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1

Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Details Activities (8) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: Body and surface wave tomography are two of the primary methods for estimation of regional scale seismic velocity variations. Seismic velocity is affected by temperature and rock composition in complex ways, but when combined with geologic and structural maps, relative temperature can in some cases be estimated. We present preliminary tomographic models for compressional and shear-wave velocity using local and regional earthquakes recorded by Earthscope Transportable Array stations, network

2

A Scaling Approach to Probabilistic Assessment of Regional Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new approach to probabilistic projections of regional climate change is introduced. It builds on the already established quasi-linear relation between global-mean temperature and regional climate change found in atmosphere–ocean general ...

Katja Frieler; Malte Meinshausen; Matthias Mengel; Nadine Braun; William Hare

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tibuleac Published: GRC, 2009 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009)...

4

An integrated assessment tool to define effective air quality policies at regional scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the Integrated Assessment of air quality is dealt with at regional scale. First the paper describes the main challenges to tackle current air pollution control, including economic aspects. Then it proposes a novel approach to manage the ... Keywords: Air quality modeling, Decision support, Integrated assessment modeling, Model reduction, Multi-objective optimization

Claudio Carnevale; Giovanna Finzi; Enrico Pisoni; Marialuisa Volta; Giorgio Guariso; Roberta Gianfreda; Giuseppe Maffeis; Philippe Thunis; Les White; Giuseppe Triacchini

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Multi-criteria assessment for linking regional conservation planning and farm-scale actions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional-scale ecological restoration priorities such as increasing the extent and quality of native vegetation are generally planned at catchment scales, while on-ground restoration actions are generally implemented at paddock or farm scales. This paper ... Keywords: Conservation planning, GIS, MCA, Precision agriculture

A. Zerger; G. Warren; P. Hill; D. Robertson; A. Weidemann; K. Lawton

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Assessing the Capability of a Regional-Scale Weather Model to Simulate Extreme Precipitation Patterns and Flooding in Central Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A regional-scale weather model is used to determine the potential for flood forecasting based on model-predicted rainfall. Extreme precipitation and flooding events are a significant concern in central Texas, due to both the high occurrence and ...

Marla R. Knebl Lowrey; Zong-Liang Yang

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Assessing regional scale predictions of aerosols, marine stratocumulus, and their interactions during VOCALS-REx using WRF-Chem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assesses the ability of the recent chemistry version (v3.3) of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model to simulate boundary layer structure, aerosols, stratocumulus clouds, and energy fluxes over the Southeast Pacific Ocean. Measurements from the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) and satellite retrievals (i.e., products from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), and GOES-10) are used for this assessment. The Morrison double-moment microphysics scheme is newly coupled with interactive aerosols in the model. The 31-day (15 October-16 November 2008) WRF-Chem simulation with aerosol-cloud interactions (AERO hereafter) is also compared to a simulation (MET hereafter) with fixed cloud droplet number concentrations in the microphysics scheme and simplified cloud and aerosol treatments in the radiation scheme. The well-simulated aerosol quantities (aerosol number, mass composition and optical properties), and the inclusion of full aerosol-cloud couplings lead to significant improvements in many features of the simulated stratocumulus clouds: cloud optical properties and microphysical properties such as cloud top effective radius, cloud water path, and cloud optical thickness. In addition to accounting for the aerosol direct and semi-direct effects, these improvements feed back to the simulation of boundary-layer characteristics and energy budgets. Particularly, inclusion of interactive aerosols in AERO strengthens the temperature and humidity gradients within the capping inversion layer and lowers the marine boundary layer (MBL) depth by 130 m from that of the MET simulation. These differences are associated with weaker entrainment and stronger mean subsidence at the top of the MBL in AERO. Mean top-of-atmosphere outgoing shortwave fluxes, surface latent heat, and surface downwelling longwave fluxes are in better agreement with observations in AERO, compared to the MET simulation. Nevertheless, biases in some of the simulated meteorological quantities (e.g., MBL temperature and humidity) and aerosol quantities (e.g., underestimations of accumulation mode aerosol number) might affect simulated stratocumulus and energy fluxes over the Southeastern Pacific, and require further investigation. The well-simulated timing and outflow patterns of polluted and clean episodes demonstrate the model's ability to capture daily/synoptic scale variations of aerosol and cloud properties, and suggest that the model is suitable for studying atmospheric processes associated with pollution outflow over the ocean. The overall performance of the regional model in simulating mesoscale clouds and boundary layer properties is encouraging and suggests that reproducing gradients of aerosol and cloud droplet concentrations and coupling cloud-aerosol-radiation processes are important when simulating marine stratocumulus over the Southeast Pacific.

Yang Q.; Lee Y.; Gustafson Jr., W. I.; Fast, J. D.; Wang, H.; Easter, R. C.; Morrison, H.; Chapman, E. G.; Spak, S. N.; Mena-Carrasco, M. A.

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

8

Assessing regional scale predictions of aerosols, marine stratocumulus, and their interactions during VOCALS-REx using WRF-Chem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the recent chemistry version (v3.3) of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model, we have coupled the Morrison double-moment microphysics scheme with interactive aerosols so that full two-way aerosol-cloud interactions are included in simulations. We have used this new WRF-Chem functionality in a study focused on assessing predictions of aerosols, marine stratocumulus clouds, and their interactions over the Southeast Pacific using measurements from the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) and satellite retrievals. This study also serves as a detailed analysis of our WRF-Chem simulations contributed to the VOCALS model Assessment (VOCA) project. The WRF-Chem 31-day (October 15-November 16, 2008) simulation with aerosol-cloud interactions (AERO hereafter) is also compared to a simulation (MET hereafter) with fixed cloud droplet number concentrations assumed by the default in Morrison microphysics scheme with no interactive aerosols. The well-predicted aerosol properties such as number, mass composition, and optical depth lead to significant improvements in many features of the predicted stratocumulus clouds: cloud optical properties and microphysical properties such as cloud top effective radius, cloud water path, and cloud optical thickness, and cloud macrostructure such as cloud depth and cloud base height. These improvements in addition to the aerosol direct and semi-direct effects, in turn, feed back to the prediction of boundary-layer characteristics and energy budgets. Particularly, inclusion of interactive aerosols in AERO strengths temperature and humidity gradients within capping inversion layer and lowers the MBL depth by 150 m from that of the MET simulation. Mean top-of-the-atmosphere outgoing shortwave fluxes, surface latent heat, and surface downwelling longwave fluxes are in better agreement with observations in AERO, compared to the MET simulation. Nevertheless, biases in some of the simulated meteorological quantities (e.g., MBL temperature and humidity over the remote ocean) and aerosol quantities (e.g., overestimations of supermicron sea salt mass) might affect simulated stratocumulus and energy fluxes over the SEP, and require further investigations. Although not perfect, the overall performance of the regional model in simulating mesoscale aerosol-cloud interactions is encouraging and suggests that the inclusion of spatially varying aerosol characteristics is important when simulating marine stratocumulus over the southeastern Pacific.

Yang, Qing; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.; Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Morrison, H.; Lee, Y.- N.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Spak, S. N.; Mena-Carrasco, M. A.

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

9

Multimodel Multisignal Climate Change Detection at Regional Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using an optimal detection technique and climate change simulations produced with two versions of two GCMs, we have assessed the causes of twentieth-century temperature changes from global to regional scales. Our analysis is conducted in nine ...

Xuebin Zhang; Francis W. Zwiers; P. A. Stott

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

REGIONAL ASSESSMENT PROGRAM MASTER Regional Issue Identification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from these Federal Region totals. Energy sources addressed were coal, nuclear, oil, oil shale, gas, geothermal, . - - - hydroelectric and solar. Six of the national laboratories,...

11

Bioenergy Sustainability at the Regional Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet national goals for biofuels production, there are going to be large increases in acreage planted to dedicated biofuels crops. These acreages may be in perennial grasses, annual crops, short rotation woody crops, or other types of vegetation and may involve use of existing cropland, marginal lands, abandoned lands or conversion of forest land. The establishment of bioenergy crops will affect ecological processes and their interactions and thus have an influence on ecosystem services provided by the lands on which these crops are grown. The regional-scale effects of bioenergy choices on ecosystem services need special attention because they often have been neglected yet can affect the ecological, social and economic aspects of sustainability. A regional-scale perspective provides the opportunity to make more informed choices about crop selection and management, particularly with regard to water quality and quantity issues, and also about other aspects of ecological, social, and economic sustainability. We give special attention to cellulosic feedstocks because of the opportunities they provide. Adopting an adaptive management approach for biofuels feedstock production planning will be possible to a certain extent if there is adequate monitoring data on the effects of changes in land use. Effects on water resources are used as an example and existing understanding of water resource effects are analyzed in detail. Current results indicate that there may be water quality improvements coupled with some decreases in available water for downstream uses.

Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Lowrance, Richard [USDA-ARS Southeast Watershed Research Laboratory, Tifton, Georgia; Robertson, G. Phillip [W.K. Kellogg Biological Station and Great Lakes Bioenergy Research

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

A participatory approach to design spatial scenarios of cropping systems and assess their effects on phoma stem canker management at a regional scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phoma stem canker is a worldwide disease of oilseed rape, responsible for major economic losses. The main control methods are the use of resistant cultivars, cropping practices and spatial territory organization, involving large-scale spatial processes. ... Keywords: Participatory design, Phoma stem canker, Scenario approach, Spatial simulation model, Winter OilSeed Rape

L. Hossard, M. H. Jeuffroy, E. Pelzer, X. Pinochet, V. Souchere

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Integrated regional assessment: qualitative and quantitative issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Qualitative and quantitative issues are particularly significant in integrated regional assessment. This chapter examines the terms “qualitative” and “quantitative” separately and in relation to one another, along with a discussion of the degree of interdependence or overlap between the two. Strategies for integrating the two general approaches often produce uneasy compromises. However, integrated regional assessment provides opportunities for strong collaborations in addressing specific problems in specific places.

Malone, Elizabeth L.

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

14

Pacific Northwest Regional Assessment of the Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, demand response and energy efficiency demand-side reductions. The fact that natural gas is the regionPacific Northwest Regional Assessment of the Potential Benefits of the Direct Use of Natural Gas) .........................42 Figure 1 Service Area Map of PNW Participating Natural Gas Utilities

15

The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program: Overview of Phase I Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) is an international effort designed to investigate the uncertainties in regional-scale projections of future climate and produce highresolution climate change scenarios using multiple ...

Linda O. Mearns; Ray Arritt; Sébastien Biner; Melissa S. Bukovsky; Seth McGinnis; Stephan Sain; Daniel Caya; James Correia Jr.; Dave Flory; William Gutowski; Eugene S. Takle; Richard Jones; Ruby Leung; Wilfran Moufouma-Okia; Larry McDaniel; Ana M. B. Nunes; Yun Qian; John Roads; Lisa Sloan; Mark Snyder

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Mississippi Moisture Budgets on Regional Scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two years of regional analyses based on the Eta Data Assimilation System (EDAS) are used to examine the mesoscale features of the moisture budgets of the Mississippi River basin and its subbasins. Despite the short period, basic aspects of the ...

Ernesto H. Berbery; Eugene M. Rasmusson

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Reflected Solar Radiances from Regional Scale Scenes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of bi-directional reflectance models is presented for various atmospheric scene types. The models were composited from data collected from an aircraft platform in May-July 1979 during Summer MONEX. The space scale of the composited models ...

John M. Davis; Stephen K. Cox

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

On the Parameterization of Surface Roughness at Regional Scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A parameterization for surface roughness and blending height at regional scales, under neutral atmospheric stability, is studied and tested. The analysis is based on a suite of large-eddy simulations (LES) over surfaces with varying roughness ...

Elie Bou-Zeid; Marc B. Parlange; Charles Meneveau

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Passive incentive requirements: a regional assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nation's goal of 20% solar contribution by the turn of the century will be achieved, in part, by the construction of residences heated by virtue of their passive solar designs. These designs are not economically competitive against all conventional fuels in all locations. Some degree of government incentive will be required to assure a competitive position for these designs. A methodology is presented which is used to assess the magnitude of the government incentive required to assure feasibility. The methodology is used to provide a regional assessment for the Pacific Northwest under alternative home ownership periods and conventional fuel types.

Ben-David, S.; Kirschner, C.; Noll, S.A.; Roach, F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project. Status report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) prescribes several approaches to achieve its goal of doubling the salmon and steelhead runs of the Columbia River. Among those approaches are habitat restoration, improvements in adult and juvenile passage at dams and artificial propagation. Supplementation will be a major part of the new hatchery programs. The purpose of the Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP) is to provide an overview of ongoing and planned supplementation activities, to construct a conceptual framework and model for evaluating the potential benefits and risks of supplementation and to develop a plan for better regional coordination of research and monitoring and evaluation of supplementation. RASP has completed its first year of work. Progress toward meeting the first year`s objectives and recommendations for future tasks are contained in this report.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional scale assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A Regional Climate Change Assessment Program for North America  

SciTech Connect

There are two main uncertainties in determining future climate: the trajectories of future emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols, and the response of the global climate system to any given set of future emissions [Meehl et al., 2007]. These uncertainties normally are elucidated via application of global climate models, which provide information at relatively coarse spatial resolutions. Greater interest in, and concern about, the details of climate change at regional scales has provided the motivation for the application of regional climate models, which introduces additional uncertainty [Christensen et al., 2007a]. These uncertainties in fi ne- scale regional climate responses, in contrast to uncertainties of coarser spatial resolution global models in which regional models are nested, now have been documented in numerous contexts [Christensen et al., 2007a] and have been found to extend to uncertainties in climate impacts [Wood et al., 2004; Oleson et al., 2007]. While European research in future climate projections has moved forward systematically to examine combined uncertainties from global and regional models [Christensen et al., 2007b], North American climate programs have lagged behind. To fi ll this research gap, scientists developed the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (-NARCCAP). The fundamental scientifi c motivation of this international program is to explore separate and combined uncertainties in regional projections of future climate change resulting from the use of multiple atmosphere- ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) to drive multiple regional climate models (RCMs). An equally important, and related, motivation for this program is to provide the climate impacts and adaptation community with high- resolution regional climate change scenarios that can be used for studies of the societal impacts of climate change and possible adaptation strategies.

Mearns, L. O.; Gutowski, William; Jones, Richard; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; McGinnis, Seth; Nunes, A.; Qian, Yun

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

22

Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico Report to the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program #12;#12;Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico Report should be cited as: Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico: U.S. Geological

ten Brink, Uri S.

23

Regional-Scale Climate Change: Observations and Model Simulations  

SciTech Connect

This collaborative proposal addressed key issues in understanding the Earthâ??s climate system, as highlighted by the U.S. Climate Science Program. The research focused on documenting past climatic changes and on assessing future climatic changes based on suites of global and regional climate models. Geographically, our emphasis was on the mountainous regions of the world, with a particular focus on the Neotropics of Central America and the Hawaiian Islands. Mountain regions are zones where large variations in ecosystems occur due to the strong climate zonation forced by the topography. These areas are particularly susceptible to changes in critical ecological thresholds, and we conducted studies of changes in phonological indicators based on various climatic thresholds.

Raymond S. Bradley; Henry F. Diaz

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

24

National-Scale Wind Resource Assessment for Power Generation (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation describes the current standards for conducting a national-scale wind resource assessment for power generation, along with the risk/benefit considerations to be considered when beginning a wind resource assessment. The presentation describes changes in turbine technology and viable wind deployment due to more modern turbine technology and taller towers and shows how the Philippines national wind resource assessment evolved over time to reflect changes that arise from updated technologies and taller towers.

Baring-Gould, E. I.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment of 14 Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment of 14 Regions Outside the United States APRIL 2011 in this overview is based on the report "World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment," which was prepared | World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment 1 Background The use of horizontal drilling

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

26

Methods for regional assessment of geothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The techniques in geothermal resource assessment are summarized, terminology and assumptions are clarified, and a foundation for the development of optimum geothermal resource assessment methodology is provided. A logical, sequential subdivision of the geothermal resource base is proposed, accepting its definition as all the heat in the earth's crust under a given area, measured from mean annual temperature. That part of the resource base which is shallow enough to be tapped by production drilling is termed the accessible resource base, and it in turn is divided into useful and residual components. The useful component (i.e., the heat that could reasonably be extracted at costs competitive with other forms of energy at some specified future time) is termed the geothermal resource. This in turn is divided into economic and subeconomic components, based on conditions existing at the time of assessment. In the format of a McKelvey diagram, this logic defines the vertical axis (degree of economic feasibility). The horizontal axis (degree of geologic assurance) contains identified and undiscovered components. Reserve is then designated as the identified economic resource. All categories should be expressed in units of heat, with resource and reserve figures calculated at wellhead, prior to the inevitable large losses inherent in any practical thermal use or in conversion to electricity. Methods for assessing geothermal resources can be grouped into 4 classes: (a) surface thermal flux, (b) volume, (c) planar fracture, and (d) magmatic heat budget. The volume method appears to be most useful.

Muffler, P.; Cataldi, R.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

REGIONAL-SCALE WIND FIELD CLASSIFICATION EMPLOYING CLUSTER ANALYSIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The classification of time-varying multivariate regional-scale wind fields at a specific location can assist event planning as well as consequence and risk analysis. Further, wind field classification involves data transformation and inference techniques that effectively characterize stochastic wind field variation. Such a classification scheme is potentially useful for addressing overall atmospheric transport uncertainty and meteorological parameter sensitivity issues. Different methods to classify wind fields over a location include the principal component analysis of wind data (e.g., Hardy and Walton, 1978) and the use of cluster analysis for wind data (e.g., Green et al., 1992; Kaufmann and Weber, 1996). The goal of this study is to use a clustering method to classify the winds of a gridded data set, i.e, from meteorological simulations generated by a forecast model.

Glascoe, L G; Glaser, R E; Chin, H S; Loosmore, G A

2004-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

28

Application of Scale-Selective Data Assimilation to Regional Climate Modeling and Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method referred to as scale-selective data assimilation (SSDA) is designed to inject the large-scale components of the atmospheric circulation from a global model into a regional model to improve regional climate simulations and predictions. ...

Shiqiu Peng; Lian Xie; Bin Liu; Fredrick Semazzi

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Renewable biomass energy: Understanding regional scale environmental impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

If biomass energy is to become a significant component of the US energy sector, millions of acres of farmland must be converted to energy crops. The environmental implications of this change in land use must be quantitatively evaluated. The land use changes will be largely driven by economic considerations. Farmers will grow energy crops when it is profitable to do so. Thus, models which purport to predict environmental changes induced by energy crop production must take into account those economic features which will influence land use change. In this paper, we present an approach for projecting the probable environmental impacts of growing energy crops at the regional scale. The approach takes into account both economic and environmental factors. We demonstrate the approach by analyzing, at a county-level the probable impact of switchgrass production on erosion, evapotranspiration, nitrate in runoff, and phosphorous fertilizer use in multi-county subregions within the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) region. Our results show that the adoption of switchgrass production will have different impacts in each subregion as a result of differences in the initial land use and soil conditions in the subregions. Erosion, evapotranspiration, and nitrate in runoff are projected to decrease in both subregions as switchgrass displaces the current crops. Phosphorous fertilizer applications are likely to increase in one subregion and decrease in the other due to initial differences in the types of conventional crops grown in each subregion. Overall these changes portend an improvement in water quality in the subregions with the increasing adoption of switchgrass.

Graham, R.L.; Downing, M.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

Asia-Pacific Regional Climate Change Adaptation Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Asia-Pacific Regional Climate Change Adaptation Assessment Asia-Pacific Regional Climate Change Adaptation Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Asia-Pacific Regional Climate Change Adaptation Assessment Agency/Company /Organization: U.S. Agency for International Development Sector: Energy Topics: Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.usaid.gov/rdma/documents/RDMA_Asia-Pacific_Climate_Change_Adaptati Country: China, Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Laos, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Maldives, Mongolia, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Timor-Leste, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Vanuatu UN Region: Central Asia, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia References: Asia-Pacific Adaptation Assessment[1]

31

Basin-Scale Opportunity Assessment Initiative Background Literature Review  

SciTech Connect

As called for in the March 24, 2010, Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Hydropower, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), environmental stakeholders, and the hydropower industry are collaborating to identify opportunities to simultaneously increase electricity generation and improve environmental services in river basins of the United States. New analytical tools provide an improved ability to understand, model, and visualize environmental and hydropower systems. Efficiencies and opportunities that might not be apparent in site-by-site analyses can be revealed through assessments at the river-basin scale. Information from basin-scale assessments could lead to better coordination of existing hydropower projects, or to inform siting decisions (e.g., balancing the removal of some dams with the construction of others), in order to meet renewable energy production and environmental goals. Basin-scale opportunity assessments would inform energy and environmental planning and address the cumulative effects of hydropower development and operations on river basin environmental quality in a way that quantifies energy-environment tradeoffs. Opportunity assessments would create information products, develop scenarios, and identify specific actions that agencies, developers, and stakeholders can take to locate new sustainable hydropower projects, increase the efficiency and environmental performance of existing projects, and restore and protect environmental quality in our nation's river basins. Government agencies and non-governmental organizations (NGO) have done significant work to understand and assess opportunities for both hydropower and environmental protection at the basin scale. Some initiatives have been successful, others less so, and there is a need to better understand the legacy of work on which this current project can build. This background literature review is intended to promote that understanding. The literature review begins with a discussion in Section 2.0 of the Federal regulatory processes and mission areas pertaining to hydropower siting and licensing at the basin scale. This discussion of regulatory processes and mission areas sets the context for the next topic in Section 3.0, past and ongoing basin-scale hydropower planning and assessment activities. The final sections of the literature review provide some conclusions about past and ongoing basin-scale activities and their relevance to the current basin-scale opportunity assessment (Section 4.0), and a bibliography of existing planning and assessment documents (Section 5.0).

Saulsbury, Bo [ORNL; Geerlofs, Simon H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Basin-Scale Opportunity Assessment Initiative Background Literature Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As called for in the March 24, 2010, Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Hydropower, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), environmental stakeholders, and the hydropower industry are collaborating to identify opportunities to simultaneously increase electricity generation and improve environmental services in river basins of the United States. New analytical tools provide an improved ability to understand, model, and visualize environmental and hydropower systems. Efficiencies and opportunities that might not be apparent in site-by-site analyses can be revealed through assessments at the river-basin scale. Information from basin-scale assessments could lead to better coordination of existing hydropower projects, or to inform siting decisions (e.g., balancing the removal of some dams with the construction of others), in order to meet renewable energy production and environmental goals. Basin-scale opportunity assessments would inform energy and environmental planning and address the cumulative effects of hydropower development and operations on river basin environmental quality in a way that quantifies energy-environment tradeoffs. Opportunity assessments would create information products, develop scenarios, and identify specific actions that agencies, developers, and stakeholders can take to locate new sustainable hydropower projects, increase the efficiency and environmental performance of existing projects, and restore and protect environmental quality in our nation's river basins. Government agencies and non-governmental organizations (NGO) have done significant work to understand and assess opportunities for both hydropower and environmental protection at the basin scale. Some initiatives have been successful, others less so, and there is a need to better understand the legacy of work on which this current project can build. This background literature review is intended to promote that understanding. The literature review begins with a discussion in Section 2.0 of the Federal regulatory processes and mission areas pertaining to hydropower siting and licensing at the basin scale. This discussion of regulatory processes and mission areas sets the context for the next topic in Section 3.0, past and ongoing basin-scale hydropower planning and assessment activities. The final sections of the literature review provide some conclusions about past and ongoing basin-scale activities and their relevance to the current basin-scale opportunity assessment (Section 4.0), and a bibliography of existing planning and assessment documents (Section 5.0).

Saulsbury, Bo [ORNL; Geerlofs, Simon H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Regional-scale climate simulations: Improvement in near-surface field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional-scale climate simulations: Improvement in near-surface field Regional-scale climate simulations: Improvement in near-surface field projections with spectral nudging July 30, 2013 EVS researchers have established a new optimal approach for downscaling physically based global climate model projections to the regional scale. The new approach is significant because it preserves both the prescribed large-scale dynamics of the global model and the increased variability of the higher-resolution physics in a regional-scale model. Global-scale climate models have coarse spatial resolution and cannot resolve many local and regional-scale features, such as increased precipitation due to the lake effect in the Chicago region. Specially built models that operate at a higher spatial resolution and can resolve these types of features are referred to as regional-scale climate models. These

34

Regional Scale Surface CO2 Exchange Estimates Using a Boundary...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

boundary layer height, and equated entrainment rate with large-scale subsidence velocities obtained from (1) NCEP reanalysis, (2) the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC)...

35

Regional Climate Simulations for Impact Assessment: Project to Intercompare Regional Climate Simulations (PIRCS) Interim Report -- 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project provides the first direct intercomparison of regional climate model predictions with observations, as a means to quantify the uncertainties in future predictions of climate change. Results from regional climate model simulations will be inputs to national and international assessments of possible future climate change and impacts due to increased emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

A Multiscale Remote Sensing Model for Disaggregating Regional Fluxes to Micrometeorological Scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disaggregation of regional-scale (103 m) flux estimates to micrometeorological scales (101–102 m) facilitates direct comparison between land surface models and ground-based observations. Inversely, it also provides a means for upscaling flux-...

Martha C. Anderson; J. M. Norman; John R. Mecikalski; Ryan D. Torn; William P. Kustas; Jeffrey B. Basara

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Extracting Subseasonal Scenarios: An Alternative Method to Analyze Seasonal Predictability of Regional-Scale Tropical Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current seasonal prediction of rainfall typically focuses on 3-month rainfall totals at regional scale. This temporal summation reduces the noise related to smaller-scale weather variability but also implicitly emphasizes the peak of the ...

Vincent Moron; Pierre Camberlin; Andrew W. Robertson

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Surface Heterogeneity Effects on Regional-Scale Fluxes in Stable Boundary Layers: Surface Temperature Transitions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-eddy simulation, with recently developed dynamic subgrid-scale models, is used to study the effect of heterogeneous surface temperature distributions on regional-scale turbulent fluxes in the stable boundary layer (SBL). Simulations are ...

Rob Stoll; Fernando Porté-Agel

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Study of Regional-Scale Boundary Layer Characteristics over Northern India with a Special Reference to the Role of the Thar Desert in Regional-Scale Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extensive contrasts of land surface heterogeneities have a pivotal role in modulating boundary layer processes and consequently, the regional-scale dispersion of air pollutants. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) modeling system has been ...

Jagabandhu Panda; Maithili Sharan; S. G. Gopalakrishnan

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program: Overview of Phase I Results  

SciTech Connect

The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program is an international effort designed to systematically investigate the uncertainties in regional scale projections of future climate and produce high resolution climate change scenarios using multiple regional climate models (RCMs) nested within atmosphere ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) forced with the A2 SRES scenario, with a common domain covering the conterminous US, northern Mexico, and most of Canada. The program also includes an evaluation component (Phase I) wherein the participating RCMs are nested within 25 years of NCEP/DOE global reanalysis II. The grid spacing of the RCM simulations is 50 km.

Mearns, L. O.; Arritt, R.; Biner, S.; Bukovsky, Melissa; McGinnis, Seth; Sain, Steve; Caya, Daniel; Correia Jr., James; Flory, Dave; Gutowski, William; Takle, Gene; Jones, Richard; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Moufouma-Okia, Wilfran; McDaniel, Larry; Nunes, A.; Qian, Yun; Roads, J.; Sloan, Lisa; Snyder, Mark A.

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional scale assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Seismic Hazard Assessment of the Sheki-Ismayilli Region, Azerbaijan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic hazard assessment is an important factor in disaster management of Azerbaijan Republic. The Shaki-Ismayilli region is one of the earthquake-prone areas in Azerbaijan. According to the seismic zoning map, the region is located in intensity IX zone. Large earthquakes in the region take place along the active faults. The seismic activity of the Shaki-Ismayilli region is studied using macroseismic and instrumental data, which cover the period between 1250 and 2003. Several principal parameters of earthquakes are analyzed: maximal magnitude, energetic class, intensity, depth of earthquake hypocenter, and occurrence. The geological structures prone to large earthquakes are determined, and the dependence of magnitude on the fault length is shown. The large earthquakes take place mainly along the active faults. A map of earthquake intensity has been developed for the region, and the potential seismic activity of the Shaki-Ismayilli region has been estimated.

Ayyubova, Leyla J. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29A, H. Javid Ave., Baku 1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

42

Regional issue identification and assessment: study methodology. First annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall assessment methodologies and models utilized for the first project under the Regional Issue Identification and Assessment (RIIA) program are described. Detailed descriptions are given of the methodologies used by lead laboratories for the quantification of the impacts of an energy scenario on one or more media (e.g., air, water, land, human and ecology), and by all laboratories to assess the regional impacts on all media. The research and assessments reflected in this document were performed by the following national laboratories: Argonne National Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report contains five chapters. Chapter 1 briefly describes the overall study methodology and introduces the technical participants. Chapter 2 is a summary of the energy policy scenario selected for the RIIA I study and Chapter 3 describes how this scenario was translated into a county-level siting pattern of energy development. The fourth chapter is a detailed description of the individual methodologies used to quantify the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of the scenario while Chapter 5 describes how these impacts were translated into comprehensive regional assessments for each Federal Region.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Scale-Selective Bias Correction in a Downscaling of Global Analysis Using a Regional Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systematic large-scale errors are often found within the regional domain in the regional dynamical downscaling procedure. This paper proposes a method to suppress such errors using a combination of spectral tendency damping and area average ...

Hideki Kanamaru; Masao Kanamitsu

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Recent Achievements of the Neo-Deterministic Seismic Hazard Assessment in the CEI Region  

SciTech Connect

A review of the recent achievements of the innovative neo-deterministic approach for seismic hazard assessment through realistic earthquake scenarios has been performed. The procedure provides strong ground motion parameters for the purpose of earthquake engineering, based on the deterministic seismic wave propagation modelling at different scales--regional, national and metropolitan. The main advantage of this neo-deterministic procedure is the simultaneous treatment of the contribution of the earthquake source and seismic wave propagation media to the strong motion at the target site/region, as required by basic physical principles. The neo-deterministic seismic microzonation procedure has been successfully applied to numerous metropolitan areas all over the world in the framework of several international projects. In this study some examples focused on CEI region concerning both regional seismic hazard assessment and seismic microzonation of the selected metropolitan areas are shown.

Panza, G. F. [DST-University of Trieste, Via E. Weiss 4, 34127 Trieste (Italy); ESP-SAND, ICTP, Trieste (Italy); Kouteva, M. [ESP-SAND, ICTP, Trieste (Italy); CLSMEE--BAS, 3 Acad G. Bonchev str, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Vaccari, F.; Peresan, A.; Romanelli, F. [DST--University of Trieste, Via E. Weiss 4, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Cioflan, C. O.; Radulian, M.; Marmureanu, G. [NIEP-Magurele-Bucharest, 12 Calugareni str., Ilfov (Romania); Paskaleva, I. [CLSMEE--BAS, 3 Acad G. Bonchev str, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Gribovszki, K.; Varga, P. [Geodetic and Geophysical Research, Institute of HAS, Sopron (Hungary); Herak, M. [Department of Geophysics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Horvatovac bb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Zaichenco, A. [IGG, Chisinau (Moldova, Republic of); Zivcic, M. [ARSO-Seismology and Geology Office, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

45

Spatial Coherence of Tropical Rainfall at the Regional Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the spatial coherence characteristics of daily station observations of rainfall in five tropical regions during the principal rainfall season(s): the Brazilian Nordeste, Senegal, Kenya, northwestern India, and northern ...

Vincent Moron; Andrew W. Robertson; M. Neil Ward; Pierre Camberlin

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

TERMS OF REFERENCE REGIONAL ANALYST, Election Assessment Mission (EAM)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ODIHR is the leading agency in Europe in the field of election observation. It coordinates and organizes the deployment of several observation missions with thousands of observers every year to assess the compliance of elections in OSCE participating States in line with OSCE commitments, other international standards for democratic elections and national legislation. Its unique methodology provides an in-depth insight into all elements of an electoral process, and permits to make concrete recommendations to further improve electoral processes. Objective Under the direction of the Head of the ODIHR Election Assessment Mission (EAM), the Regional Analyst is responsible for observing all aspects of the election cycle, and gaining an in-depth understanding of the overall pre-election administrative procedures and campaign environment in the area of deployment. The Regional Analyst should pay particular attention to the following aspects of the election cycle: • voter identification and registration;

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Observed Scaling in Clouds and Precipitation and Scale Incognizance in Regional to Global Atmospheric Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use observations of robust scaling behavior in clouds and precipitation to derive constraints on how partitioning of precipitation should change with model resolution. Our analysis indicates that 90–99% of stratiform precipitation should occur ...

Travis A. O’Brien; Fuyu Li; William D. Collins; Sara A. Rauscher; Todd D. Ringler; Mark Taylor; Samson M. Hagos; L. Ruby Leung

48

How Well Do Large-Scale Models Reproduce Regional Hydrological Extremes in Europe?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new methodology for assessing the ability of gridded hydrological models to reproduce large-scale hydrological high and low flow events (as a proxy for hydrological extremes) as described by catalogues of historical droughts [...

Christel Prudhomme; Simon Parry; Jamie Hannaford; Douglas B. Clark; Stefan Hagemann; Frank Voss

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Downscaling of Global Climate Change Estimates to Regional Scales: An Application to Iberian Rainfall in Wintertime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical strategy to deduct regional-scale features from climate general circulation model (GCM) simulations has been designed and tested. The main idea is to interrelate the characteristic patterns of observed simultaneous variations of ...

Hans von Storch; Eduardo Zorita; Ulrich Cubasch

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Large-Scale Atmospheric Forcing by Southeast Pacific Boundary Layer Clouds: A Regional Model Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A regional model is used to study the radiative effect of boundary layer clouds over the southeast Pacific on large-scale atmosphere circulation during August–October 1999. With the standard settings, the model simulates reasonably well the large-...

Yuqing Wang; Shang-Ping Xie; Bin Wang; Haiming Xu

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Representation of Atmospheric Motion in Models of Regional-Scale Air Pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is developed for generating ensembles of wind fields for use in regional scale (1000 km) models of transport and diffusion. The underlying objective is a methodology for representing atmospheric motion in applied air pollution models ...

Robert G. Lamb; Saroj K. Hati

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Implementation of an E–? Parameterization of Vertical Subgrid-Scale Mixing in a Regional Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An E–? parameterization of subgrid-scale vertical turbulent mixing has been installed in NORAPS (Navy operational Regional Atmospheric Prediction System). The 1.5-order parameterization uses full prognostic equations for turbulence kinetic energy ...

Rolf H. Langland; Chi-Sann Liou

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Regional-Scale Flows in Mountainous Terrain. Part II: Simplified Numerical Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of two- and three-dimensional idealized numerical experiments are conducted to examine the effects of different physical processes upon the development of the thermally driven regional-scale circulations over mountainous terrain ...

James E. Bossert; William R. Cotton

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Sensitivity Study of Regional Climate Model Simulations to Large-Scale Nudging Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies with nested regional climate models (RCMs) have shown that large-scale spectral nudging (SN) seems to be a powerful method to correct RCMs’ weaknesses such as internal variability, intermittent divergence in phase space (IDPS), ...

Adelina Alexandru; Ramon de Elia; René Laprise; Leo Separovic; Sébastien Biner

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Reconstructing Millennial-Scale, Regional Paleoclimates of Boreal Canada during the Holocene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional paleoclimate reconstructions for northern Canada quantify Holocene climate variability on orbital and millennial time scales and provide a context to better understand the current global warming. The reconstructions are based on ...

A. E. Viau; K. Gajewski

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Scaling studies and conceptual experiment designs for NGNP CFD assessment  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to document scaling studies and conceptual designs for flow and heat transfer experiments intended to assess CFD codes and their turbulence models proposed for application to prismatic NGNP concepts. The general approach of the project is to develop new benchmark experiments for assessment in parallel with CFD and coupled CFD/systems code calculations for the same geometry. Two aspects of the complex flow in an NGNP are being addressed: (1) flow and thermal mixing in the lower plenum ("hot streaking" issue) and (2) turbulence and resulting temperature distributions in reactor cooling channels ("hot channel" issue). Current prismatic NGNP concepts are being examined to identify their proposed flow conditions and geometries over the range from normal operation to decay heat removal in a pressurized cooldown. Approximate analyses have been applied to determine key non-dimensional parameters and their magnitudes over this operating range. For normal operation, the flow in the coolant channels can be considered to be dominant turbulent forced convection with slight transverse property variation. In a pressurized cooldown (LOFA) simulation, the flow quickly becomes laminar with some possible buoyancy influences. The flow in the lower plenum can locally be considered to be a situation of multiple hot jets into a confined crossflow -- with obstructions. Flow is expected to be turbulent with momentumdominated turbulent jets entering; buoyancy influences are estimated to be negligible in normal full power operation. Experiments are needed for the combined features of the lower plenum flows. Missing from the typical jet experiments available are interactions with nearby circular posts and with vertical posts in the vicinity of vertical walls - with near stagnant surroundings at one extreme and significant crossflow at the other. Two types of heat transfer experiments are being considered. One addresses the "hot channel" problem, if necessary. The second type will treat heated jets entering a model plenum. Unheated MIR (Matched-Index-of-Refraction) experiments are first steps when the geometry is complicated. One does not want to use a computational technique which will not even handle constant properties properly. The purpose of the fluid dynamics experiments is to develop benchmark databases for the assessment of CFD solutions of the momentum equations, scalar mixing and turbulence models for typical NGNP plenum geometries in the limiting case of negligible buoyancy and constant fluid properties. As indicated by the scaling studies, in normal full power operation of a typical NGNP conceptual design, buoyancy influences should be negligible in the lower plenum. The MIR experiment will simulate flow features of the paths of jets as they mix in flowing through the array of posts in a lower plenum en route to the single exit duct. Conceptual designs for such experiments are described.

D. M. McEligot; G. E. McCreery

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The Value of Coarse-Scale Soil Moisture Observations for Regional Surface Energy Balance Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using high-resolution (1 km) hydrologic modeling of the 575 000-km2 Red–Arkansas River basin, the impact of spatially aggregating soil moisture imagery up to the footprint scale (32–64 km) of spaceborne microwave radiometers on regional-scale ...

Wade T. Crow; Eric F. Wood

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Integration of regional to outcrop digital data: 3D visualisation of multi-scale geological models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-scale geological models contain three-dimensional, spatially referenced data, typically spanning at least six orders of magnitude from outcrop to regional scale. A large number of different geological and geophysical data sources can be combined ... Keywords: Digital geological mapping, Immersive visualisation, Terrestrial laser-scanning, User interaction, Virtual outcrop models

R. R. Jones; K. J. W. McCaffrey; P. Clegg; R. W. Wilson; N. S. Holliman; R. E. Holdsworth; J. Imber; S. Waggott

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

A Statistical Framework to Identify the Influence of Large-Scale Weather Events on Regional Air Pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional air pollution episodes occur as a result of increased emissions and prevalence of conducive meteorological conditions. The frequency of occurrence of such favorable conditions on a regional scale may be influenced by large-scale climatic ...

Angadh Singh; Ahmet Palazoglu

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

STRSCNE: A Scaled Trust-Region Solver for Constrained Nonlinear Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a Matlab solver for constrained nonlinear equations is presented. The code, called STRSCNE, is based on the affine scaling trust-region method STRN, recently proposed by the authors. The approach taken in implementing the key steps of the ... Keywords: constrained equations, global convergence, performance profile, trust-region methods

Stefania Bellavia; Maria Macconi; Benedetta Morini

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional scale assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Structural fatigue assessment and management of large-scale port logistics equipments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the advances of port enterprises, much intensive research has been gradually involved in the structural fatigue assessment and management of port logistics equipments. However, relevant work on large-scale port logistics equipments is still ... Keywords: S-N curve, crack formation, crack propagation life, fatigue assessment, fracture mechanics, gantry cranes, large-scale port logistics equipment, structural safety assessment

Yuan Liu; Weijian Mi; Huiqiang Zheng

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Child and adolescent functional assessment scale : predicting foster care placement outcomes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study explored whether the Child and Adolescent Functional Assessment Scale (CAFAS) scores of children in the care of Family and Children's Services of Renfrew… (more)

Grenier, Jennifer.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

THE FRACTAL DIMENSION OF STAR-FORMING REGIONS AT DIFFERENT SPATIAL SCALES IN M33  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the distribution of stars, H II regions, molecular gas, and individual giant molecular clouds in M33 over a wide range of spatial scales. The clustering strength of these components is systematically estimated through the fractal dimension. We find scale-free behavior at small spatial scales and a transition to a larger correlation dimension (consistent with a nearly uniform distribution) at larger scales. The transition region lies in the range {approx}500-1000 pc. This transition defines a characteristic size that separates the regime of small-scale turbulent motion from that of large-scale galactic dynamics. At small spatial scales, bright young stars and molecular gas are distributed with nearly the same three-dimensional fractal dimension (D {sub f,3D} {approx}< 1.9), whereas fainter stars and H II regions exhibit higher values, D {sub f,3D} {approx_equal} 2.2-2.5. Our results indicate that the interstellar medium in M33 is on average more fragmented and irregular than in the Milky Way.

Sanchez, Nestor; Alfaro, Emilio J. [Instituto de Astrofisica de AndalucIa, CSIC, Apdo. 3004, E-18080, Granada (Spain); Anez, Neyda [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad Experimental de Ciencias, Universidad del Zulia, Maracaibo (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Odekon, Mary Crone, E-mail: nestor@iaa.e [Department of Physics, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866 (United States)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Seasonal, Regional, and Storm-Scale Variability of Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Characteristics in Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal, regional, and storm-scale variations of cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning characteristics in Florida are presented. Strong positive CG (+CG) and negative CG (?CG) flashes (i.e., having large peak current) are emphasized since they often are ...

Scott D. Rudlosky; Henry E. Fuelberg

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Influence of vegetation and seasonal forcing on carbon dioxide fluxes across the Upper Midwest, USA: Implications for regional scaling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide fluxes were examined over the growing seasons of 2002 and 2003 from 14 different sites in Upper Midwest (USA) to assess spatial variability of ecosystem atmosphere CO2 exchange. These sites were exposed to similar temperature/precipitation regimes and spanned a range of vegetation types typical of the region (northern hardwood, mixed forest, red pine, jack pine, pine barrens and shrub wetland). The hardwood and red pine sites also spanned a range of stand ages (young, intermediate, mature). While seasonal changes in net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and photosynthetic parameters were coherent across the 2 years at most sites, changes in ecosystem respiration (ER) and gross ecosystem production (GEP) were not. Canopy height and vegetation type were important variables for explaining spatial variability of CO2 fluxes across the region. Light-use efficiency (LUE) was not as strongly correlated to GEP as maximum assimilation capacity (Amax). A bottom-up multi-tower land cover aggregated scaling of CO2 flux to a 2000 km2 regional flux estimate found June to August 2003 NEE, ER and GEP to be 290 89, 408, 48, and 698, 73 gC m-2, respectively. Aggregated NEE, ER and GEP were 280% larger, 32% smaller and 3% larger, respectively, than that observed from a regionally integrating 447m tall flux tower. However, when the tall tower fluxes were decomposed using a footprint-weighted influence function and then reaggregated to a regional estimate, the resulting NEE, ER and GEP were within 11% of the multi-tower aggregation. Excluding wetland and young stand age sites from the aggregation worsened the comparison to observed fluxes. These results provide insight on the range of spatial sampling, replication, measurement error and land cover accuracy needed for multi-tiered bottom-up scaling of CO2 fluxes in heterogeneous regions such as the Upper Midwest, USA.

Desai, Desai Ankur R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Noormets, Asko [North Carolina State University; Bolstad, Paul V [University of Minnesota; Chen, Jiquan [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Cook, Bruce D [University of Minnesota, St Paul; Davis, Kenneth [Pennsylvania State University; Euskirchen, Eugenie S [University of Alaska; Gough, Christopher M [Ohio State University; Martin, Jonathan G [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Ricciuto, Daniel M [ORNL; Schmid, Hans Peter [Indiana University; Tang, Jianwu [Chicago Botanical Garden, Glencoe, Illiinois; Wang, Weiguo [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Influence of Vegetation and Seasonal Forcing on Carbon Dioxide Fluxes Across the Upper Midwest, USA: Implications for Regional Scaling  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide fluxes were examined over the growing seasons of 2002 and 2003 from 14 different sites in the Upper Midwest (USA) to assess spatial variability of ecosystem–atmosphere CO2 exchange. These sites were exposed to similar temperature/precipitation regimes and spanned a range of vegetation types typical of the region (northern hardwood, mixed forest, red pine, jack pine, pine barrens, and shrub wetland). The hardwood and red pine sites also spanned a range of stand ages (young, intermediate, mature). While seasonal changes in net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and photosynthetic parameters were coherent across the 2 years at most sites, changes in ecosystem respiration (ER) and gross ecosystem production (GEP) were not. Canopy height and vegetation type were important variables for explaining spatial variability of CO2 fluxes across the region. Light-use efficiency (LUE) was not as strongly correlated to GEP as maximum assimilation capacity (Amax). A bottom-up multi-tower land cover aggregated scaling of CO2 flux to a 2000 km2 regional flux estimate found June to August 2003 NEE, ER, and GEP to be ?290 ± 89, 408 ± 48, and 698 ± 73 gC m?2, respectively. Aggregated NEE, ER, and GEP were 280% larger, 32% smaller and 3% larger, respectively, than that observed from a regionally integrating 447 m tall flux tower. However, when the tall tower fluxes were decomposed using a footprint-weighted influence function and then re-aggregated to a regional estimate, the resulting NEE, ER, and GEP were within 11% of the multi-tower aggregation. Excluding wetland and young stand age sites from the aggregation worsened the comparison to observed fluxes. These results provide insight on the range of spatial sampling, replication, measurement error, and land cover accuracy needed for multi-tiered bottom-up scaling of CO2 fluxes in heterogeneous regions such as the Upper Midwest, USA.

Desai, Ankur R.; Noormets, Asko; Bolstad, Paul V.; Chen, Jiquan; Cook, Bruce D.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Euskirchen, Eugenie S.; Gough, Christopher; Martin, Jonathan G.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Schmid, Hans P.; Tang, Jianwu; Wang, Weiguo

2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

67

Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article. 2011 Environ. Res. Lett. 6 034001 (http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/6/3/034001) Download details: IP Address: 98.204.49.123 The article was downloaded on 01/07/2011 at 12:38 Please note that terms and conditions apply. View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience IOP PUBLISHING ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Environ. Res. Lett. 6 (2011) 034001 (9pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/6/3/034001 Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment Dev Millstein and Surabi Menon Lawrence

68

Basin scale assessment of gas hydrate dissociation in response to climate change  

SciTech Connect

Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating climate. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those now occurring in the arctic and those predicted under future climate change scenarios, has only recently been investigated. Field investigations have discovered substantial methane gas plumes exiting the seafloor along the Arctic Ocean margin, and the plumes appear at depths corresponding to the upper limit of a receding gas hydrate stability zone. It has been suggested that these plumes may be the first visible signs of the dissociation of shallow hydrate deposits due to ongoing climate change in the arctic. We simulate the release of methane from oceanic deposits, including the effects of fully-coupled heat transfer, fluid flow, hydrate dissociation, and other thermodynamic processes, for systems representative of segments of the Arctic Ocean margins. The modeling encompasses a range of shallow hydrate deposits from the landward limit of the hydrate stability zone down to water depths beyond the expected range of century-scale temperature changes. We impose temperature changes corresponding to predicted rates of climate change-related ocean warming and examine the possibility of hydrate dissociation and the release of methane. The assessment is performed at local-, regional-, and basin-scales. The simulation results are consistent with the hypothesis that dissociating shallow hydrates alone can result in significant methane fluxes at the seafloor. However, the methane release is likely to be confined to a narrow region of high dissociation susceptibility, defined by depth and temperature, and that any release will be continuous and controlled, rather than explosive. This modeling also establishes the first realistic bounds for methane release along the arctic continental shelf for potential hydrate dissociation scenarios, and ongoing work may help confirm whether climate change is already impacting the stability of the vast oceanic hydrate reservoir.

Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.; Cameron-Smith, P.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Scale-Up Potential of SOFC Technologies: An Assessment of Technical and Economic Factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has been conducting fuel cell technology assessments and sponsoring research and development of fuel cell technologies for distributed power market applications for the past 20 years. Recent technology assessments have identified solid oxide fuel cells to have the potential to significantly impact the electric utility business if cost, performance, durability, and scale-up issues can be resolved (EPRI Report 1008429).

2005-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

70

Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment Title Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Millstein, Dev, and Surabi Menon Journal Environmental Research Letters Volume 6 Start Page 1 Pagination 9 Date Published 07/2011 Keywords co2 offsets, cool roofs, photovoltaics, radiative forcing, urban environment Abstract Modifications to the surface albedo through the deployment of cool roofs and pavements (reflective materials) and photovoltaic arrays (low reflection) have the potential to change radiative forcing, surface temperatures, and regional weather patterns. In this work we investigate the regional climate and radiative effects of modifying surface albedo to mimic massive deployment of cool surfaces (roofs and pavements) and, separately, photovoltaic arrays across the United States. We use a fully coupled regional climate model, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, to investigate feedbacks between surface albedo changes, surface temperature, precipitation and average cloud cover. With the adoption of cool roofs and pavements, domain-wide annual average outgoing radiation increased by 0.16 ± 0.03 W m-2 (mean ± 95% C.I.) and afternoon summertime temperature in urban locations was reduced by 0.11-0.53 "C, although some urban areas showed no statistically significant temperature changes. In response to increased urban albedo, some rural locations showed summer afternoon temperature increases of up to +0.27 "C and these regions were correlated with less cloud cover and lower precipitation. The emissions offset obtained by this increase in outgoing radiation is calculated to be 3.3 ± 0.5 Gt CO2 (mean ± 95% C.I.). The hypothetical solar arrays were designed to be able to produce one terawatt of peak energy and were located in the Mojave Desert of California. To simulate the arrays, the desert surface albedo was darkened, causing local afternoon temperature increases of up to +0.4 "C. Due to the solar arrays, local and regional wind patterns within a 300 km radius were affected. Statistically significant but lower magnitude changes to temperature and radiation could be seen across the domain due to the introduction of the solar arrays. The addition of photovoltaic arrays caused no significant change to summertime outgoing radiation when averaged over the full domain, as interannual variation across the continent obscured more consistent local forcing.

71

Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment Title Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Millstein, Dev, and Surabi Menon Journal Environmental Research Letters Volume 6 Start Page 1 Pagination 9 Date Published 07/2011 Keywords co2 offsets, cool roof, photovoltaics, radiative forcing, urban environment Abstract Modifications to the surface albedo through the deployment of cool roofs and pavements (reflective materials) and photovoltaic arrays (low reflection) have the potential to change radiative forcing, surface temperatures, and regional weather patterns. In this work we investigate the regional climate and radiative effects of modifying surface albedo to mimic massive deployment of cool surfaces (roofs and pavements) and, separately, photovoltaic arrays across the United States. We use a fully coupled regional climate model, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, to investigate feedbacks between surface albedo changes, surface temperature, precipitation and average cloud cover. With the adoption of cool roofs and pavements, domain-wide annual average outgoing radiation increased by 0.16 ± 0.03 W m-2 (mean ± 95% C.I.) and afternoon summertime temperature in urban locations was reduced by 0.11-0.53 "C, although some urban areas showed no statistically significant temperature changes. In response to increased urban albedo, some rural locations showed summer afternoon temperature increases of up to +0.27 "C and these regions were correlated with less cloud cover and lower precipitation. The emissions offset obtained by this increase in outgoing radiation is calculated to be 3.3 ± 0.5 Gt CO2 (mean ± 95% C.I.). The hypothetical solar arrays were designed to be able to produce one terawatt of peak energy and were located in the Mojave Desert of California. To simulate the arrays, the desert surface albedo was darkened, causing local afternoon temperature increases of up to +0.4 "C. Due to the solar arrays, local and regional wind patterns within a 300 km radius were affected. Statistically significant but lower magnitude changes to temperature and radiation could be seen across the domain due to the introduction of the solar arrays. The addition of photovoltaic arrays caused no significant change to summertime outgoing radiation when averaged over the full domain, as interannual variation across the continent obscured more consistent local forcing.

72

An integrated assessment of global and regional water demands for electricity generation to 2095  

SciTech Connect

Electric power plants currently account for approximately one-half of the global industrial water withdrawal. While continued expansion of the electric sector seems likely into the future, the consequent water demands are quite uncertain, and will depend on highly variable water intensities by electricity technologies, at present and in the future. Using GCAM, an integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change, we first establish lower-bound, median, and upper-bound estimates for present-day electric sector water withdrawals and consumption by individual electric generation technologies in each of 14 geopolitical regions, and compare them with available estimates of regional industrial or electric sector water use. We then explore the evolution of global and regional electric sector water use over the next century, focusing on uncertainties related to withdrawal and consumption intensities for a variety of electric generation technologies, rates of change of power plant cooling system types, and rates of adoption of a suite of water-saving technologies. Results reveal that the water withdrawal intensity of electricity generation is likely to decrease in the near term with capital stock turnover, as wet towers replace once-through flow cooling systems and advanced electricity generation technologies replace conventional ones. An increase in consumptive use accompanies the decrease in water withdrawal rates; however, a suite of water conservation technologies currently under development could compensate for this increase in consumption. Finally, at a regional scale, water use characteristics vary significantly based on characteristics of the existing capital stock and the selection of electricity generation technologies into the future.

Davies, Evan; Kyle, G. Page; Edmonds, James A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal-energy storage. Volume 2. Regions 7 through 12  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: Unglaciated Central Region; Glaciated Appalachians, Unglaciated Appalachians; Coastal Plain; Hawaii; and Alaska. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal energy storage. Volume 1. Regions 1 through 6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: the Western Mountains; Alluvial Basins; Columbia LAVA Plateau; Colorado Plateau; High Plains; and Glaciated Central Region. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A Qualitative Assessment of the Australian Tropical Region Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bureau of Meteorology, Australia, routinely analyzes the tropospheric winds over the Australian Tropical Region (40°S–40°N, 70°–180°E). These wind data are assimilated without the use of a forecast model. While being free of any model bias, ...

Harry H. Hendon

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Regional assessment of sampling techniques for more efficient dynamical climate downscaling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamical downscaling is a computationally expensive method whereby fine-scale details of the atmosphere may be portrayed by running a limited area numerical weather prediction model (often called a regional climate model) nested within a coarse ...

James O. Pinto; Andrew J. Monaghan; Luca Delle Monache; Emilie Vanvyve; Daran L. Rife

77

Evaluation of the Surface Climatology over the Conterminous United States in the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program Hindcast Experiment Using a Regional Climate Model Evaluation System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface air temperature, precipitation, and insolation over the conterminous United States region from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) regional climate model (RCM) hindcast study are evaluated using the Jet ...

Jinwon Kim; Duane E. Waliser; Chris A. Mattmann; Linda O. Mearns; Cameron E. Goodale; Andrew F. Hart; Dan J. Crichton; Seth McGinnis; Huikyo Lee; Paul C. Loikith; Maziyar Boustani

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

A multi-scale qualitative approach to assess the impact of urbanization on natural habitats and their connectivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Habitat loss and fragmentation are often concurrent to land conversion and urbanization. Simple application of GIS-based landscape pattern indicators may be not sufficient to support meaningful biodiversity impact assessment. A review of the literature reveals that habitat definition and habitat fragmentation are frequently inadequately considered in environmental assessment, notwithstanding the increasing number of tools and approaches reported in the landscape ecology literature. This paper presents an approach for assessing impacts on habitats on a local scale, where availability of species data is often limited, developed for an alpine valley in northern Italy. The perspective of the methodology is multiple scale and species-oriented, and provides both qualitative and quantitative definitions of impact significance. A qualitative decision model is used to assess ecological values in order to support land-use decisions at the local level. Building on recent studies in the same region, the methodology integrates various approaches, such as landscape graphs, object-oriented rule-based habitat assessment and expert knowledge. The results provide insights into future habitat loss and fragmentation caused by land-use changes, and aim at supporting decision-making in planning and suggesting possible ecological compensation. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Many environmental assessments inadequately consider habitat loss and fragmentation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Species-perspective for defining habitat quality and connectivity is claimed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Species-based tools are difficult to be applied with limited availability of data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We propose a species-oriented and multiple scale-based qualitative approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Advantages include being species-oriented and providing value-based information.

Scolozzi, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.scolozzi@fmach.it [Sustainable Agro-ecosystems and Bioresources Department, IASMA Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, Via E. Mach 1, 38010 San Michele all& #x27; Adige, (Italy); Geneletti, Davide, E-mail: geneletti@ing.unitn.it [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

Meteorological and topographical indicators of wind energy for regional assessments  

SciTech Connect

Techniques using meteorological and topographical indicators of wind energy, developed by PNL and applied to the Northwest wind resource assessment, improved the reliability of the analysis of the geographical distribution of wind energy. The identification and application of these indicators led to an improved understanding of the conditions associated with high and low wind energy. Furthermore, these indicators are especially useful in complex terrain and wind-data-sparse areas for obtaining a somewhat realistic estimate of the wind energy resource.

Elliott, D. L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

A Case Study of the Adequacy of GCM Simulations for Input to Regional Climate Change Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sacramento Basin is used as the focus for a case study testing whether general circulation models (GCMS) are capable of simulating the large-scale and synoptic-scale processes important in studies of regional water resources. Output from a ...

James S. Risbey; Peter H. Stone

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional scale assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Grassland/atmosphere response to changing climate: Coupling regional and local scales. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the study were: to evaluate the response of grassland ecosystems to atmospheric change at regional and site scales, and to develop multiscaled modeling systems to relate ecological and atmospheric models with different spatial and temporal resolutions. A menu-driven shell was developed to facilitate use of models at different temporal scales and to facilitate exchange information between models at different temporal scales. A detailed ecosystem model predicted that C{sub 3} temperate grasslands wig respond more strongly to elevated CO{sub 2} than temperate C{sub 4} grasslands in the short-term while a large positive N-PP response was predicted for a C{sub 4} Kenyan grassland. Long-term climate change scenarios produced either decreases or increases in Colorado plant productivity (NPP) depending on rainfall, but uniform increases in N-PP were predicted in Kenya. Elevated CO{sub 2} is likely to have little effect on ecosystem carbon storage in Colorado while it will increase carbon storage in Kenya. A synoptic climate classification processor (SCP) was developed to evaluate results of GCM climate sensitivity experiments. Roughly 80% agreement was achieved with manual classifications. Comparison of lx and 2xCO{sub 2} GCM Simulations revealed relatively small differences.

Coughenour, M.B.; Kittel, T.G.F.; Pielke, R.A.; Eastman, J.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Urban land use, air toxics and public health: Assessing hazardous exposures at the neighborhood scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use data are increasingly understood as important indicators of potential environmental health risk in urban areas where micro-scale or neighborhood level hazard exposure data are not routinely collected. This paper aims to offer a method for estimating the distribution of air toxics in urban neighborhoods using land use information because actual air monitoring data rarely exist at this scale. Using Geographic Information System spatial modeling tools, we estimate air toxics concentrations across neighborhoods in New York City and statistically compare our model with the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Air Toxic Assessment and air monitoring data across three NYC neighborhoods. We conclude that land use data can act as a good proxy for estimating neighborhood scale air toxics, particularly in the absence of monitoring data. In addition, the paper suggests that land use data can expand the reach of environmental impact assessments that routinely exclude analyses of potential exposures to urban air toxics at the neighborhood scale.

Corburn, Jason [Columbia University, Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation and School of International and Public Affairs, 400 Avery Hall, 1172 Amsterdam Ave. New York, NY 10027 (United States)]. E-mail: jtc2105@columbia.edu

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

Adaptive Control of a Utility-Scale Wind Turbine Operating in Region 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many challenges exist for the efficient and safe operation of wind turbines due to the difficulty in creating accurate models of their dynamic characteristics and the turbulent conditions in which they operate. A promising new area of wind turbine research is the application of adaptive control techniques, which are well suited to problems where the plant model is not well known and the plant operating conditions are unpredictable. In this paper, we design an adaptive collective pitch controller for a high-fidelity simulation of a utility scale, variable-speed horizontal axis wind turbine operating in Region 3. The objective of the adaptive pitch controller is to regulate generator speed and reject step disturbances, which model the uniform wind disturbance across the wind turbine rotor. The control objective is accomplished by collectively pitching the turbine blades. To improve controller performance, we use an extension of the Direct Model Reference Adaptive Control (DMRAC) approach to regulate turbine rotational speed and to accommodate step disturbances. The turbine simulation models the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. The CART is a utility-scale wind turbine that has a well-developed and extensively verified simulator. The adaptive collective pitch controller for Region 3 was compared in simulations with a baseline classical Proportional Integrator (PI) collective pitch controller. In the simulations, the adaptive pitch controller showed improved generator speed regulation in Region 3 when compared with the baseline PI pitch controller. The adaptive controller demonstrated robustness to modeling errors and changes in system parameters.

Frost, S. A.; Balas, M. J.; Wright, A. D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Comparison between the Large-Scale Environments of Moderate and Intense Precipitating Systems in the Mediterranean Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A characterization of the large-scale environment associated with precipitating systems in the Mediterranean region, based mainly on NOAA-16 Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) observations from 2001 to 2007, is presented. Channels 5, 7, and ...

Beatriz M. Funatsu; Chantal Claud; Jean-Pierre Chaboureau

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part II: Imperfect Model Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this two-part work, the feasibility of using an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) for mesoscale and regional-scale data assimilation through various observing system simulation experiments was demonstrated assuming a perfect forecast ...

Zhiyong Meng; Fuqing Zhang

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Statistical Error Decomposition of Regional-Scale Climatological Precipitation Estimates from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly rainfall estimates inferred from the NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite contain errors due to discrete temporal sampling and remote spaceborne rain retrievals. This paper develops a regional-scale error model that ...

Brad L. Fisher

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Theoretical Assessment of Uncertainty in Regional Averages due to Network Density and Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulations are performed over Russia for July and December 2005, 2006, and 2007 to create a “dataset” to assess the impact of network density and design on regional averages. Based on the values at ...

Debasish PaiMazumder; Nicole Mölders

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Towards Assessing NARCCAP Regional Climate Model Credibility for the North American Monsoon: Current Climate Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine 17 dynamically downscaled simulations produced as part of the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) for their skill in reproducing the North American Monsoon system. We focus on precipitation and the ...

Melissa S. Bukovsky; David J. Gochis; Linda O. Mearns

89

On the Development of Regional Climatic Scenarios for Policy-Oriented Climatic-Impact Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review on the development of climatic scenarios related to policy-oriented assessment of the impact of climatic variations is presented. It seeks to provide background information needed to evaluate the extent to which existing regional ...

Peter J. Lamb

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

An integrated modelling framework for simulating regional-scale actor responses to global change in the water domain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within coupled hydrological simulation systems, taking socio-economic processes into account is still a challenging task. In particular, systems that aim at evaluating impacts of climatic change on large spatial and temporal scales cannot be based on ... Keywords: Actors, Climate change, Coupled simulation, Domestic water use, Framework technology, Integrated water resources management, Regional scale model, Social simulation, Water supply

R. Barthel; S. Janisch; N. Schwarz; A. Trifkovic; D. Nickel; C. Schulz; W. Mauser

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

A Preliminary Regional Geothermal Assessment Of The Gulf Of Suez, Egypt |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regional Geothermal Assessment Of The Gulf Of Suez, Egypt Regional Geothermal Assessment Of The Gulf Of Suez, Egypt Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Preliminary Regional Geothermal Assessment Of The Gulf Of Suez, Egypt Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The tectonic setting of Egypt, in the northeastern corner of the African continent, suggests that it may possess significant geothermal resources, especially along its eastern margin. The most promising areas for geothermal development in the NW Red Sea-Gulf of Suez rift system are locations along the eastern shore of the Gulf of Suez that are characterized by surface thermal manifestations, including a cluster of hot springs with varied temperatures. The Gulf of Suez region is one of the most interesting geothermal areas in Egypt because of the high temperatures

92

Lyme Disease In New York State: Spatial Pattern At A Regional Scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lyme disease occurs commonly in New York State, but its geographic distribution is heterogeneous. For each of nine consecutive years, incidence rates from 57 New York State counties were subjected to spatial autocorrelation analysis. Although the epidemic advanced during the study period, the analyses reveal a consistent pattern of spatial dependence. The correlation distance, the distance over which incidence rates covary positively, remained near 120 km over the nine years. A local spatial analysis around Westchester County, a major disease focus, indicated that the global correlation distance matched the extent of the most intense local clustering; statistically weaker clustering extended to 200 km from Westchester. Analyzing the spatial character of the epidemic may reveal the epizootic processes underlying patterns in human infection, and may help identify a spatial scale for regional control of disease. Lyme disease remains the most frequently reported vector-borne disease in the Northern Hemisphere, and the world's most common tick-borne infection.

Stephan Glavanakov; Dennis J. White; Thomas Caraco; Andrei Lapenis; George Robinson; Boleslaw K. Szymanski; William; A. Maniatty

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Regional-scale analysis of the geothermal regime in the western Canada sedimentary basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that radiogenic heat generation at the top of the crystalline Precambrian basement underneath the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin is highly variable, on average higher than for the exposed Canadian Shield, and reflects the basement tectonic structure. The areal distribution of the geothermal gradient across the sediments shows a regional-scale northerly increase, with intermediate- and local-state features correlating with anomalies in heat generation at the top of the basement. Only in the northeast and southeast corners of the basin can high geothermal gradients not be explained by heat generation; there they may be caused by convective fluid flow effects. The temperature distribution at the base of the sediments is highly correlated with the thickness of the sedimentary cover and reflects major topographic and basement features. Overall, the characteristics of the geothermal regime in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin are indicative of a conduction dominated system.

Bachu, S. (Alberta Geological Survey, Alberta Research Council, P.O. Box 8330, Postal Station F, Edmonton, Alberta T6H 5X2 (CA)); Burwash, R.A. (Dept. of Geology, Univ. of Alberta, 1-26 Earth Sciences Building, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (CA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Assessing the Performance of Multiple Regional Climate Model Simulations for Seasonal Mountain Snow in the Upper Colorado River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assesses the performance of the regional climate model (RCM) simulations from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) for the Upper Colorado River basin (UCRB), U.S. Rocky Mountains. The UCRB is a major ...

Nadine Salzmann; Linda O. Mearns

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Geochemical Data on Waters, gases, scales, and rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report tabulates an extensive geochemical database on waters, gases, scales, rocks, and hot-spring deposits from the Dixie Valley region, Nevada. The samples from which the data were obtained were collected and analyzed during 1996 to 1999. These data provide useful information for ongoing and future investigations on geothermal energy, volcanism, ore deposits, environmental issues, and groundwater quality in this region.

Goff, Fraser; Bergfeld, Deborah; Janik, C.J.; et al

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Assessment of transboundary environmental effects in the Pearl River Delta Region: Is there a role for strategic environmental assessment?  

SciTech Connect

China's EIA Law does not require transboundary proposals to be assessed, despite recognition of this globally, for example in the Espoo Convention and Kiev Protocol, and in the European EIA and SEA Directives. In a transboundary context assessment within a state is unusual, as regulating these effects is primarily about the relationship between states. However where a state has more than one legal system such as in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) Region of southern China, transboundary effects should also be addressed. Yet despite the geographical connections between Guangdong Province in mainland China (where the EIA Law applies) and the Hong Kong and Macau Special Administrative Regions (which have their own provisions, neither of which requires transboundary assessments), EIA and SEA are carried out separately. Coordinated or joint approaches to transboundary assessment are generally absent, with the legal autonomy of Hong Kong and Macau a major constraint. As a result institutional responses at the policy level have developed. The article considers global experiences with regulating transboundary EIA and SEA, and analyses potential application to land use, transport and air and water planning in the PRD Region. If applied, benefits may include prevention or mitigation of cumulative effects, broader public participation, and improvements to environmental governance. The PRD Region experience may encourage China to conduct and coordinate EIA and SEA processes with neighbouring states, which has been non-existent or extremely limited to date.

Marsden, Simon, E-mail: simon.marsden@flinders.edu.au

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Assessment of Aerosol Radiative Impact over Oceanic Regions Adjacent to Indian Subcontinent using Multi-Satellite Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Using data from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments, we have retrieved regional distribution of aerosol column single scattering albedo (parameter indicative of the relative dominance of aerosol absorption and scattering effects), a most important, but least understood aerosol property in assessing its climate impact. Consequently we provide improved assessment of short wave aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) (on both regional and seasonal scales) estimates over this region. Large gradients in north-south ARF were observed as a consequence of gradients in single scattering albedo as well as aerosol optical depth. The highest ARF (-37 W m-2 at the surface) was observed over the northern Arabian Sea during June to August period (JJA). In general, ARF was higher over northern Bay of Bengal (NBoB) during winter and pre-monsoon period, whereas the ARF was higher over northern Arabian Sea (NAS) during the monsoon and post- monsoon period. The largest forcing observed over NAS during JJA is the consequence of large amounts of desert dust transported from the west Asian dust sources. High as well as seasonally invariant aerosol single scattering albedos (~0.98) were observed over the southern Indian Ocean region far from continents. The ARF estimates based on direct measurements made at a remote island location, Minicoy (8.3°N, 73°E) in the southern Arabian Sea are in good agreement with the estimates made following multisatellite analysis.

Satheesh, S. K.; Vinoj, V.; Krishnamoorthy, K.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Particles of Outdoor Origin Title Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Particles of Outdoor Origin Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Hering, Susanne V., Melissa M. Lunden, Marc L. Fischer, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Tracy L. Thatcher, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 41 Pagination 639-654 Abstract Time-resolved fine particle concentrations of nitrate, sulfate, and black carbon were examined to assess the appropriateness of using regional data and calculated air exchange rates to model indoor concentrations of particles from outdoor sources. The data set includes simultaneous, sub-hourly aerosol composition measurements at three locations: a regional monitoring site in Fresno, California, inside of an unoccupied residence in Clovis, California, located 6 km northeast of the regional site, and immediately outside of this same residence. Indoor concentrations of PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and black carbon were modeled using varying sets of inputs to determine the influence of three factors on model accuracy: the constraints of the simplified indoor-outdoor model, measured versus modeled air exchange rates, and local versus regional outdoor measurements.

99

A scaling theory for the assignment of spectra in the irregular region. Continuation progress report  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate object of our program is to learn how to extract information about molecular rovibrational motions from experimental spectra or calculated energy levels. This goal of spectroscopy and theoretical chemistry has historically only been possible in the regular spectral region. Our project is one of several which are aimed at spectral interpretation in the chaotic or mixed chaotic plus regular regions. Our particular tools involve a scaling theory developed under our previous DOE support period. This theory uses experimentally fitted spectral Hamiltonians or Hamiltonian`s whose potentials are calculated using quantum chemistry, to obtain energy levels as a function of h{sup -1}. The scaling theory then uses this input to highlight the actions of the subset of all periodic orbits which control the dynamics at any given energy up to dissociation. The periodic orbits themselves, are the skeleton of classical phase space for the molecular motions and are found by classical non-linear dynamic techniques. The finding and following of these periodic orbits by constructing a bifurcation diagram, and in 2D, Poincare surfaces of section, is labor intensive and takes much of our available man hours. We have two projects, {open_quotes}acetylene{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}NO{sub 2}.{close_quotes} Below we first briefly sketch the results of the classical phase space study using the fitted spectral Hamiltonian that describes pure bending dynamics of in the acetylene X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} state to 15,000 cm{sup -1} of internal energy. The work on NO{sub 2} will follow. The specific purpose of this part of our work is to establish relations between experimental data and quantum mechanical results on one side and the behaviour of the dynamics given by the corresponding classical Hamiltonian function on the other side for the bend vibrations of the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} molecule. We transform it into a classical Hamiltonian function given in action and angle variables.

Taylor, H.S.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Assessing the Reliability and Economics of Wide-Scale Grid-Connected  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessing the Reliability and Economics of Wide-Scale Grid-Connected Assessing the Reliability and Economics of Wide-Scale Grid-Connected Distributed Energy Generation with Application to Electric Power Systems Under Stress Speaker(s): Hisham Zerriffi Date: November 13, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kristina LaCommare Electric power systems can be disrupted due to a variety of stress circumstances. These can range from constraints on the physical infrastructure as a result of under-capacity problems to deliberate attacks in times of conflict. Stress conditions can manifest themselves in a variety of ways and determining both the nature of the stress and the best mathematical representation of that stress in the model is complicated. This talk details a quantitative comparison of the reliability of an

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional scale assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Market Assessment of Biomass Gasification and Combustion Technology for Small- and Medium-Scale Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

190 190 July 2009 Market Assessment of Biomass Gasification and Combustion Technology for Small- and Medium-Scale Applications David Peterson and Scott Haase National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-7A2-46190 July 2009 Market Assessment of Biomass Gasification and Combustion Technology for Small- and Medium-Scale Applications David Peterson and Scott Haase Prepared under Task No. IGST.9034 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

102

Scales  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation SCALES Fish are stream-lined. They have to be. Some kinds, like the catfish, are covered with a...

103

Bioenergy Sustainability at the Regional Scale2 In press with Ecology and Society as an Insight Article5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Bioenergy Sustainability at the Regional Scale2 3 4 In press with Ecology and Society Mulholland1 , G. Philip Robertson3 8 9 10 1 Center for Bioenergy Sustainability, Environmental Sciences by the UT-Battelle, LLC, for DOE under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.32 33 #12;Bioenergy Sustainability

104

Assessment of Value Added for Surface Marine Wind Speed Obtained from Two Regional Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hindcasts with reanalysis-driven regional climate models (RCMs) are a common tool to assess weather statistics (i.e., climate) and recent changes and trends. The capability of different state-of-the-art RCMs (with and without spectral nudging ...

Jörg Winterfeldt; Ralf Weisse

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Regional Climate Simulations over North America: Interaction of Local Processes with Improved Large-Scale Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reasons for biases in regional climate simulations were investigated in an attempt to discern whether they arise from deficiencies in the model parameterizations or are due to dynamical problems. Using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System ...

Gonzalo Miguez-Macho; Georgiy L. Stenchikov; Alan Robock

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Market Assessment of Biomass Gasification and Combustion Technology for Small- and Medium-Scale Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a market assessment of gasification and direct combustion technologies that use wood and agricultural resources to generate heat, power, or combined heat and power (CHP) for small- to medium-scale applications. It contains a brief overview of wood and agricultural resources in the U.S.; a description and discussion of gasification and combustion conversion technologies that utilize solid biomass to generate heat, power, and CHP; an assessment of the commercial status of gasification and combustion technologies; a summary of gasification and combustion system economics; a discussion of the market potential for small- to medium-scale gasification and combustion systems; and an inventory of direct combustion system suppliers and gasification technology companies. The report indicates that while direct combustion and close-coupled gasification boiler systems used to generate heat, power, or CHP are commercially available from a number of manufacturers, two-stage gasification systems are largely in development, with a number of technologies currently in demonstration. The report also cites the need for a searchable, comprehensive database of operating combustion and gasification systems that generate heat, power, or CHP built in the U.S., as well as a national assessment of the market potential for the systems.

Peterson, D.; Haase, S.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Low Head/Low Power Hydropower Resource Assessment of the Pacific Northwest Hydrologic Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analytical assessment of the hydropower potential of the Pacific Northwest Hydrologic Region was performed using state-of-the-art digital elevation models and geographic information system tools. The principal focus of the study was the amount of low head (less than 30 ft)/low power (less than 1 MW) potential in the region and the fractions of this potential that corresponded to the operating envelopes of three classes of hydropower technologies: conventional turbines, unconventional systems, and microhydro (less than 100 kW) technologies. To obtain these estimates, the hydropower potential of all the stream segments in the region, which averaged 2 miles in length, were calculated. These calculations were performed using hydrography and hydraulic heads that were obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey’s Elevation Derivatives for National Applications dataset and stream flow predictions from a regression equation developed specifically for the region. Stream segments excluded from development and developed hydropower in the

Power Hydropower; Douglas G. Hall; Gregory R. Carroll; Shane J. Cherry; Y D. Lee; Garold L. Sommers

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Linkages between Orographic Forcing and the Scaling Properties of Convective Rainfall in Mountainous Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heavy rainfall over mountainous terrain often results in catastrophic flooding and presents a great challenge for forecasters. Statistical downscaling methods provide a way to bridge across the scale gap between rainfall forecasts from numerical ...

Deborah K. Nykanen

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Spurious Grid-Scale Precipitation in the North American Regional Reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spurious grid-scale precipitation (SGSP) occurs in many mesoscale numerical weather prediction models when the simulated atmosphere becomes convectively unstable and the convective parameterization fails to relieve the instability. Case studies ...

Gregory L. West; W. James Steenburgh; William Y. Y. Cheng

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Regional-Scale Flows in Mountainous Terrain. Part I: A Numerical and Observational Comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study uses observed data and a numerical simulation to examine the generation of thermally driven flows across the Colorado mountain barrier on meso-? to meso-? scales. The observations were collected from remote surface observing systems at ...

James E. Bossert; William R. Cotton

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Interannual Variability of Tropical Cyclones in the Australian Region: Role of Large-Scale Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the role of large-scale environmental factors, notably sea surface temperature (SST), low-level relative vorticity, and deep-tropospheric vertical wind shear, in the interannual variability of November–April tropical ...

Hamish A. Ramsay; Lance M. Leslie; Peter J. Lamb; Michael B. Richman; Mark Leplastrier

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Large-Scale Heat and Moisture Budgets over the ASTEX Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rawinsonde data collected from the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) were used to investigate the mean and temporal characteristics of large-scale heat and moisture budgets for a 2-week period in June 1992. During this period a ...

Paul E. Ciesielski; Wayne H. Schubert; Richard H. Johnson

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Ocean forecasting in terrain-following coordinates: Formulation and skill assessment of the Regional Ocean Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systematic improvements in algorithmic design of regional ocean circulation models have led to significant enhancement in simulation ability across a wide range of space/time scales and marine system types. As an example, we briefly review the Regional ... Keywords: Biogeochemical cycles, Incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, Regional ocean prediction, Sea ice modeling, Split-explicit time stepping

D. B. Haidvogel; H. Arango; W. P. Budgell; B. D. Cornuelle; E. Curchitser; E. Di Lorenzo; K. Fennel; W. R. Geyer; A. J. Hermann; L. Lanerolle; J. Levin; J. C. McWilliams; A. J. Miller; A. M. Moore; T. M. Powell; A. F. Shchepetkin; C. R. Sherwood; R. P. Signell; J. C. Warner; J. Wilkin

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Using fine-scale fuel measurements to assess wildland fuels, potential fire behavior and hazard mitigation treatments in the southeastern USA.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The inherent spatial and temporal heterogeneity of fuelbeds in forests of the southeastern United States may require fine scale fuel measurements for providing reliable fire hazard and fuel treatment effectiveness estimates. In a series of five papers, an intensive, fine scale fuel inventory from the Savanna River Site in the southeastern United States is used for building fuelbeds and mapping fire behavior potential, evaluating fuel treatment options for effectiveness, and providing a comparative analysis of landscape modeled fire behavior using three different data sources including the Fuel Characteristic Classification System, LANDFIRE, and the Southern Wildfire Risk Assessment. The research demonstrates that fine scale fuel measurements associated with fuel inventories repeated over time can be used to assess broad scale wildland fire potential and hazard mitigation treatment effectiveness in the southeastern USA and similar fire prone regions. Additional investigations will be needed to modify and improve these processes and capture the true potential of these fine scale data sets for fire and fuel management planning.

Ottmar, Roger, D.; Blake, John, I.; Crolly, William, T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Local-Scale Variability of Solar Radiation in a Mountainous Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous measurements of horizontal global solar irradiance and other meteorological parameters have been taken over three years at a dense radiometric network. The network is located on a mountainous region in southeastern Spain (37°N, 3°W) ...

J. Tovar; F. J. Olmo; L. Alados-Arboledas

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Investigation of Wave Growth and Decay in the SWAN Model: Three Regional-Scale Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wave growth and decay characteristics in a typical wave action model [Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN)] are investigated in this paper. This study is motivated by generally poor agreement between model results and measurements for a regional-...

W. Erick Rogers; Paul A. Hwang; David W. Wang

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Considerations of Meteorological Time Series in Estimating Regional-Scale Crop Yield  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of simulated soybean yield to spatial averaging of meteorological data was analyzed for the central United States during a 23-year period. Regional yield was simulated using the physiological model, SOYGRO, in two sets of ...

Gregory J. Carbone

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Brine chemistry: scaling and corrosion. Geothermal research study in the Salton Sea region of California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to recommend a reasonable program of brine chemistry research that will result in the development of methods for predicting and controlling scale deposition, and in guidelines for the selection of corrosion-resistant construction materials. First, background information, which is necessary for the understanding of the problems of scaling and corrosion in the Salton Sea KGRA, is presented through a review of the history of geothermal exploration and development in the Salton Sea. Second, literature relevant to the geochemistry of the Salton Sea field is reviewed and important results are emphasized. Third, current research efforts directed toward actual power plant construction are summarized and evaluated. Fourth, research which has been proposed but is not currently funded is discussed. Fifth, because silica scaling has been the most troublesome problem in the past, the basic chemistry of silica and its relationship to scaling is discussed. Sixth, recommendations for future research are made in which a fundamental engineering approach is emphasized. In this approach, experiments would be conducted on actual process equipment and detailed chemical analyses would be performed on site in well-equipped field laboratories. 88 references.

Hoffmann, M.R.

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

A multi-scale biophysical model to inform regional management of coral reefs in the western Philippines and South China Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The health and functioning of coral reef ecosystems worldwide is in decline, and in the face of increasing anthropogenic stress, the rate of decline of these important ecosystems is set to accelerate. Mitigation strategies at regional scales are costly, ... Keywords: CORSET, Connectivity, Coral reef, Decision support, Ecosystem model, Management, Philippines, Regional scale, South China Sea

J. Melbourne-Thomas; C. R. Johnson; P. M. Aliño; R. C. Geronimo; C. L. Villanoy; G. G. Gurney

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Regional partnerships to sequester CO{sub 2} at near-commercial scale  

SciTech Connect

A summary of the keynote speech by Acting Deputy Secretary of Energy, Jeffrey Kupfer, is given, as well as details about new agreements on CO{sub 2} injection. These include the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership agreement to locate CO{sub 2} injection with a 50 mw clean energy systems plant in Kumberlina, California, and the Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction Partnership and Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration PARTNERSHIP plans to inject CO{sub 2} derived from post combustion capture at power plants. 3 photos.

NONE

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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121

Evolution of anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions of air pollutants at global and regional scales during the 1980-2010 period  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several different inventories of global and regional anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions are assessed for the 1980-2010 period. The species considered in this study are carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide and black carbon. The inventories considered include the ACCMIP historical emissions developed in support of the simulations for the IPCC AR5 assessment. Emissions for 2005 and 2010 from the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) are also included. Large discrepancies between the global and regional emissions are identified, which shows that there is still no consensus on the best estimates for surface emissions of atmospheric compounds. At the global scale, anthropogenic emissions of CO, NOx and SO2 show the best agreement in most years. The agreement is low for BC emissions, particularly in the period prior to 2000. The best consensus is for NOx emissions for all periods and all regions, except for China where emissions in 1980 and 1990 need to be better defined. Emissions of CO need a better quantification in the USA for all periods; in Central Europe, the evolution of emissions during the past two decades needs to be better determined. The agreement between the different SO2 emissions datasets is rather good for the USA, but better quantification is needed elsewhere, particularly for Central Europe and China. The comparisons performed in this study show that the use of RCP8.5 for the extension of the ACCMIP inventory beyond 2000 is reasonable, until more global or regional estimates become available. Concerning biomass burning emissions, most inventories agree within 50-80%, depending on the year and season. The large differences are due to differences in the estimates of burned areas from the different available products, as well as in the amount of biomass burnt.

Granier, Claire; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Bond, Tami C.; D'Angiola, Ariela; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; Frost, G. J.; Heil, Angelika; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Kinne, Stefan; Klimont, Z.; Kloster, Jean; Lamarque, J.-F.; Liousse, Catherine; Masui, Toshihiko; Meleux, Frederik; Mieville, Aude; Ohara, Toshimasa; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Riahi, Keywan; Schultz, Martin; Smith, Steven J.; Thomson, Allison M.; van Aardenne, John; van der Werf, Guido R.; Van Vuuren, Detlef

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

122

Studies of regional-scale climate variability and change: Hidden Markov models and coupled ocean-atmosphere modes  

SciTech Connect

In this project we developed further a twin approach to the study of regional-scale climate variability and change. The two approaches involved probabilistic network (PN) models (sometimes called dynamic Bayesian networks) and intermediate-complexity coupled ocean-atmosphere models (ICMs). We thus made progress in identifying the predictable modes of climate variability and investigating their impacts on the regional scale. In previous work sponsored by DOE�s Climate Change Prediction Program (CCPP), we had developed a family of PNs (similar to Hidden Markov Models) to simulate historical records of daily rainfall, and used them to downscale seasonal predictions of general circulation models (GCMs). Using an idealized atmospheric model, we had established a novel mechanism through which ocean-induced sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies might in�uence large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns on interannual and longer time scales; similar patterns were found in a hybrid coupled ocean�atmosphere�sea-ice model. In this continuation project, we built on these ICM results and PN model development to address prediction of rainfall and temperature statistics at the local scale, associated with global climate variability and change, and to investigate the impact of the latter on coupled ocean�atmosphere modes. Our main project results consist of extensive further development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling together with the development of associated software; new intermediate coupled models; a new methodology of inverse modeling for linking ICMs with observations and GCM simulations, called empirical mode reduction (EMR); and observational studies of decadal and multi-decadal natural climate variability, informed by ICM simulations. A particularly timely by-product of this work is an extensive study of clustering of cyclone tracks in the extratropical Atlantic and the western Tropical Pacific, with potential applications to predicting landfall.

M. Ghil (UCLA), PI; S. Kravtsov (UWM); A. W. Robertson (IRI); P. Smyth (UCI)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

123

Multi-Model Assessment of Regional Surface Temperature Trends: CMIP3 and CMIP5 20th Century Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional surface temperature trends from the CMIP3 and CMIP5 20th century runs are compared with observations -- at spatial scales ranging from global averages to individual grid points -- using simulated intrinsic climate variability from pre-...

Thomas R. Knutson; Fanrong Zeng; Andrew T. Wittenberg

124

Energy Requirement Analysis of Large-Scale Biogas Project in High-Cold Region of China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual mean temperature is very low in high cold region of china. The insulating and heating measures on the basis of the energy requirement analysis of biogas project are needed to ensure the normal running of fermentation process. In this paper, ... Keywords: High-cold, Biogas, Fermentation, Heat

Yinsheng Yang; Lili Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Renewable energy resource and technology assessment: Southern Tier Central Region, New York, New York. Renewable Energy Resource Inventory; renewable energy technology handbook; technology assessment workbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Renewable Energy Resource Inventory contains regional maps that record the location of renewable energy resources such as insolation, wind, biomass, and hydropower in the Southern Tier Central Region of New York State. It contains an outline of a process by which communities can prepare local renewable energy resource inventories using maps and overlays. The process starts with the mapping of the resources at a regional scale and telescopes to an analysis of resources at a site-specific scale. The resource inventory presents a site analysis of Sullivan Street Industrial Park, Elmira, New York.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Tests of an ensemble Kalman filter for mesoscale and regional-scale data assimilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation examines the performance of an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) implemented in a mesoscale model in increasingly realistic contexts from under a perfect model assumption and in the presence of significant model error with synthetic observations to real-world data assimilation in comparison to the three-dimensional variational (3DVar) method via both case study and month-long experiments. The EnKF is shown to be promising for future application in operational data assimilation practice. The EnKF with synthetic observations, which is implemented in the mesoscale model MM5, is very effective in keeping the analysis close to the truth under the perfect model assumption. The EnKF is most effective in reducing larger-scale errors but less effective in reducing errors at smaller, marginally resolvable scales. In the presence of significant model errors from physical parameterization schemes, the EnKF performs reasonably well though sometimes it can be significantly degraded compared to its performance under the perfect model assumption. Using a combination of different physical parameterization schemes in the ensemble (the so-called �multi-scheme� ensemble) can significantly improve filter performance due to the resulting better background error covariance and a smaller ensemble bias. The EnKF performs differently for different flow regimes possibly due to scale- and flow-dependent error growth dynamics and predictability. Real-data (including soundings, profilers and surface observations) are assimilated by directly comparing the EnKF and 3DVar and both are implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting model. A case study and month-long experiments show that the EnKF is efficient in tracking observations in terms of both prior forecast and posterior analysis. The EnKF performs consistently better than 3DVar for the time period of interest due to the benefit of the EnKF from both using ensemble mean for state estimation and using a flow-dependent background error covariance. Proper covariance inflation and using a multi-scheme ensemble can significantly improve the EnKF performance. Using a multi-scheme ensemble results in larger improvement in thermodynamic variables than in other variables. The 3DVar system can benefit substantially from using a short-term ensemble mean for state estimate. Noticeable improvement is also achieved in 3DVar by including some flow dependence in its background error covariance.

Meng, Zhiyong

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

A GIS/Simulation Framework for Assessing Change in Water Yield over Large Spatial Scales  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent legislation to,initiate vegetation management in the Central Sierra hydrologic region of California includes a focus on corresponding changes in water yield. This served as the impetus for developing a combined geographic information system (GIS) and simulation assessment framework. Using the existing vegetation density condition, together with proposed rules for thinning to reduce fire risk, a set of simulation model inputs were generated for examining the impact of the thinning scenario on water yield. The approach allows results to be expressed as the mean and standard deviation of change in water yield for each 1 km2 map cell that is treated. Values for groups of cells are aggregated for typical watershed units using area-weighted averaging. Wet, dry and average precipitation years were simulated over a large region. Where snow plays an important role in hydrologic processes, the simulated change in water yield was less than 0.5% of expected annual runoff for a typical water shed. Such small changes would be undetectable in the field using conventional stream flow analysis. These results suggest that use of water yield increases to help justify forest-thinning activities or offset their cost will be difficult.

Graham, R.; Hargrove, W.W.; Huff, D.D.; Nikolov, N.; Tharp, M.L.

1999-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

128

An Assessment of Possible Climate Change in the Australian Region Based on an Intercomparison of General Circulation Modeling Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assist in estimating likely future climate change in the Australian region, the authors examine the results of four different general circulation modeling experiments run to assess the equilibrium impact of doubling greenhouse gases. The ...

P. H. Whetton; A. B. Pittock; M. R. Haylock; P. J. Rayner

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

A method for the assessment of the visual impact caused by the large-scale deployment of renewable-energy facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production of energy from renewable sources requires a significantly larger use of the territory compared with conventional (fossil and nuclear) sources. For large penetrations of renewable technologies, such as wind power, the overall visual impact at the national level can be substantial, and may prompt public reaction. This study develops a methodology for the assessment of the visual impact that can be used to measure and report the level of impact caused by several renewable technologies (wind farms, solar photovoltaic plants or solar thermal ones), both at the local and regional (e.g. national) scales. Applications are shown to several large-scale, hypothetical scenarios of wind and solar-energy penetration in Spain, and also to the vicinity of an actual, single wind farm.

Rodrigues, Marcos; Montanes, Carlos [Fluid Mechanics Group, University of Zaragoza, Maria de Luna 3, 50018, Zaragoza (Spain); Fueyo, Norberto, E-mail: Norberto.Fueyo@unizar.e [Fluid Mechanics Group, University of Zaragoza, Maria de Luna 3, 50018, Zaragoza (Spain)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

SITE: a methodology for assessment of energy facility siting patterns. Regional studies program  

SciTech Connect

The timely development of the nation's energy production capacity in a manner that minimizes potential adverse local and regional impacts associated with energy facilities requires the use of sophisticated techniques for evaluation of siting alternatives and fuel cycle options. This report is a documentation of the computerized SITE methodology that has been developed for evaluating health, environmental, and socioeconomic impacts related to utilization of alternate sites for energy production within a region of interest. The cost, impact, and attribute vectors, which are generated and displayed on density maps, can be used in a multiparameter overlay process to identify preferable siting areas. The assessment of clustered facilities in energy centers is also possible within the SITE analysis framework. An application of the SITE methodology to Northern Illinois is presented. Also included is a description of the ongoing extension of SITE for the accumulative evaluation of alternative regional energy siting patterns and fuel cycle options. An appendix provides documentation and user information for the SITE computer program. (auth)

Frigerio, N.A.; Habegger, L.J.; King, R.F.; Hoover, L.J.; Clark, N.A.; Cobian, J.M.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Department of Energy Small-Scale Hydropower Program: Feasibility assessment and technology development summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes two subprograms under the US Department of Energy's Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Program. These subprograms were part of the financial assistance activities and included the Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) feasibility assessments and the technology development projects. The other major subprograms included engineering research and development, legal and institutional aspects, and technology transfer. These other subprograms are covered in their respective summary reports. The problems of energy availability and increasing costs of energy led to a national effort to develop economical and environmental attractive alternative energy resources. One such alternative involved the utilization of existing dams with hydraulic heads of <65 ft and the capacity to generate hydroelectric power of 15 MW or less. Thus, the PRDA program was initiated along with the Technology Development program. The purpose of the PRDA feasibility studies was to encourage development of renewable hydroelectric resources by providing engineering, economic, environmental, safety, and institutional information. Fifty-five feasibility studies were completed under the PRDA. This report briefly summarizes each of those projects. Many of the PRDA projects went on to become technology development projects. 56 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Rinehart, B.N.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Department of Energy Small-Scale Hydropower Program: Feasibility assessment and technology development summary report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes two subprograms under the US Department of Energy's Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Program. These subprograms were part of the financial assistance activities and included the Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) feasibility assessments and the technology development projects. The other major subprograms included engineering research and development, legal and institutional aspects, and technology transfer. These other subprograms are covered in their respective summary reports. The problems of energy availability and increasing costs of energy led to a national effort to develop economical and environmental attractive alternative energy resources. One such alternative involved the utilization of existing dams with hydraulic heads of hydroelectric power of 15 MW or less. Thus, the PRDA program was initiated along with the Technology Development program. The purpose of the PRDA feasibility studies was to encourage development of renewable hydroelectric resources by providing engineering, economic, environmental, safety, and institutional information. Fifty-five feasibility studies were completed under the PRDA. This report briefly summarizes each of those projects. Many of the PRDA projects went on to become technology development projects. 56 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Rinehart, B.N.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Mid-Holocene Orbital Forcing of Regional-Scale Climate: A Case Study of Western North America Using a High-Resolution RCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the context of anthropogenic climate change, paleoclimate modeling has become a key technique for studying climate system responses to changes in external forcing. Of current interest is the response of regional-scale climate to global-...

Noah S. Diffenbaugh; Lisa C. Sloan

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Development of an 8-Parameter Probabilistic Artificial Neural Network Model for Long-Range Monsoon Rainfall Pattern Recognition over the Smaller Scale Geographical Region -District  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Attempts to recognize pattern of monsoon rainfall over the smaller scale geographical region (district) 8-Parameter Probabilistic ANN model have been developed. Eleven neurons in input layer to input eleven years rainfall data time series. Eleven neurons ...

S. Karmakar; M. K. Kowar; P. Guhathakurta

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part III: Comparison with 3DVAR in a Real-Data Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of using an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) for mesoscale and regional-scale data assimilation has been demonstrated in the authors’ recent studies via observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) both under a perfect-model ...

Zhiyong Meng; Fuqing Zhang

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Natural Tracers and Multi-Scale Assessment of Caprock Sealing Behavior: A Case Study of the Kirtland Formation, San Juan Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The assessment of caprocks for geologic CO{sub 2} storage is a multi-scale endeavor. Investigation of a regional caprock - the Kirtland Formation, San Juan Basin, USA - at the pore-network scale indicates high capillary sealing capacity and low permeabilities. Core and wellscale data, however, indicate a potential seal bypass system as evidenced by multiple mineralized fractures and methane gas saturations within the caprock. Our interpretation of {sup 4}He concentrations, measured at the top and bottom of the caprock, suggests low fluid fluxes through the caprock: (1) Of the total {sup 4}He produced in situ (i.e., at the locations of sampling) by uranium and thorium decay since deposition of the Kirtland Formation, a large portion still resides in the pore fluids. (2) Simple advection-only and advection-diffusion models, using the measured {sup 4}He concentrations, indicate low permeability ({approx}10-20 m{sup 2} or lower) for the thickness of the Kirtland Formation. These findings, however, do not guarantee the lack of a large-scale bypass system. The measured data, located near the boundary conditions of the models (i.e., the overlying and underlying aquifers), limit our testing of conceptual models and the sensitivity of model parameterization. Thus, we suggest approaches for future studies to better assess the presence or lack of a seal bypass system at this particular site and for other sites in general.

Jason Heath; Brian McPherson; Thomas Dewers

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Assessment of Natural Stream Sites for Hydroelectric Dams in the Pacific Northwest Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This pilot study presents a methodology for modeling project characteristics using a development model of a stream obstructing dam. The model is applied to all individual stream reaches in hydrologic region 17, which encompasses nearly all of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. Project site characteristics produced by the modeling technique include: capacity potential, principal dam dimensions, number of required auxiliary dams, total extent of the constructed impoundment boundary, and the surface area of the resulting reservoir. Aggregated capacity potential values for the region are presented in capacity categories including total, that at existing dams, within federal and environmentally sensitive exclusion zones, and the balance which is consider available for greenfield development within the limits of the study. Distributions of site characteristics for small hydropower sites are presented and discussed. These sites are screened to identify candidate small hydropower sites and distributions of the site characteristics of this site population are presented and discussed. Recommendations are made for upgrading the methodology and extensions to make the results more accessible and available on a larger scale.

Douglas G. Hall; Kristin L. Verdin; Randy D. Lee

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

A Spatial Structural and Statistical Approach to Building Classification of Residential Function for City-Scale Impact Assessment Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to implement robust climate change adaption and mitigation strategies in cities fine spatial scale information on building stock is required. However, for many cities such information is rarely available. In response, we present a methodology ... Keywords: City Spatial Planning and Impact Assessment, Morphological and Spatial Metrics, Multinomial Logistic Regression, Residential Building Classification

Dimitrios P. Triantakonstantis; Stuart L. Barr

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Task 3 (Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of NORM, Heavy Metals, and Organics) and 4 (Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas) activities involved continued data analysis and report writing. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Region) was issued as a final report during the previous reporting period. Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Seafood Consumption and Use Patterns) activities included the preparation of the final report. There were no Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan) activities to report. Task 8 (Project Management and Deliverables) activities involved the submission of the necessary reports and routine management.

Gettleson, D.A.

1997-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

140

Overview of the Quality and Completeness of Resource Assessment Data for the APEC Region  

SciTech Connect

The availability of information and data on the renewable energy resources (solar, wind, biomass, geothermal, and hydro) for renewable energy technologies is a critical element in the successful implementation of these technologies. This paper presents a comprehensive summary of published information on these resources for each of 1 8 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies. In the introductory sections, a discussion of the quality and completeness of this information is presented, along with recommendations on steps that need to be taken to facilitate the further development and deployment of renewable energy technologies throughout the APEC region. These sections are then followed by economy-specific reviews, and a complete bibliography and summary description for each citation. The major results of this survey are that a basis for understanding renewable energy resources is currently available for essentially all the economies, although there is a significant need to apply improved and updated resource assessment techniques in most. For example, most wind resource assessments rely on data collected at national weather stations, which often results in underestimates of the true potential wind resource within an economy. As a second example, solar resource assessments in most economies rely on an analysis of very simple sunshine record data, which results in large uncertainties in accurately quantifying the resource. National surveys of biomass, geothermal, and hydro resources are often lacking; in most cases, resources for these technologies were discussed for site-specific studies only. Thus, the major recommendations in this paper are to: ( 1 ) upgrade current or install new wind and solar measurement systems at key 'benchmark' locations to provide accurate, representative information on these resources; (2) apply advanced wind and solar resource assessment tools that rely on data quality assessment procedures, the use of satellite data, and models, and that can reliably interpolate the data collected at the benchmark sites; (3) conduct national surveys of biomass, geothermal, and hydro resources uniformly and consistently; and ( 4) establish a centralized data center that provides ready access to the most up-to-date and validated renewable resource data in all APEC economies.

Renne, D. S.; Pilasky, S.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional scale assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Institutional constraints on alternative water for energy: a guidebook for regional assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Basic information is presented about the legal, political, and social constraints faced by energy developers in the acquisition of water from underground, irrigation return flow, municipal waste, and saline sources. It is a guide to those institutional constraints which are general and pronounced enough to be important for regional assessments. First, attention was focused on the acquisition phase of the water use cycle. Second, constraints were analyzed primarily from a regional, rather than state-by-state, perspective. Emphasis was placed generally on the West - particularly the synfuel-rich Rocky Mountain states, the East, and Mid-West, in that order. Alaska and Hawaii were not surveyed. Third, the study focuses on the constraints associated with groundwater, municipal waste, irrigation return flow, and sea water, in that order. The phrase, institutional constraints, as used in the study, means legal, social, economic, and political restrictions, requirements, circumstances, or conditions that must be anticipated or responded to in order to acquire water for energy development. The study focuses primarily on legal constraints and secondarily on political constraints, because they tend to encompass or reflect other forms of institutional constraints.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid Phase methanol (LPMEOH) Process A DOE Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program seeks to offer the energy marketplace more efficient and environmentally benign coal utilization technology options by demonstrating them in industrial settings. This document is a DOE post-project assessment (PPA) of one of the projects selected in Round III of the CCT Program, the commercial-scale demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process, initially described in a Report to Congress by DOE in 1992. Methanol is an important, large-volume chemical with many uses. The desire to demonstrate a new process for the production of methanol from coal, prompted Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) to submit a proposal to DOE. In October 1992, DOE awarded a cooperative agreement to Air Products to conduct this project. In March 1995, this cooperative agreement was transferred to Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L.P. (the Partnership), a partnership between Air Products and Eastman Chemical Company (Eastman). DOE provided 43 percent of the total project funding of $213.7 million. Operation of the LPMEOH Demonstration Unit, which is sited at Eastman's chemicals-from-coal complex in Kingsport, Tennessee, commenced in April 1997. Although operation of the CCT project was completed in December 2002, Eastman continues to operate the LPMEOH Demonstration Unit for the production of methanol. The independent evaluation contained herein is based primarily on information from Volume 2 of the project's Final Report (Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Co., L.P. 2003), as well as other references cited.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2003-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

143

Assessment and design of small-scale hydro-electric power plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Appraisal and design of small-scale hydro power plants requires a knowledge of hydraulics, hydrology, civil, mechanical, and electrical engineering, and basic economics. Further, small hydro… (more)

Jones, ID

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Assessment of Dynamical Downscaling in Near-Surface Fields with Different Spectral Nudging Approaches Using the Nested Regional Climate Model (NRCM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic downscaling with regional-scale climate models is used widely for increasing the spatial resolution of global-scale climate model projections. One uncertainty in generating these projections is the choice of boundary forcing applied. In ...

Jiali Wang; Veerabhadra R. Kotamarthi

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Assessment of the Performance of CORDEX Regional Climate Models in Simulating Eastern Africa Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates the ability of ten Regional Climate Models (RCMs) from the COordinated Regional climate Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX) in simulating the characteristics of rainfall patterns over Eastern Africa region. The seasonal ...

Hussen Seid Endris; Philip Omondi; Suman Jain; Christopher Lennard; Bruce Hewitson; Ladislaus Chang’a; J. L. Awange; Alessandro Dosio; Patrick Ketiem; Grigory Nikulin; Hans-Jürgen Panitz; Matthias Büchner; Frode Stordal; Lukiya Tazalika

146

Assessment of Cracks in Stress Concentration Regions with Localized Plastic Zones  

SciTech Connect

Marty brittle fracture evaluation procedures include plasticity corrections to elastically computed stress intensity factors. These corrections, which are based on the existence of a plastic zone in the vicinity of the crack tip, can overestimate the plasticity effect for a crack embedded in a stress concentration region in which the elastically computed stress exceeds the yield strength of the material in a localized zone. The interactions between the crack, which acts to relieve the high stresses driving the crack, plasticity effects in the stress concentration region, and the nature and source of the loading are examined by formulating explicit flaw finite element models for a crack emanating from the root of a notch located in a panel subject to an applied tensile stress. The results of these calculations provide conditions under which a crack-tip plasticity correction based on the Irwin plastic zone size overestimates the plasticity effect. A failure assessment diagram (FAD) curve is used to characterize the effect of plasticity on the crack driving force and to define a less restrictive plasticity correction for cracks at notch roots when load-controlled boundary conditions are imposed. The explicit flaw finite element results also demonstrate that stress intensity factors associated with load-controlled boundary conditions, such as those inherent in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code as well as in most handbooks of stress intensity factors, can be much higher than those associated with displacement-controlled conditions, such as those that produce residual or thermal stresses. Under certain conditions, the inclusion of plasticity effects for cracks loaded by displacement-controlled boundary conditions reduces the crack driving force thus justifying the elimination of a plasticity correction for such loadings. The results of this study form the basis for removing unnecessary conservatism from flaw evaluation procedures that utilize plasticity corrections.

Friedman, E.

1998-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

147

Plan for the long term environmental assessment of geopressured resource development in the Louisiana Gulf Coast Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of research to develop a plan for the long-term environmental assessment of geopressured/geothermal resource development in the Louisiana Gulf Coast region are reported. An overall view of the environmental issues facing decision-makers in the area of geopressured resource development is presented, along with a plan for monitoring potential environmental impacts. Separate assessments and plans are presented for geological effects, air and water quality, ecosystem quality, and socioeconomic and cultural considerations. (JGB)

Newchurch, E.J.; Bryan, C.F.; Harrison, D.P.; Muller, R.A.; Wilcox, R.E.; Bachman, A.L.; Newman, J.P.; Cunningham, K.J.; Hilding, R.K.; Rehage, J.A.

1978-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Transportation and Site Location Analysis for Regional Integrated Biomass Assessment (RIBA)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The farmgate cost and available supply of biomass often exhibit considerable variation within a State. This variation, combined with the relatively high cost of transporting bulky biomass material, produces a wide range of expected delivered feedstock costs across a State. As a consequence, both production and transportation costs must be well-modeled when analyzing potential locations for conversion facilities. The Regional Integrated Biomass Assessment system consists of two phases. The descriptive phase characterizes a farmgate cost and supply surface for switchgrass production over a given State. These results are passed to the analytical phase, where a transportation model is used to compute the marginal cost of supplying an ethanol plant at a prescribed level of demand. The model generates a marginal cost surface that illustrates the most promising areas for locating an ethanol plant. Next, a sequential location model simulates the commercial development of ethanol production facilities. This model considers every road network node as a potential site and generates a sequence of likely plant locations. Results from the RIBA analysis demonstrate that the cost of switchgrass can increase dramatically from one location to another. This variation will seriously effect the economics of conversion in the proper sizing and locating of ethanol plant facilities.

Noon, C.E.; Daly, M.J.; Graham, R.L.; Zahn, F.B.

1996-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Life Cycle Assessment of a Pilot Scale Farm-Based Biodiesel Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study used environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) to investigate waste vegetable oil (WVO) biodiesel production at the University of Guelph, Ridgetown Campus, Centre for… (more)

Wasserman, Eli Shawn Jordan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Large-Scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States: Assessment of Opportunities and Barriers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper assesses the potential for U.S. offshore wind to meet the energy needs of many coastal and Great Lakes states.

Musial, W.; Ram, B.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Techniques for assessing the wind energy resource in the North Central region  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy has sponsored the development of regional wind energy resource atlases for twelve regions of the United States. The North Central Region, which consists of North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Minnesota, and Iowa, was one of the regions for which an atlas was assembled. This report is a description of observational and analytical techniques used in the development of the North Central region's wind energy resource atlas.

Freeman, D.L.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Scale Dependence of Radar-Rainfall Rates—An Assessment Based on Raindrop Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scale differences may introduce a bias when comparing, merging, or assimilating rainfall measurements because the dynamic range of values representing the underlying physical process strongly depends on the resolution of the data. The present ...

Matthias Steiner; James A. Smith

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Regional groundwater flow and tritium transport modeling and risk assessment of the underground test area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The groundwater flow system of the Nevada Test Site and surrounding region was evaluated to estimate the highest potential current and near-term risk to the public and the environment from groundwater contamination downgradient of the underground nuclear testing areas. The highest, or greatest, potential risk is estimated by assuming that several unusually rapid transport pathways as well as public and environmental exposures all occur simultaneously. These conservative assumptions may cause risks to be significantly overestimated. However, such a deliberate, conservative approach ensures that public health and environmental risks are not underestimated and allows prioritization of future work to minimize potential risks. Historical underground nuclear testing activities, particularly detonations near or below the water table, have contaminated groundwater near testing locations with radioactive and nonradioactive constituents. Tritium was selected as the contaminant of primary concern for this phase of the project because it is abundant, highly mobile, and represents the most significant contributor to the potential radiation dose to humans for the short term. It was also assumed that the predicted risk to human health and the environment from tritium exposure would reasonably represent the risk from other, less mobile radionuclides within the same time frame. Other contaminants will be investigated at a later date. Existing and newly collected hydrogeologic data were compiled for a large area of southern Nevada and California, encompassing the Nevada Test Site regional groundwater flow system. These data were used to develop numerical groundwater flow and tritium transport models for use in the prediction of tritium concentrations at hypothetical human and ecological receptor locations for a 200-year time frame. A numerical, steady-state regional groundwater flow model was developed to serve as the basis for the prediction of the movement of tritium from the underground testing areas on a regional scale. The groundwater flow model was used in conjunction with a particle-tracking code to define the pathlines followed by groundwater particles originating from 415 points associated with 253 nuclear test locations. Three of the most rapid pathlines were selected for transport simulations. These pathlines are associated with three nuclear test locations, each representing one of the three largest testing areas. These testing locations are: BOURBON on Yucca Flat, HOUSTON on Central Pahute Mesa, and TYBO on Western Pahute Mesa. One-dimensional stochastic tritium transport simulations were performed for the three pathlines using the Monte Carlo method with Latin hypercube sampling. For the BOURBON and TYBO pathlines, sources of tritium from other tests located along the same pathline were included in the simulations. Sensitivity analyses were also performed on the transport model to evaluate the uncertainties associated with the geologic model, the rates of groundwater flow, the tritium source, and the transport parameters. Tritium concentration predictions were found to be mostly sensitive to the regional geology in controlling the horizontal and vertical position of transport pathways. The simulated concentrations are also sensitive to matrix diffusion, an important mechanism governing the migration of tritium in fractured carbonate and volcanic rocks. Source term concentration uncertainty is most important near the test locations and decreases in importance as the travel distance increases. The uncertainty on groundwater flow rates is as important as that on matrix diffusion at downgradient locations. The risk assessment was performed to provide conservative and bounding estimates of the potential risks to human health and the environment from tritium in groundwater. Risk models were designed by coupling scenario-specific tritium intake with tritium dose models and cancer and genetic risk estimates using the Monte Carlo method. Estimated radiation doses received by individuals from chronic exposure to tritium, and the corre

None

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Assessment of the Regional Climate Model Version 3 over the Maritime Continent Using Different Cumulus Parameterization and Land Surface Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an assessment of the Regional Climate Model, version 3 (RegCM3), coupled to two land surface schemes: the Biosphere–Atmosphere Transfer System, version 1e (BATS1e), and the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS). The model’s ...

Rebecca L. Gianotti; Dongfeng Zhang; Elfatih A. B. Eltahir

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Assessing regional evapotranspiration and water balance across a Mediterranean montane climate gradient  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water storage anoma- lies) generally rely on assessing one component and inferring the other as a residual (Yeh and

Anderson, Ray G.; Jin, Yufang; Goulden, Michael L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

An Assessment of GCM Skill in Simulating Persistence across Multiple Time Scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change impact studies for water resource applications, such as the development of projections of reservoir yields or the assessment of likely frequency and amplitude of drought under a future climate, require that the year-to-year ...

Fiona Johnson; Seth Westra; Ashish Sharma; Andrew J. Pitman

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Large-Scale Pyrolysis Oil Production: A Technology Assessment and Economic Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A broad perspective of pyrolysis technology as it relates to converting biomass substrates to a liquid bio-oil product and a detailed technical and economic assessment of a fast pyrolysis plant.

Ringer, M.; Putsche, V.; Scahill, J.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

A collaborative framework for multi-area dynamic security assessment of large scale systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that our knowledge of power system dynamics and the quality of available dynamic security analysis software- security assessment (load-flow computations) [4]­[10]. But there remain several open questions which have

Wehenkel, Louis

159

Direct heat applications of geothermal energy in The Geysers/Clear Lake region. Volume I. Geotechnical assessment, agribusiness applications, socioeconomic assessment, engineering assessment. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The different uses to which geothermal heat and fluids could be applied as a direct utilization of resource or as heat utilization are explored. The following aspects are covered: geotechnical assessment, agricultural and industrial applications, socioeconomic assessment, and engineering assessment. (MHR)

Not Available

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

An assessment of accountability policies for large-scale distributed computing systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grid computing systems offer resources to solve large-scale computational problems and are thus widely used in a large variety of domains, including computational sciences, energy management, and defense. Accountability in these application domains is ... Keywords: accountability, distributed systems, grid, policies, scalability

Wonjun Lee; Anna C. Squicciarini; Elisa Bertino

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional scale assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Structural Assessment of D-Regions Affected by Alkali-Silica Reaction/Delayed Ettringite Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combined experimental and analytical program was conducted to investigate the effects of Alkali-Silica Reaction (ASR) and Delayed Ettringite Formation (DEF) on D-regions in reinforced concrete (RC) bridge bents. Four large-scale RC specimens, which represent cantilever and straddle bents in Texas bridges in each specimen, were constructed. The first specimen represented the unexposed control specimen, while the other three were conditioned in the field with supplemental watering to promote ASR/DEF and served as the exposed specimens. The control and two exposed specimens with various levels of ASR/DEF, after eight months and two years of field conditioning, were load tested to failure. The last specimen remains in field with additional exposure to promote ASR/DEF and will be load tested in future studies. The width and length of preload-induced cracks and developing cracks that initiated in the exposed specimens and grew over time, indicating concrete expansion due to ASR/DEF mechanisms, were measured. Petrographic analysis results of concrete cores extracted from the exposed specimens after their load testing confirmed the formation of ASR gel and minimum accumulation of ettringite. The structural testing results showed that the failure mechanism in all three tested specimens was due to a brittle shear failure in the beam-column joint. However, slightly greater stiffness, strength, and ductility were observed in the exposed specimens as a result of the activation of the reinforcing steel in the specimens due to the expansion of the concrete primarily from ASR, which effectively prestressed and confined the core concrete. Sectional analysis and Strut-and-Tie Modeling (STM) of the experimental specimens were applied. Three-dimensional nonlinear Finite Element Analyses (FEA) were also conducted to numerically simulate the overall structural performance, internal response, and out-of-plane behavior of the experimental specimens. The effects of varying constitutive relations of the concrete in tension on models of the specimens were compared with the measured experimental response. A method to mimic ASR/DEF effects on exposed specimens was proposed and incorporated into the FEA approach. As a result, forces that prestress and confine the core concrete were effectively applied through the reinforcing steel prior to subsequent structural loading. The three-dimensional FEA approach was able to simulate the out-of-plane behavior of the beam-column joint and the proposed method yielded comparable results with the measured overall and internal behavior of specimens.

Liu, Shih-Hsiang 1979-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment of 14 Regions Outside the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Washington, DC 20585The information presented in this overview is based on the report “World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment, ” which

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Initial Market Assessment for Small-Scale Biomass-Based CHP  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to reexamine the energy generation market opportunities for biomass CHP applications smaller than 20 MW. This paper provides an overview of the benefits of and challenges for biomass CHP in terms of policy, including a discussion of the drivers behind, and constraints on, the biomass CHP market. The report provides a summary discussion of the available biomass supply types and technologies that could be used to feed the market. Two primary markets are outlined--rural/agricultural and urban--for small-scale biomass CHP, and illustrate the primary intersections of supply and demand for those markets. The paper concludes by summarizing the potential markets and suggests next steps for identifying and utilizing small-scale biomass.

Brown, E.; Mann, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Trial Application of the Facility Safeguardability Assessment Process to the NuScale SMR Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FSA is a screening process intended to focus a facility designer’s attention on the aspects of their facility or process design that would most benefit from application of SBD principles and practices. The process is meant to identify the most relevant guidance within the SBD tools for enhancing the safeguardability of the design. In fiscal year (FY) 2012, NNSA sponsored PNNL to evaluate the practical application of FSA by applying it to the NuScale small modular nuclear power plant. This report documents the application of the FSA process, presenting conclusions regarding its efficiency and robustness. It describes the NuScale safeguards design concept and presents functional "infrastructure" guidelines that were developed using the FSA process.

Coles, Garill A.; Hockert, John; Gitau, Ernest TN; Zentner, Michael D.

2013-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

165

Trial Application of the Facility Safeguardability Assessment Process to the NuScale SMR Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FSA is a screening process intended to focus a facility designer’s attention on the aspects of their facility or process design that would most benefit from application of SBD principles and practices. The process is meant to identify the most relevant guidance within the SBD tools for enhancing the safeguardability of the design. In fiscal year (FY) 2012, NNSA sponsored PNNL to evaluate the practical application of FSA by applying it to the NuScale small modular nuclear power plant. This report documents the application of the FSA process, presenting conclusions regarding its efficiency and robustness. It describes the NuScale safeguards design concept and presents functional "infrastructure" guidelines that were developed using the FSA process.

Coles, Garill A.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Hockert, John; Zentner, Michael D.

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

166

Assessment of multiple ecosystem services in New Zealand at the catchment scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ecosystem services approach to resource management considers all services provided by ecosystems to all sections of the community. As such, it could be used to assess sustainability of human development and equity in resource use. To facilitate the ... Keywords: Climate regulation, Erosion, Land-use change, Landscape modelling, Scenario analysis, Water quality

A. -G. E. Ausseil; J. R. Dymond; M. U. F. Kirschbaum; R. M. Andrew; R. L. Parfitt

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Distributed Processing of a Regional Prediction Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the parallelization of a mesoscale-cloud-scale numerical weather prediction model and experiments conducted to assess its performance. The model used is the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS), a limited-area ...

Kenneth W. Johnson; Jeff Bauer; Gregory A. Riccardi; Kelvin K. Droegemeier; Ming Xue

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

A Study to Assess Needed Improvements and Barriers in Planning and Delivering Agricultural Extension Activities in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to assess planning and delivering agricultural extension activities in the Kurdistan region of Iraq for future program implementation. The study was a descriptive research and used a modified Delphi technique to identify needed improvements and highlight barriers in planning and delivering extension activities by the willingness of extension workers. The population of the study was 50 MOAWR purposely selected government employees consisted of 10 extension experts, 15 extension administrators, and 25 extension agents. The study used three rounds web-based survey questionnaires. In Round I, the panelists were responded to two open ended questions to identify needed improvements and barriers in planning and delivering extension activities. The gathered information from Round I was examined, organized, and combined to create the second questionnaire for Round II. In Round II, the panelists were indicated their levels of agreement or disagreement about each needed improvement and barrier. The study employed a six-Likert scale with 1=”Strongly Agree”, 2=”Agree”, 3=”Somewhat Agree”, 4=”Somewhat Disagree”, 5=”Disagree”, and 6=”Strongly Disagree”. The needed improvements and barriers that received two-thirds of agreement (numbers 1 and 2 in the six-point Likert scale) were used to create the third questionnaire for Round III. In Round III, panelists were developed consensus by rating the statements that received two-third agreement in Round II. Equally, the same Round II six-point Likert scale was used in Round III. The result findings of the study were revealed to the demands of extension policy implementation in the region. The results of the study were summarized in three overall implementation theme areas: community based program development, building capacity program, and institutional structuring and three distinct research areas: leadership in extension, personal traits of extension agents, and external communication. Furthermore, the results of the study provided key points and details for each implementation theme and distinct research area.

Khoshnaw, Yousif Khalid

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Regional assessment of geothermal potential along the Balcones and Luling-Mexia-Talco Fault Zones, Central Texas. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A region-wide inventory and assessment of aquifers known to yield warm water (greater than 90/sup 0/F, 32/sup 0/C) is presented. This study was conducted to ascertain the potential for obtaining geothermal energy for space heating and water heating. The aquifers investigated include the Hosston/Trinity Sands, the Hensel Sand, the Paluxy Sand, the Edwards Limestone, and the Woodbine Sand. Each aquifer was examined in terms of its stratigraphic and structural framework and its hydrogeological properties. (MHR)

Woodruff, C.M. Jr.; McBride, M.W.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A Hydroclimatological Assessment of Regional Drought Vulnerability: A Case Study of Indiana Droughts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterizing and developing drought climatology continues to be a challenging problem. As decision makers seek guidance on water management strategies, there is a need for assessing the performance of drought indices. This requires the ...

Umarporn Charusombat; Dev Niyogi

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The April 1990 Floods over Eastern Australia: Synoptic Description and Assessment of Regional NWP Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Between 17 and 22 April 1990 widespread flooding occurred throughout Queensland, New South Wales, and Victoria, with several record rainfalls recorded. This paper investigates the forcing of the rainfall, assesses the quality of the operational ...

Graham A. Mills; Ian Russell

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Assessment of Roughness Length Schemes Implemented within the Noah Land Surface Model for High Altitude Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current land surface models still have difficulties with producing reliable surface heat fluxes and skin temperature (Tsfc) estimates for high altitude regions, which may be addressed via adequate parameterization of the roughness lengths for ...

Donghai Zheng; Rogier Van Der Velde; Zhongbo Su; Martijn J. Booij; Arjen Y. Hoekstra

173

Multimodel Combination by a Bayesian Hierarchical Model: Assessment of Ice Accumulation over the Oceanic Arctic Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of general circulation models (GCMs) varies across regions and periods. When projecting into the future, it is therefore not obvious whether to reject or to prefer a certain GCM. Combining the outputs of several GCMs may enhance ...

Malaak Kallache; Elena Maksimovich; Paul-Antoine Michelangeli; Philippe Naveau

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Preliminary direct heat geothermal resource assessment of the Tennessee Valley region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary appraisal of the direct heat geothermal energy resources of the Tennessee Valley region has been completed. This region includes Kentucky, Tennessee and parts of adjacent states. Intermediate and deep aquifers were selected for study. Basement and Top-of-Knox structure and temperature maps were compiled from oil and gas well data on file at various state geological survey offices. Results of this study indicate that the New Madrid seismic zone is the only area within the region that possesses potential for direct heat utilization. In other areas geothermal energy is either too deep for economical extraction or it will not be able to compete with other local energy resources. The only anomalously high temperature well outside the New Madrid seismic zone was located in the Rome Trough and near the central part of the eastern Kentucky coal basin. Geothermal energy in that region would face strong competition from coal, oil and natural gas.

Staub, W.P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Radiological assessment of the decontamination and decommissioning of a small-scale fuel-reprocessing plant  

SciTech Connect

Decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of surplus radiological facilities is becoming a major concern as buildings built during the 1940's and 1950's reach the end of their useful lives. Prior to the start of a D and D project, a detailed radiological characterization of the facility is required to determine the nature and extent of residual contamination. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently begun such a characterization of Building 3505, originally called the Metal Recovery Facility, which served as a small-scale fuel reprocessing plant during the 1950's. Extensive contamination remains within areas of the facility, including transuranic (TRU) materials. Laboratory analyses were used in conjunction with in situ measurements of dose rate and contamination levels to determine the current status of the building and surrounding area. This information will be used to estimate the amount of decontamination required and the quantity of radioactive waste.

Simpson, D.R.; Emery, J.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The Precipitation Anomaly Classification: A Method for Monitoring Regional Precipitation Deficiency and Excess on a Global Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An objective method to identify and track significant global precipitation anomalies on time scales of a month or longer is presented. The technique requires current observations of monthly precipitation amounts for each station and long term (20 ...

J. E. Janowiak; C. F. Ropelewski; M. S. Halpert

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

DOE/EA-1626: Final Environmental Assessment for Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) Phase III Large-Scale Field Test (October 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

26 26 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) Phase III Large-Scale Field Test Decatur, Illinois October 2008 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY U.S. Department of Energy MGSC Phase III National Energy Technology Laboratory Final Environmental Assessment ______________________________________________________________________________ Table of Contents i October 2008 TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES.......................................................................................................................... v LIST OF FIGURES ........................................................................................................................

178

Evaluating a biomass resource: The TVA region-wide biomass resource assessment model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wood is an alterative fuel for electric power generation at coal-fired plants in the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) region. Short rotation wood energy crops (SRWC) could provide a source of this woody biomass. However, the economic and supply structures of SRWC markets have not been established. Establishing the likely price and supply of SRWC biomass in a region is a complex task because biomass is not an established commodity as are oil, natural gas and coal. In this study we project the cost and supply of short-rotation woody biomass for the TVA region -- a 276 county area that includes all of Tennessee and portions of 10 contiguous states in the southeastern United States. Projected prices and quantities of SRWC are assumed to be a function of the amount and quality of crop and pasture land available in a region. expected SRWC yields and production costs on differing soils and land types, and the profit that could be obtained from current conventional crop production on these same lands. Results include the supply curve of SRWC biomass that is projected to be available from the entire region, the amount and location of crop and pasture land that would be used, and the conventional agricultural crops that would be displaced as a function of SRWC production. Finally, we show the results of sensitivity analysis on the projected cost and supply of SRWC biomass. In particular, we examine the separate impacts of varying SRWC production yields.

Downing, M.; Graham, R.L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Biennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Appendix A Regional Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-effectiveness of natural gas power plants are the cost of natural gas (assessed elsewhere), capital cost and thermal of coal-fired electricity generation. In addition, the delivered price of coal to power plants located used in the plan are more appropriate to a power plant that has purchased pipeline capacity to ensure

180

Regional residual plots for assessing the fit of linear regression models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intuitively appealing lack-of-fit test to assess the adequacy of a regression model is introduced together with a graphical diagnostic tool. The graphical method itself includes a formal testing procedure, and, it is particularly useful to detect ... Keywords: Diagnostic tool, Graphical method, Lack-of-fit, Multiple regression

E. Deschepper; O. Thas; J. P. Ottoy

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional scale assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles and Petroleum Displacement: A Regional Economic Impact Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interest in alternatives to conventional vehicles such as plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) has risen because of the environmental and energy security concerns associated with petroleum dependence, but what would be the economic impact of the widespread use of such vehicles? This study quantified the regional economic impacts associated with an increased market penetration of PHEVs in the household vehicle market.

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

182

Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal-energy storage. Volume 3. Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains two appendices to the main report. The first lists the aquifers in the 12 geographic regions of the USA and characterizes each as containing sands and gravels or limestones or volcanic rock. The second appendix tabulates the hydrologic characteristics of each aquifer. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Representation of Terrestrial Hydrology and Large-Scale Drought of the Continental United States from the North American Regional Reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) is a state-of-the-art land–atmosphere reanalysis product that provides improved representation of the terrestrial hydrologic cycle compared to previous global reanalyses, having the potential to ...

Justin Sheffield; Ben Livneh; Eric F. Wood

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The Role of the North Atlantic Oscillation in Shaping Regional-Scale Peak Seasonal Precipitation across the Indian Subcontinent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study focuses on the impact of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) in shaping the regional-level precipitation during the peak months of the two main rainy seasons over the Indian subcontinent. Monthly precipitation data from 1871 to ...

Shouraseni Sen Roy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Development of an Antarctic Regional Climate System Model. Part I: Sea Ice and Large-Scale Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled atmosphere–ice regional model previously used for simulations in the Arctic has been implemented in the Antarctic. Three 14-month simulations were performed for 1988–89, with different oceanic specifications. The year 1988 was ...

David A. Bailey; Amanda H. Lynch

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Verification of Patch- and Regional-Scale Energy Balance Estimates Derived from Microwave and Optical Remote Sensing during SGP97  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1997 Southern Great Plains Hydrology Experiment (SGP97) was designed and conducted to extend surface soil moisture retrieval algorithms based on passive microwave observations to coarser resolutions, larger regions with more diverse ...

William P. Kustas; Thomas J. Jackson; Andrew N. French; J. Ian MacPherson

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Aircraft Regional-Scale Flux Measurements over Complex Landscapes of Mangroves, Desert, and Marine Ecosystems of Magdalena Bay, Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural ecosystems are rarely structurally simple or functionally homogeneous. This is true for the complex coastal region of Magdalena Bay, Baja California Sur, Mexico, where the spatial variability in ecosystem fluxes from the Pacific coastal ...

Rommel C. Zulueta; Walter C. Oechel; Joseph G. Verfaillie; Steven J. Hastings; Beniamino Gioli; William T. Lawrence; Kyaw Tha Paw U

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Empirical assessment of a prismatic daylight-redirecting window film in a full-scale office testbed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for presentation to the IESNA 2013 Annual Conference, Huntington Beach, CA, for presentation to the IESNA 2013 Annual Conference, Huntington Beach, CA, October 26-29, 2013 and for publication in Leukos, the journal of the IESNA. Empirical assessment of a prismatic daylight- redirecting window film in a full-scale office testbed Anothai Thanachareonkit, Eleanor S. Lee, Andrew McNeil Building Technologies and Urban Systems Department, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Mailstop 90-3111, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA Abstract Daylight redirecting systems with vertical windows have the potential to offset lighting energy use in deep perimeter zones. Microstructured prismatic window films can be manufactured using low-cost, roll-to-roll fabrication methods and adhered to the inside surface of existing

189

ADVANCED INTEGRATION OF MULTI-SCALE MECHANICS AND WELDING PROCESS SIMULATION IN WELD INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential to save trillions of BTU’s in energy usage and billions of dollars in cost on an annual basis based on use of higher strength steel in major oil and gas transmission pipeline construction is a compelling opportunity recognized by both the US Department of Energy (DOE). The use of high-strength steels (X100) is expected to result in energy savings across the spectrum, from manufacturing the pipe to transportation and fabrication, including welding of line pipe. Elementary examples of energy savings include more the 25 trillion BTUs saved annually based on lower energy costs to produce the thinner-walled high-strength steel pipe, with the potential for the US part of the Alaskan pipeline alone saving more than 7 trillion BTU in production and much more in transportation and assembling. Annual production, maintenance and installation of just US domestic transmission pipeline is likely to save 5 to 10 times this amount based on current planned and anticipated expansions of oil and gas lines in North America. Among the most important conclusions from these studies were: • While computational weld models to predict residual stress and distortions are well-established and accurate, related microstructure models need improvement. • Fracture Initiation Transition Temperature (FITT) Master Curve properly predicts surface-cracked pipe brittle-to-ductile initiation temperature. It has value in developing Codes and Standards to better correlate full-scale behavior from either CTOD or Charpy test results with the proper temperature shifts from the FITT master curve method. • For stress-based flaw evaluation criteria, the new circumferentially cracked pipe limit-load solution in the 2007 API 1104 Appendix A approach is overly conservative by a factor of 4/?, which has additional implications. . • For strain-based design of girth weld defects, the hoop stress effect is the most significant parameter impacting CTOD-driving force and can increase the crack-driving force by a factor of 2 depending on strain-hardening, pressure level as a % of SMYS, and flaw size. • From years of experience in circumferential fracture analyses and experimentation, there has not been sufficient integration of work performed for other industries into analogous problems facing the oil and gas pipeline markets. Some very basic concepts and problems solved previously in these fields could have circumvented inconsistencies seen in the stress-based and strain-based analysis efforts. For example, in nuclear utility piping work, more detailed elastic-plastic fracture analyses were always validated in their ability to predict loads and displacements (stresses and strains). The eventual implementation of these methodologies will result in acceleration of the industry adoption of higher-strength line-pipe steels.

Wilkowski, Gery M.; Rudland, David L.; Shim, Do-Jun; Brust, Frederick W.; Babu, Sundarsanam

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

Regional power systems planning: a state of the art assessment. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report was to define regional power systems planning problems, the tools available and their shortcomings, and to document all of the above in a concise readable form. The approach consisted of a survey and literature search. The survey determined the tools being used by utilities, the tools they had rejected, and the tools they planned to try out. The literature search was conducted for the purpose of documenting the tools available, and performing a comparative analysis of these tools. The project included a mix of utility, university, and consulting organizations. Several organizations were consulted in the selection of the participants. A non-profit organization, The University of Oklahoma, was selected to manage the project. The results were reviewed in a series of four one day meetings by known authorities in each field. This report consists of the results of this project. Perhaps its major finding is that several aspects of the regional planning problem are not well defined, the roles of the various participants in regional planning is not clear, and certainly research is needed for the development of new methodology.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Direct heat applications of geothermal energy in The Geysers/Clear Lake region. Volume I. Geotechnical assessment, agribusiness applications, socioeconomic assessment, engineering assessment. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discussion is presented under the following section headings: background and some technical characteristics of geothermal resources; geology and geohydrology, geophysics, and, conclusions regarding availability of geothermal energy for nonelectric uses; agricultural assessment of Lake County, site assessment for potential agricultural development, analysis of potential agricultural applications, special application of low cost geothermal energy to algae harvesting, development of an integrated agribusiness, geothermal complex in Lake County, analysis of individual enterprises, and, recommendations for subsequent work; demographic characteristics, economic condition and perspective of Lake County, economic impact of geothermal in Lake County, social and economic factors related to geothermal resource development, socioeconomic impact of nonelectric uses of geothermal energy, and, identification of direct heat applications of geothermal energy for Lake County based on selected interviews; cost estimate procedure, example, justification of procedure, and, typical costs and conclusions; and, recommended prefeasibility and feasibility studies related to construction of facilities for nonelectric applications of geothermal resource utilization. (JGB)

Not Available

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Assessment of a Food for Work Program and the Drought Survival Needs of Ethiopian Communities in the Northern Tigray Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The highland Tigray region of Northern Ethiopia has historically suffered significantly from drought shock events. These events, coupled with a high poverty rate- have left a severe impact on the agricultural output and community survival of the region. Several development interventions have been implemented in Ethiopia to address the effects of drought and poverty, the largest being the recent Food for Work Productive Safety Net Programme (PSNP). The purpose of this study was to assess the food security and drought survival needs of Ethiopian communities, more specifically, communities in the Northern Tigray Region. The main research questions were: (a) what are major themes from the permanent literature on the PSNP's management policies' impact at the beneficiary level; and (b) what are common needs of drought prone villages in the Tigray Region of Northern Ethiopia? Research Question (a) was approached through content analysis of six purposely chosen peer reviewed journal articles related to the implementation of the first five years of the PSNP. Data was analyzed through the constant comparative method and two major themes emerged: Targeting Policy, and Transfer Policy. To address Research Question (b), the researcher traveled to four drought prone villages in the Tigray Region and facilitated a combination of Participatory Rural Appraisal and Rapid Rural Appraisal techniques to assess community-level needs. Interviews with Non-Governmental Agency employees, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development employees, and University faculty provided institutional perspective to the research question. Data was analyzed using the constant comparative method and inductively formed into 11 themes, housed in three sectors: Economic Diversification, Environmental Management, and Social Coping Mechanisms. The results of this study concurred with food security literature; namely that mechanisms for selecting intervention beneficiaries (i.e., targeting policy) and the process for distributing benefits (i.e., transfer policy) are practical concerns at the village level in Ethiopia. Analysis of participatory data formed a framework of community drought survival needs in the context of the Tigray Region. Asset building, water management, and human capacity are example needs which emerged from this study and should be addressed for the long term improvement of Ethiopia's resilience to drought shock events.

Collett, Ryan

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

An assessment of regional climate trends and changes to the Mt. Jaya glaciers of Irian Jaya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past century, glaciers throughout the tropics have predominately retreated. These small glaciers, which respond quickly to climate changes, are becoming increasingly important in understanding glacier-climate interactions. The glaciers on Mt. Jaya in Irian Jaya, Indonesia are the last remaining tropical glaciers in the Western Pacific region. Although considerable research exists investigating the climatic factors most affecting tropical glacier mass balance, extensive research on the Mt. Jaya glaciers has been lacking since the early 1970s. Using IKONOS satellite images, the ice extents of the Mt. Jaya glaciers in 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 were mapped. The mapping indicates that the recessional trend which began in the mid-19th century has continued. Between 1972 (Allison, 1974; Allison and Peterson, 1976) and 2000, the glaciers lost approximately 67.6% of their area, representing a reduction in surface ice area from 7.2 km2 to 2.35 km2. From 2000 to 2005, the glaciers lost an additional 0.54 km2, representing approximately 24% of the 2000 area. Rates of ice loss, calculated from area measurements for the Mt. Jaya glaciers in 1942, 1972, 1987, and 2005, indicate that ice loss on Mt. Jaya has increased during each subsequent period. Preliminary modeling, using 600 hPa atmospheric temperature, specific humidity, wind speeds, surface precipitation, and radiation values, acquired from the NCEP Reanalysis dataset, indicates that the only climate variable having a statistically-significant change with a magnitude great enough to strongly affect ice loss on these glaciers was an increase in the mean monthly atmospheric temperature of 0.24�°C between 1972 and 1987. However, accelerated ice loss occurring from 1988-2005 without large observed changes in the weather variables indicates that a more complex explanation may be required. Small, though statistically-significant changes were found in regional precipitation, with precipitation decreasing from 1972-1987 and increasing from 1988-2005. While, individually, these changes were not of sufficient magnitude to have greatly affected ice loss on these glaciers, increased precipitation along with a rising freezing level may have resulted in a greater proportion of the glacier surface being affected by rain. This may account for the increased recession rate observed in the latter period.

Kincaid, Joni L.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Integrated assessment of a new Waste-to-Energy facility in Central Greece in the context of regional perspectives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main aim of this study is the integrated assessment of a proposed Waste-to-Energy facility that could contribute in the Municipal Solid Waste Management system of the Region of Central Greece. In the context of this paper alternative transfer schemes for supplying the candidate facility were assessed considering local conditions and economical criteria. A mixed-integer linear programming model was applied for the determination of optimum locations of Transfer Stations for an efficient supplying chain between the waste producers and the Waste-to-Energy facility. Moreover different Regional Waste Management Scenarios were assessed against multiple criteria, via the Multi Criteria Decision Making method ELECTRE III. The chosen criteria were total cost, Biodegradable Municipal Waste diversion from landfill, energy recovery and Greenhouse Gas emissions and the analysis demonstrated that a Waste Management Scenario based on a Waste-to-Energy plant with an adjacent landfill for disposal of the residues would be the best performing option for the Region, depending however on the priorities of the decision makers. In addition the study demonstrated that efficient planning is necessary and the case of three sanitary landfills operating in parallel with the WtE plant in the study area should be avoided. Moreover alternative cases of energy recovery of the candidate Waste-to-Energy facility were evaluated against the requirements of the new European Commission Directive on waste in order for the facility to be recognized as recovery operation. The latter issue is of high significance and the decision makers in European Union countries should take it into account from now on, in order to plan and implement facilities that recover energy efficiently. Finally a sensitivity check was performed in order to evaluate the effects of increased recycling rate, on the calorific value of treated Municipal Solid Waste and the gate fee of the candidate plant and found that increased recycling efforts would not diminish the potential for incineration with energy recovery from waste and neither would have adverse impacts on the gate fee of the Waste-to-Energy plant. In general, the study highlighted the need for efficient planning in solid waste management, by taking into account multiple criteria and parameters and utilizing relevant tools and methodologies into this context.

Perkoulidis, G. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Papageorgiou, A., E-mail: giou6@yahoo.g [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Karagiannidis, A. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kalogirou, S. [Waste to Energy Research and Technology Council (Greece)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

Data Analysis, Pre-Ignition Assessment, and Post-Ignition Modeling of the Large-Scale Annular Cookoff Tests  

SciTech Connect

In order to understand the implications that cookoff of plastic-bonded explosive-9501 could have on safety assessments, we analyzed the available data from the large-scale annular cookoff (LSAC) assembly series of experiments. In addition, we examined recent data regarding hypotheses about pre-ignition that may be relevant to post-ignition behavior. Based on the post-ignition data from Shot 6, which had the most complete set of data, we developed an approximate equation of state (EOS) for the gaseous products of deflagration. Implementation of this EOS into the multimaterial hydrodynamics computer program PAGOSA yielded good agreement with the inner-liner collapse sequence for Shot 6 and with other data, such as velocity interferometer system for any reflector and resistance wires. A metric to establish the degree of symmetry based on the concept of time of arrival to pin locations was used to compare numerical simulations with experimental data. Several simulations were performed to elucidate the mode of ignition in the LSAC and to determine the possible compression levels that the metal assembly could have been subjected to during post-ignition.

G. Terrones; F.J. Souto; R.F. Shea; M.W.Burkett; E.S. Idar

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

196

Regional variability in feeding habits of the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris): a preliminary assessment using ¹?N and ¹³C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an attempt to assess the effectiveness of stable isotope analysis to determine diet composition of wild manatees, twenty-five species of vegetation commonly consumed by manatees were collected from four regions in Florida, analyzed for relative values of stable carbon (¹³C) and nitrogen (¹?N) using a mass spectrometer, and compared to stable carbon and nitrogen values of epidermal, dermal, and muscle tissue from manatee carcasses (n=25) recovered in the same four regions. Relative abundance of stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen was also measured for sloughed skin collected from two manatees being rehabilitated in captivity prior to re-release and dermal tissue from one manatee that died of natural causes while in captivity. Relative values of isotopes of ¹³C ranged from -8.7[0/00] (±0.2) to -28.3[0/00] (± 0.1), relative values of ¹?N ranged from -0.8[0/00] (±1.0) to 6.4[0/00] (±0.0). The C? grass Spartina alterniflora had an average []¹³C value of -13.5[0/00] (±0.2) and []¹?N of 3.6[0/00] (±2.4). Seagrass species that were sampled had values ranging from -8.7[0/00] to -16.9[0/00] for []¹³C and 2.8[0/00] to -2.5[0/00] for []¹?N. There was no statistically significant difference in isotope values of manatee tissue types or plant components. Even so, some individuals did exhibit substantial variation between dermal layers, possibly indicating food and habitat changes within a period less than or equal to the half-life of elemental turnover time for the tissues examined. A mixing model was applied to estimate and compare diet composition by region. Results of the model indicated that manatees in all regions consumed 44% or more of their diet from marine and/or estuarine sources. Manatees in the Brevard County area obtained 100% of their diet from marine and/or estuarine sources. Results suggest that stable isotope analysis may be a viable tool to further research manatee food habits. When used in conjunction with telemetry and observational data stable isotope data may aid in the identification of habitat critical to the continued survival of this species. Results of this research suggest marine and estuarine environments are important sources for manatees though where freshwater vegetation is available results suggest it is utilized.

Reich, Kimberly Jeanne

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Health assessment for Anaconda Smelter Site, Anaconda, Deer Lodge County, Montana, Region 8. CERCLIS No. MTD093291656. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA,) Region VIII has requested that the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) evaluate the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Reports for the Mill Creek, Montana Anaconda Swelter Site. Extensive environmental sampling by EPA, urinary arsenic surveys conducted by the Centers for Disease Control, the Endangerment Assessment (EA,) and the RI have consistently shown extensive contamination of soils and house dust by arsenic, cadmium, and lead, and episodic contamination of drinking water with arsenic above the EPA Maximal Contaminant Level (MCL). The RI presents results of calculations showing, potentially, an elevated excess lifetime risk of skin cancer for males from chronic exposure to arsenic by ingestion. The calculations were performed only for males, the most sensitive subpopulation; however, the female subpopulation would also be expected to have a lesser but elevated excess skin cancer risk from ingestion of arsenic. The long-term health effects of cadmium and lead are additional concerns. When EPA makes a Record of Decision (ROD) for the Mill Creek site, ATSDR can more readily make a definitive statement about the adequacy of the chosen Alternative for reducing the public health risk at Mill Creek.

Not Available

1987-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

198

Scaling up of Carbon Exchange Dynamics from AmeriFlux Sites to a Super-Region in the Eastern United States  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this project was to evaluate carbon exchange dynamics across a region of North America between the Great Plains and the East Coast. This region contains about 40 active carbon cycle research (AmeriFlux) sites in a variety of climatic and landuse settings, from upland forest to urban development. The core research involved a scaling strategy that uses measured fluxes of CO{sub 2}, energy, water, and other biophysical and biometric parameters to train and calibrate surface-vegetation-atmosphere models, in conjunction with satellite (MODIS) derived drivers. To achieve matching of measured and modeled fluxes, the ecosystem parameters of the models will be adjusted to the dynamically variable flux-tower footprints following Schmid (1997). High-resolution vegetation index variations around the flux sites have been derived from Landsat data for this purpose. The calibrated models are being used in conjunction with MODIS data, atmospheric re-analysis data, and digital land-cover databases to derive ecosystem exchange fluxes over the study domain.

Hans Peter Schmid; Craig Wayson

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

199

Final Environmental Assessment Small-Scale Geothermal Power Plant and Direct-Use Geothermal Application at AmeriCulture Inc., Cotton City, NM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Colorado 80401-3393 Colorado 80401-3393 August 26, 2002 DOE/EA-1396 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT For the SMALL-SCALE POWER PLANT AND DIRECT-USE GEOTHERMAL APPLICATION At AMERICULTURE, INC., COTTON CITY, NEW MEXICO AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, Golden Field Office ACTION: Finding of No Significant impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted an Environmental Assessment (EA) of the Small-Scale Power Plant and Direct-Use Application at AmeriCulture, Inc. to evaluate potential impacts of construction and operations that would be funded in part by DOE. Small geothermal power plants have the potential for widespread application, but achieving cost- effectiveness in small plant sizes presents a number of challenges. To address these challenges, DOE is supporting the small-scale field verification projects to (1) determine and validate the

200

An assessment of density-based fine-scale methods for estimating diapycnal diffusivity in the Southern Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fine-scale estimates of diapycnal diffusivity ? are computed from CTD and XCTD data sampled in Drake Passage and in the eastern Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean and are compared against microstructure measurements from the same times and ...

Marina Frants; Gillian M. Damerell; Sarah T. Gille; Karen J. Heywood; Jennifer MacKinnon; Janet Sprintall

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional scale assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Watershed modeling using large-scale distributed computing in Condor and the Soil and Water Assessment Tool model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models are increasingly being used to quantify the effects of best management practices (BMPs) on water quality. While these models offer the ability to study multiple BMP scenarios, and to analyze impacts of various management decisions on watershed ... Keywords: Condor, Conservation Effectiveness Assessment Program, Lincoln Lake, Soil and Water Assessment Tool Model, TeraGrid, best management practices

Margaret W Gitau; Li-Chi Chiang; Mohamed Sayeed; Indrajeet Chaubey

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

A GEFA Assessment of Observed Global Ocean Influence on U.S. Precipitation Variability: Attribution to Regional SST Variability Modes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a comprehensive assessment of the observed influence of the global ocean on U.S. precipitation variability using the method of Generalized Equilibrium Feedback Assessment (GEFA), which enables an unambiguous attribution of the ...

Yafang Zhong; Zhengyu Liu; Michael Notaro

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

4. Title and Subtitle Assessment of Multimodal Freight Bottlenecks and Alleviation Strategies for the Upper Midwest Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mississippi Valley Freight Coalition (MVFC) is a regional organization that cooperates in the planning, operation, preservation, and improvement of transportation infrastructure in the tenstate Mississippi Valley region. Managed by CFIRE.

Jessica Y. Guo; Qi Gong; Andrew Obernesser; Jessica Y. Guo; Jessica Y. Guo; Qi Gong; Andrew Obernesser

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Self-organization of large-scale ULF electromagnetic wave structures in their interaction with nonuniform zonal winds in the ionospheric E region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study is made of the generation and subsequent linear and nonlinear evolution of ultralow-frequency planetary electromagnetic waves in the E region of a dissipative ionosphere in the presence of a nonuniform zonal wind (a sheared flow). Hall currents flowing in the E region and such permanent global factors as the spatial nonuniformity of the geomagnetic field and of the normal component of the Earth's angular velocity give rise to fast and slow planetary-scale electromagnetic waves. The efficiency of the linear amplification of planetary electromagnetic waves in their interaction with a nonuniform zonal wind is analyzed. When there are sheared flows, the operators of linear problems are non-self-conjugate and the corresponding eigenfunctions are nonorthogonal, so the canonical modal approach is poorly suited for studying such motions and it is necessary to utilize the so-called nonmodal mathematical analysis. It is shown that, in the linear evolutionary stage, planetary electromagnetic waves efficiently extract energy from the sheared flow, thereby substantially increasing their amplitude and, accordingly, energy. The criterion for instability of a sheared flow in an ionospheric medium is derived. As the shear instability develops and the perturbation amplitude grows, a nonlinear self-localization mechanism comes into play and the process ends with the self-organization of nonlinear, highly localized, solitary vortex structures. The system thus acquires a new degree of freedom, thereby providing a new way for the perturbation to evolve in a medium with a sheared flow. Depending on the shape of the sheared flow velocity profile, nonlinear structures can be either purely monopole vortices or vortex streets against the background of the zonal wind. The accumulation of such vortices can lead to a strongly turbulent state in an ionospheric medium.

Aburjania, G. D. [Tbilisi State University, I. Vekua Institute of Applied Mathematics (Georgia); Chargazia, Kh. Z. [Nodia Institute of Geophysics (Georgia)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Regional issue identification and assessment (RIIA). Volume I. An analysis of the TRENDLONG MID-MID Scenario for Federal Region 10  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Environmental, human health and safety, socioeconomic and institutional impacts of future energy development for Federal Region 10, which includes the states of Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, are reported. It is concluded that the reduction in electric generating capacity of 568 MWe specified by the scenario for Alaska will not be realized because of institutional constraints and economic impacts. Development of 1000 MWe of geothermal generating capacity in Region 10 called for by the scenario will not be met by 1990. Besides technical feasibility and economic contraints, procedures in Oregon and Washington for securing leases and siting permits have not been fully developed. The location and impacts associated with construction and operation of oil and gas transshipment facilities such as the proposed pipeline to transport natural gas from fields in northern Alaska to the lower 48 states and the pipeline to transport Alaskan oil through Washington State to refineries in the Midwest are likely to be important issues in the Region. The addition of 7,951 MWe to the currently existing hydroelectric generating capacity of 29,990 MWe by 1990 will intensify competition among multiple uses of limited water resources of the Columbia and Snake River systems which drain Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. Irrigation, recreation, transportation, maintenance of wildlife habitats and anadromous fisheries conflict and compete with hydroelectric power generation. Public opposition to further development of nuclear power currently exists and seems to be intensifying in light of recent events. The scenario-specified addition of 4,816 MWe of nuclear generating capacity to the Region's current nuclear capacity of 2,016 MWe may be jeopardized by this opposition; specifically the 1,174 MWe addition to Oregon's nuclear capacity may not be realized.

Wilfert, G. L.; Beckwith, M. A.; Cowan, C. E.; Keizur, G. R. [comps.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

An assessment of a partial pit ventilation system to reduce emission under slatted floor - Part 1: Scale model study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of ammonia and greenhouse gases from naturally ventilated livestock houses cause contamination of the surrounding atmospheric environment. Requests to reduce ammonia emissions from livestock farms are growing in Denmark. It is assumed that ... Keywords: Livestock, Pit ventilation, Scale model, Slatted floor, Tracer gas, Wind tunnel

Wentao Wu; Peter Kai; Guoqiang Zhang

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Multi-scale Simulation Methodology for Stress Assessment in 3D IC: Effect of Die Stacking on Device Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential challenges with managing mechanical stress distributions and the consequent effects on device performance for advanced 3D integrated circuit (IC) technologies are outlined. A set of physics-based compact models for a multi-scale simulation, ... Keywords: 3D IC, FEA, Layout, Packaging, Strain engineering, Stress, TSV

Valeriy Sukharev; Armen Kteyan; Jun-Ho Choy; Henrik Hovsepyan; Ara Markosian; Ehrenfried Zschech; Rene Huebner

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=425640"

209

Large-Scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States: Assessment of Opportunities and Barriers, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASSESSMENT OF ASSESSMENT OF OPPORTUNITIES AND BARRIERS September 2010 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or

210

Assessing the Influence of Regional SST Modes on the Winter Temperature in China: the Effect of Tropical Pacific and Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the influence of different sea surface temperature (SST) modes on the winter temperature in China using the Generalized Equilibrium Feedback Assessment (GEFA). It is found that the second EOF mode of winter temperature in ...

Zhihong Jiang; Hao Yang; Zhengyu Liu; Yanzhu Wu; Na Wen

211

An Engineering and Economic Assessment of Alstom's Chilled Ammonia Process Development Unit (PDU) Design Applied at Full Scale to a n 1100 F Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized Coal Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI’s CO2 capture program aims to assess promising CO2 capture processes for pulverized coal-fired boilers, assist in developing lower cost options than the best technologies/processes available to date, and accelerate promising capture technologies to full-scale commercialization. This report presents the findings and conclusions from EPRI’s Economic and Engineering Assessment of the initial Alstom chilled ammonia process (CAP) design, scaled up, and applied to ...

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

212

A Bayesian Assessment of Climate Change Using Multimodel Ensembles. Part II: Regional and Seasonal Mean Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Bayesian approach is applied to the observed regional and seasonal surface air temperature (SAT) changes using single-model ensembles (SMEs) with the ECHO-G model and multimodel ensembles (MMEs) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (...

Seung-Ki Min; Andreas Hense

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Summary of three regional assessment studies of solar electric generation opportunities in the Southwest, Southeast, and Northeast United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Market opportunities for solar generation of electricity for utility and for residential/commercial/industrial applications in the Northeast, Southeast, and Southwest regions of the United States were evaluated in three studies (JBF 1979, Stone and Webster 1979a, 1979b) and are summarized. The evaluations were based on both economic analyses and user perception of what they would require to select or approve the use of solar electric generation for themselves or for their employers. Over 30 utilities and several industrial and commercial firms and homeowners were involved. Solar electric technologies considered included biomass, hybrid retrofit, OTEC, photovoltaic, solar thermal, and wind. The studies projected that solar electric technologies could account for several percent of the forecast generation in year 2000 in the Southeast and Southwest regions,and up to 10 to 20% in the Northeast region. No single solar electric technology or application (for utility or industrial/commercial/residential use) arrived earlier at economic breakeven than other technologies in the Southeast region, but wind generation for both utility and industrial applications predominated in the Northeast region. The Southwest region, in which only utility applications were considered, showed wind energy and retrofit hybrid (a solar adjunct to an existing fossil-fueled plant) to be the most likely early applications.

Watts, R.L.; Harty, H.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Influence of climate model biases and daily-scale temperature and precipitation events on hydrological impacts assessment: A case study of the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Fourth Assessment Report concludes that climate change is now unequivocal, and associated increases in evaporation and atmospheric water content could intensify the hydrological cycle. However, the biases and coarse spatial resolution of global climate models limit their usefulness in hydrological impact assessment. In order to reduce these limitations, we use a high-resolution regional climate model (RegCM3) to drive a hydrological model (variable infiltration capacity) for the full contiguous United States. The simulations cover 1961-1990 in the historic period and 2071-2100 in the future (A2) period. A quantile-based bias correction technique is applied to the times series of RegCM3-simulated precipitation and temperature. Our results show that biases in the RegCM3 fields not only affect the magnitude of hydrometeorological variables in the baseline hydrological simulation, but they also affect the response of hydrological variables to projected future anthropogenic increases in greenhouse forcing. Further, we find that changes in the intensity and occurrence of severe wet and hot events are critical in determining the sign of hydrologic change. These results have important implications for the assessment of potential future hydrologic changes, as well as for developing approaches for quantitative impacts assessment.

Ashfaq, Moetasim [ORNL; Bowling, Laura C. [Purdue University; Cherkauer, Keith [Purdue University; Pal, Jeremy [Loyola University; Diffenbaugh, Noah [Stanford University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 4. The Northeast region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each state of the region. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled in this chapter into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. An introduction and outline are provided for in the descriptions of the wind resource given for each state. Assessments for individual states are presented. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the state chapters.

Pickering, K.E.; Vilardo, J.M.; Schakenbach, J.T.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 5: the East Central Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each state of the region. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. Assessments for individual states are presented as separate chapters. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the state chapters. States include Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia.

Brode, R.; Stoner, R.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Genetic Variability of Cell Wall Degradability for the Selection of Alfalfa with Improved Saccharification Efficiency Marc-Olivier Duceppe & Annick Bertrand & Sivakumar Pattathil & Jeffrey Miller & Yves Castonguay & Michael G. Hahn & Réal Michaud & Marie-Pier Dubé # Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2012 Abstract Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) has a high potential for sustainable bioethanol production, particularly because of its low reliance on N fertilizer. We assessed near-infrared reflec- tance spectroscopy (NIRS) as a high-throughput technique to measure cell wall (CW) degradability in a large number of lignified alfalfa stem samples. We also used a powerful immu- nological approach, glycome profiling, and chemical analyses to increase our knowledge of the composition of CW poly- saccharides of alfalfa stems with various levels

218

A Large-Scale, High-Resolution Hydrological Model Parameter Data Set for Climate Change Impact Assessment for the Conterminous US  

SciTech Connect

To extend geographical coverage, refine spatial resolution, and improve modeling efficiency, a computation- and data-intensive effort was conducted to organize a comprehensive hydrologic dataset with post-calibrated model parameters for hydro-climate impact assessment. Several key inputs for hydrologic simulation including meteorologic forcings, soil, land class, vegetation, and elevation were collected from multiple best-available data sources and organized for 2107 hydrologic subbasins (8-digit hydrologic units, HUC8s) in the conterminous United States at refined 1/24 (~4 km) spatial resolution. Using high-performance computing for intensive model calibration, a high-resolution parameter dataset was prepared for the macro-scale Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model. The VIC simulation was driven by DAYMET daily meteorological forcing and was calibrated against USGS WaterWatch monthly runoff observations for each HUC8. The results showed that this new parameter dataset may help reasonably simulate runoff at most US HUC8 subbasins. Based on this exhaustive calibration effort, it is now possible to accurately estimate the resources required for further model improvement across the entire conterminous United States. We anticipate that through this hydrologic parameter dataset, the repeated effort of fundamental data processing can be lessened, so that research efforts can emphasize the more challenging task of assessing climate change impacts. The pre-organized model parameter dataset will be provided to interested parties to support further hydro-climate impact assessment.

Oubeidillah, Abdoul A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL] [ORNL; Ashfaq, Moetasim [ORNL] [ORNL; Naz, Bibi S [ORNL] [ORNL; Tootle, Glenn [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa] [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

A GIS decision support system for regional forest management to assess biomass availability for renewable energy production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, the use of a mix of renewable and traditional energy sources is deemed to help in solving increasing energy demands and environmental issues, thus making it particularly important to assess the availability of renewable energy sources. In ... Keywords: Bioenergy, Decision support system, Environmental sustainability, Forest residues, GIS, Harvesting techniques modelling, Renewable energy

Pietro Zambelli; Chiara Lora; Raffaele Spinelli; Clara Tattoni; Alfonso Vitti; Paolo Zatelli; Marco Ciolli

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Preliminary environmental assessment of selected geopressured - geothermal prospect areas: Louisiana Gulf Coast Region. Volume II. Environmental baseline data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A separate section is presented for each of the six prospect areas studied. Each section includes a compilation and discussion of environmental baseline data derived from existing sources. The data are arranged as follows: geology and geohydrology, air quality, water resources and flood hazards, ecological systems, and land use. When data specific to the prospect were not available, regional data are reported. (MHR)

Newchurch, E.J.; Bachman, A.L.; Bryan, C.F.; Harrison, D.P.; Muller, R.A.; Newman, J.P. Jr.; Smith, C.G. Jr.; Bailey, J.I. Jr.; Kelly, G.G.; Reibert, K.C.

1978-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional scale assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Performance assessment of mass flow rate measurement capability in a large scale transient two-phase flow test system  

SciTech Connect

Mass flow is an important measured variable in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Program. Large uncertainties in mass flow measurements in the LOFT piping during LOFT coolant experiments requires instrument testing in a transient two-phase flow loop that simulates the geometry of the LOFT piping. To satisfy this need, a transient two-phase flow loop has been designed and built. The load cell weighing system, which provides reference mass flow measurements, has been analyzed to assess its capability to provide the measurements. The analysis consisted of first performing a thermal-hydraulic analysis using RELAP4 to compute mass inventory and pressure fluctuations in the system and mass flow rate at the instrument location. RELAP4 output was used as input to a structural analysis code SAPIV which is used to determine load cell response. The computed load cell response was then smoothed and differentiated to compute mass flow rate from the system. Comparison between computed mass flow rate at the instrument location and mass flow rate from the system computed from the load cell output was used to evaluate mass flow measurement capability of the load cell weighing system. Results of the analysis indicate that the load cell weighing system will provide reference mass flows more accurately than the instruments now in LOFT.

Nalezny, C.L.; Chapman, R.L.; Martinell, J.S.; Riordon, R.P.; Solbrig, C.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Impact of potential large-scale irrigation on the West African Monsoon and its dependence on location of irrigated area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the impact of potential large-scale irrigation on the West African Monsoon using the MIT Regional Climate Model (MRCM). A new irrigation module is implemented to assess the impact of location and scheduling of irrigation on ...

Eun-Soon Im; Marc P. Marcella; Elfatih A. B. Eltahir

223

A CRITICAL ASSESSMENT OF NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD MODELING OF THE SOLAR CORONA FOR ACTIVE REGION 10953  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) models are thought to be viable tools for investigating the structure, dynamics, and evolution of the coronae of solar active regions. In a series of NLFFF modeling studies, we have found that NLFFF models are successful in application to analytic test cases, and relatively successful when applied to numerically constructed Sun-like test cases, but they are less successful in application to real solar data. Different NLFFF models have been found to have markedly different field line configurations and to provide widely varying estimates of the magnetic free energy in the coronal volume, when applied to solar data. NLFFF models require consistent, force-free vector magnetic boundary data. However, vector magnetogram observations sampling the photosphere, which is dynamic and contains significant Lorentz and buoyancy forces, do not satisfy this requirement, thus creating several major problems for force-free coronal modeling efforts. In this paper, we discuss NLFFF modeling of NOAA Active Region 10953 using Hinode/SOT-SP, Hinode/XRT, STEREO/SECCHI-EUVI, and SOHO/MDI observations, and in the process illustrate three such issues we judge to be critical to the success of NLFFF modeling: (1) vector magnetic field data covering larger areas are needed so that more electric currents associated with the full active regions of interest are measured, (2) the modeling algorithms need a way to accommodate the various uncertainties in the boundary data, and (3) a more realistic physical model is needed to approximate the photosphere-to-corona interface in order to better transform the forced photospheric magnetograms into adequate approximations of nearly force-free fields at the base of the corona. We make recommendations for future modeling efforts to overcome these as yet unsolved problems.

DeRosa, Marc L.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Cheung, Mark C. M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover St. B/252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Barnes, Graham; Leka, K. D. [North West Research Associates, Colorado Research Associates Division, 3380 Mitchell Ln., Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Lites, Bruce W. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research , P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Amari, Tahar; Canou, Aurelien [CNRS, Centre de Physique Theorique de l'Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); McTiernan, James M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Regnier, Stephane [Mathematics Institute, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Thalmann, Julia K.; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd; Tadesse, Tilaye [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Strasse 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Valori, Gherardo [Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, 14482 Potsdam (Germany); Wheatland, Michael S. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Conlon, Paul A. [Astrophysics Research Group, School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Fuhrmann, Marcel [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Potsdam, Am Neuen Palais 10, 14469 Potsdam (Germany)

2009-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

224

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 9. The Southwest Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in Nevada and California. Background on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted is presented. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. An introduction and outline to the descriptions of the wind resource given for each state are given. Assessments for individual states are presented as separate chapters. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed.

Simon, R.L.; Norman, G.T.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Field, laboratory, and modeling studies of water infiltration and runoff in subfreezing snow on regional scales to estimate future greenhouse-induced changes in sea-level. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The current DOE-supported research program (Reduce Uncertainty in Future Sea-Level Change Due to Ice Wastage) addressed the question of how the refreezing of meltwater in cold snow affects sea-level changes in a future changing climate. The continuation of that research, proposed here, takes an additional new approach by focusing on processes which can be defined and characterized by measurements on regional scales. This new emphasis is intended to be directly applicable to a large-scale analysis from which runoff forecasts (and consequent sea level change) from the entire arctic region can be made. The research proposed here addresses the problem of forecasting future sea-level change due to greenhouse-induced changes in runoff from polar glaciers and ice caps. The objectives of this work are (1) to observe in the field the processes of infiltration and refreezing which lead to the formation of impermeable firn layers; (2) to reproduce these observed processes in the laboratory to confirm and further quantify their understanding; (3) to develop and calibrate a regional scale numerical model which can simulate these processes, based on measured parameters and driven by boundary conditions determined by climate; and (4) to apply this model to predict the development of impermeable firn (and consequent runoff and discharge to the ocean) in response to predicted future climate change.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Impact of Urbanization on Heavy Convective Precipitation under Strong Large-Scale Forcing: A Case Study over the Milwaukee-Lake Michigan Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, observational and numerical modeling analyses based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model are used to investigate the impact of urbanization on heavy rainfall over the Milwaukee-Lake Michigan region. We examine urban ...

Long Yang; James A. Smith; Mary Lynn Baeck; Elie Bou-Zeid; Stephen M. Jessup; Fuqiang Tian; Heping Hu

227

Mechanistic Model Simulations of the East African Climate Using NCAR Regional Climate Model: Influence of Large-Scale Orography on the Turkana Low-Level Jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Center for Atmospheric Research regional climate model (RegCM) is employed to study the dynamics of the Turkana low-level jet that lies between the Ethiopian and the East African highlands, and also investigate the mechanisms ...

Matayo Indeje; Fredrick H. M. Semazzi; Lian Xie; Laban J. Ogallo

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Estimating Regional Surface Heat and Moisture Fluxes above Prairie Cropland from Surface and Upper-Air Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper-air budget methods can be used to estimate the surface sensible and latent heat flux densities on a regional scale. This study assesses the application of radiosonde-based budget methods above homogeneous cropland. Serial daytime soundings ...

Alan G. Barr; G. S. Strong

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Assessing the Potential of Using Hydrate Technology to Capture, Store and Transport Gas for the Caribbean Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monetizing gas has now become a high priority issue for many countries. Natural gas is a much cleaner fuel than oil and coal especially for electricity generation. Approximately 40 percent of the world's natural gas reserves remain unusable because of lack of economic technology. Gas produced with oil poses a challenge of being transported and is typically flared or re-injected into the reservoir. These are gas transportation issues we now face. Gas hydrate may be a viable means of capturing, storing and transporting stranded and associated gas. For example, stranded gas in Trinidad could be converted to gas hydrates and transported to the islands of the Caribbean. This study will seek to address some of the limitations from previous studies on transporting natural gas as a hydrate while focusing on small scale transportation of natural gas to the Caribbean Islands. This work proposes a workflow for capturing, storing and transporting gas in the hydrate form, particularly for Caribbean situations where there are infrastructural constraints such as lack of pipelines. The study shows the gas hydrate value chain for transportation of 5 MMscf/d of natural gas from Trinidad to Jamaica. The analysis evaluated the water required for hydrate formation, effect of composition on hydrate formation, the energy balance of the process, the time required for formation, transportation and dissociation and preliminary economics. The overall energy requirement of the process which involves heating, cooling and expansion is about 15-20 percent of the energy of the gas transported in hydrate form. The time estimated for the overall process is 20–30 hrs. The estimated capital cost to capture and transport 5 MMscf/d from Trinidad to Jamaica is about US$ 30 million. The composition of the gas sample can affect the conditions of formation, heating value and the expansion process. In summary, there is great potential for transporting natural gas by gas hydrate on a small scale based on the proposed hydrate work flow. This study did not prove commerciality at this time, however, some of the limitations require further evaluations and these include detailed modeling of the formation time, dissociation time and heat transfer capabilities.

Rajnauth, Jerome Joel

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West; Report and Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect

This study assesses the outlook for utility-scale renewable energy development in the West once states have met their renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements. In the West, the last state RPS culminates in 2025, so the analysis uses 2025 as a transition point on the timeline of RE development. Most western states appear to be on track to meet their final requirements, relying primarily on renewable resources located relatively close to the customers being served. What happens next depends on several factors including trends in the supply and price of natural gas, greenhouse gas and other environmental regulations, consumer preferences, technological breakthroughs, and future public policies and regulations. Changes in any one of these factors could make future renewable energy options more or less attractive.

Hurlbut, D. J.; McLaren, J.; Gelman, R.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Energy Storage for Variable Renewable Energy Resource Integration - A Regional Assessment for the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP)  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses the following key questions in the discussion on the integration of renewable energy resources in the Pacific Northwest power grid: a) what will be the future balancing requirement to accommodate a simulated expansion of wind energy resources from 3.3 GW in 2008 to 14.4 GW in 2019 in the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP), and b) what are the most cost effective technological solutions for meeting the balancing requirements in the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP). A life-cycle analysis was performed to assess the least-cost technology option for meeting the new balancing requirement. The technologies considered in this study include conventional turbines (CT), sodium sulfur (NaS) batteries, lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries, pumped hydro energy storage (PH), and demand response (DR). Hybrid concepts that combine 2 or more of the technologies above are also evaluated. This analysis was performed with collaboration by the Bonneville Power Administration and funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Jin, Chunlian; Balducci, Patrick J.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Guo, Xinxin; Nguyen, Tony B.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

232

Snowpack Variations in the Central Andes of Argentina and Chile, 1951–2005: Large-Scale Atmospheric Influences and Implications for Water Resources in the Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The snowpack in the central Andes (30°–37°S) is the primary source for streamflow in central Chile and central-western Argentina, but few published studies are available on snowpack variability in the region. This paper develops the first ...

Mariano H. Masiokas; Ricardo Villalba; Brian H. Luckman; Carlos Le Quesne; Juan Carlos Aravena

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

A Regional-Scale GIS-Based Modeling System for Evaluating the Potential Costs and Supplies of Biomass from Biomass Crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A GIS-based modeling system was developed for analyzing the geographic variation in potential bioenergy feedstock supplies and optimal locations for siting bioenergy facilities. The modeling system is designed for analyzing individual US states but could readily be adapted to any geographic region.

Graham, R.L.; English, B.C.; Noon, C.E.; Liu, W.; Daly, M.J.; Jager, H.I.

1996-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

234

Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West; Executive Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West Executive Summary David J. Hurlbut, Joyce McLaren, and Rachel Gelman National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. AROE.2000 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-57830 August 2013 Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308

235

Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(This page intentionally left blank) (This page intentionally left blank) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West David J. Hurlbut, Joyce McLaren, and Rachel Gelman National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. AROE.2000 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-57830 August 2013 Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308

236

Recovery Act: 'Carbonsheds' as a Framework for Optimizing United States Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Pipeline Transport on a Regional to National Scale  

SciTech Connect

Carbonsheds are regions in which the estimated cost of transporting CO{sub 2} from any (plant) location in the region to the storage site it encompasses is cheaper than piping the CO{sub 2} to a storage site outside the region. We use carbonsheds to analyze the cost of transport and storage of CO{sub 2} in deploying CCS on land and offshore of the continental U.S. We find that onshore the average cost of transport and storage within carbonsheds is roughly $10/t when sources cooperate to reduce transport costs, with the costs increasing as storage options are depleted over time. Offshore transport and storage costs by comparison are found to be roughly twice as expensive but t may still be attractive because of easier access to property rights for sub-seafloor storage as well as a simpler regulatory system, and possibly lower MMV requirements, at least in the deep-ocean where pressures and temperatures would keep the CO{sub 2} negatively buoyant. Agent-based modeling of CCS deployment within carbonsheds under various policy scenarios suggests that the most cost-effective strategy at this point in time is to focus detailed geology characterization of storage potential on only the largest onshore reservoirs where the potential for mitigating emissions is greatest and the cost of storage appears that it will be among the cheapest.

Pratson, Lincoln

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

Chloride/magnesium ratio of shallow groundwaters as a regional geothermal indicator in Hawaii. Assessment of geothermal resources in Hawaii: Number 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because of the complex geological and hydrological conditions and the virtual lack of thermal springs, regional geothermal investigations in Hawaii require the use of techniques substantially different from those conventionally applied in other geothermal environments. The large number of hydrological wells in the state provides an appreciable source of groundwater chemical data. However, largely because of the island environment, interpretation of much of these data as geothermal indicators becomes ambiguous. Initially, SiO/sub 2/ and temperature of groundwaters were used to identify thermally anomalous zones, but on a regional basis it has been found that these criteria are not always successful. As a further criterion for assessment, the Cl/Mg ratio of the groundwater has been used. On a state-wide basis, this ratio has been successful in further screening the SiO/sub 2/-temperature selected sites, and in defining more specific areas which warrant further investigation. Temperature, SiO/sub 2/ and Cl/Mg values for nearly 400 groundwater samples are included.

Cox, M.E.; Thomas, D.M.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Regional geological assessment of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence of the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins relative to potential storage/disposal of radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect

The thick and regionally extensive sequence of shales and associated clastic sedimentary rocks of Late Devonian and Early Mississippian age has been considered among the nonsalt geologies for deep subsurface containment of high-level radioactive wastes. This report examines some of the regional and basin-specific characteristics of the black and associated nonblack shales of this sequence within the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins of the north-central and eastern United States. Principal areas where the thickness and depth of this shale sequence are sufficient to warrant further evaluation are identified, but no attempt is made to identify specific storage/disposal sites. Also identified are other areas with less promise for further study because of known potential conflicts such as geologic-hydrologic factors, competing subsurface priorities involving mineral resources and groundwater, or other parameters. Data have been compiled for each basin in an effort to indicate thickness, distribution, and depth relationships for the entire shale sequence as well as individual shale units in the sequence. Included as parts of this geologic assessment are isopach, depth information, structure contour, tectonic elements, and energy-resource maps covering the three basins. Summary evaluations are given for each basin as well as an overall general evaluation of the waste storage/disposal potential of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence,including recommendations for future studies to more fully characterize the shale sequence for that purpose. Based on data compiled in this cursory investigation, certain rock units have reasonable promise for radioactive waste storage/disposal and do warrant additional study.

Lomenick, T.F.; Gonzales, S.; Johnson, K.S.; Byerly, D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Resources for the United States  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the offshore wind resource potential for the contiguous United States and Hawaii as of May 2009. The development of this assessment has evolved over multiple stages as new regional meso-scale assessments became available, new validation data was obtained, and better modeling capabilities were implemented. It is expected that further updates to the current assessment will be made in future reports.

Schwartz, M.; Heimiller, D.; Haymes, S.; Musial, W.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Published as: Ha T. Nguyen and Joshua M. Pearce, "Incorporating Shading Losses in Solar Photovoltaic Potential Assessment at the Municipal Scale" Solar Energy 86(5), pp. 12451260 (2012). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.solener.2012.01.017  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photovoltaic Potential Assessment at the Municipal Scale" Solar Energy 86(5), pp. 1245­1260 (2012). DOI: http; Photovoltaic; Renewable energy; Solar energy; Solar irradiation modeling ; Shading Abbreviations (Apv, "Incorporating Shading Losses in Solar Photovoltaic Potential Assessment at the Municipal Scale" Solar Energy 86

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional scale assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Urban scale integrated assessment for London: Which emission reduction strategies are more effective in attaining prescribed PM10 air quality standards by 2005?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tightening of air quality standards for populated urban areas has led to increasing attention to assessment of air quality management areas (AQMAs) where exceedance occurs, and development of control strategies to eliminate such exceedance. Software ... Keywords: Air quality management, Dispersion modelling, Emission reduction strategies, Integrated assessment, Particulate matter, Urban air pollution

A. Mediavilla-Sahagún; H. M. ApSimon

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Fish Scales  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish Scales Name: Kaylee Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Do all fish have scales? Replies: No, some like catfish and bullheads, have smooth skins. J. Elliott No,...

243

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biasi, Et Al., Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Modeling-Computer_Simulations_At_Nw_Basin_%26_Range_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=401461" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded

244

Creation of the WATCH Forcing Data and Its Use to Assess Global and Regional Reference Crop Evaporation over Land during the Twentieth Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Water and Global Change (WATCH) project evaluation of the terrestrial water cycle involves using land surface models and general hydrological models to assess hydrologically important variables including evaporation, soil moisture, and runoff. ...

G. P. Weedon; S. Gomes; P. Viterbo; W. J. Shuttleworth; E. Blyth; H. Österle; J. C. Adam; N. Bellouin; O. Boucher; M. Best

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

EA-1835: Environmental Assessment Determination | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment Determination EA-1835: Environmental Assessment Determination Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Phase II Michigan Basin Project in Chester...

246

Assessment of Peruvian biofuel resources and alternatives  

SciTech Connect

Comprehensive assessment of the biofuel potential of Peru is based on: determination of current biofuel utilization practices, evauation of Peruvian biomass productivity, identification of Peruvian agricultural and forestry resources, assessment of resource development and management concerns, identification of market considerations, description of biofuel technological options, and identification of regional biofuel technology applications. Discussion of current biofuel utilization centers on a qualitative description of the main conversion approaches currently being practiced in Peru. Biomass productivity evaluations consider the terrain and soil, and climatic conditions found in Peru. The potential energy from Peruvian agricultural and forestry resources is described quantitatively. Potental regional production of agricultural residues and forest resources that could supply energy are identified. Assessment of resource development and management concerns focuses on harvesting, reforestation, training, and environmental consequences of utilization of forest resources. Market factors assessed include: importation, internal market development, external market development, energy policy and pricing, and transportation. Nine biofuel technology options for Peru are identified: (1) small-to-medium-scale gasification, (2) a wood waste inventory, (3) stationary and mobile charcoal production systems, (4) wood distillation, (5) forest resource development and management, (6) electrical cogeneration, (7) anaerobic digestion technology, (8) development of ethanol production capabilities, and (9) agricultural strategies for fuel production. Applications of these biofuel options are identified for each of the three major regions - nine applications for the Costa Region, eight for the Sierra Region, and ten for the Selva Region.

Harper, J.P.; Smith, W.; Mariani, E.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Promoter Prediction on a Genomic Scale - the Adh Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe our statistical system for promoter recognition in genomic DNA with which we took part in the Genome Annotation Assessment Project (GASP1). We applied two versions of the system; the first uses a region based approach towards transcription start site identification, namely interpolated Markov chains, the second a hybrid approach combining regions and signals within a stochastic segment model. We compare the results of both versions with each other and examine how well the application on a genomic scale compares to the results we previously obtained on smaller data sets.

Uwe Ohler

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Geodetic Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region Geodetic Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Targeting of Potential Geothermal Resources in the Great Basin from Regional to Basin-Scale Relationships Between Geodetic Strain and Geological Structures, Geoffrey Blewitt. The objectives of this project are to assess the use of inter-seismic crustal strain rates derived from GPS-stations as an exploration tool for non-magmatic high-temperature geothermal systems, and to use this technique to target potential geothermal resources in the Great Basin. Two potential target areas were identified in year one (FY03) by regional-scale studies: (1) the area

249

Geodetic Survey At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Survey At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, Geodetic Survey At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Targeting of Potential Geothermal Resources in the Great Basin from Regional to Basin-Scale Relationships Between Geodetic Strain and Geological Structures, Geoffrey Blewitt. The objectives of this project are to assess the use of inter-seismic crustal strain rates derived from GPS-stations as an exploration tool for non-magmatic high-temperature geothermal systems, and to use this technique to target potential geothermal resources in the Great Basin. Two potential target areas were identified in year one (FY03) by regional-scale studies: (1) the area

250

Assessment of Degree of Applicability of Benchmarks for Gadolinium Using KENO V.a and the 238-Group SCALE Cross-Section Library  

SciTech Connect

A review of the degree of applicability of benchmarks containing gadolinium using the computer code KENO V.a and the gadolinium cross sections from the 238-group SCALE cross-section library has been performed for a system that contains {sup 239}Pu, H{sub 2}O, and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The system (practical problem) is a water-reflected spherical mixture that represents a dry-out condition on the bottom of a sludge receipt and adjustment tank around steam coils. Due to variability of the mixture volume and the H/{sup 239}Pu ratio, approximations to the practical problem, referred to as applications, have been made to envelop possible ranges of mixture volumes and H/{sup 239}Pu ratios. A newly developed methodology has been applied to determine the degree of applicability of benchmarks as well as the penalty that should be added to the safety margin due to insufficient benchmarks.

Goluoglu, S.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 10. Alaska region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each subregion of Alaska. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a state scale is given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each subregion are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the Alaska wind energy resource. An outline to the descriptions of the wind resource given for each subregion is included. Assessments for individual subregions are presented as separate chapters. The subregion wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the Alaska wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the subregion chapters.

Wise, J.L.; Wentink, T. Jr.; Becker, R. Jr.; Comiskey, A.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

EA-1626: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

626: Final Environmental Assessment 626: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1626: Final Environmental Assessment Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) Phase III Large-Scale Field Test DOE proposes to co-fund an $84,274,927 project located on property of the MGSC partner Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM). The overall objective of this project would be to demonstrate the ability of the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a major regional saline reservoir in the Illinois Basin, to accept and retain approximately 1.1 million short tons (1 million metric tons) of CO2 injected over a period of three years. DOE/EA-1626: Final Environmental Assessment for Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) Phase III Large-Scale Field Test (October 2008) More Documents & Publications EA-1828: Final Environmental Assessment

253

Preliminary assessment report for Grubbs/Kyle Training Center, Smyrna/Rutherford County Regional Airport, Installation 47340, Smyrna, Tennessee. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Tennessee Army National Guard (TNARNG) property near Smyrna, Tennessee. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Grubbs/Kyle Training Center property, the requirement of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program.

Dennis, C.; Stefano, J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation: Non-treatment technologies and pilot scale facility implementation -- excavation -- storage technology -- safety analysis and review statement. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to assess the state-of-the-art of excavation technology as related to environmental remediation applications. A further purpose is to determine which of the excavation technologies reviewed could be used by the US Corp of Engineers in remediating contaminated soil to be excavated in the near future for construction of a new Lock and Dam at Winfield, WV. The study is designed to identify excavation methodologies and equipment which can be used at any environmental remediation site but more specifically at the Winfield site on the Kanawha River in Putnam County, West Virginia. A technical approach was determined whereby a functional analysis was prepared to determine the functions to be conducted during the excavation phase of the remediation operations. A number of excavation technologies were identified from the literature. A set of screening criteria was developed that would examine the utility and ranking of the technologies with respect to the operations that needed to be conducted at the Winfield site. These criteria were performance, reliability, implementability, environmental safety, public health, and legal and regulatory compliance. The Loose Bulk excavation technology was ranked as the best technology applicable to the Winfield site. The literature was also examined to determine the success of various methods of controlling fugitive dust. Depending upon any changes in the results of chemical analyses, or prior remediation of the VOCs from the vadose zone, consideration should be given to testing a new ``Pneumatic Excavator`` which removes the VOCs liberated during the excavation process as they outgas from the soil. This equipment however would not be needed on locations with low levels of VOC emissions.

Johnson, H.R.; Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Koperna, G.J. Jr.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Geodetic Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Geodetic Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Targeting of Potential Geothermal Resources in the Great Basin from Regional to Basin-Scale Relationships Between Geodetic Strain and Geological Structures, Geoffrey Blewitt. The objectives of this project are to assess the use of inter-seismic crustal strain rates derived from GPS-stations as an exploration tool for non-magmatic high-temperature geothermal systems, and to use this technique to target potential geothermal resources in the Great Basin. Two potential target areas were identified in year one (FY03) by regional-scale studies: (1) the area

256

Hybrid regional air pollution models  

SciTech Connect

This discussion deals with a family of air quality models for predicting and analyzing the fine particulate loading in the atmosphere, for assessing the extent and degree of visibility impairment, and for determining the potential of pollutants for increasing the acidity of soils and water. The major horizontal scales of interest are from 400km to 2000km; and the time scales may vary from several hours, to days, weeks, and a few months or years, depending on the EPA regulations being addressed. First the role air quality models play in the general family of atmospheric simulation models is described. Then, the characteristics of a well-designed, comprehensive air quality model are discussed. Following this, the specific objectives of this workshop are outlined, and their modeling implications are summarized. There are significant modeling differences produced by the choice of the coordinate system, whether it be the fixed Eulerian system, the moving Lagrangian system, or some hybrid of the two. These three systems are briefly discussed, and a list of hybrid models that are currently in use are given. Finally, the PNL regional transport model is outlined and a number of research needs are listed.

Drake, R.L.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 3. Great Lakes Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Great Lakes Region atlas assimilates six collections of wind resource data, one for the region and one for each of the five states that compose the Great Lakes region: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin. At the state level, features of the climate, topography, and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than in the regional discussion and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations over several time scales in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and of hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction, and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

Paton, D.L.; Bass, A.; Smith, D.G.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Walker-Lane_Transitional_Zone_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=425676"

259

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Modeling-Computer_Simulations_At_Northern_Basin_%26_Range_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=40142

260

Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reflection) have the potential to change radiative forcing, surface temperatures, and regional weather arrays across the United States. We use a fully coupled regional climate model, the Weather Research to be 3.3 ± 0.5 Gt CO2 (mean ± 95% C.I.). The hypothetical solar arrays were designed to be able

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional scale assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Modeling and application of soil moisture at varying spatial scales with parameter scaling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dissertation focuses on characterization of subpixel variability within a satellite-based remotely sensed coarse-scale soil moisture footprint. The underlying heterogeneity of coarse-scale soil moisture footprint is masked by the area-integrated properties within the sensor footprint. Therefore, the soil moisture values derived from these measurements are an area average. The variability in soil moisture within the footprint is introduced by inherent spatial variability present in rainfall, and geophysical parameters (vegetation, topography, and soil). The geophysical parameters/variables typically interact in a complex fashion to make soil moisture evolution and dependent processes highly variable, and also, introduce nonlinearity across spatio-temporal scales. To study the variability and scaling characteristics of soil moisture, a quasi-distributed Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer (SVAT) modeling framework is developed to simulate the hydrological dynamics, i.e., the fluxes and the state variables within the satellite-based soil moisture footprint. The modeling framework is successfully tested and implemented in different hydroclimatic regions during the research. New multiscale data assimilation and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques in conjunction with the SVAT modeling framework are developed to quantify subpixel variability and assess multiscale soil moisture fields within the coarse-scale satellite footprint. Reasonable results demonstrate the potential to use these techniques to validate multiscale soil moisture data from future satellite mission e.g., Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission of NASA. The results also highlight the physical controls of geophysical parameters on the soil moisture fields for various hydroclimatic regions. New algorithm that uses SVAT modeling framework is also proposed and its application demonstrated, to derive the stochastic soil hydraulic properties (i.e., saturated hydraulic conductivity) and surface features (i.e., surface roughness and volume scattering) related to radar remote sensing of soil moisture.

Das, Narendra Narayan

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Nuclear scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the {pi}-{gamma} force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

Friar, J.L.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Hungary-Employment Impacts of a Large-Scale Deep Building Retrofit  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hungary-Employment Impacts of a Large-Scale Deep Building Retrofit Hungary-Employment Impacts of a Large-Scale Deep Building Retrofit Programme Jump to: navigation, search Name Hungary-Employment Impacts of a Large-Scale Deep Building Retrofit Programme Agency/Company /Organization European Climate Foundation Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Buildings, - Building Energy Efficiency Topics Co-benefits assessment, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://3csep.ceu.hu/sites/defa Country Hungary UN Region Eastern Europe References Hungary-Employment Impacts of a Large-Scale Deep Building Retrofit Programme[1] Hungary-Employment Impacts of a Large-Scale Deep Building Retrofit Programme Screenshot "The goal of the present research was to gauge the net employment impacts of a largescale deep building energy-efficiency renovation programme in

264

Preliminary Assessment of the Structural Controls of Neal Hot Springs  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Preliminary Assessment of the Structural Controls of Neal Hot Springs Preliminary Assessment of the Structural Controls of Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Field, Malhuer County, Oregon Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Preliminary Assessment of the Structural Controls of Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Field, Malhuer County, Oregon Abstract The Neal Hot Springs geothermal field is marked by hotsprings that effuse from opaline sinter mounds just north of BullyCreek, in Malheur County, Oregon. Production wells have highflow rates and temperatures above 138C at depths of 850-915 m.On a regional scale, the geothermal field occupies a broad zonewithin the intersection between a regional, N-striking, normalfault system within the Oregon-Idaho graben and a regionalNW-striking, normal fault system within the western Snake

265

Parabolic Scaling and Curvelets Beyond Parabolic Scaling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parabolic Scaling and Curvelets Beyond Parabolic Scaling Cubic Scaling for Caustics and Tangential on Imaging Science Hart F. Smith Cubic Scaling for Caustics and Tangential Reflections #12;Parabolic Scaling and Curvelets Beyond Parabolic Scaling The Second Dyadic Decomposition Wave-Evolution of Curvelets Second Dyadic

Smith, Hart F.

266

Regional and Global Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products > Regional/Global Products > Regional/Global Regional and Global Data Biogeochemical Dynamics Data Regional and global biogeochemical dynamics data can be used to improve our understanding of the structure and function of various ecosystems; to enable prediction across spatial and temporal scales; and to parameterize and validate terrestrial ecosystem models. The ORNL DAAC compiles, archives, and distributes more than 150 products from the following projects: Climate Collections Hydroclimatology Collections ISLSCP II Project Net Primary Productivity (NPP) River Discharge (RIVDIS) Russian Land Cover (RLC) Soil Collections Vegetation Collections Vegetation-Ecosystem Modeling (VEMAP) Climate Collections Climate collections include measured and modeled values for variables such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, radiation, wind velocity, and

267

Regional Residential  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

upward pressure from crude oil markets, magnified by a regional shortfall of heating oil supplies, residential prices rose rapidly to peak February 7. The problem was...

268

Regional Maps  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

United States Census Divisions Figure 2.Electricity Market Module (EMM)Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting Figure...

269

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHP (SECARB)  

SciTech Connect

The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is on schedule and within budget projections for the work completed during the first 18-months of its two year program. Work during the semiannual period (fifth and sixth project quarters) of the project (October 1, 2004-March 31, 2005) was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix.'' Under Task 1.0 Define Geographic Boundaries of the Region, no changes occurred during the fifth or sixth quarters of the project. Under Task 2.0 Characterize the Region, refinements have been made to the general mapping and screening of sources and sinks. Integration and geographical information systems (GIS) mapping is ongoing. Characterization during this period was focused on smaller areas having high sequestration potential. Under Task 3.0 Identify and Address Issues for Technology Deployment, SECARB continues to expand upon its assessment of safety, regulatory, permitting, and accounting frameworks within the region to allow for wide-scale deployment of promising terrestrial and geologic sequestration approaches. Under Task 4.0 Develop Public Involvement and Education Mechanisms, SECARB has used results of a survey and focus group meeting to refine approaches that are being taken to educate and involve the public. Under Task 5.0 Identify the Most Promising Capture, Sequestration, and Transport Options, SECARB has evaluated findings from work performed during the first 18-months. The focus of the project team has shifted from region-wide mapping and characterization to a more detailed screening approach designed to identify the most promising opportunities. Under Task 6.0 Prepare Action Plans for Implementation and Technology Validation Activity, the SECARB team is developing an integrated approach to implementing the most promising opportunities and in setting up measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) programs for the most promising opportunities. Milestones completed during the fifth and sixth project quarters included: (1) Q1-FY05--Assess safety, regulatory and permitting issues; and (2) Q2-FY05--Finalize inventory of major sources/sinks and refine GIS algorithms.

Kenneth J. Nemeth

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Detailed Renewable Energy Resource Assessment Data Inventory (US) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Detailed Renewable Energy Resource Assessment Data Inventory (US) Detailed Renewable Energy Resource Assessment Data Inventory (US) Dataset Summary Description Detailed inventory of available renewable energy (RE) resource assessment data. Although the type, amount, and regional distribution of resource information vary by resource, assessments are available for each RE category (conducted by DOE and various private and public organizations). Solar, wind and geothermal resources have assessment products available at numerous scales (national, regional, and site specific). Assessments are available for biomass and hydropower resources at a national level, with only limited information available at the regional and site-specific levels. Ocean energy has the least resource assessment information available. This information was compiled by NREL and initially published in the 2006 Report to Congress on Renewable Energy Resource Assessment Information for the United States (Original document courtesy of archive.org). This datasets was last updated in January, 2011. For each assessment, the inventory includes: data name, data type, source, period of record, spatial coverage, spatial resolution, temporal scale, units, stated accuracy, availability, URL, update frequency, and additional notes.

271

Regional Purchasing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Purchasing Regional Purchasing Regional Purchasing Pursuant to Appendix M of Prime Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396 between DOE/NNSA and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), LANS is committed to building a strong supplier base with Northern New Mexico businesses and the local Native American pueblos in the purchases of goods and services. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email We seek out and utilize known Northern New Mexico business as suppliers The Northern New Mexico counties included are Los Alamos Santa Fe Rio Arriba Taos Mora San Miguel Sandoval The eight regional pueblos included are Nambe Ohkay Owingeh (formerly known as San Juan) Picuris Pojoaque San Ildefonso Santa Clara Taos Tesuque When the Laboratory cannot identify regional firms, it will expand its

272

Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Targeting of Potential Geothermal Resources in the Great Basin from Regional to Basin-Scale Relationships Between Geodetic Strain and Geological Structures, Geoffrey Blewitt. The objectives of this project are to assess the use of inter-seismic crustal strain rates derived from GPS-stations as an exploration tool for non-magmatic high-temperature

273

Regional Inventories  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: This year has not started well for gasoline inventories, with inventories being low across regions of the country. The Midwest region (PADD II) had been running lower than most regions, but began to catch up during the last week in April. Gasoline inventories ran about 9% below their 5-year average for this time of year and about 4% below where they were last year. The recent refinery problems in the Midwest, though, could erase some of that recovery. The impacts of Tosco's Wood River refinery and Marathon's St Paul refinery are not fully realized. But inventories were also precariously low along the East Coast (PADD I) and are extremely low in the Rocky Mountain region (PADD IV), although the size of this market mitigates any national impact. While the

274

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 2. The North Central Region  

SciTech Connect

The North Central atlas assimilates six collections of wind resource data: one for the region and one for each of the five states that compose the North Central region (Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota). At the state level, features of the climate, topography and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than is provided in the regional discussion, and that data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and international wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed direction and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

Freeman, D.L.; Hadley, D.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 7. The south central region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This atlas of the south central region combines seven collections of wind resource data: one for the region, and one for each of the six states (Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas). At the state level, features of the climate, topography, and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than that provided in the regional discussion, and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction, and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

Edwards, R.L.; Graves, L.F.; Sprankle, A.C.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Soil moisture modeling and scaling using passive microwave remote sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil moisture in the shallow subsurface is a primary hydrologic state governing land-atmosphere interaction at various scales. The primary objectives of this study are to model soil moisture in the root zone in a distributed manner and determine scaling properties of surface soil moisture using passive microwave remote sensing. The study was divided into two parts. For the first study, a root zone soil moisture assessment tool (SMAT) was developed in the ArcGIS platform by fully integrating a one-dimensional vadose zone hydrology model (HYDRUS-ET) with an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation capability. The tool was tested with dataset from the Southern Great Plain 1997 (SGP97) hydrology remote sensing experiment. Results demonstrated that SMAT displayed a reasonable capability to generate soil moisture distribution at the desired resolution at various depths of the root zone in Little Washita watershed during the SGP97 hydrology remote sensing experiment. To improve the model performance, several outstanding issues need to be addressed in the future by: including "effective" hydraulic parameters across spatial scales; implementing subsurface soil properties data bases using direct and indirect methods; incorporating appropriate hydrologic processes across spatial scales; accounting uncertainties in forcing data; and preserving interactions for spatially correlated pixels. The second study focused on spatial scaling properties of the Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR)-based remotely sensed surface soil moisture fields in a region with high row crop agriculture. A wavelet based multi-resolution technique was used to decompose the soil moisture fields into larger-scale average soil moisture fields and fluctuations in horizontal, diagonal and vertical directions at various resolutions. The specific objective was to relate soil moisture variability at the scale of the PSR footprint (800 m X 800 m) to larger scale average soil moisture field variability. We also investigated the scaling characteristics of fluctuation fields among various resolutions. The spatial structure of soil moisture exhibited linearity in the log-log dependency of the variance versus scale-factor, up to a scale factor of -2.6 (6100 m X 6100 m) irrespective of wet and dry conditions, whereas dry fields reflect nonlinear (multi-scaling) behavior at larger scale-factors.

Das, Narendra N.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Regional issue identification...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

issue identification and assessment (RIIA). Volume I. An analysis of the TRENDLONG MID-MID Scenario for Federal Region 10 Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site...

278

Regional Partnerships | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regional Regional Partnerships Regional Partnerships DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Program DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also called carbon sequestration) in different regions and geologic formations within the Nation. Collectively, the seven RCSPs represent regions encompassing: 97 percent of coal-fired CO2 emissions; 97 percent of industrial CO2 emissions; 96 percent of the total land mass; and essentially all the geologic sequestration sites in the U.S. potentially available for carbon storage. We launched this initiative in 2003. It's being completed in phases (I, II, and III) and forms the centerpiece of national efforts to develop the

279

Opportunities and Challenges to Scaling-up Wind Power in Vietnam | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Challenges to Scaling-up Wind Power in Vietnam Challenges to Scaling-up Wind Power in Vietnam Jump to: navigation, search Name Opportunities and Challenges to Scaling-up Wind Power in Vietnam Agency/Company /Organization Asian Development Bank Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Wind Topics Co-benefits assessment, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Background analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type Presentation Website http://www.adb.org/documents/e Country Vietnam UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Vietnam-Wind Power Opportunities and Challenges [1] References ↑ "Vietnam-Wind Power Opportunities and Challenges" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Opportunities_and_Challenges_to_Scaling-up_Wind_Power_in_Vietnam&oldid=383401"

280

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP (SECARB)  

SciTech Connect

The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is on schedule and within budget projections for the work completed during the first year of its two year program. Work during the semiannual period (third and fourth quarter) of the project (April 1--September 30, 2004) was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix.'' Under Task 1.0 Define Geographic Boundaries of the Region, Texas and Virginia were added during the second quarter of the project and no geographical changes occurred during the third or fourth quarter of the project. Under Task 2.0 Characterize the Region, general mapping and screening of sources and sinks has been completed, with integration and Geographical Information System (GIS) mapping ongoing. The first step focused on the macro level characterization of the region. Subsequent characterization will focus on smaller areas having high sequestration potential. Under Task 3.0 Identify and Address Issues for Technology Deployment, SECARB has completed a preliminary assessment of safety, regulatory, permitting, and accounting frameworks within the region to allow for wide-scale deployment of promising terrestrial and geologic sequestration approaches. Under Task 4.0 Develop Public Involvement and Education Mechanisms, SECARB has conducted a survey and focus group meeting to gain insight into approaches that will be taken to educate and involve the public. Task 5.0 and 6.0 will be implemented beginning October 1, 2004. Under Task 5.0 Identify the Most Promising Capture, Sequestration, and Transport Options, SECARB will evaluate findings from work performed during the first year and shift the focus of the project team from region-wide mapping and characterization to a more detailed screening approach designed to identify the most promising opportunities. Under Task 6.0 Prepare Action Plans for Implementation and Technology Validation Activity, the SECARB team will develop an integrated approach to implementing and setting up measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) programs for the most promising opportunities. During this semiannual period special attention was provided to Texas and Virginia, which were added to the SECARB region, to ensure a smooth integration of activities with the other 9 states. Milestones completed and submitted during the third and fourth quarter included: Q3-FY04--Complete initial development of plans for GIS; and Q4-FYO4--Complete preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues.

Kenneth J. Nemeth

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional scale assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

U.S. Department of Energy Region 6 Radiological Assistance Program response plan. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upon request, the DOE, through the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP), makes available and will provide radiological advice, monitoring, and assessment activities during radiological incidents where the release of radioactive materials is suspected or has occurred. Assistance will end when the need for such assistance is over, or if there are other resources available to adequately address the incident. The implementation of the RAP is usually accomplished through the recommendation of the DOE Regional Coordinating Office`s (RCO) on duty Regional Response Coordinator (RRC) with the approval of the Regional Coordinating Office Director (RCOD). The DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is the designated RCO for DOE Region 6 RAP. The purpose of this document is: to describe the mechanism for responding to any organization or private citizen requesting assistance to radiological incidents; to coordinate radiological assistance among participating federal agencies, states, and tribes in DOE Region 6; and to describe the RAP Scaled Response concept of operations.

Jakubowski, F.M.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Scale Model Turbine Missile Casing Impact Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes three 1/5-scale-model turbine missile impact experiments performed to provide benchmark data for assessing turbine missiles effects in nuclear plant design. The development of an explosive launcher to accelerate the turbine missile models to the desired impact velocities is described. A comparison of the test results with those from full-scale experiments demonstrates scalability.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

National Climate Assessment: Indicators System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indicators System Print E-mail Indicators System Print E-mail What are the goals for the NCA indicators? The vision for the National Climate Assessment (NCA) is to create a system of indicators that will help inform policy-makers and citizens understand key aspects of our changing climate. Scientific information about physical climate conditions, climate impacts, vulnerabilities, and preparedness will be tracked and compiled. These measures are called indicators. The goals of the Indicators System are to: Provide meaningful, authoritative climate-relevant measures about the status, rates, and trends of key physical, ecological, and societal variables and values Inform decisions on management, research, and education at regional to national scales Identify climate-related conditions and impacts to help develop effective mitigation and adaptation measures

284

Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed its Phase I program in December 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership Phase I project was to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. Many other goals were accomplished on the way to this objective, including (1) analysis of CO{sub 2} storage options in the region, including characterization of storage capacities and transportation options, (2) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} sources, (3) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} separation and capture technologies employed in the region, (4) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region, (5) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, and (6) assessing and initiating public knowledge and acceptance of possible sequestration approaches. Results of the Southwest Partnership's Phase I evaluation suggested that the most convenient and practical ''first opportunities'' for sequestration would lie along existing CO{sub 2} pipelines in the region. Action plans for six Phase II validation tests in the region were developed, with a portfolio that includes four geologic pilot tests distributed among Utah, New Mexico, and Texas. The Partnership will also conduct a regional terrestrial sequestration pilot program focusing on improved terrestrial MMV methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region. The sixth and final validation test consists of a local-scale terrestrial pilot involving restoration of riparian lands for sequestration purposes. The validation test will use desalinated waters produced from one of the geologic pilot tests. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state government agencies and universities, five major electric utility companies, seven oil, gas and coal companies, three federal agencies, the Navajo Nation, several NGOs, and the Western Governors Association. This group is continuing its work in the Phase II Validation Program, slated to conclude in 2009.

Brian McPherson

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Regional Extreme Monthly Precipitation Simulated by NARCCAP RCMs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the ability of the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) ensemble of regional climate models to simulate extreme monthly precipitation and its supporting circulation for regions of North America, ...

William J. Gutowski Jr.; Raymond W. Arritt; Sho Kawazoe; David M. Flory; Eugene S. Takle; Sébastien Biner; Daniel Caya; Richard G. Jones; René Laprise; L. Ruby Leung; Linda O. Mearns; Wilfran Moufouma-Okia; Ana M. B. Nunes; Yun Qian; John O. Roads; Lisa C. Sloan; Mark A. Snyder

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

EA-1773: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment EA-1773: Final Environmental Assessment NEOS New Planet BioEnergy, LLC Commercial Scale Integrated Demonstration BioEnergy Center, Vero Beach, Florida...

287

CAPITAL REGION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

t 09/20/07 15:28 FAX 301 903 4656 t 09/20/07 15:28 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION 0 j002 SDOE F 1325.8 (8-89) EFG (0790) Energy United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE. September 18, 2007 Audit Report No.: OAS-L-07-23 REPLY TO: IG-34 (A07TG036) SUBJECT: Evaluation of "The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Cyber Security Program-2007" TO: Chairman, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results o Four evaluation of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission) cyber security program. The evaluation was initiated in May 2007, and our fieldwork was conducted through September 2007. Our methodology is described in the attachment to this report. . INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Commission reports that it is constantly improving thl stability, reliability, and

288

The CarboEurope Regional Experiment Strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantification of sources and sinks of carbon at global and regional scales requires not only a good description of the land sources and sinks of carbon, but also of the synoptic and mesoscale meteorology. An experiment was performed in Les ...

A. J. Dolman; L. Tolk; R. Ronda; J. Noilhan; C. Sarrat; A. Brut; B. Piguet; P. Durand; A. Butet; N. Jarosz; Y. Brunet; D. Loustau; E. Lamaud; F. Miglietta; B. Gioli; V. Magliulo; M. Esposito; C. Gerbig; S. Körner; P. Glademard; M. Ramonet; P. Ciais; B. Neininger; R. W. A. Hutjes; J. A. Elbers; R. Macatangay; O. Schrems; G. Pérez-Landa; M. J. Sanz; Y. Scholz; G. Facon; E. Ceschia; P. Beziat

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Building Scale DC Microgrids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale DC Microgrids Title Building Scale DC Microgrids Publication Type Conference Proceedings LBNL Report Number LBNL-5729E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Marnay, Chris, Steven...

290

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

applications for which silica scaling must be prevented Benefits: Reduces scaling in cooling towers by up to 50% Increases the number of cycles of concentration substantially...

291

Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii). Task 3: water resources evaluation. Topical report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii). Task 3: water resources evaluation. Topical report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The fundamental objective of the water resources analysis was to assess the availability of surface and ground water for potential use as power plant make-up water in the major geothermal areas of California. The analysis was concentrated on identifying the major sources of surface and ground water, potential limitations on the usage of this water, and the

292

New Oversight Process and Safety Culture Assessment Lessons Learned...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Urgency * Training Safety Culture Assessment Lessons Learned Method -- Data Gathering Techniques Surveys Behavioral Anchored Rating Scales (BARS) Focus Group...

293

Alaska Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Region Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Alaska Geothermal Region Details Areas (54) Power Plants (1) Projects (2) Techniques (0) Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States[1] Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States[2] References ↑ "Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States" ↑ "Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States" Geothermal Region Data State(s) Alaska Area 1,717,854 km²1,717,854,000,000 m² 663,091.644 mi² 18,490,808,670,600 ft² 2,054,553,384,000 yd² 424,490,312.67 acres USGS Resource Estimate for this Region Identified Mean Potential 677 MW677,000 kW

294

Regional distribution of diagenetic carbonate cement in Palaeocene deepwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional distribution of diagenetic carbonate cement in Palaeocene deepwater sandstones: North Sea. This study attempts to make a large-scale regional examination of the distribution of carbonate cements

Haszeldine, Stuart

295

National Climate Assessment: Production Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NCA & Development Advisory Committee NCA & Development Advisory Committee Production Team Indicators System Coastal Resilience Resources Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally National Climate Assessment: Production Team Print E-mail National Climate Assessment Staff (USGCRP National Coordination Office) Current NCA Staff Dr. Fabien Laurier, Director, Third National Climate Assessment Dr. Glynis Lough, Chief of Staff for the National Climate Assessment Emily Therese Cloyd, Engagement Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment Bryce Golden-Chen, Program Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment Alison Delgado, Scientist Dr. Ilya Fischhoffkri, Scientist Melissa Kenney, Indicators Coordinator Dr. Fred Lipschultz, Regional Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment

296

Neighborhood, City, or Region: Deconstructing Scale in Planning Frames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pdf -----. 2004. Transportation 2030 Equity Analysis Report.generation: Transportation 2030 plan for the San Franciscoplanning organization’s 2030 plan (MTC 2005) frames

Lowe, Kate

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Seasonal Climate Trends, the North Atlantic Oscillation, and Salamander Abundance in the Southern Appalachian Mountain Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is a large-scale climate teleconnection that coincides with worldwide changes in weather. Its impacts have been documented at large scales, particularly in Europe, but not as much at regional scales. ...

Robert J. Warren II; Mark A. Bradford

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Region 9: Pacific Rim Region, Regional Sustainability Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REGION 9: PACIFIC RIM REGION REGION 9: PACIFIC RIM REGION Regional Sustainability Plan Presented by Ruth Cox Region 9 Regional Administrator Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) May 22 nd , 2013 REGION 9 INFORMATION MANAGE Federal space  36 million RSF in Region Nine * 173 owned buildings, 955 leased buildings * 100,000 Federal workers housed DESIGN & CONSTRUCT new Federal buildings $1.4 billion in FY12 capital construction projects $318 million in FY13 - Los Angeles Courthouse project PROVIDE PROCUREMENT LEADERSHIP across the Federal government  $1.24 billion in total GSA Schedule sales in FY12  $468 million to small businesses  34,000 fleet vehicles, 53% of which are Alternative Fuel Vehicles Pacific Rim Profile - CA, AZ, NV, HI

299

Research Needs and Directions of Regional Climate Modeling Using WRF and CCSM  

SciTech Connect

Climate varies across a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. Yet, climate modeling has long been approached using global models that can resolve only the broader scales of atmospheric processes and their interactions with land, ocean, and sea ice. Clearly, large-scale climate determines the environment for mesoscale and microscale processes that govern the weather and local climate, but, likewise, processes that occur at the regional scale may have significant impacts on the large scale circulation. Resolving such scale interactions will lead to much improved understanding of how climate both influences, and is influenced by, human activities. Since October 2003, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) has supported an effort through the Opportunity Fund to develop regional climate modeling capability using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model (http://www.wrf-model.org/index.php) and the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) (http://www.ccsm.ucar.edu/models), with participations by members of both the Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology and Climate and Global Dynamics Divisions. The goal is to develop a next generation community Regional Climate Model (RCM) that can address both downscaling and upscaling issues in climate modeling. Downscaling is the process of deriving regional climate information based on large-scale climate conditions. Both dynamical and statistical downscaling methods have been used to produce regional climate change scenarios; however, their resolution and physical fidelity are considered inadequate. Hence, the global change community has expressed a strong demand for improved regional climate information to explore the implications of adaptation and mitigation and assess climate change impacts (http://www.climatescience.gov/events/workshop2002/). Upscaling encapsulates the aggregate effects of small-scale physical and dynamical processes on the large-scale climate. One form of upscaling is the use of physical parameterizations such as that for deep convection. These are also considered to be inadequate, as much of the uncertainty in model sensitivity to greenhouse gases is now known to be associated with cloud parameterizations. Another form of upscaling is to explicitly include the effects of regional processes on the large-scale environment, both locally and remotely. Since their inception in the late 1980s, RCMs have been used predominantly to address downscaling issues through one-way coupling with global analyses or climate models. As part of the NCAR project, WRF has been adapted for simulating regional climate. Seasonal simulations over the U.S. have shown realistic features including the low-level jet and diurnal cycle of rainfall in the Central U.S. (Leung et al. 2005), and orographic precipitation in the western U.S. (Done et al. 2005). A WRF Regional Climate Modeling Working Group has been established to coordinate RCM research activities. To help define the next steps, a workshop on “Research Needs and Directions of Regional Climate Modeling Using WRF and CCSM” was organized to engage the regional and global climate modeling communities to: (1) define research needs for the development of a next generation community RCM based on WRF and CCSM; (2) define upscaling and downscaling research that can be addressed by RCMs; and (3) develop a plan of actions that would meet the research needs. This article summarizes the research issues and recommendations discussed at the workshop. There is no implied order in the research priorities listed below. Workshop agenda and presentations can be found at http://box.mmm.ucar.edu/events/rcm05/.

Leung, Lai R.; Kuo, Y.-H.; Tribbia, J.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

ARAC: A flexible real-time dose consequence assessment system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since its beginning, the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), an emergency radiological dose assessment service of the US Government, has been called on to do consequence assessments for releases into the atmosphere of radionuclides and a variety of other substances. Some of the more noteworthy emergency responses have been for the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl nuclear power reactor accidents, and more recently, for a cloud of gases from a rail-car spill into the Sacramento river of the herbicide metam sodium, smoke from hundreds of burning oil wells in Kuwait, and ash clouds from the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. The spatial scales of these responses range from local, to regional, to global, and the response periods from hours, to weeks, to months. Because of the variety of requirements of each unique assessment, ARAC has developed and maintains a flexible system of people, computer software and hardware.

Ellis, J.S.; Sullivan, T.J.

1993-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional scale assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Solar Atlas (PACA Region - France) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Atlas (PACA Region - France) Solar Atlas (PACA Region - France) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Solar Atlas (PACA Region - France) Agency/Company /Organization: MINES ParisTech Sector: Energy Focus Area: Solar Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.webservice-energy.com/ Country: France Web Application Link: www.webservice-energy.org/viewer/heron/applications/atlas-paca/ Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): International UN Region: Western Europe Coordinates: 43.615149095322°, 7.0526915788651° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.615149095322,"lon":7.0526915788651,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

302

A Case Study Approachto Understanding Regional Resilience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a cornerstone of disaster response. 9 As the much-studieddisaster—that is, its robustness, redundancy, resourcefulness and rapidity of response—disasters. Perhaps a region requires a generation of assessment, readiness and response---

Kathryn A. Foster

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

EA-1886: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1886: Draft Environmental Assessment Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Kevin Dome Carbon Storage Project, Shelby,...

304

Extreme Scale Visual Analytics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme-scale visual analytics (VA) is about applying VA to extreme-scale data. The articles in this special issue examine advances related to extreme-scale VA problems, their analytical and computational challenges, and their real-world applications.

Wong, Pak C.; Shen, Han-Wei; Pascucci, Valerio

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

305

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 8. The southern Rocky Mountain region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Southern Rocky Mountain atlas assimilates five collections of wind resource data: one for the region and one for each of the four states that compose the Southern Rocky Mountain region (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah). At the state level, features of the climate, topography and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than is provided in the regional discussion, and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction, and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

Andersen, S.R.; Freeman, D.L.; Hadley, D.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Event:Hands-on Training Workshop for the Africa Region on Mitigation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Hands-on Training Workshop for the Africa Region on Mitigation Assessment: on 20120910 The Consultative Group of Experts...

307

Event:Hands-on Training Workshop for the Asia and Pacific Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Adaptation Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Hands-on Training Workshop for the Asia and Pacific Region on Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment:...

308

Temperature Trends in the NARCCAP Regional Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The skill of six regional climate models (RCMs) in reproducing short-term (24-yr), observed, near-surface temperature trends when driven by reanalysis is examined. The RCMs are part of the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (...

Melissa S. Bukovsky

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Correction and commentary for "Ocean forecasting in terrain-following coordinates: Formulation and skill assessment of the regional ocean modeling system" by Haidvogel et al., J. Comp. Phys. 227, pp. 3595-3624  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although our names appear as co-authors in the above article (Haidvogel et al. (2008) [1], hereafter H2008), we were not aware of its existence until after it was published. In reading the article, we discovered that a significant portion of it (~40%, ... Keywords: Conservation and constancy preservation, Regional ocean modeling, Split-explicit time stepping, Terrain-following coordinates

Alexander F. Shchepetkin; James C. McWilliams

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation » Carbon Capture and Storage » Regional Science & Innovation » Carbon Capture and Storage » Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Program DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also called carbon sequestration) in different regions and geologic formations within the Nation. Collectively, the seven RCSPs represent regions encompassing: 97 percent of coal-fired CO2 emissions; 97 percent of industrial CO2 emissions; 96 percent of the total land mass; and essentially all the geologic sequestration sites in the U.S. potentially available for carbon storage.

311

Detailed Renewable Energy Resource Assessment Data Inventory...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(national, regional, and site specific). Assessments are available for biomass and hydropower resources at a national level, with only limited information available at the...

312

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel technology to remove both dissolved and colloidal silica using small gel particles. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Silica Scaling Removal Process Applications: Cooling tower systems Water treatment systems Water evaporation systems Potential mining applications (produced water) Industry applications for which silica scaling must be prevented Benefits: Reduces scaling in cooling towers by up to 50% Increases the number of cycles of concentration substantially Reduces the amount of antiscaling chemical additives needed Decreases the amount of makeup water and subsequent discharged water (blowdown) Enables considerable cost savings derived from reductions in

313

Scaling Issues for Large-Scale Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· ESNet Can Play a Very Important Role in the Science Grid � Security Aspects of Grids · ESNet Can Provide will be important and very useful for managing large-scale virtual org. structures #12;·ESNet Can Play a Very Important Role in the Science Grid · ESNet can provide a rooted and managed namespace, and a place to home

314

Thermodynamics and scale relativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown how the fractal paths of scale relativity (following Nottale) can be introduced into a thermodynamical context (following Asadov-Kechkin).

Carroll, Robert

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

systems Water treatment systems Water evaporation systems Potential mining applications (produced water) Industry applications for which silica scaling must be prevented Benefits:...

316

Draft Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment for the GILA-NORTH GILA TRANSMISSION LINE REBUILD AND UPGRADE PROJECT (DOE/EA-1948) December 2013 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region Prepared by Cooperating Agencies U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Yuma Area Office U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles District DRAFT Gila to North Gila Transmission Line Rebuild and Upgrade Project Environmental Assessment Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Yuma Area Office U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District Prepared by: December 2013 Gila to North Gila Transmission Line Rebuild and Upgrade Project

317

Classifying forest productivity at different scales  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Spatial scale is an important consideration when evaluating, using, or constructing forest productivity classifications. First, the factors which dominate spatial variability in forest productivity are scale dependent. For example, within a stand, spatial variability in productivity is dominated by microsite differences; within a national forest such as the Cherokee National Forest, spatial variability is dominated by topography and land-use history (e.g., years since harvest); within a large region such as the southeast, spatial variability is dominated by climatic patterns. Second, classifications developed at different spatial scales are often used for different purposes. For example, stand-level classifications are often keys or rules used in the field to judge the quality or potential of a site. National-forest classifications are often presented as maps or tables and may be used in forest land planning. Regional classifications may be maps or tables and may be used to quantify or predict resource availability. These scale-related differences in controlling factors and purposes will affect both the methods and the data used to develop classifications. In this paper, I will illustrate these points by describing and comparing three forest productivity classifications, each developed for a specific purpose at a specific scale. My objective is not to argue for or against any of these particular classifications but rather to heighten awareness of the critical role that spatial scale plays in the use and development of forest productivity classifications. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Graham, R.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Regional companies eye growth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional companies eye growth Regional companies eye growth Adaptive Radio Technologies, Los Alamos Visualization Associates, Mesa Tech International Inc., and ThermaSun Inc. were...

319

Review of air quality assessment studies and definitions of some research needs for the emerging oil shale technology  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the air quality assessment programs that have been conducted by the various private and government sponsored developers who propose to extract energy from the oil shale. These studies have ranged from regional comprehensive baseline and environmental impact studies over several years' period to intermittant localized small scale air quality monitoring programs. A review of the environmental programs, their location, retorting type, and extent of environmental program undertaken is given.

Parker, G.B.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Platforms and real options in large-scale engineering systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis introduces a framework and two methodologies that enable engineering management teams to assess the value of real options in programs of large-scale, partially standardized systems implemented a few times over ...

Kalligeros, Konstantinos C., 1976-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional scale assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Effects of Noise on Thorpe Scales and Run Lengths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimating the diapycnal mixing rate from standard CTD data by identifying overturning regions in the water column (the Thorpe-scale approach) provides good spatial and temporal coverage but is sometimes limited by instrument noise. This noise ...

Helen L. Johnson; Chris Garrett

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Meso-? Scale Perturbations of the Wind Field by Thunderstorm Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of data from the high density storm-scale rawinsonde network of SESAME during the storm events on 2 May 1979 showed the existence of persistent and strong regions of tropospheric convergence and divergence which were detectable on the ...

Stan L. Ulanski; Gerald M. Heymsfield

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Materialized community ground models for large-scale earthquake simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale earthquake simulation requires source datasets which describe the highly heterogeneous physical characteristics of the earth in the region under simulation. Physical characteristic datasets are the first stage in a simulation pipeline which ...

Steven W. Schlosser; Michael P. Ryan; Ricardo Taborda; Julio López; David R. O'Hallaron; Jacobo Bielak

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Setting the Scales of the Ocean Response to Isolated Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ocean response to negative buoyancy flux, applied in an isolated region at the surface, is investigated to determine the scales of the equilibrium state, that is, the time to reach equilibrium, the equilibrium density anomaly within the ...

David C. Chapman

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

The Frictional Nearshore Response to Forcing by Synoptic Scale Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytic barotropic model was used to study the nearshore frictional response to synoptic-scale wind forcing. The results depend only on the region where the surface and bottom Ekman layers interact strongly and the water is consequently well ...

Gary T. Mitchum; Allan J. Clarke

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Definition: Reduced Wide-Scale Blackouts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

will reduce the probability of wide-scale regional blackouts.1 Related Terms bes emergency, smart grid References SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An i LikeLike...

327

Large-scale functional models of visual cortex for remote sensing  

SciTech Connect

Neuroscience has revealed many properties of neurons and of the functional organization of visual cortex that are believed to be essential to human vision, but are missing in standard artificial neural networks. Equally important may be the sheer scale of visual cortex requiring {approx}1 petaflop of computation. In a year, the retina delivers {approx}1 petapixel to the brain, leading to massively large opportunities for learning at many levels of the cortical system. We describe work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to develop large-scale functional models of visual cortex on LANL's Roadrunner petaflop supercomputer. An initial run of a simple region VI code achieved 1.144 petaflops during trials at the IBM facility in Poughkeepsie, NY (June 2008). Here, we present criteria for assessing when a set of learned local representations is 'complete' along with general criteria for assessing computer vision models based on their projected scaling behavior. Finally, we extend one class of biologically-inspired learning models to problems of remote sensing imagery.

Brumby, Steven P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kenyon, Garrett [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rasmussen, Craig E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swaminarayan, Sriram [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bettencourt, Luis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Landecker, Will [PORTLAND STATE UNIV.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Comparing Large-Scale Hydrological Model Simulations to Observed Runoff Percentiles in Europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale hydrological models describing the terrestrial water balance at continental and global scales are increasingly being used in earth system modeling and climate impact assessments. However, because of incomplete process understanding and ...

Lukas Gudmundsson; Lena M. Tallaksen; Kerstin Stahl; Douglas B. Clark; Egon Dumont; Stefan Hagemann; Nathalie Bertrand; Dieter Gerten; Jens Heinke; Naota Hanasaki; Frank Voss; Sujan Koirala

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Understanding Convective Extreme Precipitation Scaling Using Observations and an Entraining Plume Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previously observed twice Clausius-Clapeyron (2CC) scaling for extreme precipitation at hourly timescales has led to discussions about its origin. The robustness of this scaling is assessed by analyzing a sub-hourly dataset of 10-minute resolution ...

Jessica M. Loriaux; Geert Lenderink; Stephan R. De Roode; A. Pier Siebesma

330

UNEP/DTIE Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Project  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNEP/DTIE Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Project UNEP/DTIE Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Project Document Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): This project will provide solar and wind resource data and geographic information assessment tools to public and private sector executives who are involved in energy market development. It will demonstrate the use of these instruments in investment and policy decision making and build local capacities for their continuous use. The project will enable private investors and public policy makers to assess the technical, economic and environmental potential for large-scale investments in technologies that enable the exploitation of two increasingly important sources of renewable energy. During this pilot project, tools for analysis and use of resource information will be developed, a global tx_metadatatool and review mechanism will be initiated, regional/national solar and wind resource maps generated and national assessment demonstrations performed. The overall goal is to promote the integration of wind and solar alternatives in national and regional energy planning and sector restructuring as well as related policy making. The project will enable informed decision making and enhance the ability of participating governments to attract increased investor interest in renewable energy. Thirteen countries will be directly involved in the pilot stage of the project. Global and regional maps will be available to all developing countries.

331

Large-Scale Vertical and Horizontal Circulation in the North Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of large-scale hydrography, air–sea forcing, and regional circulation from numerous studies are combined by inverse methods to determine the basin-scale circulation, average diapycnal mixing, and adjustments to air–sea forcing of the ...

Rick Lumpkin; Kevin Speer

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Validation of a pattern scaling approach for determining the maximum available renewable freshwater resource  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pattern scaling approach allows projection of regional climate changes under a wide range of emission scenarios. A basic assumption of this approach is that the spatial response pattern to global warming (scaling pattern) is the same for all ...

Yasuhiro Ishizaki; Tokuta Yokohata; Seita Emori; Hideo Shiogama; Kiyoshi Takahashi; Naota Hanasaki; Toru Nozawa; Tomoo Ogura; Toshiyuki Nakaegawa; Masakazu Yoshimori; Ai Yoshida; Shigeru Watanabe

333

NREL: Energy Analysis: Resource Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Assessment Resource Assessment NREL has developed maps and tools to conduct renewable energy resource assessments at the state, national and international level. Around the world, interest is growing in renewable energy as a strategy to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and increase energy security. The starting point for new renewable energy projects is a characterization of the renewable resources available across a region, a resource assessment. NREL uses geospatial data sets to identify regions that are appropriate for renewable development and those that should be excluded such as water bodies, urban areas, cropland, forests, very steep terrain, and protected areas. Once resource data are available for a region, NREL can estimate the theoretical potential, or upper limit, for renewable energy in an area.

334

Sustainable agricultural residue removal for bioenergy: A spatially comprehensive US national assessment  

SciTech Connect

This study provides a spatially comprehensive assessment of sustainable agricultural residue removal potential across the United States for bioenergy production. Earlier assessments determining the quantity of agricultural residue that could be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at the regional and national scale faced a number of computational limitations. These limitations included the number of environmental factors, the number of land management scenarios, and the spatial fidelity and spatial extent of the assessment. This study utilizes integrated multi-factor environmental process modeling and high fidelity land use datasets to perform the sustainable agricultural residue removal assessment. Soil type represents the base spatial unit for this study and is modeled using a national soil survey database at the 10–100 m scale. Current crop rotation practices are identified by processing land cover data available from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service Cropland Data Layer database. Land management and residue removal scenarios are identified for each unique crop rotation and crop management zone. Estimates of county averages and state totals of sustainably available agricultural residues are provided. The results of the assessment show that in 2011 over 150 million metric tons of agricultural residues could have been sustainably removed across the United States. Projecting crop yields and land management practices to 2030, the assessment determines that over 207 million metric tons of agricultural residues will be able to be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at that time. This biomass resource has the potential for producing over 68 billion liters of cellulosic biofuels.

Muth, David J. [Idaho National Laboratory; Bryden, Kenneth Mark [Ames L; Nelson, R. G. [Kansas State University

2012-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

335

Digital scale converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digital scale converter is provided for binary coded decimal (BCD) conversion. The converter may be programmed to convert a BCD value of a first scale to the equivalent value of a second scale according to a known ratio. The value to be converted is loaded into a first BCD counter and counted down to zero while a second BCD counter registers counts from zero or an offset value depending upon the conversion. Programmable rate multipliers are used to generate pulses at selected rates to the counters for the proper conversion ratio. The value present in the second counter at the time the first counter is counted to the zero count is the equivalent value of the second scale. This value may be read out and displayed on a conventional seven-segment digital display.

Upton, Richard G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Large-Scale Hydropower  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Large-scale hydropower plants are generally developed to produce electricity for government or electric utility projects. These plants are more than 30 MW in size, and there is more than 80,000 MW...

337

Fish scales and growth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish scales and growth Name: Belinda Clark Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: In my daughter's book about fish, it states that fish continue to get bigger as they age...

338

Lightning Scaling Relations Revisited  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scaling relations connecting storm electrical generator power (and hence lightning flash rate) to charge transport velocity and storm geometry were originally posed by Vonnegut in the 1960s. These were later simplified to yield simple ...

Dennis J. Boccippio

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Amazonian Deforestation and Regional Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale conversion of tropical forests into pastures or annual crops could lead to changes in the climate. We have used a coupled numerical model of the global atmosphere and biosphere (Center for Ocean-Land- Atmosphere GCM) to assess the ...

Carlos A. Nobre; Piers J. Sellers; Jagadish Shukla

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Estimating the Effects on the Regional Precipitation Climate in a Semiarid Region Caused by an Artificial Lake Using a Mesoscale Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects on the regional precipitation climate by the construction of an artificial lake, in a semiarid region are studied. The study is performed using a mesoscale model to identify the larger-scale meteorological conditions when ...

Leif Enger; Michael Tjernström

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional scale assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A Hierarchical Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tools for predicting the evolution of the climate system. Through decades of development, GCMs have demonstrated useful skill in simulating climate at continental to global scales. However, large uncertainties remain in projecting climate change at regional scales, which limit our ability to inform decisions on climate change adaptation and mitigation. To bridge this gap, different modeling approaches including nested regional climate models (RCMs), global stretch-grid models, and global high-resolution atmospheric models have been used to provide regional climate simulations (Leung et al. 2003). In previous efforts to evaluate these approaches, isolating their relative merits was not possible because factors such as dynamical frameworks, physics parameterizations, and model resolutions were not systematically constrained. With advances in high performance computing, it is now feasible to run coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs at horizontal resolution comparable to what RCMs use today. Global models with local refinement using unstructured grids have become available for modeling regional climate (e.g., Rauscher et al. 2012; Ringler et al. 2013). While they offer opportunities to improve climate simulations, significant efforts are needed to test their veracity for regional-scale climate simulations.

Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ringler, Todd; Collins, William D.; Taylor, Mark; Ashfaq, Moetasim

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

342

Peculiarity of Seismicity in the Balakend-Zagatal Region, Azerbaijan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of seismicity in the Balakend-Zagatal region demonstrates a temporal correlation of small events in the region with the moderate events in Caucasus for the time interval of 1980 to 1990. It is shown that the processes resulting in deformation and tectonic movements of main structural elements of the Caucasus region are internal and are not related to large-scale tectonic processes. A week dependence of the regional movements on the large-scale motion of the lithospheric plates and microplates is apparent from another geological and geodetic data as well.

Ismail-Zadeh, Tahir T. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29A, H. Javid Ave., Baku 1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

343

Lake Region State College | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

College College Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Region State College Facility Lake Region State College Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Lake Region State College Developer Lake Region State College Energy Purchaser Lake Region State College Location Devils Lake ND Coordinates 48.166071°, -98.864529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.166071,"lon":-98.864529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

344

Materials - Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Assessment The staff of the Energy Systems Division has a long history of technical and economic analysis of the production and recycling of materials for transportation...

345

Fish Scales and Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish Scales and Science Fish Scales and Science Name: Amanda Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: In special education class.Science project time.Topic choosen is HOW DO SCALES HELP FISH? Any suggestions or information would be of help. Replies: Wait a minute. Why do you think the scales help the fish? How do you know they do? Have you talked to a fish lately? Maybe they are useless, or even a problem. Maybe the fish wishes it didn't have scales! I say this only to emphasize two things: First of all, when you think scientifically, the MOST IMPORTANT thing is to be very careful not to assume you know something when you really don't. What I mean by that is: don't think you know the answer before you are dead positive absolutely for-sure 100% certain that you do. Why? Why make a big fuss over being so very careful? Well, I hate to tell you this (but you probably already know it), it's just SO EASY for human beings to fool themselves, to think they know the answers when they really don't know AT ALL what they are talking about. If you have a brother or sister, you know EXACTLY what I mean, I expect.

346

Case Studies of Potential Facility-Scale and Utility-Scale Non-Hydro Renewable Energy Projects across Reclamation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of an assessment and analysis of renewable energy opportunities conducted for the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Tasks included assessing the suitability for wind and solar on both a utility and facility scale.

Haase, S.; Burman, K.; Dahle, D.; Heimiller, D.; Jimenez, A.; Melius, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; VanGeet, O.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Defining assessment projects and scenarios for policy support: Use of ontology in Integrated Assessment and Modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated Assessment and Modelling (IAM) provides an interdisciplinary approach to support ex-ante decision-making by combining quantitative models representing different systems and scales into a framework for integrated assessment. Scenarios in IAM ... Keywords: Collaborative approach, Integration, Knowledge management, Multi-disciplinary teams, Policy assessment

S. Janssen; F. Ewert; Hongtao Li; I. N. Athanasiadis; J. J. F. Wien; O. Thérond; M. J. R. Knapen; I. Bezlepkina; J. Alkan-Olsson; A. E. Rizzoli; H. Belhouchette; M. Svensson; M. K. van Ittersum

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

SciTech Connect

The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's (SECARB) Phase I program focused on promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and commercial deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. The SECARB program, and its subsequent phases, directly support the Global Climate Change Initiative's goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by the year 2012. Work during the project's two-year period was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix''. The SECARB team was successful in accomplishing its tasks to define the geographic boundaries of the region; characterize the region; identify and address issues for technology deployment; develop public involvement and education mechanisms; identify the most promising capture, sequestration, and transport options; and prepare action plans for implementation and technology validation activity. Milestones accomplished during Phase I of the project are listed below: (1) Completed preliminary identification of geographic boundaries for the study (FY04, Quarter 1); (2) Completed initial inventory of major sources and sinks for the region (FY04, Quarter 2); (3) Completed initial development of plans for GIS (FY04, Quarter 3); (4) Completed preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues (FY04, Quarter 4); (5) Assessed safety, regulatory and permitting issues (FY05, Quarter 1); (6) Finalized inventory of major sources/sinks and refined GIS algorithms (FY05, Quarter 2); (7) Refined public involvement and education mechanisms in support of technology development options (FY05, Quarter 3); and (8) Identified the most promising capture, sequestration and transport options and prepared action plans (FY05, Quarter 4).

Kenneth J. Nemeth

2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

Mesoscale Vortices in the Weddell Sea Region (Antarctica)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary results of investigations of Antarctic mesocyclones in the Weddell Sea region are presented for the Antarctic summer periods 1983–88. Based on NOAA and METEOR satellite images, a total of 195 mesoscale vortices (scale less than 1000 ...

Günther Heinemann

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Does Nudging Squelch the Extremes in Regional Climate Modeling?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important question in regional climate downscaling is whether to constrain (nudge) the interior of the limited-area domain toward the larger-scale driving fields. Prior research has demonstrated that interior nudging can increase the skill of ...

Tanya L. Otte; Christopher G. Nolte; Martin J. Otte; Jared H. Bowden

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Vegetation Feedbacks to Climate in the Global Monsoon Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vegetation feedbacks on climate, on the subannual time scale, are examined across six monsoon regions with a fully coupled atmosphere–ocean–ice–land model with dynamic vegetation. Initial value ensemble experiments are run in which the total ...

Michael Notaro; Guangshan Chen; Zhengyu Liu

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Regional Models: Emerging Research Tools for Synoptic Meteorologists  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the development of limited-area, regional-scale numerical-weather prediction models has been driven largely by the practical need to improve quantitative precipitation forecasts, a related motivation has been scientific interest in ...

Daniel Keyser; Louis W. Uccellini

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Remote and Local Forcing in the Brazil–Malvinas Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Origins of the seasonal variability observed in current meter data from the Malvinas (Falkland) Current are sought in the wind field on both a regional and circumpolar scale. A singular value decomposition of the covariance of the fields makes it ...

Frédéric Vivier; Christine Provost; Michael P. Meredith

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Lagrangian Methods for Climatological Analysis of Regional Atmospheric Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A quantitative climatological analysis of regional-scale atmospheric transport in Texas is developed using previously described Lagrangian (kinematic) trajectory methods. The trajectories are computed using resolved winds from 1979 to 2001 from ...

Darielle N. Dexheimer; Kenneth P. Bowman

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Associations between the Global Energy Cycle and Regional Rainfall in South Africa and Southwest Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale atmospheric processes in the Southern Hemisphere are examined on both seasonal and daily time scales in order to seek associations between these and regional rainfall variability in the summer rainfall areas of South Africa and the ...

Warren J. Tennant; Chris J. C. Reason

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Streamflow Data from Small Basins: A Challenging Test to High-Resolution Regional Climate Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface models and large-scale hydrological models provide the basis for studying impacts of climate and anthropogenic changes on continental- to regional-scale hydrology. Hence, there is a need for comparison and validation of simulated ...

Kerstin Stahl; Lena M. Tallaksen; Lukas Gudmundsson; Jens H. Christensen

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

North American Regional Reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1997, during the late stages of production of NCEP-NCAR Global Reanalysis (GR), exploration of a regional reanalysis project was suggested by the GR project's Advisory Committee, “particularly if the RDAS [Regional Data Assimilation System] is ...

Fedor Mesinger; Geoff DiMego; Eugenia Kalnay; Kenneth Mitchell; Perry C. Shafran; Wesley Ebisuzaki; Dušan Jovi?; Jack Woollen; Eric Rogers; Ernesto H. Berbery; Michael B. Ek; Yun Fan; Robert Grumbine; Wayne Higgins; Hong Li; Ying Lin; Geoff Manikin; David Parrish; Wei Shi

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Regional hydrothermal commercialization plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan for the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range Region articulates the complete range of initiatives (federal, state, local, and industrial) required for the early commercialization of the regions geothermal resources. (MHR)

1978-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

359

Environmental Assessments (EA) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 16, 2011 August 16, 2011 EA-1870: Draft Environmental Assessment Utah Coal and Biomass Fueled Pilot Plant Kanab, Utah August 15, 2011 EA-1888: Draft Environmental Assessment Old Town Fuel and Fiber Proposed Demonstration-Scale Integrated Biorefinery August 13, 2011 EA-1862: Draft Environmental Assessment Oneida Seven Generations Corporation: Energy Recovery Project, Ashwaubenon, Wisconsin August 12, 2011 EA-1723: Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment General Motors LLC Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative August 3, 2011 EA-1840: Final Environmental Assessment California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo and Kern Counties, California August 1, 2011 EA-1829: Draft Environmental Assessment Phycal Algae Pilot Project, Wahiawa and Kalaeloa, HI

360

Hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for Sengan region, Japan.  

SciTech Connect

A 1 km square regular grid system created on the Universal Transverse Mercator zone 54 projected coordinate system is used to work with volcanism related data for Sengan region. The following geologic variables were determined as the most important for identifying volcanism: geothermal gradient, groundwater temperature, heat discharge, groundwater pH value, presence of volcanic rocks and presence of hydrothermal alteration. Data available for each of these important geologic variables were used to perform directional variogram modeling and kriging to estimate geologic variable vectors at each of the 23949 centers of the chosen 1 km cell grid system. Cluster analysis was performed on the 23949 complete variable vectors to classify each center of 1 km cell into one of five different statistically homogeneous groups with respect to potential volcanism spanning from lowest possible volcanism to highest possible volcanism with increasing group number. A discriminant analysis incorporating Bayes theorem was performed to construct maps showing the probability of group membership for each of the volcanism groups. The said maps showed good comparisons with the recorded locations of volcanism within the Sengan region. No volcanic data were found to exist in the group 1 region. The high probability areas within group 1 have the chance of being the no volcanism region. Entropy of classification is calculated to assess the uncertainty of the allocation process of each 1 km cell center location based on the calculated probabilities. The recorded volcanism data are also plotted on the entropy map to examine the uncertainty level of the estimations at the locations where volcanism exists. The volcanic data cell locations that are in the high volcanism regions (groups 4 and 5) showed relatively low mapping estimation uncertainty. On the other hand, the volcanic data cell locations that are in the low volcanism region (group 2) showed relatively high mapping estimation uncertainty. The volcanic data cell locations that are in the medium volcanism region (group 3) showed relatively moderate mapping estimation uncertainty. Areas of high uncertainty provide locations where additional site characterization resources can be spent most effectively. The new data collected can be added to the existing database to perform future regionalized mapping and reduce the uncertainty level of the existing estimations.

Balasingam, Pirahas (University of Arizona); Park, Jinyong (University of Arizona); McKenna, Sean Andrew; Kulatilake, Pinnaduwa H. S. W. (University of Arizona)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional scale assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards November 17, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis Regional Partner to Demonstrate Safe and Permanent Storage of 2 Million Tons of CO2 at Wyoming Site WASHINGTON, DC - Completing a series of awards through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded $66.9 million to the Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership for the Department's seventh large-scale carbon sequestration project. Led by Montana State University-Bozeman, the Partnership will conduct a large-volume test in the Nugget Sandstone formation to demonstrate the ability of a geologic formation to safely, permanently and economically

362

DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards November 17, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis Regional Partner to Demonstrate Safe and Permanent Storage of 2 Million Tons of CO2 at Wyoming Site WASHINGTON, DC - Completing a series of awards through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded $66.9 million to the Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership for the Department's seventh large-scale carbon sequestration project. Led by Montana State University-Bozeman, the Partnership will conduct a large-volume test in the Nugget Sandstone formation to demonstrate the ability of a geologic formation to safely, permanently and economically

363

An Assessment Of Atmospheric Water Budget Components Over Tropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Balancing global moisture budgets is a difficult task that is even more challenging at regional scales. Atmospheric water budgets components are investigated within five tropical (15°S, 15°N) ocean regions, including the Indian Ocean, three ...

Paula J. Brown; Christian D. Kummerow

364

Angular Scaling In Jets  

SciTech Connect

We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

365

Windows technology assessment  

SciTech Connect

This assessment estimates that energy loss through windows is approximately 15 percent of all the energy used for space heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings in New York State. The rule of thumb for the nation as a whole is about 25 percent. The difference may reflect a traditional assumption of single-pane windows while this assessment analyzed installed window types in the region. Based on the often-quoted assumption, in the United States some 3.5 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of primary energy, costing some $20 billion, is annually consumed as a result of energy lost through windows. According to this assessment, in New York State, the energy lost due to heat loss through windows is approximately 80 trillion Btu at an annual cost of approximately $1 billion.

Baron, J.J.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Extended Longitudinal Scaling: direct evidence of saturation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiparticle production of charged particles at high energies exhibit the phenomenon of Limiting Fragmentation. Furthermore, the region in rapidity over which the production of particles appears to be independent of energy, increases with energy. It is argued that this phenomenon, known as Extended Longitudinal Scaling, is a direct manifestation of some kind of saturation, akin to that in the Color Glass Condensate picture of particle production.

Wit Busza

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

367

NIST Time Scale Data Archive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Time Scale Data Archive. ... The AT1 scale is run in real time using data from an ensemble of cesium standards and hydrogen masers. ...

2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

368

Lab Scale Hydraulic Parameter Estimation .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydraulic tomography has been tested at the field scale, lab scale and in synthetic experiments. Recently Illman and Berg have conducted studies at the lab… (more)

Hartz, Andrew Scott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Scaled Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Product Scaled Solar manufacturers and markets utility-grade, concentrated photovoltaic solar energy systems to commercial customers References Scaled Solar1 LinkedIn...

370

Western Regional Partnership Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regional Partnership Overview Regional Partnership Overview June 2013 Briefing Overview  WRP Background  Importance of Region  WRP Tribal Relations Committee  WRP Energy Committee WRP Region's Uniqueness  5 states stretching from the Great Plains to the Pacific Ocean  Diverse terrain ranging from desert valleys to forested mountains  Significant State Trust Landholdings  Approximately 188 Federally recognized Tribes  Significant amounts of Federally managed land  According to GSA 2004 study, WRP states range from 41.8% - 84.5% of total state land WRP Region's Importance to DoD  Extensive Training Ranges  Interconnected ground/air ranges provide unmatched warfighter training opportunities

371

RTSTEP regional transportation simulation tool for emergency planning - final report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale evacuations from major cities during no-notice events - such as chemical or radiological attacks, hazardous material spills, or earthquakes - have an obvious impact on large regions rather than on just the directly affected area. The scope of impact includes the accommodation of emergency evacuation traffic throughout a very large area; the planning of resources to respond appropriately to the needs of the affected population; the placement of medical supplies and decontamination equipment; and the assessment and determination of primary escape routes, as well as routes for incoming emergency responders. Compared to events with advance notice, such as evacuations based on hurricanes approaching an affected area, the response to no-notice events relies exclusively on pre-planning and general regional emergency preparedness. Another unique issue is the lack of a full and immediate understanding of the underlying threats to the population, making it even more essential to gain extensive knowledge of the available resources, the chain of command, and established procedures. Given the size of the area affected, an advanced understanding of the regional transportation systems is essential to help with the planning for such events. The objectives of the work described here (carried out by Argonne National Laboratory) is the development of a multi-modal regional transportation model that allows for the analysis of different evacuation scenarios and emergency response strategies to build a wealth of knowledge that can be used to develop appropriate regional emergency response plans. The focus of this work is on the effects of no-notice evacuations on the regional transportation network, as well as the response of the transportation network to the sudden and unusual demand. The effects are dynamic in nature, with scenarios changing potentially from minute to minute. The response to a radiological or chemical hazard will be based on the time-delayed dispersion of such materials over a large area, with responders trying to mitigate the immediate danger to the population in a variety of ways that may change over time (e.g., in-place evacuation, staged evacuations, and declarations of growing evacuation zones over time). In addition, available resources will be marshaled in unusual ways, such as the repurposing of transit vehicles to support mass evacuations. Thus, any simulation strategy will need to be able to address highly dynamic effects and will need to be able to handle any mode of ground transportation. Depending on the urgency and timeline of the event, emergency responders may also direct evacuees to leave largely on foot, keeping roadways as clear as possible for emergency responders, logistics, mass transport, and law enforcement. This RTSTEP project developed a regional emergency evacuation modeling tool for the Chicago Metropolitan Area that emergency responders can use to pre-plan evacuation strategies and compare different response strategies on the basis of a rather realistic model of the underlying complex transportation system. This approach is a significant improvement over existing response strategies that are largely based on experience gained from small-scale events, anecdotal evidence, and extrapolation to the scale of the assumed emergency. The new tool will thus add to the toolbox available to emergency response planners to help them design appropriate generalized procedures and strategies that lead to an improved outcome when used during an actual event.

Ley, H.; Sokolov, V.; Hope, M.; Auld, J.; Zhang, K.; Park, Y.; Kang, X. (Energy Systems)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

372

Regional Dynamics Model (REDYN) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regional Dynamics Model (REDYN) Regional Dynamics Model (REDYN) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: REDYN Agency/Company /Organization: Regional Dynamics Inc. Sector: Energy Phase: Determine Baseline, "Evaluate Options and Determine Feasibility" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property., Develop Goals Topics: Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment, - Macroeconomic Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.regionaldynamics.com/

373

NETL: C&CBTL -Laboratory Scale Liquids Production and Assessment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel production system using coal containing different percentages of biomass such as corn stover and switchgrass at a rate of two liters per day. Altex Coal Biomass to Drop-In...

374

Regional Comparisons, Spatial Aggregation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Regional Comparisons, Spatial Aggregation, and Asymmetry of Price Pass-Through in U.S. Gasoline Markets MICHAEL YE*, JOHN ZYREN**, JOANNE SHORE**, AND MICHAEL BURDETTE** Abstract Spot to retail price pass-through behavior of the U.S. gasoline market was investigated at the national and regional levels, using weekly wholesale and retail motor gasoline prices from January 2000 to the present. Asymmetric pass-through was found across all regions, with faster pass-through when prices are rising. Pass-through patterns, in terms of speed and time for completion, were found to vary from region to region. Spatial aggregation was investigated at the national level and the East Coast with the aggregated cumulative pass-through being greater than the volume-weighted regional pass-through when spot prices increase. These results are useful to the petroleum industry, consumers,

375

BENCH SCALE SALTSTONE PROCESS DEVELOPMENT MIXING STUDY  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop a bench scale test facility, using a mixer, transfer pump, and transfer line to determine the impact of conveying the grout through the transfer lines to the vault on grout properties. Bench scale testing focused on the effect the transfer line has on the rheological property of the grout as it was processed through the transfer line. Rheological and other physical properties of grout samples were obtained prior to and after pumping through a transfer line. The Bench Scale Mixing Rig (BSMR) consisted of two mixing tanks, grout feed tank, transfer pump and transfer hose. The mixing tanks were used to batch the grout which was then transferred into the grout feed tank. The contents of the feed tank were then pumped through the transfer line (hose) using a progressive cavity pump. The grout flow rate and pump discharge pressure were monitored. Four sampling stations were located along the length of the transfer line at the 5, 105 and 205 feet past the transfer pump and at 305 feet, the discharge of the hose. Scaling between the full scale piping at Saltstone to bench scale testing at SRNL was performed by maintaining the same shear rate and total shear at the wall of the transfer line. The results of scaling down resulted in a shorter transfer line, a lower average velocity, the same transfer time and similar pressure drops. The condition of flow in the bench scale transfer line is laminar. The flow in the full scale pipe is in the transition region, but is more laminar than turbulent. The resulting plug in laminar flow in the bench scale results in a region of no-mixing. Hence mixing, or shearing, at the bench scale should be less than that observed in the full scale, where this plug is non existent due to the turbulent flow. The bench scale tests should be considered to be conservative due to the highly laminar condition of flow that exists. Two BSMR runs were performed. In both cases, wall shearing was shown to reduce the rheological properties of the grout as it was processed through the transfer line. Samples taken at the static feed tank showed that gelling impacted the rheological properties of the grout before it was fed into the pump and transfer line. A comparison of the rheological properties of samples taken at the feed tank and transfer line discharge indicated shearing of the grout was occurring in the transfer line. Bench scale testing of different mixing methods with three different salt solutions showed that method of mixing influences the rheological properties of the grouts. The paddle blade mixing method of the salt solution used for the BMSR testing provided comparable rheological properties of the grout prepared in the BMSR after 14 minutes of processing, B3. The paddle blade mixing method can be used to represent BMSR results and mixing time can be adjusted to represent larger scale mixing.

Cozzi, A.; Hansen, E.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

376

Draft Enivonmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dear Reader: The enclosed Draft Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Utah Coal and Biomass Fueled Pilot Plant Project, Kanab, Utah , (Draft EA-1870D) was prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality's National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementing regulations (40 CFR Parts 1500 to 1508) and DOE NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). The Draft EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of DOE providing cost-shared funding under a cooperative agreement with Viresco Energy, LLC (Viresco) for its design, construction, and testing of a pilot-scale gasification process facility. The objective of Viresco's proposed project is to conduct a pilot- scale evaluation of the Steam Hydrogasification Reaction process to determine the technical

377

A Climatology of Tropical Anvil and Its Relationship to the Large-Scale Circulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation uses multiple tools to investigate tropical anvil, i.e., thick, non-precipitating cloud associated with deep convection with the main objectives to provide a climatology of tropics-wide anvil properties and a better understanding of anvil formation, and to provide a more realistic assessment of the radiative impact of tropical anvil on the large-scale circulation. Based on 10 years (1998-2007) of observations, anvil observed by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation (PR) shows significant geographical variations, which can be linked to variations in the parent convection. Strong upper level wind shear appears to assist the generation of anvil and may further explain the different anvil statistics over land and ocean. Variations in the large-scale environment appear to play a more important role in anvil production in regions where convection regularly attains heights greater than 7 km. For regions where convection is less deep, variations in the depth of the convection and the large-scale environment likely contribute more equally to anvil generation. Anvil radiative heating profiles are estimated by extrapolating millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) radiative properties from Manus to the 10-year TRMM PR record. When the unconditional anvil areal coverage is taken into account, the anvil radiative heating becomes quite weak, increasing the PR latent heating profile by less than 1 percent at mid and upper levels. Stratiform rain and cirrus radiative heating contributions increase the upper level latent heating by 12 percent. This tropical radiative heating only slightly enhances the latent heating driven model response throughout the tropics, but more significantly over the East Pacific. These modest circulation changes suggest that previous studies may have overemphasized the importance of radiative heating in terms of Walker and Hadley circulation variations. Further, the relationship of cloud radiative heating to latent heating needs to be taken into account for more realistic studies of cloud radiative forcing on the large-scale circulation.

Li, Wei

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Construction and Operation of a Proposed Biogas Anaerobic Digestion Facility at an Ethanol Plant Western Plains Energy, LLC Grinnell Township (Oakley), Gove County, Kansas U. S. Department of Agriculture Rural Business Cooperative Service 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20250-3225 August 29, 2011 Environmental Assessment Western Plains Energy, LLC Gove County, Kansas ii TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page I. PROPOSAL DESCRIPTION AND NEED .................................................................... 1 II. PRIMARY BENEFICIARIES AND RELATED ACTIVITIES .................................. 2 III. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSAL AREA .............................................................. 2

379

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA WIND ENERGY RESEARCH CONSORTIUM PROJECT ROSEMOUNT, MINNESOTA U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office MARCH 2011 DOE/EA-1791 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE UNVIERSITY OF MINNESOTA WIND ENERGY RESEARCH CONSORTIUM PROJECT ROSEMOUNT, MINNESOTA U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office MARCH 2011 U.S. Department of Energy University of Minnesota Wind Energy Research Consortium Project Golden Field Office Environmental Assessment March 2011 Page i Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 1

380

Climate change mitigation and adaptation in strategic environmental assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Countries are implementing CO{sub 2} emission reduction targets in order to meet a globally agreed global warming limit of +2 Degree-Sign C. However, it was hypothesised that these national reduction targets are not translated to regional or state level planning, and are not considered through Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) in order to meet emission reduction obligations falling on the transport, energy, housing, agriculture, and forestry sectors. SEAs of land use plans in the German state of Saxony, and the English region of the East of England were examined for their consideration of climate change impacts based on a set of criteria drawn from the literature. It was found that SEAs in both cases failed to consider climate change impacts at scales larger than the boundary of the spatial plan, and that CO{sub 2} reduction targets were not considered. This suggests a need for more clarity in the legal obligations for climate change consideration within the text of the SEA Directive, a requirement for monitoring of carbon emissions, a need for methodological guidance to devolve global climate change targets down to regional and local levels, and a need for guidance on properly implementing climate change protection in SEA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strategic Environmental Assessments (SEA) of 12 land use plans from Germany and England have been examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEA failed to consider climate change impacts at scales larger than the boundary of the land use plans. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEA should be an important instrument for climate protection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete steps for climate protection mainstreaming into SEA at the European Union and national levels have been suggested.

Wende, Wolfgang, E-mail: W.Wende@ioer.de [Head of Research Area on Landscape Change and Management, Leibniz Institute of Ecological and Regional Development, Weberplatz 1, D-01217 Dresden (Germany); Bond, Alan, E-mail: alan.bond@uea.ac.uk [InteREAM, School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); Bobylev, Nikolai, E-mail: nikolaibobylev@gmail.com [School of Innovation Science, Saint Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 195251, Politechnicheskaya, 29, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); St. Petersburg Research Centre for Ecological Safety of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 197110, Korpusnaya, 18, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Stratmann, Lars, E-mail: l.stratmann@ioer.de [Leibniz Institute of Ecological and Regional Development, Weberplatz 1, D-01217 Dresden (Germany)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional scale assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Wind Energy Resource Assessment of the Caribbean and Central America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A wind energy resource assessment of the Caribbean and Central America has identified many areas with good to outstanding wind resource potential for wind turbine applications. Annual average wind resource maps and summary tables have been developed for 35 island/country areas throughout the Caribbean and Central America region. The wind resource maps highlight the locations of major resource areas and provide estimates of the wind energy resource potential for typical well-exposed sites in these areas. The average energy in the wind flowing in the layer near the ground is expressed as a wind power class: the greater the average wind energy, the higher the wind power class. The summary tables that are included with each of the 35 island/country wind energy maps provide information on the frequency distribution of the wind speeds (expressed as estimates of the Weibull shape factor, k) and seasonal variations in the wind resource for the major wind resource areas identified on the maps. A new wind power class legend has been developed for relating the wind power classes to values of mean wind power density, mean wind speed, and Weibull k. Guidelines are presented on how to adjust these values to various heights above ground for different roughness and terrain characteristics. Information evaluated in preparing the assessment included existing meteorological data from airports and other weather stations, and from ships and buoys in offshore and coastal areas. In addition, new data from recent measurement sites established for wind energy siting studies were obtained for a few areas of the Caribbean. Other types of information evaluated in the assessment were climatological data and maps on winds aloft, surface pressure, air flow, and topography. The various data were screened and evaluated for their usefulness in preparing the wind resource assessment. Much of the surface data from airports and other land-based weather stations were determined to be from sheltered sites and were thus not very useful in assessing the wind resource at locations that are well exposed to the winds. Ship data were determined to be the most useful for estimating the large-scale wind flow and assessing the spatial distribution of the wind resource throughout the region. Techniques were developed for analyzing and correcting ship wind data and extrapolating these data to coastal and inland areas by considering terrain influences on the large-scale wind flow. In areas where extrapolation of ship wind data was not entirely feasible, such as interior areas of Central America, other techniques were developed for estimating the wind flow and distribution of the wind resource. Through the application of the various innovative techniques developed for assessing the wind resource throughout the Caribbean and Central America region, many areas with potentially good to outstanding wind resource were identified that had not been previously recognized. In areas where existing site data were available from exposed locations, the measured wind resource was compared with the estimated wind resource that was derived using the assessment techniques. In most cases, there was good agreement between the measured wind resource and the estimated wind resource. This assessment project supported activities being pursued by the U.S. Committee for Renewable Energy Commerce and Trade (CORECT), the U.S. government's interagency program to assist in overseas marketing and promote renewable energy exports. An overall goal of the program is to improve U.S. competitiveness in the world renewable energy market. The Caribbean and Central America assessment, which is the first of several possible follow-on international wind energy resource assessments, provides valuable information needed by the U.S. wind energy industry to identify suitable wind resource areas and concentrate their efforts on these areas.

DL Elliott; CI Aspliden; GL Gower; CG Holladay, MN Schwartz

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Very High-Resolution Regional Climate Simulations over Scandinavia—Present Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrological cycle on a regional scale is poorly represented with a present-day coarse resolution general circulation model (GCM). With a dynamical downscaling technique, in which a regional higher-resolution climate model (RCM) is nested ...

Ole B. Christensen; Jens H. Christensen; Bennert Machenhauer; Michael Botzet

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Forecasting Tropical Cyclone Formation in the Fiji Region: A Probit Regression Approach Using Bayesian Fitting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An objective methodology for forecasting the probability of tropical cyclone (TC) formation in the Fiji, Samoa, and Tonga regions (collectively the FST region) using antecedent large-scale environmental conditions is investigated. Three separate ...

Savin S. Chand; Kevin J. E. Walsh

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Assessing Impacts of Climate Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

Dale, V. H.; Rauscher, H. M.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

385

Assessing impacts of climate change on forests: The state of biological modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

Dale, V.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rauscher, H.M. [Forest Service, Grand Rapids, MI (United States). North Central Forest Experiment Station

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

386

Integrated Assessment Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the role of Integrated Assessment models (IAMs) in climate change research. IAMs are an interdisciplinary research platform, which constitutes a consistent scientific framework in which the large-scale interactions between human and natural Earth systems can be examined. In so doing, IAMs provide insights that would otherwise be unavailable from traditional single-discipline research. By providing a broader view of the issue, IAMs constitute an important tool for decision support. IAMs are also a home of human Earth system research and provide natural Earth system scientists information about the nature of human intervention in global biogeophysical and geochemical processes.

Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; McJeon, Haewon C.

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ASSESSMENT ASSESSMENT and STABILIZATION' SCENARIOS PARRERSBURG,'W. VA. SITE FEBRUARY 1980 M. CARSON J. COFFMAN N. MANDELTORT, ! Division of Nuclear Service Operations Chem-Nuclear\ Systems, Inc. 240 Stoneridge Dr., Suite 100 Columbia, South Carolina 29210 Prepared for AMAX Specialty Hetals Corporation One Greenwich Plaza Greenwich, Connecticut 06830 During July' 1978, Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc. (CNSI) began an assessment program for AMAX Specialty Metals Corp."(AMAX) u to locate, quantify, and evaluate the'extent of environmental radioactive contamination at the AMAX Parkersburg., West Virginia former zirconium/hafnium processing facility. In addition, preliminary ive assessments were to be made to assist AMAX in evaluat ,ing alternat methods for site cleanup.

388

Large-Scale Integration of Deferrable Demand and Renewable Energy Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Large-Scale Integration of Deferrable Demand and Renewable Energy Sources Anthony Papavasiliou model for assessing the impacts of the large-scale integration of renewable energy sources. In order to accurately assess the impacts of renewable energy integration and demand response integration

Oren, Shmuel S.

389

EA-1853: Final Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DOE/EA-1853 PERRIN RANCH WIND ENERGY INTERCONNECTION PROJECT COCONINO COUNTY, ARIZONA Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region P.O. Box 6457 Phoenix, Arizona 85005 Prepared by SWCA Environmental Consultants 3033 North Central Avenue, Suite 145 Phoenix, Arizona 85012 (602) 274-3831 www.swca.com July 2011 July 2011 i CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................................ 1 1. INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................ 1 1.1 BACKGROUND .......................................................................................................................... 1

390

Monetary Awards Scale  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MONETARY AWARDS SCALE FOR INTANGIBLE BENEFITS FROM MONETARY AWARDS SCALE FOR INTANGIBLE BENEFITS FROM SUGGESTIONS, INVENTIONS, SPECIAL ACTS OR SERVICES VALUE OF BENEFIT EXTENT OF APPLICATION Limited Affects functions, mission, or personnel of one office (e.g., field site office or one office within a HQ Departmental element). Affects a small area of science or technology. Extended Affects functions, mission, or personnel of a several field site offices or HQ office within a Departmental element (e.g., more than one). Affects an important area of science or technology. Broad Affects functions, mission, or personnel of an entire Departmental element or Departmental element with multiple site offices. Affects a broad area of science or technology. General Affects functions, mission, or personnel

391

Regional Education Partners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Northern New Mexico and LANL through effective partnerships with regional secondary and higher education organizations, businesses and industry. Contact Executive Office Director...

392

Regional Climate Information & Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information & Modeling Print E-mail The specific impacts and vulnerabilities posed by climate change are largely defined by regional differences 9in things like geography,...

393

Space, time and nesting Integrated Assessment Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated Assessment Modelling in the field of air pollution has advanced greatly since the 1985 Helsinki Protocol on the reduction of Sulphur emissions and their transboundary fluxes. With subsequent protocols and increased understanding of the inter-relationships ... Keywords: CLRTAP, Integrated Assessment Modelling, Scale, Science-policy interaction, Space, Time

T. Oxley; H. M. ApSimon

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Contribution of site assessment toward prioritising investment in natural capital  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In prioritising investment in natural capital, site-scale indicators are increasingly used to capture fine-scale variation inherent in complex ecosystems. However, site assessment is costly, has high skill demand, and is time-consuming. We assess the ... Keywords: Agri-environment schemes, Analytical hierarchy process, Conservation investment, Cost-effective, GIS, Stewardship

Neville D. Crossman; Brett A. Bryan; Darran King

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Generalized Region Connection Calculus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Region Connection Calculus (RCC) is one of the most widely referenced system of high-level (qualitative) spatial reasoning. RCC assumes a continuous representation of space. This contrasts sharply with the fact that spatial information obtained from ... Keywords: (Generalized) Boolean connection algebra, (Generalized) Region Connection Calculus, Continuous space, Discrete space, Mereology, Mereotopology, Qualitative spatial reasoning

Sanjiang Li; Mingsheng Ying

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Joint Peru/United States report on Peru/United States cooperative energy assessment. Volume 4 of 4 Volumes Annexes 8-11  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive assessment of the biofuel potential of Peru is presented. Topics discussed cover current biofuel utilization practices; evaluation of Peruvian biomass productivity; identification of Peruvian agricultural and forestry resources; assessment of resource development and management concerns; identification of market considerations; description of biofuel technological options; and regional identification of biofuel technology applications. The discussion of current biofuel utilization centers on a qualitative description of the main conversion approaches now being practiced in Peru. Biomass productivity is evaluated in the context of the terrain, soil, and climatic conditions found in Peru. A quantitative description of the energy potential that could be realized from agricultural and forestry resources of Peru follows. A regional picture is given for the production of agricultural residues and forest resources that could potentially supply energy. The assessment of resource development and management concerns focuses on harvesting, reforestation, training, and the environmental consequences of utilization of forest resources. Market factors assessed include: importation, internal market development, external market development, energy policy and pricing, and transportation. Ten biofuel technology options for Peru were identified: small- to medium-scale gasification, a wood waste inventory, stationary and mobile charcoal production systems, wood distillation, forest resource development and management, electrical cogeneration, anaerobic digestion technology, development of ethanol production capabilities, and agricultural strategies for fuel production.Based upon these biofuel options, nine applications were identified for the Costa Region, eight for the Sierra Region, and ten for the Selva Region.

Not Available

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

FLOWS AT THE EDGE OF AN ACTIVE REGION: OBSERVATION AND INTERPRETATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upflows observed at the edges of active regions have been proposed as the source of the slow solar wind. In the particular case of Active Region (AR) 10942, where such an upflow has been already observed, we want to evaluate the part of this upflow that actually remains confined in the magnetic loops that connect AR 10942 to AR 10943. Both active regions were visible simultaneously on the solar disk and were observed by STEREO/SECCHI EUVI. Using Hinode/EIS spectra, we determine the Doppler shifts and densities in AR 10943 and AR 10942 in order to evaluate the mass flows. We also perform magnetic field extrapolations to assess the connectivity between AR 10942 and AR 10943. AR 10943 displays a persistent downflow in Fe XII. Magnetic extrapolations including both ARs show that this downflow can be connected to the upflow in AR 10942. We estimate that the mass flow received by AR 10943 areas connected to AR 10942 represents about 18% of the mass flow from AR 10942. We conclude that the upflows observed on the edge of active regions represent either large-scale loops with mass flowing along them (accounting for about one-fifth of the total mass flow in this example) or open magnetic field structures where the slow solar wind originates.

Boutry, C.; Buchlin, E.; Vial, J.-C. [Universite Paris Sud, Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, UMR8617, 91405 Orsay (France); Regnier, S., E-mail: eric.buchlin@ias.u-psud.fr [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

398

Aerosol Characterization Data from the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Project (ACE-Asia)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Aerosol Characterization Experiments (ACE) were designed to increase understanding of how atmospheric aerosol particles affect the Earth's climate system. These experiments integrated in-situ measurements, satellite observations, and models to reduce the uncertainty in calculations of the climate forcing due to aerosol particles and improve the ability of models to predict the influences of aerosols on the Earth's radiation balance. ACE-Asia was the fourth in a series of experiments organized by the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Program (A Core Project of the International Geosphere Biosphere Program). The Intensive Field Phase for ACE-Asia took place during the spring of 2001 (mid-March through early May) off the coast of China, Japan and Korea. ACE-Asia pursued three specific objectives: 1) Determine the physical, chemical, and radiative properties of the major aerosol types in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region and investigate the relationships among these properties. 2) Quantify the physical and chemical processes controlling the evolution of the major aerosol types and in particular their physical, chemical, and radiative properties. 3) Develop procedures to extrapolate aerosol properties and processes from local to regional and global scales, and assess the regional direct and indirect radiative forcing by aerosols in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region [Edited and shortened version of summary at http://data.eol.ucar.edu/codiac/projs?ACE-ASIA]. The Ace-Asia collection contains 174 datasets.

399

Environmental Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASSESSMENT (EA) ASSESSMENT (EA) FOR THE RECONSTRUCTION OF THE SOUTH ACCESS ROAD (CR 802) IN SUPPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT (WIPP) IN EDDY COUNTY, NEW MEXICO NEPA #: DOI-BLM-NM-P020-2010-0011-EA PREPARED IN COOPERATION WITH: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE P. O. BOX 2078 CARLSBAD, NM 88221-2078 PREPARED BY: OWEN W. LOFTON SUPERVISORY MULTI RESOURCES SPECIALIST BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE 620 EAST GREENE CARLSBAD, NM 88220 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT BLM Office: Carlsbad Field Office DOI-BLM-NM-P020-2010-0011-EA Serial #: NM-123703 Department of Energy (DOE), Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) South Access Road (SAR) 1.0 Purpose and Need for Action 1.1 The DOE CBFO, is requesting a right-of-way (ROW) that consists of re-

400

Rapid Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment Assessment of Lignin Content and Structure in Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) Grown Under Different Environmental Conditions David G. J. Mann & Nicole Labbé & Robert W. Sykes & Kristen Gracom & Lindsey Kline & Isabella M. Swamidoss & Jason N. Burris & Mark Davis & C. Neal Stewart Jr. Published online: 13 October 2009 # Springer Science + Business Media, LLC. 2009 Abstract Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a candi- date feedstock in bioenergy, and plant breeding and molecular genetic strategies are being used to improve germplasm. In order to assess these subsequent modifica- tions, baseline biomass compositional data are needed in a relevant variety of environments. In this study, switch- grass cv. Alamo was grown in the field, greenhouse, and growth chamber and harvested into individual leaf and stem tissue components. These components

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional scale assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Sleep Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sleep Assessment Sleep Assessment 1 | Thank you for taking the time to complete this extensive form. Sleep disturbances and/or fatigue are most often the result of many factors. In order to best treat your condition we need to understand your symptoms and history. Please bring your completed assessment form to your appointment. To schedule an appointment please call 505 844-HBES (4237). Name: Employee ID#: Date: Male Female Age: Health Plan : United BCBSNM Other: Referred by: Sleep and Health History In general, would you describe your sleep as: Refreshing Not Refreshing How would you rate your sleep? Very Good Good Adequate Poor Very Poor How would you describe your sleep problem? Sleep Problem (indicate all that apply) Duration of problem

402

Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Storage: Regulatory and Capacity Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the2009. Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships –from geologic carbon sequestration: area-of-review

Birkholzer, J.T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Environmental Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Interior the Interior Bureau of Land Management Environmental Assessment DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052-EA DOE/EA-1960 June 28, 2013 Townsite Solar Project Transmission Line PREPARING OFFICE U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Southern Nevada District Office Las Vegas Field Office 4701 N. Torrey Pines Drive Las Vegas, Nevada 702-515-5000 Office 702-515-5010 Fax Environmental Assessment for the Townsite Solar Project DOE/EA-1960 DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052 EA N-91290 Prepared For U.S. Department of the Interior

404

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED ENERGY CONSERVATION STANDARDS FOR RESIDENTIAL CLOTHES WASHERS December 2000 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Office of Building Research and Standards Washington, DC 20585 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR RESIDENTIAL CLOTHES WASHERS TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-1 2. PURPOSE AND NEED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-1 3. ALTERNATIVES INCLUDING THE PROPOSED ACTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-2 3.1 No Action Alternative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-2 3.2 Proposed Standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-2 3.3 Alternative Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-3 3.4 Impacts of Proposed and Alternative Standards

405

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Environmental Assessment Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee June 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office This page intentionally left blank. DOE/EA-1779 Environmental Assessment Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Date Issued-June 2011 Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC and CDM Federal Services Inc. contributed to the preparation of this document and may not be considered for review of the document U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management This page intentionally left blank. iii CONTENTS FIGURES......................................................................................................................................................

406

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Interior the Interior Bureau of Land Management Environmental Assessment DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052-EA DOE/EA-1960 June 28, 2013 Townsite Solar Project Transmission Line PREPARING OFFICE U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Southern Nevada District Office Las Vegas Field Office 4701 N. Torrey Pines Drive Las Vegas, Nevada 702-515-5000 Office 702-515-5010 Fax Environmental Assessment for the Townsite Solar Project DOE/EA-1960 DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052 EA N-91290 Prepared For U.S. Department of the Interior

407

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

682 682 Environmental Assessment Upgrades and Life Extension of the 242-A Evaporator, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Conducted Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Richland, Washington Environmental Assessment February 20 10 DOE/EA- 1682 This page intentionally left blank. 1 February 20 10 DOE/EA- 1682 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION..............................................................................1. 1.1 BACKGROUND ......................................................................... 3 1.2 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR THE PROPOSED ACTION ......................... 6 1.3 NEPA REQUIREMENTS............................................................... 6 2.0 DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVE ....................... 8

408

Technical and Economic Assessment of Regional Hydrogen Transition Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for trucks or the same pipeline length, we say that they arethe model results for pipeline length as a function of thein lower additional pipeline lengths. Unlike the case with

Ogden, Joan; Yang, Christopher; Nicholas, Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Technical and Economic Assessment of Regional Hydrogen Transition Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stations (17 sites) plus 23 CNG fleet sites for a total ofthe LA area. We then added more CNG fleet station sites (anstations + 23 (of 40 existing) CNG sites 2.5% of stations in

Ogden, Joan; Yang, Christopher; Nicholas, Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Technical and Economic Assessment of Regional Hydrogen Transition Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasoline Stations Gas Station Density (/km 2 ) Metrics forpopulation density or gas station density) to grid spacing40 cities, 100 gas sites All retail stations (3961) Legend

Ogden, Joan M; Yang, Christopher; Nicholas, Michael A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Regional assessment of nonforestry related biomass resources: Arkansas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document consists of spreadsheets detailing in a county by county manner agricultural crop, agricultural waste, municipal waste and industrial waste in Arkansas that are potential biomass energy sources.

Not Available

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Assessing the drivers of regional trends in solar photovoltaic manufacturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The photovoltaic (PV) industry has grown rapidly as a source of energy and economic activity. Since 2008, the average manufacturer-sale price of PV modules has declined by over a factor of two, coinciding with a significant ...

Goodrich, Alan C.

413

Energy Efficiency Technology Assessment for the Tennessee Valley Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As America's largest public power provider and steward of the nation's fifth largest river system, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) must seek ways to achieve sustainable power production, quality distribution, environmental stewardship, and economic growth within the Tennessee Valley. To help meet the growing energy needs of the Valley and the nation and in support of TVA goals and critical success factors, cost effective energy-efficiency and load leveling alternatives that support the wise use of elect...

2003-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

414

Methods For Regional Assessment Of Geothermal Resources | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

That part of the resource base which is shallow enough to be tapped by production drilling is termed the "accessible resource base", and it in turn is divided into "useful" and...

415

Quantifying the Likelihood of Regional Climate Change: A Hybridized Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growing need for risk-based assessments of impacts and adaptation to climate change calls for increased capability in climate projections: specifically, the quantification of the likelihood of regional outcomes and the representation of their ...

C. Adam Schlosser; Xiang Gao; Kenneth Strzepek; Andrei Sokolov; Chris E. Forest; Sirein Awadalla; William Farmer

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Impact of Deforestation on Regional Precipitation over the Indochina Peninsula  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is now widely recognized that tropical deforestation can change the regional climate significantly. The increasing population and the spreading deforestation in the Indochina Peninsula, especially in Thailand, make it urgent to assess the ...

Shinjiro Kanae; Taikan Oki; Katumi Musiake

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on Regional Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on climate is assessed by comparing two decade-long simulations, with the lakes either included or excluded, using the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics Regional Climate Model, ...

Michael Notaro; Kathleen Holman; Azar Zarrin; Elody Fluck; Steve Vavrus; Val Bennington

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Confidence Regions and Pooling—Some Statistics for Weather Experimentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of confidence intervals for assessing the results of weather modification experiments is demonstrated and is shown to be more informative than tests of significance. Multivariate tests, confidence regions, and simultaneous confidence ...

K. Ruben Gabriel

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Regional, Very Heavy Daily Precipitation in NARCCAP Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors analyze the ability of the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program's ensemble of climate models to simulate very heavy daily precipitation and its supporting processes, comparing simulations that used observation-...

Sho Kawazoe; William J. Gutowski Jr.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Small-Scale Carbon Sequestration Field Test Yields Significant Lessons  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small-Scale Carbon Sequestration Field Test Yields Significant Small-Scale Carbon Sequestration Field Test Yields Significant Lessons Learned Small-Scale Carbon Sequestration Field Test Yields Significant Lessons Learned May 20, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership, one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance carbon capture and storage technologies, has completed a preliminary geologic characterization and sequestration field test at FirstEnergy's R. E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio. The project provided significant geologic understanding and "lessons learned" from a region of the Appalachian Basin with few existing deep well penetrations for geologic characterization. The initial targets for the geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) at the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional scale assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Post-Project (DOE) Assessments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Assessments DOE Assessments Clean Coal Demonstrations DOE Post-Project Assessments DOE Assessment of the Clean Coal Diesel Demonstration Project [PDF-590KB] DOE Assessment of the JEA Large-Scale CFB Combustion Demonstration Project [PDF-177KB] DOE Assessment of the Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration [PDF-649KB] DOE Assessment of the Tampa Electric Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Demonstration Project [PDF-550KB] 500-MW Demonstration of Advanced Wall-Fired Combustion Techniques for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Emissions from Coal- Fired Boilers: A DOE Assessment [PDF-921KB] Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH™) Process [PDF-382KB] Healy Clean Coal Project: A DOE Assessment [PDF-713KB] Pulse Combustor Design: A DOE Assessment [PDF-569KB]

422

DOE Awards First Three Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

First Three Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Projects First Three Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Projects DOE Awards First Three Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Projects October 9, 2007 - 3:14pm Addthis U.S. Projects Total $318 Million and Further President Bush's Initiatives to Advance Clean Energy Technologies to Confront Climate Change WASHINGTON, DC - In a major step forward for demonstrating the promise of clean energy technology, U.S Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell today announced that the Department of Energy (DOE) awarded the first three large-scale carbon sequestration projects in the United States and the largest single set in the world to date. The three projects - Plains Carbon Dioxide Reduction Partnership; Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership; and Southwest Regional Partnership for Carbon

423

Minority energy assessment report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research is to project household energy consumption, energy expenditure, and energy expenditure as share of income for five population groups from 1991 to 2009. The approach uses the Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy's Office of Minority Economic Impact. The MEAM provides a framework that can be used to forecast regional energy consumption and energy expenditure for majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. The forecasts of key macroeconomic and energy variables used as exogenous variables in the MEAM were obtained from the Data Resources, Inc., Macromodel and Energy Model. Generally, the projections of household energy consumption, expenditure, and energy expenditure as share of income vary across population groups and census regions.

Teotia, A.P.S.; Poyer, D.A.; Lampley, L.; Anderson, J.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

the Regional Development Corporation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carry out this work, CPO partners carry out this work, CPO partners with the Los Alamos National Laboratory Foundation for education, the Regional Development Corporation for economic development, and the regional United Way organizations for community giving. Education Los Alamos National Security (LANS) invests more than $1 million each year to enhance regional educational opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education. Education Focus Areas Our education commitments address four focus areas: * Workforce Development * Student Internships * Teacher and Faculty Professional Development * Public Understanding of Science In 2011, more than 1,100 students

425

Assessment of rainwater harvesting in Northern Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study assesses the current state of rainwater harvesting in the Northern Region of Ghana and makes recommendations regarding if and how rainwater harvesting could be used to address Pure Home Water's goal of reaching ...

Barnes, David Allen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

EA-1886: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Environmental Assessment Final Environmental Assessment EA-1886: Final Environmental Assessment Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership to demonstrate the viability and safety of CO2 storage in a regionally significant subsurface formation in Toole County, Montana and to promote the commercialization of future anthropogenic carbon storage in this region. EA-1886-FEA-2013.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1886: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1886: Finding of No Significant Impact

427

Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas: Executive Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This executive summary provides an overview of an NREL assessment to identify potential opportunities to develop a biomass pelletization or briquetting plant in the region around Greensburg, Kansas.

Haase, S.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Regional Planning | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Planning Regional Planning Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Regional Planning Efforts Alias (field_alias) Apply California, Oregon, Washington Regional Ocean Partnership West Coast Governors' Alliance Regional Data Portal In Development U.S. Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico Regional Ocean Partnership U.S. Caribbean Regional Ocean Partnership-currently being formally established Regional Data Portal To be developed Georgia, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina Regional Ocean Partnership Governors' South Atlantic Alliance Regional Data Portal Currently in development American Samoa, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Marshall Islands, Palau

429

Utility Scale Wind turbine Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Three Affiliated Tribes proposing to Department of Energy was nothing new to Denmark. National Meteorological Studies have proved that North Dakota has some of the most consistence wind resources in the world. The Three Affiliated Tribes wanted to assess their potential and become knowledgeable to developing this new and upcoming resource now valuable. By the Tribe implementing the Utility-scale Wind Turbine Project on Fort Berthold, the tribe has proven the ability to complete a project, and has already proceeded in a feasibility studies to developing a large-scale wind farm on the reservation due to tribal knowledge learned, public awareness, and growing support of a Nation wanting clean renewable energy. The tribe is working through the various measures and regulations with the want to be self-sufficient, independent, and marketable with 17,000 times the wind energy needed to service Fort Berthold alone.

Terry Fredericks

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

NIST Time Scale Data Archive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Time Scale Data Archive. Updated monthly. Return to Archive index Leap second and UT1-UTC information. This page ...

2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

431

Regional Competitions - EERE Commercialization Office  

Regional Competitions. Six Regional Clean Energy Business Plan Competitions are taking place across the country– representing all of the United ...

432

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Review Meeting October 12-14, 2005 Table of Contents Agenda PDF-1438KB Phase I Program Review Meeting Phase II Kick-Off Meeting Phase...

433

Regional Climate Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Workshop on Regional Climate Research: Needs and Opportunities was held 2–4 April 2001 at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado. The workshop was cosponsored by the National Science Foundation and the Department of ...

L. Ruby Leung; Linda O. Mearns; Filippo Giorgi; Robert L. Wilby

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Regional Climate Information & Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is a series of six region-specific adaptation tools for the coastal communities in Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, the Solomon Islands, Timor-Leste, and Papua New Guinea....

435

Sections / Geographical Regions Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Sections provide a local forum for fats and oils professionals. Building a Stronger Global Association Sections / Geographical Regions Information Divisions achievement agricultural analytical application award awards biotechnology detergents

436

CSNI Project for Fracture Analyses of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (FALSIRE II)  

SciTech Connect

A summary of Phase II of the Project for FALSIRE is presented. FALSIRE was created by the Fracture Assessment Group (FAG) of the OECD/NEA`s Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CNSI) Principal Working Group No. 3. FALSIRE I in 1988 assessed fracture methods through interpretive analyses of 6 large-scale fracture experiments in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels under pressurized- thermal-shock (PTS) loading. In FALSIRE II, experiments examined cleavage fracture in RPV steels for a wide range of materials, crack geometries, and constraint and loading conditions. The cracks were relatively shallow, in the transition temperature region. Included were cracks showing either unstable extension or two stages of extensions under transient thermal and mechanical loads. Crack initiation was also investigated in connection with clad surfaces and with biaxial load. Within FALSIRE II, comparative assessments were performed for 7 reference fracture experiments based on 45 analyses received from 22 organizations representing 12 countries. Temperature distributions in thermal shock loaded samples were approximated with high accuracy and small scatter bands. Structural response was predicted reasonably well; discrepancies could usually be traced to the assumed material models and approximated material properties. Almost all participants elected to use the finite element method.

Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.; Keeney, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schulz, H.; Sievers, J. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Koeln (Gemany)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

The Scale of Inflation in the Landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We determine the frequency of regions of small-field inflation in the Wigner landscape as an approximation to random supergravities/type IIB flux compactifications. We show that small-field inflation occurs exponentially more often than large-field inflation The power of primordial gravitational waves from inflation is generically tied to the scale of inflation. For small-field models this is below observational reach. However, we find small-field inflation to be dominated by the highest inflationary energy scales compatible with a sub-Planckian field range. Hence, we expect a typical tensor-to-scalar ratio $r\\sim {\\cal O}(10^{-3})$ currently undetectable in upcoming CMB measurements.

Francisco G. Pedro; Alexander Westphal

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

438

Mongolia wind resource assessment project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of detailed, regional wind-resource distributions and other pertinent wind resource characteristics (e.g., assessment maps and reliable estimates of seasonal, diurnal, and directional) is an important step in planning and accelerating the deployment of wind energy systems. This paper summarizes the approach and methods being used to conduct a wind energy resource assessment of Mongolia. The primary goals of this project are to develop a comprehensive wind energy resource atlas of Mongolia and to establish a wind measurement program in specific regions of Mongolia to identify prospective sites for wind energy projects and to help validate some of the wind resource estimates. The Mongolian wind resource atlas will include detailed, computerized wind power maps and other valuable wind resource characteristic information for the different regions of Mongolia.

Elliott, D.; Chadraa, B.; Natsagdorj, L.

1998-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

439

Southern Rockies Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southern Rockies Geothermal Region Southern Rockies Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Southern Rockies Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States[1] References ↑ "Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States" Geothermal Region Data State(s) Colorado, New Mexico Area 128,454 km²128,454,000,000 m² 49,583.244 mi² 1,382,666,010,600 ft² 153,630,984,000 yd² 31,741,625.67 acres USGS Resource Estimate for this Region Identified Mean Potential 0 MW0 kW 0 W 0 mW 0 GW 0 TW Undiscovered Mean Potential 1,010 MW1,010,000 kW 1,010,000,000 W 1,010,000,000,000 mW 1.01 GW 0.00101 TW Planned Capacity

440

Cape Cod Regional Transit Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cod Regional Transit Authority Cod Regional Transit Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name Cape Cod Regional Transit Authority Facility Cape Cod Regional Transit Authority Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Sustainable Energy Development Energy Purchaser Cape Cod Regional Transit Authority Location Hyannis MA Coordinates 41.69005134°, -70.14437914° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.69005134,"lon":-70.14437914,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

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441

Wafer-scale charge isolation technique  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are described which improve the performance of charge-coupled devices (CCD) in the presence of ionizing radiation. The invention is a wafer scale charge isolation technique which inhibits or reduces the flow of electrons created by the passage of ionizing radiation in the bulk regions of a silicon CCD. The technique has been tested in a device designed for operating in the infra-red wavelength band. The technique prevents charge from reaching the active charge collection volume of a pixel in a CCD.

Colella, N.J.; Kimbrough, J.R.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

LARGE-SCALE FLOWS IN PROMINENCE CAVITIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regions of rarefied density often form cavities above quiescent prominences. We observed two different cavities with the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter on 2005 April 21 and with Hinode/EIS on 2008 November 8. Inside both of these cavities, we find coherent velocity structures based on spectral Doppler shifts. These flows have speeds of 5-10 km s{sup -1}, occur over length scales of tens of megameters, and persist for at least 1 hr. Flows in cavities are an example of the nonstatic nature of quiescent structures in the solar atmosphere.

Schmit, D. J. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado-Boulder, UCB 391, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Gibson, S. E.; Tomczyk, S. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Reeves, K. K. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Sterling, Alphonse C. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Space Science Office, VP62, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Brooks, D. H. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Williams, D. R. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Tripathi, D. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Greenhouse Gas–Induced Changes in Summer Precipitation over Colorado in NARCCAP Regional Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation changes between 32-yr periods in the late twentieth and mid-twenty-first centuries are investigated using regional climate model simulations provided by the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP). The ...

Michael A. Alexander; James D. Scott; Kelly Mahoney; Joseph Barsugli

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Greenhouse Gas Induced Changes in Summer Precipitation over Colorado in NARCCAP Regional Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation changes between 32-year periods in the late-20th and mid-21st centuries are investigated using regional climate model simulations provided by the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP). The simulations ...

Michael A. Alexander; James D. Scott; Kelly Mahoney; Joseph Barsugli

445

Addressing Complexity In Laboratory Experiments- The Scaling Of Dilute  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Addressing Complexity In Laboratory Experiments- The Scaling Of Dilute Multiphase Flows In Magmatic Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Addressing Complexity In Laboratory Experiments- The Scaling Of Dilute Multiphase Flows In Magmatic Systems Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The kinematic and dynamic scaling of dilute multiphase mixtures in magmatic systems is the only guarantee for the geological verisimilitude of laboratory experiments. We present scaling relations that can provide a more complete framework to scale dilute magmatic systems because they

446

Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Full-Scale Production Full-Scale Production Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production Clean Energy Manufacturing Resources - Technology Full-Scale Production Find resources to help you design a production and manufacturing process for a new clean energy technology or product. For full-scale production, other areas to consider include workforce development; R&D funding; and regional, state, and local resources. For more resources, see the Clean Energy Manufacturing Federal Resource Guide. Design Production and Manufacturing Process Advanced Research Projects Agency: Tech-to-Market Resources - general tech-to-market (T2M) resources. DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office: Manufacturing Demonstration Facility - a collaborative manufacturing community that works to provide real data to

447

Considerations in the Selection of Global Climate Models for Regional Climate Projections: The Arctic as a Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate projections at regional scales are in increased demand from management agencies and other stakeholders. While global atmosphere–ocean climate models provide credible quantitative estimates of future climate at continental scales and above,...

James E. Overland; Muyin Wang; Nicholas A. Bond; John E. Walsh; Vladimir M. Kattsov; William L. Chapman

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Y scaling in a simple quark model  

SciTech Connect

A simple quark model is used to define a nuclear pair model, that is, two composite hadrons interacting only through quark interchange and bound in an overall potential. An equivalent hadron model is developed, displaying an effective hadron-hadron interaction which is strongly repulsive. We compare the effective hadron model results with the exact quark model observables in the kinematic region of large momentum transfer, small energy transfer. The nucleon response function in this y-scaling region is, within the traditional framework, sensitive to the nucleon momentum distribution at large momentum. We find a surprisingly small effect of hadron substructure. Furthermore, we find in our model that a simple parametrization of modified hadron size in the bound state, motivated by the bound quark momentum distribution, is not a useful way to correlate different observables.

Kumano, S.; Moniz, E.J.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Vegetation Feedbacks to Climate in the Global Monsoon Regions Michael Notaro *, Guangshan Chen, Zhengyu Liu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Vegetation Feedbacks to Climate in the Global Monsoon Regions Michael Notaro *, Guangshan across six monsoon regions with a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean-ice-land model with dynamic vegetation monsoon regions is reduced and the climatic response assessed. Consistent responses among the regions

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

450

Region-specific study of the electric utility industry. Phase I, final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the financial background of the electric utility industry in VACAR, reports on the present condition of the industry and then assesses the future of this industry. The Virginia-Carolinas subregion (VACAR) of the Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) was selected for this regional study because of its cooperativeness and its representative mix of powerplants, for example coal, hydro, nuclear, oil. It was found that the supply of future economic electricity is in jeopardy because of the regulatory process, the increasing risk associated with large scale generating stations and the weakening of the nuclear option. A number of options for the future were considered, including deregulation, government ownership and retaining the present system with modifications. The option selected to improve the present condition of the electricity industry was to make the present system work. The present system is sound, and with modifications, problems could be solved within the existing framework. 8 figs., 4 tabs.

Wacaster, A.J. (ed.)

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Establishing Regional Resource Centers  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Establishing Regional Resource Centers Establishing Regional Resource Centers July 25, 2013 Coordinator: Welcome and thank you for standing by. At this time all participants are in a listen only mode. To ask a question later during the question and answer session please press star then 1 on your touchtone phone. Today's conference is being recorded. If you have any objections you may disconnect. And I would like to turn it over to Mr. Jonathan Bartlett. Sir, you may begin. Jonathan Bartlett: Thank you very much. This is Jonathan Bartlett from the Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Technologies Office. Today's WPA Webinar will be on the subject of establishing regional resource centers. I will be joined by Ian Baring-Gould at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the

452

Regional Retail Gasoline Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Notes: Retail gasoline prices, like those for distillate fuels, have hit record prices nationally and in several regions this year. The national average regular gasoline price peaked at $1.68 per gallon in mid-June, but quickly declined, and now stands at $1.45, 17 cents higher than a year ago. Two regions, in particular, experienced