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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Ecological surveys of the proposed high explosives wastewater treatment facility region  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) proposes to improve its treatment of wastewater from high explosives (HE) research and development activities. The proposed project would focus on a concerted waste minimization effort to greatly reduce the amount of wastewater needing treatment. The result would be a 99% decrease in the HE wastewater volume, from the current level of 6,760,000 L/mo (1,786,000 gal./mo) to 41,200 L/mo (11,000 gal./mo). This reduction would entail closure of HE wastewater outfalls, affecting some wetland areas that depend on HE wastewater effluents. The outfalls also provide drinking water for many wildlife species. Terminating the flow of effluents at outfalls would represent an improvement in water quality in the LANL region but locally could have a negative effect on some wetlands and wildlife species. None of the affected species are protected by any state or federal endangered species laws. The purpose of this report is to briefly discuss the different biological studies that have been done in the region of the project area. This report is written to give biological information and baseline data and the biota of the project area.

Haarmann, T.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Regional factors governing performance and sustainability of wastewater treatment plants in Honduras : Lake Yojoa Subwatershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lake Yojoa, the largest natural lake in Honduras, is currently experiencing eutrophication from overloading of nutrients, in part due to inadequate wastewater treatment throughout the Lake Yojoa Subwatershed. Some efforts ...

Walker, Kent B. (Kent Bramwell)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Devising wastewater treatment strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Troubleshooting a waste water treatment system takes basic knowledge of how the process is designed to work, tools, and a few resources. This paper describes a Seven Steps Program employed fopr troubleshooting. A well-designed troubleshooting program should be comprehensive, thoroughly tested and constantly revisited to maintain a reliable and efficient wastewater treatment system. Such a method includes each of the integral components including biological, human, mechanical, and chemical. This total systems approach can result in improved system operation and better bottom line results.

Hornby, L.E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Aerobic Treatment Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aerobic units treat wastewater using the same process, only scaled down, as municipal wastewater treatment systems. This publication explains how aerobic units work, what their design requirements are, and how to maintain them.

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Treatment of biomass-gasification wastewater  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results obtained in innovative biological wastewater treatment process studies and a solvent extraction study are reported. (MHR)

Maxham, J.V.; Bell, N.E.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Municipal wastewater treatment with special reference to the central wastewater treatment plant in Poznan, Poland.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wastewater treatment is becoming a more critical topic due to diminishing water resources, increasing cost of disposing wastewater and also stricter measures and legislations set… (more)

Orukpe, Otaigbe Stephen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Treatment of Wood Preserving Wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The wastewater produced by the wood preserving industry presents a difficult problem to treat economically. A review of the literature indicates the size of the industry has limited the pursuit of an orderly and economic solution. Atmospheric evaporation was one possible means of treatment which had not been studied to any great degree. Two bench scale evaporation units were employed to determine the fundamental relationships affecting wastewater quality during such treatment. In batch evaporation tests, it was repeatedly demonstrated that a constant rate of total organic carbon and chemical oxygen demand removal occurred as the wastewater was evaporated. A procedure for designing atmospheric evaporation ponds was developed and applied to a hypothetical wood preserving plant. From this example design estimates of equivalent hydrocarbon concentrations in the air downwind of the pond are made. Various other design considerations such as the input data, modifications to the design procedure, solids accumulation, and miscellaneous design aspects are discussed. A treatment scheme incorporating atmospheric evaporation ponds after chemical coagulation and settling is proposed.

Reynolds, T. D.; Shack, P. A.

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Liquid Chlorination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains the process, components, legal requirements, factors affecting performance, and maintenance needs of liquid chlorination systems for onsite wastewater treatment.

Weaver, Richard; Lesikar, Bruce J.; Richter, Amanda; O'Neill, Courtney

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

9

ENERGY STAR Score for Wastewater Treatment Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 to 100 percentile ranking of performance, relative to the national population. Property Types. The ENERGY STAR score for wastewater treatment plants applies to primary,...

10

Energy Efficiency Strategies for Municipal Wastewater Treatment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities J. Daw and K. Hallett National Renewable Energy Laboratory J. DeWolfe and I. Venner Malcolm Pirnie, the Water Division of ARCADIS...

11

Wastewater and Wastewater Treatment Systems (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality administers regulations for waste water and waste water treatment systems. Construction of a municipal treatment work, non-industrial waste water...

12

The Impact of Advanced Wastewater Treatment Technologies and Wastewater Strength on the Energy Consumption of Large Wastewater Treatment Plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process often requiring the use of advanced treatment technologies. Stricter effluent standards have resulted in an increase in the… (more)

Newell, Timothy Stephen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Power Plant Wastewater Treatment Technology Review Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing power plant water management options means screening an increasing number of wastewater treatment technologies. This report provides engineers with detailed information on treatment process performance, economics, and applications to complete rapid, yet meaningful, technology screening evaluations.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

ENERGY STAR Score for Wastewater Treatment Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

!! !! July 2013 ENERGY STAR Score for Wastewater Treatment Plants in the United States Page 1 ENERGY STAR Score for Wastewater Treatment Plants in the United States Technical Reference OVERVIEW ! The ENERGY STAR Score for Wastewater Treatment Plants applies to primary, secondary, and advanced treatment facilities with or without nutrient removal capacity. The objective of the ENERGY STAR score is to provide a fair assessment of the energy performance of a property relative to its peers, taking into account the climate, weather, and business activities at the property. To identify the aspects of building activity that are significant drivers of energy

15

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Ultraviolet Light Disinfection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some onsite wastewater treatment systems include a disinfection component. This publication explains how homeowners can disinfect wastewater with ultraviolet light, what the components of such a system are, what factors affect the performance of a UV light disinfection system, and how to maintain such a system.

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

16

Sandusky Wastewater Treatment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Treatment Treatment Jump to: navigation, search Name Sandusky Wastewater Treatment Facility Sandusky Wastewater Treatment Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Sandusky Wastewater Treatment Energy Purchaser Sandusky Wastewater Treatment Location Sandusky OH Coordinates 41.452091°, -82.723523° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.452091,"lon":-82.723523,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

17

Treatment and Disposal of Unanticipated 'Scavenger' Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site often generates wastewater for disposal that is not included as a source to one of the site's wastewater treatment facilities that are permitted by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control. The techniques used by the SRS contract operator (Westinghouse Savannah River Company) to evaluate and treat this unanticipated 'scavenger' wastewater may benefit industries and municipalities who experience similar needs. Regulations require that scavenger wastewater be treated and not just diluted. Each of the pollutants that are present must meet effluent permit limitations and/or receiving stream water quality standards. if a scavenger wastewater is classified as 'hazardous' under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) its disposal must comply with RCRA regulations. Westinghouse Savannah River Company obtained approval from SCDHEC to dispose of scavenger wastewater under specific conditions that are included within the SRS National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit. Scavenger wastewater is analyzed in a laboratory to determine its constituency. Pollutant values are entered into spreadsheets that calculate treatment plant removal capabilities and instream concentrations. Disposal rates are computed, ensuring compliance with regulatory requirements and protection of treatment system operating units. Appropriate records are maintained in the event of an audit.

Payne, W.L.

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Wastewater treatment plant instrumentation handbook. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instruments are required for proper operation of wastewater plants. To be of use the instruments must be operable and maintainable. This requires care in the selection, application and installation of instruments and control equipment. Contents of the handbook address the how-to of designing and applying instrumentation and controls for waste treatment operations. Special focus is given to problems, causes and solutions. The handbook covers instruments, valves and pumps commonly used in wastewater plants.

Manross, R.C.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Simultaneous Biohydrogen Production and Wastewater Treatment in Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) Using Beet Sugar Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biohydrogen production with simultaneous wastewater treatment was studied in continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) using beet sugar wastewater as substrate. Aerobic activated sludge was used as parent inoculum to startup the bioreactor. The reactor ... Keywords: bio-hydrogen production, environmental pollution, Treatment, beet sugar wastewater

Gefu Zhu; Chaoxiang Liu; Guihua Xu; Jianzheng Li; Yanli Gao; Lijun Chen; Haichen Liu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Pre-treatment of Dye Wastewater by Electrolysis Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Pre-treatment of Dye Wastewater by Electrolysis Technology .... Application in High Temperature Thermochemical Hydrogen Production.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Membrane Research for Water and Wastewater Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes two research projects involving the use of membranes in water treatment: o Technologies for Improving Water Desalination -- The objectives of this study were to compare capacitive deionization (CDI) with carbon aerogel and reverse osmosis (RO) for salinity reduction using conventional treatment, conventional treatment with ozone and biologically active filters, and microfiltration as the pretreatment step. o Membrane Pretreatment of Reclaimed Wastewater for Reverse Osmosis Desali...

2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

22

Wastewater treatment: New insight provided by interactive multiobjective optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe a new interactive tool developed for wastewater treatment plant design. The tool is aimed at supporting the designer in designing new wastewater treatment plants as well as optimizing the performance of already available plants. ... Keywords: Decision support, IND-NIMBUS, Interactive methods, Multicriteria optimization, Simulation-based optimization, Wastewater treatment planning

Jussi Hakanen; Kaisa Miettinen; Kristian Sahlstedt

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Wastewater treatment and energy : an analysis on the feasibility of using renewable energy to power wastewater treatment plants in Singapore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is a very energy intensive industry. Singapore has a state-of-the-art wastewater treatment system that uses a number of sustainable techniques that greatly improve its overall efficiency. The centralized ...

Foley, Kevin John

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Flue gas desulfurization wastewater treatment primer  

SciTech Connect

Purge water from a typical wet flue gas desulfurization system contains myriad chemical constituents and heavy metals whose mixture is determined by the fuel source and combustion products as well as the stack gas treatment process. A well-designed water treatment system can tolerate upstream fuel and sorbent arranged in just the right order to produce wastewater acceptable for discharge. This article presents state-of-the-art technologies for treating the waste water that is generated by wet FGD systems. 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Higgins, T.E.; Sandy, A.T.; Givens, S.W.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

EA-1190: Wastewater Treatment Capability Upgrade, Amarillo, Texas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed upgrade of the U.S. Department of Energy Pantex Plant Wastewater Treatment Plant in Amarillo, Texas.

26

Energy recovery at Chi?in?u wastewater treatment plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Possibilities for energy recovery from sludge at Chi?in?u wastewater treatment plant have been investigated and evaluated. One way of recovering energy from sludge is… (more)

Graan, Daniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Process state estimation in a wastewater biological treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using clustering techniques for data classification is very common. In this paper a Self-Organizing Map model is used to carry out an estimation of the process state in a wastewater biological treatment using clustering algorithms and validation indexes. ... Keywords: biological treatment, chemical oxygen demand, clustering, self-organizing mapping, validation, wastewater

Iván Machóh; Hilario López; Antonio Robles

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Model-based optimisation of Wastewater Treatment Plants design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the mathematical basis and some illustrative examples of a model-based decision-making method for the automatic calculation of optimum design parameters in modern Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTP). The starting point of the proposed ... Keywords: Mathematical modelling, Optimum design, Wastewater Treatment Plants

A. Rivas; I. Irizar; E. Ayesa

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Tablet Chlorination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wastewater that is sprayed onto lawns must first be disinfected to prevent odors and remove disease-causing organisms. This publication explains how tablet chlorinators disinfect wastewater and gives tips on how to maintain them.

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

30

Energy Efficiency Strategies for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Water and wastewater systems are significant energy consumers with an estimated 3%-4% of total U.S. electricity consumption used for the movement and treatment of water and wastewater. Water-energy issues are of growing importance in the context of water shortages, higher energy and material costs, and a changing climate. In this economic environment, it is in the best interest for utilities to find efficiencies, both in water and energy use. Performing energy audits at water and wastewater treatment facilities is one way community energy managers can identify opportunities to save money, energy, and water. In this paper the importance of energy use in wastewater facilities is illustrated by a case study of a process energy audit performed for Crested Butte, Colorado's wastewater treatment plant. The energy audit identified opportunities for significant energy savings by looking at power intensive unit processes such as influent pumping, aeration, ultraviolet disinfection, and solids handling. This case study presents best practices that can be readily adopted by facility managers in their pursuit of energy and financial savings in water and wastewater treatment. This paper is intended to improve community energy managers understanding of the role that the water and wastewater sector plays in a community's total energy consumption. The energy efficiency strategies described provide information on energy savings opportunities, which can be used as a basis for discussing energy management goals with water and wastewater treatment facility managers.

Daw, J.; Hallett, K.; DeWolfe, J.; Venner, I.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Process Wastewater," in Analysis of Waters Associated with Alternate Fuel Production,shale during In in-situ processes, retort water its production

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil Shale Process Wastewater," in Analysis of Waters Associated with Alternate Fuel Production,oil and shale during In in-situ processes, retort water its production

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Treatability of emerging contaminants in wastewater treatment plants during wet weather flows.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Municipal wastewater treatment plants have traditionally been designed to treat conventional pollutants found in sanitary wastewaters. However, many synthetic pollutants, such as pharmaceuticals and personal… (more)

Goodson, Kenya L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Treatment of biomass gasification wastewaters using reverse osmosis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reverse osmosis (RO) was evaluated as a treatment technology for the removal of organics from biomass gasification wastewaters (BGW) generated from an experimental biomass gasifier at Texas Tech University. Wastewaters were characteristically high in chemical oxygen demand (COD) with initial values ranging from 32,000 to 68,000 mg/1. Since RO is normally considered a complementary treatment technology, wastewaters were pretreated by biological or wet air oxidation (WAO) processes. One set of experiments were run using untreated wastewaters to compare membrane performance with those experiments using pretreated wastewaters. Experiments were run for 8 to 10 hrs using UOP's TFC-85 membrane operating at 700 psig and 18 to 20/sup 0/C. This membrane is similar to the NS-100, a membrane known for being effective in the separation of organics from solution. Separation of organics from solution was determined by COD removal. Removal percentages for biologically pretreated wastewaters averaged 98% except for one group of runs averaging 69% removal. This exception was probably due to the presence of milk solids in the feed. Use of RO on WAO pretreated wastewaters and unpretreated feeds resulted in 90% COD removal. Membrane degradation was observed when using full-strength and WAO pretreated feeds, but not when using feeds that had undergone biological pretreatment. Color removal was computed for the majority of experiments completed. Overall, 99 to 100% of the total color was removed from BGW feeds, values which coincide with those reported in the literature for other wastewaters.

Petty, S.E.; Eliason, S.D.; Laegreid, M.M.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater April 13, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A water treatment system that can turn wastewater into clean water has been shown to reduce potential environmental impacts associated with producing natural gas from shale formations in the Appalachian basin. Altela Inc.'s AltelaRain® 4000 water desalination system was tested at BLX, Inc.'s Sleppy well site in Indiana County, Pa. as part of a National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)-sponsored demonstration. During nine continuous months of operation, the unit successfully treated 77 percent of the water stream onsite, providing distilled water as the product. The average treated water cost per barrel over the demonstration period was

36

Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater April 13, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A water treatment system that can turn wastewater into clean water has been shown to reduce potential environmental impacts associated with producing natural gas from shale formations in the Appalachian basin. Altela Inc.'s AltelaRain® 4000 water desalination system was tested at BLX, Inc.'s Sleppy well site in Indiana County, Pa. as part of a National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)-sponsored demonstration. During nine continuous months of operation, the unit successfully treated 77 percent of the water stream onsite, providing distilled water as the product. The average treated water cost per barrel over the demonstration period was

37

Why Sequence the Microbial Community from a Wastewater Treatment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microbial Community from a Wastewater Treatment Plant? The goal of this project is to get a concise picture of the capacity of a complete complex microbial community in a...

38

Stabilization of a nonlinear anaerobic wastewater treatment model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nonlinear anaerobic digester model of wastewater treatment plants is considered. The stabilizability of the dynamic system is studied and a continuous stabilizing feedback, depending only on an on-line measurable variable, is proposed. Computer simulations ...

Neli S. Dimitrova; Mikhail I. Krastanov

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Chemically enhanced primary treatment of wastewater in Honduran Imhoff tanks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Imhoff tanks represent approximately 40% of the wastewater treatment infrastructure in Honduras. This thesis evaluates the usage of solid aluminum sulfate as a means to achieving national effluent regulations in Imhoff ...

Mikelonis, Anne M. (Anne Marie)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Life-cycle assessment of wastewater treatment plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a general model for the carbon footprints analysis of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. In previous research, the issue of global warming is often related ...

Dong, Bo, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Arsenic and Selenium Treatment Technology Summary for Power Plant Wastewaters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the most suitable technologies available for the removal of arsenic and selenium from power plant wastewaters. The information stems from literature searches and the authors' experience in wastewater treatment systems from generally non-power plant sources — since there are limited operating experiences for power plant applications. The report lists existing and potential technologies that meet the treatment goals of reducing arsenic and selenium to the levels set for U.S. En...

2004-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

42

Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Southeast Water Pollution Control Plant Case Study Title Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Southeast Water Pollution Control Plant Case Study Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6056E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Olsen, Daniel, Sasank Goli, David Faulkner, and Aimee T. McKane Date Published 12/2012 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords market sectors, technologies Abstract This report details a study into the demand response potential of a large wastewater treatment facility in San Francisco. Previous research had identified wastewater treatment facilities as good candidates for demand response and automated demand response, and this study was conducted to investigate facility attributes that are conducive to demand response or which hinder its implementation. One years' worth of operational data were collected from the facility's control system, submetered process equipment, utility electricity demand records, and governmental weather stations. These data were analyzed to determine factors which affected facility power demand and demand response capabilities.

43

Construction of Industrial Electron Beam Plant for Wastewater Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pilot plant for treating 1,000 m3/day of dyeing wastewater with e-beam has been constructed and operated since 1998 in Daegu, Korea together with the biological treatment facility. The wastewater from various stages of the existing purification process has been treated with electron beam in this plant, and it gave rise to elaborate the optimal technology of the electron beam treatment of wastewater with increased reliability at instant changes in the composition of wastewater. Installation of the e-beam pilot plant resulted in decolorizing and destructive oxidation of organic impurities in wastewater, appreciable to reduction of chemical reagent consumption, in reduction of the treatment time, and in increase in flow rate limit of existing facilities by 30-40%. Industrial plant for treating 10,000 m3/day, based upon the pilot experimental result, is under construction and will be finished by 2005. This project is supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Korean Government.

Han, B.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y.; Kim, S.; Lee, M.; Choi, J.; Ahn, S.; Makarov, I.E.; Ponomarev, A.V.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

44

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

45

Applications of Energy Efficiency Technologies in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Depending on the level and type of treatment, municipal wastewater treatment (WWT) can be an energy intensive process, constituting a major cost for the municipal governments. According to a 1993 study wastewater treatment plants consume close to 1% of the electrical power in Northern and Central California. Activated sludge is the most common method for wastewater treatment, and at the same time the most energy intensive process. New energy efficient technologies can help reduce energy consumption of these processes, while improving the treatment effectiveness. Energy efficient technologies can be implemented in retrofit, expansion as well as new construction. This paper details the application of energy efficient technologies in retrofit as well as new construction projects, outlining significant opportunities for energy efficiency and conservation as well as demand response in various types of WWT facilities. This is based on detailed assessments of over 10 wastewater treatment plants in Northern California. The results show that energy savings in the range of 15,000 kWh per year to over 3.2 million kWh per year with paybacks in the range of 1.7 years to 8.9 years are readily achievable in retrofit projects. Application of energy efficient technologies in new construction can be most beneficial in the lifetime of the plant, which usually exceeds 30 years. Based on our experience in evaluation of design by others in energy efficiency design assistance of 7 plants, energy efficiency opportunities in new construction will be elaborated. This paper will discuss common energy efficient practices in new construction and outline additional opportunities that can help further improve energy efficiency of new construction projects. Finally, based on a recent survey, wastewater treatment plants have excellent opportunities for demand response. In Northern California, several WWT plants have participated and greatly benefited from demand response opportunities. Opportunities for demand response based on detailed assessment of 10 plants will be discussed."

Chow, S.; Werner, L.; Wu, Y. Y.; Ganji, A. R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

An integrated system to remote monitor and control anaerobic wastewater treatment plants through the internet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and manages the problem. Keywords Anaerobic digestion, automation, control, fault detection and isolationAn integrated system to remote monitor and control anaerobic wastewater treatment plants through of the anaerobic wastewater treatment plants that do not benefit from a local expert in wastewater treatment

Bernard, Olivier

47

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Homeowner's Guide to Evaluating Service Contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This guide helps homeowners who are seeking maintenance services for their onsite wastewater treatment systems (such as septic systems). Included are definitions of common terms used in service contracts, types of service contracts available, and factors to consider when choosing a service provider.

Lesikar, Bruce J.; O'Neill, Courtney; Deal, Nancy; Loomis, George; Gustafson, David; Lindbo, David

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

48

Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Jump to: navigation, search Name Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Facility Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Gilbane Building Company Developer Narragansett Bay Commission Energy Purchaser Field's Point Location Providence RI Coordinates 41.79260859°, -71.3896966° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.79260859,"lon":-71.3896966,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

49

FGD wastewater treatment still has a way to go  

SciTech Connect

The power industry should jointly address questions about FGD water treatment and share the lessons it has learned so far. The article describes a scheme developed by CH2M Hill to treat FGD wastewater and remove heavy metals. The process desaturates the waste water of sulfates and removes the bulk of the insoluble suspended solids prior to tertiary treatment of heavy metals using a chemical/physical treatment process. Additional treatment could be provided (for example, anoxic biological treatment) for selenium, nitrates and organics. 2 figs.

Higgins, T.; Givens, S.; Sandy, T. [CH2M Hill (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Case Studies to Evaluate Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater Physical/Chemical Treatment Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study focuses on physical/chemical wastewater treatment technologies used to remove trace metals from flue gas desulphurization (FGD) wastewater. The scope of this study includes FGD wastewater treatment for trace metals.BackgroundThe United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently revising the Effluent Limitations Guidelines (ELGs) for the steam electric power generating industry. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provided ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

51

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reverse Osmosis Vapor Compression Evaporation Crystalli~such as crystallization, vapor compression evaporation, andstep treatments such as vapor compression evaporation,

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

GRR/Section 18-HI-c - Wastewater Treatment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 18-HI-c - Wastewater Treatment GRR/Section 18-HI-c - Wastewater Treatment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-HI-c - Wastewater Treatment 18HIC - WastewaterTreatment (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Health Clean Water Branch Regulations & Policies HRS 11-62 HRS 342D Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18HIC - WastewaterTreatment (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Wastewater Treatment Permit The Wastewater Branch administers the statewide engineering and financial functions relating to water pollution control,

53

Research Progress on Perfume Wastewater Treatment Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improvement of Spectrometric Determination of COD by Microwave ... Influence of sewage pipe network on COD reduction efficiency in sewage treatment plant.

54

Treatment of Mixed Wastewater of Slaughterhouse Wastewater and Biogas Slurry with Pilot Contact Oxidation System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a pilot contact oxidation system was used to different mixing ratio wastewater of slaughterhouse wastewater and biogas slurry. The results showed that when the mixing ratio of slaughterhouse wastewater and biogas slurry was 19:1 and the ... Keywords: contact oxidation process, slaughterhouse wastewater and biogas slurry, COD removal, ammonia removal

Peng Li; Qun-Hui Wang; Jie Zhang; Tian-Long Zheng; Juan Wang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Radiological Risk Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect

Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document develops plausible and/or likely scenarios, including the identification of likely radioactive materials and quantities of those radioactive materials to be involved. These include 60Co, 90Sr, 137Cs, 192Ir, 226Ra, plutonium, and 241Am. Two broad categories of scenarios are considered. The first category includes events that may be suspected from the outset, such as an explosion of a "dirty bomb" in downtown Seattle. The explosion would most likely be heard, but the type of explosion (e.g., sewer methane gas or RDD) may not be immediately known. Emergency first responders must be able to quickly detect the radioisotopes previously listed, assess the situation, and deploy a response to contain and mitigate (if possible) detrimental effects resulting from the incident. In such scenarios, advance notice of about an hour or two might be available before any contaminated wastewater reaches a treatment plant. The second category includes events that could go initially undetected by emergency personnel. Examples of such a scenario would be the inadvertent or surreptitious introduction of radioactive material into the sewer system. Intact rogue radioactive sources from industrial radiography devices, well-logging apparatus, or moisture density gages may get into wastewater and be carried to a treatment plant. Other scenarios might include a terrorist deliberately putting a dispersible radioactive material into wastewater. Alternatively, a botched terrorism preparation of an RDD may result in radioactive material entering wastewater without anyone's knowledge. Drinking water supplies may also be contaminated, with the result that some or most of the radioactivity ends up in wastewater.

Strom, Daniel J.

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

56

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

III, "Method of Breaking Shale Oil-Water Emulsion," U. S.and Biological Treatment of Shale Oil Retort Water, DraftPA (1979). H. H. Peters, Shale Oil Waste Water Recovery by

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waters from Green River Oil Shale," Chem. and Ind. , 1. ,Effluents from In-Situ oil Shale Processing," in Proceedingsin the Treatment of Oil Shale Retort Waters," in Proceedings

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Model-free control based on reinforcement learning for a wastewater treatment problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents a proposal, based on the model-free learning control (MFLC) approach, for the control of the advanced oxidation process in wastewater plants. This is prompted by the fact that many organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters are ... Keywords: Intelligent control, Oxidation-reduction potential, Wastewater treatment plants

S. Syafiie; F. Tadeo; E. Martinez; T. Alvarez

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Evaluation of wastewater treatment requirements for thermochemical biomass liquefaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The broad range of processing conditions involved in direct biomass liquefaction lead to a variety of product properties. The aqueous byproduct streams have received limited analyses because priority has been placed on analysis of the complex organic liquid product. The range of organic contaminants carried in the aqueous byproducts directly correlates with the quantity and quality of contaminants in the liquid oil product. The data in the literature gives a general indication of the types and amounts of components expected in biomass liquefaction wastewater; however, the data is insufficient to prepare a general model that predicts the wastewater composition from any given liquefaction process. Such a model would be useful in predicting the amount of water that would be soluble in a given oil and the level of dissolved water at which a second aqueous-rich phase would separate from the oil. Both biological and thermochemical processes have proposed for wastewater treatment, but no treatment process has been tested. Aerobic and anaerobic biological systems as well as oxidative and catalytic reforming thermochemical systems should be considered.

Elliott, D.C.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Passive treatment of wastewater and contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect

A bioremediation system using inorganic oxide-reducing microbial consortia for the treatment of, inter alia coal mine and coal yard runoff uses a containment vessel for contaminated water and a second, floating phase for nutrients. Biodegradable oils are preferred nutrients.

Phifer, Mark A. (N. Augusta, SC); Sappington, Frank C. (Dahlonega, GA); Millings, Margaret R. (N. Augusta, SC); Turick, Charles E. (Aiken, SC); McKinsey, Pamela C. (Aiken, SC)

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

1.85 Water and Wastewater Treatment Engineering, Spring 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theory and design of systems for treating industrial and municipal wastewater and potable water supplies. Methods for characterizing wastewater properties. Physical, chemical, and biological processes, including primary ...

Shanahan, Peter

62

Evaluation of the pollution abatement technologies available for treatment of wastewater from oil shale processing  

SciTech Connect

A review covers the conventional and in-situ oil shale processing technologies and their status of development; the sources and characteristics of the wastewaters from oil shale retorting operation, from leaching of spent shale, from cooling tower and boiler blowdowns, from oil refining operations, from saline aquifer, and from minor sources, such as from air pollution control equipment, runoff from dust control, and sanitary wastewaters; and wastewater treatment methods applicable for treating wastewater from oil shale processes including physical, chemical, biological, and tertiary treatment methods and specific processes for removing specific pollutants (e.g., phenols, cyanides, heavy metals) from wastewaters. 31 references.

Sung, R.D.; Prien, C.H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Treatment of oily wastewaters from onshore operations  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of samples of process water from the Alyeska ballast treatment plant, Port Valdez, Alaska, disclosed that organic matter present in the process stream included volatile organic matter (lower molecular weight hydrocarbons), dissolved nonvolatile organic matter (including phenolic and naphthalenic compounds), and suspended oil. To develop informaton on the effectiveness of oil removal and to characterize the chemical redistribution taking place in the process, concentrations of each organic fraction were measured and the principal compounds were characterized chemically. Results show that the treatment plant was effective in reducing free oil content of the ballast water. A reduction of 99.8% in the organic load was realized, producing effluent generally within federal regulations regarding discharge of oil. The bulk of organic content reduction took place in the gravity separator. (JMT)

Lysyj, I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Energy consumption, conservation and recovery in municipal wastewater treatment: an overview  

SciTech Connect

The potentials for energy consumption, conservation, and recovery at municipal wastewater treatment plants are relatively small compared to the national energy figures. Nevertheless they are significant, particularly to local owners and operators. Estimates of energy consumption, as well as opportunities for conservation and energy recovery in municipal wastewater treatment operations, are reviewed. The relationship between energy conservation and aquaculture based wastewater treatment systems is also introduced. Finally, current DOE activities in this area are presented.

Bender, M F

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Life Cycle Environmental and Cost Impacts of Dairy Wastewater Treatment Using Algae Brendan Higgins, Dr. Alissa Kendall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

displacement. The cost of wastewater treatment using the ATS was estimated to be $1.23 per m3 wastewater Wastewater Processing Algae Processing Biogas Processing Equipment and Material Data Sources Fixed filmLife Cycle Environmental and Cost Impacts of Dairy Wastewater Treatment Using Algae Brendan Higgins

California at Davis, University of

66

Treatment of biomass gasification wastewaters using liquid-liquid extraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) investigated liquid-liquid extraction as a treatment method for biomass gasification wastewaters (BGW). Distribution coefficients for chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were determined for the following solvents: methylisobutyl ketone (MIBK), n-butyl acetate, n-butanol, MIBK/n-butyl acetate (50:50 vol), MIBK/n-butanol (50:50 vol), tri-butyl phosphate, tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO)/MIBK (10:90 wt), TOPO/kerosene (10:90 wt), kerosene, and toluene. The best distribution coefficient of 1.3 was given by n-butanol. Chemical analysis of the wastewater by gas chromatography (GC) showed acetic acid and propionic acid concentrations of about 4000 mg/1. Methanol, ethanol, and acetone were identified in trace amounts. These five compounds accounted for 45% of the measured COD of 29,000 mg/1. Because of the presence of carboxylic acids, pH was expected to affect extraction of the wastewater. At low pH the acids should be in the acidic form, which increased extraction by MIBK. Extraction by n-butanol was increased at high pH, where the acids should be in the ionic form.

Bell, N.E.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Pretreatment of Pulp Mill Wastewater Treatment Residues to Improve Their Anaerobic Digestion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Anaerobic digestion of excess biological wastewater treatment sludge (WAS) from pulp mills has the potential to reduce disposal costs and to generate energy through biogas… (more)

Wood, Nicholas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Ozone Alternative Disinfection Study for a Large-Scale Wastewater Treatment Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a feasibility study for the use of an ozonation disinfection system for the treatment of wastewater in the Passaic Valley.

1999-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

69

Removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from reject water of municipal wastewater treatment plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Reject water, the liquid fraction produced after dewatering of anaerobically digested activated sludge on a municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWWTP), contains from 750 to 1500… (more)

Guo, Chenghong.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Evaluation of wastewater treatment requirements for thermochemical biomass liquefaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass can provide a substantial energy source. Liquids are preferred for use as transportation fuels because of their high energy density and handling ease and safety. Liquid fuel production from biomass can be accomplished by any of several different processes including hydrolysis and fermentation of the carbohydrates to alcohol fuels, thermal gasification and synthesis of alcohol or hydrocarbon fuels, direct extraction of biologically produced hydrocarbons such as seed oils or algae lipids, or direct thermochemical conversion of the biomass to liquids and catalytic upgrading to hydrocarbon fuels. This report discusses direct thermochemical conversion to achieve biomass liquefaction and the requirements for wastewater treatment inherent in such processing. 21 refs.

Elliott, D.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Energy efficiency in municipal wastewater treatment plants: Technology assessment  

SciTech Connect

The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) estimates that municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in New York State consume about 1.5 billion kWh of electricity each year for sewage treatment and sludge management based on the predominant types of treatment plants, the results of an energy use survey, and recent trends in the amounts of electricity WWTPs use nationwide. Electric utilities in New York State have encouraged demand-side management (DSM) to help control or lower energy costs and make energy available for new customers without constructing additional facilities. This report describes DSM opportunities for WWTPs in New York State; discusses the costs and benefits of several DSM measures; projects energy impact statewide of the DSM technologies; identifies the barrier to implementing DSM at WWTPs; and outlines one possible incentive that could stimulate widespread adoption of DSM by WWTP operators. The DSM technologies discussed are outfall hydropower, on-site generation, aeration efficiency, time-of-day electricity pricing, and storing wastewater.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Review: Data-derived soft-sensors for biological wastewater treatment plants: An overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper surveys and discusses the application of data-derived soft-sensing techniques in biological wastewater treatment plants. Emphasis is given to an extensive overview of the current status and to the specific challenges and potential that allow ... Keywords: Data-driven models, Soft-sensors, Wastewater treatment, Water quality monitoring

Henri Haimi, Michela Mulas, Francesco Corona, Riku Vahala

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Integrated Fault Detection and Isolation: Application to a Winery's Wastewater Treatment Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an integrated object-oriented fuzzy logic fault detection and isolation (FDI) module for a biological wastewater treatment process is presented. The defined FDI strategy and the software implementation are detailed. Using experimental ... Keywords: anaerobic digestion, fuzzy logic, object-oriented programming, on-line fault detection and isolation (FDI), wastewater treatment

Antoine Genovesi; Jérôme Harmand; Jean-Philippe Steyer

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Literature analysis of anaerobic wastewater treatment in China from 1998 to 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the bibliometric method, this paper analyzes statistically the research papers on anaerobic wastewater treatment in China collected by China Journal Whole-length Database of National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) published during the period ... Keywords: anaerobic treatment, bibliometric method, literature, wastewater

Liu Min; Huang Zhan-bin; Huang Zhen

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Selective ensemble extreme learning machine modeling of effluent quality in wastewater treatment plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Real-time and reliable measurements of the effluent quality are essential to improve operating efficiency and reduce energy consumption for the wastewater treatment process. Due to the low accuracy and unstable performance of the traditional effluent ... Keywords: Wastewater treatment process, effluent quality prediction, extreme learning machine, genetic algorithm, selective ensemble model

Li-Jie Zhao; Tian-You Chai; De-Cheng Yuan

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Distributed digital processing and closed loop computer control of wastewater treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of digital computer control to municipal wastewater treatment processes is steadily gaining popularity. Within the next few years this mode of control is expected to become a standard feature of larger wastewater treatment plants. The ... Keywords: Closed loop systems, PID control, computer application, computer control, digital control, direct digital control, ecology, feedback, feedforward, water pollution

Bipin Mishra

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Prediction analysis of a wastewater treatment system using a Bayesian network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is a complicated dynamic process, the effectiveness of which is affected by microbial, chemical, and physical factors. At present, predicting the effluent quality of wastewater treatment systems is difficult because of complex biological ... Keywords: Bayesian network, Inference, Modified sequencing batch reactor, Prediction analysis

Dan Li; Hai Zhen Yang; Xiao Feng Liang

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Bioreactors: Wastewater treatment. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of bioreactors for wastewater treatment. References to stirred tank, photobio, biofilm, oxidizing, composting, fluidized bed, porous membrane, and plate column reactors are presented. Applications in municipal, food processing, chemical, agricultural, mining, and oil-refining wastewater treatment are reviewed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Forecast of total nitrogen in wastewater treatment plants by means techniques of soft computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prediction in Wastewater Treatment Plants is an important purpose for decision-making. The complexity of the biological processes happening and, on the other hand, the uncertainty and incompleteness of the real data lead us to treat this problem modelling ... Keywords: environmental modelling, fuzzy systems, genetic algoritms, neural networks, soft computing, total nitrogen, wastewater treatment plant

Narcis Clara

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,study of automated demand response in wastewater treatmentopportunities for demand response control strategies in

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

05CH11231. References EPRI, Energy Audit Manual for Water/Research Institute, Energy Audit Manual for Water/Wastewater

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Wastewater treatment in the oil-shale industry  

SciTech Connect

Because of the stringent state and federal standards governing the discharge of wastes into local waters and the limited water supplies in this area, an oil shale industry will probably reuse process effluents to the maximum extent possible and evaporate the residuals. Therefore, discharge of effluents into surface and ground waters may not be necessary. This paper reviews the subject of wastewater treatment for an oil shale industry and identifies key issues and research priorities that must be resolved before a large-scale commercial industry can be developed. It focuses on treatment of the waters unique to an oil shale industry: retort water, gas condensate, and mine water. Each presents a unique set of challenges.

Fox, J.P.; Phillips, T.E.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

The Reactive Light Yellow Dye Wastewater Treatment by Sewage Sludge-Based Activated Carbon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper is aim to discuss the dye wastewater treatment by sewage sludge-based adsorbent. The adsorbent derived from sewage sludge, which produced through phosphoric acid-microwave method, and commercia activated carbon (ACC) were tested in the process ... Keywords: Sewage Sludge-based Activated Carbon (ACSS), the Reactive Light Yellow, Dye Wastewater, Adsorption

Yang Lijun; Dai Qunwei

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Study on Further Treatment of Coal Coking Wastewater by Ultrasound Wave, Fenton's Reagent and Coagulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study on further treatment of coal coking wastewater by ultrasound wave, Fenton's reagent and coagulation was carried out in this paper at the first time, Furthermore, this paper discussed the optimum cooperative reaction condition of their combined ... Keywords: ultrasound wave, coke plant wastewater, Fenton reagent, coagulation

Jun Shi; Liangbo Zhang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Treatment of Wastewater from Mineral Processing by using Algae.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nowadays, the utilisation of algae in industrial processes to produce useful compounds or to treat waste streams is of great interest. Industrial wastewaters such as… (more)

Sprock, Stefan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Application of constructed wetlands on wastewater treatment for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 13, 2007 ... treating the aquaculture wastewater, examined the water quality condition of aquaculture .... and adjusted according to daily food intake. During ...

87

Process Design of Wastewater Treatment for the NREL Cellulosic Ethanol Model  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a preliminary process design for treating the wastewater from NREL's cellulosic ethanol production process to quality levels required for recycle. In this report Brown and Caldwell report on three main tasks: 1) characterization of the effluent from NREL's ammonia-conditioned hydrolyzate fermentation process; 2) development of the wastewater treatment process design; and 3) development of a capital and operational cost estimate for the treatment concept option. This wastewater treatment design was incorporated into NREL's cellulosic ethanol process design update published in May 2011 (NREL/TP-5100-47764).

Steinwinder, T.; Gill, E.; Gerhardt, M.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

National and Regional Water and Wastewater Rates For Use in Cost-Benefit Models and Evaluations of Water Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006 California Water Rate Survey. 2006. Black & VeatchRegional Water and Wastewater Rates For Use in Cost-Benefit5 Calculated Marginal Rates for

Fisher, Diane C.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Melody, Moya

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Methane Recovery and Energy Generation in Spent Wash Wastewater Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wastewater from distillation process has high organic content, which has to be treated to bring down the levels of COD and BOD to prescribed standards of environmental authorities. In this study, the organic wastewater from distillery also known ... Keywords: Methane recovery, spent wash, Greenhouse gases (GHG), upflow anaerobic slduge blanket (UASB), Clean Development Mechanism (CDM)

Wei-hua Yang; Li Wei; Sheng-nan Zhao; Jiang Dong

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study  

SciTech Connect

This case study enhances the understanding of open automated demand response opportunities in municipal wastewater treatment facilities. The report summarizes the findings of a 100 day submetering project at the San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant, a municipal wastewater treatment facility in Oceanside, California. The report reveals that key energy-intensive equipment such as pumps and centrifuges can be targeted for large load reductions. Demand response tests on the effluent pumps resulted a 300 kW load reduction and tests on centrifuges resulted in a 40 kW load reduction. Although tests on the facility?s blowers resulted in peak period load reductions of 78 kW sharp, short-lived increases in the turbidity of the wastewater effluent were experienced within 24 hours of the test. The results of these tests, which were conducted on blowers without variable speed drive capability, would not be acceptable and warrant further study. This study finds that wastewater treatment facilities have significant open automated demand response potential. However, limiting factors to implementing demand response are the reaction of effluent turbidity to reduced aeration load, along with the cogeneration capabilities of municipal facilities, including existing power purchase agreements and utility receptiveness to purchasing electricity from cogeneration facilities.

Thompson, Lisa; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee; Piette, Mary Ann

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

91

Saving Energy at 24/7 Wastewater Treatment Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy at 24/7 Wastewater Treatment Plant Energy at 24/7 Wastewater Treatment Plant Saving Energy at 24/7 Wastewater Treatment Plant July 29, 2010 - 4:11pm Addthis How does it work? Longview, Texas received $781,900 in Recovery Act funding. Co-generation power plant to save 16,571 kWh annually. Local utility to provide the city $150 rebate for every kW of peak demand reduced. In the city of Longview, Texas, the wastewater treatment facility uses more electricity than any other public building. Making investments to permanently cut energy costs at the plant is important for this East Texas city of approximately 77,000. "Our city has felt the effects of the recession. Several companies have laid 100-200 folks off and many are still waiting to be hired back," said Shawn Raney, a safety specialist with the Longview city government. "The

92

Radiological Instrumentation Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect

The King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into its combined sanitary and storm sewer system. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material. Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. Volume 2 of PNNL-15163 assesses the radiological instrumentation needs for detection of radiological or nuclear terrorism, in support of decisions to treat contaminated wastewater or to bypass the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP), and in support of radiation protection of the workforce, the public, and the infrastructure of the WPTP. Fixed radiation detection instrumentation should be deployed in a defense-in-depth system that provides 1) early warning of significant radioactive material on the way to the WPTP, including identification of the radionuclide(s) and estimates of the soluble concentrations, with a floating detector located in the wet well at the Interbay Pump Station and telemetered via the internet to all authorized locations; 2) monitoring at strategic locations within the plant, including 2a) the pipe beyond the hydraulic ram in the bar screen room; 2b) above the collection funnels in the fine grit facility; 2c) in the sampling tank in the raw sewage pump room; and 2d) downstream of the concentration facilities that produce 6% blended and concentrated biosolids. Engineering challenges exist for these applications. It is necessary to deploy both ultra-sensitive detectors to provide early warning and identification and detectors capable of functioning in high-dose rate environments that are likely under some scenarios, capable of functioning from 10 microrems per hour (background) up to 1000 rems per hour. Software supporting fixed spectroscopic detectors is needed to provide prompt, reliable, and simple interpretations of spectroscopic outputs that are of use to operators and decision-makers. Software to provide scientists and homeland security personnel with sufficient technical detail for identification, quantification, waste management decisions, and for the inevitable forensic and attribution needs must be developed. Computational modeling using MCNP software has demonstrated that useful detection capabilities can be deployed. In particular, any of the isotopes examined can be detected at levels between 0.01 and 0.1 ?Ci per gallon. General purpose instruments that can be used to determine the nature and extent of radioactive contamination and measure radiation levels for purposes of protecting personnel and members of the public should be available. One or more portable radioisotope identifiers (RIIDs) should be available to WTD personnel. Small, portable battery-powered personal radiation monitors should be widely available WTD personnel. The personal monitors can be used for personal and group radiation protection decisions, and to alert management to the need to get expert backup. All considerations of radiological instrumentation require considerations of training and periodic retraining of personnel, as well as periodic calibration and maintenance of instruments. Routine “innocent” alarms will occur due to medical radionuclides that are legally discharged into sanitary sewers on a daily basis.

Strom, Daniel J.; McConn, Ronald J.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.

2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

93

National Research Needs Conference Proceedings: Risk-Based Decision Making for Onsite Wastewater Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On May 19-20, 2000, the Research Needs Conference for "Risk-Based Decision Making for Onsite Wastewater Treatment" was convened in St. Louis, Missouri. The conference, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), was the culmination of an eighteen-month-long effort by the National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project (NDWRCDP) to assist onsite wastewater leadership in identifying critical research gaps in the field. The five "White Papers" included in this volume of Pro...

2001-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Treatment Technology Summary For Critical Pollutants of Concern in Power Plant Wastewaters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the most promising technologies available for the removal of aluminum, arsenic, boron, copper, mercury and selenium from power plant FGD wastewaters. Remediation of the high chloride levels in FGD waters is also discussed. The information for this technology summary stems from literature searches, technology supplier and vendor interviews and the authors' experience in power plant and other wastewater treatment systems. The report lists existing and potential technologies that meet...

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

95

Renewable Energy in Water and Wastewater Treatment Applications; Period of Performance: April 1, 2001--September 1, 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guidebook will help readers understand where and how renewable energy technologies can be used for water and wastewater treatment applications. It is specifically designed for rural and small urban center water supply and wastewater treatment applications. This guidebook also provides basic information for selecting water resources and for various kinds of commercially available water supply and wastewater treatment technologies and power sources currently in the market.

Argaw, N.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

state.aspx? id=124. California Energy Commission. (2000). "pubs/fuelcell.pdf. California Energy Commission (2003).Wastewater Treatment. California Energy Commission (2003).

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Emissions of volatile and potentially toxic organic compounds from waste-water treatment plants and collection systems (Phase 2). Volume 3. Waste-water treatment-plant emissions. Experimental phase. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume 3 describes the measurements and experimental data obtained to assess emissions from various points within a POTW. Included are a discussion of sampling methods development, emissions studies of activated carbon bed odor control units located at various points of a large municipal wastewater treatment plant and its collection system, upwind/downwind sampling from an activated sludge aeration basins at a large municipal wastewater treatment plant, and preliminary studies of haloform formation as a result of chlorination of wastewater.

Chang, D.P.Y.; Guensler, R.; Kim, J.O.; Chou, T.L.; Uyeminami, D.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Characterization and Biological Treatment of O-Nitrobenzaldehyde Manufacturing Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

O-nitrobenzaldehyde (ONBA) manufacturing wastewater not only contains significant amount of oil-like substance, but also high salinity, total nitrogen (TN) content and concentration of dissolved organics resulting in high COD load. Oil-like substance ... Keywords: o-nitrobenzaldehyde, sludge age, hydraulic residence time, design equation

Yu Fang-Bo; Guan Li-Bo; Zhou Shan; Li Shun-Peng

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Determination of Baselines for Evaluation and Promotion of Energy Efficiency in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment plants are one of the largest energy consumers managed by the public sector. As plants expand in the future to accommodate population growth, energy requirements will substantially increase. Thus, implementation of energy efficient technologies is crucial in reducing national energy consumption. A detailed understanding of the current industry standards (baselines) is needed to estimate the energy savings potential for advanced state-of-the-art technologies and to provide incentives for application of the new technologies in retrofit and new construction projects. This paper summarizes the process BASE Energy, Inc. (BASE) went through to establish baselines to compare the energy performance of potential energy efficient technologies in the wastewater treatment industry that can be applied to energy efficiency programs available for wastewater treatment plants.

Chow, S. A.; Ganji, A. R.; Fok, S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

ENERGY STAR Score for Wastewater Treatment Plants | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wastewater Treatment Plants Wastewater Treatment Plants Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Effluent Quality Prediction of Wastewater Treatment Plant Based on Fuzzy-Rough Sets and Artificial Neural Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effluent ammonia-nitrogen (NH3-N), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total nitrogen (TN) removals are the most common environmental and process performance indicator for all types of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In this paper, a soft computing ... Keywords: neural network, fuzzy rough sets, input variable selection, wastewater treatment, prediction, soft computing

Fei Luo; Ren-hui Yu; Yu-ge Xu; Yan Li

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Predictive Maintenance, Design, Construction, and Maintenance for Passive Treatment of Wastewaters and the PT2 Passive Treatment Planning Tool V1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual provides an approach to evaluating, designing, constructing, and maintaining passive treatment systems for select wastewater contaminants. It is intended for environmental managers and engineering design staff to assess the applicability of passive technologies to treat wastewater discharges. The manual's guidelines are a work-in-progress as the understanding of passive treatment increases with time. Readers are advised to seek expert advice when encountering wastewater conditions varying sig...

2002-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

103

Wastewater treatment: Dye and pigment industry. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning treatment of wastewater containing dyes and pigments. The citations discuss the of dyes and pigments in wastewater treatment systems, biodegradation of dyes, absorption and adsorption processes to remove dyes from wastewater, environmental effects from the disposal of dye-containing wastes, and methods of analysis for dyes in waste streams. Treatment methods such as ozonation, reverse osmosis, activated charcoal filtration, activated sludge, electrochemical treatments, thermal treatments, simple filtration, and absorption media are included. (Contains a minimum of 112 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Specifically Designed Constructed Wetlands: A Novel Treatment Approach for Scrubber Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pilot-scale wetland treatment system was specifically designed and constructed at Clemson University to evaluate removal of mercury, selenium, and other constituents from flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater. Specific objectives of this research were: (1) to measure performance of a pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment system in terms of decreases in targeted constituents (Hg, Se and As) in the FGD wastewater from inflow to outflow; (2) to determine how the observed performance is achieved (both reactions and rates); and (3) to measure performance in terms of decreased bioavailability of these elements (i.e. toxicity of sediments in constructed wetlands and toxicity of outflow waters from the treatment system). Performance of the pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment systems was assessed using two criteria: anticipated NPDES permit levels and toxicity evaluations using two sentinel toxicity-testing organisms (Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas). These systems performed efficiently with varied inflow simulations of FGD wastewaters removing As, Hg, and Se concentrations below NPDES permit levels and reducing the toxicity of simulated FGD wastewater after treatment with the constructed wetland treatment systems. Sequential extraction procedures indicated that these elements (As, Hg, and Se) were bound to residual phases within sediments of these systems, which should limit their bioavailability to aquatic biota. Sediments collected from constructed wetland treatment systems were tested to observe toxicity to Hyalella azteca or Chironomus tetans. Complete survival (100%) was observed for H. azteca in all cells of the constructed wetland treatment system and C. tentans had an average of 91% survival over the three treatment cells containing sediments. Survival and growth of H. azteca and C. tentans did not differ significantly between sediments from the constructed wetland treatment system and controls. Since the sediments of the constructed wetland treatment system are repositories for As, Hg, and Se and the bioavailability of these elements decreased after deposition, the pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment system contributed significantly to mitigation of risks to aquatic life from these elements.

John H. Rodgers Jr; James W. Castle; Chris Arrington: Derek Eggert; Meg Iannacone

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Supplemental Power for the town of Browning Waste-Water Treatment Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report is issued for the "Supplemental power for the Town of Browning waste-water treatment facility" under the Field Verification Program for Small Wind Turbines Grant. The grant application was submitted on April 16, 1999 wherein the full description of this project is outlined. The project was initially designed to test the Bergy small wind turbines, 10 kW, applicability to residential and commercial applications. The objectives of the project were the following: 1. To verify the performance of the BWC Excel-S/E model wind turbine in an operational application in the fierce winds and severe weather conditions of the Class V winds of the Blackfeet Indian Reservation of Northern Montana. 2. To open up the Blackfeet reservation and northern Montana, to government sponsored, regionally distributed wind generation programs. 3. To examine the natural partnership of wind/electric with water pumping and water purification applications whose requirements parallel the variably available nature of energy produced by wind. 4. To provide data and hands-on experience to citizens, scientists, political leaders, utility operators and Tribal planners with regard to the potential uses of small-capacity, distributed-array wind turbines on the Blackfeet Reservation and in other areas of northern Montana. This project has not been without a few, which were worked out and at the time of this report continue to be worked on with the installation of two new Trace Technologies invertors and a rebuilt one with new technology inside. For the most part when the system has worked it produced power that was used within the wastewater system as was the purpose of this project.

William Morris; Dennis Fitzpatrick

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

106

Multi-criteria analysis of wastewater treatment plant design and control scenarios under uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment plant control and monitoring can help to achieve good effluent quality, in a complex, highly non-linear process. The Benchmark Simulation Model no. 2 (BSM2) is a useful tool to competitively evaluate plant-wide control on a long-term ... Keywords: Activated sludge model, Anaerobic digestion, Anoxic volume, BSM2, Cascade controller, Monte Carlo simulation, Multi-criteria assessment

L. Benedetti; B. De Baets; I. Nopens; P. A. Vanrolleghem

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Application of RBF Network Based on Immune Algorithm to Predicting of Wastewater Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is a nonlinear, time-varing and time- delay process. It is difficult to establish exact mathematic model. A novel radial basis function (RBF) neural network model based on immune algorithm (IA) is presented in this paper. It combines ...

Hongtao Ye; Fei Luo; Yuge Xu

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Effect of loading rate variation on soybean protein wastewater treatment by UASB reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to improve the efficiency and evaluate the feasibility of anaerobic digestion for treatment of soybean protein wastewater. The stability and performance of the Up?Flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) process was investigated at different organic loading rates (OLRS) and hydraulic retention times over 200 days. When chemical oxygen demand (COD) reached maximum

Yi Sun; Yongfeng Li; Zi?rui Guo; An?ying Jiao; Wei Han; Chuan?ping Yang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Reducing the Anaerobic Digestion Model N1 for its application to an industrial wastewater treatment plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Anaerobic Digestion Model N°1 for its application to an industrial wastewater treatment plant treating 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 2 Abstract The Anaerobic Digestion Model N°1 (ADM1., 2005). Anaerobic digestion process involves many interactions between species that may not all have

110

Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Wastewater Treatment and Gypsum Handling Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Wastewater Treatment and Gypsum Handling Area provides fossil plant maintenance personnel with current maintenance information on these systems. This guide will assist plant maintenance personnel in improving the reliability and reducing the maintenance costs for these areas of their scrubber system.

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

111

Volatile organic compound emissions from usaf wastewater treatment plants in ozone nonattainment areas. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), this research conducts an evaluation of the potential emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from selected Air Force wastewater treatment plants. Using a conservative mass balance analysis and process specific simulation models, volatile organic emission estimates are calculated for four individual facilities--Edwards AFB, Luke AFB, McGuire AFB, and McClellan AFB--which represent a cross section of the current inventory of USAF wastewater plants in ozone nonattainment areas. From these calculations, maximum facility emissions are determined which represent the upper limit for the potential VOC emissions from these wastewater plants. Based on the calculated emission estimates, each selected wastewater facility is evaluated as a potential major stationary source of volatile organic emissions under both Title I of the 1990 CAAA and the plant's governing Clean Air Act state implementation plan. Next, the potential impact of the specific volatile organics being emitted is discussed in terms of their relative reactivity and individual contribution to tropospheric ozone formation. Finally, a relative comparison is made between the estimated VOC emissions for the selected wastewater facilities and the total VOC emissions for their respective host installations.

Ouellette, B.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Modelling respirometric tests for the assessment of kinetic and stoichiometric parameters on MBBR biofilm for municipal wastewater treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR) technology is a suitable option for up-grading and retro-fitting wastewater treatment plants. Although being introduced in late 80s, design and operational guidelines of MBBR are mainly based on empirical approaches. ... Keywords: MBBR, Modelling, Municipal wastewater, Respirometry, Storage

Martina Ferrai; Giuseppe Guglielmi; Gianni Andreottola

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Desulphurization and simultaneous treatment of wastewater from blast furnace by pulsed corona discharge  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory tests were conducted for removal of SO{sub 2} from simulated flue gas and simultaneous treatment of wastewater from blast furnace by pulsed corona discharge. Tests were conducted for the flue gas flow from 12 to 18 Nm{sup 3}/h, the simulated gas temperature from 80 to 120 {sup o}C, the inlet flux of wastewater from 33 to 57 L/h, applied voltage from 0 to 27 kV, and SO{sub 2} initial concentration was about 1,430 mg/m{sup 3}. Results showed that wastewater from blast furnace has an excellent ability of desulphurization (about 90%) and pulsed corona discharge can enhance the desulphurization efficiency. Meanwhile, it was observed that the SO{sub 2} removal ratio decreased along with increased cycle index, while it increased as the flux of flue gas was reduced, and increased when the flux of wastewater from blast furnace was increased. In addition, results demonstrated that the content of sulfate radical produced in wastewater increase with an increment of applied pulsed voltage, cycle index, or the flux of flue gas. Furthermore, the results indicated that the higher the inlet content of cyanide the better removal effect of it, and the removal rate can reach 99.9% with a residence time of 2.1 s in the pulsed corona zone during the desulphurization process when the inlet content was higher, whereas there was almost no removal effect when the inlet content was lower. This research may attain the objective of waste control, and can provide a new way to remove SO{sub 2} from flue gas and simultaneously degrade wastewater from blast furnace for integrated steel plants.

Li, S.L.; Feng, Q.B.; Li, L.; Xie, C.L.; Zhen, L.P. [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Coal conversion wastewater treatment by catalytic oxidation in supercritical water  

SciTech Connect

Wastewaters from coal-conversion processes contain phenolic compounds in appreciable concentrations. These compounds need to be removed so that the water can be discharged or re-used. Catalytic oxidation in supercritical water is one potential means of treating coal-conversion wastewaters, and this project examined the reactions of phenol over different heterogeneous oxidation catalysts in supercritical water. More specifically, the authors examined the oxidation of phenol over a commercial catalyst and over bulk MnO{sub 2}, bulk TiO{sub 2}, and CuO supported on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. They used phenol as the model pollutant because it is ubiquitous in coal-conversion wastewaters and there is a large database for non-catalytic supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) with which they can contrast results from catalytic SCWO. The overall objective of this research project is to obtain the reaction engineering information required to evaluate the utility of catalytic supercritical water oxidation for treating wastes arising from coal conversion processes. All four materials were active for catalytic supercritical water oxidation. Indeed, all four materials produced phenol conversions and CO{sub 2} yields in excess of those obtained from purely homogeneous, uncatalyzed oxidation reactions. The commercial catalyst was so active that the authors could not reliably measure reaction rates that were not limited by pore diffusion. Therefore, they performed experiments with bulk transition metal oxides. The bulk MnO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} catalysts enhance both the phenol disappearance and CO{sub 2} formation rates during SCWO. MnO{sub 2} does not affect the selectivity to CO{sub 2}, or to the phenol dimers at a given phenol conversion. However, the selectivities to CO{sub 2} are increased and the selectivities to phenol dimers are decreased in the presence of TiO{sub 2}, which are desirable trends for a catalytic SCWO process. The role of the catalyst appears to be accelerating the rate of formation of phenoxy radicals, which then react in the fluid phase by the same mechanism operative for non-catalytic SCWO of phenol. The rates of phenol disappearance and CO{sub 2} formation are sensitive to the phenol and O{sub 2} concentrations, but independent of the water density. Power-law rate expressions were developed to correlate the catalytic kinetics. The catalytic kinetics were also consistent with a Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate law derived from a dual-site mechanism comprising the following steps: reversible adsorption of phenol on one type of catalytic site, reversible dissociative adsorption of oxygen on a different type of site, and irreversible, rate-determining surface reaction between adsorbed phenol and adsorbed oxygen.

Phillip E. Savage

1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

115

COAL CONVERSION WASTEWATER TREATMENT BY CATALYTIC OXIDATION IN SUPERCRITICAL WATER  

SciTech Connect

Wastewaters from coal-conversion processes contain phenolic compounds in appreciable concentrations. These compounds need to be removed so that the water can be discharged or re-used. Catalytic oxidation in supercritical water is one potential means of treating coal-conversion wastewaters, and this project examined the reactions of phenol over different heterogeneous oxidation catalysts in supercritical water. More specifically, we examined the oxidation of phenol over a commercial catalyst and over bulk MnO{sub 2}, bulk TiO{sub 2}, and CuO supported on Al{sub 2} O{sub 3}. We used phenol as the model pollutant because it is ubiquitous in coal-conversion wastewaters and there is a large database for non-catalytic supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) with which we can contrast results from catalytic SCWO. The overall objective of this research project is to obtain the reaction engineering information required to evaluate the utility of catalytic supercritical water oxidation for treating wastes arising from coal conversion processes. All four materials were active for catalytic supercritical water oxidation. Indeed, all four materials produced phenol conversions and CO{sub 2} yields in excess of those obtained from purely homogeneous, uncatalyzed oxidation reactions. The commercial catalyst was so active that we could not reliably measure reaction rates that were not limited by pore diffusion. Therefore, we performed experiments with bulk transition metal oxides. The bulk MnO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} catalysts enhance both the phenol disappearance and CO{sub 2} formation rates during SCWO. MnO{sub 2} does not affect the selectivity to CO{sub 2}, or to the phenol dimers at a given phenol conversion. However, the selectivities to CO{sub 2} are increased and the selectivities to phenol dimers are decreased in the presence of TiO{sub 2} , which are desirable trends for a catalytic SCWO process. The role of the catalyst appears to be accelerating the rate of formation of phenoxy radicals, which then react in the fluid phase by the same mechanism operative for non-catalytic SCWO of phenol. The rates of phenol disappearance and CO{sub 2} formation are sensitive to the phenol and O{sub 2} concentrations, but independent of the water density. Power-law rate expressions were developed to correlate the catalytic kinetics. The catalytic kinetics were also consistent with a Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate law derived from a dual-site mechanism comprising the following steps: reversible adsorption of phenol on one type of catalytic site, reversible dissociative adsorption of oxygen on a different type of site, and irreversible, rate-determining surface reaction between adsorbed phenol and adsorbed oxygen.

Phillip E. Savage

1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

116

Onondaga County Department of Water Environment Protection: Process Optimization Saves Energy at Metropolitan Syracuse Wastewater Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This DOE Industrial Technologies Program spotlight describes how Onondaga County, New York, is saving nearly 3 million kWh and 270 million Btu annually at a wastewater treatment plant after replacing inefficient motors and upgrading pumps.

Not Available

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

2011 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2010, through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: (1) Site description; (2) Facility and system description; (3) Permit required monitoring data and loading rates; (4) Status of special compliance conditions and activities; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2011 permit year, approximately 1.22 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

Michael G. Lewis

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

2010 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2009, through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2010 permit year, approximately 2.2 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

Mike lewis

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

2012 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2011, through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of compliance conditions and activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2012 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Evaluation of biological treatment for the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a wastewater treatment plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon can be an effective treatment method applied to control oil pollution in both fresh water and marine environments. Hydrocarbon degraders, both indigenous and exogenous, are responsible for utilizing petroleum hydrocarbon as their substrate for growth and energy, thereby degrading them. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons is often enhanced by bioaugmentation and biostimulation depending on the contaminated environment and the competence of the hydrocarbon degraders present. An evaluation of the performance of the biological treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon by the hydrocarbon degrading microbes at the Brayton Fire School??s 4 million gallon per day (MGD) wastewater treatment plant was the main research objective. Samples were taken for two seasons, winter (Nov 03 ?? Jan 03) and summer (Jun 04 ?? Aug 04), from each of the four treatment units: the inlet tank, equalization tank, aeration tank and the outfall tank. The population of aliphatic hydrocarbon degraders were enumerated and nutrient availability in the system were used to evaluate the effectiveness of on-going bioaugmentation and biostimulation. Monitoring of general effluent parameters was conducted to evaluate the treatment plant??s removal efficiency and to determine if effluent discharge was in compliance with the TCEQ permit. The aeration tank is an activated sludge system with no recycling. Hydrocarbon degraders are supplied at a constant rate with additional nutrient supplement. There was a significant decrease in the population of microbes that was originally fed to the system and the quantity resident in the aeration tank. Nutrient levels in the aeration tank were insufficient for the concentration of hydrocarbon degraders, even after the application of dog food as a biostimulant. The use of dog food is not recommended as a nutrient supplement. Adding dog food increases the nitrogen and phosphorus concentration in the aeration tank but the amount of carbon being added with the dog food increases the total chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). An increase in the concentration of total COD and BOD further increases the nitrogen and phosphorus requirement in the system. The main objective of supplying adequate nutrients to the hydrocarbon degraders would never be achieved as there would be an additional demand of nutrients to degrade the added carbon source. This research study was conducted to identify the drawbacks in the treatment plant which needs further investigation to improve efficiency.

Basu, Pradipta Ranjan

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Feasibility study for alternate fuels production: unconventional natural gas from wastewater treatment plants. Volume II, Appendix D. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data are presented from a study performed to determined the feasibility of recovering methane from sewage at a typical biological secondary wastewater treatment plant. Three tasks are involved: optimization of digester gas; digester gas scrubbing; and application to the East Bay Municipal Utility District water pollution control plant. Results indicate that excess digester gas can be used economically at the wastewater treatment plant and that distribution and scrubbing can be complex and costly. (DMC) 193 references, 93 figures, 26 tables.

Overly, P.; Tawiah, K.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Long-Term Performance of a Passive Wastewater Treatment System: The Albright Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Albright passive wastewater treatment system, which receives alkaline leachate from a closed coal combustion by-product landfill, has operated continuously for 19 years. It has undergone two major upgrades to incorporate new passive technologies. Monitoring parameters have included pH, alkalinity, acidity, aluminum, iron, manganese, nickel, zinc, total dissolved solids, and total suspended solids, along with several other trace metals present at very low concentrations. This report summarizes the his...

2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

123

Formation of titanate nanostructures under different NaOH concentration and their application in wastewater treatment  

SciTech Connect

The effects of the concentration of NaOH on the formation and transformation of various titanate nanostructures were studied. With increasing NaOH concentration, three different formation mechanisms were proposed. Nanotubes can only be obtained under moderate NaOH conditions, and should transform into nanowires with prolonged hydrothermal treatment, and their formation rate is accelerated by increasing NaOH concentration. Low concentration of NaOH results in the direct formation of nanowires, while extra high concentration of NaOH leads to the formation of amorphous nanoparticles. Adsorption and photocatalysis studies show that titanate nanowires and nanotubes might be potential adsorbents for the removal of both heavy metal ions and dyes and photocatalysts for the removal of dyes from wastewater. -- Graphical abstract: The morphologies of the titanates depend deeply on the concentration of NaOH. With increasing NaOH concentration, three different formation mechanisms were proposed. The application of these titanate nanostructures in the wastewater treatment was studied. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Effect of NaOH concentration on the structures of various titanates was reported. {yields} Three different formation mechanisms were presented with increasing NaOH concentration. {yields} Various titanates were used as adsorbents/photocatalysts in wastewater treatment.

Huang Jiquan [Key Lab of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Graduate school of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China); Cao Yongge, E-mail: caoyongge@fjirsm.ac.c [Key Lab of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Deng Zhonghua; Tong Hao [Key Lab of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Thermal sludge dryer demonstration: Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant, Buffalo, NY. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Buffalo Sewer Authority (BSA), in cooperation with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (Energy Authority), commissioned a demonstration of a full scale indirect disk-type sludge dryer at the Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant (BIWWTP). The purpose of the project was to determine the effects of the sludge dryer on the sludge incineration process at the facility. Sludge incineration is traditionally the most expensive, energy-intensive unit process involving solids handling at wastewater treatment plants; costs for incineration at the BIWWTP have averaged $2.4 million per year. In the conventional method of processing solids, a series of volume reduction measures, which usually includes thickening, digestion, and mechanical dewatering, is employed prior to incineration. Usually, a high level of moisture is still present within sewage sludge following mechanical dewatering. The sludge dryer system thermally dewaters wastewater sludge to approximately 26%, (and as high as 38%) dry solids content prior to incineration. The thermal dewatering system at the BIWWTP has demonstrated that it meets its design requirements. It has the potential to provide significant energy and other cost savings by allowing the BSA to change from an operation employing two incinerators to a single incinerator mode. While the long-term reliability of the thermal dewatering system has yet to be established, this project has demonstrated that installation of such a system in an existing treatment plant can provide the owner with significant operating cost savings.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Analysis, anaerobic treatment and ozonation of wool scouring wastewater  

SciTech Connect

Wool scouring effluents (WSE) were analyzed by high-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HRGC-MS), and then exposed to anaerobic biological treatment using laboratory scale fixed-bed filters. This resulted in a nearly 50% reduction in chemical oxygen demand (COD). Ozonation of the effluent from the biological step led to an even further decrease in total organic carbon (TOC). The fatty acid content of the WSE was affected by both biological treatment and ozonation. Finally, steroids in the WSE underwent reduction reactions when exposed to the anaerobic biological treatment.

Monteverdi, A.; Rindone, B.; Sorlini, C. (Univ. di Milano (Italy)); Andreoni, V. (Univ. di Torino (Italy)); Rozzi, A. (Inst. di Ingegneria Sanitaria del Politechnico di Milano (Italy))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory?s research to date in characterizing energy efficiency and automated demand response opportunities for wastewater treatment facilities in California. The report describes the characteristics of wastewater treatment facilities, the nature of the wastewater stream, energy use and demand, as well as details of the wastewater treatment process. It also discusses control systems and energy efficiency and automated demand response opportunities. In addition, several energy efficiency and load management case studies are provided for wastewater treatment facilities.This study shows that wastewater treatment facilities can be excellent candidates for open automated demand response and that facilities which have implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems are well-suited to shift or shed electrical loads in response to financial incentives, utility bill savings, and/or opportunities to enhance reliability of service. Control technologies installed for energy efficiency and load management purposes can often be adapted for automated demand response at little additional cost. These improved controls may prepare facilities to be more receptive to open automated demand response due to both increased confidence in the opportunities for controlling energy cost/use and access to the real-time data.

Lekov, Alex; Thompson, Lisa; McKane, Aimee; Song, Katherine; Piette, Mary Ann

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Septic Tank/Soil Absorption Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For septic tank and soil absorption systems to work properly, homeowners must choose the right kind of system for their household size and soil type, and they must maintain them regularly. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation, and maintenance of septic tank and soil absorption systems.

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

128

Treatment of biomass-gasification wastewaters by wet-air oxidation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production of synthetic natural gas from gasification of biomass results in the generation of a high-strength wastewater that is difficult to treat by conventional means. This study investigated the use of wet air oxidation (WAO) as a treatment method for these wastewaters. A literature review was conducted to identify the suitability of WAO for the treatment of high-strength industrial wastewaters and to determine typical operating conditions for such treatment. Data presented in the literature showed that WAO should be suitable for treatment. Data presented in the literature showed that WAO should be suitable for treatment of biomass gasification wastewaters (BGW), and a laboratory treatability study was designed. BGW, having an initial chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 30,800 mg/1 and initial color of 183,000 APHA units, was treated in a laboratory autoclave for 20, 40, 60, 120, and 180 min at temperatures and pressures of 150/sup 0/C, 5.1 MPa (750 psi); 200/sup 0/C, 6.9 MPa (1000 psi); 250/sup 0/C, 10.3 MPa (1500 psi); and 300/sup 0/C, 13.8 MPa (2000 psi). Maximum COD removals of 0% for the 150/sup 0/C, 5.2 MPa (750 psi) runs; 40% for the 200/sup 0/C, 6.9 MPa (1000 psi) runs, 55% for the 250/sup 0/C, 10.3 MPa (1500 psi) runs; and 85% for the 300/sup 0/C, 13.8 MPa (2000 psi) runs were measured. Maximum color removals for these respective runs were 56%, 82%, 97%, and 99%. Initial removal rates of COD and color were observed to increase with reaction temperature. The experimental results suggest that oxidation of BGW organics by WAO occurs in a stepwise fashion with large organic molecules first being hydrolyzed and then partially oxidized to low molecular weight intermediates. Complete oxidation of these intermediates is more difficult and most easily accomplished at high reaction temperatures. The best application of WAO to treatment of BGW appears to be as a pretreatment to biological treatment and it is recommended that this application be investigated.

English, C.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

FERRATES: SYNTHESIS, PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS IN WATER AND WASTEWATER TREATMENT.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The higher oxidation states of iron (Fe(VI) and Fe(V) in particular) have been shown to be strongly oxidizing in enzymatic systems, where they can carry out aliphatic hydrogen abstraction. In addition, they have been postulated as intermediates in Fenton-type systems. Fe(VI) itself is relatively stable and has been shown to have potential as an oxidant in the so-called ''green'' treatment of polluted waters. By contrast, Fe(V) is a relatively short-lived transient when produced in aqueous solution in the absence of strongly bonding ligands other than hydroxide, a feature that has limited studies of its reactivity. Fe(VI) has been proposed to be useful in battery design and a very interesting study suggested that ferrate may be able to oxidize insoluble chromium to chromate and thus serve to remove chromium contamination in the Hanford radioactive waste tanks.

CABELLI, D.E.; SHARMA, V.K.

2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

130

Tritiated wastewater treatment and disposal evaluation for 1995  

SciTech Connect

A second annual summary and analysis of potential processes for the mitigation of tritium contained in process effluent, ground water and stored waste is presented. It was prepared to satisfy the Hanford Federal Facility and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-26-05B. Technologies with directed potential for separation of tritium at present environmental levels are organized into two groups. The first group consists of four processes that have or are undergoing significant development. Of these four, the only active project is the development of membrane separation technology at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Although research is progressing, membrane separation does not present a near term option for the mitigation of tritium. A second grouping of five early stage projects gives an indication of the breadth of interest in low level tritium separation. If further developed, two of these technologies might prove to be candidates for a separation process. At the present, there continues to be no known commercially available process for the practical reduction of the tritium burden in process effluent. Material from last year`s report regarding the occurrence, regulation and management of tritium is updated and included in the appendices of this report. The use of the State Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS) for disposal of tritiated effluent from the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) begins in the fall of 1995. This is the most significant event impacting tritium in the environment at the Hanford Site this coming year.

Allen, W.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and have significant electricity demand during utility peakoperates at an average electricity demand of 1.3 MW, withalso has a high electricity demand. In many wastewater

Thompson, Lisa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Method and apparatus for energy efficient self-aeration in chemical, biochemical, and wastewater treatment processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a pulse spilling self-aerator (PSSA) that has the potential to greatly lower the installation, operation, and maintenance cost associated with aerating and mixing aqueous solutions. Currently, large quantities of low-pressure air are required in aeration systems to support many biochemical production processes and wastewater treatment plants. Oxygen is traditionally supplied and mixed by a compressor or blower and a mechanical agitator. These systems have high-energy requirements and high installation and maintenance costs. The PSSA provides a mixing and aeration capability that can increase operational efficiency and reduce overall cost.

Gao, Johnway [Richland, WA; Skeen, Rodney S [Pendleton, OR

2002-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

133

Tech-economic Analysis on Anoxic/Oxic Membrane Bioreactor (A/O-MBR) for Domestic Wastewater Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the project of sewage treatment in Qingdao Liuting International Airport as the case, through the analysis on pollutant removal effect, effluent quality, investment and costs, feasibility of A/O-MBR process is comprehensively studied from such two ... Keywords: A/O-MBR, wastewater treatment, techeconomic analysis

Zhiqiang Liu; Junying Wang; Chengpeng Wang

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

2009 EVALUATION OF TRITIUM REMOVAL AND MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1995, a state-approved land disposal site (SALDS) has received tritium contaminated effluents from the Hanford Site Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Tritium in this effluent is mitigated by storage in slow moving groundwater to allow extended time for decay before the water reaches the site boundary. By this method, tritium in the SALDS is isolated from the general environment and human contact until it has decayed to acceptable levels. This report contains the 2009 update evaluation of alternative tritium mitigation techniques to control tritium in liquid effluents and groundwater at the Hanford site. A thorough literature review was completed and updated information is provided on state-of-the-art technologies for control of tritium in wastewaters. This report was prepared to satisfy the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-026-07B (Ecology, EPA, and DOE 2007). Tritium separation and isolation technologies are evaluated periodically to determine their feasibility for implementation to control Hanford site liquid effluents and groundwaters to meet the Us. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40 CFR 141.16, drinking water maximum contaminant level (MCL) for tritium of 20,000 pOll and/or DOE Order 5400.5 as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) policy. Since the 2004 evaluation, there have been a number of developments related to tritium separation and control with potential application in mitigating tritium contaminated wastewater. These are primarily focused in the areas of: (1) tritium recycling at a commercial facility in Cardiff, UK using integrated tritium separation technologies (water distillation, palladium membrane reactor, liquid phase catalytic exchange, thermal diffusion), (2) development and demonstration of Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE) using hydrogen/water exchange to separate tritium from water, (3) evaporation of tritium contaminated water for dispersion in the atmosphere, and (4) use of barriers to minimize the transport of tritium in groundwater. Continuing development efforts for tritium separations processes are primarily to support the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) program, the nuclear power industry, and the production of radiochemicals. While these applications are significantly different than the Hanford application, the technology could potentially be adapted for Hanford wastewater treatment. Separations based processes to reduce tritium levels below the drinking water MCL have not been demonstrated for the scale and conditions required for treating Hanford wastewater. In addition, available cost information indicates treatment costs for such processes will be substantially higher than for discharge to SALDS or other typical pump and treat projects at Hanford. Actual mitigation projects for groundwater with very low tritium contamination similar to that found at Hanford have focused mainly on controlling migration and on evaporation for dispersion in the atmosphere.

LUECK KJ; GENESSE DJ; STEGEN GE

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

135

Evaluation of cooling tower and wastewater treatment operations at the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to provide a technical assessment of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant Wastewater Treatment System. This Scope of Work consisted of five primary tasks described as follows: Task 1 - Determine the quantity of hydantoins in the stripped gas liquor (SGL), their precursors, and the kinetics of their formation in condensed liquor for the Great Plains Gasification Associates (GPGA) gasification facility. The University of North Dakota Energy Research Center (UNDERC) has measured a high concentration of hydantoins in the gas liquor from their slagging gasifier. UNDERC has tested the use of SGL in a pilot cooling tower and they witnessed some adverse effects in the cooling tower and heat exchanger systems. Task 2 - Investigate the adverse Department of Energy (DOE) findings at UNDERC with regard to corrosion, foaming, biological and organic fouling, chemical attack on concrete and organic emissions resulting from the use of SGL in a pilot plant cooling tower. Task 3 - Validate the heat load on the cooling tower for both summer and winter operation and determine the adequacy of the surge pond to store the maximum predicted amount of excess water accumulated during winter operation. Task 4 - Assess potential fouling, foaming and organic carry-over problems associated with operability of the multiple-effect evaporator and develop recommendations on possible alternate use of evaporator condensate to alleviate possible problems in disposing of excess wastewater. Task 5 - Provide DOE with recommendations on the wastewater treatment backup design and test program already committed to by GPGA. This paper presents Fluor's findings regarding the five primary tasks. 12 refs., 4 figs., 15 tabs.

Lang, R.A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

National and Regional Water and Wastewater Rates For Use inCost-Benefit Models and Evaluations of Water Efficiency Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculating the benefits and costs of water conservation orefficiency programs requires knowing the marginal cost of the water andwastewater saved by those programs. Developing an accurate picture of thepotential cost savings from water conservation requires knowing the costof the last few units of water consumed or wastewater released, becausethose are the units that would be saved by increased water efficiency.This report describes the data we obtained on water and wastewater ratesand costs, data gaps we identified, and other issues related to using thedata to estimate the cost savings that might accrue from waterconservation programs. We identified three water and wastewater ratesources. Of these, we recommend using Raftelis Financial Corporation(RFC) because it: a) has the most comprehensive national coverage; and b)provides greatest detail on rates to calculate marginal rates. The figurebelow shows the regional variation in water rates for a range ofconsumption blocks. Figure 1A Marginal Rates of Water Blocks by Regionfrom RFC 2004Water and wastewater rates are rising faster than the rateof inflation. For example, from 1996 to 2004 the average water rateincreased 39.5 percent, average wastewater rate increased 37.8 percent,the CPI (All Urban) increased 20.1 percent, and the CPI (Water andSewerage Maintenance) increased 31.1 percent. On average, annualincreases were 4.3 percent for water and 4.1 percent for wastewater,compared to 2.3 percent for the All Urban CPI and 3.7 percent for the CPIfor water and sewerage maintenance. If trends in rates for water andwastewater rates continue, water-efficient products will become morevaluable and more cost-effective.

Fisher, Diane C.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Melody, Moya

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

K-1435 Wastewater Treatment System for the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Wastewater at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper will discuss the design and performance of a wastewater treatment system installed to support the operation of a hazardous waste incinerator. The Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator (TSCAI), located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), is designed and permitted to treat Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) wastes including characteristic and listed wastes and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated mixed waste. The incinerator process generates acidic gases and particulates which consist of salts, metals, and radionuclides. These off-gases from the incinerator are treated with a wet off-gas scrubber system. The recirculated water is continuously purged (blow down), resulting in a wastewater to be treated. Additional water sources are also collected on the site for treatment, including storm water that infiltrates into diked areas and fire water from the incinerator's suppression system. To meet regulatory requirements for discharge, a wastewater treatment system (WWTS) was designed, constructed, and operated to treat these water sources. The WWTS was designed to provide for periodic fluctuation of contaminant concentrations due to various feed streams to the incinerator. Blow down consists of total suspended solids (TSS) and total dissolved solids (TDS), encompassing metals, radionuclide contamination and trace organics. The system design flow rate range is 7.95 to 17 cubic meters per hour (m3/hr) (35 to 75 gallons per minute; gpm). The system is designed with redundancy to minimize time off-line and to reduce impacts to the TSCAI operations. A novel treatment system uses several unit operations, including chemical feed systems, two-stage chemical reaction treatment, micro-filtration, sludge storage and dewatering, neutralization, granular activated carbon, effluent neutralization, and a complete programmable logic controller (PLC) and human-machine interface (HMI) control system. To meet the space requirements and to provide portability of the WWTS to other applications, the system was installed in three, over-the-road semi trailers, and interconnected with piping and power. Trailers were oriented on a small site footprint to facilitate ease of installation. A remote sump pump skid was provided to convey water from two holding sumps adjacent to the treatment process. An accumulation tank and pump were also provided to receive miscellaneous wastewaters for treatment if they meet the waste acceptance criteria. The paper will include details of the technology used in the design, the requirements for compliance, and the initial performance demonstration and jar testing results. The WWTS successfully allowed for highly efficient, high-volume treatment with compliant discharge to off-site surface water. (authors)

Beck, Ch.A. [Senior Project Manager, Golder Associates Inc. (United Kingdom); Tiepel, E.W. [Principal, Golder Associates Inc. (United Kingdom); Swientoniewski, M.D. [P.E. Senior Project Engineer, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (United States); Crow, K.R. [P.E., Project Manager, CDM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

K-1435 Wastewater Treatment System for the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Wastewater at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the design and performance of a wastewater treatment system installed to support the operation of a hazardous waste incinerator. The Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator (TSCAI), located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), is designed and permitted to treat Resource ConservatioN and Recovery Act (RCRA) wastes including characteristic and listed wastes and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated mixed waste. the incinerator process generates acidic gases and particulates which consist of salts, metals, and radionuclides. These off-gases from the incinerator are treated with a wet off-gas scrubber system. The recirculated water is continuously purged (below down), resulting in a wastewater to be treated. Additional water sources are also collected on the site for treatment, including storm water that infiltrates into diked areas and fire water from the incinerator's suppression system. To meet regulatory requirements for discharge, a wastewater treatment system (WWTS) was designed, constructed, and operated to treat these water sources. The WWTS was designed to provide for periodic fluctuation of contaminant concentrations due to various feed streams to the incinverator. Blow down consists of total suspended solids (TSS) and total dissolved solids (TDS), encompassing metals, radionuclide contamination and trace organics. The system design flow rate range is 35 to 75 gallons per minute (gpm). The system is designed with redundancy to minimize time off-line and to reduce impacts to the TSCAI operations. A novel treatment system uses several unit operations, including chemical feed systems, two-stage chemical reaction treatment, microfiltration, sludge storage and dewatering, neutralization, granular activated carbon, effluent neutralization, and a complete programmable logic controller (PLC) and human-machine interface (HMI) control system. To meet the space requirements and to provide portability of the WWTS to other applications, the system was installed in three, over-the-road semi trailers, and interconnected with piping and power. Trailers were oriented on a small site footprint to facilitate ease of installation. A remote sump pump skid was provided to convey water from two holding sumps adjacent to the treatment process. An accumulation tank and pump were also provided to receive miscellaneous wastewaters for treatment if they meet the waste acceptance criteria. The paper includes details of the technology used in the design, the requirements for compliance, and the initial performance demonstration and jar testing results. The WWTS successfully allowed for highly efficient, high-volume treatment with compliant discharge to off-site surface water.

Swientoniewski M.D.

2008-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

139

Treatment of concentrated industrial wastewaters originating from oil shale and the like by electrolysis polyurethane foam interaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Highly concentrated and toxic petroleum-based and synthetic fuels wastewaters such as oil shale retort water are treated in a unit treatment process by electrolysis in a reactor containing oleophilic, ionized, open-celled polyurethane foams and subjected to mixing and laminar flow conditions at an average detention time of six hours. Both the polyurethane foams and the foam regenerate solution are re-used. The treatment is a cost-effective process for waste-waters which are not treatable, or are not cost-effectively treatable, by conventional process series.

Tiernan, Joan E. (Novato, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The Treatment of Livestock Wastewater by Three Step Series Constructed Rapid Infiltration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constructed Rapid Infiltration system (CRI) is anew type of wastewater land disposal technique based on the traditional wastewater Rapid Infiltration. This paper was study on three step series CRI for removal of pollutants by using preparation of the ... Keywords: constructed rapid infiltration system, three step series, piggery wastewater, oxygen recovery

Kang Ai-bin; Chen Hong-han

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Evaluation of operating characteristics for a chabazite zeolite system for treatment of process wastewater at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory and pilot-scale testing were performed for development and design of a chabazite zeolite ion-exchange system to replace existing treatment systems at the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The process wastewater treatment systems at ORNL need upgrading to improve efficiency, reduce waste generation, and remove greater quantities of contaminants from the wastewater. Previous study indicated that replacement of the existing PWTP systems with an ion-exchange system using chabazite zeolite will satisfy these upgrade objectives. Pilot-scale testing of the zeolite system was performed using a commercially available ion-exchange system to evaluate physical operating characteristics and to validate smaller-scale column test results. Results of this test program indicate that (1) spent zeolite can be sluiced easily and completely from a commercially designed vessel, (2) clarification followed by granular anthracite prefilters is adequate pretreatment for the zeolite system, and (3) the length of the mass transfer zone was comparable with that obtained in smaller-scale column tests. Laboratory studies were performed to determine the loading capacity of the zeolite for selected heavy metals. These test results indicated fairly effective removal of silver, cadmium, copper, mercury, nickel, lead, and zinc from simple water solutions. Heavy-metals data collected during pilot-scale testing of actual wastewater indicated marginal removal of iron, copper, and zinc. Reduced effectiveness for other heavy metals during pilot testing can be attributed to the presence of interfering cations and the relatively short zeolite/wastewater contact time. Flocculating agents (polyelectrolytes) were tested for pretreatment of wastewater prior to the zeolite flow-through column system. Several commercially available polyelectrolytes were effective in flocculation and settling of suspended solids in process wastewater.

Kent, T.E.; Perona, J.J.; Jennings, H.L.; Lucero, A.J.; Taylor, P.A.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Application of the Analytic Hierarchy Process and the Analytic Network Process for the assessment of different wastewater treatment systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multicriteria analyses (MCAs) are used to make comparative assessments of alternative projects or heterogeneous measures and allow several criteria to be taken into account simultaneously in a complex situation. The paper shows the application of different ... Keywords: Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), Analytic Network Process (ANP), Sustainability assessment, decision support systems (DSS), wastewater treatment (WWT) technologies

Marta Bottero; Elena Comino; Vincenzo Riggio

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Feasibility of geothermal heat use in the San Bernardino Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant. Final report, September 1980-June 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of the feasibility study for utilizing low temperature geothermal heat in the City of San Bernardino Wastewater Treatment Plant are summarized. The study is presented in terms of preliminary engineering design, economic analysis, institutional issues, environmental impacts, resource development, and system implementation.

Racine, W.C.; Larson, T.C.; Stewart, C.A.; Wessel, H.B.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Treatment of biomass gasification wastewater using a combined wet air oxidation/activated sludge process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A lab-scale treatability study for using thermal and biological oxidation to treat a biomass gasification wastewater (BGW) having a chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 46,000 mg/l is described. Wet air oxidation (WA0) at 300/sup 0/C and 13.8 MPa (2000 psi) was used to initially treat the BGW and resulted in a COD reduction of 74%. This was followed by conventional activated sludge treatment using operating conditions typical of municipal sewage treatment plants. This resulted in an additional 95% COD removal. Overall COD reduction for the combined process was 99%. A detailed chemical analysis of the raw BGW and thermal and biological effluents was performed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These results showed a 97% decrease in total extractable organics with WA0 and a 99.6% decrease for combined WA0 and activated sludge treatment. Components of the treated waters tended to be fewer in number and more highly oxidized. An experiment was conducted to determine the amount of COD reduction caused by volatilization during biological treatment. Unfortunately, this did not yield conclusive results. Treatment of BGW using WA0 followed by activated sludge appears to be very effective and investigations at a larger scale are recommended.

English, C.J.; Petty, S.E.; Sklarew, D.S.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Federal involvement in: municipal wastewater treatment plant sludge energy recovery and conservation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results are presented of a study concerning federal involvement in municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWWTP) sludge energy recovery and conservation. The objectives of the study were to: determine and report the major agency programs and related MWWTP sludge energy recovery and conservation projects; determine and summarize the coordination efforts between federal agencies involved in MWWTP sludge; and recommend future U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) involvement in MWWTP sludge energy recovery and conservation projects. Specific federal agencies designated for surveying include ERDA, EPA, USDA, Bureau of Mines, National Science Foundation, and National Commission on Water Quality. Past (post-1966), present, and planned federal involvement in MWWTP sludge energy recovery and conservation, research and development, demonstration, and study projects were considered.

None

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Selenium Speciation in Biofilms from Granular Sludge Bed Reactors Used for Wastewater Treatment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Se K-edge XAFS spectra were collected for various model compounds of Se as well as for 3 biofilm samples from bioreactors used for Se-contaminated wastewater treatment. In the biofilm samples, Se is dominantly as Se(0) despite Se K-edge XANES spectroscopy cannot easily distinguish between elemental Se and Se(-I)-bearing selenides. EXAFS spectra indicate that Se is located within aperiodic domains, markedly different to these known in monoclinic red selenium. However, Se can well occur within nanodivided domains related to monoclinic red Se, as this form was optically observed at the rim of some sludges. Aqueous selenate is then efficiently bioreduced, under sulfate reducing and methanogenic conditions.

van Hullenbusch, Eric; /Marne la Vallee U.; Farges, Francois; /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci. /Museum Natl. Hist. Natur., Paris; Lenz, Markus; Lens, Piet; /Wageningen U.; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci. /SLAC, SSRL

2006-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

147

Assessment of oil shale retort wastewater treatment and control technology: phases I and II. Final report, May 1979-March 1980  

SciTech Connect

Oil shale retorting is a synthetic fuel production technology on the verge of commercialization in the United States. In order to ensure that the emerging oil shale industry will have minimal adverse effects upon surface and/or groundwater where recoverable reserves of oil shale are found, demonstrated technologies to upgrade oil shale wastewaters must be available to developers. To this end, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has contracted with Monsanto Research Corporation to conduct a three-year, five-phase study to: (1) summarize known information concerning oil shale retort wastewater sources and characteristics; (2) identify potentially applicable control technologies capable of treating the identified wastewater streams; and (3) design, construct, and operate pilot-plant facilities to evaluate the selected technologies. This report presents results of Phases I and II, in which literature and other information sources were surveyed to obtain relevant data about oil shale retorting technologies, wastewater sources and characteristics, potential wastewater uses, and potentially applicable treatment technologies. As a result of the study, data gaps were identified, and recommendations for bench-scale treatability studies were made.

Klieve, J.R.; Rawlinss, G.D.; Hoeflein, J.R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Algal Biofilm Production and Harvesting System for Wastewater Treatment with Biofuels By-Products.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Excess nitrogen and phosphorus in discharged wastewaters can lead to downstream eutrophication, ecosystem damage, and impaired water quality that may affect human health. Chemical-based… (more)

Christenson, Logan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Biological Treatment of Ammonia-Rich Wastewaters by Natural Microbial Communities in the ATOXIC/ASSET Purification System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes along with high throughput 454 pyrosequencing technology were used to identify microbial communities present at a novel passive wastewater treatment system designed to remove ammonium, nitrate, and heavy metals from fossil plant effluents. Seasonal changes in microbial community composition were observed, however significant (p=0.001) changes were detected in bacterial and archaeal communities consistent with ammonium removal throughout the treatment systems. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed presence of potential ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), Nitrosomonas, Nitrosococcus, Planctomycetes, and OD1. Other bacteria, such as Nitrospira, Nitrococcus, Nitrobacter, Thiobacillus, -Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, which play roles in nitrification and denitrification, were also detected. The relative abundance of the potential ammonium-oxidizing archaea (AOA) (Thermoprotei within the phylum Crenarchaeota) increased with ammonium availability at the splitter box and zero-valent iron extraction trenches even though AOB removed half of the ammonium in the trickling filters at the beginning of the treatment system. The microbial community removed the ammonium from the wastewater within both pilot-scale treatment systems, thus the treatment system components provided an effective environment for the treatment of ammonium enriched wastewater from coal burning power plants equipped with selective catalytic reducers for nitrogen oxide removal.

Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Fisher, L. Suzanne [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA); Brodie, Greg A [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA); Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Advanced On-Site Wastewater Treatment and Management Market Study: Volume 2: State Reports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is comprised of summaries of the status of on-site and small community wastewater systems in each state in the United States. The summaries provide an excellent general reference for further research into the status of each state's on-site wastewater systems.

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

151

Aeration control and parameter soft estimation for a wastewater treatment plant using a neurogenetic design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biochemical oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand are the most important parameters for wastewater management and planning, which represents the oxygen consumption from degradation of organic material. Insufficient levels of dissolved oxygen prevent ... Keywords: aeration optimal control, artificial neural networks, genetic algorithms, wastewater process

Javier Fernandez de Canete; Pablo del Saz-Orozco; Inmaculada Garcia-Moral

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The carbon footprint analysis of wastewater treatment plants and nitrous oxide emissions from full-scale biological nitrogen removal processes in Spain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a general model for the carbon footprint analysis of advanced wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with biological nitrogen removal processes, using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. Literature ...

Xu, Xin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Biologically induced concrete deterioration in a wastewater treatment plant assessed by combining microstructural analysis with thermodynamic modeling  

SciTech Connect

In the nitrification basins of wastewater treatment plants, deterioration of the concrete surface can occur due to acid attack caused by a nitrifying biofilm covering the concrete. To identify the mechanism of deterioration, concrete cubes of different composition were suspended in an aerated nitrification basin of a wastewater treatment plant for two years and analyzed afterwards. The microstructural investigation reveals that not only dissolution of hydrates takes place, but that calcite precipitation close to the surface occurs leading to the formation of a dense layer. The degree of deterioration of the different cubes correlates with the CaO content of the different cements used. Cements which contain a high fraction of CaO form more calcite offering a better protection against the acid attack. The presence of slag, which lowers the amount CaO in the cement, leads to a faster deterioration of the concrete than observed for samples produced with pure OPC.

Leemann, A., E-mail: andreas.leemann@empa.c [Empa, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Lothenbach, B.; Hoffmann, C. [Empa, Duebendorf (Switzerland)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Treatment of concentrated industrial wastewaters originating from oil shale and the like by electrolysis polyurethane foam interaction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Highly concentrated and toxic petroleum-based and synthetic fuels wastewaters such as oil shale retort water are treated in a unit treatment process by electrolysis in a reactor containing oleophilic, ionized, open-celled polyurethane foams and subjected to mixing and l BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention described herein arose in the course of, or under, Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098 between the U.S. Department of Energy and the University of California.

Tiernan, Joan E. (38 Clay Ct., Novato, CA 94947)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A methodology to estimate greenhouse gases emissions in Life Cycle Inventories of wastewater treatment plants  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this paper is to present the Direct Emissions Estimation Model (DEEM), a model for the estimation of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O emissions from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). This model is consistent with non-specific but widely used models such as AS/AD and ASM no. 1 and presents the benefits of simplicity and application over a common WWTP simulation platform, BioWin Registered-Sign , making it suitable for Life Cycle Assessment and Carbon Footprint studies. Its application in a Spanish WWTP indicates direct N{sub 2}O emissions to be 8 times larger than those associated with electricity use and thus relevant for LCA. CO{sub 2} emissions can be of similar importance to electricity-associated ones provided that 20% of them are of non-biogenic origin. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A model has been developed for the estimation of GHG emissions in WWTP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Model was consistent with both ASM no. 1 and AS/AD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N{sub 2}O emissions are 8 times more relevant than the one associated with electricity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 2} emissions are as important as electricity if 20% of it is non-biogenic.

Rodriguez-Garcia, G., E-mail: gonzalo.rodriguez.garcia@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Hospido, A., E-mail: almudena.hospido@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Bagley, D.M., E-mail: bagley@uwyo.edu [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Wyoming, 82072 Laramie, WY (United States); Moreira, M.T., E-mail: maite.moreira@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Feijoo, G., E-mail: gumersindo.feijoo@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Rua Lope Gomez de Marzoa, S/N, 15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Municipal Wastewater Characteristics of Sylhet City, Bangladesh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are essential to design wastewater treatment facilities inessential in the design and operation of collection, treatment, and disposal facilities

Alam, Raquibul; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Chowdhury, Md. Aktarul Islam; Nath, Suman Kanti

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors for treatment of wastewater from the brewery industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anaerobic digestion can be utilized to convert industrial wastewater into clean water and energy. The goal of this project was to set up lab-scale anaerobic digesters to collect data that will be used to develop and validate ...

Scampini, Amanda C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Intensive archaeological survey of the proposed Central Sanitary Wastewater Treatment Facility, Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect

The project area for the proposed Central Sanitary Wastewater Treatment Facility on the Savannah River Site includes a six-acre tract along Fourmile Branch and 18 mi of trunk line corridors. Archaeological investigations of the six-acre parcel resulted in the discovery of one small prehistoric site designated 38AK465. This cultural resource does not have the potential to add significantly to archaeological knowledge of human occupation in the region. The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) therefore recommends that 38AK465 is not eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) and further recommends a determination of no effect. Archaeological survey along the trunk line corridors implicated previously recorded sites 38AK92, 38AK145, 38AK415, 38AK417, 38AK419, and 38AK436. Past disturbance from construction had severely disturbed 38AK92 and no archaeological evidence of 38AK145, 38AK419, and 38AK436 was recovered during survey. Lacking further evidence for the existence of these sites, the SRARP recommends that 38AK92, 38AK145, 38AK419, and 38AK436 are not eligible for nomination to the NRHP and thus warrant a determination of no effect. Two of these sites, 38Ak415 and 38AK417, required further investigation to evaluate their archaeological significance. Both of the sites have the potential to yield significant data on the prehistoric period occupation of the Aiken Plateau and the SRARP recommends that they are eligible for nomination to the NRHP. The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program recommends that adverse effects to sites 38AK415 and 38AK417 from proposed construction can be mitigated through avoidance.

Stephenson, D.K.; Sassaman, K.E.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management  

SciTech Connect

Treated municipal wastewater is a common, widely available alternative source of cooling water for thermoelectric power plants across the U.S. However, the biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, carbonate and phosphates in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, respectively. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits and life cycle costs of implementing tertiary treatment of secondary treated municipal wastewater prior to use in recirculating cooling systems. The study comprised bench- and pilot-scale experimental studies with three different tertiary treated municipal wastewaters, and life cycle costing and environmental analyses of various tertiary treatment schemes. Sustainability factors and metrics for reuse of treated wastewater in power plant cooling systems were also evaluated. The three tertiary treated wastewaters studied were: secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to acid addition for pH control (MWW_pH); secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF); and secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected nitrification, sand filtration, and GAC adsorption (MWW_NFG). Tertiary treatment was determined to be essential to achieve appropriate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control for use of secondary treated municipal wastewater in power plant cooling systems. The ability to control scaling, in particular, was found to be significantly enhanced with tertiary treated wastewater compared to secondary treated wastewater. MWW_pH treated water (adjustment to pH 7.8) was effective in reducing scale formation, but increased corrosion and the amount of biocide required to achieve appropriate biofouling control. Corrosion could be adequately controlled with tolytriazole addition (4-5 ppm TTA), however, which was the case for all of the tertiary treated waters. For MWW_NF treated water, the removal of ammonia by nitrification helped to reduce the corrosivity and biocide demand. Also, the lower pH and alkalinity resulting from nitrification reduced the scaling to an acceptable level, without the addition of anti-scalant chemicals. Additional GAC adsorption treatment, MWW_NFG, yielded no net benefit. Removal of organic matter resulted in pitting corrosion in copper and cupronickel alloys. Negligible improvement was observed in scaling control and biofouling control. For all of the tertiary treatments, biofouling control was achievable, and most effectively with pre-formed monochloramine (2-3 ppm) in comparison with NaOCl and ClO2. Life cycle cost (LCC) analyses were performed for the tertiary treatment systems studied experimentally and for several other treatment options. A public domain conceptual costing tool (LC3 model) was developed for this purpose. MWW_SF (lime softening and sand filtration) and MWW_NF were the most cost-effective treatment options among the tertiary treatment alternatives considered because of the higher effluent quality with moderate infrastructure costs and the relatively low doses of conditioning chemicals required. Life cycle inventory (LCI) analysis along with integration of external costs of emissions with direct costs was performed to evaluate relative emissions to the environment and external costs associated with construction and operation of tertiary treatment alternatives. Integrated LCI and LCC analysis indicated that three-tiered treatment alternatives such as MWW_NSF and MWW_NFG, with regular chemical addition for treatment and conditioning and/or regeneration, tend to increase the impact costs and in turn the overall costs of tertiary treatment. River water supply and MWW_F alternatives with a single step of tertiary treatment were associated with lower impact costs, but the contribution of impact costs to overall annual costs was higher than all other treatment alternatives. MWW_NF and MWW_SF alternatives exhibited moderate external impact costs with moderate infrastructure and chemical conditioner dosing, which makes them (especially

David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

160

Oxidative Mineralization and Characterization of Polyvinyl Alcohol Solutions for Wastewater Treatment  

SciTech Connect

The principal objectives of this study are to identify an appropriate polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) oxidative mineralization technique, perform compatibility and evaporation fate tests for neat and mineralized PVA, and determine potential for PVA chemical interferences which may affect ion exchange utilization for radioactive wastewater processing in the nuclear industry.

Oji, L.N.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Study on Processing Condition of Submerged Rotating MBR for Wastewater Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A submerged rotating membrane bioreactor (SRMBR), with a rotatable, rounded, flat-sheet Poly(vinyldiene fluoride) (PVDF) membrane module fixed on the hollow axes and moved by an electromotor, was used for wastewater reclamation. The efficiencies of SRMBR, ... Keywords: Submerged rotating MBR, rotation speed, permeate flux, PVDF flat-sheet composite membrane

Danying Zuo; Hongjun Li

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

A dynamic estimation scheme of specific growth rates of bacteria for an anaerobic wastewater treatment process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The dynamics of this process are the ones of standard anaerobic digestion, and depend on the type of organic is devoted to the description of the model of the specific anaerobic digestion processA dynamic estimation scheme of specific growth rates of bacteria for an anaerobic wastewater

163

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Wastewater Treatment Capability Upgrade, Project NO. 96-D-122 Pantex Plant Amarillo, Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) addresses the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action regarding an upgrade of the Pantex Plant Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF). Potential environmental consequences associated with the proposed action and alternative actions are provided. DOE proposes to design, build, and operate a new WWTF, consistent with the requirements of Title 30 of the Texas Administrative Code (TAC), Chapter 317, ''Design Criteria for Sewage Systems,'' capable of supporting current and future wastewater treatment requirements of the Plant. Wastewater treatment at Pantex must provide sufficient operational flexibility to meet Pantex Plant's anticipated future needs, including potential Plant mission changes, alternative effluent uses, and wastewater discharge permit requirements. Treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water maybe used for irrigation on DOE-owned agricultural land. Five factors support the need for DOE action: (1) The current WWTF operation has the potential for inconsistent permit compliance. (2) The existing WWTF lies completely within the 100-year floodplain. (3) The Pantex Plant mission has the potential to change, requiring infrastructure changes to the facility. (4) The life expectancy of the existing facility would be nearing its end by the time a new facility is constructed. (5) The treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water would have a beneficial agricultural use through irrigation. Evaluation during the internal scoping led to the conclusion that the following factors are present and of concern at the proposed action site on Pantex Plant: (1) Periodic wastewater effluent permit exceedances; (2) Wetlands protection and floodplain management; (3) Capability of the existing facility to meet anticipated future needs of Pantex (4) Existing facility design life; and (5) Use of treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water for irrigation. Evaluation during the internal scoping led to the conclusion that the following conditions are not present, nor of concern at the proposed site on Pantex Plant, and no further analysis was conducted: (1) State or national parks, forests, or other conservation areas; (2) Wild and scenic rivers; (3) Natural resources, such as timber, range, soils, minerals; (4) Properties of historic, archeological, or architectural significance; (5) Native American concerns; (6) Minority and low-income populations; and (7) Prime or unique farmland. In this document, DOE describes the proposed action and a reasonable range of alternatives to the proposed action, including the ''No-Action'' alternative. The proposed action cited in the ''U.S. Department of Energy Application for a Texas Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit Modifying Permit to Dispose of Waste, No. 02296,'' December 1998, included the construction of a new wastewater treatment facility, a new irrigation storage pond, and the conversion of the current wastewater treatment facility into an irrigation storage pond. Although a permit modification application has been filed, if a decision on this EA necessitates it, an amendment to the permit application would be made. The permit application would be required for any of the alternatives and the filing does not preclude or predetermine selection of an alternative considered by this EA. This permit change would allow Pantex to land-dispose treated wastewater by irrigating agricultural land. This construction for the proposed action would include designing two new lagoons for wastewater treatment. One of the lagoons could function as a facultative lagoon for treatment of wastewater. The second lagoon would serve as an irrigation storage impoundment (storage pond), with the alternative use as a facultative lagoon if the first lagoon is out of service for any reason. The new facultative lagoon and irrigation water storage pond would be sited outside of the 100-year flood plain. The existing WWTF lagoon would be used as a storage pond for treated wastewater effluent for irrigation water, as needed. The two new lagoons would be li

N /A

1999-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

164

Wetland treatment of oil and gas well wastewaters. Quarterly technical report, November 25, 1992--February 24, 1993  

SciTech Connect

During the first quarter of the above contract, all the elements of Task 1 were completed. The first quarterly report presented an overview of a wetland and its increasing use in industrial wastewater treatment. An idealized, reaction engineering description of wetlands was presented to demonstrate how the various processes that occur in a wetland can be modeled. Previous work on the use of wetlands to remove BOD, TSS, Phosphorus and Nitrogen was reviewed. Recent literature on the application of wetland technology to the treatment of petroleum-related wastewater was critically evaluated and an outline of the research plans for the first year was delineated. Further, our literature search (nominally completed under Task 1) unearthed more recent studies (some unpublished) and a summary was included in the second quarterly report. In the second quarterly report, results of our efforts on the construction of a laboratory-type wetland were also reported. Initial studies on the use of wetland amendments such as modified-clays and algae cells were presented and discussed. Adsorption of heavy metal ions, Cu{sup 2+} and Cr(VI) onto soils drawn from the laboratory-type wetland built as a part of this contract has been undertaken and these results are presented and discussed in this quarterly report. A number of studies on the design and preparation of modified-clays for the adsorption of Cr(VI) and {beta}-naphthoic acid (NA) has been carried out during this quarter and these are also described and discussed in this report. The choice of {beta}-naphthoic acid (NA) as an ionogenic organic compound was made on the basis of a recent personal communication to the Project Director that NA is a major contaminant in many oil and gas well wastewaters.

Kadlec, R.H.; Srinivasan, K.R.

1993-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

165

Importance of denitrification to the efficiency of waste-water treatment in forested wetlands. Project completion report  

SciTech Connect

Wastewater, even after secondary treatment, typically contains high concentrations of nutrients that can cause eutrophication of receiving waters and deterioration of water quality. Therefore, there has been much interest in the use of natural wetlands as a simple and energy-efficient means of removing nutrients from wastewater and improving water quality. The utilization of a wetland for tertiary treatment of wastewater is based on the ability of the wetland to act as a nutrient sink. One of the most important processes in wetland ecosystems that influences their capacity as a nitrogen sink is the gaseous exchange of nitrogen with the atmosphere known as denitrification. Since denitrification represents a loss of nitrogen to the atmosphere, the mechanism tends to be most favorable for the removal of nitrogen. The objectives of the research project were to (1) determine the temporal and spatial ambient rates of denitrification and compare these rates to those of sediments amended with increased concentrations of nitrate comparable to concentrations of total nitrogen in the sewage effluent to be discharged; and (2) determine the proportion of total denitrification that can be attributed to direct utilization of nitrate loaded into the wetland, as compared to nitrate produced via nitrification within the wetland. Although nitrate is readily denitrified, short-term incubation rates are relatively low which is attributed to the presently low nitrate concentrations and subsequent reduced denitrifying microbial population in the wetland sediments. Nitrate concentrations varied seasonally associated with increased flooding during spring. Rates of nitrification coupled with denitrification were investigated with nitrogen-15 isotopes. Nitrification is limited in the wetland sedments; therefore, controls the rate of total nitrogen loss from the system.

Twilley, R.R.; Boustany, R.G.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Fate of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles during Anaerobic Digestion of Wastewater and Post-Treatment Processing of Sewage Sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rapid development and commercialization of nanomaterials will inevitably result in the release of nanoparticles (NPs) to the environment. As NPs often exhibit physical and chemical properties significantly different from those of their molecular or macrosize analogs, concern has been growing regarding their fate and toxicity in environmental compartments. The wastewater-sewage sludge pathway has been identified as a key release pathway leading to environmental exposure to NPs. In this study, we investigated the chemical transformation of two ZnO-NPs and one hydrophobic ZnO-NP commercial formulation (used in personal care products), during anaerobic digestion of wastewater. Changes in Zn speciation as a result of postprocessing of the sewage sludge, mimicking composting/stockpiling, were also assessed. The results indicated that 'native' Zn and Zn added either as a soluble salt or as NPs was rapidly converted to sulfides in all treatments. The hydrophobicity of the commercial formulation retarded the conversion of ZnO-NP. However, at the end of the anaerobic digestion process and after postprocessing of the sewage sludge (which caused a significant change in Zn speciation), the speciation of Zn was similar across all treatments. This indicates that, at least for the material tested, the risk assessment of ZnO-NP through this exposure pathway can rely on the significant knowledge already available in regard to other 'conventional' forms of Zn present in sewage sludge.

Lombi, Enzo; Donner, Erica; Tavakkoli, Ehsan; Turney, Terence W.; Naidu, Ravi; Miller, Bradley W.; Scheckel, Kirk G. (U. South Australia); (EPA); (Monash)

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

167

Feasibility of geothermal heat use in the San Bernardino Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant. Final report, September 1980-June 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system was developed for utilizing nearby low temperature geothermal energy to heat two high-rate primary anaerobic digesters at the San Bernardino Wastewater Treatment Plant. The geothermal fluid would replace the methane currently burned to fuel the digesters. A summary of the work accomplished on the feasibility study is presented. The design and operation of the facility are examined and potentially viable applications selected for additional study. Results of these investigations and system descriptions and equipment specifications for utilizing geothermal energy in the selected processes are presented. The economic analyses conducted on the six engineering design cases are discussed. The environmental setting of the project and an analysis of the environmental impacts that will result from construction and operation of the geothermal heating system are discussed. A Resource Development Plan describes the steps that the San Bernardino Municipal Water Department could follow in order to utilize the resource. A preliminary well program and rough cost estimates for the production and injection wells also are included. The Water Department is provided with a program and schedule for implementing a geothermal system to serve the wastewater treatment plant. Regulatory, financial, and legal issues that will impact the project are presented in the Appendix. An outline of a Public Awareness Program is included.

Racine, W.C.; Larson, T.C.; Stewart, C.A.; Wessel, H.B.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Industry Strategic Executive Overview: Highlights of the Municipal Wastewater Treatment Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wastewater industry represents significant opportunities for both load growth and energy efficiency in the coming years, but it is also an industry struggling with tremendous pressures. Increasingly strict regulations on water quality and the disposal of biosolids (sludge) are forcing plants to upgrade and add new processes and new technologies. The industry is also dealing with an infrastructure that is beginning to age and funding prospects that are not nearly as positive as they once were. At the ...

2000-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

169

Current Practices: Solid Waste Management from Zero Liquid Discharge (ZLD) Wastewater Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was conducted to identify current practices used by power plants to manage their solid waste residuals from zero liquid discharge (ZLD) operations treating flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater. Because there are such few FGD ZLD systems in operation not only in the United States but also worldwide, the study scope was expanded to include non-FGD ZLD operations, as well. Only two of the seven facilities interviewed in this study operate ZLDs on FGD water; therefore, much of the current ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Performance Evaluation of a Radial Deionization System for Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed effluent limitation guidelines for steam electric power generating units could affect not only how power plants use water but also how they discharge it. The revised guidelines propose discharge limits for selenium, mercury, arsenic, and nitrite/nitrate in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater. Final rule approval is expected by the middle of 2014. Additional regulation of these contaminants and other constituents may occur through ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

171

Supplemental Power for the town of Browning Waste-Water Treatment Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has not been without a few, which were worked out and at the time of this report continue to be worked on with the installation of two new Trace Technologies invertors and a rebuilt one with new technology inside. For the most part when the system has worked it produced power that was used within the wastewater system as was the purpose of this project.

William Morris; Dennis Fitzpatrick

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

172

Fate of As, Se, and Hg in a Passive Integrated System for Treatment of Fossil Plant Wastewater  

SciTech Connect

TVA is collaborating with EPRI and DOE to demonstrate a passive treatment system for removing SCR-derived ammonia and trace elements from a coal-fired power plant wastewater stream. The components of the integrated system consist of trickling filters for ammonia oxidation, reaction cells containing zero-valent iron (ZVI) for trace contaminant removal, a settling basin for storage of iron hydroxide floc, and anaerobic vertical-flow wetlands for biological denitrification. The passive integrated treatment system will treat up to 0.25 million gallons per day (gpd) of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) pond effluent, with a configuration requiring only gravity flow to obviate the need for pumps. The design of the system will enable a comparative evaluation of two parallel treatment trains, with and without the ZVI extraction trench and settling/oxidation basin components. One of the main objectives is to gain a better understanding of the chemical transformations that species of trace elements such as arsenic, selenium, and mercury undergo as they are treated in passive treatment system components with differing environmental conditions. This progress report details the design criteria for the passive integrated system for treating fossil power plant wastewater as well as performance results from the first several months of operation. Engineering work on the project has been completed, and construction took place during the summer of 2005. Monitoring of the passive treatment system was initiated in October 2005 and continued until May 18 2006. The results to date indicate that the treatment system is effective in reducing levels of nitrogen compounds and trace metals. Concentrations of both ammonia and trace metals were lower than expected in the influent FGD water, and additions to increase these concentrations will be done in the future to further test the removal efficiency of the treatment system. In May 2006, the wetland cells were drained of FGD water, refilled with less toxic ash pond water, and replanted due to low survival rates from the first planting the previous summer. The goals of the TVA-EPRI-DOE collaboration include building a better understanding of the chemical transformations that trace elements such as arsenic, selenium, and mercury undergo as they are treated in a passive treatment system, and to evaluate the performance of a large-scale replicated passive treatment system to provide additional design criteria and economic factors.

Terry Yost; Paul Pier; Gregory Brodie

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

Emissions of volatile and potentially toxic organic compounds from waste-water treatment plants and collection systems (Phase 2). Volume 1. Project summaries. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the Phase II research project on emission of potentially toxic organic compounds (PTOCs) from wastewater treatment plants were fivefold: (1) assessment of the importance of gaseous emissions from municipal wastewater collection systems; (2) resolution of the discrepancy between the measured and estimated emissions (Phase I), from the Joint Water Pollution Control Plant (JWPCP) operated by the County Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County (CSDLAC); (3) determination of airborne concentrations of PTOCS immediately downwind of an activated sludge aeration process at the City of Los Angeles' Hyperion Treatment Plant (HTP); (4) a modeling assessment of the effects of transient loading on emissions during preliminary and primary treatment at a typical municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWTP); (5) a preliminary investigation of effects of chlorination practices on haloform production. Volume 1, for which the abstract was prepared, contains a summary of results from each project; Volume 2 contains the discussion regarding the modeling of collection system emissions; Volume 3 addresses methods development and field sampling efforts at the JWPCP and HTP, data on emissions from a mechanically ventilated sewer and results of some preliminary haloform formation studies in wastewaters; and Volume 4 discusses aspects of the emissions modeling problem.

Chang, D.P.Y.; Schroeder, E.D.; Corsi, R.L.; Guensler, R.; Meyerhofer, J.A.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Formal verification of wastewater treatment processes using events detected from continuous signals by means of artificial neural networks. Case study: SBR plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a modular architecture for the analysis and the validation of wastewater treatment processes. An algorithm using neural networks is used to extract the relevant qualitative patterns, such as ''apexes'', ''knees'' and ''steps'', from ... Keywords: Artificial neural networks, Business process management, Event detection, Intelligent systems, Rule-based management system, SBR

Luca Luccarini; Gianni Luigi Bragadin; Gabriele Colombini; Maurizio Mancini; Paola Mello; Marco Montali; Davide Sottara

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Combustion testing and heat recovery study: Frank E. Van Lare Wastewater Treatment Plant, Monroe County. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the study were to record and analyze sludge management operations data and sludge incinerator combustion data; ascertain instrumentation and control needs; calculate heat balances for the incineration system; and determine the feasibility of different waste-heat recovery technologies for the Frank E. Van Lare (FEV) Wastewater Treatment Plant. As an integral part of this study, current and pending federal and state regulations were evaluated to establish their impact on furnace operation and subsequent heat recovery. Of significance is the effect of the recently promulgated Federal 40 CFR Part 503 regulations on the FEV facility. Part 503 regulations were signed into law in November 1992, and, with some exceptions, affected facilities must be in compliance by February 19, 1994. Those facilities requiring modifications or upgrades to their incineration or air pollution control equipment to meet Part 503 regulations must be in compliance by February 19, 1995.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Using rotating biological contactors for the treatment of coal gasification wastewaters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to determine the treatability of University of North Dakota Energy Research Centers (UNDERC's) and Great Plains' coal gasification wastewaters using a bench scale four stage rotating biological contactor (RBC). The treatability testing included an evaluation of organic removal rates in the first stage and the overall rates in the last three stages using the Stover-Kincannon model. Nitrification was evaluated at various loading rates. Stage 1 accounted for most of the removal of alcohols, fatty acids, phenol, and thiocyanate from both UNDERC stripped gas liquor (SGL) and for alcohols and fatty acid removal from the Great Plains (GP) SGL. The 2, 3 and 4 stages accomplished very little additional organic removal in either system. Biodegradable organic removals remained high in the first stage of the GP SGL test run despite anaerobic conditions in the first stage. 5 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

Turner, C.D.; Wernberg, K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Biofuel potential, nitrogen utilization, and growth rates of two green algae isolated from a wastewater treatment facility.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nitrogen removal from wastewater by algae provides the additional benefit of producing lipids for biofuel and biomass for anaerobic digestion. As ammonium is the renewable… (more)

Eustance, Everett O'Brien.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Treatment of Wine Distillery Wastewater Using an Anaerobic Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor with Low Density of Polyethylene Support  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An anaerobic moving bed biofilm reactor filled with small and low density polyethylene support as biofilm carrier was operated to treat wine distillery wastewater for nearly 8 months. The support packed in the reactor is Bioflow 30 with density 0.92g/cm3 ... Keywords: Anaerobic digestion, moving bed biofilm reactor, low density polyethylene support, wine distillery wastewater

Chai Sheli; Rene Moletta

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Evaluation of Confining Layer Integrity Beneath the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, Dade County, Florida  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review has been performed of existing information that describes geology, hydrogeology, and geochemistry at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, which is operated by the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, in Dade County, Florida. Treated sanitary wastewater is injected into a saline aquifer beneath the plant. Detection of contaminants commonly associated with treated sanitary wastewater in the freshwater aquifer that overlies the saline aquifer has indicated a need for a reevaluation of the ability of the confining layer above the saline aquifer to prevent fluid migration into the overlying freshwater aquifer. Review of the available data shows that the geologic data set is not sufficient to demonstrate that a competent confining layer is present between the saline and freshwater aquifers. The hydrogeologic data also do not indicate that a competent confining layer is present. The geochemical data show that the freshwater aquifer is contaminated with treated wastewater, and the spatial patterns of contamination are consistent with upward migration through localized conduits through the Middle Confining Unit, such as leaking wells or natural features. Recommendations for collection and interpretation of additional site characterization data are provided.

Starr, R.C.; Green, T.S.; Hull, L.C.

2001-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

180

Evaluation of Confining Layer Integrity Beneath the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, Dade County, Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review has been performed of existing information that describes geology, hydrogeology, and geochemistry at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, which is operated by the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, in Dade County, Florida. Treated sanitary wastewater is injected into a saline aquifer beneath the plant. Detection of contaminants commonly associated with treated sanitary wastewater in the freshwater aquifer that overlies the saline aquifer has indicated a need for a reevaluation of the ability of the confining layer above the saline aquifer to prevent fluid migration into the overlying freshwater aquifer. Review of the available data shows that the geologic data set is not sufficient to demonstrate that a competent confining layer is present between the saline and freshwater aquifers. The hydrogeologic data also do not indicate that a competent confining layer is present. The geochemical data show that the freshwater aquifer is contaminated with treated wastewater, and the spatial patterns of contamination are consistent with upward migration through localized conduits through the Middle Confining Unit, such as leaking wells or natural features. Recommendations for collection and interpretation of additional site characterization data are provided.

Starr, Robert Charles; Green, Timothy Scott; Hull, Laurence Charles

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Advanced On-Site Wastewater Treatment and Management Market Study: Volume 1: Assessment of Short-Term Opportunities and Long-Run Pot ential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-site septic systems have traditionally been considered a temporary solution on the way to sewering. However, the elimination of federal grants for sewers and wastewater treatment plants has brought a new awareness of the high costs and the sometimes adverse environmental consequences of centralized point discharges. At the same time, advances in on-site technologies, including such systems as low-flow water conservation, watertight septic tanks with screens, sand filtration, disinfection, remote monit...

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

182

Demonstration of constructed wetlands for treatment of municipal wastewaters, monitoring report for the period, March 1988--October 1989  

SciTech Connect

To evaluate the constructed wetland technology, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) implemented a municipal wastewater demonstration project in western Kentucky. Using combined city, State, and TVA appropriated funds, three constructed wetland systems were built at Benton, Hardin, and Pembroke, Kentucky. Demonstration objectives include evaluating relative advantages and disadvantages of these types of systems; determining permit compliance ability; developing, evaluating, and improving basic design and operation criteria; evaluating cost effectiveness; and transferring technology to users and regulators. A demonstration monitoring project was implemented with a partnership of funds from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, other EPA funds through the National Small Flows Clearinghouse (NSFC), and TVA appropriations. TVA is managing the project in cooperation with an interagency team consisting of EPA, Kentucky Division of Water and NSFC. This report, which supersedes the first monitoring report (Choate, et. al., 1989) of these demonstration projects, describes each constructed wetland system, its status, and summarizes monitoring data and plans for each system. 5 refs., 30 figs., 26 tabs.

Choate, K.D.; Watson, J.T.; Steiner, G.R.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Tomorrow`s energy today for cities and counties -- Alternative wastewater treatment: Advanced Integrated Pond systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a discussion of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of the Advanced Integrated Pond System as an alternative for other more costly municipal waste water treatment plants.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Thermal Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater Treatment Processes for Zero Liquid Discharge Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a worldwide inventory of power plant flue gas desulfurization (FGD) blowdown treatment systems using thermal technologies to achieve zero liquid discharge (ZLD) water management. The number of thermal treatment systems presently operating is very few, with the majority using chemical pretreatment followed by evaporation in a brine concentrator and crystallizer and finally dewatering of the residual salts. Of the operating thermal ZLD systems identified, six are located in Italy and o...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Application of gas flotation and foam separation for the treatment of tar-sand wastewaters  

SciTech Connect

A feasibility study was undertaken to evaluate the potential of air flotation and foam separation for the treatment of tar sand, steam generation waste waters collected following an in-situ experiment in Vernal, Utah. It was found that the process waters were not amenable to treatment by means of polymer-aided air flotation or foam separation. Suspended solids were readily removed by the process, but dissolved organic substances were not affected significantly.

Boardman, G.D.; Nolan, B.T.; VanLeigh, L.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Record of Decision; Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant Facilities Improvements Project and Geyesers Effluent Pipeline Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

60 60 Federal Register / Vol. 60, No. 198 / Friday, October 13, 1995 / Notices The Department is publishing in the Federal Register the Petition for Waiver in its entirely. The Petition contains no confidential information. The Department is soliciting comments, data, and information respecting the Petition. Sincerely, Christine A. Ervin, Assistant Secretary, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. August 8, 1995. Assistant Secretary, Conservation & Renewable Energy, United States Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, D.C. Subject: Petition for Waiver and Application for Interim Waiver. Dear Assistant Secretary: This is a Petition for Waiver and Application for Interim Waiver submitted pursuant to Title 10 CFR 430.27, as amended 14 November 1986.

187

BUNCOMBE COUNTY WASTEWATER PRE-TREATMENT AND LANDFILL GAS TO ENERGY PROJECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to construct a landfill gas-to-energy (LFGTE) facility that generates a renewable energy source utilizing landfill gas to power a 1.4MW generator, while at the same time reducing the amount of leachate hauled offsite for treatment. The project included an enhanced gas collection and control system, gas conditioning equipment, and a 1.4 MW generator set. The production of cleaner renewable energy will help offset the carbon footprint of other energy sources that are currently utilized.

Jon Creighton

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

188

MWIP: Surrogate formulations for thermal treatment of low-level mixed waste. Part 4, Wastewater treatment sludges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The category of sludges, filter cakes, and other waste processing residuals represent the largest volume of low-level mixed (hazardous and radioactive) wastes within the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Treatment of these wastes to minimize the mobility of contaminants, and to eliminate the presence of free water, is required under the Federal Facility Compliance Act agreements between DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency. In the text, we summarize the currently available data for several of the high priority mixed-waste sludge inventories within DOE. Los Alamos National Laboratory TA-50 Sludge and Rocky Flats Plant By-Pass Sludge are transuranic (TRU)-contaminated sludges that were isolated with the use of silica-based filter aids. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant West End Treatment Facility Sludge is predominantly calcium carbonate and biomass. The Oak Ridge K-25 Site Pond Waste is a large-volume waste stream, containing clay, silt, and other debris in addition to precipitated metal hydroxides. We formulate ``simulants`` for the waste streams described above, using cerium oxide as a surrogate for the uranium or plutonium present in the authentic material. Use of nonradiological surrogates greatly simplifies material handling requirements for initial treatability studies. The use of synthetic mixtures for initial treatability testing will facilitate compositional variation for use in conjunction with statistical design experiments; this approach may help to identify any ``operating window`` limitations. The initial treatability testing demonstrations utilizing these ``simulants`` will be based upon vitrification, although the materials are also amenable to testing grout-based and other stabilization procedures. After the feasibility of treatment and the initial evaluation of treatment performance has been demonstrated, performance must be verified using authentic samples of the candidate waste stream.

Bostick, W.D.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Stevenson, R.J.; Richmond, A.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bickford, D.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL POWER PLANT LOCATED AT TERMINAL ISLAND WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) has developed one of the most recognized fuel cell demonstration programs in the United States. In addition to their high efficiencies and superior environmental performance, fuel cells and other generating technologies that can be located at or near the load, offers several electric utility benefits. Fuel cells can help further reduce costs by reducing peak electricity demand, thereby deferring or avoiding expenses for additional electric utility infrastructure. By locating generators near the load, higher reliability of service is possible and the losses that occur during delivery of electricity from remote generators are avoided. The potential to use renewable and locally available fuels, such as landfill or sewage treatment waste gases, provides another attractive outlook. In Los Angeles, there are also many oil producing areas where the gas by-product can be utilized. In June 2000, the LADWP contracted with FCE to install and commission the precommercial 250kW MCFC power plant. The plant was delivered, installed, and began power production at the JFB in August 2001. The plant underwent manufacturer's field trials up for 18 months and was replace with a commercial plant in January 2003. In January 2001, the LADWP contracted with FCE to provide two additional 250kW MCFC power plants. These commercial plants began operations during mid-2003. The locations of these plants are at the Terminal Island Sewage Treatment Plant at the Los Angeles Harbor (for eventual operation on digester gas) and at the LADWP Main Street Service Center east of downtown Los Angeles. All three carbonate fuel cell plants received partial funding through the Department of Defense's Climate Change Fuel Cell Buydown Program. This report covers the technical evaluation and benefit-cost evaluation of the Terminal Island 250kW MCFC power plant during its first year of operation from June 2003 to July 2004.

William W. Glauz

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Operational characteristics of anaerobic digesters at selected municipal wastewater treatment facilities in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bench-scale and pilot plant studies at PNL have shown that powdered activated carbon is effective in improving volatile solids destruction and gas production in anaerobic digesters that are operating at less than normally expected levels of efficiency. To evaluate the applicability of this technology to digesters in the United States, digester operating characteristics at 60 facilities were surveyed and the number of stressed digesters estimated. The results show that although median values of the operating parameters conformed with those of a well-operated digester, 30% of the digesters surveyed were stressed with regard to at least one important parameter. Of the 30 largest treatment plants in the U.S., 7 fell into this category. Digester gas production and usage were then examined to determine the importance of methane off-gas as an energy source. A conservative estimate is that the gas produced nationally represents a heating value of about 2.36 x 10/sup 13/ Btu/year with a present value of $40 million. Of this amount, an estimated 75% is used either onsite or sold. Onsite uses include heating digesters and buildings, incinerating sludge, operating equipment, and generating electricity. The other 25% is flared and the energy value lost. The present value of the flared gas is about $10 million/year. Natural gas prices are projected to increase 150% over the next 7 years. If the present utilization ratio continues, the flared gas will be worth approximately $27 million in 1985. Presently, digester gas is mainly used for process heating and operating equipment. The technical and economic feasibility of recovering digester gas for electrical power generation, onsite equipment operation, and sales to other consumers (utilities, private companies) should be thoroughly investigated. If fuel gas recovery and utilization are found to be desirable, consideration should be given to expanding and upgrading anaerobic digester facilities in the U.S.

Spencer, R.R.; Wong, A.L.; Coates, J.A.; Ahlstrom, S.B.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Argumentation-based framework for industrial wastewater discharges management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The daily operation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in unitary sewer systems of industrialized areas is of special concern. Severe problems can occur due to the characteristics of incoming flow. In order to avoid decision that leads to hazardous ... Keywords: Agents, Argumentation, Industrial discharge management, River basin management, Urban wastewater system, Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP)

M. Aulinas; P. Tolchinsky; C. Turon; M. Poch; U. Cortés

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Effect of Trace Elements on Anaerobic Digestion of Coking Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pretreatment of coking wastewater using ASBR was conducted at 35? in this paper. The addition of trace elements to the anaerobic reactor has positive effect on the anaerobic treatment of coking wastewater, but too much or too little of it will ... Keywords: trace elements, anaerobic digestion, coking wastewater

Yu-ying Li; Bing Li

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Engineered nanoparticles in wastewater and wastewater sludge - Evidence and impacts  

SciTech Connect

Nanotechnology has widespread application in agricultural, environmental and industrial sectors ranging from fabrication of molecular assemblies to microbial array chips. Despite the booming application of nanotechnology, there have been serious implications which are coming into light in the recent years within different environmental compartments, namely air, water and soil and its likely impact on the human health. Health and environmental effects of common metals and materials are well-known, however, when the metals and materials take the form of nanoparticles - consequential hazards based on shape and size are yet to be explored. The nanoparticles released from different nanomaterials used in our household and industrial commodities find their way through waste disposal routes into the wastewater treatment facilities and end up in wastewater sludge. Further escape of these nanoparticles into the effluent will contaminate the aquatic and soil environment. Hence, an understanding of the presence, behavior and impact of these nanoparticles in wastewater and wastewater sludge is necessary and timely. Despite the lack of sufficient literature, the present review attempts to link various compartmentalization aspects of the nanoparticles, their physical properties and toxicity in wastewater and wastewater sludge through simile drawn from other environmental streams.

Brar, Satinder K., E-mail: satinder.brar@ete.inrs.c [INRS-ETE, Universite du Quebec, 490, Rue de la Couronne, Quebec, G1K 9A9 (Canada); Verma, Mausam [Department of Biological Engineering, Sexton Campus, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3J 2X4 (Canada); Tyagi, R.D. [INRS-ETE, Universite du Quebec, 490, Rue de la Couronne, Quebec, G1K 9A9 (Canada); Surampalli, R.Y. [US Environmental Protection Agency, P.O. Box 17-2141, Kansas City, KS 66117 (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Wastewater Reuse as Cooling-Tower Makeup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As many parts of the United States begin to face shortages, utilities will look for reliable new water sources. Focusing on the use of wastewater as makeup to cooling towers, this report describes commercially available wastewater treatments for power plant applications and highlights the need for research to control biologic slime and phosphate scale formation.

1987-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

195

Unique process combination decontaminates mixed wastewater at Rocky Flats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the Sitewide Water Treatment Facility (SWTF) used to process environmental remediation wastewaters found at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site.

Kelso, William J.; Cirillo, J. Russ

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Solid-Liquid Separation of Animal Manure and Wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid-liquid separation is an alternative treatment for animal manure and process-generated wastewater. This publication explains the techniques, equipment, performance and economics of separators.

Mukhtar, Saqib; Sweeten, John M.; Auvermann, Brent W.

1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

197

Wastewater sludge management options for Honduras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sludge management is a fundamental area of concern across wastewater treatment systems in Honduras. The lack of timely sludge removal has led to declining plant performance in many facilities throughout the country. In ...

Bhattacharya, Mahua, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Water and Wastewater Technology Demonstration Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was funded jointly by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Southern California Edison (SCE), and the California Energy Commission (CEC), with project management by SCE. The primary objective was to identify and develop technologies that could help California's water/wastewater industry reduce the cost of water and wastewater treatment and improve the overall operation at treatment facilities. Metropolitan Water District (MWD) and Orange County Water District (OCWD) were commissioned...

2002-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Maximizing Wastewater Reduction for the Process Industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study provides an overview of water and wastewater management practices in the U.S. process industries. The focus is on the chemical and petroleum industries and their methods for maximizing wastewater reduction and zero discharge. However, it also covers end-of-pipe treatment, since water reduction and zero discharge practices have evolved from end-of-pipe treatment practices. The resulting report is a comprehensive reference developed to help utilities and energy service providers understand and f...

1999-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

200

Household water treatment and safe storage options for Northern Region Ghana : consumer preference and relative cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A range of household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) products are available in Northern Region Ghana which have the potential to significantly improve local drinking water quality. However, to date, the region has ...

Green, Vanessa (Vanessa Layton)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Ammonium estimation in a biological wastewater plant using feedforward neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mathematical models are normally used to calculate the component concentrations in biological wastewater treatment. However, this work deals with the wastewater from a coke plant and it implies inhibition effects between components which do not permit ...

Hilario López García; Iván Machón González

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Management of Process Wastewater at Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A confluence of drivers is causing utilities to consider closing ash ponds and converting to dry ash handling. These drivers include wastewater discharge regulations on salinity, chlorides, nutrients, and metals, as well as solid waste regulations resulting from concerns with pond safety. Because ash ponds at many sites receive a variety of wastewaters, even if a plant converts to dry ash handling and thereby reduces or eliminates ash sluice water, other wastewater streams will still require treatment. E...

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

The application of PHREEQCi, a geochemical computer program, to aid in the management of a wastewater treatment wetland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past decade, constructed wetlands have become popular for treating coal-generated acid mine drainage and leachate from coal-ash disposal areas. The goal of the wetland manager is to design a system in which the pH is neutralized, toxic metals are removed, and wetland discharge meets or exceeds discharge standards for water quality. This is typically accomplished by using a combination of wetlands, ponds, and limestone drains. The treatment capability of a constructed wetland is based on relationships among dissolved oxygen (DO), pH, and metal speciation. The aim of this research was to determine if PHREEQCi, a geochemical computer program, could be used in wetland management and design. The wetland site chosen for this study was at a Texas Municipal Power Agency (TMPA) plant located in Grimes County, Texas and was created to treat leachate from a solid waste disposal area where coal ash and SO? scrubber sludge was deposited. The leachate contains significant concentrations of sulfate, chloride, total dissolved solids (TDS), arsenic, and selenium. Using PHREEQCi, geochemical speciation models were created to study the interrelationships between critical chemical components at the TMPA site in order to establish an optimum set of conditions to improve treatment capability and to avoid wetland failure. The results of the geochemical speciation modeling indicated a challenging situation for a wetland manager because different species precipitate under contrasting environments. In order to apply the geochemical speciation results to the design of the TMPA site, two conditions must be recognized. First, metal removal is best accomplished by generating alkaline and oxidative conditions to promote metal-oxide precipitation. Second, sulfate can be controlled under reducing environments where it is converted to sulfide and metal sulfides precipitate. Chlorides are very soluble and no viable conclusions as to the most appropriate removal method could be postulated. TDS has an ambiguous composition and could not be modeled using PHREEQCi.

Mitzman, Stephanie

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Harvesting Energy from Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuels and energy ­­ US production of oil peaked 30 years agoUS production of oil peaked 30 years ago ­­ Global production of oil will peak sometimeGlobal production of oil will peak sometime in the next 1

205

Pilot-Scale Demonstration of Hybrid Zero-Valent Iron Water Treatment Technology: Removing Trace Metals from Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In previous laboratory- and field bench-scale tests, the hybrid zero-valent iron (hZVI) process had been demonstrated capable of removing selenium, mercury, nitrates, and other pollutants from flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater. By incorporating zero-valent iron (ZVI) with magnetite and certain Fe(II) species, the hZVI technology creates a highly reactive mixture that can transform and immobilize various trace metals, oxyanions, and other impurities from aqueous streams. To further evaluate ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

206

California Food Processing Industry Wastewater Demonstration Project: Phase I Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Automated Demand Response in Wastewater TreatmentProcessing Industry Demand Response Participation: A Scopingand Open Automated Demand Response. Lawrence Berkeley

Lewis, Glen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Removal and Utilization of Wastewater Nutrients for Algae Biomass and Biofuels.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Logan City Environmental Department operates a facility that consists of 460 acres of fairly shallow lagoons (~ 5'deep) for biological wastewater treatment that meets… (more)

Griffiths, Erick W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Lipid Productivity of Algae Grown on Dairy Wastewater as a Possible Feedstock for Biodiesel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis is to develop a biological wastewater treatment system that utilizes algal growth to simultaneously create renewable energy in the form… (more)

Woertz, Ian C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Water and Wastewater Industries: Characteristics and Energy Management Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of electricity for water and wastewater treatment is increasing due to demands for increased service and new regulations for upgraded treatment. Options available to control the electricity costs may consist of technological changes, improved management, and participation in electric utility sponsored energy management programs. This report provides electric utility planning, marketing, and customer service staff with a practical tool to better understand the water and wastewater industries and t...

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Wastewater heat recovery apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat recovery system with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature.

Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Wastewater heat recovery apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat recovery system is described with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature. 6 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

A general water supply planning model: Evaluation of decentralized treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing population, diminishing supplies and variable climatic conditions can cause difficulties in meeting water demands; especially in arid regions where water resources are limited. Given the complexity of the system and the interactions among ... Keywords: Decentralized wastewater treatment system, System dynamics, Water conservation, Water supply

G. Chung; K. Lansey; P. Blowers; P. Brooks; W. Ela; S. Stewart; P. Wilson

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

GRR/Section 14-OR-f - Onsite Wastewater Management | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-OR-f - Onsite Wastewater Management GRR/Section 14-OR-f - Onsite Wastewater Management < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-OR-f - Onsite Wastewater Management 14ORFOnsiteWastewaterManagementSepticSystems.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies OAR 340-071: Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems OAR 340-073: DEQ Construction Standards Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14ORFOnsiteWastewaterManagementSepticSystems.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Over 30% of Oregonians dispose of wastewater from their homes and

214

Novel single stripper with side-draw to remove ammonia and sour gas simultaneously for coal-gasification wastewater treatment and the industrial implementation  

SciTech Connect

A large amount of wastewater is produced in the Lurgi coal-gasification process with the complex compounds carbon dioxide, ammonia, phenol, etc., which cause a serious environmental problem. In this paper, a novel stripper operated at elevated pressure is designed to improve the pretreatment process. In this technology, two noticeable improvements were established. First, the carbon dioxide and ammonia were removed simultaneously in a single stripper where sour gas (mainly carbon dioxide) is removed from the tower top and the ammonia vapor is drawn from the side and recovered by partial condensation. Second, the ammonia is removed before the phenol recovery to reduce the pH value of the subsequent extraction units, so as the phenol removal performance of the extraction is greatly improved. To ensure the operational efficiency, some key operational parameters are analyzed and optimized though simulation. It is shown that when the top temperature is kept at 40 C and the weight ratio of the side draw to the feed is above 9%, the elevated pressures can ensure the removal efficiency of NH{sub 3} and carbon dioxide and the desired purified water as the bottom product of the unit is obtained. A real industrial application demonstrates the attractiveness of the new technique: it removes 99.9% CO{sub 2} and 99.6% ammonia, compared to known techniques which remove 66.5% and 94.4%, respectively. As a result, the pH value of the wastewater is reduced from above 9 to below 7. This ensures that the phenol removal ratio is above 93% in the following extraction units. The operating cost is lower than that of known techniques, and the operation is simplified.

Feng, D.C.; Yu, Z.J.; Chen, Y.; Qian, Y. [South China University of Technology, Ghangzhou (China). School of Chemical Engineering

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Southeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Southeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Southeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Southeast www.southeastCHPTAP.org Isaac Panzarella North Carolina State University 919-515-0354 ipanzarella@ncsu.edu Alabama View Energy and Environmental Analysis Inc.'s (EEA) database of all known CHP installations in Alabama. Arkansas Fourche Creek Wastewater Treatment Facility, Little Rock View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in Arkansas. Florida Howard F. Curren Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant, Tampa Shands Hospital, Gainesville View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in Florida.

216

Simultaneous removal of COD and ammonia from high-strength wastewater in a three-phase fluidized bed reactor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A major challenge of environmental engineering is the efficient treatment of wastewater containing high concentrations of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia. This work addresses… (more)

Wan, Li

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Falmouth Wastewater | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wastewater Wastewater Jump to: navigation, search Name Falmouth Wastewater Facility Falmouth Wastewater Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Falmouth Wastewater Developer Falmouth Wastewater Energy Purchaser Falmouth Wastewater Location Falmouth MA Coordinates 41.566789°, -70.608791° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.566789,"lon":-70.608791,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

218

'Bugs' used to treat FGD wastewater  

SciTech Connect

Tough regulation of heavy metals may justify a bioreactor approach in addition to chemical treatment of FGD wastewater. Two of Duke Energy' coal-fired plants, Belews Creek and Allen (in North Carolina) have installed new biological reactor systems to increase selenium removal to levels not achievable by existing scrubber waste water systems. The ABMet system removes nitrate and selenium in a single step. Progress Energy has installed the system at Roxboro and Mayo Stations, also in North Carolina. 1 fig., 2 photos.

Blankinship, S.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

GRR/Section 18-ID-c - Wastewater Pretreatment Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8-ID-c - Wastewater Pretreatment Permit 8-ID-c - Wastewater Pretreatment Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-ID-c - Wastewater Pretreatment Permit 18IDCWastewaterPretreatmentPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18IDCWastewaterPretreatmentPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Industrial wastewater permits are issued at the local level. If wastewater is not discharged into a municipal sewer system, the nonpoint source and NPDES permit inquiries are sufficient. A common approach to wastewater treatment is to treat on-site. See Idaho's

220

Scenario analysis for the role of sanitation infrastructures in integrated urban wastewater management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, the sanitation infrastructures of most of the Urban Wastewater Systems (UWSs) have been managed individually, without considering the many relationships among the sewer systems, Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTPs) and receiving waters. ... Keywords: Ammonia concentration, Catchment, Expert knowledge, Management scenarios, Model integration, Sanitation infrastructure control, Water Framework Directive, Water quality

F. Devesa; J. Comas; C. Turon; A. Freixó; F. Carrasco; M. Poch

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Energy and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system Title Energy and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Shehabi, Arman, Jennifer R. Stokes, and Arpad Horvath Journal Environmental Research Letters Volume 7 Issue 2 Abstract Both centralized and decentralized wastewater systems have distinct engineering, financial and societal benefits. This paper presents a framework for analyzing the environmental effects of decentralized wastewater systems and an evaluation of the environmental impacts associated with two currently operating systems in California, one centralized and one decentralized. A comparison of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions and criteria air pollutants from the systems shows that the scale economies of the centralized plant help lower the environmental burden to less than a fifth of that of the decentralized utility for the same volume treated. The energy and emission burdens of the decentralized plant are reduced when accounting for high-yield wastewater reuse if it supplants an energy-intensive water supply like a desalination one. The centralized facility also reduces greenhouse gases by flaring methane generated during the treatment process, while methane is directly emitted from the decentralized system. The results are compelling enough to indicate that the life-cycle environmental impacts of decentralized designs should be carefully evaluated as part of the design process.

222

Applying a Modified Triad Approach to Investigate Wastewater lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approximately 20 miles of wastewater lines are below grade at an active military Base. This piping network feeds or fed domestic or industrial wastewater treatment plants on the Base. Past wastewater line investigations indicated potential contaminant releases to soil and groundwater. Further environmental assessment was recommended to characterize the lines because of possible releases. A Remedial Investigation (RI) using random sampling or use of sampling points spaced at predetermined distances along the entire length of the wastewater lines, however, would be inefficient and cost prohibitive. To accomplish RI goals efficiently and within budget, a modified Triad approach was used to design a defensible sampling and analysis plan and perform the investigation. The RI task was successfully executed and resulted in a reduced fieldwork schedule, and sampling and analytical costs. Results indicated that no major releases occurred at the biased sampling points. It was reasonably extrapolated that since releases did not occur at the most likely locations, then the entire length of a particular wastewater line segment was unlikely to have contaminated soil or groundwater and was recommended for no further action. A determination of no further action was recommended for the majority of the waste lines after completing the investigation. The modified Triad approach was successful and a similar approach could be applied to investigate wastewater lines on other United States Department of Defense or Department of Energy facilities. (authors)

Pawlowicz, R.; Urizar, L. [Bechtel National, Inc., 1230 Columbia St., Suite 400, San Diego, CA 92101 (United States); Blanchard, S. [Brown and Caldwell, 9665 Chesapeake Drive, Suite 201, San Diego, CA 92123 (United States); Jacobsen, K. [Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southwest 1220 Pacific Highway, San Diego, CA 92132 (United States); Scholfield, J. [EarthTech, 841 Bishop St., Suite 500, Honolulu, HI 96813 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Food service establishment wastewater characterization and management practice evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food service establishments that use onsite wastewater treatment systems are experiencing hydraulic and organic overloading of pretreatment systems and/or drain fields. Design guidelines for these systems are typically provided in State regulations and based on residential hydraulic applications. For the purposes of this research, hydraulic loading indicates the daily flow of water directed to the wastewater system. Organic loading refers to the composition of the wastewater as quantified by five-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), total fats, oils and greases (FOG), and total suspended solids (TSS). The first part of this study included an analysis of the central tendencies of analytical data of four wastewater parameters from 28 restaurants representing a broad spectrum of restaurant types. Field sampling consisted of two sets of grab samples collected from each restaurant for six consecutive days at approximately the same time each day. These sets were collected approximately two weeks apart. The numerical data included BOD5, FOG, and TSS. The fourth parameter evaluated was daily flow. Data exploration and statistical analyses of the numerical data from the 28 restaurants was performed with the standard gamma probability distribution model in ExcelTM and used to determine inferences of the analytical data. The analysis shows higher hydraulic and organic values for restaurant wastewater than residential wastewater. The second part of the study included a statistical analysis of restaurant management practices and primary cuisine types and their influence on BOD5, FOG, TSS, and daily flow to determine if management practices and/or cuisine types may be influencing wastewater composition and flow. A self-reporting survey was utilized to collect management practice and cuisine type information. Survey response information and analytical data were entered into an ExcelTM spreadsheet and subsequently incorporated into SASTM statistical software for statistical analysis. Analysis indicated that the number of seats in a restaurant, use of self-serve salad bars, and primary cuisine types are statistically significant indicators of wastewater characteristics.

Garza, Octavio Armando

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Portable wastewater flow meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under fill pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

Hunter, Robert M. (320 S. Wilson Ave., Bozeman, MT 59715)

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

225

Portable wastewater flow meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under full pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

Hunter, Robert M. (320 S. Wilson Ave., Bozeman, MT 59715)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The effect of sulfide inhibition and organic shock loading on anaerobic biofilm reactors treating a low-temperature, high-sulfate wastewater.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In order to assess the long-term treatment of sulfate- and carbon- rich wastewater at low temperatures, three anaerobic biofilm reactors were operated at 20°C,… (more)

McDonald, Heather Brown

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Mechanical Freeze/Thaw and Freeze Concentration of Water and Wastewater Residuals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water and wastewater treatment plants generate water residuals that must be disposed of in accordance with environmental regulations. This report analyzes the use of mechanical freeze/thaw and freeze concentration processes to reduce the volume of these residuals.

2003-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

228

Source Characterization and Pretreatment Evaluation of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in Healthcare Facility Wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Healthcare facility wastewaters are a potentially important and under characterized source of pharmaceuticals and personal care products to the environment. In this study the composition and magnitude of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) released into a single municipality’s wastewater system from a hospital, a nursing care facility, an assisted living facility and an independent living facility are presented for 54 pharmaceuticals, 8 hormones and 31 Alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEOs). Chemical oxidation using molecular ozone and advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) (UV-hydrogen peroxide, Fenton’s Reagent, and Photo – Fenton’s Reagent) were screened and evaluated as potential treatment technologies for removal of APEOs in water and wastewater. In this research, APEOs were found to be dominant PPCP class out of 94 individual analytes measured, accounting for more than 65% of the total mass loading observed leaving the healthcare facility wastewater. Seventy one out of the total measured PPCPs were detected in wastewater from at least one of the facilities. Healthcare facility wastewater are the source of PPCPs to the environment; however, their contribution to the total magnitude of PPCPs in municipal wastewater and the surrounding environment will be determined by the relative flow contribution of wastewater released from the facility to the municipal sewer network. Molecular ozone and advanced oxidation processes were observed to remove APEOs from analyzed water matrices; however, understanding the product formation during the oxidation process is important before concluding a suitable treatment process. Molecular ozone reacted selectively with the double bond in the APEO while AOPs reaction was non selective oxidation. During the AOPs, OH· formation rate and scavenging rate constant of wastewater was found to be the factors governing the oxidation process. Thus, the research carried out informs a risk management decisions concerning the prevalence of PPCPs in the wastewater and use of oxidation systems as a treatment technologies for removal of PPCPs.

Nagarnaik, Pranav Mukund

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PA 15213-3890 412-268-2946 dzombak@cmu.edu Use of TreaTed MUnicipal WasTeWaTer as poWer planT cooling sysTeM MakeUp WaTer: TerTiary TreaTMenT VersUs expanded cheMical regiMen...

230

Optimiziing the laboratory monitoring of biological wastewater-purification systems  

SciTech Connect

Optimization of the laboratory monitoring of biochemical wastewater-treatment systems at coke plants is considered, for the example of OAO Koks. By adopting a methodological approach to determine the necessary data from chemical analysis, it is possible to reduce the time, labor, and materials required for monitoring, without impairing the purification process or compromising the plant's environmental policies.

S.V. Gerasimov [OAO Koks, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Energy production from food industry wastewaters using bioelectrochemical cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conversion of waste and renewable resources to energy using microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is an upcoming technology for enabling a cleaner and sustainable environment. This paper assesses the energy production potential from the US food industry wastewater resource. It also reports on an experimental study investigating conversion of wastewater from a local milk dairy plant to electricity. An MFC anode biocatalyst enriched on model sugar and organic acid substrates was used as the inoculum for the dairy wastewater MFC. The tests were conducted using a two-chamber MFC with a porous three dimensional anode and a Pt/C air-cathode. Power densities up to 690 mW/m2 (54 W/m3) were obtained. Analysis of the food industry wastewater resource indicated that MFCs can potentially recover 2 to 260 kWh/ton of food processed from wastewaters generated during food processing, depending on the biological oxygen demand and volume of water used in the process. A total of 1960 MW of power can potentially be produced from US milk industry wastewaters alone. Hydrogen is an alternate form of energy that can be produced using bioelectrochemical cells. Approximately 2 to 270 m3 of hydrogen can be generated per ton of the food processed. Application of MFCs for treatment of food processing wastewaters requires further investigations into electrode design, materials, liquid flow management, proton transfer, organic loading and scale-up to enable high power densities at the larger scale. Potential for water recycle also exists, but requires careful consideration of the microbiological safety and regulatory aspects and the economic feasibility of the process.

Hamilton, Choo Yieng [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Evaluation of land disposal and underground injection of shale oil wastewaters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results indicate that the salinity of retort water, the principal wastewater generated by shale oil recovery operations, will be too high in most cases for irrigation of cover crops needed for effective stabilization by land disposal. Furthermore, large storage lagoons would be required to hold the retort water during the long winters encountered in the oil shale regions of Colorado, Wyoming and Utah. Land disposal cannot be carried out during prolonged periods of freezing weather. Additional problems which may arise with land disposal include air pollution from volatile constituents and groundwater pollution from refractory organics and dissolved salts in the retort water. Pretreatment requirements include the removal of ammonia which is present at toxic concentrations in retort water. Underground injection of retort water may be permitted in regions possessing favorable geological characteristics. It is anticipated that this method would be used as a last resort where effective or resonably priced treatment technology is not available. Regulatory restraints are expected to limit the use of underground injection for disposal of highly polluted shale oil wastewaters. Proving the confinement of injected wastes, a frequently difficult and expensive task, will be required to assure protection of drinking water resources.

Mercer, B.W.; Campbell, A.C.; Wakamiya, W.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Modeling trihalomethane formation potential from wastewater chlorination. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deletion of federally mandated fecal coliform limits has led many states to review and modify their wastewater disinfection requirements. One issue in analyzing wastewater disinfection is the discharge of potentially carcinogenic halogenated organics formed during the chlorination process. This research investigates the formation of one class of the halogenated organics, the trihalomethanes. The applicability of using drinking water trihalomethane formation models for use with wastewater effluent is examined. Three models are compared for predictive capability by using measured trihalomethane values from previous research data. The results show that a previously developed model is applicable for use based on assumptions stated. Results provide environmental managers with worst case predictions for a range of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) parameters. Predictions indicate that trihalomethane formation from the chlorination of wastewater is typically lower than the Safe Drinking Water Act trihalomethane standard of 100 ug/L. The worst case model predictions reach, and in certain extreme cases, pass the standard of 100 ug/L. This level of trihalomethanes formed is minimized if aeration of the receiving bodies of water occurs. Based on this research, the risk of forming trihalomethanes as disinfection by-products from chlorination do not outweigh the benefits gained from proper chlorine disinfection of effluent.

McCormick, C.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Production of Biogas from Wastewaters of Food Processing Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Process used in converting biodegradable, soluble, organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters to a directly-burnable biogas composed mainly of methane has been developed, tested, and commercially applied in Holland. Operations on wastewater from the processing of sugar beets have shown hydraulic retention times of less than 10 hours with reactor loadings of at least 10 Kg COD per m3 digester volume per day and purification efficiencies exceeding 90%. Biogas production is at a rate of about 1 therm (100000 BTU) per 10 Kg COD treated. A moderately sized (1000 m3) wastewater treatment plant processing the order of 10000 Kg COD per day will, therefore, produce the order of 1000 therms of energy per day while, at the same time, reducing the COD level in the effluent by an order of magnitude. The set of conditions required for efficient operation of this anaerobic process will be discussed. The process is unique in its mixed sludge bed approach allowing for tolerance of swings in Ph (6-8) at relatively low temperatures (32 C - 38 C) which can be readily achieved from most wastewater streams with little expenditure of additional energy. Sludge production is remarkably low, only about 5% of the COD loading, greatly alleviating disposal problems. These characteristics are conducive for the use of the anaerobic process to recover energy from a variety of wastewaters rich in carbohydrate-type substances as produced routinely as a by product of many types of food processing activities.

Sax, R. I.; Holtz, M.; Pette, K. C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Wastewaters at SRS where heavy metals are a potential problem  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this report is to identify and prioritize heavy metal-containing wastewaters at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in terms of their suitability for testing of and clean-up by a novel bioremediation process being developed by SRTC. This process involves the use of algal biomass for sequestering heavy metal and radionuclides from wastewaters. Two categories of SRS wastewaters were considered for this investigation: (1) waste sites (primarily non-contained wastes managed by Environmental Restoration), and (2) waste streams (primarily contained wastes managed by Waste Management). An attempt was made to evaluate all sources of both categories of waste throughout the site so that rational decisions could be made with regard to selecting the most appropriate wastewaters for present study and potential future treatment. The investigation included a review of information on surface and/or groundwater associated with all known SRS waste sites, as well as waters associated with all known SRS waste streams. Following the initial review, wastewaters known or suspected to contain potentially problematic concentrations of one or more of the toxic metals were given further consideration.

Wilde, E.W.; Radway, J.C.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Fischer-Tropsch Wastewater Utilization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is generally directed to handling the wastewater, or condensate, from a hydrocarbon synthesis reactor. More particularly, the present invention provides a process wherein the wastewater of a hydrocarbon synthesis reactor, such as a Fischer-Tropsch reactor, is sent to a gasifier and subsequently reacted with steam and oxygen at high temperatures and pressures so as to produce synthesis gas. The wastewater may also be recycled back to a slurry preparation stage, where solid combustible organic materials are pulverized and mixed with process water and the wastewater to form a slurry, after which the slurry fed to a gasifier where it is reacted with steam and oxygen at high temperatures and pressures so as to produce synthesis gas.

Shah, Lalit S. (Sugar Land, TX)

2003-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

237

Method of making selective crystalline silicon regions containing entrapped hydrogen by laser treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel hydrogen rich single crystalline silicon material having a band gap energy greater than 1.1 eV can be fabricated by forming an amorphous region of graded crystallinity in a body of single crystalline silicon and thereafter contacting the region with atomic hydrogen followed by pulsed laser annealing at a sufficient power and for a sufficient duration to recrystallize the region into single crystalline silicon without out-gasing the hydrogen. The new material can be used to fabricate semi-conductor devices such as single crystalline silicon solar cells with surface window regions having a greater band gap energy than that of single crystalline silicon without hydrogen.

Pankove, Jacques I. (Princeton, NJ); Wu, Chung P. (Trenton, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during oil shale retorting: retort water and gas condensate.commercial oil shale plant, retort water and gas condensateunique to an oil shale retort water, gas condensate, and

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disposal. Potential Water Sources III +J III f. ttl UI"'"'i ttl . -t III III t)III III f. ttl f. ttl +J ttl 'M u f. < +J

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steam, and groundwater intrusion during oil shale retorting: retort water and gas condensate.Steam Stripping of Occi- dental petroleum Retort No. 6 Gas Condensate,

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Graywater Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homeowners who use graywater to water their lawns need to understand the risks and safety issues associated with this practice. This publication discusses the constituents of graywater; their potential effects on human, soil, plant and environmental health and steps to prevent harm to them. 6 pp., 1 figure, 3 tables

Melton, Rebecca; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

242

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the plant location. Water produced by surface processesF, Zn, and Ni. Retort waters produced by surface retorts arewater); the volume of water produced is sufficient to meet

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

III, "Method of Breaking Shale Oil-Water Emulsion," U. S.Waters from Green River Oil Shale," Chem. and Ind. , 1. ,Effluents from In-Situ oil Shale Processing," in Proceedings

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Use of magnetic nanoparticles for wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contamination of marine sediments and water environments by urban runoffs, industrial and domestic effluents and oil spills is proving to be of critical concern as they affect aquatic organisms and can quickly disperse to ...

Parekh, Asha, 1942-

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water is used for cooling tower makeup or boiler feedwater,Storm water runoff Cooling tower blowdown Boiler feedwatertreatment; and mine waters, cooling tower blowdown, and pre-

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Quantitative Analyses of Anaerobic Wastewater Treatment Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-generation biodiesel, ethanol, or biogas to the transport sector to be blended with fossil fuels. Still under

Timmer, Jens

247

Method of making selective crystalline silicon regions containing entrapped hydrogen by laser treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel hydrogen rich single crystalline silicon material having a band gap energy greater than 1.1 eV can be fabricated by forming an amorphous region of graded crystallinity in a body of single crystalline silicon and thereafter contacting the region with atomic hydrogen followed by pulsed laser annealing at a sufficient power and for a sufficient duration to recrystallize the region into single crystalline silicon without out-gassing the hydrogen. The new material can be used to fabricate semi-conductor devices such as single crystalline silicon solar cells with surface window regions having a greater band gap energy than that of single crystalline silicon without hydrogen. 2 figs.

Pankove, J.I.; Wu, C.P.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

Waste-water characterization survey, Little Rock AFB, Arizona. Final report, 11-24 July 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The AFOEHL conducted a waste-water characterization survey at Little Rock AFB from 11 to 24 Jul 88. The scope of the survey included characterizing the major sanitary discharges on base and determining whether the waste-water being discharged to the Jacksonville Wastewater Treatment plant violated limits for biochemical oxygen demand and total suspended solids. A total of 26 sampling sites were evaluated. Analytical results showed that discharge standards for biological oxygen demand and total suspended solids were not being exceeded by Little Rock AFB.

Scott, S.P.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Reduce Overhead, Implement Energy Efficiency in Water/Wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through the Focus on Energy program in the State of Wisconsin we have been able to identify savings for industries in their water/wastewater treatment or distribution systems. Modifications required to realize savings resulted in reduced energy consumption and reduced cost to industry. Reduced cost is a pleasant benefit when the cost of utility bills comes off the bottom line and if the industry is working on a 5 percent margin the actual value of the savings could be considered to be 20 times its actual savings. Modifications can be made in wastewater treatment applications by adjusting dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in treatment process, modifying aeration system blowers, changing diffusers, and considering a DO automatic control system. In water systems, changes in pump operations by not throttling valves for control, adding variable speed drives to constant speed operations, and reducing pressure on systems where it will not adversely impact the process.

Cantwell, J. C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Exxon sued for wastewater runoff  

SciTech Connect

A community activist group in Houston, Texans United, has filed a lawsuit against Exxon for allegedly dumping more than 2 billion gallons of untreated wastewater from its Baytown, TX complex into the Houston Ship Channel from 1989 to 1995. The suit asks that Exxon be ordered to comply with its federal operating permit and pay the state up to $25,000/day for more than 50 days of alleged violations. EPA is reviewing Exxon`s request to revise its permit. The group alleges that Exxon`s untreated process wastewater sometimes contains enough benzene to qualify as a hazardous waste. The Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission has revised Exxon`s discharge permit to allow the release of pollutants during heavy rains. Exxon rejects the accusation and says it reports any wastewater discharge exceedance.

Cornitius, T.

1996-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

251

Wastewater Discharge Program (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wastewater Discharge Program (Maine) Wastewater Discharge Program (Maine) Wastewater Discharge Program (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection The wastewater discharge regulations require that a license be obtained for the discharge of wastewater to a stream, river, wetland, or lake of the

252

93rd Annual Water & Wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and maintenance of wells. Small System Wastewater Presiding:Mark Gerard, KDHE Retired, Wamego, Kan. Jerry Grant.m. Production Maintenance Management PaulCrocker,BoardofPublicUtilities,KansasCity,Kan. 2:00 p.m. Refreshment.m.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50 Asset Management (9:00 a.m.­4:30 p

Peterson, Blake R.

253

FAILURE ANALYSIS: WASTEWATER DRUM BULGING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 55 gallon wastewater drum lid was found to be bulged during storage in a remote area. Drum samples were obtained for analysis. The interior surface of these samples revealed blistering and holes in the epoxy phenolic drum liner and corrosion of the carbon steel drum. It is suspected that osmotic pressure drove permeation of the water through the epoxy phenolic coating which was weakened from exposure to low pH water. The coating failed at locations throughout the drum interior. Subsequent corrosion of the carbon steel released hydrogen which pressurized the drum causing deformation of the drum lid. Additional samples from other wastewater drums on the same pallet were also evaluated and limited corrosion was visible on the interior surfaces. It is suspected that, with time, the corrosion would have advanced to cause pressurization of these sealed drums.

Vormelker, P

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Wastewater reuse and recycle in petroleum refineries  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this study were to identify feasible reuse and recycle techniques that can be successful in reducing wastewater discharge and to estimate their associated costs. Wastewater reduction is a fundamental aspect of the US EPA's proposed regulations for the petroleum refining industry. EPA undertook this study to confirm the cost estimates used in the proposed guidelines, to identify specific technologies, and to accurately assess their costs. Fifteen refineries were chosen to represent the range of refinery characteristics including crude capacity, process employed, and wastewater generation. Significant wastewater reductions were found possible at 12 refineries studied.

Langer, B.S.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Wastewater Construction and Operation Permits (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations describe permit requirements for the construction and operation of facilities treating wastewater, and provide separation distances from other water sources.

256

Implementing Energy Efficiency in Wastewater to Reduce Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the industrial world creating a quality product at minimum cost is the goal. In this environment all expenses are scrutinized, when they are part of the manufacturing process. However, even at the most conscientious facility the wastewater system is often overlooked, just plain accepted as is. At many locations facility personnel are completely unaware of utility costs but more importantly they are not aware of their energy consumption. The Wisconsin Focus on Energy Industrial Program has surveyed and assessed many municipal and industrial wastewater systems across the state, identified opportunities to save energy and assisted in implementing energy efficiency modifications without adversely impacting the quality of the treatment system or the manufacturing process. In many instances not only did the energy efficiency modification result in reduced energy consumption and costs, it also reduced maintenance and down time while improving effluent quality. Most of the opportunities that were implemented were installed while the manufacturing operations remained in operation.

Cantwell, J. C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Separation of Tritium from Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A proprietary tritium loading bed developed by Molecular Separations, Inc (MSI) has been shown to selectively load tritiated water as waters of hydration at near ambient temperatures. Tests conducted with a 126 {micro}C{sub 1} tritium/liter water standard mixture showed reductions to 25 {micro}C{sub 1}/L utilizing two, 2-meter long columns in series. Demonstration tests with Hanford Site wastewater samples indicate an approximate tritium concentration reduction from 0.3 {micro}C{sub 1}/L to 0.07 {micro}C{sub 1}/L for a series of two, 2-meter long stationary column beds Further reduction to less than 0.02 {micro}C{sub 1}/L, the current drinking water maximum contaminant level (MCL), is projected with additional bed media in series. Tritium can be removed from the loaded beds with a modest temperature increase and the beds can be reused Results of initial tests are presented and a moving bed process for treating large quantities of wastewaters is proposed. The moving bed separation process appears promising to treat existing large quantities of wastewater at various US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The enriched tritium stream can be grouted for waste disposition. The separations system has also been shown to reduce tritium concentrations in nuclear reactor cooling water to levels that allow reuse. Energy requirements to reconstitute the loading beds and waste disposal costs for this process appear modest.

JEPPSON, D.W.

2000-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

258

California Food Processing Industry Wastewater Demonstration Project: Phase I Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is an energy-intensive process and electricity demand is especially high during the utilities summer peak electricity demand periods. This makes wastewater treatment facilities prime candidates for demand response programs. However, wastewater treatment is often peripheral to food processing operations and its demand response opportunities have often been overlooked. Phase I of this wastewater demonstration project monitored wastewater energy and environmental data at Bell-Carter Foods, Inc., California's largest olive processing plant. For this monitoring activity the project team used Green Energy Management System (GEMS) automated enterprise energy management (EEM) technologies. This report presents results from data collected by GEMS from September 15, 2008 through November 30, 2008, during the olive harvest season. This project established and tested a methodology for (1) gathering baseline energy and environmental data at an industrial food-processing plant and (2) using the data to analyze energy efficiency, demand response, daily peak load management, and environmental management opportunities at the plant. The Phase I goals were to demonstrate the measurement and interrelationship of electricity demand, electricity usage, and water quality metrics and to estimate the associated CO{sub 2} emissions.

Lewis, Glen; Atkinson, Barbara; Rhyne, Ivin

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

259

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Pacific www.pacificCHPTAP.org Terry Clapham California Center for Sustainable Energy 858-244-4872 terry.clapham@energycenter.org California Alameda County Santa Rita Jail, Dublin Burlingame Wastewater Treatment Plant, Burlingame Chiquita Water Reclamation Plant, Santa Margarita DGS Central Plant, Sacramento East Bay Municipal Utility District, Oakland East Bay Municipal Utility District WWTP, Oakland EMWD Microturbine Energy System, Riverside County

260

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Pacific www.pacificCHPTAP.org Terry Clapham California Center for Sustainable Energy 858-244-4872 terry.clapham@energycenter.org California Alameda County Santa Rita Jail, Dublin Burlingame Wastewater Treatment Plant, Burlingame Chiquita Water Reclamation Plant, Santa Margarita DGS Central Plant, Sacramento East Bay Municipal Utility District, Oakland East Bay Municipal Utility District WWTP, Oakland EMWD Microturbine Energy System, Riverside County

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Chemical oxidizers treat wastewater  

SciTech Connect

Based on the inherent benefits of these original oxidation systems, a second generation of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) has emerged. These processes combine key features of the first generation technologies with more sophisticated advances in UV technology, such as the new pulsed plasma xenon flash lamp that emits high-energy, high-intensity UV light. Second generation systems can be equipped with a transmittance controller to prevent lamp fouling or scaling. The coupling of the first generation's technology with the new UV sources provides the rapid destruction of chlorinated and nonchlorinated hydrocarbons and humic acids from contaminated water. It also is effective in the treatment of organic laden gases from soil vapor extraction systems. AOPs may promote the oxidation (and subsequent removal) of heavy metals in water, though few data are available to verify the claim. The success of AOPs, including ozonation with UV light, hydrogen peroxide with UV light and advanced photolysis, is linked with their creation of hydroxyl-free radicals (OH[center dot]) that are effective in eliminating contaminants such as formaldehyde, chlorinated hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. Hydroxyl free-radicals are consumed in microsecond reactions and exhibit little substrate selectivity with the exception of halogenated alkanes such as chloroform. They can act as chain carriers. Given their power, hydroxyl free-radicals react with virtually all organic solutes more quickly (especially in water) than any other oxidants, except fluorine. There are projects that have found the combination of some AOPs to be the most efficient organic destruction techniques for the job. For example, one project successfully remediated groundwater contaminated with gasoline and Number 2 diesel through successive treatments of ozone and hydrogen peroxide with ultraviolet light, followed by granular activated carbon. 5 refs., 2 tabs.

Stephenson, F.A. (Dames Moore, Phoenix, AZ (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

The use of hydrologically altered wetlands to treat wastewater in coastal Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two major environmental problems currently affecting Louisiana are a high rate of coastal wetland loss and high levels of surface water pollution. The application of secondarily treated wastewater to wetlands is proposed to dealing with these problems. The benefits of wetland wastewater treatment include improved surface water quality, increased accretion rates to balance subsidence, improved plant productivity, and decreased capital outlays for conventional engineering treatment systems. Wetland treatment systems can be designed and operated to restore deteriorating wetlands to previous levels of productivity. Hydrologically altered wetlands in the Louisiana coastal zone are appropriate for receiving municipal and some industrial effluent. While the US EPA has determined that wetland wastewater treatment is effective in treating municipal effluent, it has discouraged the use of natural wetlands for this purpose. As a result, hydrologically altered wetlands in the Louisiana coastal zone are being neglected and ultimately lost, while scarce funds are used to construct artificial wetlands to treat municipal effluent. Effluent discharge to existing wetlands can be incorporated into a comprehensive management plan designed to increase sediment and nutrient input into subsiding wetlands in the Louisiana coastal zone. Secondarily treated effluent discharged from industrial and municipal facilities in the Louisiana coastal zone were reviewed for suitability for wetland wastewater treatment. Selection criteria for wetland treatment systems were developed for both dischargers and receiving wetlands. Designs for two potential case studies based on established selection criteria for wetland wastewater treatment systems are presented. An economic analysis of the four case studies indicates a high potential for financial savings when wetlands replace conventional engineering methods for tertiary treatment.

Breaux, A.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Wastewater characterization survey, Cannon Air Force Base, New Mexico. Final report, 28 September 1992-9 October 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wastewater characterization survey was conducted at Cannon AFB, New Mexico, from 28 September 1992 - 9 October 1992 by personnel from the Water Quality Branch of Armstrong Laboratory. Extensive sampling of the wastewater lagoon influent, effluent, and sludge was conducted. In addition, 9 industrial sites were sampled in the industrial areas of the base. The average influent biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) was 197 milligrams per liter (mg/1) and the average chemical oxygen demand (COD) was 436 mg/1. The lagoons removed 63% of the BOD in the wastewater. Low levels of metals were found, but levels of oils and greases, chloride, sulfate, solids, nitrogen, and phosphorus were higher than typical of weak wastewater levels. Selenium levels in the wastewater were higher than allowed by New Mexico Water Quality Regulations for irrigation. The new wastewater treatment plant to be built must comply with New Mexico standards for discharges of water into or below the surface of the ground.... Wastewater characterization, Cannon AFB, New Mexico, Selenium, Irrigation, Lagoon, Biochemical oxygen demand, Chemical oxygen demand.

McCoy, R.P.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Underground Injection Wells as an Option for Disposal of Shale Gas Wastewaters: Policies & Practicality.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environments and are very salty, like the Marcellus shale and other oil and gas formations underlying the areaUnderground Injection Wells as an Option for Disposal of Shale Gas Wastewaters: Policies), Region 3. Marcellus Shale Educational Webinar, February 18, 2010 (Answers provide below by Karen Johnson

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

265

LIQUID NATURAL GAS (LNG): AN ALTERNATIVE FUEL FROM LANDFILL GAS (LFG) AND WASTEWATER DIGESTER GAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Research and Development Subcontract sought to find economic, technical and policy links between methane recovery at landfill and wastewater treatment sites in New York and Maryland, and ways to use that methane as an alternative fuel--compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquid natural gas (LNG) -- in centrally fueled Alternative Fueled Vehicles (AFVs).

VANDOR,D.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Drying radioactive wastewater salts using a thin film dryer  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the operational experience in drying brines generated at a radioactive wastewater treatment facility. The brines are composed of aqueous ammonium sulfate/sodium sulfate and aqueous sodium nitrate/sodium sulfate, The brine feeds receive pretreatment to preclude dryer bridging and fouling. The dryer products are a distillate and a powder. The dryer is a vertical thin film type consisting of a steam heated cylinder with rotor. Maintenance on the dryer has been minimal. Although many operability problems have had to be overcome, dryer performance can now be said to be highly reliable.

Scully, D.E.

1998-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

267

Water/Wastewater Engineering Report (High Efficiency Pump/Motor Replacement - M2 Model)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pumping water or wastewater is the largest use of electricity for a municipal water supply or wastewater treatment plant. Increasing the overall efficiency of the pumping system can achieve significant energy savings. Overall pump system efficiency depends on the efficiency of the motor, the pump, and the design of the piping layout. The model developed in this document focuses on improvements mostly to the pumping system rather than a municipal piping system. Furthermore, this model primarily addresses electric motor-driven pumps, and does not include the pumps driven with gasoline or diesel engines.

Liu, Z.; Brumbelow, K.; Haberl, J. S.

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

268

Reducing the Risks. In the aftermath of a terrorist attack, wastewater utilities may have to contend with decontamination water containing chemical, biological, or radiological substances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the aftermath of a chemical, biological, or radiological (CBR) attack, decontamination of people and infrastructure will be needed. Decontamination inevitably produces wastewater, and wastewater treatment plants (WTPs) need to know how to handle decontamination wastewater. This article describes CBR substances; planning, coordinating, and communicating responses across agencies; planning within a utility; coordination with local emergency managers and first responders; mitigating effects of decontamination wastewater; and mitigating effects on utility personnel. Planning for Decontamination Wastewater: A Guide for Utilities, the document on which this article is based, was developed under a cooperative agreement from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency by the National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA) and its contractor, CH2MHILL, Inc.

Warren, Linda P.; Hornback, Chris; Strom, Daniel J.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Optimization of wastewater stabilization ponds in Honduras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the academic year of 2008-2009, three Master of Engineering students from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) conducted a study of wastewater ...

Kullen, Lisa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Anaerobic treatment of gasifier effluents. Quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed during the quarter ending December 30, 1981. The major efforts have been directed toward the continued acclimation of two anaerobic treatment systems, start up of a third anaerobic treatment system, GC/MS characterization of the coal gasification wastewater, data acquisition for determination of distribution coefficients for the extraction of phenol from the wastewater using MIBK, and preliminary design of a solvent extraction system for wastewater pretreatment. The progress of these efforts are depicted in the Gannt Chart, along with project expenditures for the above contract, and are presented in detail in the following sections.

Cross, W.H.; Chian, E.S.K.; Pohland, F.G.; Giabbai, M.; Harper, S.R.; Kharkar, S.; Cheng, S.S.; Shuey, P.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

California Food Processing Industry Wastewater Demonstration Project: Phase I Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on a wastewater electricity distribution system capacityon a wastewater electricity distribution system capacityof electricity generation, transmission, distribution and

Lewis, Glen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Wastewater heat recovery method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a heat recovery system with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature.

Kronberg, J.W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Electricity Use and Management in the Municipal Water Supply and Wastewater Industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of electricity for water and wastewater treatment is increasing due to demands for expanded service capacity and new regulations for upgraded treatment. Options available to control the electricity costs include technological changes, improved management, and participation in electric utility sponsored energy management programs. Appropriate options for a specific system will vary depending on the system characteristics, availability of electric utility programs to assist the water and ...

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

274

Program on Technology Innovation: Biotechnological Approaches to Removing Boron from Electric Utility Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-based electric power generation faces compliance difficulties with respect to boron (B) contamination. Concentrations of B in coal-combustion byproduct electric utility effluents commonly range from 30 to 120 ppm; there is a critical need for cost-effective technologies to treat and remove B from these effluents to levels around 1.7 ppm. Wetland treatment systems offer significant operational and maintenance cost savings over chemical treatment alternatives for wastewater discharges from ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

275

A Drop in the Bucket: Ten Years of Government Spending on Water and Wastewater Infrastructure in Texas Colonias  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 1989, the United States Federal Government and the State of Texas have targeted water and wastewater infrastructure development spending in the colonias to improve access to safe, reliable and adequate water supplies and wastewater service. Prior to widespread installation of piped, treated water infrastructure, waterborne illnesses attained levels only seen in developing countries. Despite the hundreds of millions of dollars that have been spent since 1989 on water and wastewater infrastructure improvements, roughly a quarter of colonias still lacked basic access to water and wastewater services. Previous research and assessments of where this government spending has been targeted have not evaluated all four largest funding sources together or demonstrated the impacts of water and wastewater infrastructure spending on either public health or the local economy. This report evaluates the first of these problems by analyzing government spending of these funding sources from 1996 to 2006 in Cameron, Hidalgo, and Starr counties. The report provides the history and context of the Texas colonia problem, discusses who provides water and wastewater services to the colonias, and describes the make-up of federal and state financial assistance to the colonias to develop their water and wastewater infrastructure. Conventional understandings of where government spending is going, for what, and to whom, are challenged by the data and analysis. Analysis results indicate greater spending on wastewater infrastructure improvements than water service in addition to greater allocation to municipal systems that extended service into colonia areas historically operated by water service corporations. Further research may build on this data as well as regional economic and epidemiological data to determine outcomes of the spending in quantitative terms using various impact assessment methodologies. This report concludes with a discussion of impact assessment.

Rapier, Richard Edward

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

LANL achieves milestone on path to zero wastewater discharge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL achieves milestone on wastewater discharge LANL achieves milestone on wastewater discharge LANL achieves milestone on path to zero wastewater discharge Industrial wastewater will be recycled as the result of a long-term strategy to treat wastewater rather than discharging it into the environment. January 20, 2012 Aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory Aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Contact Colleen Curran Communications Office (505) 664-0344 Email Improved compliance while recycling millions of gallons of industrial wastewater LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, January 20, 2012-Millions of gallons of industrial wastewater will be recycled at Los Alamos National Laboratory as the result of a long-term strategy to treat wastewater rather than discharging it into the environment. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, which issues permits for

277

Decision Document for the Storm Water Outfalls/Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant, Pesticide Rinse Area, Old Fire Fighting Training Pit, Illicit PCB Dump Site, and the Battery Acid Pit Fort Lewis, Washington  

SciTech Connect

PNNL conducted independent site evaluations for four sites at Fort Lewis, Washington, to determine their suitability for closure on behalf of the installation. These sites were recommended for "No Further Action" by previous invesitgators and included the Storm Water Outfalls/Industrial Waste Water Treatment Plant (IWTP), the Pesticide Rinse Area, the Old Fire Fighting Training Pit, and the Illicit PCB Dump Site.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Liikala, Terry L.; Strenge, Dennis L.; Taira, Randal Y.

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

278

Removal of Natural Steroid Hormones from Wastewater Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

itdoesnotcontainsaltsandthesurfactantthatitdoescontain haslowosmoticpressure.Yet,furtherinvestigationsofscaling effects by surfactants at high of ultrafiltration as pretreatment to reverse osmosis in wastewater reuseandseawaterdesalinationapplications

279

Development of a Regional Climate Model for U.S. Midwest Applications. Part I: Sensitivity to Buffer Zone Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A regional climate model (RCM) is being developed for U.S. Midwest applications on the basis of the newly released Pennsylvania State University–NCAR Fifth-Generation Mesoscale Model (MM5), version 3.3. This study determines the optimal RCM ...

Xin-Zhong Liang; Kenneth E. Kunkel; Arthur N. Samel

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

APPLICATIONS OF LAYERED DOUBLE HYDROXIDES IN REMOVING OXYANIONS FROM OIL REFINING AND COAL MINING WASTEWATER  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI), in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), conducted a study of using the layered double hydroxides (LDH) as filter material to remove microorganisms, large biological molecules, certain anions and toxic oxyanions from various waste streams, including wastewater from refineries. Results demonstrate that LDH has a high adsorbing capability to those compounds with negative surface charge. Constituents studied include model bacteria, viruses, arsenic, selenium, vanadium, diesel range hydrocarbons, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), mixed petroleum constituents, humic materials and anions. This project also attempted to modify the physical structure of LDH for the application as a filtration material. Flow characterizations of the modified LDH materials were also investigated. Results to date indicate that LDH is a cost-effective new material to be used for wastewater treatment, especially for the treatment of anions and oxyanions.

Song Jin; Paul Fallgren

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Wastewater recycling and heat reclamation at the Red Lion Central Laundry, Portland, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses water, energy, and cost savings that can be achieved in a commercial laundry through the use of a wastewater recycling and heat recovery system. Cost savings are achieved through reductions in water use, reduction in sewage charges, reductions in water heating energy, and potential reductions in water treatment chemicals. This report provides an economic analysis of the impact of capital investment, daily consumption, and local utility rates on the payback period.

Garlick, T.F.; Halverson, M.A.; Ledbetter, M.R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Various Arsenic Treatments in Non-Ferrous Metallurgy and Other ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Various Arsenic Treatments in Non-Ferrous Metallurgy and ... from the Coking Wastewater Using Three-Dimensional Electrode Reactor ... Phase Equilibrium and Characterization Studies of Binary Organic Thermal Energy ...

283

Uniformity of wastewater dispersal using subsurface drip emitters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An on-site wastewater treatment project site with two separate drip fields produced data on emitter flow rates and uniformity after 6 years of operation. The site served a two-bedroom residence in Weslaco, Texas, with treatment through a septic tank and subsurface flow constructed wetland. Filtration was accomplished with a small sand filter and screen filter. Results represent a worst-case scenario because the air relief valves were improperly installed and maintenance on the system was lacking. A pressure compensating (PC) emitter (Netafim Bioline 2.30 L/hr) and a pressure dependent (PD) emitter (Aqua-Drip 3.79 L/hr) were evaluated. When new, the PC emitters produced a mean discharge of 2.33 L/hr with a manufacturing coefficient of 0.043. The PD emitters, when new, produced a mean discharge of 4.30 L/hr and a manufacturing coefficient of variation of 0.016. The testing protocol was verified with the collection of data on new emitters. Two individual drip fields contained PC emitters (Netafim Bioline 3.50 L/hr) and PD emitters (Aqua-Drip 2.35 L/hr). The PC emitters were installed in a 200 m continuous length of tubing and the PD emitters were installed with ten individual lines of 15.24 m connected with a supply and return header. Wastewater with an average BOD? of 23 mg/L was applied to two drip fields for 6 years. Emitter flow rates for 313 PC emitters were reduced to a mean discharge of 0.95 L/hr with a coefficient of variation of 0.74 and the 251 PD emitters were reduced to a mean discharge of 1.52 L/hr with a coefficient of variation of 0.35. Two shock chlorination treatments with chlorine concentrations of 500 mg/L and 1000 mg/L were used to increase the emitter's flow rate. Sixty PC and 61 PD emitters were evaluated. The initial average flow rate of the PC emitters was 0.818 L/hr. Average flow rates for the PC emitters increased significantly to 0.859 L/hr and 0.954 L/hr following the 500 mg/L and 1000 mg/L shock chlorination treatments, respectively. The initial flow rate of the PD emitters was 1.54 L/hr. The field flushing cycle represented an increase in flow rate to 1.60 L/hr. The shock chlorination treatments increased the average flow rate to 1.71 L/hr and 1.77 L/hr following the 500 mg/L and 1000 mg/L treatments respectively. All increases in mean discharge were statistically significant. Uniformity and over-application of wastewater were evaluated by analyzing the soil profile on a 1.22 m grid over the entire drain field. Statistical uniformity was 48.1 percent and 71.4 percent for the PC and PD emitters, respectively. The uniformity coefficient resulted in similar results with 70.1 percent for the PC emitters and 85.6 percent for the PD emitters. PC and PD fields caused an over-application of 55.3 percent and 58.5 percent of the field area, respectively.

Persyn, Russell Alan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

L AREA WASTEWATER STORAGE DRUM EVALUATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the determination of the cause of pressurization that led to bulging deformation of a 55 gallon wastewater drum stored in L-Area. Drum samples were sent to SRNL for evaluation. The interior surface of these samples revealed blistering and holes in the epoxy phenolic drum liner and corrosion of the carbon steel drum. It is suspected that osmotic pressure drove permeation of the water through the epoxy phenolic coating which was weakened from exposure to low pH water. The coating failed at locations throughout the drum interior. Subsequent corrosion of the carbon steel released hydrogen which pressurized the drum causing deformation of the drum lid. Additional samples from other wastewater drums on the same pallet were also evaluated and limited corrosion was visible on the interior surfaces. It is suspected that, with time, the corrosion would have advanced to cause pressurization of these sealed drums.

Vormelker, P; Cynthia Foreman, C; Zane Nelson, Z; David Hathcock, D; Dennis Vinson, D

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

Two-phase anaerobic digestion within a solid waste/wastewater integrated management system  

SciTech Connect

A two-phase, wet anaerobic digestion process was tested at laboratory scale using mechanically pre-treated municipal solid waste (MSW) as the substrate. The proposed process scheme differs from others due to the integration of the MSW and wastewater treatment cycles, which makes it possible to avoid the recirculation of process effluent. The results obtained show that the supplying of facultative biomass, drawn from the wastewater aeration tank, to the solid waste acidogenic reactor allows an improvement of the performance of the first phase of the process which is positively reflected on the second one. The proposed process performed successfully, adopting mesophilic conditions and a relatively short hydraulic retention time in the methanogenic reactor, as well as high values of organic loading rate. Significant VS removal efficiency and biogas production were achieved. Moreover, the methanogenic reactor quickly reached optimal conditions for a stable methanogenic phase. Studies conducted elsewhere also confirm the feasibility of integrating the treatment of the organic fraction of MSW with that of wastewater.

De Gioannis, G. [DIGITA, Department of Geoengineering and Environmental Technologies, University of Cagliari, Piazza D'Armi 09123 Cagliari (Italy); Diaz, L.F. [CalRecovery, Inc., 2454 Stanwell Drive, Concord, California 94520 (United States); Muntoni, A. [DIGITA, Department of Geoengineering and Environmental Technologies, University of Cagliari, Piazza D'Armi 09123 Cagliari (Italy)], E-mail: amuntoni@unica.it; Pisanu, A. [DIGITA, Department of Geoengineering and Environmental Technologies, University of Cagliari, Piazza D'Armi 09123 Cagliari (Italy)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification (Tennessee) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification (Tennessee) Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification are

287

Economic analysis of municipal wastewater utilization for thermoelectric power production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermoelectric power industry in the U.S. uses a large amount of freshwater. The large water demand is increasingly a problem, especially for new power plant development, as availability of freshwater for new uses diminishes in the United States. Reusing non-traditional water sources, such as treated municipal wastewater, provides one option to mitigate freshwater usage in the thermoelectric power industry. The amount of freshwater withdrawal that can be displaced with non-traditional water sources at a particular location requires evaluation of the water management and treatment requirements, considering the quality and abundance of the non-traditional water sources. This paper presents the development of an integrated costing model to assess the impact of degraded water treatment, as well as the implications of increased tube scaling in the main condenser. The model developed herein is used to perform case studies of various treatment, condenser cleaning and condenser configurations to provide insight into the ramifications of degraded water use in the cooling loops of thermoelectric power plants. Further, this paper lays the groundwork for the integration of relationships between degraded water quality, scaling characteristics and volatile emission within a recirculating cooling loop model.

Safari, I.; Walker, M.; Abbasian, J.; Arastoopour, H.; Hsieh, M-K.; Theregowda, R.; Dzombak, D.; Miller, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Wastewater treatment in Las Vegas, Santa Barbara, Honduras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Municipality of Las Vegas, Honduras is located immediately to the west of Lake Yojoa, the largest inland lake in Honduras. Beginning in 2005, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) began working with stakeholders ...

Hodge, Matthew M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Wastewater Treatment Gas to Energy for Federal Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

15 miles) should explore whether the plant is of sufficient size to produce excess biogas, the availability of the biogas, and what end-use application would make economic...

290

Treatment of Fuel Process Wastewater Using Fuel Cells - Energy ...  

Description Oil and natural gas drilling operations use copious amounts of water. Due to the presence of significant levels of petroleum by-products and metal salts, ...

291

Anaerobic filters: an energy plus for wastewater treatment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Separate abstracts are prepared for 12 papers presented at the seminar/workshop. One had previously appeared in the appropriate DOE data bases. (MCW)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

ENERGY STAR Score for Wastewater Treatment Plants | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal agency resources Grocery & convenience stores resources Healthcare resources Higher education resources Home-based business resources Hospitality resources Industrial...

293

Treatment of Fuel Process Wastewater Using Fuel Cells  

Oil and natural gas drilling operations use copious amounts of water. Due to the presence of significant levels of petroleum by-products and metal salts, water from

294

Lead-containing Wastewater Treatment by Constructed Wetland ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The adsorption mechanism of fly ash and slag was analyzed, and the influence of ... Influence of sewage pipe network on COD reduction efficiency in sewage ...

295

Wastewater Treatment Comes To Detroit: Law, Politics, Technology And Funding.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Detroit was one of the cities identified by the International Joint Commission as polluting the Great Lakes in contravention of the Boundary Waters Treaty of… (more)

Johnson, Barry Neal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Down the Drain: The Hidden Costs of California Energy. 2004,Pacific Institute. California Energy Commission,which is funded by the California Energy Commission (Energy

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Water Conserving On-site Wastewater Treatment Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For persons with disabilities, this document is available upon request in other formats. To submit a request, please call 1-888-586-9427 (TDD/TTY 1-800-833-6388). Para personas discapacitadas, este documento está disponible a su pedido en otros formatos.

On-site Wastewater; Mary Selecky

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Novel Technology for Wastewater Treatment by Biologics in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stabilization of Chromium-based Slags with MgO · Study on the EMD Residue and Shale for Preparing Solidification Brick · Study on the In-Situ Remediation of  ...

299

Study on the Treatment of Wastewater Containing High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production of Rock Wool from Ornamental Rock Wastes · Purification of Vegetable Oils Post-Consumption Residential and Commercial Clay with Two Brazilian.

300

Applications of nanotechnology in water and wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Qilin Li* Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA a r demand, which is exacerbated by population growth, global climate change, and water quality deterioration and the improvement of living standard continuously drive up the demand. Moreover, global climate change accentuates

Alvarez, Pedro J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Understanding and Maintaining your Septic System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is important that homeowners maintain their septic systems properly. Otherwise, problems that develop could threaten human health and the environment. In this publication you will learn how to maintain all the components of a septic system. There are checklists to remind you of important steps in maintaining the safety and integrity of your system.

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin; Alexander, Rachel

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

302

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power generators during peak demand periods. 13 Onsite powerit can be used during peak-demand periods. 15 Implementingtreatment loads from peak demand hours to off-peak hours is

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

NETL: News Release - New Wastewater Treatment Facilities To Open...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ned Godshall, Altela's Chief Executive Officer. While this process, called thermal distillation, is well known, the technology that Altela has pioneered is unique in its energy...

304

Pilot-Scale Demonstration of hZVI Process for Treating Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater at Plant Wansley, Carrollton, GA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The hybrid Zero Valent Iron (hZVI) process is a novel chemical treatment platform that has shown great potential in our previous bench-scale tests for removing selenium, mercury and other pollutants from Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) wastewater. This integrated treatment system employs new iron chemistry to create highly reactive mixture of Fe^0, iron oxides (FeOx) and various forms of Fe (II) for the chemical transformation and mineralization of various heavy metals in water. To further evaluate and develop the hZVI technology, a pilot-scale demonstration had been conducted to continuously treat 1-2 gpm of the FGD wastewater for five months at Plant Wansley, a coal-fired power plant of Georgia Power. This demonstrated that the scaled-up system was capable of reducing the total selenium (of which most was selenate) in the FGD wastewater from over 2500 ppb to below 10 ppb and total mercury from over 100 ppb to below 0.01 ppb. This hZVI system reduced other toxic metals like Arsenic (III and V), Chromium (VI), Cadmium (II), Lead (II) and Copper (II) from ppm level to ppb level in a very short reaction time. The chemical consumption was estimated to be approximately 0.2-0.4 kg of ZVI per 1 m^3 of FGD water treated, which suggested the process economics could be very competitive. The success of the pilot test shows that the system is scalable for commercial application. The operational experience and knowledge gained from this field test could provide guidance to further improvement of technology for full scale applications. The hZVI technology can be commercialized to provide a cost-effective and reliable solution to the FGD wastewater and other metal-contaminated waste streams in various industries. This technology has the potential to help industries meet the most stringent environmental regulations for heavy metals and nutrients in wastewater treatment.

Peddi, Phani 1987-

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Projects from Federal Region IX: Department of Energy Appropriate Energy Technology Program. Part II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Details and progress of appropriate energy technology programs in Region IX are presented. In Arizona, the projects are Solar Hot Water for the Prescott Adult Center and Solar Prototype House for a Residential Community. In California, the projects are Solar AquaDome Demonstration Project; Solar Powered Liquid Circulating Pump; Appropriate Energy Technology Resource Center; Digester for Wastewater Grown Aquatic Plants; Performance Characteristics of an Anaerobic Wastewater Lagoon Primary Treatment System; Appropriate Energy/Energy Conservation Demonstration Project; Solar Energy for Composting Toilets; Dry Creek Rancheria Solar Demonstration Projects; Demonstration for Energy Retrofit Analysis and Implementation; and Active Solar Space Heating System for the Integral Urban House. In Hawaii, the projects are: Java Plum Electric; Low-Cost Pond Digesters for Hawaiian Pig Farm Energy Needs; Solar Beeswax Melter; Methane Gas Plant for Operating Boilers and Generating Steam; and Solar Water Heating in Sugarcane Seed-Treatment Plants. A Wind-Powered Lighted Navigation Buoys Project for Guam is also described. A revised description of the Biogas Energy for Hawaiian Small Farms and Homesteads is given in an appendix.

Case, C.W.; Clark, H.R.; Kay, J.; Lucarelli, F.B.; Rizer, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Denitrification rates in a wastewater-irrigated forest soil in New Zealand  

SciTech Connect

Denitrification is considered to be an important N removal process in land-based wastewater treatment systems, although in situ denitrification rates have rarely been reported. The authors investigated the contribution of denitrification to N removal in a land treatment system by measuring in situ denitrification rates for 12 mo in a Monterey pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) forest irrigated with tertiary-treated wastewater. The variability of denitrification rates was investigated using a nested field design that divided the land treatment system into four spatial components (irrigation block, topographic position, field site, and sample plot) and two temporal components (sample period, sample day). Denitrification was measured using undisturbed soil cores collected daily, for six consecutive days on 21 occasions throughout the year. Soil moisture content, NO{sub 3} concentration, available C, denitrifying enzyme activity, and temperature also were measured. The annual denitrification rate in the irrigated soil was 2.4 kg N ha{sup {minus}1} yr{sup {minus}1}, and only slightly higher than the unirrigated soil. Temporal effects contributed more than spatial effects to the overall variation in denitrification rates. Multiple regression analysis showed that soil factors could only explain 29% of the variation in denitrification rates. Soil water-filled porosity was low in the land treatment system, and less than the critical threshold value determined in a laboratory study. The authors concluded that denitrification in this land treatment system studied was limited by excessive aeration in the free-draining soils.

Barton, L.; McLay, C.D.A.; Schipper, L.A.; Smith, C.T.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Design optimization of wastewater collection networks by PSO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimal design of wastewater collection networks is addressed in this paper by making use of the so-called PSO (Particle Swarm Optimization) technique. This already popular evolutionary technique is adapted for dealing both with continuous and discrete ... Keywords: Dynamic programming, Evolutionary method, Optimal design, Particle Swarm Optimization, Wastewater collection networks

Joaquín Izquierdo; Idel Montalvo; Rafael Pérez; Vicente S. Fuertes

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Biological treatment of refinery wastes  

SciTech Connect

A detailed study of the treatment situation at a Thai refinery that used an API separator with no equalization tank, followed by an activated-sludge system, showed that only 42% of the total COD and 57% of the soluble COD was degradable. In a study of the possibility of additional treatments, an aerated lagoon showed promising results. The wastewater composition of the three main Thai refineries was surveyed.

Mahmud, Z.; Thanh, N.C.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Driving Water and Wastewater Utilities to More Sustainable Energy Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Water Environment Federation (WEF) and industry leaders have identified the need for an energy roadmap to guide utilities of all sizes down the road to sustainable energy management through increased renewable energy production, energy conservation and focus on overall energy management. This roadmap leverages the framework developed in the electric power sector to move to smart grid technology: the smart grid maturity model (SGMM). The basis of this material originated at a workshop of water and power industry leaders convened by WEF in North Carolina, in March 2012. Case studies were analyzed from successful utilities in Austria, Holland, Australia, and the United States. High level, strategic best practices were identified and organized into topic areas, which define the level of progression (enable, integrate and optimize) towards achieving energy sustainability. The WEF energy roadmap is intended to guide utilities of all sizes as they progress towards becoming the treatment plants of the future. While it is not practical for all wastewater treatment plants to become energy positive or neutral, all can take steps towards increasing energy sustainability. Financial viability for energy management sustainability is crucial for success. Finding alternative financial models such as Energy Services Performance Contracts (ESPC) is a good option to accomplish energy management goals in a timely and financially responsible method.

Ferrel, L.; Liner, B.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

ROLE OF TOXICITY ASSESSMENT AND MONITORING IN MANAGING THE RECOVERY OF A WASTEWATER RECEIVING STREAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We evaluate the roles of a long-term comprehensive toxicity assessment and monitoring program in management and for ecological recovery of a freshwater receiving stream impacted by industrial discharges and legacy contamination. National Pollution Discharge Elimination Permit (NPDES)-driven whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests using Ceriodaphnia and fathead minnows were conducted for more than twenty years to characterize wastewaters at the US National Nuclear Security Agency s Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Ambient toxicity tests also were conducted to assess water samples from EFPC, the stream receiving the wastewater discharges. The ambient tests were conducted as part of an extensive biological monitoring program that included routine surveys of fish, invertebrate and periphyton communities. WET testing, associated toxicant identification evaluations (TIEs), and ambient toxicity monitoring were instrumental in identifying toxicants and their sources at the Y-12 Complex, guiding modifications to wastewater treatment procedures, and assessing the success of various pollution-abatement actions. Through time, as requirements changed and water quality improved, the toxicity monitoring program became more focused. Ambient testing with Ceriodaphnia and fathead minnow larvae also was supplemented with less-standardized but more-sensitive alternative laboratory and in situ bioassays. The Y-12 Complex biological monitoring experience demonstrates the significant roles effluent and ambient toxicity testing can have in controlling and managing toxic discharges to receiving waters. It also emphasizes the value of supplementing WET and standardized ambient toxicity tests with alternative laboratory and in situ toxicity tests tailored to address specific problems.

Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL; Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL; Smith, John G [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Development and application of an integrated ecological modelling framework to analyze the impact of wastewater discharges on the ecological water quality of rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modelling is an effective tool to investigate the ecological state of water resources. In developing countries, the impact of sanitation infrastructures (e.g. wastewater treatment plants) is typically assessed considering the achievement of legal physicochemical ... Keywords: Habitat suitability models, Information-theoretic approach, Integrated ecological modelling, MIKE 11, Multi-model inference

Javier E. Holguin-Gonzalez, Gert Everaert, Pieter Boets, Alberto Galvis, Peter L. M. Goethals

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits, Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permits, State Permits, Water Quality Based Effluent Limitations and Water Quality Certification (Mississippi) Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits, Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permits, State Permits, Water Quality Based Effluent Limitations and Water Quality Certification (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential

313

Waste-water characterization survey, Barksdale AFB, Louisiana. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The USAFOEHL conducted an on-site waste-water-quality survey at Barksdale AFB, LA from 14 to 28 March 1988 at the request of the 2nd Strategic Hospital/SGPB. The survey was requested to resolve a 1 October 1987 EPA Region VI 30-day administrative order. All samples were analyzed for pH, chemical oxygen demand (COD), conductivity, total suspended solids (TSS) and oil and grease. Samples taken from industrial areas were selectively analyzed for purgeable halocarbons, purgeable aromatics, total recoverable phenols (EPA Method 420), phenols (EPA Method 604), fluorides, surfactants (MBAS), characteristic hazardous waste and metals by the ICP metals screen. Lift stations (buildings 4725 and 3455) and NPDES site 003 were also analyzed for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). Sampling results were evaluated against the following criteria: (1) Bossier City, Louisiana Wastewater Permit Standard BC0022; (2) Pretreatment Standards for Existing Sources, 40 CFR Part 433 - Metal finishing point source category; (3) NPDES Permit LA0007293 for Mack's Bayou.

Zimmer, A.T.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Assessment of sludge management options in a waste water treatment plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is part of a larger project which began in response to a request by the Spanish water agengy, Cadagua, for advice on life cycle assessment (LCA) and environmental impacts of Cadagua operated wastewater treatment ...

Lim, Jong hyun, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Energy-Efficient Industrial Waste Treatment Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rising energy costs coupled with the continuing need for effective environmental treatment methods have stimulated interest in advanced energy-efficient technologies. EPRI has reviewed a wide variety of electricity-based processes for industrial air pollution control, wastewater treatment, and solid waste treatment along with some closely related competing technologies. These technologies ranged from untested concepts to well-established ones. While most offer process cost savings and improvements over e...

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

Water Distribution and Wastewater Systems Operators (North Dakota) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Distribution and Wastewater Systems Operators (North Dakota) Water Distribution and Wastewater Systems Operators (North Dakota) Water Distribution and Wastewater Systems Operators (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting All public water supply and wastewater disposal systems are subject to classification and regulation by the State of North Dakota, and must obtain certification from the State Department of Health

317

Middle east crisis has varied effect on wastewater utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The jump in oil prices that followed Iraq's invasion of Kuwait in early August of 1990 was felt throughout the US economy. The authors particularly discuss the impact of the Middle East Crisis as it relates to wastewater utilities.

Nichols, A.B.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility Facility Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Adams County, Colorado Coordinates 39.8398269°, -104.1930918° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.8398269,"lon":-104.1930918,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

319

Fourche Creek Wastewater Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fourche Creek Wastewater Biomass Facility Fourche Creek Wastewater Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fourche Creek Wastewater Biomass Facility Facility Fourche Creek Wastewater Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Pulaski County, Arkansas Coordinates 34.7538615°, -92.2236667° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.7538615,"lon":-92.2236667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

320

Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Wastewater Characterization and Management: 2007 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tightened air regulations on acid-gas-forming emissions are leading more electric utilities to install flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, typically wet scrubbers. However, there are challenges associated with such decisions in terms of utility wastewater management. Volatile metals, such as selenium and mercury, are better captured in wet scrubber systems than in electrostatic precipitators and may be present at higher concentrations in utility wastewater systems. This report is designed to help pow...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Anaerobic Digestion of Food Waste?recycling Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Food waste?recycling (FWR) wastewater was evaluated as feedstock for two?stage anaerobic digestion at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). The FWR wastewater tested contained high concentrations of organic materials and had chemical oxygen demand (COD) >130 g/L and volatile solids (VS) >55 g/L. Two identical two?stage anaerobic digesters were operated to investigate the performance at six HRTs ranging from 10–25 days. In the acidogenic reactor

Gyuseong Han; Seung Gu Shin; Juntaek Lim; Minho Jo; Seokhwan Hwang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Water/Wastewater Engineering Report (Storm Sewer/Infiltration Sanitary Sewage Separation-M1 Model)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In some cities, the municipal sewer system collects both storm water and sanitary sewage in the same pipes. During dry weather these sewers carry all the sanitary sewage to the wastewater treatment plant for treatment. However, when rainstorms or snow melt increase the amount of runoff, the combined flow of sanitary sewage and storm water can exceed the capacity of the sewer system, which can cause serious problems like the storm water and sewage mix are discharged untreated into the river or the sewage backs up into streets and basement. Storm water treated in the sewage treatment plant also causes unnecessary energy use. Sewer systems can also have unintended ground water entering the network, which occurs because of hydraulic pressure on the buried sewer lines infiltration. Therefore, separating the storm water/infiltration and sanitary sewage reduces the possibility of sewage discharge during heavy rain periods, and saves energy.

Liu, Z.; Brumbelow, K.; Haberl, J. S.

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

323

Conneaut Wastewater Facility Wind Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wastewater Facility Wind Turbine Wastewater Facility Wind Turbine Jump to: navigation, search Name Conneaut Wastewater Facility Wind Turbine Facility Conneaut Wastewater Facility Wind Turbine Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Conneaut Wastewater Facility Developer NexGen Energy Partners Energy Purchaser Conneaut Wastewater Facility Location Conneaut OH Coordinates 41.968223°, -80.552268° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.968223,"lon":-80.552268,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

324

Reuse of Treated Internal or External Wastewaters in the Cooling Systems of Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated the feasibility of using three impaired waters - secondary treated municipal wastewater, passively treated abandoned mine drainage (AMD), and effluent from ash sedimentation ponds at power plants - for use as makeup water in recirculating cooling water systems at thermoelectric power plants. The evaluation included assessment of water availability based on proximity and relevant regulations as well as feasibility of managing cooling water quality with traditional chemical management schemes. Options for chemical treatment to prevent corrosion, scaling, and biofouling were identified through review of current practices, and were tested at bench and pilot-scale. Secondary treated wastewater is the most widely available impaired water that can serve as a reliable source of cooling water makeup. There are no federal regulations specifically related to impaired water reuse but a number of states have introduced regulations with primary focus on water aerosol 'drift' emitted from cooling towers, which has the potential to contain elevated concentrations of chemicals and microorganisms and may pose health risk to the public. It was determined that corrosion, scaling, and biofouling can be controlled adequately in cooling systems using secondary treated municipal wastewater at 4-6 cycles of concentration. The high concentration of dissolved solids in treated AMD rendered difficulties in scaling inhibition and requires more comprehensive pretreatment and scaling controls. Addition of appropriate chemicals can adequately control corrosion, scaling and biological growth in ash transport water, which typically has the best water quality among the three waters evaluated in this study. The high TDS in the blowdown from pilot-scale testing units with both passively treated mine drainage and secondary treated municipal wastewater and the high sulfate concentration in the mine drainage blowdown water were identified as the main challenges for blowdown disposal. Membrane treatment (nanofiltration or reverse osmosis) can be employed to reduce TDS and sulfate concentrations to acceptable levels for reuse of the blowdown in the cooling systems as makeup water.

Radisav Vidic; David Dzombak; Ming-Kai Hsieh; Heng Li; Shih-Hsiang Chien; Yinghua Feng; Indranil Chowdhury; Jason Monnell

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

325

Rules for the Discharge of Non-Sanitary Wastewater and Other...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for the Discharge of Non-Sanitary Wastewater and Other Fluids To or Below the Ground Surface (Rhode Island) Rules for the Discharge of Non-Sanitary Wastewater and Other Fluids To...

326

California Food Processing Industry Wastewater Demonstration Project: Phase I Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Wastewater Management.Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water, Office of Wastewater Management.Management Fact Sheet: Energy Conservation. ” U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office

Lewis, Glen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Embedded Network Sensing of Moisture and Nitrate Propagation During Irrigation with Reclaimed Wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operation, thus optimizing discharge of nitrate-laden wastewater. rain gauge D ata acquisition a nd wireless

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

A fuzzy logic based system for heavy metals loaded wastewaters monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents a fuzzy logic based system for wastewater quality monitoring with the purpose of attenuating the environmental impact of the heavy metals loaded wastewaters. The proposed method offers an improvement over the traditionally modelling ... Keywords: environmental indices, fuzzy logic, fuzzy rules, wastewater quality monitoring

Daniel Dunea; Mihaela Oprea

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Studies on the Extraction of Phenol from the Wastewater of Multi-generation System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recovery of phenol from the wastewater produced in the multi-cogeneration system has been studied. Based on the experimental results and theoretical analysis, butyl acetate was selected as the extractant and 99.95% of the volatile phenols in the wastewater ... Keywords: phenol, solvent extraction, wastewater, multigeneration system, recycle

Zhenjing Shi; Mengxiang Fang; Chunguang Zhou; Qinghui Wang; Zhongyang Luo

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Collection and representation of GIS data to aid household water treatment and safe storage technology implementation in the northern region of Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2005, a start-up social business called Pure Home Water (PHW) was begun in Ghana to promote and sell household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) technologies. The original aim of the company was to offer a variety ...

VanCalcar, Jenny E. (Jenny Elizabeth)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Processing needs and methodology for wastewaters from the conversion of coal, oil shale, and biomass to synfuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The workshop identifies needs to be met by processing technology for wastewaters, and evaluates the suitability, approximate costs, and problems associated with current technology. Participation was confined to DOE Environmental Control Technology contractors to pull together and integrate past wastewater-related activities, to assess the status of synfuel wastewater treatability and process options, and to abet technology transfer. Particular attention was paid to probable or possible environmental restrictions which cannot be economically met by present technology. Primary emphasis was focussed upon process-condensate waters from coal-conversion and shale-retorting processes. Due to limited data base and time, the workshop did not deal with transients, upsets, trade-offs and system optimization, or with solids disposal. The report is divided into sections that, respectively, survey the water usage and effluent situation (II); identify the probable and possible water-treatment goals anticipated at the time when large-scale plants will be constructed (III); assess the capabilities, costs and shortcomings of present technology (IV); explore particularly severe environmental-control problems (V); give overall conclusions from the Workshop and recommendations for future research and study (VI); and, finally, present Status Reports of current work from participants in the Workshop (VII).

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Flexible hybrid membrane treatment systems for tailored nutrient management: A new paradigm in urban wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the clay and glaze waste that previously was washed down the drain, reclaiming 15 gallons of glaze and 300 with a student team. Over 90% of irrigation systems are automated and connected to a weather station

333

Deepening Treatment of the Low C/N Ratio Biogas Slurry at Mountainous Region Livestock Farming by Using Modified Two-Stage A/O System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intensive and fast development of livestock farming with ecological pattern of raising¨Cbiogas¨Cirrigating is widely applied in China. After anaerobic fermentation the agricultural wastes can provides clean energy. However, there is problem by lacking ... Keywords: livestock farming, biogas slurry, low C/N ratio, deepening treatment

Wei-wei Yu; Zhi Zhang; Sheng-lan Bi; Shu-yang Li; Chao Liu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Integrating BES in the wastewater and sludge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, denitrification, and anaerobic digester treatment systems, while chemical methods include phosphate removal, dye of WAS, including treatment of influent or the accumulated sludge with anaerobic digesters (Rulkens 2008 bacterial metabolism even at conditions outside the optimum range for anaerobic digestion (Angenent et al

Angenent, Lars T.

335

2724-W laundry wastewater stream-specific report  

SciTech Connect

The proposed wastestream designation for the 2742-W Laundry wastewater wastestream is that this stream is not a dangerous waste, pursuant to the Washington (State) Administration Code (WAC) 173-303, Dangerous Waste Regulations. A combination of process knowledge and sampling data was used to make this determination. 19 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

The original signatures are maintained on file  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... JEA's water and wastewater operation consists of ... non- regional sewer treatment plants comprise ... by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

337

Application Programming Interface Documentation - Qb - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Oxnard Wastewater Treatment Plant (50225) Regional Waste Systems ... TXI Riverside Cement Power House ... Heat Recovery Coke Facility (55067) ...

338

2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The 2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and any permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of any of the facilities during the 2001 permit year are discussed. Additionally, any special studies performed at the facilities, which related to the operation of the facility or application of the wastewater, are discussed.

Meachum, Teresa Ray; Lewis, Michael George

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The 2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and any permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of any of the facilities during the 2001 permit year are discussed. Additionally, any special studies performed at the facilities, which related to the operation of the facility or application of the wastewater, are discussed.

Meachum, T.R.; Lewis, M.G.

2002-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

MHK Projects/Bonnybrook Wastewater Facility Project 1 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bonnybrook Wastewater Facility Project 1 Bonnybrook Wastewater Facility Project 1 < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.0097,"lon":-114.02,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

MHK Projects/Bonnybrook Wastewater Facility Project 2 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bonnybrook Wastewater Facility Project 2 Bonnybrook Wastewater Facility Project 2 < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.0097,"lon":-114.02,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

342

Management of Biological Materials in Wastewater from Research & Development Facilities  

SciTech Connect

PNNL has developed and instituted a systematic approach to managing work with biological material that begins in the project planning phase and carries through implementation to waste disposal. This paper describes two major processes used at PNNL to analyze and mitigate the hazards associated with working with biological materials and evaluate them for disposal to the sewer, ground, or surface water in a manner that protects human health and the environment. The first of these processes is the Biological Work Permit which is used to identify requirements for handling, storing, and working with biological materials and the second is the Sewer Approval process which is used to evaluate discharges of wastewaters containing biological materials to assure they meet industrial wastewater permits and other environmental regulations and requirements.

Raney, Elizabeth A.; Moon, Thomas W.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

California Food Processing Industry Wastewater Demonstration Project: Phase I Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wastewater energy and environmental parameters, tariffs, andenergy and environmental parameters correlated with weather and tariffenergy and environmental parameters correlated with weather and tariff

Lewis, Glen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Geochemical Determination of the Fate and Transport of Injected Fresh Wastewater to a Deep Saline Aquifer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Deep well injection into non-potable saline aquifers of treated domestic wastewater has been used in Florida for decades as a safe and effective alternative… (more)

Walsh, Virginia M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) - Monitoring of organic pollutants in wastewater.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) are two methods used for measuring organic pollutants in wastewater. Both methods are widely used… (more)

Hodzic, Elvisa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Numerical Simulation of an Open Channel Ultraviolet Waste-water Disinfection Reactor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The disinfection characteristics of an open channel ultra-violet (UV) wastewater disinfection reactor are investigated using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. The model is based… (more)

Saha, Rajib Kumar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen Sulfide Emission Factors Applicable to Wastewater Wet Wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Transport of wastewater in sewer networks causes potential problems associated with gases which include ammonia, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide and methane, in regard… (more)

Mudragaddam, Madhuri

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Honduras wastewater treatment : chemically enhanced primary treatment and sustainable secondary treatment technologies for use with Imhoff tanks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) However, it is doubtful the costs associated with dosages required to achieve these removals are sustainable for communities such as Las Vegas. To address these deficiencies further sustainable practices for ...

McLean, Robert C. (Robert Charles)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Bio-composite Nonwoven Media Based on Chitosan and Empty Fruit Bunches for Wastewater Application  

SciTech Connect

Fibrous filter media in the form of non-woven filters have been used extensively in water treatment as pre-filters or to support the medium that does the separation. Lignocellulosic such as empty fruit bunches have potential to be used as a low cost filter media as they represent unused resources, widely available and are environmentally friendly. Laboratory filtration tests were performed to investigate the potential application of empty fruit bunches that enriched with chitosan as a fiber filter media to remove suspended solids, oil and grease, and organics in terms of chemical oxygen demand from palm oil mill effluent. The present paper studies the effect of chitosan concentration on the filter media performance. Bench-scaled experiment results indicated that pre-treatment using the fiber filtration system removed up to 67.3% of total suspended solid, 65.1% of oil and grease and 46.1% of chemical oxygen demand. The results show that the lignocellulosic fiber filter could be a potential technology for primary wastewater treatment.

Sadikin, Aziatul Niza; Nawawi, Mohd Ghazali Mohd; Othman, Norasikin

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

350

DEVELOPMENT OF CHEMICAL REDUCTION AND AIR STRIPPING PROCESSES TO REMOVE MERCURY FROM WASTEWATER  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates the removal of mercury from wastewater using chemical reduction and air stripping using a full-scale treatment system at the Savannah River Site. The existing water treatment system utilizes air stripping as the unit operation to remove organic compounds from groundwater that also contains mercury (C ~ 250 ng/L). The baseline air stripping process was ineffective in removing mercury and the water exceeded a proposed limit of 51 ng/L. To test an enhancement to the existing treatment modality a continuous dose of reducing agent was injected for 6-hours at the inlet of the air stripper. This action resulted in the chemical reduction of mercury to Hg(0), a species that is removable with the existing unit operation. During the injection period a 94% decrease in concentration was observed and the effluent satisfied proposed limits. The process was optimized over a 2-day period by sequentially evaluating dose rates ranging from 0.64X to 297X stoichiometry. A minimum dose of 16X stoichiometry was necessary to initiate the reduction reaction that facilitated the mercury removal. Competing electron acceptors likely inhibited the reaction at the lower 1 doses, which prevented removal by air stripping. These results indicate that chemical reduction coupled with air stripping can effectively treat large-volumes of water to emerging part per trillion regulatory standards for mercury.

Jackson, D.; Looney, B.; Craig, B.; Thompson, M.; Kmetz, T.

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

351

Operation and Maintenance Manual for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This Operation and Maintenance Manual lists operator and management responsibilities, permit standards, general operating procedures, maintenance requirements and monitoring methods for the Sewage Treatment Plant at the Central Facilities Area at the Idaho National Laboratory. The manual is required by the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03) the sewage treatment plant.

Norm Stanley

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Removal of cadmium and chromium from a pretreated wastewater with reverse osmosis. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this research project was to investigate the removals of cadmium(II) and chromium(VI) from a simulated wastewater by reverse osmosis (RO). The project was one very focused aspect of a major U.S. Navy multi-year research project aimed at achieving zero-discharge from its Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plants. The effects of varied operating conditions on the performance of a thin-film composite brackish water RO membrane were investigated: feed solutions of 1000, 2000, and 3000 mg/l NaCl; 2000 mg/l NaCl at pH 5, 6 and 7; and background feed composition solutions of NaCl and Na2SO4 at four different mix ratios. The effects of temperature in the range of 20 to 36 C, and operating pressures of 400, 300 and 200 psi were also investigated. In nearly all cases metal concentrations were 10 mg/l; a 100 mg/l test was also performed. Typical RO behaviors were observed with water and solute permeation. Both water permeation and solute passage decreased with time due to membrane compaction. On the other hand, water permeation increased with applied pressure. The best rejections for the metals were obtained in feed solutions of sodium chloride and sodium sulfate. A maximum rejection of 99.9 percent was observed for cadmium(II) at a feed solution mole fraction of approximately 0.95 sodium sulfate and a pH of 6. The highest chromium(VI) rejection observed was 99.1 percent at a 0.5 mole fraction of sodium sulfate and pH of 6.

Zapp, K.M.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Regional Residential  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

upward pressure from crude oil markets, magnified by a regional shortfall of heating oil supplies, residential prices rose rapidly to peak February 7. The problem was...

354

Regional Maps  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

United States Census Divisions Figure 2.Electricity Market Module (EMM)Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting Figure...

355

Application of a Multi-Criteria Decision Support Tool in Assessing the Feasibility of Implementing Treated Wastewater Reuse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater reuse is increasingly becoming an important component of water resources management in many countries. Planning of a sustainable wastewater reuse project involves multi-criteria that incorporate technical, economic, environmental and social ... Keywords: Decision Support Tool, Feasibility Assessment, Multi-Criteria Attributes, Wastewater Reuse

J.R. Adewumi, A.A. Ilemobade, J.E. van Zyl

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Evaluating the environmental impact of coal-fired power plants through wastewater pollutant vector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable and safe operation of a coal-fired power plant is strongly linked to freshwater resources, and environmental problems related to water source and wastewater discharging are challenging the power plant operation. This study deals with an evaluation ... Keywords: coal-fired power plant, environmental impact, pollutant vector, wastewater

Nikos E. Mastorakis; Andreea Jeles; Cornelia A. Bulucea; Carmen A. Bulucea; Constantin Brindusa

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

2003 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The 2003 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe the conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operations of the facilities during the 2003 permit year are discussed.

Teresa R. Meachum

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

2002 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The 2002 Wastewater Land Application site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of the facilities during the 2002 permit year are discussed.

Meachum, T.R.; Lewis, M.G.

2003-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

359

1997 evaluation of tritium removal and mitigation technologies for Hanford Site wastewaters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains results of a biennial assessment of tritium separation technology and tritium nitration techniques for control of tritium bearing wastewaters at the Hanford Site. Tritium in wastewaters at Hanford have resulted from plutonium production, fuel reprocessing, and waste handling operations since 1944. this assessment was conducted in response to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

Jeppson, D.W.; Biyani, R.K.; Duncan, J.B.; Flyckt, D.L.; Mohondro, P.C.; Sinton, G.L.

1997-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

360

Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

your Power. (2008). "Demand Response Programs." RetrievedTool Berkeley, CA, Demand Response Research Center.2008). "What is Demand Response?" Retrieved 10/10/2008, from

Thompson, Lisa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007). A byproduct of anaerobic digestion is biogas whichthe byproduct of the anaerobic digestion of solids removedgas produced from anaerobic digestion at no cost. CalPower,

Thompson, Lisa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anaerobic digestion is biogas which contains 50–70 percentPlant collects this biogas and uses it in the cogeneration

Thompson, Lisa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand of 1.3 MW, with peak demand reaching 2 MW. Figure 1summer period. SDG&E’s peak demand period is between 11 AMlast 10 with the highest peak demand (Coughlin 2008). Unlike

Thompson, Lisa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Regional Purchasing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Purchasing Regional Purchasing Regional Purchasing Pursuant to Appendix M of Prime Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396 between DOE/NNSA and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), LANS is committed to building a strong supplier base with Northern New Mexico businesses and the local Native American pueblos in the purchases of goods and services. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email We seek out and utilize known Northern New Mexico business as suppliers The Northern New Mexico counties included are Los Alamos Santa Fe Rio Arriba Taos Mora San Miguel Sandoval The eight regional pueblos included are Nambe Ohkay Owingeh (formerly known as San Juan) Picuris Pojoaque San Ildefonso Santa Clara Taos Tesuque When the Laboratory cannot identify regional firms, it will expand its

365

SEPARATION OF HEAVY METALS: REMOVAL FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATERS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SEPARATION SEPARATION OF HEAVY METALS: REMOVAL FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATERS AND CONTAMINATED SOIL* Robert W. Peters + and Linda Shem Energy Systems Division Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439 Abstract This paper reviews the applicable separation technologies relating to removal of heavy metals from solution and from soils in order to present the state-of-the-art in the field. Each technology is briefly described and typical operating conditions and technology performance are presented. Technologies described include chemical precipitation (including hydroxide, carbonate, or sulfide reagents), coagulation/flocculation, ion exchange, solvent extraction, extraction with chelating agents, complexation, electrochemical operation, cementation, membrane operations, evaporation, adsorption, solidification/stabilization, and

366

Arsenic and Selenium Speciation in Fly Ash and Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the work is to predict As and Se behavior in pond wastewater based on coal and power plant characteristics so that utilities will have tools for selection of coals (and blends) that will allow them to meet applicable water quality regulations in the ash pond discharge. Arsenic and selenium were chosen as the focus of this work because the behavior of arsenic and selenium is not well correlated with pH in ash pond water, but with speciation of these oxyanions in the fly ash. Furthermore, ...

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

367

Regional Inventories  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: This year has not started well for gasoline inventories, with inventories being low across regions of the country. The Midwest region (PADD II) had been running lower than most regions, but began to catch up during the last week in April. Gasoline inventories ran about 9% below their 5-year average for this time of year and about 4% below where they were last year. The recent refinery problems in the Midwest, though, could erase some of that recovery. The impacts of Tosco's Wood River refinery and Marathon's St Paul refinery are not fully realized. But inventories were also precariously low along the East Coast (PADD I) and are extremely low in the Rocky Mountain region (PADD IV), although the size of this market mitigates any national impact. While the

368

Linking ceragenins to water-treatment membranes to minimize biofouling.  

SciTech Connect

Ceragenins were used to create biofouling resistant water-treatment membranes. Ceragenins are synthetically produced antimicrobial peptide mimics that display broad-spectrum bactericidal activity. While ceragenins have been used on bio-medical devices, use of ceragenins on water-treatment membranes is novel. Biofouling impacts membrane separation processes for many industrial applications such as desalination, waste-water treatment, oil and gas extraction, and power generation. Biofouling results in a loss of permeate flux and increase in energy use. Creation of biofouling resistant membranes will assist in creation of clean water with lower energy usage and energy with lower water usage. Five methods of attaching three different ceragenin molecules were conducted and tested. Biofouling reduction was observed in the majority of the tests, indicating the ceragenins are a viable solution to biofouling on water treatment membranes. Silane direct attachment appears to be the most promising attachment method if a high concentration of CSA-121a is used. Additional refinement of the attachment methods are needed in order to achieve our goal of several log-reduction in biofilm cell density without impacting the membrane flux. Concurrently, biofilm forming bacteria were isolated from source waters relevant for water treatment: wastewater, agricultural drainage, river water, seawater, and brackish groundwater. These isolates can be used for future testing of methods to control biofouling. Once isolated, the ability of the isolates to grow biofilms was tested with high-throughput multiwell methods. Based on these tests, the following species were selected for further testing in tube reactors and CDC reactors: Pseudomonas ssp. (wastewater, agricultural drainage, and Colorado River water), Nocardia coeliaca or Rhodococcus spp. (wastewater), Pseudomonas fluorescens and Hydrogenophaga palleronii (agricultural drainage), Sulfitobacter donghicola, Rhodococcus fascians, Rhodobacter katedanii, and Paracoccus marcusii (seawater), and Sphingopyxis spp. (groundwater). The testing demonstrated the ability of these isolates to be used for biofouling control testing under laboratory conditions. Biofilm forming bacteria were obtained from all the source water samples.

Hibbs, Michael R.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Feng, Yanshu (Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah); Savage, Paul B. (Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah); Pollard, Jacob (Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah); Branda, Steven S.; Goeres, Darla (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Buckingham-Meyer, Kelli (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Stafslien, Shane (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Marry, Christopher; Jones, Howland D. T.; Lichtenberger, Alyssa; Kirk, Matthew F.; McGrath, Lucas K. (LMATA, Albuquerque, NM)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

The role of SCADA in developing a lean enterprise for municipal wastewater operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Central to optimizing a wastewater system's operations is the collection of alarm and operational data from various remote locations throughout a municipality, hence the basic need for supervisory control and data acquisition ...

Prutz, Stanley J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Fluoride-containing wastewater converted to synthetic fluorspar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the manufacture of uranium hexafluoride, sulfur hexafluoride, iodine pentafluoride, and antimony pentafluoride, the Allied Corporation's Metropolis Works (Metropolis, IL) generates approximately 250,000 gpd of process wastewater which contains substantial amounts of soluble fluoride. Most of the wastewater is also acidic. Alkaline waste and hydrated lime (calcium hydroxide) in a pair of neutralizers are used to precipitate the soluble fluoride as calcium fluoride. Due to the alkalinity, the material is considered a hazardous waste. The limited availability of land suitable for the construction of impoundment basins and the potential for eventual seepage from the basins presented a challenge to the management and technical staff at the Metropolis Works situation on-site. Efforts were directed toward developing a process to convert the calcium fluoride waste into a useful product. Excess lime waste could be converted to 90% CaF/sub 2/ by neutralizing the lime with hydrofluoric acid. The 90% CaF/sub 2/, closely resembling fluorspar, would be able to be used directly at other Allied plants as a substitute for natural fluorspar in the production of anhydrous hydrofluoric (AHF) acid. Engineering efforts to design a full-scale plant for the recovery of CaF/sub 2/ began in mid-1980. Construction of the plant begin in July, 1981. Since startup in mid-1982, the full scale recovery plant has been in continuous operation. Design capacity is 8000 tons/yr of synthetic fluorspar. The synthetic fluorspar is directly replacing an equivalent amount of imported natural fluorspar in the production of anhydrous hydrofluoric acid. Total cost to construct the CaF/sub 2/ recovery plant was $4.3 million. Currently realized cost savings of about $1 million/yr give the project an expected payback period of under five years.

Cipolla, A.J.; Shields, E.J.; Wickersham, C.P.; Toy, D.A.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Wastewater Subsurface Drip Distribution: Peer-Reviewed Guidelines for Design, Operation, and Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface drip distribution is the most efficient method currently available for application and subsurface dispersal of wastewater to soil. Because it is so effective, drip distribution represents a viable option for wastewater disposal and reuse for all soil types. The technology is commonly used at sites where point source discharges and National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits are not appropriate due to environmental sensitivity of receiving streams. It is also commonly used a...

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Pretreatment of industrial discharges to publicly owned treatment works (POTW)  

SciTech Connect

A discussion covers a brief survey of federal regulations establishing standards for the pretreatment of pollutants discharged into POTW's; the experience of the Municipality of Metropolitan Seattle (Metro) in dealing with the pretreatment of heavy metals in industrial and commercial discharges; a study and analysis by Seattle Metro of organic priority pollutants in wastewater including identification sources; and POTW treatment control technology for organic priority pollutants in Seattle Metro.

Ongerth, J.E.; Dewalle, F.B.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Section 6.8 On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Greening Federal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

such as intermittent or recirculating sand filters; * Constructed wetlands that rely on algae, microbes, macrophytic plants such as water hyacinths or bul- rushes, and other...

374

Investigation of microalgae cultivation and anaerobic codigestion of algae and sewage sludge for wastewater treatment facilities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main goals of this research are to investigate the anaerobic digestibility of algae and to investigate the effects of growth media on the growth… (more)

Wang, Meng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Brief paper: Fuzzy control of the activated sludge wastewater treatment process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activated sludge process is a commonly used method for treating sewage and waste waters. It is characterised by a lack of relevant instrumentation, control goals that are not always clearly stated, the use of qualitative information in decision making ... Keywords: Computer control, control system synthesis, controllers, fuzzy control, process control, water pollution, water resources

R. M. Tong; M. B. Beck; A. Latten

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Forward osmosis treatment of drilling mud and fracturing wastewater from oil and gas operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with different objectives (Plan-Neofluar 10�/0.30, Plan-Neofluar 40�/ 1.30 Oil, and Plan-Apochromat 63�/1.40 Oil-W, Burgath K-P, Oberthu¨r T, Tarkian M, Pfeiffer T. 2000. Unconventional PGE occurrences and PGE

377

ACCEPTED BY WATER ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH ODOR AND VOC REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Compost Amendment to Reduce Nutrient Runoff. Prepared for the City of Redmond. College of Forestry. Water Quality and Quantity Effects of Amending Soils with Compost Surface runoff decreased by five to 10 times after amending the soil with compost (4 in of compost tilled 8 in into the soil), compared

378

Development of a novel catalytic membrane reactor: application in wastewater treatment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Los procesos de oxidación químicos son una herramienta universal para el tratamiento de aguas subterráneas, efluentes industriales y aguas residuales. Una de estas técnicas se… (more)

Osegueda Chicas, Oscar Antonio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Applicability of Regression Technique for Physical Modeling: A case study on Adsorption in Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The reliability of Physical Modeling in applications such as Adsorption and Heat transfer studies is not accurate since their mechanisms are complex and a proper understanding of the physics of the system is incomplete. In order to verify the applicability of Regression technique for Physical Modeling, a physical model is developed based on Multiple regression technique to predict the Pollutant Removal efficiency of fluoride in adsorption studies. Two sets of data points are collected viz., of twenty-one points consisting of homogeneous data with respect to adsorbent and of forty-eight points (heterogeneous data, including the above twenty-one points) and tested with the model. Results showed that, the physical model is giving encouraging results for homogeneous data (Standard Deviation (SD): 0.157) but is giving erratic results (SD: 0.361) for the heterogeneous data. The heterogeneous data consists of non-linear adsorption data, which the model could not predict accurately indicating that, the Regression technique holds a limitation in understanding the physics of the system. Novel techniques such as ANN can be used to predict the output from the data set with better accuracy than that using Regression technique. Back propagation Network of ANN is used as a test trial for the above database and the results are encouraging (SD: 0.29) with respect to heterogeneous data.

B. V. Babu; V. Ramakrishna

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Defining a Value Equation for Distributed Resources: Wastewater Treatment and Express Delivery Industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities and other energy service companies continue to look at distributed resources (DR) as a source of innovative products and services that can help them increase customer value and open new sources of revenue in a restructured energy industry. However, the market potential generated by DR solutions is only now beginning to be tapped as new technologies become commercially available, their prices decrease to more competitive levels, and market characteristics are better understood.

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Channel Design to Increase Wastewater Treatment Wetland Capacity and Connectivity in Stockton, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

facility management, and berm maintenance and repair. (OMI/maintenance is expected to include daily monitoring of water levels and control structures, water quality sampling and data analysis, vegetation management,

Cubbison, Erin O.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

CAPITAL REGION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

t 09/20/07 15:28 FAX 301 903 4656 t 09/20/07 15:28 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION 0 j002 SDOE F 1325.8 (8-89) EFG (0790) Energy United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE. September 18, 2007 Audit Report No.: OAS-L-07-23 REPLY TO: IG-34 (A07TG036) SUBJECT: Evaluation of "The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Cyber Security Program-2007" TO: Chairman, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results o Four evaluation of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission) cyber security program. The evaluation was initiated in May 2007, and our fieldwork was conducted through September 2007. Our methodology is described in the attachment to this report. . INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Commission reports that it is constantly improving thl stability, reliability, and

383

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Alsco Anaconda, OH. (First remedial action), September 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Alsco Anaconda site is a 4.8-acre former sludge disposal area in Gnadenhutten, Tuscarawas County, Ohio. Contamination at the site occurred from 1965 to 1978 when wastewater and wastewater treatment sludge from the plant, containing hazardous aluminum processing wastes (FO19), was disposed of in an unlined settling basin and a sludge pit. In 1978 the plant owners began dewatering the treatment sludge prior to disposal of sludge offsite in the settling basin and a former swamp area. Because leachate from the sludge may have contaminated the ground water and surface water, a subsequent ROD will address the appropriate remedial action for those media. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and sludge are organics including PCBs, and metals including chromium, cyanide, and arsenic.

Not Available

1989-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

384

Waste treatment: Beverage industry. (Latest citations from Food Science & Technology Abstracts (FSTA)). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning waste treatment in the alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverage industries. Brewery effluent and wastewater management and disposal are reviewed. References cover aerobic treatment, sources of effluents, waste reduction, waste fermentation, effluent purification, and cost-effectiveness evaluation. The use of wastes for biogas production and for building material manufacture is examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Combination gas producing and waste-water disposal well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a waste-water disposal system for use in a gas recovery well penetrating a subterranean water-containing and methane gas-bearing coal formation. A cased bore hole penetrates the coal formation and extends downwardly therefrom into a further earth formation which has sufficient permeability to absorb the waste water entering the borehole from the coal formation. Pump means are disposed in the casing below the coal formation for pumping the water through a main conduit towards the water-absorbing earth formation. A barrier or water plug is disposed about the main conduit to prevent water flow through the casing except for through the main conduit. Bypass conduits disposed above the barrier communicate with the main conduit to provide an unpumped flow of water to the water-absorbing earth formation. One-way valves are in the main conduit and in the bypass conduits to provide flow of water therethrough only in the direction towards the water-absorbing earth formation.

Malinchak, Raymond M. (McKeesport, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Exploitation of olive mill wastewater and liquid cow manure for biogas production  

SciTech Connect

Co-digestion of organic waste streams is an innovative technology for the reduction of methane/greenhouse gas emissions. Different organic substrates are combined to generate a homogeneous mixture as input to the anaerobic reactor in order to increase process performance, realize a more efficient use of equipment and cost-sharing by processing multiple waste streams in a single facility. In this study, the potential of anaerobic digestion for the treatment of a mixture containing olive mill wastewater (OMW) and liquid cow manure (LCM) using a two-stage process has been evaluated by using two continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) under mesophilic conditions (35 {sup o}C) in order to separately monitor and control the processes of acidogenesis and methanogenesis. The overall process was studied with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 19 days. The digester was continuously fed with an influent composed (v/v) of 20% OMW and 80% LCM. The average removal of dissolved and total COD was 63.2% and 50%, respectively. The volatile solids (VS) removal was 34.2% for the examined mixture of feedstocks operating the system at an overall OLR of 3.63 g CODL{sub reactor}{sup -1}d{sup -1}. Methane production rate at the steady state reached 0.91 L CH{sub 4}L{sub reactor}{sup -1}d{sup -1} or 250.9 L CH{sub 4} at standard temperature and pressure conditions (STP) per kg COD fed to the system.

Dareioti, Margarita A.; Dokianakis, Spyros N.; Stamatelatou, Katerina; Zafiri, Constantina [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, 1 Karatheodori St., GR 26500 Patras (Greece); Kornaros, Michael, E-mail: kornaros@chemeng.upatras.g [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, 1 Karatheodori St., GR 26500 Patras (Greece)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Southwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Southwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Southwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Southwest www.southwestCHPTAP.org Christine Brinker Southwest Energy Efficiency Project 720-939-8333 cbrinker@swenergy.org Arizona Ina Road Water Pollution Control Facility, Tucson University of Arizona, Tucson View Energy and Environmental Analysis Inc.'s (EEA) database of all known CHP installations in Arizona. Colorado Metro Wastewater Reclamation District, Denver MillerCoors, Golden New Belgium Brewery, Fort Collins Trailblazer Pipeline, Fort Collins View EEA's database of all known CHP installations in Colorado.

388

ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF IN-SITU RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wastewater Genera ted in Shale Oil Development 9 BattelleControl Technology for Shale Oil Wastewaters 9 11 inPhyllis Fox INTRODUCTION Oil shale retorting produces from

Ossio, Edmundo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Transformation of Phosphorus Forms in the Construction Process of Phosphate Reduction System of Hypersaline and High-Phosphorus Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transformation of phosphorus forms in the construction process of biological phosphate reduction system was discussed in treating saline and high-phosphorus pickled mustard tuber wastewater to resolve problems encountered with present phosphorus removal ... Keywords: hypersaline and high-phosphorus wastewater, phosphate reduction, phosphorus balance, phosphorus forms

Chen Yao; Zhou Jian; Long Teng-rui; Li Zhi-gan

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

A case history of a coal gasification wastewater cooling tower at the Great Plains coal gasification project  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the conceptual process design of the Great Plains cooling water system, the fouling history of the cooling tower, and the results of the design modifications. In addition, general design guidelines for future wastewater reuse cooling towers are recommended. By following these guidelines, design engineers can minimize the risk of fouling that could impair a wastewater cooling tower's thermal performance.

Crocker, B.R.; Bromel, M.C.; Pontbriand, M.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

2002 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and Associated Documentation  

SciTech Connect

The 2002 Wastewater Land Application site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of the facilities during the 2002 permit year are discussed.

Meachum, Teresa Ray; Michael G. Lewis

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Decision support methodology using rule-based reasoning coupled to non-parametric measurement for industrial wastewater network management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EU water framework directive [Directive 2000/60/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 October 2000 Establishing a Framework for Community Action in the Field of Water Policy, Official Journal L 327, 22/12/2000 p. 0001-0073] encourages ... Keywords: Decision support methodology (DSM), Industrial wastewater network, UV spectra, Variability, WWTP, Wastewater quality controls

E. Dupuit; M. F. Pouet; O. Thomas; J. Bourgois

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Information; and Other Matters- Amount of Uranium in Liquid Waste Effluents, Treated Domestic Sanitary Wastewater Sampling, and Liquid Effluent Collection and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the AES exemption request related to commencement of construction (Ref. 2). On October 15, 2009, AES submitted the response to the NRC RAIs related to commencement of construction (Ref. 3). Subsequently, the NRC requested additional information regarding the AES response. Enclosure 1.1 provides the AES response to the additional information regarding preconstrucion activities requested by the NRC. Enclosure 2.1 provides the markup pages of the EREF ER. On August 10, 2009, the NRC transmitted to AES RAIs regarding the EREF Environmental Report (ER) (Ref. 4). On September 9, 2009, AES submitted the response to the NRC ER RAIs (Ref. 5). Subsequently, the NRC requested additional information regarding other matters including the amount of uranium in liquid waste effluents, treated domestic sanitary wastewater sampling, and Liquid Effluent Collection and Treatment System evaporator sediment sampling. Enclosure 1.2 provides the AES response regarding the amount of uranium in liquid waste effluent. There are no markup pages to the EREF ER for this response. Enclosure 1.3 provides the AES response regarding treated domestic sanitary wastewater sampling. Enclosure 2.2 provides the markup pages of the EREF ER. Enclosure 1.4 provides the AES

Eagle Rock; Enrichment Facility

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Membrane filtration waste treatment technology comes of age in battery manufacturing plants  

SciTech Connect

A new waste treatment system from MEMTEK Corporation incorporates membrane filtration, and makes possible the effective treatment of waste streams containing a number of toxic heavy metals. Using this membrane technology, MEMTEK is capable of treating the wastewater in battery manufacturing plants to meet even the strictest limits imposed by local regulatory agencies and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Lead and zinc in the treated effluent are typically below 0.1 ppm. The typical battery manufacturing processes introduce metals, primarily lead, into plant effluents, especially from formation, battery wash, and laundry operation. Due to the high usage of acid in the plant, the wastewater is also usually of a low pH, typically 2 or less. The dissolved and particulate contaminants in this effluent must be removed to very low levels before the water can be released to the sewer or the environment. The waste treatment process is described.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Region 9: Pacific Rim Region, Regional Sustainability Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REGION 9: PACIFIC RIM REGION REGION 9: PACIFIC RIM REGION Regional Sustainability Plan Presented by Ruth Cox Region 9 Regional Administrator Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) May 22 nd , 2013 REGION 9 INFORMATION MANAGE Federal space  36 million RSF in Region Nine * 173 owned buildings, 955 leased buildings * 100,000 Federal workers housed DESIGN & CONSTRUCT new Federal buildings $1.4 billion in FY12 capital construction projects $318 million in FY13 - Los Angeles Courthouse project PROVIDE PROCUREMENT LEADERSHIP across the Federal government  $1.24 billion in total GSA Schedule sales in FY12  $468 million to small businesses  34,000 fleet vehicles, 53% of which are Alternative Fuel Vehicles Pacific Rim Profile - CA, AZ, NV, HI

396

CX-000978: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Virginia Water Authority's Roanoke Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant Biogas Combined Heat and Power CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 02192010 Location(s): Roanoke...

397

Virginia | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Virginia Water Authority's Roanoke Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant Biogas Combined Heat and Power CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 02192010 Location(s): Roanoke...

398

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Virginia Water Authority's Roanoke Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant Biogas Combined Heat and Power CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 02192010 Location(s): Roanoke...

399

A selection framework for infrastructure condition monitoring technologies in water and wastewater networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global water sector faces significant challenges to maintain secure and reliable service provision in the context of ageing infrastructure, urban growth, and with investment capacity constrained by user affordability. As part of an on-going effort ... Keywords: Asset management, Condition monitoring, Intelligent Networks, Pipe networks, Water/wastewater

P. Davis; E. Sullivan; D. Marlow; D. Marney

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Role of fly ash in the removal of organic pollutants from wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash, a relatively abundant and inexpensive material, is currently being investigated as an adsorbent for the removal of various organic pollutants from wastewater. The wastewater contains various types of phenolic compounds, such as chloro, nitro, amino, and other substituted compounds. Various types of pesticides, such as lindane, malathion, carbofuran, etc., and dyes, such as, methylene blue, crystal violet, malachite green, etc., are also present in the wastewater. These contaminants pollute the water stream. These organic pollutants, such as phenolic compounds, pesticides, and dyes, etc., can be removed very effectively using fly ash as adsorbent. This article presents a detailed review on the role of fly ash in the removal of organic pollutants from wastewater. Adsorption of various pollutants using fly ash has been reviewed. The adsorption mechanism and other influencing factors, favorable conditions, and competitive ions, etc., on the adsorption process have also been discussed in this paper. It is evident from the review that fly ash has demonstrated good removal capabilities for various organic compounds. 171 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

M. Ahmaruzzaman [National Institute of Technology, Silchar (India). Department of Chemistry

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Design and study of a risk management criterion for an unstable anaerobic wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an unstable biological process used for wastewater treat- ment. This anaerobic digestion ecosystem can have steady-state to another. This is especially the case for the anaerobic digestion process: a more and more There exists numerous dynamical models for anaerobic digestion, from the basic ones considering only one

Bernard, Olivier

402

SewerSnort: A drifting sensor for in situ Wastewater Collection System gas monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biochemical reactions that occur in sewer pipes produce a considerable amount of hydrogen sulfide gas (H"2S corrosive and poisonous), methane gas (CH"4 explosive and a major climate change contributor), carbon dioxide (CO"2 a major climate change contributor), ... Keywords: Biochemical process, Electrochemical gas sensor, Mobile sensing, Received signal strength indicator based localization, Wastewater Collection System

Jung Soo Lim, Jihyoung Kim, Jonathan Friedman, Uichin Lee, Luiz Vieira, Diego Rosso, Mario Gerla, Mani B. Srivastava

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Treatability studies on different refinery wastewater samples using high-throughput microbial electrolysis cells (MECs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the first time. Bioelectrochemical treatability was evaluated relative to oxygen demand. MECs were-oiled refinery wastewater sample from one site (DOW1) produced the best results, with 2.1 ± 0.2 A/m2 (maximum current density), 79% chemical oxygen demand removal, and 82% headspace biological oxygen demand removal

404

Anaerobic Baffled Reactor (ABR) for Alkali-minimization Dyeing-printing Wastewater Biodegradation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of the laboratory scale anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) was investigated by the use of granular sludge to treat alkali-minimization and dyeing-printing wastewater (ADW-water). The experiment showed that the start-up of reactor was completed ... Keywords: ABR, ADW-water, Granular sludge, UV254, VFA

Qijun Zhong; Bo Yang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Conversion of oil shale ash into zeolite for cadmium and lead removal from wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversion of oil shale ash into zeolite for cadmium and lead removal from wastewater Reyad; available online 29 October 2003 Abstract A by-product fly ash from oil shale processing was converted shale; Ash; Zeolite; Cadmium and lead removal 1. Introduction Oil shale exists in Jordan with large

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

406

Impacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania Nathaniel R compositions of the effluents reflect the composition of Marcellus Shale produced waters. The discharge to concentrations in Marcellus Shale produced waters. Nonetheless, 226 Ra levels in stream sediments (544-8759 Bq

Jackson, Robert B.

407

Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration. 1 fig.

Smith, D.D.; Hiller, J.M.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

408

Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration.

Smith, Douglas D. (Knoxville, TN); Hiller, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Influence of Pathological Nodal Status and Maximal Standardized Uptake Value of the Primary Tumor and Regional Lymph Nodes on Treatment Plans in Patients With Advanced Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: A better understanding of the prognostic factors in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) may optimize the therapeutic approach. In this study, we sought to investigate whether the combination of clinical information, pathologic results, and preoperative maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) at the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes might improve the prognostic stratification in this patient group. Methods and Materials: A total of 347 consecutive OSCC patients were investigated. All participants underwent fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography within 2 weeks before surgery and neck dissection. The duration of follow-up was at least 24 months in all surviving patients. The optimal cutoff values for SUVmax at the primary tumor (SUVtumor-max) and regional lymph nodes (SUVnodal-max) were selected according to the 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate. Independent prognosticators were identified by Cox regression analysis. Results: In multivariate analysis, a cutoff SUVtumor-max of 8.6, a cutoff SUVnodal-max of 5.7, and the presence of pathologic lymph node metastases were found to be significant prognosticators for the 5-year DFS. A scoring system using these three prognostic factors was formulated to define distinct prognostic groups. The 5-year rates for patients with a score between 0 and 3 were as follows: neck control, 94%, 86%, 77%, 59% (p < 0.0001); distant metastases, 1%, 7%, 22%, 47% (p < 0.0001); disease-specific survival, 93%, 85%, 61%, 36%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Based on the study findings, the combined evaluation of pathologic node status and SUVmax at the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes may improve prognostic stratification in OSCC patients.

Liao, C.-T. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Head and Neck Oncology Group, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Wang, H.-M. [Department of Head and Neck Oncology Group, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Lin, C.-Y. [Department of Head and Neck Oncology Group, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Ng, S.-H. [Department of Head and Neck Oncology Group, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Huang, S.-F.; Chen, I.-H. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Head and Neck Oncology Group, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Hsueh Chuen; Lee, L.-Y. [Department of Head and Neck Oncology Group, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, C.-H. [Department of Head and Neck Oncology Group, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Electrochemical degradation characteristics of refractory organic pollutants in coking wastewater on multiwall carbon nanotube-modified electrode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The multiwall carbon nanotube-mollified electrode (MWCNT-ME) was fabricated and its electrocatalytic activity of refractory organic pollutants of coking wastewater was investigated. The surface morphology, absorption properties, and the electrochemical ...

Yan Wang; Shujing Sun; Guifu Ding; Hong Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Evaluation of the Origin of Dissolved Organic Carbon and the Treatability of Mercury in Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regulations for reducing the dissolved mercury (Hg) concentrations in wastewater discharged by electric generating power plants are becoming more stringent via federal regulatory limits proposed by the EPA and regulatory limits set by select states. Data obtained in a previous EPRI study conducted in 2009 suggested a potential negative impact of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and iodide concentrations present in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater on mercury treatability (EPRI report 1019867). ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

412

Ocean current observations near McMurdo Station, Antarctica from 1991 to 1993: Relation to wastewater discharge dispersal  

SciTech Connect

Analyses of ocean currents in the vicinity of McMurdo Station, Antarctica, are relevant to the transport and dispersal of wastewater from the McMurdo Station sewage outfall pipe. Observations of ocean currents during the initial phases of this study have been presented by Howington and McFeters. These studies, using coliform bacterial counts as an indicator of dispersion of the wastewater plume and current meters to measure flow patterns, indicated that dispersal of the plume by local currents does not effectively remove the plume from the vicinity of McMurdo Sound, under the present outfall pipe location. Moreover, these studies suggest that, although the flow pattern is generally consistent with transport of the plume away from McMurdo Station, episodes of current reversal are sufficient to transport the wastewater plume along the shore toward the southeast, eventually overlapping the seawater intake area near the McMurdo jetty. Several concerns included (a) impacts of wastewater inputs to nearshore benthic and pelagic habitats adjacent to McMurdo Station, (b) effects of wastewater input to the McMurdo Station fresh water intake source, and (c) reduction in human impacts on the McMurdo Sound ecosystem. These concerns motivated studies to characterize nearshore currents more extensively in relation to dispersal of the wastewater plume. This report discusses analysis results of current observations from November 1992 to November 1993.

Barry, J.P. [J. P. Consulting, Monterey, CA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

National and Regional Water and Wastewater Rates For Use in Cost-Benefit Models and Evaluations of Water Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

excel/aeotab_19.xls Fisher, D.C. , and J.D. Lutz. Water andWaste Water Tariffs for New Residential Construction inNational Association of Clean Water Agencies. 2005 Financial

Fisher, Diane C.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Melody, Moya

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

National and Regional Water and Wastewater Rates For Use in Cost-Benefit Models and Evaluations of Water Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a weighted average of the utility’s rate for its first andsurvey asks about the utility’s rate structure (flat vs.0 for all 41 of the flat-rate utilities, was $0.74 per unit.

Fisher, Diane C.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Melody, Moya

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

National and Regional Water and Wastewater Rates For Use in Cost-Benefit Models and Evaluations of Water Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the savings realized by water conservation or efficiencythe benefits and costs of water conservation or efficiencycost savings from water conservation requires knowing the

Fisher, Diane C.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Melody, Moya

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Sludge recycle and reuse in acid mine drainage treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutralization of acid mine drainage produces vast quantities of iron-rich sludge, and large quantities of unused lime remain in the sludge after treatment. In a study in which sludge was recycled to increase lime utilization, sludge was mixed with raw acid mine drainage and settled out in an intermediate clarifier. The clarifier supernatant was then treated by lime addition, aeration and sedimentation. The low-pH sludge was withdrawn from the intermediate clarifier. The iron was recovered by acidification and used as wastewater coagulant. The recycle scheme resulted in a 30% decrease in lime requirements, and the resultant coagulant performed well when compared with stock iron coagulant solutions.

Keefer, G.B.; Sack, W.A.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Laboratory Protocol to Demonstrate Equivalency for Plant Wastewater Cotreatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adding chemical metal-cleaning wastes to ash ponds can be an inexpensive, effective method for removing contaminant metals from both wastes and ponds.This proposed laboratory protocol defines steps for determining the usefulness of ash pond comixing on a case-by-case basis and for demonstrating the equivalency of comixing with dedicated waste treatment, as required by EPA.

1987-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

418

Evaluation of treated wastewater for the production of Syngonium podophyllum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to evaluate the use of reclaimed water for the irrigation of nursery and floral crops. On the first phase of the research, a survey of several sources of reclaimed water was done. The quality of waters surveyed differed widely. Total soluble solids (salinity) of waters surveyed was found in the range of 438 mg/l and 1978 mg/I. Therefore, classification of reclaimed water according to its salt content varied from extremely saline to non-saline. Trace elements did not represent a risk in any of the waters. In the second phase of the research, 5 combinations of reclaimed water with reverse osmosis water were evaluated on the irrigation of Syngonium podophyllum. There was a significant difference between treatments for the variables plant height, width, growth index, and quality. Fresh weight and dry weight of treatments were not significantly different. The control (100% reverse osmosis water) was the treatment with the highest growth yields. Treatment with the lowest growth yields was 1 00% reclaimed water. Electrical conductivity and pH of irrigation solution were significantly different within treatments and also varied overtime. In the third phase of the research, a 1: 1 combination of reclaimed water:reverse osmosis water with different fertility regimes was evaluated on the irrigation of Syngonium. Treatments were 1 00 mg/l N, 200 mg/l N, 300 mg/l N, and 400 mg/l N. Electrical conductivity of treatments at the beginning of the experiments were 1. 1 8 mS/cm, 1.87 mS/cm, 2.37 mS/cm, and 3.20 mS/cm. Results show significant difference for all parameters evaluated (plant height, width, growth index, and quality). Plants irrigated with the lowest fertility regime had the highest growth yield averages. Averages decreased as the fertility regime increased. In the last phase of the research, coliform levels were evaluated in growing medium of Syngonium plants and in the irrigation solution. Although reclaimed water used, coming from secondary effluent, was not disinfected, coliform colonies diminished to undetectable levels in a relatively short period of time (1-14 days).

Garza Morton, Jose Antonio

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Regional companies eye growth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional companies eye growth Regional companies eye growth Adaptive Radio Technologies, Los Alamos Visualization Associates, Mesa Tech International Inc., and ThermaSun Inc. were...

420

REGIONAL ASSESSMENT PROGRAM MASTER Regional Issue Identification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from these Federal Region totals. Energy sources addressed were coal, nuclear, oil, oil shale, gas, geothermal, . - - - hydroelectric and solar. Six of the national laboratories,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Laboratory Evaluation of Novel Trace Element Removal Technologies for Wet FGD Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems can remove a wide range of trace elements, such as mercury, selenium, arsenic, and others from the flue gas. Some trace elements leave the FGD system with solid byproduct streams, but a portion generally leaves as dissolved species in the FGD chloride purge stream. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) effluent limitation guidelines and state or local regulations generally limit the quantities of these trace species in wastewater discharges from ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

Water Research 39 (2005) 49614968 Electricity generation from swine wastewater using microbial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) (maximum power density of 45 mW/m2 ). More extensive tests with a single-chambered air cathode MFC produced a maximum power density with the animal wastewater of 261 mW/m2 (200 O, with a maximum power density of Pmax ¼ 225 mW=m2 (fixed 1000 O resistor) and half-saturation concentration of Ks

423

Achieving very low mercury levels in refinery wastewater by membrane filtration.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microfiltration (MF), ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were evaluated for their ability to achieve the world's most stringent Hg discharge criterion (oil refinery's wastewater. The membrane processes were operated at three different pressures to demonstrate the potential for each membrane technology to achieve the targeted effluent mercury concentrations. The presence of mercury in the particulate form in the refinery wastewater makes the use of MF and UF membrane technologies more attractive in achieving very low mercury levels in the treated wastewater. Both NF and RO were also able to meet the target mercury concentration at lower operating pressures (20.7 bar). However, higher operating pressures ({ge}34.5 bar) had a significant effect on NF and RO flux and fouling rates, as well as on permeate quality. SEM images of the membranes showed that pore blockage and narrowing were the dominant fouling mechanisms for the MF membrane while surface coverage was the dominant fouling mechanism for the other membranes. The correlation between mercury concentration and particle size distribution was also investigated to understand mercury removal mechanisms by membrane filtration. The mean particle diameter decreased with filtration from 1.1 {+-} 0.0 {micro}m to 0.74 {+-} 0.2 {micro}m after UF.

Urgun Demirtas, M.; Benda, P.; Gillenwater, P. S.; Negri, M. C.; Xiong, H.; Snyder, S. W. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( ES)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Anaerobic Co-digestion of Chicken Processing Wastewater and Crude Glycerol from Biodiesel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of this thesis was to study the anaerobic digestion (AD) of wastewater from a chicken processing facility and of crude glycerol from local biodiesel operations. The AD of these substrates was conducted in bench-scale reactors operated in the batch mode at 35°C. The secondary objective was to evaluate two sources of glycerol as co-substrates for AD to determine if different processing methods for the glycerol had an effect on CH? production. The biogas yields were higher for co-digestion than for digestion of wastewater alone, with average yields at 1 atmosphere and 0°C of 0.555 and 0.540 L (g VS added)?¹, respectively. Another set of results showed that the glycerol from an on-farm biodiesel operation had a CH? yield of 0.702 L (g VS added)?¹, and the glycerol from an industrial/commercial biodiesel operation had a CH? yield of 0.375 L (g VS added)?¹. Therefore, the farm glycerol likely had more carbon content than industrial glycerol. It was believed that the farm glycerol had more impurities, such as free fatty acids, biodiesel and methanol. In conclusion, anaerobic co-digestion of chicken processing wastewater and crude glycerol was successfully applied to produce biogas rich in CH?.

Foucault, Lucas Jose

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

File:Individual wastewater permit packet s-7.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Individual wastewater permit packet s-7.pdf Individual wastewater permit packet s-7.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:Individual wastewater permit packet s-7.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 423 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 33 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 09:34, 24 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 09:34, 24 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 33 pages (423 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup

426

Fuel from wastewater : harnessing a potential energy source in Canada through the co-location of algae biofuel production to sources of effluent, heat and CO2.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is collaborating with the National Research Council (NRC) Canada and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a decision-support model that will evaluate the tradeoffs associated with high-latitude algae biofuel production co-located with wastewater, CO2, and waste heat. This project helps Canada meet its goal of diversifying fuel sources with algae-based biofuels. The biofuel production will provide a wide range of benefits including wastewater treatment, CO2 reuse and reduction of demand for fossil-based fuels. The higher energy density in algae-based fuels gives them an advantage over crop-based biofuels as the 'production' footprint required is much less, resulting in less water consumed and little, if any conversion of agricultural land from food to fuel production. Besides being a potential source for liquid fuel, algae have the potential to be used to generate electricity through the burning of dried biomass, or anaerobically digested to generate methane for electricity production. Co-locating algae production with waste streams may be crucial for making algae an economically valuable fuel source, and will certainly improve its overall ecological sustainability. The modeling process will address these questions, and others that are important to the use of water for energy production: What are the locations where all resources are co-located, and what volumes of algal biomass and oil can be produced there? In locations where co-location does not occur, what resources should be transported, and how far, while maintaining economic viability? This work is being funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Biomass Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and is part of a larger collaborative effort that includes sampling, strain isolation, strain characterization and cultivation being performed by the NREL and Canada's NRC. Results from the NREL / NRC collaboration including specific productivities of selected algal strains will eventually be incorporated into this model.

Passell, Howard David; Whalen, Jake (SmartWhale Consulting, Dartmouth, NS, CA); Pienkos, Philip P. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); O'Leary, Stephen J. (National Research Council Canada, Institute for Marine Biosciences, Halifax, NS, CA); Roach, Jesse Dillon; Moreland, Barbara D.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Waste Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...rates, and batch collection volume requirements Water conservation possibilities What is required to meet discharge limits Availability and type of treatment chemicals How sludge will be dewatered, dried, and disposed...

428

North American Regional Reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1997, during the late stages of production of NCEP-NCAR Global Reanalysis (GR), exploration of a regional reanalysis project was suggested by the GR project's Advisory Committee, “particularly if the RDAS [Regional Data Assimilation System] is ...

Fedor Mesinger; Geoff DiMego; Eugenia Kalnay; Kenneth Mitchell; Perry C. Shafran; Wesley Ebisuzaki; Dušan Jovi?; Jack Woollen; Eric Rogers; Ernesto H. Berbery; Michael B. Ek; Yun Fan; Robert Grumbine; Wayne Higgins; Hong Li; Ying Lin; Geoff Manikin; David Parrish; Wei Shi

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Regional hydrothermal commercialization plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan for the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range Region articulates the complete range of initiatives (federal, state, local, and industrial) required for the early commercialization of the regions geothermal resources. (MHR)

1978-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

430

Anaerobic treatment in decentralised and source ... - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

and biogas production provide good biomass- wastewater contact. Reductions of total COD from sewage up to 80–90% are reported. At tem- peratures above ...

431

Water and Sustainability (Volume 4): U.S. Electricity Consumption for Water Supply and Treatment -- The Next Half Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fast growing demand for clean, fresh water -- coupled with the need to protect and enhance the environment -- has made many areas of the United States and the rest of the world vulnerable to water shortages for various human uses. As they interact with the electricity industry, these uses encompass agricultural irrigation, thermoelectric generation, municipal water/wastewater treatment and distribution, and industrial processes. The dependency of electricity supply and demand on water availability ca...

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Western Regional Partnership Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regional Partnership Overview Regional Partnership Overview June 2013 Briefing Overview  WRP Background  Importance of Region  WRP Tribal Relations Committee  WRP Energy Committee WRP Region's Uniqueness  5 states stretching from the Great Plains to the Pacific Ocean  Diverse terrain ranging from desert valleys to forested mountains  Significant State Trust Landholdings  Approximately 188 Federally recognized Tribes  Significant amounts of Federally managed land  According to GSA 2004 study, WRP states range from 41.8% - 84.5% of total state land WRP Region's Importance to DoD  Extensive Training Ranges  Interconnected ground/air ranges provide unmatched warfighter training opportunities

433

Regional Comparisons, Spatial Aggregation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Regional Comparisons, Spatial Aggregation, and Asymmetry of Price Pass-Through in U.S. Gasoline Markets MICHAEL YE*, JOHN ZYREN**, JOANNE SHORE**, AND MICHAEL BURDETTE** Abstract Spot to retail price pass-through behavior of the U.S. gasoline market was investigated at the national and regional levels, using weekly wholesale and retail motor gasoline prices from January 2000 to the present. Asymmetric pass-through was found across all regions, with faster pass-through when prices are rising. Pass-through patterns, in terms of speed and time for completion, were found to vary from region to region. Spatial aggregation was investigated at the national level and the East Coast with the aggregated cumulative pass-through being greater than the volume-weighted regional pass-through when spot prices increase. These results are useful to the petroleum industry, consumers,

434

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

40 CFR Part 419 Petroleum Refining Point Source Category.40 CFR Part 419 Petroleum Refining Point Source Category.source, and operating procedures (Wang 2005). Petroleum

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

your Power. (2008). "Demand Response Programs." RetrievedUsing Open Automated Demand Response, Lawrence Berkeley2008). "What is Demand Response?" Retrieved 10/10/2008, from

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Biogas production from broiler manure, wastewater treatment plant sludge, and greenhouse waste by anaerobic co-digestion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inappropriate management of organic wastes can cause serious damage to the environment by polluting water and air

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission. (2008). "Anaerobic Digestion." Retrieved AugustRENEWABLE / BIOMASS / ANAEROBIC DIGESTION /. CaliforniaResearch: Biomass - Anaerobic Digestion." Retrieved December

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A byproduct of this process is biogas which contains 50– 70%Partners LLC 2007). This biogas can be used to generate heatmethane fermentation and biogas recovery (Green 1995).

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Processing Industry Energy Efficiency Initiative, CaliforniaK. (2004). Bringing Energy Efficiency to the Water andAgricultural/Water End-Use Energy Efficiency Program. Lyco

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

DOH Publication #337-016Water Conserving On-site Wastewater Treatment Systems- Recommended Standards and Guidance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For persons with disabilities, this document is available upon request in other formats. To submit a request, please call 1-888-586-9427 (TDD/TTY 1-800-833-6388). Para personas discapacitadas, este documento está disponible a su pedido en otros formatos.

On-site Wastewater; Mary Selecky

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to remove large quantities of oil and grease. Wastewateroils, and feedstocks for the petrochemical industry (Benyahia 2006). Petroleum refining uses large quantities

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Wetland treatment of oil and gas well wastewaters. Quarterly technical report, November 25, 1993--March 24, 1994  

SciTech Connect

In the third quarterly report, adsorption of heavy metals ions such as Cu(II) and Cr(VI) onto soils drawn from the laboratory-type wetland (LW) was shown to be weak. On the other hand, it was shown that modified-clays did adsorb Cr(VI) ions strongly at pH 4.5. Further, studies on the pH dependence of the adsorption of {beta}-naphthoic acid, (NA), a well-documented contaminant in many oil and gas well waste waters (4), onto modified-clays were undertaken and it was shown that uptake of NA by modified-clays was of the high affinity type at pH 4.5 and 7.0, but weak at pH 9.0. Adsorption of heavy metal ions, Cu{sup 2+}, and CR(VI) onto algae, a proposed wetland amendment, was carried out and the results were presented and discussed in the fourth quarterly report. Studies on the dynamics of uptake of phenol and NA by laboratory-type wetlands (LWs) were initiated and preliminary results indicated that both phenol and NA were sorbed onto components of LWs. A mass balance model has been developed to quantify the fate of phenol in LWs. The model is based on the postulate that the fate of phenol in LWs can be attributed to a combination of (1) evaporation of solute and solvent, (2) adsorption of phenol onto various components of LW and (3) its biodegradation, both in solution and at solid-liquid interface. As an initial approximation, the latter two processes have been lumped together and incorporated into the model as an unit operation. Both zero order and first order kinetics for the disappearance of phenol have been considered. Evaporative losses of water and phenol have also been taken into account and this model is presented and discussed in this quarterly report.

Kadlec, R.H.; Srinivasan, K.R.

1994-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Wetland treatment of oil and gas well wastewaters. Quarterly technical report, May 25, 1993-August 24, 1993  

SciTech Connect

In the third quarterly report adsorption of heavy metals ions such as Cu(II) and Cr(VI) onto soils drawn from the laboratory-type wetland was shown to be weak. Secondly, it was shown that modified-clays did adsorb Cr(VI) ions strongly at pH 4.5. Further, studies on the pH dependence of the adsorption of {beta}-naphthoic acid, (NA), a well-documented contaminant in many oil and gas well waste waters onto modified-clays were undertaken and it was shown that uptake of NA by modified-clays was of the high affinity type at pH 4.5 and 7.0, but weak at pH 9.0. Adsorption of heavy metal ions, Cu{sup 2+}, and Cr(VI) onto algae, a proposed wetland amendment, was carried out and the results were presented and discussed in the fourth quarterly report. Uptake of NA by the soil component of the laboratory-type wetland was monitored as a function of pH. This quarterly report presents results from studies on the uptake of phenol and {beta}-naphthoic acid by laboratory-type wetlands designed and built during the earlier phases of this study. The uptake of phenol by the wetlands is quite rapid, and nearly complete in 50 hours, but it was also found that evaporative losses of phenol from the supernatant water during the same time period was considerable. On the other hand, {beta}-naphthoic acid (NA) is sorbed quite slowly and there was no indication of evaporative losses in the case on NA.

1993-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

444

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

units per 100 mL Oil and Grease TSS Source: EnvironmentalTSS removal pH pH Oil and Grease mg/L Source: CaliforniaOil and Grease Phenolic compounds Ammonia Sulfide Total chromium Hexavalent chromium pH Source:

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Treatment of landfill leachate and municipal wastewater in subsurface flow filters using mineralized peat and hydrated oil shale ash.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Käesoleva doktoritöö eesmärgiks on kindlaks teha hästi mineraliseerunud turba (edaspidi turba) ja kaltsiumirikka hüdratiseerunud põlevkivituha (edaspidi tuha) efektiivsus prügila nõrgveest ja olmereoveest erinevate reoainete, eelkõige… (more)

Kõiv, Margit

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Regional Education Partners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Northern New Mexico and LANL through effective partnerships with regional secondary and higher education organizations, businesses and industry. Contact Executive Office Director...

447

Regional Climate Information & Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information & Modeling Print E-mail The specific impacts and vulnerabilities posed by climate change are largely defined by regional differences 9in things like geography,...

448

Developing a Regional Recovery Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract A biological attack would present an unprecedented challenge for local, state, and federal agencies; the military; the private sector; and individuals on many fronts ranging from vaccination and treatment to prioritization of cleanup actions to waste disposal. To prepare the Seattle region to recover from a biological attack, the Seattle Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) partners collaborated with military and federal agencies to develop a Regional Recovery Framework for a Biological Attack in the Seattle Urban Area. The goal was to reduce the time and resources required to recover and restore wide urban areas, military installations, and other critical infrastructure following a biological incident by providing a coordinated systems approach. Based on discussions in small workshops, tabletop exercises, and interviews with emergency response agency staff, the partners identified concepts of operation for various areas to address critical issues the region will face as recovery progresses. Key to this recovery is the recovery of the economy. Although the Framework is specific to a catastrophic, wide-area biological attack using anthrax, it was designed to be flexible and scalable so it could also serve as the recovery framework for an all-hazards approach. The Framework also served to coalesce policy questions that must be addressed for long-term recovery. These questions cover such areas as safety and health, security, financial management, waste management, legal issues, and economic development.

Lesperance, Ann M.; Olson, Jarrod; Stein, Steven L.; Clark, Rebecca; Kelly, Heather; Sheline, Jim; Tietje, Grant; Williamson, Mark; Woodcock, Jody

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Evaluation of Trenchless Installation Technology for Radioactive Wastewater Piping Applications  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) cleanup mission at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) includes dispositioning facilities, contaminated legacy materials/waste, and contamination sources and remediation of soil under facilities, groundwater, and surface water to support final Records of Decision (RODs). The Integrated Facilities Disposition Project (IFDP) is a roughly $15B project for completion of the EM mission at Oak Ridge, with a project duration of up to 35 years. The IFDP Mission Need Statement - Critical Decision-0 (CD-0) - was approved by DOE in July 2007, and the IFDP Alternative Selection and Cost Range - Critical Decision-1 (CD-1) - was approved in November 2008. The IFDP scope includes reconfiguration of waste collection and treatment systems as needed to complete the IFDP remediation and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) missions in a safe and cost-effective manner while maintaining compliance with all governing regulations and bodies and preserving the support of continuing operations at ORNL. A step in the CD-1 approval process included an external technical review (ETR) of technical approaches proposed in the CD-1 document related to the facility reconfiguration for the ORNL radioactive waste and liquid low-level waste management systems. The ETR team recommended that the IFDP team consider the use of trenchless technologies for installing pipelines underground in and around contaminated sites as part of the alternatives evaluations required in support of the CD-2 process. The team specifically recommended evaluating trenchless technologies for installing new pipes in existing underground pipelines as an alternative to conventional open trench installation methods. Potential benefits could include reduction in project costs, less costly underground piping, fewer disruptions of ongoing and surface activities, and lower risk for workers. While trenchless technologies have been used extensively in the sanitary sewer and natural gas pipeline industries, they have been used far less in contaminated environments. Although trenchless technologies have been used at ORNL in limited applications to install new potable water and gas lines, the technologies have not been used in radioactive applications. This study evaluates the technical risks, benefits, and economics for installing gravity drained and pressurized piping using trenchless technologies compared to conventional installation methods for radioactive applications under ORNL geological conditions. A range of trenchless installation technologies was reviewed for this report for general applicability for replacing existing contaminated piping and/or installing new pipelines in potentially contaminated areas. Installation methods that were determined to have potential for use in typical ORNL contaminated environments were then evaluated in more detail for three specific ORNL applications. Each feasible alternative was evaluated against the baseline conventional open trench installation method using weighted criteria in the areas of environment, safety, and health (ES&H); project cost and schedule; and technical operability. The formulation of alternatives for evaluation, the development of selection criteria, and the scoring of alternatives were performed by ORNL staff with input from vendors and consultants. A description of the evaluation methodology and the evaluation results are documented in the following sections of this report.

Robinson, Sharon M [ORNL; Jubin, Robert Thomas [ORNL; Patton, Bradley D [ORNL; Sullivan, Nicholas M [ORNL; Bugbee, Kathy P [ORNL

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Generalized Region Connection Calculus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Region Connection Calculus (RCC) is one of the most widely referenced system of high-level (qualitative) spatial reasoning. RCC assumes a continuous representation of space. This contrasts sharply with the fact that spatial information obtained from ... Keywords: (Generalized) Boolean connection algebra, (Generalized) Region Connection Calculus, Continuous space, Discrete space, Mereology, Mereotopology, Qualitative spatial reasoning

Sanjiang Li; Mingsheng Ying

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION CATALYST TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) main treatment train includes the peroxide destruction module (PDM) where the hydrogen peroxide residual from the upstream ultraviolet light/hydrogen peroxide oxidation unit is destroyed. Removal of the residual peroxide is necessary to protect downstream membranes from the strong oxidizer. The main component of the PDM is two reaction vessels utilizing granular activated carbon (GAC) as the reaction media. The PDM experienced a number of operability problems, including frequent plugging, and has not been utilized since the ETF changed to groundwater as the predominant feed. The unit seemed to be underperforming in regards to peroxide removal during the early periods of operation as well. It is anticipated that a functional PDM will be required for wastewater from the vitrification plant and other future streams. An alternate media or methodology needs to be identified to replace the GAC in the PDMs. This series of bench scale tests is to develop information to support an engineering study on the options for replacement of the existing GAC method for peroxide destruction at the ETF. A number of different catalysts will be compared as well as other potential methods such as strong reducing agents. The testing should lead to general conclusions on the viability of different catalysts and identify candidates for further study and evaluation.

HALGREN DL

2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

452

CNT Case Studies for WHERAN 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... One simulates releases to water (0% wastewater treatment removal) ... wastewater treatment sludge followed by 100% desorption from ...

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

453

the Regional Development Corporation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carry out this work, CPO partners carry out this work, CPO partners with the Los Alamos National Laboratory Foundation for education, the Regional Development Corporation for economic development, and the regional United Way organizations for community giving. Education Los Alamos National Security (LANS) invests more than $1 million each year to enhance regional educational opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education. Education Focus Areas Our education commitments address four focus areas: * Workforce Development * Student Internships * Teacher and Faculty Professional Development * Public Understanding of Science In 2011, more than 1,100 students

454

Organic constituents in sour condensates from shale-oil and petroleum-crude runs at Sohio's Toledo refinery: identification and wastewater-control-technology considerations  

SciTech Connect

Samples of sour condensate generated from the continuous processing of both crude shale oil and petroleum crude were collected and extracted with methylene chloride. The extracts were analyzed using capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry at Argonne National Laboratory and Radian Corporation. Qualitatively, the predominant types of organic compounds present in the shale-oil sour condensate were pyridines and anilines; semiquantitatively, these compounds were present at a concentration of 5.7 ppM, or about 78% of the total concentration of components detected. In contrast, straight-chain alkanes were the predominant types of compounds found in the sour condensate produced during isocracking of conventional crude oil. The approximate concentration of straight-chain alkanes, 8.3 ppM, and of other branched and/or unsaturated hydrocarbons, 6.8 ppM, amounted to 88% of the total concentration of components detected in the sour condensate from the petroleum-crude run. Nitrogen compounds in the shale-oil sour condensate may necessitate alterations of the sour water and refinery wastewater-treatment facilities to provide for organics degradation and to accommodate the potentially greater ammonia loadings. This would include use of larger amounts of caustic to enhance ammonia removal by steam stripping. Possible problems associated with biological removal of organic-nitrogen compounds should be investigated in future experimental shale-oil refining runs.

Wingender, R J; Harrison, W; Raphaelian, L A

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Regional Planning | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Planning Regional Planning Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Regional Planning Efforts Alias (field_alias) Apply California, Oregon, Washington Regional Ocean Partnership West Coast Governors' Alliance Regional Data Portal In Development U.S. Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico Regional Ocean Partnership U.S. Caribbean Regional Ocean Partnership-currently being formally established Regional Data Portal To be developed Georgia, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina Regional Ocean Partnership Governors' South Atlantic Alliance Regional Data Portal Currently in development American Samoa, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Marshall Islands, Palau

456

Regional Competitions - EERE Commercialization Office  

Regional Competitions. Six Regional Clean Energy Business Plan Competitions are taking place across the country– representing all of the United ...

457

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Review Meeting October 12-14, 2005 Table of Contents Agenda PDF-1438KB Phase I Program Review Meeting Phase II Kick-Off Meeting Phase...

458

Regional and Global Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products > Regional/Global Products > Regional/Global Regional and Global Data Biogeochemical Dynamics Data Regional and global biogeochemical dynamics data can be used to improve our understanding of the structure and function of various ecosystems; to enable prediction across spatial and temporal scales; and to parameterize and validate terrestrial ecosystem models. The ORNL DAAC compiles, archives, and distributes more than 150 products from the following projects: Climate Collections Hydroclimatology Collections ISLSCP II Project Net Primary Productivity (NPP) River Discharge (RIVDIS) Russian Land Cover (RLC) Soil Collections Vegetation Collections Vegetation-Ecosystem Modeling (VEMAP) Climate Collections Climate collections include measured and modeled values for variables such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, radiation, wind velocity, and

459

Regional Climate Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Workshop on Regional Climate Research: Needs and Opportunities was held 2–4 April 2001 at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado. The workshop was cosponsored by the National Science Foundation and the Department of ...

L. Ruby Leung; Linda O. Mearns; Filippo Giorgi; Robert L. Wilby

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Regional Climate Information & Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is a series of six region-specific adaptation tools for the coastal communities in Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, the Solomon Islands, Timor-Leste, and Papua New Guinea....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional wastewater treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Sections / Geographical Regions Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Sections provide a local forum for fats and oils professionals. Building a Stronger Global Association Sections / Geographical Regions Information Divisions achievement agricultural analytical application award awards biotechnology detergents

462

16S rRNA-Based Tag Pyrosequencing of Complex Food and Wastewater Environments: Microbial Diversity and Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental microbiology has traditionally been performed using culture-based methods. However, in the last few decades, the emergence of molecular methods has changed the field considerably. The latest development in this area has been the introduction of next-generation sequencing, including pyrosequencing. These technologies allow the massively parallel sequencing of millions of DNA strands and represent a major development in sequencing technologies. The purpose of this study was to use both pyrosequencing and traditional culture-based techniques to investigate the diversity and dynamics of bacterial populations within milk and untreated sewage sludge samples. Pasteurized and raw milk samples were collected from grocery stores and dairies within Texas. Milk samples were analyzed by plating, pyrosequencing, and an assay for the presence of cell-cell signaling molecules. Samples were processed, stored, and then evaluated again for spoilage microflora. The results of this study showed that raw milk had a considerably higher bacterial load, more diversity between samples, and a significantly higher concentration of pathogens than pasteurized milk. Additionally, this study provided evidence for varying spoilage microflora between raw and pasteurized milk, as well as evidence for the production of cell-cell signaling molecules by bacterial organisms involved in milk spoilage. Four samplings of untreated sewage sludge were collected from wastewater treatment plants in seven different municipalities across the United States. Samples were subjected to quantification of selected bacterial organisms by culture and a pyrosequencing analysis was performed on extracted community DNA. The results of this study showed that untreated sewage sludge is inhabited by a huge diversity of microorganisms and that certain municipalities may have distinct bacterial populations that are conserved over time. Additionally, this study provided some evidence for seasonal differences in several of the major bacterial phyla. Lastly, this study emphasized the challenges of comparing results obtained by culture and pyrosequencing. In conclusion, this study showed that both milk and sewage are highly diverse, dynamic environments that can contain organisms of public health concern. The use of both culture-based methods and pyrosequencing in this study proved a complementary approach, providing a more comprehensive picture of both microbial environments.

McElhany, Katherine

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

The Determination of Deuterium and Tritium in Effluent Wastewater by Pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

A pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) procedure was developed for the quantitative determination of deuterium and tritium in radioactive, effluent, wastewater to aid in the design of an efficient combined electrolytic/catalytic exchange system for the recovery of these hydrogen isotopes. The deuterium and tritium NMR signals were observed at 9.210 and 45.7 MHz, respectively. Ten different effluent water samples were analyzed for deuterium and tritium to establish base-line data for the preparation of standard reference samples. The hydrogen isotope concentrations ranged from 0.11 to 2.40 g deuterium and from 2.0 to 21.0 mg tritium per liter of processed sample. The standard deviation of the hydrogen isotope determinations is +- 0.017 g deuterium and +- 0.06 mg tritium per liter of processed effluent water. In the future, the effectiveness of specially prepared and analyzed (calorimetry) effluent samples as tritium standards will be investigated.

Attalla, A.; Birkbeck, J. C.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Pilot studies to achieve waste minimization and enhance radioactive liquid waste treatment at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Radioactive and Industrial Wastewater Science Group manages and operates the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The RLWTF treats low-level radioactive liquid waste generated by research and analytical facilities at approximately 35 technical areas throughout the 43-square-mile site. The RLWTF treats an average of 5.8 million gallons (21.8-million liters) of liquid waste annually. Clarifloculation and filtration is the primary treatment technology used by the RLWTF. This technology has been used since the RLWTF became operable in 1963. Last year the RLWTF achieved an average of 99.7% removal of gross alpha activity in the waste stream. The treatment process requires the addition of chemicals for the flocculation and subsequent precipitation of radionuclides. The resultant sludge generated during this process is solidified in drums and stored or disposed of at LANL.

Freer, J.; Freer, E.; Bond, A. [and others

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Financial and economic determinants of collective action: The case of wastewater management  

SciTech Connect

Where public environmental funds support development of wastewater infrastructure, funding institutions ensure the economic use of funds, while the beneficiaries minimize their own costs. In rural areas, there is often a choice between decentralized or centralized (multi-village) systems: if the centralized system is most economic, then only this system is eligible for public funding. However, its implementation requires a voluntary cooperation of the concerned communities, who need to organize themselves to develop and run the infrastructure. The paper analyzes the social determinants of collaboration in a generic case study, using the following variables: method of (economic) assessment, modeled by the social discount rate, funding policy, modeled by the funding rate, and users' self-organization, modeled by cost sharing. In a borderline situation, where the centralized system turns out to be most economic, but this assessment is contingent on the assessment method, collective action may fail: the advantages of collective action from funding are too small to outweigh organizational deficiencies. Considering in this situation sanitation as a human right, authors recommend using innovative forms of organization and, if these fail, reassessing either the amount of funding or the eligibility for funding of more acceptable alternatives. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A generic case study models collective action and funding in wastewater management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determinants of success: economic assessment, funding policy and self-organization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Success indicators: conflict rate, funds needed to make cost shares fair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Method for analyzing centralized vs. decentralized disputes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer If collective action has less benefits, innovative cost sharing may ensure success.

Brunner, Norbert, E-mail: norbert.brunner@cemds.org [Center for Environmental Management and Decision Support, Gregor Mendel Str. 33, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Starkl, Markus, E-mail: markus.starkl@boku.ac.at [Competence Centre for Decision-Aid in Environmental Management, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences/DIB, Gregor Mendel Strasse 33, 1180 Wien (Austria)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

Comparison of small mammal species diversity near wastewater outfalls, natural streams, and dry canyons  

SciTech Connect

A wide range of plant and wildlife species utilizes water discharged from facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this study was to compare nocturnal small mammal communities at wet areas created by wastewater outfalls with communities in naturally created wet and dry areas. Thirteen locations within LANL boundaries were selected for small mammal mark-recapture trapping. Three of these locations lacked surface water sources and were classified as {open_quotes}dry,{close_quotes} while seven sites were associated with wastewater outfalls ({open_quotes}outfall{close_quotes} sites), and three were located near natural sources of surface water ({open_quotes}natural{close_quotes} sites). Data was collected on site type (dry, outfall or natural), location, species trapped, and the tag number of each individual captured. This data was used to calculate mean number of species, percent capture rate, and species diversity at each type of site. When data from each type of site was pooled, there were no significant differences in these variables between dry, outfall, and natural types. However, when data from individual sites was compared, tests revealed significant differences. All sites in natural areas were significantly higher than dry areas in daily mean number of species, percent capture rate, and species diversity. Most outfall sites were significantly higher than dry areas in all three variables tested. When volume of water from each outfall site was considered, these data indicated that the number of species, percent capture rate, and species diversity of nocturnal small mammals were directly related to the volume of water at a given outfall.

Raymer, D.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Biggs, J.R. [Ewing Technical Design, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

467