovery in Conventional Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermoelectric (TE) generators convert heat directly into electricity when a temperature gradient is applied across junctions of two dissimilar metals. The devices could increase the fuel economy of conventional vehicles by recapturing part of the waste heat from engine exhaust and generating electricity to power accessory loads. A simple vehicle and engine waste heat model showed that a Class 8 truck presents the least challenging requirements for TE system efficiency, mass, and cost; these trucks have a fairly high amount of exhaust waste heat, have low mass sensitivity, and travel many miles per year. These factors help maximize fuel savings and economic benefits. A driving/duty cycle analysis shows strong sensitivity of waste heat, and thus TE system electrical output, to vehicle speed and driving cycle. With a typical alternator, a TE system could allow electrification of 8%-15% of a Class 8 truck's accessories for 2%-3% fuel savings. More research should reduce system cost and improve economics.

Smith, K.; Thornton, M.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

{pi} and {sigma} mesons at finite temperature and density in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with dimensional regularization  

SciTech Connect

Dynamical symmetry breaking and meson masses are studied in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model at finite temperature and chemical potential using dimensional regularization. Since the model is not renormalizable in four space-time dimensions, physical results and parameters depend on the regularization method. Following the imaginary-time formalism, we introduce the temperature T and the chemical potential {mu}. The parameters of the model are fixed by calculating the pion mass and decay constant in dimensional regularization at T={mu}=0.

Inagaki, T.; Kimura, D.; Kvinikhidze, A. [Information Media Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); A. Razmadze Mathematical Institute of Georgian Academy of Sciences, Tbilisi (Georgia)

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Motion of test particles in a regular black hole space--time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the motion of test particles in the regular black hole space-time given by Ay\\'{o}n-Beato and Garc\\'{\\i}a in Phys. Rev. Lett. 80:5056 (1998). The complete set of orbits for neutral and weakly charged test particles is discussed, including for neutral particles the extreme and over-extreme metric. We also derive the analytical solutions for the equation of motion of neutral test particles in a parametric form and consider a post-Schwarzschild expansion of the periastron shift to second order in the charge.

Alberto Garcia; Eva Hackmann; Jutta Kunz; Claus Lmmerzahl; Alfredo Macias

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

211

Global regularity of wave maps VI. Abstract theory of minimal-energy blowup solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the previous papers in this series, the global regularity conjecture for wave maps from two-dimensional Minkowski space $\\R^{1+2}$ to hyperbolic space $\\H^m$ was reduced to the problem of constructing a minimal-energy blowup solution which is almost periodic modulo symmetries in the event that the conjecture fails. In this paper, we show that this problem can be reduced further, to that of showing that solutions at the critical energy which are either frequency-delocalised, spatially-dispersed, or spatially-delocalised have bounded ``entropy''. These latter facts will be demonstrated in the final paper in this series.

Tao, Terence

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The Mimetic Finite Element Method and the Virtual Element Method for elliptic problems with arbitrary regularity.  

SciTech Connect

We develop and analyze a new family of virtual element methods on unstructured polygonal meshes for the diffusion problem in primal form, that use arbitrarily regular discrete spaces V{sub h} {contained_in} C{sup {alpha}} {element_of} N. The degrees of freedom are (a) solution and derivative values of various degree at suitable nodes and (b) solution moments inside polygons. The convergence of the method is proven theoretically and an optimal error estimate is derived. The connection with the Mimetic Finite Difference method is also discussed. Numerical experiments confirm the convergence rate that is expected from the theory.

Manzini, Gianmarco [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

213

Regularization of singular terms in $N\\bar{N}$ potential model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest a method of singular terms regularization in potential model of $N\\bar{N}$ interaction. This method is free from any uncertainties, related to the usual cut-off procedure and based on the fact, that in the presence of sufficiently strong short-range annihilation $N$ and $\\bar{N}$ never approach close enough to each other. The effect of mentioned singular terms of OBE potential, modified by annihilation is shown to be repulsive. The obtained results for S- and P-wave scattering lengths are in agreement with existing theoretical models.

O. D. Dalkarov A. Yu. Voronin

2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

214

Analytically calculating shading in regular arrays of sun-pointing collectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for deriving an algorithm for analytically calculating shading of sun-pointing solar collectors by other identical collectors in the field. The method is particularly suited to regularly-spaced collectors, with convex aperture shapes. Using this method, an algorithm suitable for circular-aperture collectors is derived. The algorithm is validated against results obtained using an existing algorithm, and an example for usage of the algorithm as a tool for validating assumptions of an existing algorithm is presented. (author)

Meller, Yosef [Tel Aviv University, Faculty of Engineering, School of Mechanical Engineering, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Monotone and Conservative Cascade Remapping between Spherical Grids (CaRS): Regular LatitudeLongitude and Cubed-Sphere Grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-order monotone and conservative cascade remapping algorithm between spherical grids (CaRS) is developed. This algorithm is specifically designed to remap between the cubed-sphere and regular latitudelongitude grids. The remapping approach ...

Peter H. Lauritzen; Ramachandran D. Nair

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Assessing performance : an analytical framework for the San Jos McEnery Convention Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study first outlines three major factors that limit the assessments of convention centers: high uncertainty in the convention industry, complex institutional structures and operational priorities, and plethora of ...

Lee, Kai-yan, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

An investigation of temporal regularization techniques for dynamic PET reconstructions using temporal splines  

SciTech Connect

The use of a temporal B-spline basis for the reconstruction of dynamic positron emission tomography data was investigated. Maximum likelihood (ML) reconstructions using an expectation maximization framework and maximum A-posteriori (MAP) reconstructions using the generalized expectation maximization framework were evaluated. Different parameters of the B-spline basis of such as order, number of basis functions and knot placing were investigated in a reconstruction task using simulated dynamic list-mode data. We found that a higher order basis reduced both the bias and variance. Using a higher number of basis functions in the modeling of the time activity curves (TACs) allowed the algorithm to model faster changes of the TACs, however, the TACs became noisier. We have compared ML, Gaussian postsmoothed ML and MAP reconstructions. The noise level in the ML reconstructions was controlled by varying the number of basis functions. The MAP algorithm penalized the integrated squared curvature of the reconstructed TAC. The postsmoothed ML was always outperformed in terms of bias and variance properties by the MAP and ML reconstructions. A simple adaptive knot placing strategy was also developed and evaluated. It is based on an arc length redistribution scheme during the reconstruction. The free knot reconstruction allowed a more accurate reconstruction while reducing the noise level especially for fast changing TACs such as blood input functions. Limiting the number of temporal basis functions combined with the adaptive knot placing strategy is in this case advantageous for regularization purposes when compared to the other regularization techniques.

Verhaeghe, Jeroen; D'Asseler, Yves; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Staelens, Steven; Lemahieu, Ignace [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, Medical Image and Signal Processing Group, Ghent University, Ghent, 9000 (Belgium)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

Urban modeling based on segmentation and regularization of airborne lidar point clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an approach to process raw lidar 3-D point clouds over urban area and extract terrain, buildings and other urban features. In the initial step, non-ground points are separated from ground points using a one dimensional filtering process based on the slope between two consecutive points in the point cloud and the terrain elevation in the vicinity of the points. In the next step, the non-ground point dataset is processed to segment individual buildings. This is accomplished by using a 3-D regional growing approach. At the end of this step, each lidar point is attributed to a building. The first step towards building reconstruction is to obtain an approximate footprint of the building, which is accomplished by extracting the points on the building boundary by a modified convex hull algorithm. Once the footprint boundary points are found, their edges are regularized by using a least squares model to form the final building shape. Mathematic formulation of 3D region growing and boundary regularization is presented. Tests results of reconstructed buildings over complex urban areas are reported. 1.

Aparajithan Sampath; Jie Shan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Feasibility of Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Recovery in Conventional Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Thermoelectric (TE) generators convert heat directly into electricity when a temperature gradient is applied across junctions of two dissimilar metals. The devices could increase the fuel economy of conventional vehicles by recapturing part of the waste heat from engine exhaust and generating electricity to power accessory loads. A simple vehicle and engine waste heat model showed that a Class 8 truck presents the least challenging requirements for TE system efficiency, mass, and cost; these trucks have a fairly high amount of exhaust waste heat, have low mass sensitivity, and travel many miles per year. These factors help maximize fuel savings and economic benefits. A driving/duty cycle analysis shows strong sensitivity of waste heat, and thus TE system electrical output, to vehicle speed and driving cycle. With a typical alternator, a TE system could allow electrification of 8%-15% of a Class 8 truck's accessories for 2%-3% fuel savings. More research should reduce system cost and improve economics.

Smith, K.; Thornton, M.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Hybrid and conventional hydrogen engine vehicles that meet EZEV emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, a time-dependent engine model is used for predicting hydrogen engine efficiency and emissions. The model uses basic thermodynamic equations for the compression and expansion processes, along with an empirical correlation for heat transfer, to predict engine indicated efficiency. A friction correlation and a supercharger/turbocharger model are then used to calculate brake thermal efficiency. The model is validated with many experimental points obtained in a recent evaluation of a hydrogen research engine. A The validated engine model is then used to calculate fuel economy and emissions for three hydrogen-fueled vehicles: a conventional, a parallel hybrid, and a series hybrid. All vehicles use liquid hydrogen as a fuel. The hybrid vehicles use a flywheel for energy storage. Comparable ultra capacitor or battery energy storage performance would give similar results. This paper analyzes the engine and flywheel sizing requirements for obtaining a desired level of performance. The results indicate that hydrogen lean-burn spark-ignited engines can provide a high fuel economy and Equivalent Zero Emission Vehicle (EZEV) levels in the three vehicle configurations being analyzed.

Aceves, S.M.; Smith, J.R.

1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NUCLEAR-CONVENTIONAL POWER PLANT COST STUDY CONVENTIONAL COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS, 25,000 KW TO 325,000 KW, FOR ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY, LEMONT, ILLINOIS  

SciTech Connect

In order to establish a basis for comparing the estimated cost of nuclear power plant designs, a set of general and detailed design considerations for conventional coal-fired power plants was established. Five preliminary designs of conventional coal-fired power plants ranging in size from 25to 325 mw were selected, and cost estimates were prepared. ( A.C.)

Chittenden, W.A.

1959-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This is the first National Report prepared under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Managementi hereafter referred to as the "Joint Convention". This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel and radioactive waste management facilities within the United States of America (U.S.). National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management - May 2003

223

Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This second National Report updates the first National Report published on May 3, 2003, under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (Joint Convention). This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel (SF) and radioactive waste management facilities within the United States of America (U.S.). Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel

224

Influence of the adatom diffusion on selective growth of GaN nanowire regular arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on patterned Si/AlN/Si(111) substrates was used to obtain regular arrays of uniform-size GaN nanowires (NWs). The silicon top layer has been patterned with e-beam lithography, resulting in uniform arrays of holes with different diameters (d{sub h}) and periods (P). While the NW length is almost insensitive to the array parameters, the diameter increases significantly with d{sub h} and P till it saturates at P values higher than 800 nm. A diffusion induced model was used to explain the experimental results with an effective diffusion length of the adatoms on the Si, estimated to be about 400 nm.

Gotschke, T.; Schumann, T.; Limbach, F.; Calarco, R. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Research Centre Juelich GmbH and JARA-Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (FIT), 52425 Juelich (Germany); Paul-Drude-Institut fuer Festkoerperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Stoica, T. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Research Centre Juelich GmbH and JARA-Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (FIT), 52425 Juelich (Germany)

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

225

Expanding Conventional Seismic Stratigrphy into the Multicomponent Seismic Domain  

SciTech Connect

Multicomponent seismic data are composed of three independent vector-based seismic wave modes. These wave modes are, compressional mode (P), and shear modes SV and SH. The three modes are generated using three orthogonal source-displacement vectors and then recorded using three orthogonal vector sensors. The components travel through the earth at differing velocities and directions. The velocities of SH and SV as they travel through the subsurface differ by only a few percent, but the velocities of SV and SH (Vs) are appreciably lower than the P-wave velocity (Vp). The velocity ratio Vp/Vs varies by an order of magnitude in the earth from a value of 15 to 1.5 depending on the degree of sedimentary lithification. The data used in this study were acquired by nine-component (9C) vertical seismic profile (VSP), using three orthogonal vector sources. The 9C vertical seismic profile is capable of generating P-wave mode and the fundamental S-wave mode (SH-SH and SV-SV) directly at the source station and permits the basic components of elastic wavefield (P, SH-SH and SV-SV) to be separated from one another for the purposes of imaging. Analysis and interpretations of data from the study area show that incident full-elastic seismic wavefield is capable of reflecting four different wave modes, P, SH , SV and C which can be utilized to fully understand the architecture and heterogeneities of geologic sequences. The conventional seismic stratigraphy utilizes only reflected P-wave modes. The notation SH mode is the same as SH-SH; SV mode means SV-SV and C mode which is a converted shear wave is a special SV mode and is the same as P-SV. These four wave modes image unique geologic stratigraphy and facies and at the same time reflect independent stratal surfaces because of the unique orientation of their particle-displacement vectors. As a result of the distinct orientation of individual mode's particle-displacement vector, one mode may react to a critical subsurface sequence more than the other. It was also observed that P-wave and S-wave do not always reflect from the same stratal boundaries. The utilization of full-elastic seismic wavefield needs to be maximized in oil and gas explorations in order to optimize the search for hydrocarbons.

Innocent Aluka

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This Fourth United States of America (U.S.) National Report updates the Third Report published in October 2008, under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (Joint Convention). This report reflects developments in the U.S. through June 2011. This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel and radioactive waste management facilities within the U.S.

227

Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This Third United States National Report updates the second National Report published in October 2005, under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management 1(Joint Convention). This report reflects developments in the United States through September 2008. This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel and radioactive waste management facilities within

228

THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING WITH LEGAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING WITH LEGAL LIABILITY AND COMPENSATION FOR NUCLEAR DAMAGE THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING WITH LEGAL LIABILITY AND COMPENSATION FOR NUCLEAR DAMAGE The adoption of the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (Compensation Convention) opens a new chapter in international nuclear liability law. The Compensation Convention provides the world community with the opportunity to deal with legal liability and compensation for nuclear damage through a global regime that includes all countries that operate nuclear powerplants (nuclear power generating countries) and most countries that do not operate nuclear powerplants (nonnuclear power generating countries). Such a global regime can remove

229

National American Indian Housing Council 38th Annual Convention and Trade Show  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The National American Indian Housing Council's (NAIHCs) most longstanding annual event, the Annual Convention & Trade Show is an opportunity to learn about Indian housing, attend training...

230

Gratification obtained from television shows on Internet TV and conventional TV.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Television shows once available only on conventional TV in homes at specific days and times are now available via Internet TV in nearly any location, (more)

Li, Nai-Se

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Public Comment re NOI on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

ENERGYSOLUTIONS' Comment in Response to Notice of Inquiry, Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation -75 FR 43945

232

Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, Section 934  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

LES comments in response to Notice of Inquiry on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, Section 934

233

Fossil energy use in conventional and low-external-input cropping systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The production of fossil fuels will crest within the next decade and with reliance of modern conventional agriculture on fossil fuel energy inputs, food production (more)

Cruse, Michael James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Producing Gas-Oil Ratio Performance of Conventional and Unconventional Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This study presents a detailed analysis of producing gas-oil ratio performance characteristics from conventional reservoir to unconventional reservoir. Numerical simulations of various reservoir fluid (more)

Lei, Guowen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Levi-Civita regularization and geodesic flows for the `curved' Kepler problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce the regularization Levi-Civita parameter for the `curved Kepler', i.e., motion under the `Kepler-Coulomb' potential in a configuration space with any constant curvature and metric of any signature type. Consistent use of this parameter allows to solve the problem of motion (orbit shape and time evolution along the orbit), thereby extending the use of the Levi-Civita parameter beyond the usual Kepler problem in a flat Euclidean configuration space. A `universal' description, where all relations are applicable to the motions in any space and with any energy follow from our approach, with no need to discuss separately the cases where the configuration space is flat or where energy vanishes. We also discuss the connection of this `curved Kepler' problem with a geodesic flow. The well known results by Moser, Osipov and Belbruno are shown to hold essentially unchanged beyond the flat Euclidean configuration space. `Curved' Kepler motions with a fixed value of the constant of motion $\\sigma:=-(2E - \\kappa_1\\kappa_2 J^2)$ on any curved configuration space with constant curvature $\\kappa_1$ and metric of signature type $\\kappa_2$ can be identified with the geodesic flow on a space with curvature $\\sigma$ and metric of the same signature type.

Leonor Garcia-Gutierrez; Mariano Santander

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

236

FLIC: A translator for same-source parallel implementation of regular grid applications  

SciTech Connect

FLIC, a Fortran loop and index converter, is a parser-based source translation tool that automates the conversion of program loops and array indices for distributed-memory parallel computers. This conversion is important in the implementation of gridded models on distributed memory because it allows for decomposition and shrinking of model data structures. FLIC does not provide the parallel services itself, but rather provides an automated and transparent mapping of the source code to calls or directives of the user`s choice of run-time systems or parallel libraries. The amount of user-supplied input required by FLIC to direct the conversion is small enough to fit as command line arguments for the tool. The tool requires no additional statements, comments, or directives in the source code, thus avoiding the pervasiveness and intrusiveness imposed by directives-based preprocessors and parallelizing compilers. FLIC is lightweight and suitable for use as a precompiler and facilitates a same-source approach to operability on diverse computer architectures. FLIC is targeted to new or existing applications that employ regular gridded domains, such as weather models, that will be parallelized by data-domain decomposition.

Michalakes, J.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Conventional Facilities Chapter 6: HVAC Systems 6-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional Facilities Chapter 6: HVAC Systems 6-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report 6 MECHANICAL ­ HVAC SYSTEMS 6.1 Design Criteria 6.1.1 Codes and Standards The latest edition of the codes, standards have adequate capacity and head, no chilled water pumps #12;Conventional Facilities Chapter 6: HVAC

Ohta, Shigemi

238

Reducing Energy Usage of NULL Convention Logic Circuits using NULL Cycle Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in approximately 25% overall lower energy usage. Keywords: asynchronous circuits; NULL Convention Logic (NCL); NULLReducing Energy Usage of NULL Convention Logic Circuits using NULL Cycle Reduction Combined with Supply Voltage Scaling Brett Sparkman and Scott C. Smith Department of Electrical Engineering, University

Smith, Scott C.

239

Quantum Structure of Field Theory and Standard Model Based on Infinity-free Loop Regularization/Renormalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To understand better the quantum structure of field theory and standard model in particle physics, it is necessary to investigate carefully the divergence structure in quantum field theories (QFTs) and work out a consistent framework to avoid infinities. The divergence has got us into trouble since developing quantum electrodynamics in 1930s, its treatment via the renormalization scheme is satisfied not by all physicists, like Dirac and Feynman who have made serious criticisms. The renormalization group analysis reveals that QFTs can in general be defined fundamentally with the meaningful energy scale that has some physical significance, which motivates us to develop a new symmetry-preserving and infinity-free regularization scheme called loop regularization (LORE). A simple regularization prescription in LORE is realized based on a manifest postulation that a loop divergence with a power counting dimension larger than and equal to the space-time dimension must vanish. The LORE method is achieved without modifying original theory and leads the divergent Feynman loop integrals well-defined to maintain the divergence structure and meanwhile preserve basic symmetries of original theory. The crucial point in LORE is the presence of two intrinsic energy scales which play the roles of ultraviolet cut-off $M_c$ and infrared cut-off $\\mu_s$ to avoid infinities. The key concept in LORE is the introduction of irreducible loop integrals (ILIs) on which the regularization prescription acts, which leads to a set of gauge invariance consistency conditions between the regularized tensor-type and scalar-type ILIs. The evaluation of ILIs with ultraviolet-divergence-preserving (UVDP) parametrization naturally leads to Bjorken-Drell's analogy between Feynman diagrams and electric circuits. The LORE method has been shown to be applicable to both underlying and effective QFTs.

Yue-Liang Wu

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

240

Full length article: Multiresolution wavelet denoising for ultra-wideband time-of-arrival estimation with regularized least squares  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improving accuracy in wireless localization and ranging is a challenging task which often demands an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Impulsive ultra-wideband (UWB) technology is a promising signaling alternative that is capable of high-resolution ... Keywords: Channel estimation, Discrete wavelet transform (DWT), Impulse radio (IR), Ranging, Regularized least squares (RLS), Time-of-arrival (ToA) estimation, Ultra-wideband (UWB), Wavelet denoising (WD)

Ted C. -K. Liu; Xiaodai Dong; Wu-Sheng Lu

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Impact of Conventional Surface Data upon VAS Regression Retrievals in the Lower Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface temperature and dewpoint reports are added to the infrared radiances from the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) in order to improve the retrieval of temperature and moisture profiles in the lower troposphere. The conventional (airways) ...

Tay-How Lee; Dennis Chesters; Anthony Mostek

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Errors in Fixed and Moving Frame of References: Applications for Conventional and Doppler Radar Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Procedures for the estimation and correction of advection effects with single and multiple conventional and Doppler radars are developed. In the case of scalars or Cartesian vectors, the essence of the method is finding a moving frame of ...

Tzvi Gal-Chen

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

A Spectral Approach to the Unification of Satellite and Conventional Temperature Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method to combine temperature soundings derived from VAS radiance observations with conventional data is proposed. Unlike similar previous attempts, only a portion of the signal contained in the VAS temperature soundings was combined with ...

Kyung-Sup Shin; James R. Scoggins

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation on Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Comments by the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) on Convention on Supplementary Compensation on Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation; Section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007

245

Exploratory Analysis of the Difference between Temperature Observations Recorded by ASOS and Conventional Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Automated Surface Observing System is currently replacing conventional observations at the National Weather Service, the Federal Aviation Administration, and other stations that report hourly observations. From a climatological viewpoint, it ...

Nathaniel B. Guttman; C. Bruce Baker

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Conventions for the use of the Session Description Protocol (SDP) for ATM Bearer Connections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes conventions for using the Session Description Protocol (SDP) described in RFC 2327 for controlling ATM Bearer Connections, and any associated ATM Adaptation Layer (AAL). The AALs addressed are Type 1, Type 2 and Type 5. This ...

R. Kumar; M. Mostafa

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Agency for Non conventional Energy and Rural Technology ANERT | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Non conventional Energy and Rural Technology ANERT Non conventional Energy and Rural Technology ANERT Jump to: navigation, search Name Agency for Non-conventional Energy and Rural Technology (ANERT) Place Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India Zip 695004 Product Kerala state's nodal agency responsible for identification, promotion and development of non-conventional energy sources. Coordinates 8.50838°, 76.94773° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":8.50838,"lon":76.94773,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

248

Modelling the costs of non-conventional oil: A case study of Canadian bitumen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in conventional deposits. The longer- term problem of climate change arises from the fuller and longer-term use of coal, and of unconventional deposits such as heavy oils, tar sands and oil shales. (Grubb, 2001) As conventional oil becomes scarcer, the transport... , it is not mobile at reservoir conditions, (Cupcic, 2003): density Oil shale is a fine-grained sedimentary rock rich in organic matter, (USGS, 2005): oil shales contain kerogen, which is a solid, insoluble organic material...

Mjean, A; Hope, Chris

249

How parameters and regularization affect the Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model phase diagram and thermodynamic quantities  

SciTech Connect

We explore the phase diagram and the critical behavior of QCD thermodynamic quantities in the context of the so-called Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. We show that this improved field theoretical model is a successful candidate for studying the equation of state and the critical behavior around the critical endpoint. We argue that a convenient choice of the model parameters is crucial to get the correct description of isentropic trajectories. The effects of the regularization procedure in several thermodynamic quantities is also analyzed. The results are compared with simple thermodynamic expectations and lattice data.

Costa, P. [Centro de Fisica Computacional, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, P-3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal) and E.S.T.G., Instituto Politecnico de Leiria, Morro do Lena-Alto do Vieiro, 2411-901 Leiria (Portugal); Hansen, H. [IPNL, Universite de Lyon/Universite Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue E.Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Ruivo, M. C.; Sousa, C. A. de [Centro de Fisica Computacional, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, P-3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

,"Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes" Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes",60,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refmg_a_epm0u_vtr_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refmg_a_epm0u_vtr_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

251

B3.6 SWCX for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Project and Conventional Lab Operations-  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 SWCX for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Project and Conventional Lab Operations- 6 SWCX for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Project and Conventional Lab Operations- Revision 0 Sitewide Categorical Exclusion for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations Introduction LAs defined in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office Integrated Management System Procedure, NEPA Analysis at Hanford, a sitewide categorical exclusion is: An application of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10 CFR 1021, Appendices A and B, which may apply to Hanford Site proposed actions (activities) that are "sitewide" in nature and extent, ·which the cognizant DOE Hanford NCO has determined fit \Vithin the scope (i.e., same nature and intent, and of the same or lesser scope) of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10

252

Cost comparison of solar detoxification with conventional alternatives for the destruction of trichloroethylene  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to compare the cost of solar waste detoxification processes with conventional alternatives for the treatment of trichloroethylene (TCE) in air. The solar processes that were evaluated are high flux photothermal oxidation (PHOTOX), high flux thermal catalytic reforming (SOLTOX), and low flux photocatalytic oxidation (PHOCAT). The high flux processes, PHOTOX and SOLTOX, were based on dish concentrator technology. The low flux photocatalytic process was based on parabolic trough concentrating technology. The conventional alternatives are thermal oxidation, thermal catalytic oxidation, off-site carbon regeneration, and on-site solvent recovery. Analysis of the seven processes showed PHOCAT to be the most economical treatment method. PHOTOX showed slightly better economics relative to SOLTOX. Both were competitive, with the best conventional destruction process, thermal oxidation. Off-site carbon regeneration was the most expensive treatment method. 9 refs., 7 figs.

Glatzmaier, G.C.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Residential wood burning: Energy modeling and conventional fuel displacement in a national sample  

SciTech Connect

This research studied the natural, built, and behavioral factors predictive of energy consumption for residential space heating with wood or conventional fuels. This study was a secondary analysis of survey data from a nationwide representative sample of 5,682 households collected DOE in the 1984-1985 REC survey. Included were: weather, census division and utility data, interviewer-supplied dwelling measurements and respondent-reported energy-related family behaviors. Linear-regression procedures were used to develop a model that identified key determinants accounting for the variability in wood consumption. A nonlinear-regression model was employed to estimate the amount of conventional fuels used for space heating. The model was also used to estimate the amount of conventional fuels being displaced by wood-heating systems. There was a significant (p {le} .05) linear relationship between the dependent variable, square root of cords burned, various independent variables.

Warsco, K.S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

,"U.S. Conventional, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conventional, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices" Conventional, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Conventional, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_refmg2_c_nus_epm0u_dpgal_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_refmg2_c_nus_epm0u_dpgal_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

255

,"U.S. Conventional Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conventional Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes" Conventional Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Conventional Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refmg_c_nus_epm0u_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refmg_c_nus_epm0u_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

256

Hypofractionated Versus Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Prostate Carcinoma: Final Results of Phase III Randomized Trial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the long-term efficacy and toxicity of a hypofractionated (55 Gy in 20 fractions within 4 weeks) vs. a conventionally fractionated (64 Gy in 32 fractions within 6.5 weeks) dose schedule for radiotherapy (RT) for localized carcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: A total of 217 patients were randomized to either the hypofractionated (n = 108) or the conventional (n = 109) dose schedule. Most patients (n = 156) underwent RT planning and RT using a two-dimensional computed tomography method. Efficacy using the clinical, radiologic, and prostate-specific antigen data in each patient was evaluated before RT and at predetermined intervals after RT until death. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity using the modified Late Effect in Normal Tissue - Subjective Objective Management Analytic (LENT-SOMA) scales was also evaluated before and at intervals after RT to 60 months. Results: The whole group has now been followed for a median of 90 months (range, 3-138). Of the 217 patients, 85 developed biochemical relapse (nadir prostate-specific antigen level + 2 {mu}g/L), 36 in the hypofractionated and 49 in the conventional group. The biochemical relapse-free, but not overall, survival at 90 months was significantly better with the hypofractionated (53%) than with the conventional (34%) schedule. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity persisted 60 months after RT and did not differ between the two dose schedules. Multivariate analyses revealed that the conventional schedule was of independent prognostic significance, not only for biochemical failure, but also for an increased risk of worse genitourinary symptoms at 4 years. Conclusions: A therapeutic advantage of the hypofractionated compared with the conventional dose schedule for RT of prostate cancer was evident at 90 months in the present study.

Yeoh, Eric E., E-mail: eric.yeoh@health.sa.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Botten, Rochelle J.; Butters, Julie; Di Matteo, Addolorata C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Holloway, Richard H. [Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Fowler, Jack [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Conventional Hydropower Technologies (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Power Water Power Program supports the development of technologies that harness the nation's renewable hydropower resources to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity. Most conventional hydropower plants use a diver- sion structure, such as a dam, to capture water's potential energy via a turbine for electricity generation. The program's conventional hydropower activities focus on increasing generating capacity and efficiency at existing hydroelectric facilities, adding hydroelectric generating capacity to exist- ing non-powered dams, adding new low impact hydropower, increasing advanced pumped-storage hydropower capacity, and reducing potential environmental impacts of conven- tional hydropower production. The program's research and

258

Residential heating costs: a comparison of geothermal, solar and conventional resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The costs of residential heating throughout the United States using conventional, solar, and geothermal energy were determined under current and projected conditions. These costs are very sensitive to location - being dependent on the local prices of conventional energy supplies, local solar insolation, cimate, and the proximity and temperature of potential geothermal resources. The sharp price increases in imported fuels during 1979 and the planned decontrol of domestic oil and natural gas prices have set the stage for geothermal and solar market penetration in the 1980's.

Bloomster, C.H.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

NV Energy Solar Integration Study: Cycling and Movements of Conventional Generators for Balancing Services  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With an increasing penetration level of solar power in the southern Nevada system, the impact of solar on system operations needs to be carefully studied from various perspectives. Qualitatively, it is expected that the balancing requirements to compensate for solar power variability will be larger in magnitude; meanwhile, generators providing load following and regulation services will be moved up or down more frequently. One of the most important tasks is to quantitatively evaluate the cycling and movements of conventional generators with solar power at different penetration levels. This study is focused on developing effective methodologies for this goal and providing a basis for evaluating the wear and tear of the conventional generators

Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Ma, Jian; Makarov, Yuri V.; Guo, Xinxin

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Conventional Natural Gas Power Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This research provides a systematic review and harmonization of the life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of electricity generated from conventionally produced natural gas. We focus on estimates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted in the life cycle of electricity generation from conventionally produced natural gas in combustion turbines (NGCT) and combined-cycle (NGCC) systems. A process we term "harmonization" was employed to align several common system performance parameters and assumptions to better allow for cross-study comparisons, with the goal of clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. This presentation summarizes preliminary results.

Heath, G.; O'Donoughue, P.; Whitaker, M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Regular pattern formation through the retraction and pinch-off of edges during solid-state dewetting of patterned single crystal films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the formation of regular patterns of metal lines via solid-state dewetting of lithographically patterned single-crystal Ni(110) films with square and cross shapes. During the solid-state dewetting, valleys develop ...

Ye, Jongpil

262

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 119,409 126,351 129,240 138,077 140,629 120,215 1,091,914 1,106,473 1.7 Regular 107,403 113,871 116,502 123,871 126,317 107,784 991,801 996,970 0.9 Conventional 107,403 113,871 116,502 123,871 126,317 107,784 991,801 996,970 0.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,280 1,320 1,356 1,530 1,491 1,224 11,852 11,699 -0.9 Conventional 1,280 1,320 1,356 1,530 1,491 1,224 11,852 11,699 -0.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,726 11,160 11,382 12,676 12,821 11,207 88,261 97,804 11.2 Conventional 10,726 11,160 11,382 12,676 12,821 11,207 88,261 97,804 11.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

263

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 103,710 107,583 128,992 122,068 133,706 136,216 727,503 732,275 0.1 Regular 87,146 89,279 112,686 106,242 115,310 117,202 598,517 627,865 4.3 Conventional 47,766 48,793 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 39,380 40,486 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – W – NA Midgrade 6,076 6,783 6,276 5,802 6,492 6,793 50,651 38,222 -25.0 Conventional 3,128 3,568 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,948 3,215 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,488 11,521 10,030 10,024 11,904 12,221 W 66,188 NA Conventional 5,684 6,316 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,804 5,205 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

264

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 133,706 137,219 136,075 139,236 130,776 128,461 1,295,616 1,267,826 -2.5 Regular 115,310 117,700 117,117 118,534 113,616 111,521 1,079,234 1,089,151 0.6 Conventional W W W W W 82,755 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 28,766 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,492 6,744 6,728 7,311 6,170 6,296 81,920 64,678 -21.3 Conventional W W W W W 4,406 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 1,890 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,904 12,775 12,230 13,391 10,990 10,644 134,462 113,997 -15.5 Conventional W W W W W 7,778 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 2,866 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

265

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 121,599 126,592 126,169 141,479 140,449 137,146 1,173,202 1,140,517 -3.1 Regular 107,152 113,569 111,791 124,284 123,026 121,321 1,018,510 1,004,959 -1.7 Conventional W W W W W 93,225 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,106 3,739 3,923 4,403 4,610 4,305 47,837 38,143 -20.6 Conventional W W W W W 3,682 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,341 9,284 10,455 12,792 12,813 11,520 106,855 97,415 -9.2 Conventional W W W W W 9,730 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

266

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 115,008 129,009 135,752 132,774 149,898 146,040 1,057,561 1,034,025 -2.2 Regular 102,049 114,076 117,825 114,646 128,881 126,677 904,267 896,639 -0.8 Conventional W 98,123 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W 15,953 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,397 4,632 5,351 5,367 6,079 5,748 49,203 42,984 -12.6 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,562 10,301 12,576 12,761 14,938 13,615 104,091 94,402 -9.3 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

267

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 496,452 488,936 430,725 477,184 488,726 508,061 2,376,555 2,393,632 1.4 Regular 445,406 439,340 387,401 428,557 437,307 450,215 2,130,982 2,142,820 1.2 Conventional 89,443 92,274 83,145 88,943 93,114 96,168 398,967 453,644 14.5 Reformulated 355,963 347,066 304,256 339,614 344,193 354,047 1,732,015 1,689,176 -1.8 Midgrade 8,190 7,994 7,243 7,978 7,840 8,951 40,963 40,006 -1.7 Conventional 903 921 836 886 867 1,111 4,252 4,621 9.4 Reformulated 7,287 7,073 6,407 7,092 6,973 7,840 36,711 35,385 -3.0 Premium 42,856 41,602 36,081 40,649 43,579 48,895 204,610 210,806 3.7 Conventional 4,150 4,510 3,841 4,051 5,033 5,533 20,695 22,968 11.7

268

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 106,552 112,818 127,713 121,599 126,592 126,169 738,087 721,443 -2.8 Regular 92,915 98,586 112,315 107,152 113,569 111,791 641,081 636,328 -1.3 Conventional W 61,721 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W 36,865 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,270 4,425 4,362 4,106 3,739 3,923 31,157 24,825 -20.8 Conventional 2,157 2,245 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,113 2,180 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,367 9,807 11,036 10,341 9,284 10,455 65,849 60,290 -8.9 Conventional W 5,377 9,727 W W W W W NA Oxygenated W 4,430 1,309 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

269

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 555,511 521,124 527,101 509,281 530,764 461,105 504,188 461,105 -8.5 Regular 496,300 466,275 472,106 456,590 476,567 414,239 452,854 414,239 -8.5 Conventional 103,140 92,473 90,578 83,269 85,583 77,162 87,933 77,162 -12.2 Reformulated 393,160 373,802 381,528 373,321 390,984 337,077 364,921 337,077 -7.6 Midgrade 10,283 9,258 9,110 8,696 8,813 7,806 9,657 7,806 -19.2 Conventional 1,439 1,091 965 882 905 832 1,073 832 -22.5 Reformulated 8,844 8,167 8,145 7,814 7,908 6,974 8,584 6,974 -18.8 Premium 48,928 45,591 45,885 43,995 45,384 39,060 41,677 39,060 -6.3 Conventional 7,090 5,477 5,106 4,337 4,314 3,926 4,769 3,926 -17.7

270

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 113,339 129,220 103,710 107,583 128,992 122,057 485,992 462,342 -5.7 Regular 93,150 106,433 87,146 89,279 112,686 106,233 400,133 395,344 -2.0 Conventional 53,121 58,414 47,766 48,793 W W W W NA Oxygenated 40,029 48,019 39,380 40,486 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – W – NA Midgrade 7,437 8,430 6,076 6,783 6,276 5,802 33,765 24,937 -26.8 Conventional 3,943 4,377 3,128 3,568 W W W W NA Oxygenated 3,494 4,053 2,948 3,215 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,752 14,357 10,488 11,521 10,030 10,022 W 42,061 NA Conventional 7,016 7,564 5,684 6,316 W W W W NA Oxygenated 5,736 6,793 4,804 5,205 W W W W NA

271

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 131,902 130,122 116,547 121,960 106,552 112,814 225,544 219,366 -4.4 Regular 114,896 112,836 100,676 105,782 92,915 98,582 192,485 191,497 -2.2 Conventional W 85,371 61,541 W W 61,717 119,723 W NA Oxygenated W 27,465 39,135 W W 36,865 72,762 W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,965 5,059 4,888 4,985 4,270 4,425 11,410 8,695 -25.1 Conventional W 3,614 2,496 2,445 2,157 2,245 7,291 4,402 -40.6 Oxygenated W 1,445 2,392 2,540 2,113 2,180 4,119 4,293 2.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,041 12,227 10,983 11,193 9,367 9,807 21,649 19,174 -12.9 Conventional W 9,096 6,224 W W 5,377 12,852 W NA

272

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 116,937 123,361 112,056 110,080 126,845 126,596 473,447 475,577 0.4 Regular 105,946 112,014 101,850 99,730 115,120 115,029 429,613 431,729 0.5 Conventional 105,946 112,014 101,850 99,730 115,120 115,029 429,613 431,729 0.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,727 1,817 1,577 1,542 1,756 1,690 6,854 6,565 -4.2 Conventional 1,727 1,817 1,577 1,542 1,756 1,690 6,854 6,565 -4.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,264 9,530 8,629 8,808 9,969 9,877 36,980 37,283 0.8 Conventional 9,264 9,530 8,629 8,808 9,969 9,877 36,980 37,283 0.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

273

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 114,483 117,639 115,793 109,751 115,008 123,438 497,821 463,990 -6.8 Regular 96,041 99,099 98,040 94,445 102,049 108,904 427,645 403,438 -5.7 Conventional 59,921 61,268 60,258 59,465 W W W W NA Oxygenated 36,120 37,831 37,782 34,980 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,121 6,193 5,943 5,467 4,397 4,764 23,473 20,571 -12.4 Conventional 3,531 3,743 3,737 3,554 W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,590 2,450 2,206 1,913 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,321 12,347 11,810 9,839 8,562 9,770 46,703 39,981 -14.4 Conventional 7,264 7,339 6,945 5,907 W W W W NA Oxygenated 5,057 5,008 4,865 3,932 W W W W NA

274

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 129,009 135,752 132,774 149,898 143,203 131,902 1,185,472 1,163,090 -1.9 Regular 114,076 117,825 114,646 128,881 124,038 114,896 1,012,987 1,008,896 -0.4 Conventional 98,123 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 15,953 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,632 5,351 5,367 6,079 5,748 4,965 55,269 47,949 -13.2 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,301 12,576 12,761 14,938 13,417 12,041 117,216 106,245 -9.4 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

275

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 141,479 140,449 137,146 123,384 123,443 132,860 1,541,831 1,520,204 -1.7 Regular 124,284 123,026 121,321 108,630 108,923 116,374 1,337,804 1,338,886 -0.2 Conventional W W 93,225 80,733 66,084 71,013 W W NA Oxygenated W W NA NA 42,839 45,361 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,403 4,610 4,305 4,157 4,294 4,477 62,769 51,071 -18.9 Conventional W W 3,682 2,831 2,131 2,141 W W NA Oxygenated W W NA 1,326 2,163 2,336 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,792 12,813 11,520 10,597 10,226 12,009 141,258 130,247 -8.0 Conventional W W 9,730 7,507 5,628 6,834 W W NA Oxygenated W W NA 3,090 4,598 5,175 W W NA

276

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 121,960 106,552 112,818 127,713 121,599 126,564 605,313 595,246 -2.3 Regular 105,782 92,915 98,586 112,315 107,152 113,546 526,435 524,514 -1.0 Conventional W W 61,721 W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W 36,865 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,985 4,270 4,425 4,362 4,106 3,734 25,790 20,897 -19.5 Conventional 2,445 2,157 2,245 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,540 2,113 2,180 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,193 9,367 9,807 11,036 10,341 9,284 53,088 49,835 -6.7 Conventional W W 5,377 9,727 W W W W NA Oxygenated W W 4,430 1,309 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

277

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 110,080 126,845 126,596 134,691 134,417 146,382 877,080 891,067 1.6 Regular 99,730 115,120 115,029 121,891 121,352 131,690 793,415 806,662 1.7 Conventional 99,730 115,120 115,029 121,891 121,352 131,690 793,415 806,662 1.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,542 1,756 1,690 1,760 1,750 1,919 12,683 11,994 -5.4 Conventional 1,542 1,756 1,690 1,760 1,750 1,919 12,683 11,994 -5.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,808 9,969 9,877 11,040 11,315 12,773 70,982 72,411 2.0 Conventional 8,808 9,969 9,877 11,040 11,315 12,773 70,982 72,411 2.0 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

278

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 125,271 127,361 115,819 113,187 130,255 126,993 462,353 486,254 6.0 Regular 108,520 109,905 99,816 97,998 111,793 109,367 395,353 418,974 6.9 Conventional 62,396 62,355 55,542 53,186 W W W W NA Oxygenated 46,124 47,550 44,274 44,812 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,420 6,738 5,913 5,424 6,711 6,086 24,937 24,134 -2.4 Conventional 3,840 3,681 3,428 2,863 6,196 W W W NA Oxygenated 2,580 3,057 2,485 2,561 515 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,331 10,718 10,090 9,765 11,751 11,540 42,063 43,146 3.4 Conventional 5,564 5,846 5,492 5,053 10,535 W W W NA Oxygenated 4,767 4,872 4,598 4,712 1,216 W W W NA

279

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 122,068 133,706 137,219 136,075 139,236 130,776 1,168,496 1,139,365 -2.8 Regular 106,242 115,310 117,700 117,117 118,534 113,616 972,177 977,630 0.2 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,802 6,492 6,744 6,728 7,311 6,170 74,458 58,382 -21.9 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,024 11,904 12,775 12,230 13,391 10,990 121,861 103,353 -15.5 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

280

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 127,713 121,599 126,592 126,169 141,479 140,449 1,041,300 1,003,371 -4.0 Regular 112,315 107,152 113,569 111,791 124,284 123,026 903,614 883,638 -2.6 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,362 4,106 3,739 3,923 4,403 4,610 42,872 33,838 -21.4 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,036 10,341 9,284 10,455 12,792 12,813 94,814 85,895 -9.8 Conventional 9,727 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 1,309 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

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281

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,169 141,479 140,449 137,146 123,384 121,162 1,419,871 1,385,063 -2.7 Regular 111,791 124,284 123,026 121,321 108,630 106,804 1,232,022 1,220,393 -1.2 Conventional W W W 93,225 80,733 64,938 W W NA Oxygenated W W W NA NA 41,866 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,923 4,403 4,610 4,305 4,157 4,284 57,784 46,584 -19.6 Conventional W W W 3,682 2,831 2,130 W W NA Oxygenated W W W NA 1,326 2,154 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,455 12,792 12,813 11,520 10,597 10,074 130,065 118,086 -9.5 Conventional W W W 9,730 7,507 5,559 W W NA Oxygenated W W W NA 3,090 4,515 W W NA

282

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 124,695 128,129 139,212 139,507 142,185 127,373 1,195,427 1,155,359 -3.4 Regular 112,510 115,823 125,667 124,434 126,339 113,384 1,074,003 1,035,130 -3.6 Conventional 112,510 115,823 125,667 124,434 126,339 113,384 W 1,035,130 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,958 2,859 3,031 3,341 3,503 2,965 31,059 27,915 -10.1 Conventional 2,958 2,859 3,031 3,341 3,503 2,965 W 27,915 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,227 9,447 10,514 11,732 12,343 11,024 90,365 92,314 2.2 Conventional 9,227 9,447 10,514 11,732 12,343 11,024 W 92,314 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

283

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 122,936 133,205 139,935 139,701 142,976 125,846 1,131,379 1,167,604 3.6 Regular 110,833 118,938 124,805 123,746 127,337 112,893 995,838 1,038,492 4.7 Conventional W 99,124 W 103,498 W 91,616 W W NA Oxygenated W 19,814 W 20,248 W 21,277 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,183 3,610 3,716 3,912 3,977 3,371 38,032 33,470 -11.7 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,920 10,657 11,414 12,043 11,662 9,582 97,509 95,642 -1.6 Conventional 7,806 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 1,114 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

284

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 119,409 126,351 129,240 138,077 140,629 120,215 1,091,914 1,106,473 1.7 Regular 107,403 113,871 116,502 123,871 126,317 107,784 991,801 996,970 0.9 Conventional 107,403 113,871 116,502 123,871 126,317 107,784 991,801 996,970 0.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,280 1,320 1,356 1,530 1,491 1,224 11,852 11,699 -0.9 Conventional 1,280 1,320 1,356 1,530 1,491 1,224 11,852 11,699 -0.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,726 11,160 11,382 12,676 12,821 11,207 88,261 97,804 11.2 Conventional 10,726 11,160 11,382 12,676 12,821 11,207 88,261 97,804 11.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

285

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 143,657 132,937 131,479 120,805 126,608 113,004 112,056 113,004 0.8 Regular 129,325 120,067 118,905 109,582 114,523 103,156 101,850 103,156 1.3 Conventional 129,325 120,067 118,905 109,582 114,523 103,156 101,850 103,156 1.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,903 1,721 1,668 1,545 1,739 1,231 1,577 1,231 -21.9 Conventional 1,903 1,721 1,668 1,545 1,739 1,231 1,577 1,231 -21.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,429 11,149 10,906 9,678 10,346 8,617 8,629 8,617 -0.1 Conventional 12,429 11,149 10,906 9,678 10,346 8,617 8,629 8,617 -0.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

286

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 119,493 110,992 117,088 108,674 122,452 125,233 480,923 473,447 -0.7 Regular 108,458 100,387 106,414 98,792 111,102 113,305 436,094 429,613 -0.7 Conventional 108,458 100,387 106,414 98,792 111,102 113,305 436,094 429,613 -0.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,769 1,792 1,666 1,581 1,792 1,815 9,695 6,854 -28.7 Conventional 1,769 1,792 1,666 1,581 1,792 1,815 9,695 6,854 -28.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,266 8,813 9,008 8,301 9,558 10,113 35,134 36,980 6.1 Conventional 9,266 8,813 9,008 8,301 9,558 10,113 35,134 36,980 6.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

287

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 111,114 105,103 116,335 119,409 126,351 129,240 705,523 707,552 0.8 Regular 100,685 95,316 105,221 107,403 113,871 116,502 642,680 638,998 0.0 Conventional 100,685 95,316 105,221 107,403 113,871 116,502 642,680 638,998 0.0 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,145 1,088 1,265 1,280 1,320 1,356 7,530 7,454 -0.5 Conventional 1,145 1,088 1,265 1,280 1,320 1,356 7,530 7,454 -0.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,284 8,699 9,849 10,726 11,160 11,382 55,313 61,100 11.1 Conventional 9,284 8,699 9,849 10,726 11,160 11,382 55,313 61,100 11.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

288

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 135,752 132,774 149,898 143,203 131,902 125,448 1,317,924 1,288,538 -2.2 Regular 117,825 114,646 128,881 124,038 114,896 108,917 1,125,200 1,117,813 -0.7 Conventional W W W W W 86,345 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 22,572 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,351 5,367 6,079 5,748 4,965 4,740 61,812 52,689 -14.8 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,576 12,761 14,938 13,417 12,041 11,791 130,912 118,036 -9.8 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

289

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 118,909 110,150 125,199 124,695 128,129 139,212 767,530 746,294 -2.8 Regular 106,914 97,816 112,243 112,510 115,823 125,667 690,590 670,973 -2.8 Conventional 106,914 97,816 112,243 112,510 115,823 125,667 W 670,973 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,106 3,096 3,056 2,958 2,859 3,031 20,248 18,106 -10.6 Conventional 3,106 3,096 3,056 2,958 2,859 3,031 W 18,106 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,889 9,238 9,900 9,227 9,447 10,514 56,692 57,215 0.9 Conventional 8,889 9,238 9,900 9,227 9,447 10,514 W 57,215 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

290

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 127,703 122,936 133,205 139,935 139,701 142,976 998,548 1,041,758 4.8 Regular 113,498 110,833 118,938 124,805 123,746 127,337 878,533 925,599 5.8 Conventional 91,743 W 99,124 W 103,498 W W W NA Oxygenated 21,755 W 19,814 W 20,248 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,705 3,183 3,610 3,716 3,912 3,977 33,818 30,099 -10.6 Conventional 3,187 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 518 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,500 8,920 10,657 11,414 12,043 11,662 86,197 86,060 0.3 Conventional 8,746 7,806 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated NA 1,114 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

291

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 520,563 494,955 496,452 488,936 430,725 476,239 1,394,949 1,395,900 1.2 Regular 467,394 442,377 445,406 439,340 387,401 427,559 1,253,307 1,254,300 1.2 Conventional 98,631 89,489 89,443 92,274 83,145 88,569 232,570 263,988 14.8 Reformulated 368,763 352,888 355,963 347,066 304,256 338,990 1,020,737 990,312 -1.9 Midgrade 8,844 8,424 8,190 7,994 7,243 7,992 23,623 23,229 -0.6 Conventional 1,015 881 903 921 836 886 2,431 2,643 9.9 Reformulated 7,829 7,543 7,287 7,073 6,407 7,106 21,192 20,586 -1.8 Premium 44,325 44,154 42,856 41,602 36,081 40,688 118,019 118,371 1.4 Conventional 4,696 4,075 4,150 4,510 3,841 4,051 11,814 12,402 6.1

292

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 139,935 139,701 142,976 125,585 133,383 132,214 1,375,367 1,432,940 4.5 Regular 124,805 123,746 127,337 112,647 119,751 117,558 1,210,807 1,275,555 5.7 Conventional W 103,498 W 91,370 82,252 69,032 W W NA Oxygenated W 20,248 W 21,277 37,499 48,526 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,716 3,912 3,977 3,370 3,629 3,715 46,503 40,813 -12.0 Conventional W W W W 2,182 1,558 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 1,447 2,157 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,414 12,043 11,662 9,568 10,003 10,941 118,057 116,572 -1.0 Conventional W W W W 6,316 5,317 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 3,687 5,624 W W NA

293

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 120,530 123,655 110,788 128,326 135,052 144,606 623,613 642,427 3.0 Regular 102,740 105,511 94,520 110,336 117,278 124,693 536,897 552,338 2.9 Conventional 54,646 56,780 53,384 91,767 W W W W NA Oxygenated 48,094 48,731 41,136 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,178 6,168 5,450 6,010 5,845 6,363 30,684 29,836 -2.8 Conventional 3,547 3,392 3,052 5,351 W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,631 2,776 2,398 659 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,612 11,976 10,818 11,980 11,929 13,550 56,032 60,253 7.5 Conventional 6,254 6,016 5,941 10,395 W W W W NA Oxygenated 5,358 5,960 4,877 1,585 W W W W NA

294

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 124,392 117,292 115,606 122,264 125,761 130,716 607,082 611,639 0.1 Regular 112,370 106,132 104,410 111,432 114,120 119,277 545,306 555,371 1.2 Conventional 112,370 106,132 104,410 111,432 114,120 119,277 545,306 555,371 1.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,693 2,570 2,491 2,207 2,427 2,168 15,075 11,863 -21.8 Conventional 2,693 2,570 2,491 2,207 2,427 2,168 15,075 11,863 -21.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,329 8,590 8,705 8,625 9,214 9,271 46,701 44,405 -5.5 Conventional 9,329 8,590 8,705 8,625 9,214 9,271 46,701 44,405 -5.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

295

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 488,936 430,725 477,184 488,726 508,081 505,974 2,896,881 2,899,626 0.6 Regular 439,340 387,401 428,557 437,307 450,215 447,456 2,593,573 2,590,276 0.4 Conventional 92,274 83,145 88,943 93,114 96,168 96,218 497,347 549,862 11.2 Reformulated 347,066 304,256 339,614 344,193 354,047 351,238 2,096,226 2,040,414 -2.1 Midgrade 7,994 7,243 7,978 7,840 8,971 9,185 50,458 49,211 -1.9 Conventional 921 836 886 867 1,110 1,165 5,446 5,785 6.8 Reformulated 7,073 6,407 7,092 6,973 7,861 8,020 45,012 43,426 -3.0 Premium 41,602 36,081 40,649 43,579 48,895 49,333 252,850 260,139 3.5 Conventional 4,510 3,841 4,051 5,033 5,533 6,005 26,640 28,973 9.4

296

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 118,555 116,747 127,703 122,936 133,205 140,007 721,443 759,153 5.8 Regular 104,022 102,420 113,498 110,833 118,938 124,871 636,328 674,582 6.6 Conventional 61,295 61,912 91,743 W 99,124 W W W NA Oxygenated 42,727 40,508 21,755 W 19,814 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,122 3,874 3,705 3,183 3,610 3,716 24,825 22,210 -10.0 Conventional 1,960 1,900 3,187 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,162 1,974 518 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,411 10,453 10,500 8,920 10,657 11,420 60,290 62,361 4.0 Conventional 5,562 5,909 8,746 7,806 W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,849 4,544 NA 1,114 W W W W NA

297

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 515,841 536,199 510,224 545,228 504,188 468,538 960,722 972,726 1.2 Regular 455,816 474,668 453,976 487,995 452,854 420,289 859,766 873,143 1.6 Conventional 92,476 93,958 87,267 92,950 87,933 82,130 162,053 170,063 4.9 Reformulated 363,340 380,710 366,709 395,045 364,921 338,159 697,713 703,080 0.8 Midgrade 10,972 11,173 10,401 10,787 9,657 8,794 20,005 18,451 -7.8 Conventional 1,284 1,244 1,061 1,144 1,073 974 2,129 2,047 -3.9 Reformulated 9,688 9,929 9,340 9,643 8,584 7,820 17,876 16,404 -8.2 Premium 49,053 50,358 45,847 46,446 41,677 39,455 80,951 81,132 0.2 Conventional 6,229 5,648 4,458 4,797 4,769 4,624 9,157 9,393 2.6

298

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 509,281 530,764 461,105 446,330 487,514 467,445 1,984,705 1,862,394 -6.9 Regular 456,590 476,567 414,239 400,799 438,269 419,689 1,786,214 1,672,996 -7.1 Conventional 83,269 85,583 77,162 75,965 79,443 76,333 335,511 308,903 -8.7 Reformulated 373,321 390,984 337,077 324,834 358,826 343,356 1,450,703 1,364,093 -6.7 Midgrade 8,696 8,813 7,806 7,543 8,274 8,141 36,428 31,764 -13.5 Conventional 882 905 832 793 806 750 3,942 3,181 -20.0 Reformulated 7,814 7,908 6,974 6,750 7,468 7,391 32,486 28,583 -12.7 Premium 43,995 45,384 39,060 37,988 40,971 39,615 162,063 157,634 -3.5 Conventional 4,337 4,314 3,926 3,956 3,932 3,590 16,900 15,404 -9.6

299

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 133,205 139,935 139,701 142,976 125,585 133,383 1,255,313 1,300,726 4.0 Regular 118,938 124,805 123,746 127,337 112,647 119,751 1,104,865 1,157,997 5.2 Conventional 99,124 W 103,498 W 91,370 82,252 W W NA Oxygenated 19,814 W 20,248 W 21,277 37,499 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,610 3,716 3,912 3,977 3,370 3,629 42,259 37,098 -11.9 Conventional W W W W W 2,182 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 1,447 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,657 11,414 12,043 11,662 9,568 10,003 108,189 105,631 -2.0 Conventional W W W W W 6,316 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 3,687 W W NA

300

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine Maine Motor Gasoline 59,884 62,599 63,465 72,088 72,911 59,813 503,187 554,952 10.7 Regular 56,559 59,138 59,685 67,043 67,739 56,214 474,245 523,059 10.7 Conventional 56,559 59,138 59,685 67,043 67,739 56,214 474,245 523,059 10.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 490 701 745 1,037 1,017 571 5,636 5,995 6.8 Conventional 490 701 745 1,037 1,017 571 5,636 5,995 6.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 2,835 2,760 3,035 4,008 4,155 3,028 23,306 25,898 11.5 Conventional 2,835 2,760 3,035 4,008 4,155 3,028 23,306 25,898 11.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W No. 1 Distillate W W W W W W W W NA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 136,622 125,808 119,737 113,339 129,220 103,695 122,818 103,695 -15.6 Regular 113,449 104,798 99,178 93,150 106,433 87,131 101,479 87,131 -14.1 Conventional W W 72,818 53,121 58,414 47,751 W 47,751 NA Oxygenated W W 26,360 40,029 48,019 39,380 40,988 39,380 -3.9 Reformulated – – – – – – W – NA Midgrade 8,750 7,653 7,656 7,437 8,430 6,076 8,163 6,076 -25.6 Conventional W W 5,046 3,943 4,377 3,128 4,088 3,128 -23.5 Oxygenated W W 2,610 3,494 4,053 2,948 4,075 2,948 -27.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 14,423 13,357 12,903 12,752 14,357 10,488 W 10,488 NA Conventional W W 9,375 7,016 7,564 5,684 W 5,684 NA

302

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 139,789 134,234 138,886 144,986 126,268 128,894 1,303,091 1,310,878 0.6 Regular 120,111 114,632 118,057 122,577 107,051 108,435 1,121,359 1,118,508 -0.3 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,196 6,170 6,572 7,047 6,066 6,586 62,974 62,110 -1.4 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 13,482 13,432 14,257 15,362 13,151 13,873 118,758 130,260 9.7 Conventional W W W W W 9,885 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 3,988 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

303

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 138,886 144,986 126,268 130,385 114,483 116,987 1,552,270 1,543,839 -0.5 Regular 118,057 122,577 107,051 109,801 96,041 98,109 1,334,794 1,314,024 -1.6 Conventional W W W 80,782 59,921 60,892 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 29,019 36,120 37,217 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,572 7,047 6,066 6,616 6,121 6,286 75,413 74,547 -1.1 Conventional W W W 4,628 3,531 3,646 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 1,988 2,590 2,640 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 14,257 15,362 13,151 13,968 12,321 12,592 142,063 155,268 9.3 Conventional W W W 9,980 7,264 7,439 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 3,988 5,057 5,153 W W NA

304

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 130,717 124,186 133,338 134,214 120,819 125,138 1,284,739 1,249,335 -3.1 Regular 119,281 113,226 121,394 121,927 109,859 114,199 1,151,189 1,135,980 -1.6 Conventional 119,281 113,226 121,394 121,927 109,859 114,199 1,151,189 1,135,980 -1.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,165 1,961 2,082 2,075 1,769 1,730 30,987 21,477 -30.9 Conventional 2,165 1,961 2,082 2,075 1,769 1,730 30,987 21,477 -30.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,271 8,999 9,862 10,212 9,191 9,209 102,563 91,878 -10.7 Conventional 9,271 8,999 9,862 10,212 9,191 9,209 102,563 91,878 -10.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

305

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 128,326 135,052 139,789 134,234 138,886 143,748 1,045,772 1,054,478 0.8 Regular 110,336 117,278 120,111 114,632 118,057 121,427 898,749 901,872 0.3 Conventional 91,767 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,010 5,845 6,196 6,170 6,572 6,994 50,970 49,405 -3.1 Conventional 5,351 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 659 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,980 11,929 13,482 13,432 14,257 15,327 96,053 103,201 7.4 Conventional 10,395 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 1,585 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

306

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 115,606 122,264 125,761 130,717 124,186 133,338 885,337 869,164 -2.3 Regular 104,410 111,432 114,120 119,281 113,226 121,394 795,000 789,995 -1.1 Conventional 104,410 111,432 114,120 119,281 113,226 121,394 795,000 789,995 -1.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,491 2,207 2,427 2,165 1,961 2,082 21,429 15,903 -26.1 Conventional 2,491 2,207 2,427 2,165 1,961 2,082 21,429 15,903 -26.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,705 8,625 9,214 9,271 8,999 9,862 68,908 63,266 -8.6 Conventional 8,705 8,625 9,214 9,271 8,999 9,862 68,908 63,266 -8.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

307

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 117,292 115,606 122,264 125,761 130,717 124,184 746,294 735,824 -1.9 Regular 106,132 104,410 111,432 114,120 119,281 113,224 670,973 668,599 -0.9 Conventional 106,132 104,410 111,432 114,120 119,281 113,224 670,973 668,599 -0.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,570 2,491 2,207 2,427 2,165 1,961 18,106 13,821 -24.1 Conventional 2,570 2,491 2,207 2,427 2,165 1,961 18,106 13,821 -24.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,590 8,705 8,625 9,214 9,271 8,999 57,215 53,404 -7.2 Conventional 8,590 8,705 8,625 9,214 9,271 8,999 57,215 53,404 -7.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

308

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 117,088 108,674 122,452 125,233 130,653 131,907 735,826 736,007 0.6 Regular 106,414 98,792 111,102 113,305 117,817 118,961 668,601 666,391 0.2 Conventional 106,414 98,792 111,102 113,305 117,817 118,961 668,601 666,391 0.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,666 1,581 1,792 1,815 1,879 1,869 13,821 10,602 -22.9 Conventional 1,666 1,581 1,792 1,815 1,879 1,869 13,821 10,602 -22.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,008 8,301 9,558 10,113 10,957 11,077 53,404 59,014 11.1 Conventional 9,008 8,301 9,558 10,113 10,957 11,077 53,404 59,014 11.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

309

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 123,027 124,392 117,292 115,606 122,264 125,733 478,953 480,895 -0.4 Regular 111,045 112,370 106,132 104,410 111,432 114,092 429,483 436,066 0.7 Conventional 111,045 112,370 106,132 104,410 111,432 114,092 429,483 436,066 0.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,728 2,693 2,570 2,491 2,207 2,427 12,216 9,695 -21.3 Conventional 2,728 2,693 2,570 2,491 2,207 2,427 12,216 9,695 -21.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,705 8,625 9,214 37,254 35,134 -6.5 Conventional 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,705 8,625 9,214 37,254 35,134 -6.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

310

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 115,509 118,066 126,458 126,327 130,524 133,704 996,782 969,751 -3.1 Regular 105,682 107,662 115,160 114,987 117,633 120,719 908,868 881,032 -3.5 Conventional 105,682 107,662 115,160 114,987 117,633 120,719 908,868 881,032 -3.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,246 1,255 1,340 1,281 1,456 1,562 11,419 10,548 -8.0 Conventional 1,246 1,255 1,340 1,281 1,456 1,562 11,419 10,548 -8.0 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,581 9,149 9,958 10,059 11,435 11,423 76,495 78,171 1.8 Conventional 8,581 9,149 9,958 10,059 11,435 11,423 76,495 78,171 1.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

311

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 121,892 120,530 123,655 110,788 128,326 136,041 486,172 498,810 2.6 Regular 104,683 102,740 105,511 94,520 110,336 118,228 418,901 428,595 2.3 Conventional 58,559 54,646 56,780 53,384 91,767 W W W NA Oxygenated 46,124 48,094 48,731 41,136 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,003 6,178 6,168 5,450 6,010 5,882 24,134 23,510 -2.6 Conventional 3,324 3,547 3,392 3,052 5,351 W W W NA Oxygenated 2,679 2,631 2,776 2,398 659 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,206 11,612 11,976 10,818 11,980 11,931 43,137 46,705 8.3 Conventional 6,003 6,254 6,016 5,941 10,395 W W W NA

312

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 145,648 126,428 129,343 121,892 120,530 122,643 115,819 122,643 5.9 Regular 124,098 110,212 111,742 104,683 102,740 104,593 99,816 104,593 4.8 Conventional W W 82,134 58,559 54,646 55,813 55,542 55,813 0.5 Oxygenated W W 29,608 46,124 48,094 48,780 44,274 48,780 10.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 7,144 5,841 6,099 6,003 6,178 6,152 5,913 6,152 4.0 Conventional W W 4,303 3,324 3,547 3,374 3,428 3,374 -1.6 Oxygenated W W 1,796 2,679 2,631 2,778 2,485 2,778 11.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 14,406 10,375 11,502 11,206 11,612 11,898 10,090 11,898 17.9 Conventional W W 8,321 6,003 6,254 5,934 5,492 5,934 8.0

313

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,327 130,524 133,704 122,163 124,443 117,552 1,372,235 1,333,909 -3.1 Regular 114,987 117,633 120,719 110,769 113,333 106,683 1,250,504 1,211,817 -3.4 Conventional 114,987 117,633 120,719 110,769 113,333 106,683 1,250,504 1,211,817 -3.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,281 1,456 1,562 1,304 1,307 1,223 15,653 14,382 -8.4 Conventional 1,281 1,456 1,562 1,304 1,307 1,223 15,653 14,382 -8.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,059 11,435 11,423 10,090 9,803 9,646 106,078 107,710 1.2 Conventional 10,059 11,435 11,423 10,090 9,803 9,646 106,078 107,710 1.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

314

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 123,384 123,443 132,857 118,555 116,747 127,700 347,083 363,002 5.7 Regular 108,630 108,923 116,372 104,022 102,420 113,498 303,816 319,940 6.5 Conventional 80,733 66,084 71,011 61,295 61,912 91,743 W 214,950 NA Oxygenated NA 42,839 45,361 42,727 40,508 21,755 W 104,990 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,157 4,294 4,477 4,122 3,874 3,704 13,057 11,700 -9.4 Conventional 2,831 2,131 2,141 1,960 1,900 3,186 W 7,046 NA Oxygenated 1,326 2,163 2,336 2,162 1,974 518 W 4,654 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,597 10,226 12,008 10,411 10,453 10,498 30,210 31,362 5.0 Conventional 7,507 5,628 6,833 5,562 5,909 8,744 W 20,215 NA

315

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,203 128,935 134,724 138,634 128,837 126,103 1,299,140 1,251,722 -3.6 Regular 115,311 118,200 121,899 125,218 116,899 114,985 1,174,959 1,140,752 -2.9 Conventional 115,311 118,200 121,899 125,218 116,899 114,985 1,174,959 1,140,752 -2.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,394 1,443 1,617 1,625 1,482 1,405 17,286 14,306 -17.2 Conventional 1,394 1,443 1,617 1,625 1,482 1,405 17,286 14,306 -17.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,498 9,292 11,208 11,791 10,456 9,713 106,895 96,664 -9.6 Conventional 9,498 9,292 11,208 11,791 10,456 9,713 106,895 96,664 -9.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

316

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 110,788 128,326 135,052 139,789 134,234 138,886 899,875 910,730 1.2 Regular 94,520 110,336 117,278 120,111 114,632 118,057 774,311 780,445 0.8 Conventional 53,384 91,767 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 41,136 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,450 6,010 5,845 6,196 6,170 6,572 43,835 42,411 -3.2 Conventional 3,052 5,351 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,398 659 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,818 11,980 11,929 13,482 13,432 14,257 81,729 87,874 7.5 Conventional 5,941 10,395 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,877 1,585 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

317

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 530,764 461,105 446,330 487,514 467,445 514,161 2,499,689 2,376,555 -5.6 Regular 476,567 414,239 400,799 438,269 419,689 457,986 2,250,807 2,130,982 -5.9 Conventional 85,583 77,162 75,965 79,443 76,333 90,064 426,937 398,967 -7.2 Reformulated 390,984 337,077 324,834 358,826 343,356 367,922 1,823,870 1,732,015 -5.7 Midgrade 8,813 7,806 7,543 8,274 8,141 9,199 45,357 40,963 -10.3 Conventional 905 832 793 806 750 1,071 4,954 4,252 -14.7 Reformulated 7,908 6,974 6,750 7,468 7,391 8,128 40,403 36,711 -9.7 Premium 45,384 39,060 37,988 40,971 39,615 46,976 203,525 204,610 -0.1 Conventional 4,314 3,926 3,956 3,932 3,590 5,291 21,487 20,695 -4.3

318

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 521,124 527,101 509,281 530,764 461,105 446,180 972,727 907,285 -8.3 Regular 466,275 472,106 456,590 476,567 414,239 400,649 873,143 814,888 -8.2 Conventional 92,473 90,578 83,269 85,583 77,162 75,815 170,063 152,977 -11.5 Reformulated 373,802 381,528 373,321 390,984 337,077 324,834 703,080 661,911 -7.4 Midgrade 9,258 9,110 8,696 8,813 7,806 7,543 18,451 15,349 -18.2 Conventional 1,091 965 882 905 832 793 2,047 1,625 -21.9 Reformulated 8,167 8,145 7,814 7,908 6,974 6,750 16,404 13,724 -17.7 Premium 45,591 45,885 43,995 45,384 39,060 37,988 81,133 77,048 -6.6 Conventional 5,477 5,106 4,337 4,314 3,926 3,956 9,393 7,882 -17.5

319

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 136,075 139,236 130,776 128,461 125,271 127,346 1,558,358 1,520,443 -2.7 Regular 117,117 118,534 113,616 111,521 108,520 109,826 1,300,368 1,307,497 0.3 Conventional W W W 82,755 62,396 62,276 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 28,766 46,124 47,550 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,728 7,311 6,170 6,296 6,420 6,738 97,184 77,836 -20.1 Conventional W W W 4,406 3,840 3,681 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 1,890 2,580 3,057 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,230 13,391 10,990 10,644 10,331 10,782 160,806 135,110 -16.2 Conventional W W W 7,778 5,564 5,910 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 2,866 4,767 4,872 W W NA

320

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 117,639 115,793 109,751 115,008 129,009 136,249 637,610 605,810 -5.0 Regular 99,099 98,040 94,445 102,049 114,076 118,315 547,756 526,925 -3.8 Conventional 61,268 60,258 59,465 W 98,123 100,786 W W NA Oxygenated 37,831 37,782 34,980 W 15,953 17,529 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,193 5,943 5,467 4,397 4,632 5,351 29,669 25,790 -13.1 Conventional 3,743 3,737 3,554 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,450 2,206 1,913 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,347 11,810 9,839 8,562 10,301 12,583 60,185 53,095 -11.8 Conventional 7,339 6,945 5,907 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 5,008 4,865 3,932 W W W W W NA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 123,655 110,788 128,326 135,052 139,789 134,994 759,196 772,604 1.8 Regular 105,511 94,520 110,336 117,278 120,111 115,386 654,199 663,142 1.4 Conventional 56,780 53,384 91,767 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 48,731 41,136 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,168 5,450 6,010 5,845 6,196 6,170 37,055 35,839 -3.3 Conventional 3,392 3,052 5,351 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,776 2,398 659 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,976 10,818 11,980 11,929 13,482 13,438 67,942 73,623 8.4 Conventional 6,016 5,941 10,395 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 5,960 4,877 1,585 W W W W W NA

322

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 555,627 513,590 550,648 514,054 550,377 517,805 516,781 517,805 0.2 Regular 495,544 460,050 493,937 460,528 491,662 463,776 460,826 463,776 0.6 Conventional 98,019 85,817 90,049 80,032 90,649 86,635 83,587 86,635 3.6 Reformulated 397,525 374,233 403,888 380,496 401,013 377,141 377,239 377,141 0.0 Midgrade 14,063 11,714 11,956 11,129 12,327 11,408 14,583 11,408 -21.8 Conventional 1,989 1,208 1,145 948 1,239 1,122 1,811 1,122 -38.0 Reformulated 12,074 10,506 10,811 10,181 11,088 10,286 12,772 10,286 -19.5 Premium 46,020 41,826 44,755 42,397 46,388 42,621 41,372 42,621 3.0 Conventional 6,625 4,768 4,532 3,734 4,536 5,020 4,122 5,020 21.8

323

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 134,234 138,886 144,986 126,268 130,385 114,483 1,428,284 1,426,852 -0.1 Regular 114,632 118,057 122,577 107,051 109,801 96,041 1,228,882 1,215,915 -1.1 Conventional W W W W 80,782 59,921 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 29,019 36,120 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,170 6,572 7,047 6,066 6,616 6,121 69,107 68,261 -1.2 Conventional W W W W 4,628 3,531 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 1,988 2,590 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 13,432 14,257 15,362 13,151 13,968 12,321 130,295 142,676 9.5 Conventional W W W W 9,980 7,264 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 3,988 5,057 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

324

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 143,203 131,902 130,122 116,547 121,960 106,552 115,793 106,552 -8.0 Regular 124,038 114,896 112,836 100,676 105,782 92,915 98,040 92,915 -5.2 Conventional W W 85,371 61,541 W W 60,258 W NA Oxygenated W W 27,465 39,135 W W 37,782 W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,748 4,965 5,059 4,888 4,985 4,270 5,943 4,270 -28.2 Conventional W W 3,614 2,496 2,445 2,157 3,737 2,157 -42.3 Oxygenated W W 1,445 2,392 2,540 2,113 2,206 2,113 -4.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 13,417 12,041 12,227 10,983 11,193 9,367 11,810 9,367 -20.7 Conventional W W 9,096 6,224 W W 6,945 W NA Oxygenated W W 3,131 4,759 W W 4,865 W NA

325

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 135,583 140,679 145,648 126,428 129,343 122,337 1,410,385 1,423,631 1.2 Regular 117,302 120,112 124,098 110,212 111,742 105,054 1,215,940 1,225,417 1.1 Conventional W W W W 82,134 58,930 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 29,608 46,124 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,371 6,780 7,144 5,841 6,099 6,003 70,604 68,922 -2.1 Conventional W W W W 4,303 3,324 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 1,796 2,679 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,910 13,787 14,406 10,375 11,502 11,280 123,841 129,292 4.7 Conventional W W W W 8,321 6,064 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 3,181 5,216 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

326

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,608 113,104 109,327 121,653 124,202 126,203 610,268 594,489 -2.6 Regular 114,523 103,250 99,731 111,406 113,853 115,311 553,620 543,551 -1.8 Conventional 114,523 103,250 99,731 111,406 113,853 115,311 553,620 543,551 -1.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,739 1,231 1,295 1,424 1,390 1,394 8,325 6,734 -19.1 Conventional 1,739 1,231 1,295 1,424 1,390 1,394 8,325 6,734 -19.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,346 8,623 8,301 8,823 8,959 9,498 48,323 44,204 -8.5 Conventional 10,346 8,623 8,301 8,823 8,959 9,498 48,323 44,204 -8.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

327

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 494,955 496,452 488,936 430,725 477,184 488,871 1,862,394 1,885,716 2.1 Regular 442,377 445,406 439,340 387,401 428,557 437,307 1,672,996 1,692,605 2.0 Conventional 89,489 89,443 92,274 83,145 88,943 93,114 308,903 357,476 16.7 Reformulated 352,888 355,963 347,066 304,256 339,614 344,193 1,364,093 1,335,129 -1.3 Midgrade 8,424 8,190 7,994 7,243 7,978 7,985 31,764 31,200 -1.0 Conventional 881 903 921 836 886 1,012 3,181 3,655 15.9 Reformulated 7,543 7,287 7,073 6,407 7,092 6,973 28,583 27,545 -2.8 Premium 44,154 42,856 41,602 36,081 40,649 43,579 157,634 161,911 3.6 Conventional 4,075 4,150 4,510 3,841 4,051 5,033 15,404 17,435 14.1

328

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 139,701 142,976 125,585 133,383 132,214 134,904 1,503,924 1,567,844 4.5 Regular 123,746 127,337 112,647 119,751 117,558 119,426 1,323,450 1,394,981 5.7 Conventional 103,498 W 91,370 82,252 69,032 69,189 W W NA Oxygenated 20,248 W 21,277 37,499 48,526 50,237 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,912 3,977 3,370 3,629 3,715 3,922 50,922 44,735 -11.9 Conventional W W W 2,182 1,558 1,639 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 1,447 2,157 2,283 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,043 11,662 9,568 10,003 10,941 11,556 129,552 128,128 -0.8 Conventional W W W 6,316 5,317 5,622 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 3,687 5,624 5,934 W W NA

329

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 134,901 121,056 120,708 129,584 129,173 130,155 619,146 630,676 1.9 Regular 119,426 108,545 108,142 116,394 115,901 117,951 549,711 566,933 3.1 Conventional 69,189 73,017 72,929 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 50,237 35,528 35,213 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,919 3,612 3,378 3,439 3,369 3,135 18,494 16,933 -8.4 Conventional 1,636 1,812 1,618 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,283 1,800 1,760 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,556 8,899 9,188 9,751 9,903 9,069 50,941 46,810 -8.1 Conventional 5,622 5,550 5,821 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 5,934 3,349 3,367 W W W W W NA

330

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 132,774 149,898 143,203 131,902 130,122 116,547 1,442,448 1,409,759 -2.3 Regular 114,646 128,881 124,038 114,896 112,836 100,676 1,230,848 1,222,408 -0.7 Conventional W W W W 85,371 61,541 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 27,465 39,135 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,367 6,079 5,748 4,965 5,059 4,888 68,060 57,896 -14.9 Conventional W W W W 3,614 2,496 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 1,445 2,392 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,761 14,938 13,417 12,041 12,227 10,983 143,540 129,455 -9.8 Conventional W W W W 9,096 6,224 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 3,131 4,759 W W NA

331

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 130,122 116,547 121,960 106,552 112,818 127,713 340,552 347,083 0.8 Regular 112,836 100,676 105,782 92,915 98,586 112,315 294,534 303,816 2.0 Conventional 85,371 61,541 W W 61,721 W W W NA Oxygenated 27,465 39,135 W W 36,865 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,059 4,888 4,985 4,270 4,425 4,362 15,807 13,057 -18.3 Conventional 3,614 2,496 2,445 2,157 2,245 W W W NA Oxygenated 1,445 2,392 2,540 2,113 2,180 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,227 10,983 11,193 9,367 9,807 11,036 30,211 30,210 -1.1 Conventional 9,096 6,224 W W 5,377 9,727 W W NA Oxygenated 3,131 4,759 W W 4,430 1,309 W W NA

332

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Hawaii Motor Gasoline 36,063 37,112 34,945 37,474 37,458 32,636 328,239 321,814 -1.6 Regular 28,208 28,918 27,272 29,299 29,242 25,225 259,624 251,473 -2.8 Conventional 28,208 28,918 27,272 29,299 29,242 25,225 259,624 251,473 -2.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,046 2,141 1,997 2,159 2,181 2,006 18,071 18,741 4.1 Conventional 2,046 2,141 1,997 2,159 2,181 2,006 18,071 18,741 4.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 5,809 6,053 5,676 6,016 6,035 5,405 50,544 51,600 2.5 Conventional 5,809 6,053 5,676 6,016 6,035 5,405 50,544 51,600 2.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

333

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 113,930 111,114 105,103 116,335 119,409 126,351 579,196 578,312 0.5 Regular 103,132 100,685 95,316 105,221 107,403 113,871 527,693 522,496 -0.3 Conventional 103,132 100,685 95,316 105,221 107,403 113,871 527,693 522,496 -0.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,252 1,145 1,088 1,265 1,280 1,320 6,249 6,098 -1.8 Conventional 1,252 1,145 1,088 1,265 1,280 1,320 6,249 6,098 -1.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,546 9,284 8,699 9,849 10,726 11,160 45,254 49,718 10.6 Conventional 9,546 9,284 8,699 9,849 10,726 11,160 45,254 49,718 10.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

334

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 113,104 109,327 121,653 124,202 126,203 128,935 744,685 723,424 -2.9 Regular 103,250 99,731 111,406 113,853 115,311 118,200 674,972 661,751 -2.0 Conventional 103,250 99,731 111,406 113,853 115,311 118,200 674,972 661,751 -2.0 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,231 1,295 1,424 1,390 1,394 1,443 10,075 8,177 -18.8 Conventional 1,231 1,295 1,424 1,390 1,394 1,443 10,075 8,177 -18.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,623 8,301 8,823 8,959 9,498 9,292 59,638 53,496 -10.3 Conventional 8,623 8,301 8,823 8,959 9,498 9,292 59,638 53,496 -10.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

335

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 137,441 135,583 140,679 145,648 126,428 128,134 1,285,114 1,300,085 1.5 Regular 117,996 117,302 120,112 124,098 110,212 110,732 1,107,420 1,119,353 1.4 Conventional W W W W W 82,137 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 28,595 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,550 6,371 6,780 7,144 5,841 6,030 64,184 62,850 -1.8 Conventional W W W W W 4,303 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 1,727 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,895 11,910 13,787 14,406 10,375 11,372 113,510 117,882 4.2 Conventional W W W W W 8,321 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 3,051 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

336

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 139,212 139,507 142,185 127,373 129,849 123,032 1,448,714 1,408,240 -2.8 Regular 125,667 124,434 126,339 113,384 116,510 111,050 1,300,022 1,262,690 -2.9 Conventional 125,667 124,434 126,339 113,384 116,510 111,050 W 1,262,690 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,031 3,341 3,503 2,965 3,032 2,728 37,887 33,675 -11.1 Conventional 3,031 3,341 3,503 2,965 3,032 2,728 W 33,675 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,514 11,732 12,343 11,024 10,307 9,254 110,805 111,875 1.0 Conventional 10,514 11,732 12,343 11,024 10,307 9,254 W 111,875 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

337

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 125,199 124,695 128,129 139,212 139,507 144,488 1,055,712 1,030,289 -2.4 Regular 112,243 112,510 115,823 125,667 124,434 128,593 948,829 924,000 -2.6 Conventional 112,243 112,510 115,823 125,667 124,434 128,593 W 924,000 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,056 2,958 2,859 3,031 3,341 3,519 27,613 24,966 -9.6 Conventional 3,056 2,958 2,859 3,031 3,341 3,519 W 24,966 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,900 9,227 9,447 10,514 11,732 12,376 79,270 81,323 2.6 Conventional 9,900 9,227 9,447 10,514 11,732 12,376 W 81,323 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

338

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 110,992 117,088 108,674 122,452 125,233 131,002 611,640 604,449 -0.5 Regular 100,387 106,414 98,792 111,102 113,305 118,166 555,375 547,779 -0.7 Conventional 100,387 106,414 98,792 111,102 113,305 118,166 555,375 547,779 -0.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,792 1,666 1,581 1,792 1,815 1,879 11,860 8,733 -25.9 Conventional 1,792 1,666 1,581 1,792 1,815 1,879 11,860 8,733 -25.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,813 9,008 8,301 9,558 10,113 10,957 44,405 47,937 8.7 Conventional 8,813 9,008 8,301 9,558 10,113 10,957 44,405 47,937 8.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

339

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 115,793 109,751 115,008 129,009 135,752 136,659 771,844 741,972 -3.9 Regular 98,040 94,445 102,049 114,076 117,825 118,360 662,388 644,795 -2.7 Conventional 60,258 59,465 W 98,123 W W W W NA Oxygenated 37,782 34,980 W 15,953 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,943 5,467 4,397 4,632 5,351 5,458 35,839 31,248 -12.8 Conventional 3,737 3,554 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,206 1,913 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,810 9,839 8,562 10,301 12,576 12,841 73,617 65,929 -10.4 Conventional 6,945 5,907 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,865 3,932 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

340

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 123,940 125,772 118,909 110,150 125,199 124,695 500,521 478,953 -4.3 Regular 110,947 112,956 106,914 97,816 112,243 112,510 448,982 429,483 -4.3 Conventional 66,529 67,457 106,914 97,816 112,243 112,510 W 429,483 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,352 3,268 3,106 3,096 3,056 2,958 13,798 12,216 -11.5 Conventional 1,661 1,559 3,106 3,096 3,056 2,958 W 12,216 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,641 9,548 8,889 9,238 9,900 9,227 37,741 37,254 -1.3 Conventional 5,240 5,150 8,889 9,238 9,900 9,227 W 37,254 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 146,328 138,917 138,012 128,012 123,940 125,772 1,517,105 1,568,511 3.4 Regular 131,286 124,315 123,729 113,898 110,947 112,956 1,350,867 1,407,721 4.2 Conventional W 106,842 W 82,565 66,529 67,457 W W NA Oxygenated W NA W 31,333 44,418 45,499 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,864 3,807 3,502 3,435 3,352 3,268 45,545 41,476 -8.9 Conventional W W W 2,414 1,661 1,559 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 1,021 1,691 1,709 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,178 10,795 10,781 10,679 9,641 9,548 120,693 119,314 -1.1 Conventional W W W 7,751 5,240 5,150 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 2,928 4,401 4,398 W W NA

342

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,911 137,441 135,583 140,679 145,648 126,428 1,156,653 1,171,951 1.7 Regular 109,294 117,996 117,302 120,112 124,098 110,212 995,899 1,008,621 1.6 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,086 6,550 6,371 6,780 7,144 5,841 57,888 56,820 -1.5 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,531 12,895 11,910 13,787 14,406 10,375 102,866 106,510 3.9 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

343

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 138,917 138,012 128,012 123,940 125,772 118,479 121,056 118,479 -2.1 Regular 124,315 123,729 113,898 110,947 112,956 106,713 108,545 106,713 -1.7 Conventional 106,842 W 82,565 66,529 67,457 106,713 73,017 106,713 46.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,807 3,502 3,435 3,352 3,268 2,959 3,612 2,959 -18.1 Conventional W W 2,414 1,661 1,559 2,959 1,812 2,959 63.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,795 10,781 10,679 9,641 9,548 8,807 8,899 8,807 -1.0 Conventional W W 7,751 5,240 5,150 8,807 5,550 8,807 58.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

344

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 129,584 129,173 130,014 136,995 146,328 147,395 1,009,994 1,061,253 5.1 Regular 116,394 115,901 117,816 123,792 131,286 132,073 896,468 953,949 6.4 Conventional W W W W W 114,438 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,439 3,369 3,143 3,307 3,864 3,905 30,978 28,017 -9.6 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,751 9,903 9,055 9,896 11,178 11,417 82,548 79,287 -4.0 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

345

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 461,105 446,330 487,514 467,445 514,161 520,326 3,010,145 2,896,881 -4.3 Regular 414,239 400,799 438,269 419,689 457,986 462,591 2,707,348 2,593,573 -4.7 Conventional 77,162 75,965 79,443 76,333 90,064 98,380 518,931 497,347 -4.7 Reformulated 337,077 324,834 358,826 343,356 367,922 364,211 2,188,417 2,096,226 -4.7 Midgrade 7,806 7,543 8,274 8,141 9,199 9,495 54,568 50,458 -8.0 Conventional 832 793 806 750 1,071 1,194 6,079 5,446 -10.9 Reformulated 6,974 6,750 7,468 7,391 8,128 8,301 48,489 45,012 -7.7 Premium 39,060 37,988 40,971 39,615 46,976 48,240 248,229 252,850 1.3 Conventional 3,926 3,956 3,932 3,590 5,291 5,945 27,118 26,640 -2.3

346

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 116,747 127,703 122,936 133,205 139,935 140,080 857,910 899,161 5.3 Regular 102,420 113,498 110,833 118,938 124,805 124,098 755,633 798,614 6.2 Conventional 61,912 91,743 W 99,124 W 103,850 W W NA Oxygenated 40,508 21,755 W 19,814 W 20,248 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,874 3,705 3,183 3,610 3,716 3,909 29,154 26,119 -10.0 Conventional 1,900 3,187 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 1,974 518 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,453 10,500 8,920 10,657 11,414 12,073 73,123 74,428 2.3 Conventional 5,909 8,746 7,806 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,544 NA 1,114 W W W W W NA

347

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,458 126,327 130,524 133,704 122,163 124,443 1,251,722 1,216,357 -3.1 Regular 115,160 114,987 117,633 120,719 110,769 113,333 1,140,752 1,105,134 -3.4 Conventional 115,160 114,987 117,633 120,719 110,769 113,333 1,140,752 1,105,134 -3.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,340 1,281 1,456 1,562 1,304 1,307 14,306 13,159 -8.3 Conventional 1,340 1,281 1,456 1,562 1,304 1,307 14,306 13,159 -8.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,958 10,059 11,435 11,423 10,090 9,803 96,664 98,064 1.1 Conventional 9,958 10,059 11,435 11,423 10,090 9,803 96,664 98,064 1.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

348

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 125,045 119,493 110,992 117,088 108,674 122,452 355,162 348,214 -0.9 Regular 114,124 108,458 100,387 106,414 98,792 111,102 321,974 316,308 -0.7 Conventional 114,124 108,458 100,387 106,414 98,792 111,102 321,974 316,308 -0.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,731 1,769 1,792 1,666 1,581 1,792 7,268 5,039 -29.9 Conventional 1,731 1,769 1,792 1,666 1,581 1,792 7,268 5,039 -29.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,190 9,266 8,813 9,008 8,301 9,558 25,920 26,867 4.8 Conventional 9,190 9,266 8,813 9,008 8,301 9,558 25,920 26,867 4.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

349

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 123,768 109,386 109,777 115,509 118,066 126,458 594,489 579,196 -3.2 Regular 112,568 99,533 99,656 105,682 107,662 115,160 543,551 527,693 -3.6 Conventional 112,568 99,533 99,656 105,682 107,662 115,160 543,551 527,693 -3.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,331 1,199 1,209 1,246 1,255 1,340 6,734 6,249 -7.8 Conventional 1,331 1,199 1,209 1,246 1,255 1,340 6,734 6,249 -7.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,869 8,654 8,912 8,581 9,149 9,958 44,204 45,254 1.7 Conventional 9,869 8,654 8,912 8,581 9,149 9,958 44,204 45,254 1.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

350

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 139,507 142,185 127,373 129,849 123,027 124,397 1,574,756 1,532,632 -2.7 Regular 124,434 126,339 113,384 116,510 111,045 112,374 1,413,225 1,375,059 -2.7 Conventional 124,434 126,339 113,384 116,510 111,045 112,374 W 1,375,059 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,341 3,503 2,965 3,032 2,728 2,694 41,174 36,369 -11.7 Conventional 3,341 3,503 2,965 3,032 2,728 2,694 W 36,369 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,732 12,343 11,024 10,307 9,254 9,329 120,357 121,204 0.7 Conventional 11,732 12,343 11,024 10,307 9,254 9,329 W 121,204 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

351

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 109,327 121,653 124,202 126,203 128,935 134,724 891,067 858,148 -3.7 Regular 99,731 111,406 113,853 115,311 118,200 121,899 806,662 783,650 -2.9 Conventional 99,731 111,406 113,853 115,311 118,200 121,899 806,662 783,650 -2.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,295 1,424 1,390 1,394 1,443 1,617 11,994 9,794 -18.3 Conventional 1,295 1,424 1,390 1,394 1,443 1,617 11,994 9,794 -18.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,301 8,823 8,959 9,498 9,292 11,208 72,411 64,704 -10.6 Conventional 8,301 8,823 8,959 9,498 9,292 11,208 72,411 64,704 -10.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

352

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 130,255 126,911 137,441 135,583 140,679 148,423 1,025,877 1,048,298 2.6 Regular 111,793 109,294 117,996 117,302 120,112 126,586 882,283 900,897 2.5 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,711 6,086 6,550 6,371 6,780 7,144 51,718 50,979 -1.0 Conventional 6,196 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 515 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,751 11,531 12,895 11,910 13,787 14,693 91,876 96,422 5.4 Conventional 10,535 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 1,216 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

353

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 128,012 123,940 125,772 118,909 110,150 125,387 371,348 354,446 -4.6 Regular 113,898 110,947 112,956 106,914 97,816 112,428 333,081 317,158 -4.8 Conventional 82,565 66,529 67,457 106,914 97,816 112,428 W 317,158 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,435 3,352 3,268 3,106 3,096 3,056 10,429 9,258 -11.2 Conventional 2,414 1,661 1,559 3,106 3,096 3,056 W 9,258 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,679 9,641 9,548 8,889 9,238 9,903 27,838 28,030 0.7 Conventional 7,751 5,240 5,150 8,889 9,238 9,903 W 28,030 NA

354

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 129,220 103,710 107,583 128,992 122,068 133,706 605,163 596,059 -2.2 Regular 106,433 87,146 89,279 112,686 106,242 115,310 498,211 510,663 1.8 Conventional 58,414 47,766 48,793 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 48,019 39,380 40,486 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – W – NA Midgrade 8,430 6,076 6,783 6,276 5,802 6,492 42,016 31,429 -25.7 Conventional 4,377 3,128 3,568 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,053 2,948 3,215 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 14,357 10,488 11,521 10,030 10,024 11,904 W 53,967 NA Conventional 7,564 5,684 6,316 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 6,793 4,804 5,205 W W W W W NA

355

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 127,373 129,849 123,027 124,392 117,292 115,450 229,059 232,742 -0.1 Regular 113,384 116,510 111,045 112,370 106,132 104,278 204,730 210,410 1.1 Conventional 113,384 116,510 111,045 112,370 106,132 104,278 204,730 210,410 1.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,965 3,032 2,728 2,693 2,570 2,474 6,202 5,044 -20.0 Conventional 2,965 3,032 2,728 2,693 2,570 2,474 6,202 5,044 -20.0 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,024 10,307 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,698 18,127 17,288 -6.2 Conventional 11,024 10,307 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,698 18,127 17,288 -6.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

356

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 513,590 550,648 514,054 550,377 518,226 477,497 1,006,008 995,723 0.7 Regular 460,050 493,937 460,528 491,662 464,200 427,973 897,253 892,173 1.1 Conventional 85,817 90,049 80,032 90,649 82,174 76,970 161,601 159,144 0.1 Reformulated 374,233 403,888 380,496 401,013 382,026 351,003 735,652 733,029 1.3 Midgrade 11,714 11,956 11,129 12,327 11,408 10,578 28,304 21,986 -21.0 Conventional 1,208 1,145 948 1,239 1,124 1,067 3,498 2,191 -36.3 Reformulated 10,506 10,811 10,181 11,088 10,284 9,511 24,806 19,795 -18.8 Premium 41,826 44,755 42,397 46,388 42,618 38,946 80,451 81,564 3.1 Conventional 4,768 4,532 3,734 4,536 4,692 4,409 8,045 9,101 15.0

357

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 134,691 134,417 146,382 143,657 132,937 131,479 1,272,690 1,299,140 2.1 Regular 121,891 121,352 131,690 129,325 120,067 118,905 1,150,389 1,174,959 2.1 Conventional 121,891 121,352 131,690 129,325 120,067 118,905 1,150,389 1,174,959 2.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,760 1,750 1,919 1,903 1,721 1,668 18,321 17,286 -5.6 Conventional 1,760 1,750 1,919 1,903 1,721 1,668 18,321 17,286 -5.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,040 11,315 12,773 12,429 11,149 10,906 103,980 106,895 2.8 Conventional 11,040 11,315 12,773 12,429 11,149 10,906 103,980 106,895 2.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

358

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,103 120,513 123,768 109,386 109,777 115,509 344,084 334,672 -3.8 Regular 114,985 109,752 112,568 99,533 99,656 105,616 314,387 304,805 -4.1 Conventional 114,985 109,752 112,568 99,533 99,656 105,616 314,387 304,805 -4.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,405 1,347 1,331 1,199 1,209 1,312 3,950 3,720 -6.9 Conventional 1,405 1,347 1,331 1,199 1,209 1,312 3,950 3,720 -6.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,713 9,414 9,869 8,654 8,912 8,581 25,747 26,147 0.4 Conventional 9,713 9,414 9,869 8,654 8,912 8,581 25,747 26,147 0.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

359

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 128,992 122,068 133,706 137,219 136,075 142,541 1,034,843 1,011,894 -2.6 Regular 112,686 106,242 115,310 117,700 117,117 121,620 859,427 867,100 0.5 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,276 5,802 6,492 6,744 6,728 7,311 66,751 52,212 -22.1 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,030 10,024 11,904 12,775 12,230 13,610 108,665 92,582 -15.1 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

360

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 107,583 128,992 122,068 133,706 137,219 132,842 895,949 866,120 -3.8 Regular 89,279 112,686 106,242 115,310 117,700 114,094 741,958 742,457 -0.4 Conventional 48,793 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 40,486 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,783 6,276 5,802 6,492 6,744 6,728 58,709 44,901 -23.9 Conventional 3,568 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 3,215 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,521 10,030 10,024 11,904 12,775 12,020 95,282 78,762 -17.7 Conventional 6,316 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 5,205 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 119,737 113,339 129,220 103,710 107,583 119,248 373,849 330,541 -12.6 Regular 99,178 93,150 106,433 87,146 89,279 102,540 306,715 278,965 -10.0 Conventional 72,818 53,121 58,414 47,766 48,793 85,366 W 181,925 NA Oxygenated 26,360 40,029 48,019 39,380 40,486 17,174 W 97,040 NA Reformulated – – – – – – W – NA Midgrade 7,656 7,437 8,430 6,076 6,783 6,467 26,108 19,326 -26.8 Conventional 5,046 3,943 4,377 3,128 3,568 5,419 W 12,115 NA Oxygenated 2,610 3,494 4,053 2,948 3,215 1,048 W 7,211 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,903 12,752 14,357 10,488 11,521 10,241 W 32,250 NA Conventional 9,375 7,016 7,564 5,684 6,316 8,973 W 20,973 NA

362

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 149,898 143,203 131,902 130,122 116,547 121,960 1,567,974 1,531,719 -2.3 Regular 128,881 124,038 114,896 112,836 100,676 105,782 1,337,161 1,328,190 -0.7 Conventional W W W 85,371 61,541 W W W NA Oxygenated W W W 27,465 39,135 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,079 5,748 4,965 5,059 4,888 4,985 74,450 62,881 -15.5 Conventional W W W 3,614 2,496 2,445 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 1,445 2,392 2,540 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 14,938 13,417 12,041 12,227 10,983 11,193 156,363 140,648 -10.1 Conventional W W W 9,096 6,224 W W W NA Oxygenated W W W 3,131 4,759 W W W NA

363

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 122,264 125,761 130,717 124,186 133,271 134,214 1,027,509 1,003,311 -2.8 Regular 111,432 114,120 119,281 113,226 121,327 121,927 921,308 911,855 -1.4 Conventional 111,432 114,120 119,281 113,226 121,327 121,927 921,308 911,855 -1.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,207 2,427 2,165 1,961 2,084 2,075 24,947 17,980 -28.2 Conventional 2,207 2,427 2,165 1,961 2,084 2,075 24,947 17,980 -28.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,625 9,214 9,271 8,999 9,860 10,212 81,254 73,476 -9.9 Conventional 8,625 9,214 9,271 8,999 9,860 10,212 81,254 73,476 -9.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

364

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 129,173 130,014 136,995 146,328 138,917 138,134 1,134,129 1,190,909 5.0 Regular 115,901 117,816 123,792 131,286 124,315 123,994 1,007,880 1,070,185 6.2 Conventional W W W W 106,842 97,784 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W NA NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,369 3,143 3,307 3,864 3,807 3,494 34,533 31,413 -9.0 Conventional W W W W W 3,036 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,903 9,055 9,896 11,178 10,795 10,646 91,716 89,311 -2.6 Conventional W W W W W 9,255 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

365

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 128,837 126,103 120,513 123,768 109,386 109,792 222,431 219,178 -3.1 Regular 116,899 114,985 109,752 112,568 99,533 99,671 202,981 199,204 -3.5 Conventional 116,899 114,985 109,752 112,568 99,533 99,671 202,981 199,204 -3.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,482 1,405 1,347 1,331 1,199 1,209 2,526 2,408 -6.3 Conventional 1,482 1,405 1,347 1,331 1,199 1,209 2,526 2,408 -6.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,456 9,713 9,414 9,869 8,654 8,912 16,924 17,566 2.1 Conventional 10,456 9,713 9,414 9,869 8,654 8,912 16,924 17,566 2.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

366

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 130,014 136,995 146,328 138,917 138,012 127,840 1,262,237 1,318,627 4.5 Regular 117,816 123,792 131,286 124,315 123,729 113,744 1,123,018 1,183,664 5.4 Conventional W W W 106,842 W 82,411 W W NA Oxygenated W W W NA W 31,333 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,143 3,307 3,864 3,807 3,502 3,436 38,117 34,857 -8.6 Conventional W W W W W 2,415 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 1,021 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,055 9,896 11,178 10,795 10,781 10,660 101,102 100,106 -1.0 Conventional W W W W W 7,732 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W 2,928 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

367

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 138,012 128,012 123,940 125,772 118,909 110,142 241,764 229,051 -5.3 Regular 123,729 113,898 110,947 112,956 106,914 97,810 216,687 204,724 -5.5 Conventional W 82,565 66,529 67,457 106,914 97,810 145,946 204,724 40.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,502 3,435 3,352 3,268 3,106 3,096 6,990 6,202 -11.3 Conventional W 2,414 1,661 1,559 3,106 3,096 3,430 6,202 80.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,781 10,679 9,641 9,548 8,889 9,236 18,087 18,125 0.2 Conventional W 7,751 5,240 5,150 8,889 9,236 11,371 18,125 59.4

368

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 135,052 139,789 134,234 138,886 144,986 126,240 1,172,127 1,181,956 0.8 Regular 117,278 120,111 114,632 118,057 122,577 107,025 1,008,435 1,010,047 0.2 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,845 6,196 6,170 6,572 7,047 6,066 56,889 55,524 -2.4 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 11,929 13,482 13,432 14,257 15,362 13,149 106,803 116,385 9.0 Conventional W W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated W W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

369

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 125,772 118,909 110,150 125,199 124,695 128,126 630,535 607,079 -3.7 Regular 112,956 106,914 97,816 112,243 112,510 115,820 566,798 545,303 -3.8 Conventional 67,457 106,914 97,816 112,243 112,510 115,820 W 545,303 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,268 3,106 3,096 3,056 2,958 2,859 16,941 15,075 -11.0 Conventional 1,559 3,106 3,096 3,056 2,958 2,859 W 15,075 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,548 8,889 9,238 9,900 9,227 9,447 46,796 46,701 -0.2 Conventional 5,150 8,889 9,238 9,900 9,227 9,447 W 46,701 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

370

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 137,219 136,075 139,236 130,776 128,461 125,271 1,420,301 1,393,097 -2.2 Regular 117,700 117,117 118,534 113,616 111,521 108,520 1,184,245 1,197,671 0.8 Conventional W W W W 82,755 62,396 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 28,766 46,124 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,744 6,728 7,311 6,170 6,296 6,420 89,020 71,098 -20.4 Conventional W W W W 4,406 3,840 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 1,890 2,580 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,775 12,230 13,391 10,990 10,644 10,331 147,036 124,328 -15.7 Conventional W W W W 7,778 5,564 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W 2,866 4,767 W W NA

371

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 130,385 114,483 117,639 115,793 109,751 116,793 362,769 342,337 -5.6 Regular 109,801 96,041 99,099 98,040 94,445 103,581 310,367 296,066 -4.6 Conventional 80,782 59,921 61,268 60,258 59,465 W 201,931 W NA Oxygenated 29,019 36,120 37,831 37,782 34,980 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,616 6,121 6,193 5,943 5,467 4,464 17,628 15,874 -10.0 Conventional 4,628 3,531 3,743 3,737 3,554 W 11,795 W NA Oxygenated 1,988 2,590 2,450 2,206 1,913 W 5,833 W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 13,968 12,321 12,347 11,810 9,839 8,748 34,774 30,397 -12.6 Conventional 9,980 7,264 7,339 6,945 5,907 W 22,352 W NA

372

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 126,592 126,169 141,479 140,449 137,146 135,752 1,303,324 1,276,269 -2.4 Regular 113,569 111,791 124,284 123,026 121,321 119,328 1,131,346 1,124,287 -0.9 Conventional W W W W 93,225 80,733 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W NA NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,739 3,923 4,403 4,610 4,305 4,642 52,896 42,785 -19.4 Conventional W W W W 3,682 2,831 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W NA NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,284 10,455 12,792 12,813 11,520 11,782 119,082 109,197 -8.6 Conventional W W W W 9,730 7,507 W W NA Oxygenated W W W W NA NA W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

373

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 115,819 113,187 130,255 126,911 137,441 135,583 733,278 759,196 4.1 Regular 99,816 97,998 111,793 109,294 117,996 117,302 628,363 654,199 4.7 Conventional 55,542 53,186 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 44,274 44,812 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,913 5,424 6,711 6,086 6,550 6,371 38,173 37,055 -2.4 Conventional 3,428 2,863 6,196 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,485 2,561 515 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,090 9,765 11,751 11,531 12,895 11,910 66,742 67,942 2.4 Conventional 5,492 5,053 10,535 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,598 4,712 1,216 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

374

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 128,129 139,212 139,507 142,185 127,373 129,846 1,324,158 1,285,205 -2.9 Regular 115,823 125,667 124,434 126,339 113,384 116,508 1,188,541 1,151,638 -3.1 Conventional 115,823 125,667 124,434 126,339 113,384 116,508 W 1,151,638 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 2,859 3,031 3,341 3,503 2,965 3,032 34,516 30,947 -10.3 Conventional 2,859 3,031 3,341 3,503 2,965 3,032 W 30,947 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,447 10,514 11,732 12,343 11,024 10,306 101,101 102,620 1.5 Conventional 9,447 10,514 11,732 12,343 11,024 10,306 W 102,620 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

375

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 132,857 118,555 116,747 127,703 122,936 133,838 595,274 619,779 4.8 Regular 116,372 104,022 102,420 113,498 110,833 119,514 524,537 550,287 5.6 Conventional 71,011 61,295 61,912 91,743 W W W W NA Oxygenated 45,361 42,727 40,508 21,755 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,477 4,122 3,874 3,705 3,183 3,612 20,902 18,496 -10.9 Conventional 2,141 1,960 1,900 3,187 W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,336 2,162 1,974 518 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,008 10,411 10,453 10,500 8,920 10,712 49,835 50,996 3.0 Conventional 6,833 5,562 5,909 8,746 7,806 9,328 W 37,351 NA Oxygenated 5,175 4,849 4,544 NA 1,114 NA W W NA

376

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 129,849 123,027 124,392 117,292 115,606 122,264 354,258 355,162 -0.8 Regular 116,510 111,045 112,370 106,132 104,410 111,432 316,973 321,974 0.5 Conventional 116,510 111,045 112,370 106,132 104,410 111,432 316,973 321,974 0.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,032 2,728 2,693 2,570 2,491 2,207 9,258 7,268 -22.4 Conventional 3,032 2,728 2,693 2,570 2,491 2,207 9,258 7,268 -22.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,307 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,705 8,625 28,027 25,920 -8.5 Conventional 10,307 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,705 8,625 28,027 25,920 -8.5 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

377

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 142,185 127,373 129,849 123,027 124,392 117,292 118,909 117,292 -1.4 Regular 126,339 113,384 116,510 111,045 112,370 106,132 106,914 106,132 -0.7 Conventional 126,339 113,384 116,510 111,045 112,370 106,132 106,914 106,132 -0.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,503 2,965 3,032 2,728 2,693 2,570 3,106 2,570 -17.3 Conventional 3,503 2,965 3,032 2,728 2,693 2,570 3,106 2,570 -17.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,343 11,024 10,307 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,889 8,590 -3.4 Conventional 12,343 11,024 10,307 9,254 9,329 8,590 8,889 8,590 -3.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

378

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 113,187 130,255 126,911 137,441 135,583 140,693 886,641 899,889 2.0 Regular 97,998 111,793 109,294 117,996 117,302 120,126 763,749 774,325 1.9 Conventional 53,186 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 44,812 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 5,424 6,711 6,086 6,550 6,371 6,780 44,407 43,835 -0.8 Conventional 2,863 6,196 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,561 515 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,765 11,751 11,531 12,895 11,910 13,787 78,485 81,729 4.6 Conventional 5,053 10,535 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,712 1,216 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

379

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 128,461 125,271 127,361 115,819 113,187 130,255 340,285 359,261 6.7 Regular 111,521 108,520 109,905 99,816 97,998 111,793 289,111 309,607 8.3 Conventional 82,755 62,396 62,355 55,542 53,186 W W W NA Oxygenated 28,766 46,124 47,550 44,274 44,812 W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,296 6,420 6,738 5,913 5,424 6,711 19,135 18,048 -4.6 Conventional 4,406 3,840 3,681 3,428 2,863 6,196 W 12,487 NA Oxygenated 1,890 2,580 3,057 2,485 2,561 515 W 5,561 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,644 10,331 10,718 10,090 9,765 11,751 32,039 31,606 -0.3 Conventional 7,778 5,564 5,846 5,492 5,053 10,535 W 21,080 NA

380

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 112,818 127,713 121,599 126,592 126,169 141,479 898,097 862,922 -4.4 Regular 98,586 112,315 107,152 113,569 111,791 124,284 779,576 760,612 -2.9 Conventional 61,721 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 36,865 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,425 4,362 4,106 3,739 3,923 4,403 37,124 29,228 -21.6 Conventional 2,245 W W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,180 W W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,807 11,036 10,341 9,284 10,455 12,792 81,397 73,082 -10.6 Conventional 5,377 9,727 W W W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,430 1,309 W W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 140,449 137,146 123,384 123,443 132,857 118,557 106,552 118,557 11.3 Regular 123,026 121,321 108,630 108,923 116,372 104,014 92,915 104,014 11.9 Conventional W 93,225 80,733 66,084 71,011 61,319 W 61,319 NA Oxygenated W NA NA 42,839 45,361 42,695 W 42,695 NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 4,610 4,305 4,157 4,294 4,477 4,123 4,270 4,123 -3.4 Conventional W 3,682 2,831 2,131 2,141 1,960 2,157 1,960 -9.1 Oxygenated W NA 1,326 2,163 2,336 2,163 2,113 2,163 2.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 12,813 11,520 10,597 10,226 12,008 10,420 9,367 10,420 11.2 Conventional W 9,730 7,507 5,628 6,833 5,565 W 5,565 NA

382

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 127,361 115,819 113,187 130,255 126,911 137,441 596,059 623,613 5.3 Regular 109,905 99,816 97,998 111,793 109,294 117,996 510,663 536,897 5.8 Conventional 62,355 55,542 53,186 W W W W W NA Oxygenated 47,550 44,274 44,812 W W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,738 5,913 5,424 6,711 6,086 6,550 31,429 30,684 -1.7 Conventional 3,681 3,428 2,863 6,196 W W W W NA Oxygenated 3,057 2,485 2,561 515 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,718 10,090 9,765 11,751 11,531 12,895 53,967 56,032 4.5 Conventional 5,846 5,492 5,053 10,535 W W W W NA Oxygenated 4,872 4,598 4,712 1,216 W W W W NA

383

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 132,214 134,901 121,056 120,708 129,584 129,173 485,941 500,521 3.0 Regular 117,558 119,426 108,545 108,142 116,394 115,901 430,773 448,982 4.2 Conventional 69,032 69,189 73,017 72,929 W W W W NA Oxygenated 48,526 50,237 35,528 35,213 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 3,715 3,919 3,612 3,378 3,439 3,369 14,884 13,798 -7.3 Conventional 1,558 1,636 1,812 1,618 W W W W NA Oxygenated 2,157 2,283 1,800 1,760 W W W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,941 11,556 8,899 9,188 9,751 9,903 40,284 37,741 -6.3 Conventional 5,317 5,622 5,550 5,821 W W 28,023 W NA Oxygenated 5,624 5,934 3,349 3,367 W W W W NA

384

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 116,335 119,409 126,351 129,240 138,077 140,629 969,751 986,258 2.1 Regular 105,221 107,403 113,871 116,502 123,871 126,317 881,032 889,186 1.3 Conventional 105,221 107,403 113,871 116,502 123,871 126,317 881,032 889,186 1.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,265 1,280 1,320 1,356 1,530 1,491 10,548 10,475 -0.3 Conventional 1,265 1,280 1,320 1,356 1,530 1,491 10,548 10,475 -0.3 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,849 10,726 11,160 11,382 12,676 12,821 78,171 86,597 11.2 Conventional 9,849 10,726 11,160 11,382 12,676 12,821 78,171 86,597 11.2 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

385

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 124,202 126,203 128,935 134,724 138,634 128,837 1,167,661 1,125,619 -3.6 Regular 113,853 115,311 118,200 121,899 125,218 116,899 1,056,054 1,025,767 -2.9 Conventional 113,853 115,311 118,200 121,899 125,218 116,899 1,056,054 1,025,767 -2.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,390 1,394 1,443 1,617 1,625 1,482 15,618 12,901 -17.4 Conventional 1,390 1,394 1,443 1,617 1,625 1,482 15,618 12,901 -17.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,959 9,498 9,292 11,208 11,791 10,456 95,989 86,951 -9.4 Conventional 8,959 9,498 9,292 11,208 11,791 10,456 95,989 86,951 -9.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

386

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 140,679 145,648 126,428 129,343 121,892 120,906 1,539,831 1,544,092 0.6 Regular 120,112 124,098 110,212 111,742 104,683 103,096 1,327,866 1,328,142 0.3 Conventional W W W 82,134 58,559 55,021 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 29,608 46,124 48,075 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 6,780 7,144 5,841 6,099 6,003 6,181 77,342 75,103 -2.6 Conventional W W W 4,303 3,324 3,551 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 1,796 2,679 2,630 W W NA Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 13,787 14,406 10,375 11,502 11,206 11,629 134,623 140,847 4.9 Conventional W W W 8,321 6,003 6,272 W W NA Oxygenated W W W 3,181 5,203 5,357 W W NA

387

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 124,186 133,338 134,214 120,819 125,045 116,740 1,407,938 1,365,982 -3.3 Regular 113,226 121,394 121,927 109,859 114,124 106,063 1,262,370 1,241,968 -1.9 Conventional 113,226 121,394 121,927 109,859 114,124 106,063 1,262,370 1,241,968 -1.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,961 2,082 2,075 1,769 1,731 1,651 33,741 23,129 -31.7 Conventional 1,961 2,082 2,075 1,769 1,731 1,651 33,741 23,129 -31.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 8,999 9,862 10,212 9,191 9,190 9,026 111,827 100,885 -10.1 Conventional 8,999 9,862 10,212 9,191 9,190 9,026 111,827 100,885 -10.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

388

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 122,163 124,443 117,552 113,930 111,114 105,113 219,163 216,227 0.3 Regular 110,769 113,333 106,683 103,132 100,685 95,323 199,189 196,008 0.1 Conventional 110,769 113,333 106,683 103,132 100,685 95,323 199,189 196,008 0.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,304 1,307 1,223 1,252 1,145 1,089 2,408 2,234 -5.7 Conventional 1,304 1,307 1,223 1,252 1,145 1,089 2,408 2,234 -5.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 10,090 9,803 9,646 9,546 9,284 8,701 17,566 17,985 4.1 Conventional 10,090 9,803 9,646 9,546 9,284 8,701 17,566 17,985 4.1 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

389

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 128,935 134,724 138,634 128,837 126,103 120,512 1,419,945 1,372,234 -3.4 Regular 118,200 121,899 125,218 116,899 114,985 109,751 1,284,541 1,250,503 -2.6 Conventional 118,200 121,899 125,218 116,899 114,985 109,751 1,284,541 1,250,503 -2.6 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,443 1,617 1,625 1,482 1,405 1,347 18,831 15,653 -16.9 Conventional 1,443 1,617 1,625 1,482 1,405 1,347 18,831 15,653 -16.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,292 11,208 11,791 10,456 9,713 9,414 116,573 106,078 -9.0 Conventional 9,292 11,208 11,791 10,456 9,713 9,414 116,573 106,078 -9.0 Reformulated – – – – – – – – –

390

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 120,819 125,045 119,493 110,992 117,088 108,674 232,898 225,762 -1.4 Regular 109,859 114,124 108,458 100,387 106,414 98,792 210,542 205,206 -0.9 Conventional 109,859 114,124 108,458 100,387 106,414 98,792 210,542 205,206 -0.9 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 1,769 1,731 1,769 1,792 1,666 1,581 5,061 3,247 -34.8 Conventional 1,769 1,731 1,769 1,792 1,666 1,581 5,061 3,247 -34.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 9,191 9,190 9,266 8,813 9,008 8,301 17,295 17,309 1.8 Conventional 9,191 9,190 9,266 8,813 9,008 8,301 17,295 17,309 1.8 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Total Distillate W W W W W W W W W

391

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 139,236 130,776 128,461 125,271 127,361 115,330 103,710 115,330 11.2 Regular 118,534 113,616 111,521 108,520 109,905 99,406 87,146 99,406 14.1 Conventional W W 82,755 62,396 62,355 55,132 47,766 55,132 15.4 Oxygenated W W 28,766 46,124 47,550 44,274 39,380 44,274 12.4 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Midgrade 7,311 6,170 6,296 6,420 6,738 5,913 6,076 5,913 -2.7 Conventional W W 4,406 3,840 3,681 3,428 3,128 3,428 9.6 Oxygenated W W 1,890 2,580 3,057 2,485 2,948 2,485 -15.7 Reformulated – – – – – – – – – Premium 13,391 10,990 10,644 10,331 10,718 10,011 10,488 10,011 -4.5 Conventional W W 7,778 5,564 5,846 5,413 5,684 5,413 -4.8

392

Formation of N2O and NO2 Across Conventional DeNOx SCR Catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project investigated the formation of N2O and NO2 across conventional DeNOx selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. N2O is a particularly strong greenhouse gas, and both N2O and NO2 may adversely impact downstream processes. Additional data related to their formation or reduction across SCR catalysts is desirable.

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Technological impact of Non-Conventional Renewable Energy in the Chilean Electricity System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technological impact of Non-Conventional Renewable Energy in the Chilean Electricity System Juan D of methodology and analysis of the energy sector, considering whether they are simulation models. Molina C. GSM Victor J. Martinez A. GSM Hugh Rudnick, Fellow Department of Electrical Engineering

Rudnick, Hugh

394

Guidelines for the verification and validation of expert system software and conventional software: Bibliography. Volume 8  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume contains all of the technical references found in Volumes 1-7 concerning the development of guidelines for the verification and validation of expert systems, knowledge-based systems, other AI systems, object-oriented systems, and conventional systems.

Miller, L.A.; Hayes, J.E.; Mirsky, S.M. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Chemical Weapons Convention Requirements Part 745page 1 Export Administration Regulations September 28, 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Weapons Convention Requirements Part 745­page 1 Export Administration Regulations September 28, 2001 §745.1 ADVANCE NOTIFICATION AND ANNUAL REPORT OF ALL EXPORTS OF SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) not less than 30 days in advance of every export

Bernstein, Daniel

396

EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES from motor vehicles because unlike emissions of CO2, which are relatively easy to estimate, emissions-related emissions. In the U.S., for example, emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the production and use of motor

Kammen, Daniel M.

397

Nuclear forward scattering vs. conventional Mossbauer studies of atomically tailored Eu-based materials.  

SciTech Connect

With the decrease in size of devices, rapid characterization of nano-devices is an inevitable necessity. It is shown that Moessbauer spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation from the advanced photon source provides such a tool of investigation. Results are presented and compared for conventional Moessbauer and Nuclear Forward Scattering for {sup 151}Eu-doped magnesium sulfide as an example, especially at low concentrations.

Konjhodzic, A.; Adamczyk, A.; Hasan, Z.; Alp, E. E.; Sturhahn, W.; Zhao, J.; Carroll, J. J.; Vagizov, F.; Univ. of Philadelphia; Youngstown State Univ.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Abstract --Image segmentation plays an important role in medical image processing. The aim of conventional hard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of conventional hard segmentation methods is to assign a unique label to each voxel. However, due to the limited (PV) effect. Using the hard segmentation methods, the PV effect can substantially decrease evaluation. Results demonstrated that a hard segmentation method would loss a significant amount of details

399

Wind Powering America Fact Sheet Series 1 Wind energy is more expensive than conventional energy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Powering America Fact Sheet Series 1 Wind energy is more expensive than conventional energy, the commission determined that wind energy provided the lowest cost of any new generation resource submitted a reduction in payments by electricity customers of $305 million in one year.2 2 Wind energy requires

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

400

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

103,132 1,363,072 1,314,949 -3.8 Reformulated Midgrade 1,456 1,562 1,304 1,307 1,223 1,252 16,984 15,634 -8.2 Conventional 1,456 1,562 1,304 1,307...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

881,032 -3.5 Reformulated Midgrade 1,246 1,255 1,340 1,281 1,456 1,562 11,419 10,548 -8.0 Conventional 1,246 1,255 1,340 1,281 1,456 1,562 11,419 10,548...

402

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,140,752 1,105,134 -3.4 Reformulated Midgrade 1,340 1,281 1,456 1,562 1,304 1,307 14,306 13,159 -8.3 Conventional 1,340 1,281 1,456 1,562 1,304 1,307...

403

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

991,801 -3.7 Reformulated Midgrade 1,255 1,340 1,281 1,456 1,562 1,304 12,901 11,852 -8.5 Conventional 1,255 1,340 1,281 1,456 1,562 1,304 12,901...

404

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,250,504 1,211,817 -3.4 Reformulated Midgrade 1,281 1,456 1,562 1,304 1,307 1,223 15,653 14,382 -8.4 Conventional 1,281 1,456 1,562 1,304 1,307...

405

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-3.4 Reformulated Midgrade 1,209 1,246 1,255 1,340 1,281 1,456 9,794 8,986 -8.7 Conventional 1,209 1,246 1,255 1,340 1,281 1,456 9,794 8,986 -8.7...

406

Cost of energy from some renewable and conventional technologies. Progress report, FY 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Up-to-date, consistent, and transparent estimates of the cost of delivered energy from a selected number of solar and renewable technologies were developed and these were compared with the costs of conventional alternatives meeting the energy needs in comparable applications. Technology characterizations and cost assessments of representative systems relating to 23 solar and renewable resource technology/application pairs were performed. For each pair, identical assessments were also made for representative conventional (e.g., fossil fuel) competing systems. Section 2 summarizes the standardized methodology developed to do the technology characterizations and cost assessments. Assessments of technology/application pairs relating to distributed applications are presented in Section 3. Central system assessments are presented in Section 4. (MCW)

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Outline of an on-site inspection regime for conventional arms control in Europe  

SciTech Connect

The complexity of the negotiations on Conventional Forces in Europe (CFE) was emphasized recently by General John R. Galvin, SACEUR, when he stated, {open_quotes}The difficulties of comparing the relative strengths of strategic or intermediate-range nuclear arsenals pale in comparison with the problems of assessing the relative capabilities of opposing conventional forces.{open_quotes} Throughout this process, intensive and rigorous verification measures must be developed and enforced to ensure an acceptable degree of reliability. The eventual agreement will require a complex verification monitoring process covering a vast geographical area. The long-term success of the agreement to a large extent will depend on the level of confidence achieved by the verification process and the effective deployment of technological means will be essential to that process.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Conventional BCS, Unconventional BCS, and Non-BCS Hidden Dineutron Phases in Neutron Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nature of pairing correlations in neutron matter is re-examined. Working within the conventional approximation in which the $nn$ pairing interaction is provided by a realistic bare $nn$ potential fitted to scattering data, it is demonstrated that the standard BCS theory fails in regions of neutron number density where the pairing constant $\\lambda$, depending crucially on density, has a non-BCS negative sign. We are led to propose a non-BCS scenario for pairing phenomena in neutron matter that involves the formation of a hidden dineutron state. In low-density neutron matter where the pairing constant has the standard BCS sign, two phases organized by pairing correlations are possible and compete energetically: a conventional BCS phase and a dineutron phase. In dense neutron matter, where $\\lambda$ changes sign, only the dineutron phase survives and exists until the critical density for termination of pairing correlations is reached at approximately twice the neutron density in heavy atomic nuclei.

V. A. Khodel; J. W. Clark; V. R. Shaginyan; M. V. Zverev

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

409

Combustion Turbine Guidelines: Conventional and Advanced Machines: Volume 5: Westinghouse Models W501A-D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more than a decade, EPRI has been developing gas turbine hot section component repair and coating guidelines to assist utilities in the refurbishment of these critical and expensive parts. Utilities and repair vendors have used these guidelines to perform repairs on buckets (blades), turbine nozzles (vanes), combustion liners, and combustor transitions. Guidelines now exist for a variety of conventional and advanced General Electric and Westinghouse heavy frame gas turbines.

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

410

Effects of Markets and Operations on the Suboptimization of Pumped Storage and Conventional Hydroelectric Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed plant performance analyses were conducted using unit performance data, market data, and plant operational data from 2008, 2009, and 2010 for five pumped storage plants and three conventional hydroelectric plants. These eight case studies encompass three markets (MISO, PJM, and NYISO) and two regions (Southeast area and Western area). Owners for the eight plants include three investor-owned utilities, two state power authorities, and one federal power corporation. This report expands on ...

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

411

Gasoline-fueled hybrid vs. conventional vehicle emissions and fuel economy.  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses the relative fuel economy and emissions behavior, both measured and modeled, of technically comparable, contemporary hybrid and conventional vehicles fueled by gasoline, in terms of different driving cycles. Criteria pollutants (hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides) are discussed, and the potential emissions benefits of designing hybrids for grid connection are briefly considered. In 1997, Toyota estimated that their grid-independent hybrid vehicle would obtain twice the fuel economy of a comparable conventional vehicle on the Japan 10/15 mode driving cycle. This initial result, as well as the fuel economy level (66 mpg), made its way into the U.S. press. Criteria emissions amounting to one-tenth of Japanese standards were cited, and some have interpreted these results to suggest that the grid-independent hybrid can reduce criteria emissions in the U.S. more sharply than can a conventional gasoline vehicle. This paper shows that the potential of contemporary grid-independent hybrid vehicle technology for reducing emissions and fuel consumption under U.S. driving conditions is less than some have inferred. The importance (and difficulty) of doing test and model assessments with comparable driving cycles, comparable emissions control technology, and comparable performance capabilities is emphasized. Compared with comparable-technology conventional vehicles, grid-independent hybrids appear to have no clear criteria pollutant benefits (or disbenefits). (Such benefits are clearly possible with grid-connectable hybrids operating in zero emissions mode.) However, significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions (i.e., fuel consumption) are possible with hybrid vehicles when they are used to best advantage.

Anderson, J.; Bharathan, D.; He, J.; Plotkin, S.; Santini, D.; Vyas, A.

1999-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

412

A Rosetta Stone Relating Conventions In Photo-Meson Partial Wave Analyses  

SciTech Connect

A new generation of complete experiments in pseudoscalar meson photo-production is being pursued at several laboratories. While new data are emerging, there is some confusion regarding definitions of asymmetries and the conventions used in partial wave analyses (PWA). We present expressions for constructing asymmetries as coordinate-system independent ratios of cross sections, along with the names used for these ratios by different PWA groups.

A.M. Sandorfi, B. Dey, A. Sarantsev, L. Tiator, R. Workman

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation : the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and policy-making in Panama.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Framework Convention on Climate Change has yet to deal with tropical deforestation although it represents an important source of greenhouse gas emissions. In December (more)

Guay, Bruno.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Gas Mileage of 2014 Vehicles by Dodge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Dodge Vehicles 4 Dodge Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 2014 Dodge Avenger 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic 4-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2014 Dodge Avenger 21 City 24 Combined 30 Highway 2014 Dodge Avenger 4 cyl, 2.4 L, Automatic 6-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 2014 Dodge Avenger 20 City 24 Combined 31 Highway 2014 Dodge Avenger 6 cyl, 3.6 L, Automatic 6-spd, Regular Gas or E85 Compare 2014 Dodge Avenger Gas 19 City 22 Combined 29 Highway E85 14 City 16 Combined 21 Highway 2014 Dodge Challenger 6 cyl, 3.6 L, Automatic 5-spd, Midgrade Gasoline Compare 2014 Dodge Challenger 18 City 21 Combined 27 Highway 2014 Dodge Challenger 8 cyl, 5.7 L, Automatic 5-spd, Midgrade Gasoline Compare 2014 Dodge Challenger 15 City 18 Combined 25 Highway 2014 Dodge Challenger 8 cyl, 5.7 L, Manual 6-spd, Premium Gasoline

415

CAES (conventional compressed-air energy storage) plant with steam generation: Preliminary design and cost analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was performed to evaluate the performance and cost characteristics of two alternative CAES-plant concepts which utilize the low-pressure expander's exhaust-gas heat for the generation of steam in a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). Both concepts result in increased net-power generation relative to a conventional CAES plant with a recuperator. The HRSG-generated steam produces additional power in either a separate steam-turbine bottoming cycle (CAESCC) or by direct injection into and expansion through the CAES-turboexpander train (CAESSI). The HRSG, which is a proven component of combined-cycle and cogeneration plants, replaces the recuperator of a conventional CAES plant, which has demonstrated the potential for engineering and operating related problems and higher costs than were originally estimated. To enhance the credibility of the results, the analyses performed were based on the performance, operational and cost data of the 110-MW CAES plant currently under construction for the Alabama Electric Cooperative (AEC). The results indicate that CAESCC- and CAESSI-plant concepts are attractive alternatives to the conventional CAES plant with recuperator, providing greater power generation, up to 44-MW relative to the AEC CAES plant, with competitive operating and capital costs. 5 refs., 43 figs., 26 tabs.

Nakhamkin, M.; Swensen, E.C.; Abitante, P.A. (Energy Storage and Power Consultants, Mountainside, NJ (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

SUPPLEMENT TO THE PAPER: Separating the regular and irregular energy levels and their statistics in Hamiltonian system with mixed classical dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a technical supplement to the above mentioned paper we present 192 consecutive eigenstates for the Robnik billiard with the shape parameter $\\lambda=0.15$ from 10,001st to 10,192nd, by showing the plots in the configuration space and in the phase space. The latter is smoothed projection of the Wigner function onto the surface of section. By comparison with the classical SOS plots we thus examine all eigenstates and classify them in regular and irregular: There are 70 regular states and 122 irregular states, thus giving the estimate of the relative measure of the regular component $\\rho_1=0.365$, which is in excellent agreement with the classical value $\\rho_1=0.360$ calculated and reported by Prosen and Robnik (1993).

Baowen Li; Marko Robnik

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 483,146 517,898 526,837 540,301 564,932 507,854 4,476,666 4,559,051 2.2 Regular 383,622 416,870 424,735 430,015 447,094 403,797 3,490,879 3,624,230 4.2 Conventional 76,131 87,574 90,924 99,358 103,625 85,392 752,417 777,719 3.7 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 307,491 329,296 333,811 330,657 343,469 318,405 2,738,462 2,846,511 4.3 Midgrade 36,183 38,726 38,791 40,369 42,027 36,317 375,934 340,976 -9.0 Conventional 4,848 5,549 5,989 7,246 7,514 5,617 60,295 52,990 -11.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 31,335 33,177 32,802 33,123 34,513 30,700 315,639 287,986 -8.4 Premium 63,341 62,302 63,311 69,917 75,811 67,740 609,853 593,845 -2.3

418

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 507,854 551,005 519,384 532,551 507,798 473,140 930,735 980,938 5.4 Regular 403,797 439,428 413,569 423,893 404,830 375,054 734,113 779,884 6.2 Conventional 85,392 90,979 84,964 85,820 86,681 79,490 155,254 166,171 7.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 318,405 348,449 328,605 338,073 318,149 295,564 578,859 613,713 6.0 Midgrade 36,317 37,629 34,336 34,877 33,314 31,586 71,456 64,900 -9.2 Conventional 5,617 5,829 5,231 5,343 5,332 4,984 10,809 10,316 -4.6 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 30,700 31,800 29,105 29,534 27,982 26,602 60,647 54,584 -10.0 Premium 67,740 73,948 71,479 73,781 69,654 66,500 125,166 136,154 8.8

419

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 522,909 496,923 511,860 469,410 527,337 464,928 480,036 464,928 -3.1 Regular 383,811 368,609 381,794 351,762 397,163 352,437 339,080 352,437 3.9 Conventional 89,198 83,179 85,363 77,639 84,422 74,152 49,126 74,152 50.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 294,613 285,430 296,431 274,123 312,741 278,285 289,954 278,285 -4.0 Midgrade 53,258 49,512 50,511 45,003 49,862 42,715 49,981 42,715 -14.5 Conventional 9,746 8,535 8,326 7,099 7,742 6,825 5,463 6,825 24.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 43,512 40,977 42,185 37,904 42,120 35,890 44,518 35,890 -19.4 Premium 85,840 78,802 79,555 72,645 80,312 69,776 90,975 69,776 -23.3

420

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 July 1 July 2011 August 2011 September 2011 October 2011 November 2011 Cumulative Year To Date 2010 Cumulative Year To Date 2011 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 10,899,028 11,133,916 11,472,961 10,789,103 11,017,897 10,662,361 122,166,717 118,508,987 -3.0 Regular 9,487,769 9,674,371 9,968,112 9,402,919 9,589,599 9,283,659 105,535,641 103,338,852 -2.1 Conventional 6,308,960 6,446,632 6,605,979 6,213,926 6,282,545 6,100,348 70,455,259 68,297,437 -3.1 Reformulated 3,178,809 3,227,739 3,362,133 3,188,993 3,307,054 3,183,311 35,080,382 35,041,415 -0.1 Midgrade 421,461 439,632 444,940 402,797 414,365 400,751 5,237,176 4,573,492 -12.7 Conventional 324,238 338,041 342,439 306,356 316,184 308,101 4,006,400 3,507,079 -12.5

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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421

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 532,551 507,798 471,966 528,923 525,025 563,267 2,419,127 2,596,979 7.4 Regular 423,893 404,830 374,051 423,574 425,312 450,585 1,918,589 2,078,352 8.3 Conventional 85,820 86,681 78,103 84,785 84,632 94,085 398,420 428,286 7.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 338,073 318,149 295,948 338,789 340,680 356,500 1,520,169 1,650,066 8.5 Midgrade 34,877 33,314 31,476 35,018 33,447 37,176 183,472 170,431 -7.1 Conventional 5,343 5,332 4,965 5,126 4,880 5,761 26,624 26,064 -2.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 29,534 27,982 26,511 29,892 28,567 31,415 156,848 144,367 -8.0 Premium 73,781 69,654 66,439 70,331 66,266 75,506 317,066 348,196 9.8

422

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 485,599 445,136 487,348 483,146 517,898 526,698 2,913,722 2,945,825 1.7 Regular 382,693 351,420 383,984 383,622 416,870 424,633 2,269,099 2,343,222 3.8 Conventional 81,128 74,126 79,461 76,131 87,574 90,822 473,047 489,242 4.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 301,565 277,294 304,523 307,491 329,296 333,811 1,796,052 1,853,980 3.8 Midgrade 37,658 33,798 37,107 36,183 38,726 38,776 246,954 222,248 -9.5 Conventional 5,706 5,103 5,418 4,848 5,549 5,974 37,910 32,598 -13.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 31,952 28,695 31,689 31,335 33,177 32,802 209,044 189,650 -8.8 Premium 65,248 59,918 66,257 63,341 62,302 63,289 397,669 380,355 -3.8

423

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Oregon Motor Gasoline 125,808 119,737 113,339 129,220 103,710 107,583 240,789 211,293 -13.7 Regular 104,798 99,178 93,150 106,433 87,146 89,279 197,956 176,425 -12.4 Conventional W 72,818 53,121 58,414 47,766 48,793 W 96,559 NA Oxygenated W 26,360 40,029 48,019 39,380 40,486 81,481 79,866 -3.6 Reformulated – – – – – [–] W – NA Midgrade 7,653 7,656 7,437 8,430 6,076 6,783 16,533 12,859 -23.5 Conventional W 5,046 3,943 4,377 3,128 3,568 8,292 6,696 -20.6 Oxygenated W 2,610 3,494 4,053 2,948 3,215 8,241 6,163 -26.5 Reformulated – – – – – [–] – – – Premium 13,357 12,903 12,752 14,357 10,488 11,521 W 22,009 NA

424

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 506,958 545,539 557,326 578,792 575,573 533,235 5,013,394 4,817,378 -3.9 Regular 446,104 480,482 489,993 505,930 503,624 465,652 4,287,269 4,222,778 -1.5 Conventional 88,991 98,590 106,317 115,384 117,509 101,392 860,025 894,858 4.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 357,113 381,892 383,676 390,546 386,115 364,260 3,427,244 3,327,920 -2.9 Midgrade 18,128 19,540 20,189 22,411 22,431 18,855 223,642 177,820 -20.5 Conventional 2,220 2,548 2,831 3,825 3,614 2,661 32,067 24,885 -22.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 15,908 16,992 17,358 18,586 18,817 16,194 191,575 152,935 -20.2 Premium 42,726 45,517 47,144 50,451 49,518 48,728 502,483 416,780 -17.1

425

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 517,898 526,837 540,301 564,932 507,854 551,003 4,990,670 5,110,054 2.7 Regular 416,870 424,735 430,015 447,094 403,797 439,426 3,896,856 4,063,656 4.6 Conventional 87,574 90,924 99,358 103,625 85,392 90,977 844,768 868,696 3.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 329,296 333,811 330,657 343,469 318,405 348,449 3,052,088 3,194,960 5.0 Midgrade 38,726 38,791 40,369 42,027 36,317 37,629 416,116 378,605 -8.7 Conventional 5,549 5,989 7,246 7,514 5,617 5,829 66,363 58,819 -11.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 33,177 32,802 33,123 34,513 30,700 31,800 349,753 319,786 -8.3 Premium 62,302 63,311 69,917 75,811 67,740 73,948 677,698 667,793 -1.1

426

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 580,742 556,122 584,646 525,232 495,628 553,048 1,617,006 1,573,908 -1.6 Regular 492,401 473,300 495,194 443,125 418,949 471,700 1,338,260 1,333,774 0.8 Conventional 99,633 93,097 97,753 89,276 84,235 92,353 265,100 265,864 1.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 392,768 380,203 397,441 353,849 334,714 379,347 1,073,160 1,067,910 0.6 Midgrade 27,555 24,969 26,978 25,145 23,637 25,345 87,880 74,127 -14.7 Conventional 4,083 3,397 3,613 3,520 3,396 3,436 12,677 10,352 -17.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 23,472 21,572 23,365 21,625 20,241 21,909 75,203 63,775 -14.3 Premium 60,786 57,853 62,474 56,962 53,042 56,003 190,866 166,007 -12.1

427

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 551,005 519,384 532,551 507,798 471,966 528,669 1,418,083 1,508,433 6.4 Regular 439,428 413,569 423,893 404,830 374,051 423,343 1,118,097 1,202,224 7.5 Conventional 90,979 84,964 85,820 86,681 78,103 85,079 234,715 249,863 6.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 348,449 328,605 338,073 318,149 295,948 338,264 883,382 952,361 7.8 Midgrade 37,629 34,336 34,877 33,314 31,476 35,066 108,563 99,856 -8.0 Conventional 5,829 5,231 5,343 5,332 4,965 5,145 16,227 15,442 -4.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 31,800 29,105 29,534 27,982 26,511 29,921 92,336 84,414 -8.6 Premium 73,948 71,479 73,781 69,654 66,439 70,260 191,423 206,353 7.8

428

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 May 2 May 2012 June 2012 July 2012 August 2012 September 2012 Cumulative Year To Date 2011 Cumulative Year To Date 2012 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 10,381,681 10,972,982 10,869,029 10,957,478 11,187,468 10,259,015 96,828,729 95,374,208 -1.9 Regular 9,055,073 9,485,897 9,387,294 9,445,331 9,686,539 8,924,135 84,465,594 82,777,729 -2.4 Conventional 6,056,073 6,331,044 6,271,466 6,325,622 6,471,411 5,905,794 55,914,544 55,098,887 -1.8 Reformulated 2,999,000 3,154,853 3,115,828 3,119,709 3,215,128 3,018,341 28,551,050 27,678,842 -3.4 Midgrade 395,634 448,440 437,884 440,431 443,914 389,366 3,758,376 3,739,014 -0.9 Conventional 308,218 356,037 344,998 344,074 347,342 302,476 2,882,794 2,919,273 0.9

429

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 August 8 August 2008 September 2008 October 2008 November 2008 December 2008 Cumulative Year To Date 2007 Cumulative Year To Date 2008 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,310,692 11,362,243 10,474,121 11,337,709 10,689,646 11,230,279 137,472,278 132,619,345 -3.8 Regular 9,838,238 9,866,147 9,079,750 9,857,282 9,252,412 9,662,376 117,068,294 114,689,815 -2.3 Conventional 6,600,174 6,585,394 6,037,783 6,564,432 6,124,047 6,376,363 78,867,387 76,240,598 -3.6 Reformulated 3,238,064 3,280,753 3,041,967 3,292,850 3,128,365 3,286,013 38,200,907 38,449,217 0.4 Midgrade 565,553 548,757 515,171 530,493 494,732 533,102 7,403,157 6,700,084 -9.7 Conventional 427,281 411,486 389,074 399,636 369,952 398,446 5,244,782 5,004,706 -4.8

430

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 November 9 November 2009 December 2009 January 2010 February 2010 March 2010 Cumulative Year To Date 2009 Cumulative Year To Date 2010 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,183,246 10,595,653 11,183,334 10,395,207 9,851,756 11,241,338 31,589,113 31,488,301 -0.3 Regular 9,672,142 9,186,805 9,685,059 9,021,930 8,535,040 9,751,208 27,246,238 27,308,178 0.2 Conventional 6,424,996 6,106,928 6,452,065 5,960,433 5,681,206 6,471,360 17,928,088 18,112,999 1.0 Reformulated 3,247,146 3,079,877 3,232,994 3,061,497 2,853,834 3,279,848 9,318,150 9,195,179 -1.3 Midgrade 498,472 464,446 489,811 452,262 430,593 471,743 1,481,779 1,354,598 -8.6 Conventional 372,123 345,467 364,262 338,572 327,635 357,128 1,105,975 1,023,335 -7.5

431

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 September 6 September 2006 October 2006 November 2006 December 2006 January 2007 Cumulative Year To Date 2006 Cumulative Year To Date 2007 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 12,172,851 11,242,589 11,701,993 11,359,082 11,552,997 11,119,003 10,838,448 11,119,003 2.6 Regular 10,373,158 9,543,499 9,874,534 9,625,305 9,796,295 9,428,138 9,134,832 9,428,138 3.2 Conventional 6,781,770 6,142,634 6,329,866 6,144,745 6,202,908 6,337,729 5,725,130 6,337,729 10.7 Reformulated 3,302,924 3,106,632 3,189,798 3,109,472 3,223,071 3,090,409 3,044,703 3,090,409 1.5 Midgrade 680,762 610,997 680,865 622,569 630,598 593,692 676,491 593,692 -12.2 Conventional 445,905 390,547 411,336 395,174 399,375 408,951 431,829 408,951 -5.3

432

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 July 9 July 2009 August 2009 September 2009 October 2009 November 2009 Cumulative Year To Date 2008 Cumulative Year To Date 2009 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,283,520 11,654,555 11,535,790 10,957,001 11,183,246 10,589,133 121,635,376 121,199,617 -0.1 Regular 9,749,642 10,031,422 9,952,911 9,453,135 9,672,142 9,179,115 105,290,623 104,578,116 -0.4 Conventional 6,516,508 6,753,613 6,666,886 6,292,983 6,424,996 6,104,520 69,773,294 69,490,874 -0.1 Reformulated 3,233,134 3,277,809 3,286,025 3,160,152 3,247,146 3,074,595 35,517,329 35,087,242 -0.9 Midgrade 520,328 539,700 525,970 493,246 498,472 464,280 6,140,396 5,582,418 -8.8 Conventional 395,271 406,417 394,513 368,511 372,123 345,425 4,566,567 4,188,050 -8.0

433

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 May 8 May 2008 June 2008 July 2008 August 2008 September 2008 Cumulative Year To Date 2007 Cumulative Year To Date 2008 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,130,866 11,406,473 10,999,201 11,310,692 11,362,243 10,483,382 103,320,799 99,370,972 -4.2 Regular 9,619,758 9,899,908 9,594,749 9,838,238 9,866,147 9,085,231 87,878,683 85,923,226 -2.6 Conventional 6,407,136 6,607,785 6,381,195 6,600,174 6,585,394 6,042,700 59,295,976 57,180,673 -3.9 Reformulated 3,212,622 3,292,123 3,213,554 3,238,064 3,280,753 3,042,531 28,582,707 28,742,553 0.2 Midgrade 578,959 583,483 548,464 565,553 548,757 519,014 5,548,991 5,145,600 -7.6 Conventional 430,230 434,845 411,585 427,281 411,486 392,917 3,903,522 3,840,515 -2.0

434

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 May 3 May 2013 June 2013 July 2013 August 2013 September 2013 Cumulative Year To Date 2012 Cumulative Year To Date 2013 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 10,550,973 11,084,475 10,783,633 11,034,902 11,179,256 10,342,598 95,348,662 95,578,178 0.6 Regular 9,152,875 9,589,573 9,331,481 9,532,806 9,659,579 8,992,285 82,753,484 82,935,335 0.6 Conventional 6,116,834 6,415,347 6,174,698 6,363,317 6,469,925 6,038,462 55,081,801 55,328,030 0.8 Reformulated 3,036,041 3,174,226 3,156,783 3,169,489 3,189,654 2,953,823 27,671,683 27,607,305 0.1 Midgrade 384,981 400,872 392,583 413,588 405,759 319,007 3,738,811 3,423,708 -8.1 Conventional 303,466 315,026 309,213 327,558 318,371 240,516 2,919,184 2,682,122 -7.8

435

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 545,541 567,208 520,002 553,717 553,949 505,933 1,017,514 1,059,882 2.4 Regular 452,103 468,190 426,231 451,348 455,314 417,681 826,695 872,995 3.8 Conventional 92,595 96,551 84,706 90,958 89,720 83,902 172,442 173,622 -1.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 359,508 371,639 341,525 360,390 365,594 333,779 654,253 699,373 5.1 Midgrade 30,416 31,258 29,317 32,045 31,218 27,952 65,171 59,170 -10.7 Conventional 4,820 4,956 4,291 4,765 4,659 4,089 10,378 8,748 -17.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 25,596 26,302 25,026 27,280 26,559 23,863 54,793 50,422 -9.5 Premium 63,022 67,760 64,454 70,324 67,417 60,300 125,648 127,717 0.0

436

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 July 8 July 2008 August 2008 September 2008 October 2008 November 2008 Cumulative Year To Date 2007 Cumulative Year To Date 2008 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 10,999,201 11,310,692 11,362,243 10,474,121 11,337,709 10,661,075 126,230,652 121,360,495 -4.1 Regular 9,594,749 9,838,238 9,866,147 9,079,750 9,857,282 9,232,785 107,450,344 105,007,812 -2.6 Conventional 6,381,195 6,600,174 6,585,394 6,037,783 6,564,432 6,110,846 72,474,751 69,851,034 -3.9 Reformulated 3,213,554 3,238,064 3,280,753 3,041,967 3,292,850 3,121,939 34,975,593 35,156,778 0.2 Midgrade 548,464 565,553 548,757 515,171 530,493 491,994 6,791,527 6,164,244 -9.5 Conventional 411,585 427,281 411,486 389,074 399,636 367,510 4,801,833 4,603,818 -4.4

437

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 507,798 471,966 528,923 525,025 566,449 561,919 2,945,964 3,162,080 7.3 Regular 404,830 374,051 423,574 425,312 453,084 447,496 2,343,324 2,528,347 7.9 Conventional 86,681 78,103 84,785 84,632 94,055 93,656 489,344 521,912 6.7 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 318,149 295,948 338,789 340,680 359,029 353,840 1,853,980 2,006,435 8.2 Midgrade 33,314 31,476 35,018 33,447 37,392 37,173 222,263 207,820 -6.5 Conventional 5,332 4,965 5,126 4,880 5,763 5,925 32,613 31,991 -1.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 27,982 26,511 29,892 28,567 31,629 31,248 189,650 175,829 -7.3 Premium 69,654 66,439 70,331 66,266 75,973 77,250 380,377 425,913 12.0

438

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 October 9 October 2009 November 2009 December 2009 January 2010 February 2010 Cumulative Year To Date 2009 Cumulative Year To Date 2010 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 10,957,001 11,183,246 10,595,653 11,183,334 10,395,207 9,837,550 20,542,009 20,232,757 -1.5 Regular 9,453,135 9,672,142 9,186,805 9,685,059 9,021,930 8,524,614 17,728,933 17,546,544 -1.0 Conventional 6,292,983 6,424,996 6,106,928 6,452,065 5,960,433 5,671,455 11,654,612 11,631,888 -0.2 Reformulated 3,160,152 3,247,146 3,079,877 3,232,994 3,061,497 2,853,159 6,074,321 5,914,656 -2.6 Midgrade 493,246 498,472 464,446 489,811 452,262 430,311 967,697 882,573 -8.8 Conventional 368,511 372,123 345,467 364,262 338,572 324,506 723,881 663,078 -8.4

439

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 June 8 June 2008 July 2008 August 2008 September 2008 October 2008 Cumulative Year To Date 2007 Cumulative Year To Date 2008 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,406,473 10,999,201 11,310,692 11,362,243 10,474,121 11,353,988 115,112,909 110,715,699 -4.1 Regular 9,899,908 9,594,749 9,838,238 9,866,147 9,079,750 9,871,958 97,913,352 95,789,703 -2.5 Conventional 6,607,785 6,381,195 6,600,174 6,585,394 6,037,783 6,587,743 66,073,385 63,763,499 -3.8 Reformulated 3,292,123 3,213,554 3,238,064 3,280,753 3,041,967 3,284,215 31,839,967 32,026,204 0.3 Midgrade 583,483 548,464 565,553 548,757 515,171 530,446 6,191,466 5,672,203 -8.7 Conventional 434,845 411,585 427,281 411,486 389,074 399,640 4,366,660 4,236,312 -3.3

440

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 May 9 May 2009 June 2009 July 2009 August 2009 September 2009 Cumulative Year To Date 2008 Cumulative Year To Date 2009 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,005,654 11,401,605 11,283,520 11,654,555 11,535,790 10,939,745 99,553,891 99,409,982 0.2 Regular 9,475,742 9,817,769 9,749,642 10,031,422 9,952,911 9,425,040 86,135,310 85,698,764 -0.1 Conventional 6,270,244 6,533,036 6,516,508 6,753,613 6,666,886 6,254,503 57,098,665 56,922,878 0.1 Reformulated 3,205,498 3,284,733 3,233,134 3,277,809 3,286,025 3,170,537 29,036,645 28,775,886 -0.5 Midgrade 520,486 538,157 520,328 539,700 525,970 502,085 5,114,021 4,628,505 -9.2 Conventional 393,850 405,965 395,271 406,417 394,513 377,682 3,797,759 3,479,673 -8.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regular midgrade conventional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 544,776 585,964 544,609 570,066 532,203 487,119 979,764 1,019,322 4.0 Regular 433,667 470,192 438,253 459,523 428,774 399,696 778,881 828,470 6.4 Conventional 91,845 98,835 90,774 95,486 90,155 83,021 164,784 173,176 5.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 341,822 371,357 347,479 364,037 338,619 316,675 614,097 655,294 6.7 Midgrade 35,957 37,629 35,045 36,612 35,132 29,913 64,790 65,045 0.4 Conventional 5,748 5,973 5,333 5,575 5,644 4,757 10,297 10,401 1.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 30,209 31,656 29,712 31,037 29,488 25,156 54,493 54,644 0.3 Premium 75,152 78,143 71,311 73,931 68,297 57,510 136,093 125,807 -7.6

442

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 April 0 April 2010 May 2010 June 2010 July 2010 August 2010 Cumulative Year To Date 2009 Cumulative Year To Date 2010 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,242,824 11,144,717 11,533,016 11,398,081 11,803,192 11,753,047 88,524,670 89,121,840 0.7 Regular 9,751,214 9,659,531 9,957,763 9,824,322 10,152,476 10,127,205 76,318,984 77,029,481 0.9 Conventional 6,470,265 6,449,578 6,614,490 6,577,219 6,832,436 6,808,868 50,799,128 51,394,495 1.2 Reformulated 3,280,949 3,209,953 3,343,273 3,247,103 3,320,040 3,318,337 25,519,856 25,634,986 0.5 Midgrade 472,620 468,493 492,280 493,853 518,447 506,030 4,140,246 3,834,578 -7.4 Conventional 357,875 357,108 375,084 380,545 399,954 389,336 3,114,250 2,926,109 -6.0

443

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 523,744 573,398 571,866 610,670 616,068 545,544 4,908,400 4,992,566 1.7 Regular 432,090 465,864 462,449 488,921 499,355 452,096 3,914,132 4,068,858 4.0 Conventional 86,165 94,205 96,905 106,748 109,285 92,588 829,429 847,392 2.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 345,925 371,659 365,544 382,173 390,070 359,508 3,084,703 3,221,466 4.4 Midgrade 30,510 34,242 34,914 38,917 38,243 30,421 326,185 304,156 -6.8 Conventional 4,179 5,204 5,476 6,910 6,876 4,825 52,810 48,332 -8.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 26,331 29,038 29,438 32,007 31,367 25,596 273,375 255,824 -6.4 Premium 61,144 73,292 74,503 82,832 78,470 63,027 668,083 619,552 -7.3

444

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 January 9 January 2010 February 2010 March 2010 April 2010 May 2010 Cumulative Year To Date 2009 Cumulative Year To Date 2010 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,183,334 10,395,207 9,851,756 11,242,824 11,144,717 11,552,855 53,996,372 54,187,359 0.4 Regular 9,685,059 9,021,930 8,535,040 9,751,214 9,659,531 9,974,233 46,539,749 46,941,948 0.9 Conventional 6,452,065 5,960,433 5,681,206 6,470,265 6,449,578 6,634,773 30,731,368 31,196,255 1.5 Reformulated 3,232,994 3,061,497 2,853,834 3,280,949 3,209,953 3,339,460 15,808,381 15,745,693 -0.4 Midgrade 489,811 452,262 430,593 472,620 468,493 492,803 2,540,422 2,316,771 -8.8 Conventional 364,262 338,572 327,635 357,875 357,108 375,316 1,905,790 1,756,506 -7.8

445

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prime Supplier Sales Volume Prime Supplier Sales Volume Definitions Key Terms Definition Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Finished Aviation Gasoline A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifications are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Gasoline Grades The classification of gasoline by octane ratings. Each type of gasoline (conventional and reformulated) is classified by three grades - regular, midgrade, and premium. Note: gasoline sales are reported by grade in accordance with their classification at the time of sale. In general, automotive octane requirements are lower at high altitudes. Therefore, in some areas of the United States, such as the Rocky Mountain States, the octane ratings for the gasoline grades may be 2 or more octane points lower.

446

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 566,449 559,488 600,331 607,637 544,776 583,133 5,178,870 5,495,526 6.1 Regular 453,084 445,690 474,800 481,922 433,667 468,135 4,121,313 4,385,065 6.4 Conventional 94,055 93,600 107,710 110,970 91,845 98,333 884,958 930,714 5.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 359,029 352,090 367,090 370,952 341,822 369,802 3,236,355 3,454,351 6.7 Midgrade 37,392 37,061 41,258 41,734 35,957 37,398 381,451 364,055 -4.6 Conventional 5,763 5,927 7,552 7,706 5,748 5,948 59,186 58,947 -0.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 31,629 31,134 33,706 34,028 30,209 31,450 322,265 305,108 -5.3 Premium 75,973 76,737 84,273 83,981 75,152 77,600 676,106 746,406 10.4

447

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 February 10 February 2010 March 2010 April 2010 May 2010 June 2010 Cumulative Year To Date 2009 Cumulative Year To Date 2010 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 10,395,207 9,851,756 11,242,824 11,144,717 11,533,016 11,419,001 65,370,847 65,586,521 0.3 Regular 9,021,930 8,535,040 9,751,214 9,659,531 9,957,763 9,845,077 56,372,705 56,770,555 0.7 Conventional 5,960,433 5,681,206 6,470,265 6,449,578 6,614,490 6,599,560 37,397,616 37,775,532 1.0 Reformulated 3,061,497 2,853,834 3,280,949 3,209,953 3,343,273 3,245,517 18,975,089 18,995,023 0.1 Midgrade 452,262 430,593 472,620 468,493 492,280 493,884 3,071,609 2,810,132 -8.5 Conventional 338,572 327,635 357,875 357,108 375,084 380,576 2,311,120 2,136,850 -7.5

448

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 534,207 506,958 545,539 557,326 578,792 590,558 4,493,513 4,299,128 -4.3 Regular 468,021 446,104 480,482 489,993 505,930 516,633 3,832,579 3,770,135 -1.6 Conventional 94,827 88,991 98,590 106,317 115,384 116,082 768,268 792,039 3.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 373,194 357,113 381,892 383,676 390,546 400,551 3,064,311 2,978,096 -2.8 Midgrade 19,431 18,128 19,540 20,189 22,411 21,871 203,031 158,405 -22.0 Conventional 2,536 2,220 2,548 2,831 3,825 3,711 29,340 22,321 -23.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 16,895 15,908 16,992 17,358 18,586 18,160 173,691 136,084 -21.7 Premium 46,755 42,726 45,517 47,144 50,451 52,054 457,903 370,588 -19.1

449

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 507,903 477,845 534,207 506,958 545,539 544,735 3,287,099 3,117,187 -5.2 Regular 445,636 417,336 468,021 446,104 480,482 478,313 2,800,304 2,735,892 -2.3 Conventional 87,304 84,544 94,827 88,991 98,590 102,228 549,079 556,484 1.3 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 358,332 332,792 373,194 357,113 381,892 376,085 2,251,225 2,179,408 -3.2 Midgrade 18,945 17,890 19,431 18,128 19,540 19,980 147,368 113,914 -22.7 Conventional 2,326 2,324 2,536 2,220 2,548 2,831 19,695 14,785 -24.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 16,619 15,566 16,895 15,908 16,992 17,149 127,673 99,129 -22.4 Premium 43,322 42,619 46,755 42,726 45,517 46,442 339,427 267,381 -21.2

450

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 490,623 514,004 485,038 507,317 485,599 444,938 926,862 930,537 2.1 Regular 385,329 405,977 381,467 399,305 382,693 351,486 706,114 734,179 5.7 Conventional 88,190 92,351 79,597 83,245 81,128 74,126 151,919 155,254 3.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 297,139 313,626 301,870 316,060 301,565 277,360 554,195 578,925 6.2 Midgrade 39,487 40,182 38,304 40,249 37,658 33,573 84,254 71,231 -14.0 Conventional 6,437 6,068 5,346 5,771 5,706 5,103 13,490 10,809 -18.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 33,050 34,114 32,958 34,478 31,952 28,470 70,764 60,422 -13.2 Premium 65,807 67,845 65,267 67,763 65,248 59,879 136,494 125,127 -6.8

451

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 523,217 546,228 535,449 499,935 542,611 516,779 2,026,913 2,094,774 3.3 Regular 458,192 480,634 470,492 438,673 479,616 456,628 1,777,097 1,845,409 3.8 Conventional 92,553 95,604 92,531 89,836 92,595 86,101 355,666 361,063 1.5 Reformulated 365,639 385,030 377,961 348,837 387,021 370,527 1,421,431 1,484,346 4.4 Midgrade 18,587 19,274 19,363 18,187 19,268 18,846 74,394 75,664 1.7 Conventional 2,209 2,216 2,248 2,263 2,142 1,889 9,406 8,542 -9.2 Reformulated 16,378 17,058 17,115 15,924 17,126 16,957 64,988 67,122 3.3 Premium 46,438 46,320 45,594 43,075 43,727 41,305 175,422 173,701 -1.0

452

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 June 3 June 2013 July 2013 August 2013 September 2013 October 2013 Cumulative Year To Date 2012 Cumulative Year To Date 2013 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,084,475 10,783,633 11,034,902 11,179,256 10,342,598 10,784,177 106,242,603 106,362,355 0.4 Regular 9,589,573 9,331,481 9,532,806 9,659,579 8,992,285 9,457,445 92,242,655 92,392,780 0.5 Conventional 6,415,347 6,174,698 6,363,317 6,469,925 6,038,462 6,389,646 61,423,900 61,717,676 0.8 Reformulated 3,174,226 3,156,783 3,169,489 3,189,654 2,953,823 3,067,799 30,818,755 30,675,104 -0.1 Midgrade 400,872 392,583 413,588 405,759 319,007 237,817 4,157,646 3,661,525 -11.6 Conventional 315,026 309,213 327,558 318,371 240,516 159,430 3,244,842 2,841,552 -12.1

453

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 485,038 507,317 485,599 445,136 487,348 483,146 1,889,882 1,901,229 1.4 Regular 381,467 399,305 382,693 351,420 383,984 383,622 1,465,417 1,501,719 3.3 Conventional 79,597 83,245 81,128 74,126 79,461 76,131 301,022 310,846 4.1 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 301,870 316,060 301,565 277,294 304,523 307,491 1,164,395 1,190,873 3.1 Midgrade 38,304 40,249 37,658 33,798 37,107 36,183 162,713 144,746 -10.3 Conventional 5,346 5,771 5,706 5,103 5,418 4,848 24,202 21,075 -12.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 32,958 34,478 31,952 28,695 31,689 31,335 138,511 123,671 -10.0 Premium 65,267 67,763 65,248 59,918 66,257 63,341 261,752 254,764 -1.9

454

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 518,672 519,911 533,875 490,623 514,004 485,038 5,401,348 5,457,173 0.7 Regular 410,259 408,078 417,472 385,329 405,977 381,467 3,942,774 4,267,422 7.9 Conventional 87,896 94,215 96,792 88,190 92,351 79,597 788,969 924,192 16.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 322,363 313,863 320,680 297,139 313,626 301,870 3,153,805 3,343,230 5.7 Midgrade 42,183 43,082 44,099 39,487 40,182 38,304 541,340 452,108 -16.7 Conventional 6,874 7,724 8,310 6,437 6,068 5,346 83,053 71,795 -13.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 35,309 35,358 35,789 33,050 34,114 32,958 458,287 380,313 -17.3 Premium 66,230 68,751 72,304 65,807 67,845 65,267 917,234 737,643 -19.8

455

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 March 2 March 2012 April 2012 May 2012 June 2012 July 2012 Cumulative Year To Date 2011 Cumulative Year To Date 2012 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 9,960,675 10,673,467 10,381,681 10,972,982 10,869,029 10,947,799 74,566,665 73,918,046 -1.3 Regular 8,675,313 9,321,700 9,055,073 9,485,897 9,387,294 9,426,516 65,094,563 64,148,240 -1.9 Conventional 5,746,567 6,200,255 6,056,073 6,331,044 6,271,466 6,317,185 43,094,639 42,713,245 -1.4 Reformulated 2,928,746 3,121,445 2,999,000 3,154,853 3,115,828 3,109,331 21,999,924 21,434,995 -3.0 Midgrade 381,953 407,027 395,634 448,440 437,884 442,975 2,910,639 2,908,278 -0.6 Conventional 295,054 316,628 308,218 356,037 344,998 346,993 2,233,999 2,272,374 1.2

456

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 461,983 490,382 472,638 505,168 518,672 520,748 3,417,154 3,434,470 0.0 Regular 353,719 388,272 371,031 393,423 410,259 408,801 2,466,016 2,677,900 8.1 Conventional 77,773 76,905 72,198 84,129 87,896 94,206 454,002 567,253 24.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 275,946 311,367 298,833 309,294 322,363 314,595 2,012,014 2,110,647 4.4 Midgrade 41,541 40,340 38,119 42,058 42,183 43,139 346,783 290,093 -16.7 Conventional 6,665 5,449 5,263 6,834 6,874 7,701 49,839 45,611 -8.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 34,876 34,891 32,856 35,224 35,309 35,438 296,944 244,482 -18.1 Premium 66,723 61,770 63,488 69,687 66,230 68,808 604,355 466,477 -23.2

457

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 April 8 April 2008 May 2008 June 2008 July 2008 August 2008 Cumulative Year To Date 2007 Cumulative Year To Date 2008 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,271,007 11,130,866 11,406,473 10,999,201 11,291,129 11,376,637 92,057,519 88,882,421 -3.8 Regular 9,711,700 9,619,758 9,899,908 9,594,749 9,823,737 9,882,062 78,311,720 76,839,409 -2.3 Conventional 6,451,011 6,407,136 6,607,785 6,381,195 6,592,108 6,609,650 52,834,197 51,154,163 -3.6 Reformulated 3,260,689 3,212,622 3,292,123 3,213,554 3,231,629 3,272,412 25,477,523 25,685,246 0.4 Midgrade 599,077 578,959 583,483 548,464 563,922 549,183 4,946,028 4,625,381 -6.9 Conventional 442,664 430,230 434,845 411,585 426,011 411,689 3,475,667 3,446,531 -1.2

458

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 472,638 505,168 518,672 519,911 533,875 490,499 4,425,394 4,458,007 0.4 Regular 371,031 393,423 410,259 408,078 417,472 385,260 3,212,404 3,479,909 7.9 Conventional 72,198 84,129 87,896 94,215 96,792 88,126 626,721 752,180 19.6 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 298,833 309,294 322,363 313,863 320,680 297,134 2,585,683 2,727,729 5.1 Midgrade 38,119 42,058 42,183 43,082 44,099 39,436 447,025 373,571 -16.7 Conventional 5,263 6,834 6,874 7,724 8,310 6,391 67,954 60,335 -11.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 32,856 35,224 35,309 35,358 35,789 33,045 379,071 313,236 -17.7 Premium 63,488 69,687 66,230 68,751 72,304 65,803 765,965 604,527 -21.4

459

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 December 9 December 2009 January 2010 February 2010 March 2010 April 2010 Cumulative Year To Date 2009 Cumulative Year To Date 2010 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 10,595,653 11,183,334 10,395,207 9,851,756 11,242,824 11,144,981 42,594,767 42,634,768 0.1 Regular 9,186,805 9,685,059 9,021,930 8,535,040 9,751,214 9,660,571 36,721,980 36,968,755 0.7 Conventional 6,106,928 6,452,065 5,960,433 5,681,206 6,470,265 6,450,200 24,198,332 24,562,104 1.5 Reformulated 3,079,877 3,232,994 3,061,497 2,853,834 3,280,949 3,210,371 12,523,648 12,406,651 -0.9 Midgrade 464,446 489,811 452,262 430,593 472,620 468,316 2,002,265 1,823,791 -8.9 Conventional 345,467 364,262 338,572 327,635 357,875 357,125 1,499,825 1,381,207 -7.9

460

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 471,966 528,923 525,025 566,449 559,488 597,880 3,486,265 3,757,529 7.8 Regular 374,051 423,574 425,312 453,084 445,690 473,265 2,773,339 2,999,806 8.2 Conventional 78,103 84,785 84,632 94,055 93,600 107,210 588,702 629,066 6.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 295,948 338,789 340,680 359,029 352,090 366,055 2,184,637 2,370,740 8.5 Midgrade 31,476 35,018 33,447 37,392 37,061 40,905 262,632 248,613 -5.3 Conventional 4,965 5,126 4,880 5,763 5,927 7,511 39,859 39,504 -0.9 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 26,511 29,892 28,567 31,629 31,134 33,394 222,773 209,109 -6.1 Premium 66,439 70,331 66,266 75,973 76,737 83,710 450,294 509,110 13.1

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461

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 July 0 July 2010 August 2010 September 2010 October 2010 November 2010 Cumulative Year To Date 2009 Cumulative Year To Date 2010 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,398,081 11,803,192 11,753,298 11,083,295 11,223,979 10,732,161 121,243,864 122,161,526 0.8 Regular 9,824,322 10,152,476 10,126,997 9,537,620 9,686,303 9,277,719 104,604,286 105,530,915 0.9 Conventional 6,577,219 6,832,436 6,802,068 6,386,594 6,488,317 6,189,664 69,602,540 70,452,270 1.2 Reformulated 3,247,103 3,320,040 3,324,929 3,151,026 3,197,986 3,088,055 35,001,746 35,078,645 0.2 Midgrade 493,853 518,447 506,559 472,745 476,216 453,025 5,605,086 5,237,093 -6.6 Conventional 380,545 399,954 389,334 364,283 366,991 348,975 4,209,040 4,006,356 -4.8

462

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 October 8 October 2008 November 2008 December 2008 January 2009 February 2009 Cumulative Year To Date 2008 Cumulative Year To Date 2009 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 10,474,121 11,337,709 10,689,646 11,213,521 10,593,732 9,954,928 21,407,108 20,548,660 -2.4 Regular 9,079,750 9,857,282 9,252,412 9,645,895 9,139,188 8,594,276 18,307,495 17,733,464 -1.5 Conventional 6,037,783 6,564,432 6,124,047 6,362,103 5,990,942 5,669,894 12,105,278 11,660,836 -2.0 Reformulated 3,041,967 3,292,850 3,128,365 3,283,792 3,148,246 2,924,382 6,202,217 6,072,628 -0.4 Midgrade 515,171 530,493 494,732 532,893 498,754 470,837 1,202,293 969,591 -18.0 Conventional 389,074 399,636 369,952 398,207 372,733 353,088 889,507 725,821 -17.0

463

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 September 8 September 2008 October 2008 November 2008 December 2008 January 2009 Cumulative Year To Date 2008 Cumulative Year To Date 2009 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,362,243 10,474,121 11,337,709 10,689,646 11,213,521 10,603,937 10,895,188 10,603,937 -2.7 Regular 9,866,147 9,079,750 9,857,282 9,252,412 9,645,895 9,149,775 9,324,907 9,149,775 -1.9 Conventional 6,585,394 6,037,783 6,564,432 6,124,047 6,362,103 6,014,719 6,146,574 6,014,719 -2.1 Reformulated 3,280,753 3,041,967 3,292,850 3,128,365 3,283,792 3,135,056 3,178,333 3,135,056 -1.4 Midgrade 548,757 515,171 530,493 494,732 532,893 498,666 606,466 498,666 -17.8 Conventional 411,486 389,074 399,636 369,952 398,207 373,474 447,846 373,474 -16.6

464

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 October 7 October 2007 November 2007 December 2007 January 2008 February 2008 Cumulative Year To Date 2007 Cumulative Year To Date 2008 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,284,231 11,828,909 11,143,150 11,274,965 10,895,188 10,541,115 21,619,514 21,436,303 -2.5 Regular 9,572,387 10,053,716 9,550,834 9,637,422 9,324,907 9,012,242 18,291,786 18,337,149 -1.4 Conventional 6,446,439 6,770,450 6,397,192 6,388,308 6,146,574 5,966,678 12,276,845 12,113,252 -3.0 Reformulated 3,125,948 3,283,266 3,153,642 3,249,114 3,178,333 3,045,564 6,014,941 6,223,897 1.7 Midgrade 617,751 656,711 612,716 624,895 606,466 596,245 1,190,774 1,202,711 -0.7 Conventional 442,016 476,107 447,755 455,949 447,846 441,706 828,789 889,552 5.5

465

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 February 2 February 2012 March 2012 April 2012 May 2012 June 2012 Cumulative Year To Date 2011 Cumulative Year To Date 2012 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 10,112,413 9,960,675 10,673,467 10,381,681 10,972,982 10,888,485 63,432,749 62,989,703 -1.2 Regular 8,796,447 8,675,313 9,321,700 9,055,073 9,485,897 9,406,607 55,420,192 54,741,037 -1.8 Conventional 5,790,655 5,746,567 6,200,255 6,056,073 6,331,044 6,283,793 36,648,007 36,408,387 -1.2 Reformulated 3,005,792 2,928,746 3,121,445 2,999,000 3,154,853 3,122,814 18,772,185 18,332,650 -2.9 Midgrade 394,365 381,953 407,027 395,634 448,440 437,929 2,471,007 2,465,348 -0.8 Conventional 304,446 295,054 316,628 308,218 356,037 345,001 1,895,958 1,925,384 1.0

466

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 June 2 June 2012 July 2012 August 2012 September 2012 October 2012 Cumulative Year To Date 2011 Cumulative Year To Date 2012 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 10,972,982 10,869,029 10,957,478 11,187,468 10,233,469 10,869,493 107,846,626 106,218,155 -1.8 Regular 9,485,897 9,387,294 9,445,331 9,686,539 8,899,890 9,464,731 94,055,193 92,218,215 -2.3 Conventional 6,331,044 6,271,466 6,325,622 6,471,411 5,888,708 6,316,607 62,197,089 61,398,408 -1.6 Reformulated 3,154,853 3,115,828 3,119,709 3,215,128 3,011,182 3,148,124 31,858,104 30,819,807 -3.6 Midgrade 448,440 437,884 440,431 443,914 389,163 418,835 4,172,741 4,157,646 -0.7 Conventional 356,037 344,998 344,074 347,342 302,387 325,658 3,198,978 3,244,842 1.1

467

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 564,932 507,854 551,005 519,384 532,551 507,718 485,599 507,718 4.6 Regular 447,094 403,797 439,428 413,569 423,893 404,806 382,693 404,806 5.8 Conventional 103,625 85,392 90,979 84,964 85,820 86,657 81,128 86,657 6.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 343,469 318,405 348,449 328,605 338,073 318,149 301,565 318,149 5.5 Midgrade 42,027 36,317 37,629 34,336 34,877 33,300 37,658 33,300 -11.6 Conventional 7,514 5,617 5,829 5,231 5,343 5,318 5,706 5,318 -6.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 34,513 30,700 31,800 29,105 29,534 27,982 31,952 27,982 -12.4 Premium 75,811 67,740 73,948 71,479 73,781 69,612 65,248 69,612 6.7

468

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 520,531 538,385 528,784 556,220 507,903 477,845 1,020,860 985,748 -3.4 Regular 455,324 471,622 460,881 485,119 445,636 417,336 862,074 862,972 0.1 Conventional 91,948 94,093 88,528 93,937 87,304 84,544 173,511 171,848 -1.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 363,376 377,529 372,353 391,182 358,332 332,792 688,563 691,124 0.4 Midgrade 20,551 19,614 19,560 21,299 18,945 17,890 48,782 36,835 -24.5 Conventional 2,717 2,378 2,410 2,604 2,326 2,324 6,916 4,650 -32.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 17,834 17,236 17,150 18,695 16,619 15,566 41,866 32,185 -23.1 Premium 44,656 47,149 48,343 49,802 43,322 42,619 110,004 85,941 -21.9

469

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 487,348 483,146 517,898 526,837 540,301 557,239 3,986,053 4,043,504 1.9 Regular 383,984 383,622 416,870 424,735 430,015 441,753 3,105,550 3,215,092 4.0 Conventional 79,461 76,131 87,574 90,924 99,358 101,228 664,227 689,930 4.3 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 304,523 307,491 329,296 333,811 330,657 340,525 2,441,323 2,525,162 3.9 Midgrade 37,107 36,183 38,726 38,791 40,369 41,572 336,457 304,204 -9.2 Conventional 5,418 4,848 5,549 5,989 7,246 7,464 53,868 47,323 -11.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 31,689 31,335 33,177 32,802 33,123 34,108 282,589 256,881 -8.7 Premium 66,257 63,341 62,302 63,311 69,917 73,914 544,046 524,208 -3.2

470

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 May 1 May 2011 June 2011 July 2011 August 2011 September 2011 Cumulative Year To Date 2010 Cumulative Year To Date 2011 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 10,596,332 10,950,277 10,899,028 11,133,916 11,472,961 10,782,925 100,205,386 96,822,551 -3.4 Regular 9,306,170 9,592,335 9,487,769 9,674,371 9,968,112 9,396,948 86,566,893 84,459,623 -2.4 Conventional 6,195,316 6,357,119 6,308,960 6,446,632 6,605,979 6,209,653 57,774,289 55,910,271 -3.2 Reformulated 3,110,854 3,235,216 3,178,809 3,227,739 3,362,133 3,187,295 28,792,604 28,549,352 -0.8 Midgrade 398,512 415,642 421,461 439,632 444,940 402,955 4,307,852 3,758,534 -12.8 Conventional 304,702 319,868 324,238 338,041 342,439 306,635 3,290,390 2,883,073 -12.4

471

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 April 7 April 2007 May 2007 June 2007 July 2007 August 2007 Cumulative Year To Date 2006 Cumulative Year To Date 2007 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,664,936 11,245,598 11,954,376 11,720,883 11,851,680 12,152,096 91,871,588 92,209,083 0.4 Regular 9,920,551 9,594,527 10,239,282 10,011,727 10,057,187 10,283,442 77,982,238 78,398,502 0.5 Conventional 6,655,850 6,472,156 6,916,662 6,727,284 6,812,905 6,965,290 50,354,244 52,826,992 4.9 Reformulated 3,264,701 3,122,371 3,322,620 3,284,443 3,244,282 3,318,152 25,323,552 25,571,510 1.0 Midgrade 627,229 606,378 628,109 615,822 660,939 679,369 5,315,891 5,008,620 -5.8 Conventional 436,805 428,969 438,196 435,040 477,408 493,343 3,436,363 3,538,550 3.0

472

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 March 7 March 2007 April 2007 May 2007 June 2007 July 2007 Cumulative Year To Date 2006 Cumulative Year To Date 2007 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 10,435,459 11,664,936 11,245,598 11,954,376 11,720,883 11,854,054 79,704,633 80,059,361 0.4 Regular 8,812,995 9,920,551 9,594,527 10,239,282 10,011,727 10,059,561 67,618,370 68,117,434 0.7 Conventional 5,921,392 6,655,850 6,472,156 6,916,662 6,727,284 6,815,279 43,588,258 45,864,076 5.2 Reformulated 2,891,603 3,264,701 3,122,371 3,322,620 3,284,443 3,244,282 22,007,043 22,253,358 1.1 Midgrade 588,370 627,229 606,378 628,109 615,822 660,939 4,636,711 4,329,251 -6.6 Conventional 413,262 436,805 428,969 438,196 435,040 477,408 2,990,331 3,045,207 1.8

473

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 April 9 April 2009 May 2009 June 2009 July 2009 August 2009 Cumulative Year To Date 2008 Cumulative Year To Date 2009 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,047,104 11,005,654 11,401,605 11,283,520 11,654,555 11,530,168 89,041,132 88,464,615 -0.2 Regular 9,517,305 9,475,742 9,817,769 9,749,642 10,031,422 9,944,611 77,022,679 76,265,424 -0.6 Conventional 6,273,476 6,270,244 6,533,036 6,516,508 6,753,613 6,661,814 51,076,770 50,663,303 -0.4 Reformulated 3,243,829 3,205,498 3,284,733 3,233,134 3,277,809 3,282,797 25,945,909 25,602,121 -0.9 Midgrade 514,082 520,486 538,157 520,328 539,700 529,280 4,597,334 4,129,730 -9.8 Conventional 382,094 393,850 405,965 395,271 406,417 397,969 3,408,583 3,105,447 -8.5

474

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 528,923 525,025 566,449 559,488 600,331 607,207 4,119,105 4,367,187 6.0 Regular 423,574 425,312 453,084 445,690 474,800 481,685 3,277,121 3,483,026 6.3 Conventional 84,785 84,632 94,055 93,600 107,710 111,156 707,603 740,722 4.7 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 338,789 340,680 359,029 352,090 367,090 370,529 2,569,518 2,742,304 6.7 Midgrade 35,018 33,447 37,392 37,061 41,258 41,537 307,502 290,503 -5.5 Conventional 5,126 4,880 5,763 5,927 7,552 7,706 47,726 47,251 -1.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 29,892 28,567 31,629 31,134 33,706 33,831 259,776 243,252 -6.4 Premium 70,331 66,266 75,973 76,737 84,273 83,985 534,482 593,658 11.1

475

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 January 8 January 2009 February 2009 March 2009 April 2009 May 2009 Cumulative Year To Date 2008 Cumulative Year To Date 2009 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,213,521 10,593,732 9,948,277 11,047,104 11,005,654 11,400,937 55,215,454 53,995,704 -1.6 Regular 9,645,895 9,139,188 8,589,745 9,517,305 9,475,742 9,817,877 47,538,861 46,539,857 -1.5 Conventional 6,362,103 5,990,942 5,663,670 6,273,476 6,270,244 6,517,433 31,571,210 30,715,765 -2.1 Reformulated 3,283,792 3,148,246 2,926,075 3,243,829 3,205,498 3,300,444 15,967,651 15,824,092 -0.2 Midgrade 532,893 498,754 468,943 514,082 520,486 537,480 2,963,812 2,539,745 -13.7 Conventional 398,207 372,733 351,148 382,094 393,850 405,322 2,197,246 1,905,147 -12.7

476

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 505,168 518,672 519,911 533,875 490,623 514,004 4,928,031 4,972,135 0.6 Regular 393,423 410,259 408,078 417,472 385,329 405,977 3,588,437 3,885,955 7.9 Conventional 84,129 87,896 94,215 96,792 88,190 92,351 711,279 844,595 18.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 309,294 322,363 313,863 320,680 297,139 313,626 2,877,158 3,041,360 5.4 Midgrade 42,058 42,183 43,082 44,099 39,487 40,182 495,955 413,804 -16.8 Conventional 6,834 6,874 7,724 8,310 6,437 6,068 75,985 66,449 -12.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 35,224 35,309 35,358 35,789 33,050 34,114 419,970 347,355 -17.6 Premium 69,687 66,230 68,751 72,304 65,807 67,845 843,639 672,376 -20.6

477

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 January 2 January 2013 February 2013 March 2013 April 2013 May 2013 Cumulative Year To Date 2012 Cumulative Year To Date 2013 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 10,520,696 10,317,844 9,562,221 10,722,276 10,550,973 11,075,489 52,101,218 52,228,803 0.9 Regular 9,140,006 8,967,951 8,356,626 9,352,159 9,152,875 9,582,073 45,334,430 45,411,684 0.8 Conventional 6,060,095 5,942,357 5,564,522 6,242,568 6,116,834 6,423,101 30,124,594 30,289,382 1.2 Reformulated 3,079,911 3,025,594 2,792,104 3,109,591 3,036,041 3,158,972 15,209,836 15,122,302 0.1 Midgrade 389,234 383,020 342,198 381,700 384,981 400,728 2,027,419 1,892,627 -6.0 Conventional 305,114 300,860 268,571 298,541 303,466 315,087 1,580,383 1,486,525 -5.3

478

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 514,004 485,038 507,317 485,599 445,136 487,354 1,417,244 1,418,089 1.2 Regular 405,977 381,467 399,305 382,693 351,420 383,987 1,094,386 1,118,100 3.3 Conventional 92,351 79,597 83,245 81,128 74,126 79,461 228,824 234,715 3.7 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 313,626 301,870 316,060 301,565 277,294 304,526 865,562 883,385 3.2 Midgrade 40,182 38,304 40,249 37,658 33,798 37,109 124,594 108,565 -11.9 Conventional 6,068 5,346 5,771 5,706 5,103 5,418 18,939 16,227 -13.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 34,114 32,958 34,478 31,952 28,695 31,691 105,655 92,338 -11.6 Premium 67,845 65,267 67,763 65,248 59,918 66,258 198,264 191,424 -2.4

479

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 519,911 533,875 490,623 514,004 485,038 507,934 5,935,217 5,965,107 0.2 Regular 408,078 417,472 385,329 405,977 381,467 399,925 4,344,611 4,667,347 7.1 Conventional 94,215 96,792 88,190 92,351 79,597 83,473 874,137 1,007,665 15.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 313,863 320,680 297,139 313,626 301,870 316,452 3,470,474 3,659,682 5.2 Midgrade 43,082 44,099 39,487 40,182 38,304 40,176 591,701 492,284 -17.0 Conventional 7,724 8,310 6,437 6,068 5,346 5,794 90,790 77,589 -14.8 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 35,358 35,789 33,050 34,114 32,958 34,382 500,911 414,695 -17.4 Premium 68,751 72,304 65,807 67,845 65,267 67,833 998,905 805,476 -19.6

480

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 November 8 November 2008 December 2008 January 2009 February 2009 March 2009 Cumulative Year To Date 2008 Cumulative Year To Date 2009 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,337,709 10,689,646 11,213,521 10,593,732 9,948,277 11,033,591 32,678,115 31,575,600 -2.3 Regular 9,857,282 9,252,412 9,645,895 9,139,188 8,589,745 9,503,906 28,019,195 27,232,839 -1.7 Conventional 6,564,432 6,124,047 6,362,103 5,990,942 5,663,670 6,260,077 18,556,289 17,914,689 -2.4 Reformulated 3,292,850 3,128,365 3,283,792 3,148,246 2,926,075 3,243,829 9,462,906 9,318,150 -0.4 Midgrade 530,493 494,732 532,893 498,754 468,943 514,040 1,801,370 1,481,737 -16.8 Conventional 399,636 369,952 398,207 372,733 351,148 382,052 1,332,171 1,105,933 -16.1

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481

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 August 9 August 2009 September 2009 October 2009 November 2009 December 2009 Cumulative Year To Date 2008 Cumulative Year To Date 2009 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,654,555 11,535,790 10,957,001 11,183,246 10,595,653 11,188,315 132,846,507 132,394,452 -0.1 Regular 10,031,422 9,952,911 9,453,135 9,672,142 9,186,805 9,689,438 114,935,164 114,275,244 -0.3 Conventional 6,753,613 6,666,886 6,292,983 6,424,996 6,106,928 6,456,129 76,112,908 75,949,411 0.1 Reformulated 3,277,809 3,286,025 3,160,152 3,247,146 3,079,877 3,233,309 38,822,256 38,325,833 -1.0 Midgrade 539,700 525,970 493,246 498,472 464,446 489,781 6,671,978 6,072,365 -8.7 Conventional 406,417 394,513 368,511 372,123 345,467 364,157 4,962,675 4,552,249 -8.0

482

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 464,879 461,983 490,382 472,638 505,168 518,666 2,929,735 2,913,716 -1.1 Regular 352,395 353,719 388,272 371,031 393,423 410,243 2,105,292 2,269,083 7.2 Conventional 74,146 77,773 76,905 72,198 84,129 87,896 366,432 473,047 28.4 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 278,249 275,946 311,367 298,833 309,294 322,347 W 1,796,036 NA Midgrade 42,713 41,541 40,340 38,119 42,058 42,260 W 247,031 NA Conventional 6,825 6,665 5,449 5,263 6,834 6,874 40,254 37,910 -6.3 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 35,888 34,876 34,891 32,856 35,224 35,386 W 209,121 NA Premium 69,771 66,723 61,770 63,488 69,687 66,163 W 397,602 NA

483

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 532,203 485,311 533,762 523,744 573,398 570,002 3,159,649 3,218,420 1.9 Regular 428,774 397,921 441,388 432,090 465,864 461,379 2,526,541 2,627,416 4.0 Conventional 90,155 82,287 89,054 86,165 94,205 97,033 521,856 538,899 3.3 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 338,619 315,634 352,334 345,925 371,659 364,346 2,004,685 2,088,517 4.2 Midgrade 35,132 30,039 31,738 30,510 34,242 34,518 207,708 196,179 -5.6 Conventional 5,644 4,734 4,484 4,179 5,204 5,452 31,993 29,697 -7.2 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 29,488 25,305 27,254 26,331 29,038 29,066 175,715 166,482 -5.3 Premium 68,297 57,351 60,636 61,144 73,292 74,105 425,400 394,825 -7.2

484

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 February 1 February 2011 March 2011 April 2011 May 2011 June 2011 Cumulative Year To Date 2010 Cumulative Year To Date 2011 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 10,331,640 9,723,927 10,931,545 10,596,332 10,950,277 10,905,548 65,565,601 63,439,269 -3.2 Regular 8,991,415 8,457,121 9,585,382 9,306,170 9,592,335 9,487,773 56,749,800 55,420,196 -2.3 Conventional 5,890,160 5,572,163 6,324,289 6,195,316 6,357,119 6,308,960 37,753,191 36,648,007 -2.9 Reformulated 3,101,255 2,884,958 3,261,093 3,110,854 3,235,216 3,178,813 18,996,609 18,772,189 -1.2 Midgrade 422,833 397,025 415,534 398,512 415,642 421,461 2,810,101 2,471,007 -12.1 Conventional 323,637 305,282 318,231 304,702 319,868 324,238 2,136,819 1,895,958 -11.3

485

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 August 7 August 2007 September 2007 October 2007 November 2007 December 2007 Cumulative Year To Date 2006 Cumulative Year To Date 2007 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,851,680 12,177,407 11,284,231 11,828,909 11,143,150 11,273,784 137,827,110 137,764,468 0.0 Regular 10,057,187 10,305,797 9,572,387 10,053,716 9,550,834 9,636,693 116,944,643 117,234,487 0.2 Conventional 6,812,905 6,957,656 6,446,439 6,770,450 6,397,192 6,385,527 75,160,446 78,818,966 4.9 Reformulated 3,244,282 3,348,141 3,125,948 3,283,266 3,153,642 3,251,166 38,121,718 38,415,521 0.8 Midgrade 660,939 678,476 617,751 656,711 612,716 624,303 7,836,168 7,519,208 -4.0 Conventional 477,408 490,233 442,016 476,107 447,755 455,209 5,042,506 5,356,527 6.2

486

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 March 1 March 2011 April 2011 May 2011 June 2011 July 2011 Cumulative Year To Date 2010 Cumulative Year To Date 2011 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 9,723,927 10,931,545 10,596,332 10,950,277 10,899,028 11,143,014 77,368,793 74,575,763 -3.6 Regular 8,457,121 9,585,382 9,306,170 9,592,335 9,487,769 9,680,784 66,902,276 65,100,976 -2.7 Conventional 5,572,163 6,324,289 6,195,316 6,357,119 6,308,960 6,451,009 44,585,627 43,099,016 -3.3 Reformulated 2,884,958 3,261,093 3,110,854 3,235,216 3,178,809 3,229,775 22,316,649 22,001,960 -1.4 Midgrade 397,025 415,534 398,512 415,642 421,461 440,122 3,328,548 2,911,129 -12.5 Conventional 305,282 318,231 304,702 319,868 324,238 338,834 2,536,773 2,234,792 -11.9

487

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 511,860 469,410 527,337 464,879 461,983 466,311 1,432,770 1,393,173 -3.8 Regular 381,794 351,762 397,163 352,395 353,719 370,831 1,016,897 1,076,945 4.7 Conventional 85,363 77,639 84,422 74,146 77,773 72,960 145,115 224,879 53.3 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 296,431 274,123 312,741 278,249 275,946 297,871 871,782 852,066 -3.3 Midgrade 50,511 45,003 49,862 42,713 41,541 37,312 147,343 121,566 -18.4 Conventional 8,326 7,099 7,742 6,825 6,665 5,174 15,916 18,664 16.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 42,185 37,904 42,120 35,888 34,876 32,138 131,427 102,902 -22.6 Premium 79,555 72,645 80,312 69,771 66,723 58,168 268,530 194,662 -28.3

488

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 September 7 September 2007 October 2007 November 2007 December 2007 January 2008 Cumulative Year To Date 2007 Cumulative Year To Date 2008 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 12,177,407 11,284,231 11,828,909 11,143,150 11,274,965 10,910,098 11,184,055 10,910,098 -2.4 Regular 10,305,797 9,572,387 10,053,716 9,550,834 9,637,422 9,341,315 9,478,791 9,341,315 -1.5 Conventional 6,957,656 6,446,439 6,770,450 6,397,192 6,388,308 6,164,406 6,355,453 6,164,406 -3.0 Reformulated 3,348,141 3,125,948 3,283,266 3,153,642 3,249,114 3,176,909 3,123,338 3,176,909 1.7 Midgrade 678,476 617,751 656,711 612,716 624,895 604,561 602,404 604,561 0.4 Conventional 490,233 442,016 476,107 447,755 455,949 445,067 415,527 445,067 7.1

489

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 July 2 July 2012 August 2012 September 2012 October 2012 November 2012 Cumulative Year To Date 2011 Cumulative Year To Date 2012 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 10,869,029 10,957,478 11,187,468 10,233,469 10,893,941 10,308,073 118,499,734 116,550,676 -1.9 Regular 9,387,294 9,445,331 9,686,539 8,899,890 9,489,171 8,954,687 103,329,708 101,197,342 -2.4 Conventional 6,271,466 6,325,622 6,471,411 5,888,708 6,342,099 5,999,781 68,303,527 67,423,681 -1.6 Reformulated 3,115,828 3,119,709 3,215,128 3,011,182 3,147,072 2,954,906 35,026,181 33,773,661 -3.9 Midgrade 437,884 440,431 443,914 389,163 418,835 394,304 4,572,708 4,551,950 -0.8 Conventional 344,998 344,074 347,342 302,387 325,658 311,346 3,506,286 3,556,188 1.1

490

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 June 7 June 2007 July 2007 August 2007 September 2007 October 2007 Cumulative Year To Date 2006 Cumulative Year To Date 2007 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,954,376 11,720,883 11,851,680 12,177,407 11,284,231 11,810,844 114,922,524 115,329,469 0.4 Regular 10,239,282 10,011,727 10,057,187 10,305,797 9,572,387 10,045,744 97,529,131 98,038,988 0.5 Conventional 6,916,662 6,727,284 6,812,905 6,957,656 6,446,439 6,771,613 62,862,600 66,037,410 5.1 Reformulated 3,322,620 3,284,443 3,244,282 3,348,141 3,125,948 3,274,131 31,734,278 32,001,578 0.8 Midgrade 628,109 615,822 660,939 678,476 617,751 655,271 6,580,609 6,280,749 -4.6 Conventional 438,196 435,040 477,408 490,233 442,016 475,621 4,246,024 4,453,077 4.9

491

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 February 3 February 2013 March 2013 April 2013 May 2013 June 2013 Cumulative Year To Date 2012 Cumulative Year To Date 2013 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 10,317,844 9,562,221 10,722,276 10,550,973 11,084,475 10,774,411 62,970,247 63,012,200 0.6 Regular 8,967,951 8,356,626 9,352,159 9,152,875 9,589,573 9,322,188 54,721,724 54,741,372 0.6 Conventional 5,942,357 5,564,522 6,242,568 6,116,834 6,415,347 6,165,403 36,396,060 36,447,031 0.7 Reformulated 3,025,594 2,792,104 3,109,591 3,036,041 3,174,226 3,156,785 18,325,664 18,294,341 0.4 Midgrade 383,020 342,198 381,700 384,981 400,872 392,283 2,465,303 2,285,054 -6.8 Conventional 300,860 268,571 298,541 303,466 315,026 308,897 1,925,381 1,795,361 -6.2

492

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 May 7 May 2007 June 2007 July 2007 August 2007 September 2007 Cumulative Year To Date 2006 Cumulative Year To Date 2007 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,245,598 11,954,376 11,720,883 11,851,680 12,177,407 11,284,263 103,193,258 103,518,657 0.3 Regular 9,594,527 10,239,282 10,011,727 10,057,187 10,305,797 9,571,319 87,596,811 87,992,176 0.5 Conventional 6,472,156 6,916,662 6,727,284 6,812,905 6,957,656 6,445,371 56,534,349 59,264,729 4.8 Reformulated 3,122,371 3,322,620 3,284,443 3,244,282 3,348,141 3,125,948 28,470,640 28,727,447 0.9 Midgrade 606,378 628,109 615,822 660,939 678,476 617,751 5,930,849 5,625,478 -5.1 Conventional 428,969 438,196 435,040 477,408 490,233 442,016 3,831,621 3,977,456 3.8

493

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 519,384 532,551 507,798 471,966 528,923 525,127 1,901,229 2,033,814 7.0 Regular 413,569 423,893 404,830 374,051 423,574 425,403 1,501,719 1,627,858 8.4 Conventional 84,964 85,820 86,681 78,103 84,785 84,662 310,846 334,231 7.5 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 328,605 338,073 318,149 295,948 338,789 340,741 1,190,873 1,293,627 8.6 Midgrade 34,336 34,877 33,314 31,476 35,018 33,448 144,746 133,256 -7.9 Conventional 5,231 5,343 5,332 4,965 5,126 4,880 21,075 20,303 -3.7 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 29,105 29,534 27,982 26,511 29,892 28,568 123,671 112,953 -8.7 Premium 71,479 73,781 69,654 66,439 70,331 66,276 254,764 272,700 7.0

494

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 July 7 July 2007 August 2007 September 2007 October 2007 November 2007 Cumulative Year To Date 2006 Cumulative Year To Date 2007 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,720,883 11,851,680 12,177,407 11,284,231 11,828,909 11,163,092 126,234,776 126,510,626 0.2 Regular 10,011,727 10,057,187 10,305,797 9,572,387 10,053,716 9,566,498 107,115,143 107,613,458 0.5 Conventional 6,727,284 6,812,905 6,957,656 6,446,439 6,770,450 6,411,192 68,951,122 72,447,439 5.1 Reformulated 3,284,443 3,244,282 3,348,141 3,125,948 3,283,266 3,155,306 34,871,858 35,166,019 0.8 Midgrade 615,822 660,939 678,476 617,751 656,711 615,501 7,202,436 6,897,690 -4.2 Conventional 435,040 477,408 490,233 442,016 476,107 448,202 4,640,777 4,901,765 5.6

495

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 September 0 September 2010 October 2010 November 2010 December 2010 January 2011 Cumulative Year To Date 2010 Cumulative Year To Date 2011 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,753,298 11,083,295 11,223,979 10,737,352 11,148,652 10,306,372 10,395,207 10,306,372 -0.9 Regular 10,126,997 9,537,620 9,686,303 9,282,445 9,674,169 8,971,103 9,021,930 8,971,103 -0.6 Conventional 6,802,068 6,386,594 6,488,317 6,192,653 6,427,773 5,861,588 5,960,433 5,861,588 -1.7 Reformulated 3,324,929 3,151,026 3,197,986 3,089,792 3,246,396 3,109,515 3,061,497 3,109,515 1.6 Midgrade 506,559 472,745 476,216 453,108 469,207 422,186 452,262 422,186 -6.7 Conventional 389,334 364,283 366,991 349,019 363,299 322,942 338,572 322,942 -4.6

496

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Subdistrict IA Subdistrict IA Motor Gasoline 490,382 472,638 505,168 518,672 519,911 532,719 3,939,380 3,966,352 0.3 Regular 388,272 371,031 393,423 410,259 408,078 416,243 2,850,677 3,093,420 8.1 Conventional 76,905 72,198 84,129 87,896 94,215 96,116 544,853 663,378 21.3 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 311,367 298,833 309,294 322,363 313,863 320,127 2,305,824 2,430,042 5.0 Midgrade 40,340 38,119 42,058 42,183 43,082 44,172 399,285 334,208 -16.6 Conventional 5,449 5,263 6,834 6,874 7,724 8,288 59,695 53,922 -10.0 Oxygenated – – – – – – – – – Reformulated 34,891 32,856 35,224 35,309 35,358 35,884 339,590 280,286 -17.8 Premium 61,770 63,488 69,687 66,230 68,751 72,304 689,418 538,724 -22.2

497

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 January 6 January 2007 February 2007 March 2007 April 2007 May 2007 Cumulative Year To Date 2006 Cumulative Year To Date 2007 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,552,997 11,184,055 10,435,459 11,664,936 11,245,598 11,946,133 56,003,094 56,476,181 0.8 Regular 9,796,295 9,478,791 8,812,995 9,920,551 9,594,527 10,231,025 47,363,870 48,037,889 1.4 Conventional 6,202,908 6,355,453 5,921,392 6,655,850 6,472,156 6,899,607 30,283,954 32,304,458 6.7 Reformulated 3,223,071 3,123,338 2,891,603 3,264,701 3,122,371 3,331,418 15,545,107 15,733,431 1.2 Midgrade 630,598 602,404 588,370 627,229 606,378 628,109 3,367,643 3,052,490 -9.4 Conventional 399,375 415,527 413,262 436,805 428,969 438,188 2,178,211 2,132,751 -2.1

498

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 January 0 January 2011 February 2011 March 2011 April 2011 May 2011 Cumulative Year To Date 2010 Cumulative Year To Date 2011 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,148,652 10,331,640 9,723,927 10,931,545 10,596,332 10,940,139 54,167,520 52,523,583 -3.0 Regular 9,674,169 8,991,415 8,457,121 9,585,382 9,306,170 9,581,865 46,925,478 45,921,953 -2.1 Conventional 6,427,773 5,890,160 5,572,163 6,324,289 6,195,316 6,346,649 31,175,972 30,328,577 -2.7 Reformulated 3,246,396 3,101,255 2,884,958 3,261,093 3,110,854 3,235,216 15,749,506 15,593,376 -1.0 Midgrade 469,207 422,833 397,025 415,534 398,512 415,626 2,316,248 2,049,530 -11.5 Conventional 363,299 323,637 305,282 318,231 304,702 319,852 1,756,274 1,571,704 -10.5

499

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 March 8 March 2008 April 2008 May 2008 June 2008 July 2008 Cumulative Year To Date 2007 Cumulative Year To Date 2008 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 10,511,920 11,271,007 11,130,866 11,406,473 10,999,201 11,310,692 79,915,337 77,525,347 -3.4 Regular 8,982,588 9,711,700 9,619,758 9,899,908 9,594,749 9,838,238 68,015,734 66,971,848 -2.0 Conventional 5,958,704 6,451,011 6,407,136 6,607,785 6,381,195 6,600,174 45,857,214 44,552,579 -3.3 Reformulated 3,023,884 3,260,689 3,212,622 3,292,123 3,213,554 3,238,064 22,158,520 22,419,269 0.7 Midgrade 595,827 599,077 578,959 583,483 548,464 565,553 4,291,440 4,077,829 -5.4 Conventional 441,661 442,664 430,230 434,845 411,585 427,281 3,008,513 3,036,112 0.4

500

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 September 9 September 2009 October 2009 November 2009 December 2009 January 2010 Cumulative Year To Date 2009 Cumulative Year To Date 2010 Adjusted Year To Date % Change1 United States Motor Gasoline 11,535,790 10,957,001 11,183,246 10,595,653 11,183,334 10,389,791 10,593,732 10,389,791 -1.9 Regular 9,952,911 9,453,135 9,672,142 9,186,805 9,685,059 9,027,053 9,139,188 9,027,053 -1.2 Conventional 6,666,886 6,292,983 6,424,996 6,106,928 6,452,065 5,967,513 5,990,942 5,967,513 -0.4 Reformulated 3,286,025 3,160,152 3,247,146 3,079,877 3,232,994 3,059,540 3,148,246 3,059,540 -2.8 Midgrade 525,970 493,246 498,472 464,446 489,811 442,922 498,754 442,922 -11.2 Conventional 394,513 368,511 372,123 345,467 364,262 329,298 372,733 329,298 -11.7