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Sample records for regional land development

  1. Ewing Land Development Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ewing Land Development Services Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ewing Land Development & Services Place: Pella, Iowa Zip: 50219 Product: Real estate development company...

  2. Assessing the health equity impacts of regional land-use plan making: An equity focussed health impact assessment of alternative patterns of development of the Whitsunday Hinterland and Mackay Regional Plan, Australia (Short report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunning, Colleen; Harris, Patrick; Mallett, John

    2011-07-15

    Health service and partners completed an equity focussed health impact assessment to influence the consideration of health and equity within regional land-use planning in Queensland, Australia. This project demonstrated how an equity oriented assessment matrix can assist in testing regional planning scenarios. It is hoped that this HIA will contribute to the emerging interest in ensuring that potential differential health impacts continue to be considered as part of land-use planning processes.

  3. Wind Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

    2008-01-18

    Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

  4. Ecosystem feedbacks to climate change in California: Development, testing, and analysis using a coupled regional atmosphere and land-surface model (WRF3-CLM3.5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subin, Z.M.; Riley, W.J.; Kueppers, L.M.; Jin, J.; Christianson, D.S.; Torn, M.S.

    2010-11-01

    A regional atmosphere model [Weather Research and Forecasting model version 3 (WRF3)] and a land surface model [Community Land Model, version 3.5 (CLM3.5)] were coupled to study the interactions between the atmosphere and possible future California land-cover changes. The impact was evaluated on California's climate of changes in natural vegetation under climate change and of intentional afforestation. The ability of WRF3 to simulate California's climate was assessed by comparing simulations by WRF3-CLM3.5 and WRF3-Noah to observations from 1982 to 1991. Using WRF3-CLM3.5, the authors performed six 13-yr experiments using historical and future large-scale climate boundary conditions from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The land-cover scenarios included historical and future natural vegetation from the Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System-Century 1 (MC1) dynamic vegetation model, in addition to a future 8-million-ha California afforestation scenario. Natural vegetation changes alone caused summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature changes of -0.7 to +1 C in regions without persistent snow cover, depending on the location and the type of vegetation change. Vegetation temperature changes were much larger than the 2-m air temperature changes because of the finescale spatial heterogeneity of the imposed vegetation change. Up to 30% of the magnitude of the summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature increase and 70% of the magnitude of the 1600 local time (LT) vegetation temperature increase projected under future climate change were attributable to the climate-driven shift in land cover. The authors projected that afforestation could cause local 0.2-1.2 C reductions in summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature and 2.0-3.7 C reductions in 1600 LT vegetation temperature for snow-free regions, primarily because of increased evapotranspiration. Because some of these temperature changes are of comparable magnitude to those projected under

  5. Regional Economic Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Economic Development Regional Economic Development Supporting companies in every stage of development through access to technology, technical assistance or investment Questions Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation Regional Programs (505) 665-9090 New Mexico Small Business Assistance Email Venture Acceleration Fund Email DisrupTECH Email SBIR/STTR Email FCI facilitates commercialization in New Mexico to accelerate and enhance our efforts to convert federal and state research

  6. Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-10-01

    Brochure describes the Tribal Energy Program, which provides American Indian tribes with financial and technical assistance for developing renewable energy projects on tribal land.

  7. Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Brochure describes the Tribal Energy Program, which provides American Indian tribes with financial and technical assistance for developing renewable energy projects on tribal land.

  8. Solar Development on Contaminated and Disturbed Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, Jordan; Lee, Courtney; Mosey, Gail; Melius, Jenny

    2013-12-01

    Land classified as contaminated and disturbed across the United States has the potential to host developments of utility-scale solar power. This report examines the prospect of developing utility- and commercial-scale concentrated solar power (CSP) and solar photovoltaics (PV) technologies on degraded and environmentally contaminated lands. The potential for solar development on contaminated anddisturbed lands was assessed, and for the largest and highest solar resource sites, the economic impacts and feasibility were evaluated. Developing solar power on contaminated and disturbed lands can help create jobs and revitalize local and state economies, and selecting these sites over greenfield sites can potentially have permitting and environmental mitigation advantages. The U.S.Department of Energy (DOE) SunShot goals call for 632 GW of PV and 83 GW of CSP to be deployed by 2050. Conservative land-use estimates of this study (10 acres per megawatt) show that there are disturbed and environmentally contaminated lands throughout the country that could be suitable for utility-scale solar power, and, that there is sufficient land area to meet SunShot solar deployment goals. The purpose of this assessment is to improve the understanding of these sites and facilitate solar developers' selection of contaminated and disturbed sites for development.

  9. Beijing Ideal land Technology Development Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ideal land Technology Development Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Beijing Ideal-land Technology Development Co Ltd Place: China Sector: Biofuels Product: Biofuels (...

  10. Hawaii's Rainforest Crunch: Land, People, and Geothermal Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rainforest Crunch: Land, People, and Geothermal Development Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Periodical: Hawaii's Rainforest Crunch: Land, People,...

  11. Assessing the health risk of solar development on contaminated lands |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory Assessing the health risk of solar development on contaminated lands December 11, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint A recently published report from Argonne's Environmental Science (EVS) division presents a methodology for assessing potential human health risks of developing utility-scale solar facilities on contaminated, previously developed sites. Developing on these lands rather than pristine, undeveloped lands can avoid or minimize environmental impacts, reduce

  12. An integrated computer modeling environment for regional land use, air quality, and transportation planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanley, C.J.; Marshall, N.L.

    1997-04-01

    The Land Use, Air Quality, and Transportation Integrated Modeling Environment (LATIME) represents an integrated approach to computer modeling and simulation of land use allocation, travel demand, and mobile source emissions for the Albuquerque, New Mexico, area. This environment provides predictive capability combined with a graphical and geographical interface. The graphical interface shows the causal relationships between data and policy scenarios and supports alternative model formulations. Scenarios are launched from within a Geographic Information System (GIS), and data produced by each model component at each time step within a simulation is stored in the GIS. A menu-driven query system is utilized to review link-based results and regional and area-wide results. These results can also be compared across time or between alternative land use scenarios. Using this environment, policies can be developed and implemented based on comparative analysis, rather than on single-step future projections. 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. LAND USE AND ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS FROM SHALE DEVELOPMENT IN THE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LAND USE AND ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS FROM SHALE DEVELOPMENT IN THE APPALACHIANS THE NATURE ... Research by The Nature Conservancy (Johnson et al. 2010; Johnson et al. 2011) indicates ...

  14. Oregon Land Conservation and Development Commission | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Commission Abbreviation: LCDC Place: Portland, Oregon Website: www.oregon.govLCDpageslcdc. References: Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development1 This...

  15. Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Electric Utility Consultants, Inc. (EUCI) is hosting a conference to examine key considerations when designing tribal projects to improve feasibility, assess risks and opportunities of active vs. passive tribal participation, and building a project on tribal lands.

  16. Developing a Regional Recovery Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, Ann M.; Olson, Jarrod; Stein, Steven L.; Clark, Rebecca; Kelly, Heather; Sheline, Jim; Tietje, Grant; Williamson, Mark; Woodcock, Jody

    2011-09-01

    Abstract A biological attack would present an unprecedented challenge for local, state, and federal agencies; the military; the private sector; and individuals on many fronts ranging from vaccination and treatment to prioritization of cleanup actions to waste disposal. To prepare the Seattle region to recover from a biological attack, the Seattle Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) partners collaborated with military and federal agencies to develop a Regional Recovery Framework for a Biological Attack in the Seattle Urban Area. The goal was to reduce the time and resources required to recover and restore wide urban areas, military installations, and other critical infrastructure following a biological incident by providing a coordinated systems approach. Based on discussions in small workshops, tabletop exercises, and interviews with emergency response agency staff, the partners identified concepts of operation for various areas to address critical issues the region will face as recovery progresses. Key to this recovery is the recovery of the economy. Although the Framework is specific to a catastrophic, wide-area biological attack using anthrax, it was designed to be flexible and scalable so it could also serve as the recovery framework for an all-hazards approach. The Framework also served to coalesce policy questions that must be addressed for long-term recovery. These questions cover such areas as safety and health, security, financial management, waste management, legal issues, and economic development.

  17. Energy Consumption and Renewable Energy Development Potential on Indian Lands

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    Includes information on the electricity use and needs of Indian households and tribes, the comparative electricity rates that Indian households are paying, and the potential for renewable resources development of Indian lands.

  18. Solutions from the Land: Developing a New Vision for United States...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solutions from the Land: Developing a New Vision for United States Agriculture, Forestry, and Conservation Solutions from the Land: Developing a New Vision for United States ...

  19. Navajo-Hopi Land Commission Renewable Energy Development Project (NREP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Benally, Deputy Director,

    2012-05-15

    The Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO), a Navajo Nation executive branch agency has conducted activities to determine capacity-building, institution-building, outreach and management activities to initiate the development of large-scale renewable energy - 100 megawatt (MW) or larger - generating projects on land in Northwestern New Mexico in the first year of a multi-year program. The Navajo Hopi Land Commission Renewable Energy Development Project (NREP) is a one year program that will develop and market a strategic business plan; form multi-agency and public-private project partnerships; compile site-specific solar, wind and infrastructure data; and develop and use project communication and marketing tools to support outreach efforts targeting the public, vendors, investors and government audiences.

  20. Sun Grant/DOE Regional Biomass Feedstock Partnership:Herbaceous Energy Crops and CRP Land for Biomass Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review Sun Grant/DOE Regional Biomass Feedstock Partnership: Herbaceous Energy Crops and CRP Land for Biomass Production (Award # GO85041; WBS 7.6.2.5) 23-27 March 2015 Technology Area Review: Feedstock Supply and Logistics Vance Owens, Director North Central Sun Grant Center South Dakota State University This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Goal Statement  Development of more accurate cost supply information and improved

  1. Western Region Renewable Energy Markets: Implications for the Bureau of Land Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Western Region Renewable Energy Markets: Implications for the Bureau of Land Management Scott Haase, Lynn Billman, and Rachel Gelman Produced under direction of the Bureau of Land Management by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Interagency Agreement L11PG00030 and Task No WFH7.1004. Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-53540 January 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for

  2. Western Region Renewable Energy Markets: Implications for the Bureau of Land Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haase, S.; Billman, L.; Gelman, R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) with an overview of renewable energy (RE) generation markets, transmission planning efforts, and the ongoing role of the BLM RE projects in the electricity markets of the 11 states (Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming) that comprise the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Region. This analysis focuses on the status of, and projections for, likely development of non-hydroelectric renewable electricity from solar (including photovoltaic [PV] and concentrating solar power [CSP]), wind, biomass and geothermal resources in these states. Absent new policy drivers and without the extension of the DOE loan guarantee program and Treasury's 1603 program, state RPS requirements are likely to remain a primary driver for new RE deployment in the western United States. Assuming no additional policy incentives are implemented, projected RE demand for the WECC states by 2020 is 134,000 GWh. Installed capacity to meet that demand will need to be within the range of 28,000-46,000 MW.

  3. Development Of Regional Climate Mitigation Baseline For A DominantAgro-Ecological Zone Of Karnataka, India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudha, P.; Shubhashree, D.; Khan, H.; Hedge, G.T.; Murthy, I.K.; Shreedhara, V.; Ravindranath, N.H.

    2007-06-01

    Setting a baseline for carbon stock changes in forest andland use sector mitigation projects is an essential step for assessingadditionality of the project. There are two approaches for settingbaselines namely, project-specific and regional baseline. This paperpresents the methodology adopted for estimating the land available formitigation, for developing a regional baseline, transaction cost involvedand a comparison of project-specific and regional baseline. The studyshowed that it is possible to estimate the potential land and itssuitability for afforestation and reforestation mitigation projects,using existing maps and data, in the dry zone of Karnataka, southernIndia. The study adopted a three-step approach for developing a regionalbaseline, namely: i) identification of likely baseline options for landuse, ii) estimation of baseline rates of land-use change, and iii)quantification of baseline carbon profile over time. The analysis showedthat carbon stock estimates made for wastelands and fallow lands forproject-specific as well as the regional baseline are comparable. Theratio of wasteland Carbon stocks of a project to regional baseline is1.02, and that of fallow lands in the project to regional baseline is0.97. The cost of conducting field studies for determination of regionalbaseline is about a quarter of the cost of developing a project-specificbaseline on a per hectare basis. The study has shown the reliability,feasibility and cost-effectiveness of adopting regional baseline forforestry sectormitigation projects.

  4. Developing Clean Energy Projects on Tribal Lands: Data and Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    RENEWABLE ENERGY; TECHNOLOGY POTENTIAL; MAPS; WIND; SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAICS; HYDROELECTRICITY; GEOTHERMAL; CONCENTRATED SOLAR POWER; BIOMASS; TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE; TRIBAL LANDS; ...

  5. Development of a land ice core for the Model for Prediction Across...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a land ice core for the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of a land ice core for the Model for Prediction Across Scales ...

  6. ENHANCEMENT OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SINKS THROUGH RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINE LANDS IN THE APPALACHIAN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Kronrad

    2002-12-01

    The U.S.D.I. Office of Surface Mining (OSM) estimates that there are approximately 1 million acres of abandoned mine land (AML) in the Appalachian region. AML lands are classified as areas that were inadequately reclaimed or were left unreclaimed prior to the passage of the 1977 Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and where no federal or state laws require any further reclamation responsibility to any company or individual. Reclamation and afforestation of these sites have the potential to provide landowners with cyclical timber revenues, generate environmental benefits to surrounding communities, and sequester carbon in the terrestrial ecosystem. Through a memorandum of understanding, the OSM and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have decided to investigate reclaiming and afforesting these lands for the purpose of mitigating the negative effects of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This study determined the carbon sequestration potential of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), one of the major reclamation as well as commercial species, planted on West Virginia AML sites. Analyses were conducted to (1) calculate the total number of tons that can be stored, (2) determine the cost per ton to store carbon, and (3) calculate the profitability of managing these forests for timber production alone and for timber production and carbon storage together. The Forest Management Optimizer (FORMOP) was used to simulate growth data on diameter, height, and volume for northern red oak. Variables used in this study included site indices ranging from 40 to 80 (base age 50), thinning frequencies of 0, 1, and 2, thinning percentages of 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40, and a maximum rotation length of 100 years. Real alternative rates of return (ARR) ranging from 0.5% to 12.5% were chosen for the economic analyses. A total of 769,248 thinning and harvesting combinations, net present worths, and soil expectation values were calculated in this study. Results indicate that

  7. Soil Carbon Change and Net Energy Associated with Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: A Regional Modeling Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandaru, Varaprasad; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Link, Robert P.; Zhang, Xuesong; Post, W. M.

    2013-12-01

    The use of marginal lands (MLs) for biofuel production has been contemplated as a promising solution for meeting biofuel demands. However, there have been concerns with spatial location of MLs, their inherent biofuel potential, and possible environmental consequences with the cultivation of energy crops. Here, we developed a new quantitative approach that integrates high-resolution land cover and land productivity maps and uses conditional probability density functions for analyzing land use patterns as a function of land productivity to classify the agricultural lands. We subsequently applied this method to determine available productive croplands (P-CLs) and non-crop marginal lands (NC-MLs) in a nine-county Southern Michigan. Furthermore, Spatially Explicit Integrated Modeling Framework (SEIMF) using EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) was used to understand the net energy (NE) and soil organic carbon (SOC) implications of cultivating different annual and perennial production systems.

  8. Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission...

  9. Alaska Facility- and Community-Scale Project Development Regional...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facility- and Community-Scale Project Development Regional Energy Workshops Alaska Facility- and Community-Scale Project Development Regional Energy Workshops April 13, 2015 - ...

  10. Assessment of uncertainties in the response of the African monsoon precipitation to land use change simulated by a regional model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung Ruby; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin -Ho

    2014-02-22

    Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Furthermore, the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubs and an increase in surface air temperature.

  11. Assessment of Uncertainties in the Response of the African Monsoon Precipitation to Land Use change simulated by a regional model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-02-22

    Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Although the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubs and an increase in surface air temperature.

  12. Investigating the Nexus of Climate, Energy, Water, and Land at Decision-Relevant Scales: The Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraucunas, Ian P.; Clarke, Leon E.; Dirks, James A.; Hathaway, John E.; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Huang, Maoyi; Jin, Chunlian; Kintner-Meyer, Michael C.W.; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Li, Hongyi; Moss, Richard H.; Peterson, Marty J.; Rice, Jennie S.; Scott, Michael J.; Thomson, Allison M.; Voisin, Nathalie; West, Tristram O.

    2015-04-01

    The Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA) is an innovative modeling system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to simulate interactions among natural and human systems at scales relevant to regional decision making. PRIMA brings together state-of-the-art models of regional climate, hydrology, agriculture, socioeconomics, and energy systems using a flexible coupling approach. The platform can be customized to inform a variety of complex questions and decisions, such as the integrated evaluation of mitigation and adaptation options across a range of sectors. Research into stakeholder decision support needs underpins the platform's application to regional issues, including uncertainty characterization. Ongoing numerical experiments are yielding new insights into the interactions among human and natural systems on regional scales with an initial focus on the energy-land-water nexus in the upper U.S. Midwest. This paper focuses on PRIMA’s functional capabilities and describes some lessons learned to date about integrated regional modeling.

  13. Feasibility Study for Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Hendrix, Project Director; Charles Weir, Project Manager; Dr. John Plodinec, Technology Advisor; Dr. Steve Murray, Economic Advisor

    2005-07-21

    Project Objective: The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians (MBCI) conducted a study of the feasibility of siting a renewable energy biomass-based installation on tribal lands. The purpose of the study was to determine whether such an installation can be economically sustainable, as well as consistent with the cultural, social, and economic goals of the Tribe. Scope: To achieve the goal of the feasibility study, the following tasks were carried out: (1) Resource availability assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine the availability of both poultry litter and wood residues for use in the proposed facility. (2) Power utilization assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine the potential market size for power produced, the existing infrastructure for delivering power to that market, and the costs and economic returns for doing so. (3) Technology review--The objective of this review was to identify one, or more, technical options for detailed economic and technical assessment. The study considered a range of feedstock and product mixtures of poultry litter; wood residues as feedstock; and electrical power and other ancillary products as outputs. Distributed power sources was also examined. Technologies ranging from gasification to systems that produce both power and value-added chemicals were considered. Technologies selected for detailed review were those that can be sized to process the amount of available feed (poultry litter, or poultry litter and wood residues), and that also appear to make economic sense in terms of the value of their inputs. The technology review leaned heavily on the experience from similar prior DOE projects, particularly those conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). NREL was involved in a consultative role, so that the project team could leverage their experience. (4) Systems Design(s)--Based on the technology review, a pre-conceptual design for an installation was developed. This

  14. Progress on MPAS Land Ice Model Development (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Progress on MPAS Land Ice Model Development You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of ...

  15. H.R.S. 174 - Water and Land Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: H.R.S. 174 - Water and Land DevelopmentLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 1961...

  16. Development of a land ice core for the Model for Prediction Across...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of a land ice core for the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) No ...

  17. Title 10 Chapter 151 State Land Use and Development Plans | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Title 10 Chapter 151 State Land Use and Development Plans Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Title 10 Chapter 151...

  18. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2012-10-10

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  19. Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ......... 18 9. Solar Forecast Data ......Summary This is the Final Report for the project "Development of Regional Wind Resource ...

  20. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2013-06-06

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  1. Using the National Environmental Policy Act to facilitate the transfer of federal lands for economic development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ladino, A.G.

    1997-06-01

    In order to evaluate the transfer of certain Federal lands at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the US Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the proposed action had the potential to result in environmental impacts and required the preparation of an Environmental Assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The specific proposed action evaluated by DOE with support from LANL was the transfer of approximately 28 contiguous acres of underutilized Federal land to the County. This tract was locally referred to as the DP Road tract. Although the land was underutilized, it functioned as part of a larger buffer area between potentially hazardous operations at LANL and the general public. The tract was covered with scrub vegetation. There were no government buildings located on the site. The tract of land had two Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) located within the tract boundary as well as a buried but active liquid radioactive waste pipeline that crossed the site. The tract of land was adjacent to several other DOE SWMUs as well as a public road. In addition, there were ownership issues pertaining to the transfer of the land to persons and agencies other than the County. This particular tract of land was being considered for transfer to the County at the same time DOE and LANL began evaluating another large Federal land tract for lease to the County to be developed as a private research park.

  2. Assessment of uncertainties in the response of the African monsoon precipitation to land use change simulated by a regional model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung Ruby; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin -Ho

    2014-02-22

    Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Furthermore, the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubsmore » and an increase in surface air temperature.« less

  3. Lands with Wilderness Characteristics, Resource Management Plan Constraints, and Land Exchanges: Cross-Jurisdictional Management and Impacts on Unconventional Fuel Development in Utah's Uinta Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiter, Robert; Ruple, John; Holt, Rebecca; Tanana, Heather; McNeally, Phoebe; Tribby, Clavin

    2012-10-01

    Utah is rich in oil shale and oil sands resources. Chief among the challenges facing prospective unconventional fuel developers is the ability to access these resources. Access is heavily dependent upon land ownership and applicable management requirements. Understanding constraints on resource access and the prospect of consolidating resource holdings across a fragmented management landscape is critical to understanding the role Utah’s unconventional fuel resources may play in our nation’s energy policy. This Topical Report explains the historic roots of the “crazy quilt” of western land ownership, how current controversies over management of federal public land with wilderness character could impact access to unconventional fuels resources, and how land exchanges could improve management efficiency. Upon admission to the Union, the State of Utah received the right to title to more than one-ninth of all land within the newly formed state. This land is held in trust to support public schools and institutions, and is managed to generate revenue for trust beneficiaries. State trust lands are scattered across the state in mostly discontinuous 640-acre parcels, many of which are surrounded by federal land and too small to develop on their own. Where state trust lands are developable but surrounded by federal land, federal land management objectives can complicate state trust land development. The difficulty generating revenue from state trust lands can frustrate state and local government officials as well as citizens advocating for economic development. Likewise, the prospect of industrial development of inholdings within prized conservation landscapes creates management challenges for federal agencies. One major tension involves whether certain federal public lands possess wilderness character, and if so, whether management of those lands should emphasize wilderness values over other uses. On December 22, 2010, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar issued

  4. The Clinch Bend Regional Industrial Site and economic development opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This effort focuses initially on the Clinch Bend site. Other sites and developable tracts of land are identified with the assistance of communities in proximity to Oak Ridge, the State of Tennessee, and others, and compared with the projected site requirements for large industrial facilities.

  5. Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for representative types of energy conversion processes were developed using a case study approach. Cooling water requirements for each type of energy conversion process...

  6. Development of a land ice core for the Model for Prediction Across Scales

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (MPAS) (Conference) | SciTech Connect Development of a land ice core for the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of a land ice core for the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) No abstract prepared. Authors: Hoffman, Matthew J [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2012-06-25 OSTI Identifier: 1044843 Report Number(s): LA-UR-12-22469 TRN: US201214%%525 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396

  7. Diagenesis and porosity development associated with major sea level fluctuations, Upper Permian, Jameson land, east Greenland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholle, P.A.; Ulmer, D.S. ); Stemmerik, L. )

    1990-05-01

    The Upper Permian of Jameson Land includes two major carbonate sequences, represented by the Karstryggen and Wegener Halvoe formations. The initial Karstryggen transgression led to the development of a shallow marine platform with structurally controlled evaporite basins (salinas) separated by stromatolitic, peloidal, or micritic carbonate depositional areas. The Wegener Havloe sequence reflects more rapid and extensive transgression with the deposition of three subcycles of fully marine, platform, or biohermal carbonates containing minor evaporites near the basin margins. Bioherms (bryozoan-brachiopod-marine cement mounds) show > 100 m of relief, indicating that large relative sea level changes were involved. Both the Karstryggen and Wgener Havloe cycles were terminated by major regressions, which led to karstic and/or fluvial incision of the underlying sequences. Not surprisingly, carbonate and evaporite diagenesis was greatly affected by these regional or eustatic sea level fluctuations. Evaporites dissolved or were replaced by calcite and celestite under the influence of meteoric waters. Limestones show collapse brecciation, grain leaching, soil development, and characteristic vadose and phreatic cements. Most significantly meteoric flushing led to massive dissolution of botryoidal marine cements (aragonite and probable high-Mg calcite) within biohermal facies on the Wegener Peninsula. This early porosity resurrection led to the preservation of porous bioherm core zones until hydrocarbon migration. Only late (posthydrocarbon), probably hydrothermal fluid flow led to cementation of the bioherm cores while expelling most of the reservoired hydrocarbons. If the sea level changes affecting the Greenlandic Permian are eustatic, then this study may provide significant clues to porosity development throughout the largely unexplored northern Zechstein basin.

  8. EA-1856: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant for Economic Development Purposes, Piketon, Ohio

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of conveyance of land and facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, in Piketon, Ohio, for economic development purposes.

  9. Introduction to Developing and Financing Renewable Energy Projects on Tribal Lands

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Introduction to Developing and Financing Renewable Energy Projects on Tribal Lands Review of Workshop Structure * Introduction and Motivation * Renewable Energy Technology Overview * Abbreviated Five-Step Development Process * System Advisor Model Training * "Office Hours" for detailed technical assistance/Q&A on your specific projects 2 Economic *Jobs *Income *Cost savings *Cost stabilization *Industry exposure Social *Energy reliability (diversification) *Energy independence

  10. Title 24 Chapter 117 Municipal and Regional Planning and Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Title 24 Chapter 117 Municipal and Regional Planning and Development Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Title 24...

  11. Alaska Facility- and Community-Scale Project Development Regional Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workshops | Department of Energy Facility- and Community-Scale Project Development Regional Energy Workshops Alaska Facility- and Community-Scale Project Development Regional Energy Workshops April 13, 2015 - 9:40am Addthis March 23-25, 2015 Bethel, Alaska University of Alaska Fairbanks March 26-27, 2015 Dillingham, Alaska University of Alaska, Bristol Bay Campus March 30-April 1, 2015 Juneau, Alaska University of Alaska Southeast The Office of Indian Energy hosted three back-to-back

  12. Assessing the Feasibility of Renewable Energy Development and Energy Efficiency Deployment on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nominelli, Gregg R.

    2012-12-17

    The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) is committed to preserving our natural environment and reducing the amount of fossil fuels consumed while developing "green" business manufacturing jobs on tribal lands. The Tribe's Comprehensive Strategic Plan seeks to diversify the Tribal Economy through the creation of alternative energy businesses, such as wind, solar and bio-mass facilities while protecting the waters of Lake Superior, tribal inland lakes and streams. In addition, the Community desired to utilize clean/green energy resources to promote the self-sufficiency of the Tribal Nation. The objective of the study is to preserve our environment and maintain our cultural goals of using the resources of the land wisely. To reduce our consumption of fossil fuels, mercury and carbon dioxide emissions, which harm our water and land; we have decided to evaluate the opportunities of utilizing wind power. Preliminary projections show that we may eliminate pollution from our land in a cost effective manner. This study will evaluate wind capacity and our current energy consumption while projecting the feasibility of converting to wind power for operations at our major facilities. This project will study the feasibility of wind power at two locations for the purpose of reducing the Tribe's reliance upon fossil fuels and creating business opportunities, jobs and revenue for the community.

  13. Assessing land take by urban development and its impact on carbon storage: Findings from two case studies in Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sallustio, L.; Quatrini, V.; Geneletti, D.; Corona, P.; Marchetti, M.

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • We tested a new methodology for monitoring land take and its effects on C storage. • The ecological impact of urban growth derives from the previous land use. • C loss increases with the naturalness of the territory. • Different urban assets may imply different forms of land take containment. Land take due to urbanization triggers a series of negative environmental impacts with direct effects on quality of life for people living in cities. Changes in ecosystem services are associated with land take, among which is the immediate C loss due to land use conversion. Land use change monitoring represents the first step in quantifying land take and its drivers and impacts. To this end, we propose an innovative methodology for monitoring land take and its effects on ecosystem services (in particular, C loss) under multi-scale contexts. The devised approach was tested in two areas with similar sizes, but different land take levels during the time-span 1990–2008 in Central Italy (the Province of Rome and the Molise Region). The estimates of total coverage of built up areas were calculated using point sampling. The area of the urban patches including each sampling point classified as built up areas in the year 1990 and/or in the year 2008 is used to estimate total abundance and average area of built up areas. Biophysical and economic values for carbon loss associated with land take were calculated using InVEST. Although land take was 7–8 times higher in the Province of Rome (from 15.1% in 1990 to 20.4% in 2008) than in Molise region, our findings show that its relative impact on C storage is higher in the latter, where the urban growth consistently affects not only croplands but also semi-natural land uses such as grasslands and other wooded lands. The total C loss due to land take has been estimated in 1.6 million Mg C, corresponding to almost 355 million €. Finally, the paper discusses the main characteristics of urban growth and their

  14. Identifying Barriers and Predictors for Success for Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Identifying Barriers and Predictors for Success for Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands Tommy Jones, PhD Student, University of Arizona Len Necefer, PhD Candidate, Carnegie Mellon University SAND Number: SAND2014-17558 PE Financing and Funding Remains a Challenge ▪ Small scale projects > Large scale projects - Challenges securing financing, outside capital, infrastructure, risk, RECs ▪ Lack tribal equity to dedicate to RE - competing interests ▪ Debt - Risk adverse, not

  15. Climate change in the four corners and adjacent regions: Implications for environmental restoration and land-use planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J.

    1995-09-01

    This document contains the workshop proceedings on Climate Change in the Four Corners and Adjacent Regions: Implications for Environmental Restoration and Land-Use Planning which took place September 12-14, 1994 in Grand Junction, Colorado. The workshop addressed three ways we can use paleoenvironmental data to gain a better understanding of climate change and its effects. (1) To serve as a retrospective baseline for interpreting past and projecting future climate-induced environmental change, (2) To differentiate the influences of climate and humans on past environmental change, and (3) To improve ecosystem management and restoration practices in the future. The papers presented at this workshop contained information on the following subjects: Paleoclimatic data from the Pleistocene and Holocene epochs, climate change and past cultures, and ecological resources and environmental restoration. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  16. Land and Facility Use Policy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Each comprehensive plan will consider the site's larger regional context and be developed with stakeholder participation. This policy will result in land and facility uses which ...

  17. Regional Nuclear Workforce Development in the Central Savannah River Area

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Nuclear Workforce Development in the Central Savannah River Area Dr. Susan A. Winsor Aiken Technical College President: P.O. Box 696, Aiken, SC 29802, winsors@atc.edu Mindy Mets Nuclear Workforce Initiative Program Manager, SRS Community Reuse Organization: P.O. Box 696, Aiken, SC 29802, mindy.mets@srscro.org INTRODUCTION An expanding role for nuclear energy in the United States has dramatic implications for the nuclear workforce demand in the two-state region of Georgia and South

  18. Developing a methodology and building a team to ensure objectivity in future land use planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cusick, L.T.

    1995-12-01

    The paper describes the steps involved in the development of an integrated methodology for identifying future land use options on Department of Energy (DOE) property and the establishment of a team to undertake the analysis. Three sources of information are considered: (1) internal and external stakeholder preferences, (2) economic data, and (3) environmental data. The analysis is part of a DOE process to propose future land use options for its real property while considering DOE missions and the expressed preferences of stakeholders. The process is presently ongoing at several DOE facilities; the analysis described herein is taking place on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Further described in this paper are the benefits of considering stakeholder preferences in determining future land uses and the necessity of weighing economic factors and their effects on stakeholder preferences. Similarly, this paper details the need for considering environmental information to ascertain the value of the ORR`s ecological resources. During the analysis taking place on the ORR, a methodology will be developed to integrate these varied data sets and to address both the individual and the combined effects of economic and environmental factors on stakeholders preferences. Several future land use options which will result form the analysis must be: (1) technically sound and promote informed decision-making, (2) understood by the parties involved, and (3) options that can be supported by the parties involved. This framework may be used in combination with defined technical, regulatory, and legal requirements to define achievable remediation goals for the ORR.

  19. Wind Energy Resource Assessment on Alaska Native Lands in Cordova Region of Prince William Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whissel, John C.; Piche, Matthew

    2015-06-29

    The Native Village of Eyak (NVE) has been monitoring wind resources around Cordova, Alaska in order to determine whether there is a role for wind energy to play in the city’s energy scheme, which is now supplies entirely by two run-of-the-river hydro plants and diesel generators. These data are reported in Appendices A and B. Because the hydro resources decline during winter months, and wind resources increase, wind is perhaps an ideal counterpart to round out Cordova’s renewable energy supply. The results of this effort suggests that this is the case, and that developing wind resources makes sense for our small, isolated community.

  20. Land Use and Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daniel; Polsky, Colin; Bolstad, Paul V.; Brody, Samuel D.; Hulse, David; Kroh, Roger; Loveland, Thomas; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-05-01

    A contribution to the 3rd National Climate Assessment report, discussing the following key messages: 1. Choices about land-use and land-cover patterns have affected and will continue to affect how vulnerable or resilient human communities and ecosystems are to the effects of climate change. 2. Land-use and land-cover changes affect local, regional, and global climate processes. 3. Individuals, organizations, and governments have the capacity to make land-use decisions to adapt to the effects of climate change. 4. Choices about land use and land management provide a means of reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas levels.

  1. Community Land Model Version 3.0 (CLM3.0) Developer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, FM

    2004-12-21

    This document describes the guidelines adopted for software development of the Community Land Model (CLM) and serves as a reference to the entire code base of the released version of the model. The version of the code described here is Version 3.0 which was released in the summer of 2004. This document, the Community Land Model Version 3.0 (CLM3.0) User's Guide (Vertenstein et al., 2004), the Technical Description of the Community Land Model (CLM) (Oleson et al., 2004), and the Community Land Model's Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (CLM-DGVM): Technical Description and User's Guide (Levis et al., 2004) provide the developer, user, or researcher with details of implementation, instructions for using the model, a scientific description of the model, and a scientific description of the Dynamic Global Vegetation Model integrated with CLM respectively. The CLM is a single column (snow-soil-vegetation) biogeophysical model of the land surface which can be run serially (on a laptop or personal computer) or in parallel (using distributed or shared memory processors or both) on both vector and scalar computer architectures. Written in Fortran 90, CLM can be run offline (i.e., run in isolation using stored atmospheric forcing data), coupled to an atmospheric model (e.g., the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM)), or coupled to a climate system model (e.g., the Community Climate System Model Version 3 (CCSM3)) through a flux coupler (e.g., Coupler 6 (CPL6)). When coupled, CLM exchanges fluxes of energy, water, and momentum with the atmosphere. The horizontal land surface heterogeneity is represented by a nested subgrid hierarchy composed of gridcells, landunits, columns, and plant functional types (PFTs). This hierarchical representation is reflected in the data structures used by the model code. Biophysical processes are simulated for each subgrid unit (landunit, column, and PFT) independently, and prognostic variables are maintained for each subgrid unit. Vertical heterogeneity

  2. Downscaling Global Land Cover Projections from an Integrated Assessment Model for Use in Regional Analyses: Results and Evaluation for the US from 2005 to 2095

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Huang, Maoyi; Wolf, Julie; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-06-05

    Projections of land cover change generated from Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and other economic-based models can be applied for analyses of environmental impacts at subregional and landscape scales. For those IAM and economic models that project land use at the sub-continental or regional scale, these projections must be downscaled and spatially distributed prior to use in climate or ecosystem models. Downscaling efforts to date have been conducted at the national extent with relatively high spatial resolution (30m) and at the global extent with relatively coarse spatial resolution (0.5 degree).

  3. BioEarth: Envisioning and developing a new regional earth system model to inform natural and agricultural resource management

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adam, Jennifer C.; Stephens, Jennie C.; Chung, Serena H.; Brady, Michael P.; Evans, R. David; Kruger, Chad E.; Lamb, Brian K.; Liu, Mingliang; Stöckle, Claudio O.; Vaughan, Joseph K.; et al

    2014-04-24

    Uncertainties in global change impacts, the complexities associated with the interconnected cycling of nitrogen, carbon, and water present daunting management challenges. Existing models provide detailed information on specific sub-systems (e.g., land, air, water, and economics). An increasing awareness of the unintended consequences of management decisions resulting from interconnectedness of these sub-systems, however, necessitates coupled regional earth system models (EaSMs). Decision makers’ needs and priorities can be integrated into the model design and development processes to enhance decision-making relevance and “usability” of EaSMs. BioEarth is a research initiative currently under development with a focus on the U.S. Pacific Northwest region thatmore » explores the coupling of multiple stand-alone EaSMs to generate usable information for resource decision-making. Direct engagement between model developers and non-academic stakeholders involved in resource and environmental management decisions throughout the model development process is a critical component of this effort. BioEarth utilizes a bottom-up approach for its land surface model that preserves fine spatial-scale sensitivities and lateral hydrologic connectivity, which makes it unique among many regional EaSMs. Here, we describe the BioEarth initiative and highlights opportunities and challenges associated with coupling multiple stand-alone models to generate usable information for agricultural and natural resource decision-making.« less

  4. BioEarth: Envisioning and developing a new regional earth system model to inform natural and agricultural resource management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam, Jennifer C.; Stephens, Jennie C.; Chung, Serena H.; Brady, Michael P.; Evans, R. David; Kruger, Chad E.; Lamb, Brian K.; Liu, Mingliang; Stöckle, Claudio O.; Vaughan, Joseph K.; Rajagopalan, Kirti; Harrison, John A.; Tague, Christina L.; Kalyanaraman, Ananth; Chen, Yong; Guenther, Alex; Leung, Fok-Yan; Leung, L. Ruby; Perleberg, Andrew B.; Yoder, Jonathan; Allen, Elizabeth; Anderson, Sarah; Chandrasekharan, Bhagyam; Malek, Keyvan; Mullis, Tristan; Miller, Cody; Nergui, Tsengel; Poinsatte, Justin; Reyes, Julian; Zhu, Jun; Choate, Janet S.; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Nelson, Roger; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Yorgey, Georgine G.; Johnson, Kristen; Chinnayakanahalli, Kiran J.; Hamlet, Alan F.; Nijssen, Bart; Walden, Von

    2014-04-24

    Uncertainties in global change impacts, the complexities associated with the interconnected cycling of nitrogen, carbon, and water present daunting management challenges. Existing models provide detailed information on specific sub-systems (e.g., land, air, water, and economics). An increasing awareness of the unintended consequences of management decisions resulting from interconnectedness of these sub-systems, however, necessitates coupled regional earth system models (EaSMs). Decision makers’ needs and priorities can be integrated into the model design and development processes to enhance decision-making relevance and “usability” of EaSMs. BioEarth is a research initiative currently under development with a focus on the U.S. Pacific Northwest region that explores the coupling of multiple stand-alone EaSMs to generate usable information for resource decision-making. Direct engagement between model developers and non-academic stakeholders involved in resource and environmental management decisions throughout the model development process is a critical component of this effort. BioEarth utilizes a bottom-up approach for its land surface model that preserves fine spatial-scale sensitivities and lateral hydrologic connectivity, which makes it unique among many regional EaSMs. Here, we describe the BioEarth initiative and highlights opportunities and challenges associated with coupling multiple stand-alone models to generate usable information for agricultural and natural resource decision-making.

  5. Fluvial sedimentology and basin analyses of the Permian Fairchild and Buckley formations, Beardmore Glacier region, and the Weller Coal Measures, southern Victoria Land, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isbell, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    The Beardmore Glacier region contains a 1-km-thick Permian fluvial sequence that was deposited in an elongate basin along the margin of the East Antarctica craton. Fluvial architecture, sandstone composition and paleocurrents within the basin record a change from an early Permian cratonic to a late Permian foreland basin. The Lower Permian Fairchild Formation consists entirely of overlapping channel-form sandstone bodies deposited by braided streams. Arkosic sandstone was deposited by SE flowing streams. Fairchild strata record slow subsidence within a broad cratonic basin. The Lower to Upper Permian Buckley Formation consists of an arkosic lower member and a volcaniclastic upper member. Paleocurrents which consist of transverse and longitudinal paleocurrents, suggest a cratonward migration of the basin axis through time. The Buckley Formation was deposited within a braided stream setting and is an important unit because it contains interstratified channel-sandstone sheets, shale and coal, along with evidence of channel-belt avulsions. Sandstone sheets predominate at the base of the formation, while flood-plain deposits thicken and increase in abundance upward. The interaction between fluvial processes and subsidence rates produced this alluvial stratigraphy. The Lower Permian Weller Coal Measures in southern Victoria Land were deposited within a narrow basin located cratonward of the foreland basin. Basin geometry and depositional patterns are similar to those of fault-bounded basins. Although basin formation is not constrained, deposition of the Weller was contemporaneous with the development of the foreland basin. This suggests a relationship between subsidence within the two basins.

  6. South Asia Regional Initiative for Energy Cooperation and Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    reduced greenhouse gas emissions, and overall improvements in environmental quality and human health in the region. "The South Asia Regional Initiative for Energy Cooperation and...

  7. Keweenaw Bay Indian Community Presentation - Assessing the Feasibility of Renewable Energy Development and Energy Efficiency Deployment on Tribal Lands

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Community PRESENTATION Assessing the Feasibility of Renewable Energy Development and Energy Efficiency Deployment on Tribal Lands November 18, 2009 Gregg Nominelli, J.D. Economic Developer BACKGROUND INFORMATION  U.S. Department of Justice  Tribal Council formed Committee for Alternative & Renewable Energy  Council for Energy Resource Tribes  Targeted Wind Power Development & Energy Efficiency U.S. Department of Justice  Weed & Seed Program  Community Capacity

  8. National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis of Biorefinery Siting Based on Cellulosic Feedstock Grown on Marginal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. ARRA support for this project and to the PNNL Joint Global Change Research Institute enabled us to create an advanced computing infrastructure to execute millions of simulations, conduct post-processing calculations, store input and output data, and visualize results. These computing resources included two components installed at the Research Data Center of the University of Maryland. The first resource was 'deltac': an 8-core Linux server, dedicated to county-level and state-level simulations and Postgre

  9. Developing Clean Energy Projects on Tribal Lands: Data and Resources for Tribes (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    This is a outreach brochure (booklet) for the DOE Office of Indian Energy summarizing the renewable energy technology potential on tribal lands. The booklet features tech potential maps for various technologies, information about the activities of DOE-IE, and resources for Tribes.

  10. World`s developing regions provide spark for pipeline construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koen, A.D.; True, W.R.

    1996-02-05

    This paper reviews the proposed construction of oil and gas pipelines which are underway or proposed to be started in 1996. It breaks down the projects by region of the world, type of product to be carried, and diameter of pipeline. It also provides mileage for each category of pipeline. Major projects in each region are more thoroughly discussed giving details on construction expenditures, construction problems, and political issues.

  11. Geothermal energy and the land resource: conflicts and constraints in The Geysers-Calistoga KGRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Banion, K.; Hall, C.

    1980-07-14

    This study of potential land-related impacts of geothermal power development in The Geysers region focuses on Lake County because it has most of the undeveloped resource and the least regulatory capability. First, the land resource is characterized in terms of its ecological, hydrological, agricultural, and recreational value; intrinsic natural hazards; and the adequacy of roads and utility systems. Based on those factors, the potential land-use conflicts and constraints that geothermal development may encounter in the region are identified and the availability and relative suitability of land for such development is determined. A brief review of laws and powers germane to geothermal land-use regulation is included.

  12. Uni Land | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Uni Land Place: Bologna, Italy Zip: 40063 Sector: Solar Product: Italian property company, which buys land without permits and develops it for residential and...

  13. UNECE-Transport for Sustainable Development in the ECE Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Focus Area: Transportation, Economic Development Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.unece.org.unecedev.colo.iway.chfileadminDAM...

  14. BioEarth: Envisioning and developing a new regional earth system model to inform natural and agricultural resource management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam, J. C.; Stephens, J. C.; Chung, Serena; Brady, M. P.; Evans, R. D.; Kruger, C. E.; Lamb, Brian K.; Liu, M. L.; Stockle, Claudio O.; Vaughan, Joseph K.; Rajagopalan, K.; Harrison, John; Tague, C. L.; Kalyanaraman, Anantharaman; Chen, Yong; Guenther, Alex B.; Leung, F. Y.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Perleberg, A. B.; Yoder, J.; Allen, Elizabeth; Anderson, S.; Chandrasekharan, B.; Malek, K.; Mullis, T.; Miller, C.; Nergui, T.; Poinsatte, J.; Reyes, J.; Zhu, J.; Choate, J. S.; Jiang, X.; Nelson, R.; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Yorgey, G. G.; Johnson, Kristen; Chinnayakanhalli, K. J.; Hamlet, A. F.; Nijssen, B.; Walden, Von

    2015-04-01

    As managers of agricultural and natural resources are confronted with uncertainties in global change impacts, the complexities associated with the interconnected cycling of nitrogen, carbon, and water present daunting management challenges. Existing models provide detailed information on specific sub-systems (land, air, water, economics, etc). An increasing awareness of the unintended consequences of management decisions resulting from interconnectedness of these sub-systems, however, necessitates coupled regional earth system models (EaSMs). Decision makers needs and priorities can be integrated into the model design and development processes to enhance decision-making relevance and "usability" of EaSMs. BioEarth is a current research initiative with a focus on the U.S. Pacific Northwest region that explores the coupling of multiple stand-alone EaSMs to generate usable information for resource decision-making. Direct engagement between model developers and non-academic stakeholders involved in resource and environmental management decisions throughout the model development process is a critical component of this effort. BioEarth utilizes a "bottom-up" approach, upscaling a catchment-scale model to basin and regional scales, as opposed to the "top-down" approach of downscaling global models utilized by most other EaSM efforts. This paper describes the BioEarth initiative and highlights opportunities and challenges associated with coupling multiple stand-alone models to generate usable information for agricultural and natural resource decision-making.

  15. Environmental Assessment for Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico - Final Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1997-10-07

    As part of its initiative to fulfill its responsibilities to provide support for the incorporated County of Los Alamos (the County) as an Atomic Energy Community, while simultaneously fulfilling its obligations to enhance the self-sufficiency of the County under authority of the Atomic Energy Community Act of 1955 and the Defense Authorization Act, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to lease undeveloped land in Los Alamos, New Mexico, to the County for private sector use as a research park. The Proposed Action is intended to accelerate economic development activities within the County by creating regional employment opportunities through offering federal land for private sector lease and use. As a result of the proposed land lease, any government expenditures for providing infrastructure to the property would be somewhat supplemented by tenant purchase of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) expertise in research and development activities. The presence of a research park within LANL boundaries is expected to allow private sector tenants of the park to be able to quickly and efficiently call upon LANL scientific expertise and facility and equipment capabilities as part of their own research operations and LANL research personnel, in turn, would be challenged in areas complementary to their federally funded research. In this way a symbiotic relationship would be enjoyed by both parties while simultaneously promoting economic development for the County through new job opportunities at the Research Park and at LANL, new indirect support opportunities for the community at large, and through payment of the basic building space leases. A ''sliding-scale'' approach (DOE 1993) is the basis for the analysis of effects in this Environmental Assessment (EA). That is, certain aspects of the Proposed Action have a greater potential for creating adverse environmental effects than others; therefore, they are discussed in greater detail in this EA than those aspects of

  16. Hierarchical Marginal Land Assessment for Land Use Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Shujiang; Post, Wilfred M; Wang, Dali; Nichols, Dr Jeff A; Bandaru, Vara Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Marginal land provides an alternative potential for food and bioenergy production in the face of limited land resources; however, effective assessment of marginal lands is not well addressed. Concerns over environmental risks, ecosystem services and sustainability for marginal land have been widely raised. The objective of this study was to develop a hierarchical marginal land assessment framework for land use planning and management. We first identified major land functions linking production, environment, ecosystem services and economics, and then classified land resources into four categories of marginal land using suitability and limitations associated with major management goals, including physically marginal land, biologically marginal land, environmental-ecological marginal land, and economically marginal land. We tested this assessment framework in south-western Michigan, USA. Our results indicated that this marginal land assessment framework can be potentially feasible on land use planning for food and bioenergy production, and balancing multiple goals of land use management. We also compared our results with marginal land assessment from the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and land capability classes (LCC) that are used in the US. The hierarchical assessment framework has advantages of quantitatively reflecting land functions and multiple concerns. This provides a foundation upon which focused studies can be identified in order to improve the assessment framework by quantifying high-resolution land functions associated with environment and ecosystem services as well as their criteria are needed to improve the assessment framework.

  17. Survey of lands held for uranium exploration, development, and production in fourteen western states for the six-month period ending December 31, 1982. [AZ, CA, CO, ID, MT, NV, NM, ND, OR, SD, TX, UT, WA, WY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    Tables are presented showing the land held (in thousands of acres) for uranium exploration and development according to: (1) distribution by ownership for 14 western states; (2) distribution by state; distribution by land category. A graph is presented showing land held by uranium industry from January 1966 to January 1983. Land controlled by counties for each of the 14 states are also tabulated according to land category. (ATT)

  18. Safety problems of water-development works designed for land reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shchedrin, V. N.; Kosichenko, Yu. M.

    2011-11-15

    A safety declaration is a fundamental document assuring the safety of water-development works, their correspondence to safety criteria, the design, and active technical regulations and rules.

  19. Tribal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-09-01

    This 12-page brochure provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tribal Energy Program and describes the financial, technical, and educational assistance it provides to help tribes develop their renewable energy resources and reduce their energy consumption.

  20. DOE Makes Up to $3 Million Available to Fund First Steps Toward Developing Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency on Tribal Lands

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In support of the Obama Administration’s commitment to strengthening partnerships with Tribal Nations and advancing tribal energy development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy today announced the availability of up to $3 million to initiate the first steps toward developing and sustaining renewable energy and energy efficiency on tribal lands.

  1. 24 V.S.A. Chapter 117 Municipal and Regional Planning and Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4 V.S.A. Chapter 117 Municipal and Regional Planning and Development Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: 24 V.S.A....

  2. DOE Regional Tribal Energy Project Development and Finance Workshops to be

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Held this Summer | Department of Energy Regional Tribal Energy Project Development and Finance Workshops to be Held this Summer DOE Regional Tribal Energy Project Development and Finance Workshops to be Held this Summer June 17, 2014 - 1:14pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy and the Tribal Energy Program, with support from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are hosting a series of interactive workshops this summer that will walk participants

  3. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United States: Four Regional Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Keyser, D.; Flores-Espino, F.; Miles, J.; Zammit, D.; Loomis, D.

    2015-02-01

    This report uses the offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model and provides four case studies of potential offshore deployment scenarios in different regions of the United States: the Southeast, the Great Lakes, the Gulf Coast, and the Mid-Atlantic. Researchers worked with developers and industry representatives in each region to create potential offshore wind deployment and supply chain growth scenarios, specific to their locations. These scenarios were used as inputs into the offshore JEDI model to estimate jobs and other gross economic impacts in each region.

  4. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact: Four Regional Scenarios (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2014-11-01

    NREL's Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model for Offshore Wind, is a computer tool for studying the economic impacts of fixed-bottom offshore wind projects in the United States. This presentation provides the results of an analysis of four offshore wind development scenarios in the Southeast Atlantic, Great Lakes, Mid-Atlantic, and Gulf of Mexico regions.

  5. EA-2000: Proposed Land Transfer to Develop a General Aviation Airport at the East Tennessee Technology Park Heritage Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of the proposed land transfer to the Metropolitan Knoxville Airport Authority for the development of a general aviation airport at the East Tennessee Technology Park Heritage Center, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

  6. Ecological Principles and Guidelines for Managing the Use of Land

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H; Brown, Sandra; Haeuber, R A; Hobbs, N T; Huntly, N; Naiman, R J; Riebsame, W E; Turner, M G; Valone, T J

    2014-01-01

    rules of thumb for incorporating ecological principles into land-use decision making. These guidelines suggest that land managers should: (1) examine impacts of local decisions in a regional context, (2) plan for long-term change and unexpected events, (3) preserve rare landscape elements and associated species, (4) avoid land uses that deplete natural resources, (5) retain large contiguous or connected areas that contain critical habitats, (6) minimize the intro- duction and spread of nonnative species, (7) avoid or compensate for the effects of development on ecological processes, and (8) implement land-use and management practices that are compatible with the natural potential of the area. Decision makers and citizens are encouraged to consider these guidelines and to include ecological per- spectives in choices on how land is used and managed. The guidelines suggest actions required to develop the science needed by land managers.

  7. AG Land 5 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5 Jump to: navigation, search Name AG Land 5 Facility AG Land 5 Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner AG Land Energy LLC Developer...

  8. LDK Uni Land JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Uni Land JV Jump to: navigation, search Name: LDK & Uni Land JV Place: Italy Product: Italy-based JV to develop and construct PV projects. References: LDK & Uni Land JV1 This...

  9. Development of An Empirical Water Quality Model for Stormwater Based on Watershed Land Use in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cullinan, Valerie I.; May, Christopher W.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Judd, Chaeli; Johnston, Robert K.

    2007-03-29

    The Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed is located on the west side of Puget Sound in Kitsap County, Washington, U.S.A. (Figure 1). The Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS), U.S Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the Washington State Department of Ecology (WA-DOE), Kitsap County, City of Bremerton, City of Bainbridge Island, City of Port Orchard, and the Suquamish Tribe have joined in a cooperative effort to evaluate water-quality conditions in the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed and correct identified problems. A major focus of this project, known as Project ENVVEST, is to develop Water Clean-up (TMDL) Plans for constituents listed on the 303(d) list within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed. Segments within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed were listed on the State of Washington’s 1998 303(d) because of fecal coliform contamination in marine water, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish tissue (WA-DOE 2003). Stormwater loading was identified by ENVVEST as one potential source of sediment contamination, which lacked sufficient data for a contaminant mass balance calculation for the watershed. This paper summarizes the development of an empirical model for estimating contaminant concentrations in all streams discharging into Sinclair and Dyes Inlets based on watershed land use, 18 storm events, and wet/dry season baseflow conditions between November 2002 and May 2005. Stream pollutant concentrations along with estimates for outfalls and surface runoff will be used in estimating the loading and ultimately in establishing a Water Cleanup Plan (TMDL) for the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed.

  10. Navajo-Hopi Land Commission

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Power at the Paragon-Bisti Ranch DOE TEP Review, Golden, CO May 7, 2015   THE NAVAJO-HOPI LAND SETTLEMENT ACT  Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement Act passed 1974  Required relocation of Navajo and Hopi families living on land partitioned to other tribe.  Set aside lands for the benefit of relocates  Proceeds from RE development for Relocatee Project Background   Paragon-Bisti Ranch is selected lands :  Located in northwestern New Mexico.  22,000 acres of land

  11. DOE Deployment of Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency on Indian Lands FOA |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Deployment of Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency on Indian Lands FOA DOE Deployment of Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency on Indian Lands FOA December 10, 2015 5:00PM EST U.S. Department of Energy Up to $6 million in funding is available to accelerate clean energy development on tribal lands. Through this funding opportunity announcement (FOA), DOE Office of Indian Energy will help Indian Tribes (including Alaska Native regional corporations, village corporations) to

  12. DOE Deployment of Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency on Indian Lands FOA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Up to $6 million in funding is available to accelerate clean energy development on tribal lands. Through this funding opportunity announcement (FOA), DOE Office of Indian Energy will help Indian Tribes (including Alaska Native regional corporations, village corporations, tribal consortia, and tribal organizations) to install facility-scale clean energy and energy efficiency projects and community-scale clean energy projects on Indian lands.

  13. Characterization of seven United States coal regions. The development of optimal terrace pit coal mining systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wimer, R.L.; Adams, M.A.; Jurich, D.M.

    1981-02-01

    This report characterizes seven United State coal regions in the Northern Great Plains, Rocky Mountain, Interior, and Gulf Coast coal provinces. Descriptions include those of the Fort Union, Powder River, Green River, Four Corners, Lower Missouri, Illinois Basin, and Texas Gulf coal resource regions. The resource characterizations describe geologic, geographic, hydrologic, environmental and climatological conditions of each region, coal ranks and qualities, extent of reserves, reclamation requirements, and current mining activities. The report was compiled as a basis for the development of hypothetical coal mining situations for comparison of conventional and terrace pit surface mining methods, under contract to the Department of Energy, Contract No. DE-AC01-79ET10023, entitled The Development of Optimal Terrace Pit Coal Mining Systems.

  14. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United States: Four Regional Scenarios

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report uses the offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model and provides four case studies of potential offshore wind deployment scenarios in different regions of the United States: the Southeast, the Great Lakes, the Gulf Coast, and the Mid-Atlantic.

  15. Proposed Conveyance of Land

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conveyance of Land at the Hanford Site, Richland, WA Public Scoping Fact Sheet The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking input for a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Environmental Assessment (EA) to assess the potential environmental effects of conveying approximately 1,641 acres of Hanford Site land to a local economic development organization (https://federalregister.gov/a/2012-23099). The Tri-City Development Council (TRIDEC), a DOE-recognized Community Reuse Organization

  16. Land-use Leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

    2009-12-01

    Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International offsets are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

  17. Local population impacts of geothermal energy development in the Geysers: Calistoga region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haven, K.F.; Berg, V.; Ladson, Y.W.

    1980-09-01

    The country-level population increase implications of two long-term geothermal development scenarios for the Geysers region in California are addressed. This region is defined to include the counties of Lake, Sonoma, Mendocino and Napa, all four in northern California. The development scenarios include two components: development for electrical energy production and direct use applications. Electrical production scenarios are derived by incorporating current development patterns into previous development scenarios by both industry and research organizations. The scenarios are made county-specific, specific to the type of geothermal system constructed, and are projected through the year 2000. Separate high growth rate and low growth rate scenarios are developed, based on a set of specified assumptions. Direct use scenarios are estimated from the nature of the available resource, existing local economic and demographic patterns, and available experience with various separate direct use options. From the composite development scenarios, required numbers of direct and indirect employees and the resultant in-migration patterns are estimated. In-migration patterns are compared to current county level population and ongoing trends in the county population change for each of the four counties. From this comparison, conclusions are drawn concerning the contributions of geothermal resource development to future population levels and the significance of geothermally induced population increase from a county planning perspective.

  18. Reinterpreting SMCRA: {open_quotes}Permitting{close_quotes} phased postmining land use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merkin, Z.R.; Nieman, T.J.

    1996-12-31

    The coal producing area of Appalachian Kentucky has a shortage of developable land. The majority of mined land in this region has been reclaimed to pastureland or hayland, while narrow interpretation of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) and regulations, especially regarding bond release, has limited alternative postmining land uses which could support economic development. A study of Federal and State of Kentucky laws and regulations shows that postmining land use regulations and their implementation have focussed on preventing and minimizing environmental damage. Land use and land use planning concepts are not well understood, thus permit applications inadequately address land use needs and the {open_quotes}highest and best use{close_quotes} of a site. Required information about pre-mining conditions is not collected and analyzed in a way useful for determining appropriate postmining land use. More comprehensive, higher quality land use information, with information about regional factors such as transportation, utilities, labor market, etc., should be included in the permit application to identify sites with strong development potential. This, combined with a broader interpretation of the law recognizing the validity of a phased implementation of postmined land use, would continue environmental protection while preparing reclaimed land to meet potential future land use needs. The mining plan can be designed so that appropriate areas are prepared and laid out for future buildings or roads, yet are conducive to interim use for pasture, wildlife or recreation. Reclamation to the interim use, sufficient to protect the public and allow bond release, maintains the potential for later development. Land later can be made available in response to development demands, contributing to a more diversified economy.

  19. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United States: Four Regional Scenarios

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United States: Four Regional Scenarios S. Tegen, D. Keyser, and F. Flores-Espino National Renewable Energy Laboratory J. Miles and D. Zammit James Madison University D. Loomis Great Lakes Wind Network Technical Report NREL/TP-5000-61315 February 2015 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is

  20. Development of an L-Band RF Electron Gun for SASE in the Infrared Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiwagi, Shigeru; Kato, Ryukou; Isoyama, Goro; Hayano, Hitoshi; Urakawa, Junji

    2010-02-03

    We conduct research on Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) in the infrared region using the 40 MeV, 1.3 GHz L-band linac of Osaka University. The linac equipped with a thermionic electron gun can accelerate a high-intensity single-bunch beam though its normalized emittance is high. In order to advance the research on SASE, we have begun development of an RF gun for the L-band linac in collaboration with KEK. We will report conceptual design of the RF gun and present the status of development of another RF gun for STF at KEK.

  1. Energy and land use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

  2. Development of guidance for variances from the RCRA Land Disposal Restrictions for US DOE mixed-waste streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheuer, N.; Spikula, R. ); Harms, T. . Environmental Guidance Div.); Triplett, M.B. )

    1990-02-01

    In response to the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) anticipated need for variances from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDRs), a guidance manual was prepared. The guidance manual is for use by DOE facilities and operations offices in obtaining variances from the RCRA LDR treatment standards. The manual was prepared as a part of an ongoing effort by DOE-EH to provide guidance for the operations offices and facilities to comply with the RCRA LDRs. The manual addresses treatability variances and equivalent treatment variances. A treatability variance is an alternative treatment standard granted by EPA for a restricted waste. Such a variance is not an exemption from the requirements of the LDRs, but rather is an alternative treatment standard that must be met before land disposal. An equivalent treatment variance is granted by EPA that allows treatment of a restricted waste by a process that differs from that specified in the standards, but achieves a level of performance equivalent to the technology specified in the standard. 4 refs.

  3. A reduced order modeling approach to represent subgrid-scale hydrological dynamics for regional- and climate-scale land-surface simulations: application in a polygonal tundra landscape

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pau, G. S. H.; Bisht, G.; Riley, W. J.

    2014-04-04

    Existing land surface models (LSMs) describe physical and biological processes that occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. For example, biogeochemical and hydrological processes responsible for carbon (CO2, CH4) exchanges with the atmosphere range from molecular scale (pore-scale O2 consumption) to tens of kilometer scale (vegetation distribution, river networks). Additionally, many processes within LSMs are nonlinearly coupled (e.g., methane production and soil moisture dynamics), and therefore simple linear upscaling techniques can result in large prediction error. In this paper we applied a particular reduced-order modeling (ROM) technique known as "Proper Orthogonal Decomposition mapping method" that reconstructs temporally-resolvedmore » fine-resolution solutions based on coarse-resolution solutions. We applied this technique to four study sites in a polygonal tundra landscape near Barrow, Alaska. Coupled surface-subsurface isothermal simulations were performed for summer months (June–September) at fine (0.25 m) and coarse (8 m) horizontal resolutions. We used simulation results from three summer seasons (1998–2000) to build ROMs of the 4-D soil moisture field for the four study sites individually (single-site) and aggregated (multi-site). The results indicate that the ROM produced a significant computational speedup (> 103) with very small relative approximation error (< 0.1%) for two validation years not used in training the ROM. We also demonstrated that our approach: (1) efficiently corrects for coarse-resolution model bias and (2) can be used for polygonal tundra sites not included in the training dataset with relatively good accuracy (< 1.5% relative error), thereby allowing for the possibility of applying these ROMs across a much larger landscape. This method has the potential to efficiently increase the resolution of land models for coupled climate simulations, allowing LSMs to be used at spatial scales consistent with

  4. Regional variations in US residential sector fuel prices: implications for development of building energy performance standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Tawil, J.J.; Secrest, T.J.

    1981-03-01

    The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Energy Performance Standards for New Buildings presented life-cycle-cost based energy budgets for single-family detached residences. These energy budgets varied with regional climatic conditions but were all based on projections of national average prices for gas, oil and electricity. The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking indicated that further analysis of the appropriateness of various price measures for use in setting the Standards was under way. This part of that ongoing analysis addresses the availability of fuel price projections, the variation in fuel prices and escalation rates across the US and the effects of aggregating city price data to the state, Region, or national level. The study only provides a portion of the information required to identify the best price aggregation level for developing of the standards. The research addresses some of the economic efficiency considerations necessary for design of a standard that affects heterogeneous regions. The first section discusses the effects of price variation among and within regions on the efficiency of resource allocation when a standard is imposed. Some evidence of the extreme variability in fuel prices across the US is presented. In the second section, time series, cross-sectional fuel price data are statistically analyzed to determine the similarity in mean fuel prices and price escalation rates when the data are treated at increasing levels of aggregation. The findings of this analysis are reported in the third section, while the appendices contain price distributions details. The last section reports the availability of price projections and discusses some EIA projections compared with actual prices.

  5. Land use and energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robeck, K.E.; Ballou, S.W.; South, D.W.; Davis, M.J.; Chiu, S.Y.; Baker, J.E.; Dauzvardis, P.A.; Garvey, D.B.; Torpy, M.F.

    1980-07-01

    This report provides estimates of the amount of land required by past and future energy development in the United States and examines major federal legislation that regulates the impact of energy facilities on land use. An example of one land use issue associated with energy development - the potential conflict between surface mining and agriculture - is illustrated by describing the actual and projected changes in land use caused by coal mining in western Indiana. Energy activities addressed in the report include extraction of coal, oil, natural gas, uranium, oil shale, and geothermal steam; uranium processing; preparation of synfuels from coal; oil refineries; fossil-fuel, nuclear, and hydro-electric power plants; biomass energy farms; and disposal of solid wastes generated during combustion of fossil fuels. Approximately 1.1 to 3.3 x 10/sup 6/ acres were devoted to these activities in the United States in 1975. As much as 1.8 to 2.0 x 10/sup 6/ additional acres could be required by 1990 for new, nonbiomass energy development. The production of grain for fuel ethanol could require an additional 16.9 to 55.7 x 10/sup 6/ acres by 1990. Federal laws that directly or indirectly regulate the land-use impacts of energy facilities include the National Environmental Protection Act, Clean Air Act, Federal Water Pollution Control Act, Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and Coastal Zone Management Act. The major provisions of these acts, other relevant federal regulations, and similar state and local regulatons are described in this report. Federal legislation relating to air quality, water quality, and the management of public lands has the greatest potential to influence the location and timing of future energy development in the United States.

  6. Economic and Physical Modeling of Land Use in GCAM 3.0 and an Application to Agricultural Productivity, Land, and Terrestrial Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Edmonds, James A.

    2014-09-01

    We explore the impact of changes in agricultural productivity on global land use and terrestrial carbon using the new agriculture and land use modeling approach developed for Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) version 3.0. This approach models economic land use decisions with regional, physical, and technological specificity while maintaining economic and physical integration with the rest of the GCAM model. Physical land characteristics and quantities are tracked explicitly, and crop production practices are modeled discretely to facilitate coupling with physical models. Economic land allocation is modeled with non-linear functions in a market equilibrium rather than through a constrained optimization. In this paper, we explore three scenarios of future agriculture productivity in all regions of the globe over this century, ranging from a high growth to a zero growth level. The higher productivity growth scenario leads to lower crop prices, increased production of crops in developing nations, preservation of global forested lands and lower terrestrial carbon emissions. The scenario with no productivity improvement results in higher crop prices, an expansion of crop production in the developed world, loss of forested lands globally, and higher terrestrial carbon emissions.

  7. Future land use plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-31

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) changing mission, coupled with the need to apply appropriate cleanup standards for current and future environmental restoration, prompted the need for a process to determine preferred Future Land Uses for DOE-owned sites. DOE began the ``Future Land Use`` initiative in 1994 to ensure that its cleanup efforts reflect the surrounding communities` interests in future land use. This plan presents the results of a study of stakeholder-preferred future land uses for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), located in central Long Island, New York. The plan gives the Laboratory`s view of its future development over the next 20 years, as well as land uses preferred by the community were BNL ever to cease operations as a national laboratory (the post-BNL scenario). The plan provides an overview of the physical features of the site including its history, topography, geology/hydrogeology, biological inventory, floodplains, wetlands, climate, and atmosphere. Utility systems and current environmental operations are described including waste management, waste water treatment, hazardous waste management, refuse disposal and ground water management. To complement the physical descriptions of the site, demographics are discussed, including overviews of the surrounding areas, laboratory population, and economic and non-economic impacts.

  8. Cancelled- DOE P 430.1: Land and Facility Use Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is Department of Energy policy to manage all of its land and facilities as valuable national resources. Our stewardship will be based on the principles of ecosystem management and sustainable development. We will integrate mission, economic. ecologic, social and cultural factors in a comprehensive plan for each site that will guide land and facility use decisions. Each comprehensive plan will consider the site's larger regional context and be developed with stakeholder participation. This policy will result in land and facility uses which support the Department's critical missions. stimulate the economy, and protect the environment. This Policy was cancelled by DOE N 251.102, Cancellation of Directives (2011).

  9. EA-1856: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Portsmouth...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    56: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant for Economic Development Purposes, Piketon, Ohio EA-1856: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the...

  10. Best Practices for Wind Energy Development in the Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pebbles, Victoria; Hummer, John; Haven, Celia

    2011-07-19

    This report offers a menu of 18 different, yet complementary, preferred practices and policies. The best practices cover all phases of the wind energy development process - from the policies that allow for wind development, to the sustainable operation of a wind project, to the best practices for decommissioning a spent turbine - including applications for offshore wind. Each best practice describes the opportunities and challenges (pros and cons), and offers a case example that illustrates how that best practice is being utilized by a particular jurisdiction or wind project. The practices described in this publication were selected by a diverse group of interests from the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative that included environmental groups, industry, academia, and federal, state and local government regulators. The practices were identified through a year-long process that included a literature review, online survey and interviews with individuals from the public, private and non-profit sectors. Optimally, a suite of these best practices would be applied in an appropriate combination to fit the conditions of a particular wind project or a set of wind projects within a given locality or region.

  11. Findings of an evaluation of public involvement programs associated with the development of a Land and Resource Management Plan for the Ouachita National Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holthoff, M.G.; Howell, R.E.

    1993-08-01

    Federal regulations require the United States Forest Service (USFS) to integrate public input and values into decisions concerning land and resource management planning. The USFS has typically relied on traditional methods of involving the public, whereby public access and input to policy development are unilaterally controlled by the agency. Because of the highly political nature of land and resource management planning, such technocratic forms of public involvement and decision-making appear to be proving ineffective. This paper describes and evaluates two public involvement programs associated with the Ouachita National Forest`s (ONF) lengthy forest planning process. The research consisted of personal interviews with key program leaders and knowledgeable citizen participants, collection of secondary data, and a survey of citizen participants. Because of controversial planning decisions made during an initial planning process, the ONF was forced to re-enter the planning process in order to address unresolved planning issues and to conduct a more effective public involvement program. The supplemental planning process also resulted in a considerable degree of public contention. The survey revealed that although citizen participants were somewhat more satisfied with the supplemental public involvement program relative to the initial program, neither program was viewed as satisfactory. The findings of the study suggest that in order to be more effective, USFS public involvement programs should be more responsive to public concerns and conducted in adherence to principles of collaborative planning.

  12. Development of a Remotely Operated NDE System for Inspection of Hanford's Double Shell Waste Tank Knuckle Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pardini, Allan F.; Alzheimer, James M.; Crawford, Susan L.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Gervais, Kevin L.; Harris, Robert V.; Riechers, Douglas M.; Samuel, Todd J.; Schuster, George J.; Tucker, Joseph C.; Roberts, R. A.

    2001-09-28

    This report documents work performed at the PNNL in FY01 to support development of a Remotely Operated NDE (RONDE) system capable of inspecting the knuckle region of Hanford's DSTs. The development effort utilized commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) technology wherever possible and provided a transport and scanning device for implementing the SAFT and T-SAFT techniques.

  13. Land and Facility Use Planning

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-07-09

    The Land and Facility Use Planning process provides a way to guide future site development and reuse based on the shared long-term goals and objectives of the Department, site and its stakeholders. Does not cancel other directives.

  14. Regional Purchasing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Partnerships Regional Partnerships DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Program DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also called carbon sequestration) in different regions and geologic formations within the Nation. Collectively, the seven RCSPs represent regions encompassing: 97 percent of coal-fired CO2 emissions; 97 percent

  15. TRIDEC Land TRIDEC Land Transfer REQUEST Transfer REQUEST

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Area TRIDEC Land TRIDEC Land Transfer REQUEST Transfer REQUEST 300 Acres 300 Acres Additional Lands Additional Lands Identified for Identified for EA Analysis EA Analysis 2,772...

  16. LANDS WITH WILDERNESS CHARACTERISTICS, RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AND LAND EXCHANGES: CROSS-JURISDICTIONAL MANAGEMENT AND IMPACTS ON UNCONVENTIONAL FUEL DEVELOPMENT IN UTAH'S UINTA BASIN Utah is rich in oil shale and oil sands resources. ...

  17. Bird Movements and Behaviors in the Gulf Coast Region: Relation to Potential Wind-Energy Developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, M. L.

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the possible impacts of wind development to birds along the lower Gulf Coast, including both proposed near-shore and offshore developments. The report summarizes wind resources in Texas, discusses timing and magnitude of bird migration as it relates to wind development, reviews research that has been conducted throughout the world on near- and offshore developments, and provides recommendations for research that will help guide wind development that minimizes negative impacts to birds and other wildlife resources.

  18. Survey of lands held for uranium exploration, development, and production in fourteen western states in the six month period ending June 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The statistics set forth for the period covered by this report are based on data gathered from records available to the public. These data were derived from public county records of mining claim locations, from the public reports of state and Federal land offices, from commercial reporting services, and from annual reports to stockholders of land companies. Accordingly, if any fee land has been acquired in a private transaction which has not been entered into a public record or report, that land will not be accounted for in this report. The figures for the acreage controlled at the beginning of the calendar year are those that were published for that date in the publication entitled Statistical Data of the Uranium Industry GJO-100(78).

  19. EA-1212: Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to lease undeveloped land that is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, to...

  20. Energy Efficiency Investments in Public Facilities - Developing a Pilot Mechanism for Russia and Chelyabinsk Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Meredydd; Roshchanka, Volha; Parker, Steven A.; Baranovskiy, Aleksandr

    2012-01-01

    Russian public sector buildings tend to be very inefficient, which creates vast opportunities for savings. This paper reviews opportunities to implement energy efficiency projects in Russian public buildings, created by new Russian legislation and regulations. Given Russia's limited experience with energy performance contracts (EPCs), a pilot project can help test an implementation mechanism. The authors use Chelyabinsk Region as an example to discuss opportunities, challenges and solutions to financing and implementing an EPC in Russia, navigating through federal requirements and specific local conditions.

  1. Land and Renewable Resources | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Land and Renewable Resources Argonne's environmental scientists conduct environmental impact statements to help the nation create a framework for developing renewable energy capabilities on public lands. Researchers in our Environmental Science division routinely conduct Environmental Impact Statements (EIS), which provide a rich and thorough analysis to determine what areas of public lands are best suited for solar, wind, and geothermal project development and assess the associated

  2. Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO): Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO)- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Navajo Hopi Land Commission (NHLCO), together with its partners, will conduct a feasibility study (FS) of a program to develop renewable energy on the Paragon-Bisti ranch lands in northwestern New Mexico, which were set aside under the Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement Act for the benefit of relocatees (defined as Navajo families living on Hopi Partitioned Lands as of December 22, 1974).

  3. Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and over many regions of the world, particularly during the summertime growing season when intense turbulence induced by surface radiation couples the land surface to clouds. ...

  4. AWEA Regional Wind Energy Conference—Northeast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) will be hosting a conference that focuses on the key issues in the northeast region. The event will provide attendees with a comprehensive view of the critical issues for wind power’s growth in this part of the country and cover both land-based wind power development, as well as the nascent efforts to develop off-shore wind power off the New England coast.

  5. Sustainable Land Management Through Market-Oriented Commodity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Commodity Development: Case studies from Ethiopia AgencyCompany Organization: International Livestock Research Institute Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics:...

  6. Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets for the Hawaiian Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manobianco, J.; Alonge, C.; Frank, J.; Brower, M.

    2010-07-01

    In March 2009, AWS Truepower was engaged by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a set of wind resource and plant output data for the Hawaiian Islands. The objective of this project was to expand the methods and techniques employed in the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) to include the state of Hawaii.

  7. Best Practices for Sustainable WInd Energy Development in the Great Lakes Region and Beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Great Lakes Commission; Victoria Pebbles; John Hummer; Celia Haven

    2011-07-19

    This document offers a menu of 18 different, yet complimentary preferred practices and policies. The best practices cover all phases of the wind energy development process - from the policies that allow for wind development, to the sustainable operation of a wind project, to the best practices for decommissioning a spent turbine - including applications for offshore wind. The practices include those that have been previously tested and proven effective, as well as new practices that were identified by experts in the field as needed for future wind developments. Each best practice includes information about the opportunities and challenges (pros and cons), and offers a case example that illustrates how that best practice is being utilized by a particular jurisdiction or wind project. The practices described in this publication were selected by a diverse group of interests from the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative that included environmental groups, industry, and federal, state and local government regulators. They were identified through a year long process that included a literature review, online survey and interviews with individuals from the public, private and non-profit sectors.

  8. Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development - An Application on Alternative Fuels in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shropshire, D.E.; Cobb, D.A.; Worhach, P.; Jacobson, J.J.; Berrett, S.

    2000-12-30

    The Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development project integrated the Bechtel/Nexant Industrial Materials Exchange Planner and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory System Dynamic models, demonstrating their capabilities on alternative fuel applications in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Park system. The combined model, called the Dynamic Industrial Material Exchange, was used on selected test cases in the Greater Yellow Teton Parks region to evaluate economic, environmental, and social implications of alternative fuel applications, and identifying primary and secondary industries. The test cases included looking at compressed natural gas applications in Teton National Park and Jackson, Wyoming, and studying ethanol use in Yellowstone National Park and gateway cities in Montana. With further development, the system could be used to assist decision-makers (local government, planners, vehicle purchasers, and fuel suppliers) in selecting alternative fuels, vehicles, and developing AF infrastructures. The system could become a regional AF market assessment tool that could help decision-makers understand the behavior of the AF market and conditions in which the market would grow. Based on this high level market assessment, investors and decision-makers would become more knowledgeable of the AF market opportunity before developing detailed plans and preparing financial analysis.

  9. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan Aggett

    2003-12-15

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this segment of work, our goal was to review methods for estimating tree survival, growth, yield and value of forests growing on surface mined land in the eastern coalfields of the USA, and to determine the extent to which carbon sequestration is influenced by these factors. Public Law 95-87, the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), mandates that mined land be reclaimed in a fashion that renders the land at least as productive after mining as it was before mining. In the central Appalachian region, where prime farmland and economic development opportunities for mined land are scarce, the most practical land use choices are hayland/pasture, wildlife habitat, or forest land. Since 1977, the majority of mined land has been reclaimed as hayland/pasture or wildlife habitat, which is less expensive to reclaim than forest land, since there are no tree planting costs. As a result, there are now hundreds of thousands of hectares of grasslands and scrublands in various stages of natural succession located throughout otherwise forested mountains in the U.S. A literature review was done to develop the basis for an economic feasibility study of a range of land-use conversion scenarios. Procedures were developed for both mixed hardwoods and white pine under a set of low product prices and under a set of high product prices. Economic feasibility is based on land expectation values. Further, our review shows that three types of incentive schemes might be important: (1) lump sum payment at planting (and equivalent series of annual payments); (2) revenue incentive at harvest; and (3) benefit based on carbon volume.

  10. Survey of lands held for uranium exploration, development, and production in fourteen western states in the six-month period ending December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    The statistics set forth for the period covered in this report are based on data gathered from records available to the public. The county records of mining claim locations, reports of state and federal land offices, and commercial reporting services furnish the data for this report.

  11. Survey of lands held for uranium exploration, development, and production in fourteen western states in the six-month period ending June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The statistics set forth for the period covered in this report are based on data gathered from records available to the public. The county records of mining claim locations, reports of state and federal land offices, and commercial reporting services furnish the data for this report. Accordingly, if any fee land has been acquired in a private transaction not entered into a public record or report, that land transaction will not be accounted for in this report. Manpower is not available to survey, acquire, and evaluate data from each available source in each reporting period. Therefore, in any given report, the figures quoted for one or more land categories in a given state may be identical to the figures shown in earlier reports even though some changes probably have occurred. Such changes will be shown on subsequent reports. The figures used for acreage controlled at the beginning of the calendar year are those published for that date in Statistical Data of the Uranium Industry GJ0-100 published and distributed by the Grand Junction Office of the Department of Energy.

  12. Survey of lands held for uranium exploration, development, and production in fourteen western states for the six-month period ending December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    The statistics set forth for the period covered in this report are based on data gathered from records available to the public. The county records of mining claim locations, reports of state and federal land offices, and commercial reporting services furnish the data for this report. Accordingly, if any fee land has been acquired in a private transaction not entered into a public record or report, that, land transaction will not be accounted for in this report. Manpower is not available to survey, acquire, and evaluate data from each available source in each reporting period. Therefore, in any given report, the figures quoted for one or more land categories in a given state may be identical to figures shown in earlier reports even though some changes probably have occurred. Such changes will be shown on subsequent reports. The figures used for acreage controlled at the beginning of the calendar year are those published for that date in Statistical Data of the Uranium Industry GJO-100(81) published and distributed by the Grand Junction Area Office of the Department of Energy.

  13. Survey of lands held for uranium exploration, development, and production in fourteen western states in the six-month period ending December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    The statistics set forth for the period covered in this report are based on data gathered from records available to the public. The county records of mining claim locations, reports of state and federal land offices, and commercial reporting services furnish the data for this report. Accordingly, if any fee land has been acquired in a private transaction not entered into a public record or report, that land transaction will not be accounted for in this report. Manpower is not available to survey, acquire, and evaluate data from each available source in each reporting period. Therefore, in any given report, the figures quoted for one or more land categories in a given state may be identical to the figures shown in earlier reports even though some changes probably have occurred. Such changes will be shown on subsequent reports. The figures used for acreage controlled at the beginning of the calendar year are those published for that date in Statistical Data of the Uranium Industry GJO-100 (79) published and distributed by the Grand Junction Office of the Department of Energy.

  14. Survey of lands held for uranium exploration, development, and production in fourteen western states for the six-month period ending June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    The statistics set forth for the period covered in this report are based on data gathered from records available to the public. The county records of mining claim locations, reports of state and federal land offices, and commercial reporting services furnish the data for this report. Accordingly, if any fee land has been acquired in a private transaction not entered into a public record or report, that land transaction will not be accounted for in this report. Manpower is not available to survey, acquire, and evaluate data from each available source in each reporting period. Therefore, in any given report, the figures quoted for one or more land categories in a given state may be identical to the figures shown in earlier reports even though some changes probably have occurred. Such changes will be shown on subsequent reports. The figures used for acreage controlled at the beginning of the calender year are those published for that date in Statistical Data of the Uranium Industry GJO-100(81) published and distributed by the Grand Junction Area Office of the Department of Energy.

  15. Measurement of attitudes toward commercial development of geothermal energy in Federal Region IX. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    A survey was conducted of ten target study groups and subgroups for Klamath Falls, Oregon, and Susanville, California: local government, current and potential industry at the site, relocators to the site, current and potential financial community, regulators, and current and potential promoters and developers. The results of benchmark attitudinal measurement is presented separately for each target group. A literature review was conducted and Macro-environmental attitudes of a sample of local government and industry personnel at the sites were assessed. An assessment of capabilities was made which involved two measurements. The first was a measurement of a sample of promoters, developers, and industrial service companies active at the site to determine infrastructure capabilities required by industry for geothermal plants. The second measurement involved analyzing a sample of industry management in the area and defining their requirements for plant retrofit and expansion. Finally, the processes used by the study group to analyze information to reach commitment and regulatory decisions that significantly impact on geothermal energy projects at the site were identified and defined.

  16. H.R. 817: A Bill to authorize the Secretary of Energy to lease lands within the naval oil shale reserves to private entities for the development and production of oil and natural gas. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This bill would give the Secretary of Energy authority to lease lands within the Naval oil shale reserves to private entities for the purpose of surveying for and developing oil and gas resources from the land (other than oil shale). It also allows the Bureau of Land Management to be used as a leasing agent, establishes rules on royalties, and the sharing of royalties with the state, and covers the transfer of existing equipment.

  17. Archaeology on Lab Land

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Archaeology on Lab Land Archaeology on Lab Land People have lived in this area for more than 5,000 years. Lab archaeologists are studying and preserving the ancient human occupation of the Pajarito Plateau. Archaeology on Lab Land exhibit Environmental Research & Monitoring Visit our exhibit and find out how Los Alamos researchers are studying our rich cultural diversity. READ MORE Nake'muu archaeological site Unique Archaeology The thousands of Ancestral Pueblo sites identified on Lab land

  18. Tropical Africa: Land use, biomass, and carbon estimates for 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.; Gaston, G.; Daniels, R.C.

    1996-06-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980 and describes a methodology that may be used to extend this data set to 1990 and beyond based on population and land cover data. The biomass data and carbon estimates are for woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with the possible magnitude of historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth`s land surface and includes those countries that for the most part are located in Tropical Africa. Countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea and in southern Africa (i.e., Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, and Western Sahara) have maximum potential biomass and land cover information but do not have biomass or carbon estimate. The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{sup TM} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass-carbon values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  19. Geothermal Power Plants — Minimizing Land Use and Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For energy production and development, geothermal power plants don't use much land compared to coal and nuclear power plants. And the environmental impact upon the land they use is minimal.

  20. A SOAP Web Service for accessing MODIS land product subsets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SanthanaVannan, Suresh K; Cook, Robert B; Pan, Jerry Yun; Wilson, Bruce E

    2011-01-01

    Remote sensing data from satellites have provided valuable information on the state of the earth for several decades. Since March 2000, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor on board NASA s Terra and Aqua satellites have been providing estimates of several land parameters useful in understanding earth system processes at global, continental, and regional scales. However, the HDF-EOS file format, specialized software needed to process the HDF-EOS files, data volume, and the high spatial and temporal resolution of MODIS data make it difficult for users wanting to extract small but valuable amounts of information from the MODIS record. To overcome this usability issue, the NASA-funded Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) for Biogeochemical Dynamics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed a Web service that provides subsets of MODIS land products using Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP). The ORNL DAAC MODIS subsetting Web service is a unique way of serving satellite data that exploits a fairly established and popular Internet protocol to allow users access to massive amounts of remote sensing data. The Web service provides MODIS land product subsets up to 201 x 201 km in a non-proprietary comma delimited text file format. Users can programmatically query the Web service to extract MODIS land parameters for real time data integration into models, decision support tools or connect to workflow software. Information regarding the MODIS SOAP subsetting Web service is available on the World Wide Web (WWW) at http://daac.ornl.gov/modiswebservice.

  1. Regional Partnerships

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also...

  2. AG Land 1 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Developer AG Land Energy LLC Energy Purchaser Alliant Energy Location Story County IA Coordinates 42.145531, -93.432161 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  3. AG Land 4 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Developer AG Land Energy LLC Energy Purchaser Alliant Energy Location Story County IA Coordinates 42.206397, -93.325714 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  4. AG Land 2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Developer AG Land Energy LLC Energy Purchaser Alliant Energy Location Story County IA Coordinates 41.904231, -93.354864 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  5. AG Land 3 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Developer AG Land Energy LLC Energy Purchaser Alliant Energy Location Story County IA Coordinates 42.146061, -93.428028 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  6. Survey of lands held for uranium exploration, development, and production in fourteen western states for the six-month period ending June 30, 1982. [AZ, CA, CO, ID, MT, NV, NM, ND, OR, SD, TX, UT, WA, WY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    Tables are presented showing the land held (in thousands of acres) for uranium exploration according to: (1) distribution by ownership for 14 western states (state, claim, federally acquired, Indian and fee); (2) distribution by state (1976 to 1982); (3) distribution by land category (1976 to 1982). A graph is presented showing land held by uranium industry from January 1966 to January 1982. Land controlled by counties for each of the 14 states are also tabulated according to land category. (ATT)

  7. Leveraging Regional Exploration to Develop Geologic Framework for CO2 Storage in Deep Formations in Midwestern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeraj Gupta

    2009-09-30

    Obtaining subsurface data for developing a regional framework for geologic storage of CO{sub 2} can require drilling and characterization in a large number of deep wells, especially in areas with limited pre-existing data. One approach for achieving this objective, without the prohibitive costs of drilling costly standalone test wells, is to collaborate with the oil and gas drilling efforts in a piggyback approach that can provide substantial cost savings and help fill data gaps in areas that may not otherwise get characterized. This leveraging with oil/gas drilling also mitigates some of the risk involved in standalone wells. This collaborative approach has been used for characterizing in a number of locations in the midwestern USA between 2005 and 2009 with funding from U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE award: DE-FC26-05NT42434) and in-kind contributions from a number of oil and gas operators. The results are presented in this final technical report. In addition to data collected under current award, selected data from related projects such as the Midwestern Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} storage project at and near the Mountaineer Plant, and the drilling of the Ohio Stratigraphic well in Eastern Ohio are discussed and used in the report. Data from this effort are also being incorporated into the MRCSP geologic mapping. The project activities were organized into tracking and evaluation of characterization opportunities; participation in the incremental drilling, basic and advanced logging in selected wells; and data analysis and reporting. Although a large number of opportunities were identified and evaluated, only a small subset was carried into the field stage. Typical selection factors included reaching an acceptable agreement with the operator, drilling and logging risks, and extent of pre-existing data near the candidate wells. The region of study is primarily along the

  8. NREL: Energy Analysis - Renewable Energy on Contaminated Lands

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy on Contaminated Lands Map of U.S. Map of Potential Limbo Land Sites for Consideration for Renewable Energy Technology Development. Enlarge image NREL's sustainability analysis includes work with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on the potential for using "limbo lands" as sites for renewable energy-generating stations. Limbo lands are considered underused, formerly contaminated sites; they include former Superfund sites, landfills, brownfields, abandoned mine

  9. Project Reports for Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO): Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO)- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Navajo Hopi Land Commission (NHLCO), together with its partners, will conduct a feasibility study (FS) of a program to develop renewable energy on the Paragon-Bisti ranch lands in northwestern New Mexico, which were set aside under the Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement Act for the benefit of relocatees (defined as Navajo families living on Hopi Partitioned Lands as of December 22, 1974).

  10. how much land | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    how much land Home Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land...

  11. csp land use | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    csp land use Home Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land...

  12. Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning Handbook | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning HandbookPermittingRegulatory GuidanceGuideHandbook Abstract...

  13. Colorado State Land Board Land Survey Requirements | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Colorado State Land Board Land Survey Requirements Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Colorado...

  14. Hawaii Land Study Bureau's Land Classification Finder | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Hawaii Land Study Bureau's Land Classification Finder Citation Hawaii State...

  15. VOCALS: The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wood, Robert [VOCALS-REx PI, University of Washington; Bretherton, Christopher [GEWEX/GCSS Representative, University of Washington; Huebert, Barry [SOLAS Representative, University of Hawaii; Mechoso, Roberto C. [VOCALS Science Working Group Chair, UCLA; Weller, Robert [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

    VOCALS (VAMOS* Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) is an international CLIVAR program the major goal of which is to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding of the Southeast Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system on diurnal to inter-annual timescales. The principal program objectives are: 1) the improved understanding and regional/global model representation of aerosol indirect effects over the SEP; 2) the elimination of systematic errors in the region of coupled atmospheric-ocean general circulation models, and improved model simulations and predictions of the coupled climate in the SEP and global impacts of the system variability. VOCALS is organized into two tightly coordinated components: 1) a Regional Experiment (VOCALSREx), and 2) a Modeling Program (VOCALS-Mod). Extended observations (e.g. IMET buoy, satellites, EPIC/PACS cruises) will provide important additional contextual datasets that help to link the field and the modeling components. The coordination through VOCALS of observational and modeling efforts (Fig. 3) will accelerate the rate at which field data can be used to improve simulations and predictions of the tropical climate variability [Copied from the Vocals Program Summary of June 2007, available as a link from the VOCALS web at http://www.eol.ucar.edu/projects/vocals/]. The CLIVAR sponsored program to under which VOCALS falls is VAMOS, which stands for Variability of the American Monsoon Systems.

  16. Wood energy and preservation of woodlands in semi-arid developing countries. The case of Dodoma region, Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    At present little land and labour resources are expended on energy production, but the woodlands in Dodoma are disappearing, causing villagers to save time by switching from fuelwood collected on foot to charcoal shipped in by truck. Results of a linear program show that if the costs of growing the wood for charcoal are counted the switch to charcoal saves time only in areas where population is relatively dense and natural woodland remote. Woodland preservation in Dodoma will require more plantations, increased plantation productivity, improved efficiency of charcoal kilns or stoves and ultimately a switch to some other fuel than wood.

  17. Radiation Therapy Risk Factors for Development of Lymphedema in Patients Treated With Regional Lymph Node Irradiation for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandra, Ravi A.; Miller, Cynthia L.; Skolny, Melissa N.; Warren, Laura E.G.; Horick, Nora; Jammallo, Lauren S.; Sadek, Betro T.; Shenouda, Mina N.; O'Toole, Jean; Specht, Michelle C.; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: We previously evaluated the risk of breast cancer-related lymphedema (LE) with the addition of regional lymph node irradiation (RLNR) and found an increased risk when RLNR is used. Here we analyze the association of technical radiation therapy (RT) factors in RLNR patients with the risk of LE development. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2012, we prospectively screened 1476 women for LE who underwent surgery for breast cancer. Among 1507 breasts treated, 172 received RLNR and had complete technical data for analysis. RLNR was delivered as supraclavicular (SC) irradiation (69% [118 of 172 patients]) or SC plus posterior axillary boost (PAB) (31% [54 of 172]). Bilateral arm volume measurements were performed pre- and postoperatively. Patients' RT plans were analyzed for SC field lateral border (relative to the humeral head), total dose to SC, RT fraction size, beam energy, and type of tangent (normal vs wide). Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyze associated risk factors for LE. Results: Median postoperative follow-up was 29.3 months (range: 4.9-74.1 months). The 2-year cumulative incidence of LE was 22% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15%-32%) for SC and 20% (95% CI: 11%-37%) for SC plus PAB (SC+PAB). None of the analyzed variables was significantly associated with LE risk (extent of humeral head: P=.74 for <1/3 vs >2/3, P=.41 for 1/3 to 2/3 vs >2/3; P=.40 for fraction size of 1.8 Gy vs 2.0 Gy; P=.57 for beam energy 6 MV vs 10 MV; P=.74 for tangent type wide vs regular; P=.66 for SC vs SC+PAB). Only pretreatment body mass index (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15, P=.0007) and the use of axillary lymph node dissection (HR: 7.08, 95% CI: 0.98-51.40, P=.05) were associated with risk of subsequent LE development. Conclusions: Of the RT parameters tested, none was associated with an increased risk of LE development. This study underscores the need for future work investigating alternative RLNR risk factors for LE.

  18. Geothermal Direct-Use — Minimizing Land Use and Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With geothermal direct-use applications, land use issues usually only arise during exploration and development when geothermal reservoirs are located in or near urbanized areas, critical habitat...

  19. Analysis of Impacts on Prime or Unique Agricultural Lands in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Analysis of Impacts on Prime or Unique Agricultural Lands in Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act was developed in cooperation with the Department of Agriculture. ...

  20. Bureau of Land Management, Colorado collaborate to advance efficient...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Management, Colorado collaborate to advance efficient geothermal development Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Memorandum: Bureau of Land...

  1. The Land | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Land April 12, 2016 Over the past nearly two years, there has been enormous activity, ... of its bid for CEBAF. In the following years, one portion of the campus was transferred ...

  2. integrated-land-use

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Planning Tool for Sydney, Australia Dr. Matthew Berryman, University of Wollongong Monday, November 28, 2011 - 1pm Argonne TRACC Building 222, Room D-233 The SMART Infrastructure Facility at the University of Wollongong, Australia, has been building an agent-based model to explore the feedbacks between transportation and land use. We focus on livability as a key driver of agent's location choice, and in addition to transport we include factors such

  3. Land Management - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Land Management About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Hanford Cultural Resources Contact Us Land Management Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Hanford Site - Hanford Reach The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) is responsible for the management of Hanford Site property. RL has issued the Mission Support Contract (MSC) to provide direct support to RL, DOE Office River Protection (ORP)

  4. land requirements | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    land requirements Home Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv...

  5. Program management plan for development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation efforts associated with Oak Ridge Reservation`s Land Disposal Restrictions Federal Facility Compliance Agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conley, T.B.

    1994-04-01

    This program management plan covers the development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation efforts necessary to identify treatment methods for all the waste listed in Appendix B of the ORR`s LDR/FFCA as well as any new wastes which meet Appendix B criteria. To successfully identify a treatment method, at least a proof-of-principle level of understanding must be obtained: that is, the candidate processes must be demonstrated as effective in treating the wastes to the LDR; however, an optimized process is not required. Where applicable and deemed necessary and where the budgets will support them, pilot-scale demonstrations will be pursued. The overall strategy being adopted in this program will be composed of the following activities: Scoping of the study; characterization; development and screening of alternatives; treatability investigations; and detailed analysis of alternatives.

  6. Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Planning Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning Abstract The BLM's Resource Management Plans...

  7. Evaluating the Probabilistic Land-Use Scenarios in the Radiological Dose Assessment for License Termination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S.Y.; Yu, C.; Kamboj, S.; Allison, T.; LePoire, D.; Mo, T.

    2006-07-01

    A recent trend in establishing regulatory policy regarding environmental cleanup has been the adoption of a risk-informed decision approach. This approach places an emphasis on the development of a defensible technical basis upon which cleanup decisions can be understood and accepted by stakeholders. The process has been exemplified by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) approach to implement its License Termination Rule in Title 10, Part 20, Subpart E of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 20, Subpart E), for which probabilistic radiological dose assessment has been a key technical element for demonstrating compliance. Further guidance including NUREG-1757 and its supplemental document are also prepared for this purpose. The approach also entails extensive data collection to cover the range of parameter variability, along with interpretations of the probabilistic dose results and demonstration of compliance. One major remaining issue, however, involves the future use of the land following cleanup. Land use is a key factor that may profoundly influence dose assessment, which in turn will affect the level of cleanup and therefore the associated costs. Despite this, incorporation of land-use considerations into the current probabilistic dose assessment approach has not actually been performed in the regulatory process. In order to address the issue, a study was initiated to evaluate the potential influence of land use on dose analysis, to understand the possible ramifications in cleanup decision-making. A probabilistic distribution based on land use was developed as input into the probabilistic RESRAD analysis for the demonstration of this approach.. This results in an understanding of the characteristics of dose distributions as exhibited by various land-use scenarios. By factoring in the probability distribution of land-use scenarios, the potential 'levels of conservatism' can be explicitly defined and evaluated. The results allow the

  8. LandScan 2013 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-07-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30"x30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on land cover, slope, road proximity, high-resolution imagery, and other data sets. The LandScan data set was developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient populations at risk.

  9. LandScan 2003 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-01-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" x 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on proximity to roads, slope, land cover, nighttime lights, and other data sets. LandScan 2001 has been developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient population risk.

  10. LandScan 2004 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-01-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" x 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on proximity to roads, slope, land cover, nighttime lights, and other data sets. LandScan 2001 has been developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient population risk.

  11. LandScan 2000 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-12-31

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" X 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on proximity to roads, slope, land cover, nighttime lights, and other data sets. The LandScan data set was developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient populations at risk.

  12. LandScan 2002 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-01-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" x 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on proximity to roads, slope, land cover, nighttime lights, and other data sets. LandScan 2001 has been developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient population risk.

  13. LandScan 2006 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-01-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" x 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on proximity to roads, slope, land cover, nighttime lights, and other data sets. LandScan 2001 has been developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient population risk.

  14. LandScan 2005 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-01-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" x 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on proximity to roads, slope, land cover, nighttime lights, and other data sets. LandScan 2001 has been developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient population risk.

  15. LandScan 2009 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-07-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" x 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on proximity to roads, slope, land cover, nighttime lights, and other data sets. LandScan 2001 has been developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient population risk.

  16. LandScan 2007 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-01-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" x 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on proximity to roads, slope, land cover, nighttime lights, and other data sets. LandScan 2001 has been developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient population risk.

  17. LandScan 2011 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-11-19

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" x 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on proximity to roads, slope, land cover, nighttime lights, and other data sets. LandScan 2001 has been developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient population risk.

  18. LandScan 2010 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" x 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on proximity to roads, slope, land cover, nighttime lights, and other data sets. LandScan 2001 has been developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient population risk.

  19. LandScan 2008 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-01-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" x 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on proximity to roads, slope, land cover, nighttime lights, and other data sets. LandScan 2001 has been developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient population risk.

  20. Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets. Final Subcontract Report, 15 October 2007 - 15 March 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lew, Debra

    2010-03-01

    This report describes the development of the necessary and needed wind and solar datasets used in the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS).

  1. Reinventing the Bureau of Land Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yager, J.O.; Muller, K.

    1995-12-01

    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has developed a {open_quotes}Blueprint for the Future{close_quotes} changing its organizational structure to better manage nearly 270 million acres of public lands and 540 million acres of subsurface mineral resources. Both efforts focus on ecosystem management and better business practices. The mission identified in the {open_quotes}Blueprint{close_quotes} is {open_quotes}to sustain the health, diversity and productivity of the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.{close_quotes} Within this mission goals include maintaining healthy ecosystems and improving customer service and business practices. In conjunction with the Blueprint, the BLM developed strategies to streamline its headquarters and field organizational structures and to accommodate an ecosystem management approach. The new headquarters structure uses flexible interdisciplinary work teams in place of the programmatic hierarchical approach. These teams may be established on either a permanent or temporary basis. For example, one team is responsible for reporting on the condition of the public lands as an essential part of maintaining healthy ecosystems. Although it is too early to judge the success of the BLM`s reinvention efforts, insights can be gained from a review of these efforts. One insight is that most people are so used to thinking about the public lands on a statute by statute, resource by resource, project by project basis, that is difficult for them to adjust to the ecosystem management or streamlining paradigms.

  2. A framework for benchmarking land models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yiqi; Randerson, J.; Abramowitz, G.; Bacour, C.; Blyth, E.; Carvalhais, N.; Ciais, Philippe; Dalmonech, D.; Fisher, J.B.; Fisher, R.; Friedlingstein, P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Hoffman, F. M.; Huntzinger, Deborah; Jones, C.; Koven, C.; Lawrence, David M.; Li, D.J.; Mahecha, M.; Niu, S.L.; Norby, Richard J.; Piao, S.L.; Qi, X.; Peylin, P.; Prentice, I.C.; Riley, William; Reichstein, M.; Schwalm, C.; Wang, Y.; Xia, J. Y.; Zaehle, S.; Zhou, X. H.

    2012-10-09

    Land models, which have been developed by the modeling community in the past few decades to predict future states of ecosystems and climate, have to be critically evaluated for their performance skills of simulating ecosystem responses and feedback to climate change. Benchmarking is an emerging procedure to measure performance of models against a set of defined standards. This paper proposes a benchmarking framework for evaluation of land model performances and, meanwhile, highlights major challenges at this infant stage of benchmark analysis. The framework includes (1) targeted aspects of model performance to be evaluated, (2) a set of benchmarks as defined references to test model performance, (3) metrics to measure and compare performance skills among models so as to identify model strengths and deficiencies, and (4) model improvement. Land models are required to simulate exchange of water, energy, carbon and sometimes other trace gases between the atmosphere and land surface, and should be evaluated for their simulations of biophysical processes, biogeochemical cycles, and vegetation dynamics in response to climate change across broad temporal and spatial scales. Thus, one major challenge is to select and define a limited number of benchmarks to effectively evaluate land model performance. The second challenge is to develop metrics of measuring mismatches between models and benchmarks. The metrics may include (1) a priori thresholds of acceptable model performance and (2) a scoring system to combine datamodel mismatches for various processes at different temporal and spatial scales. The benchmark analyses should identify clues of weak model performance to guide future development, thus enabling improved predictions of future states of ecosystems and climate. The near-future research effort should be on development of a set of widely acceptable benchmarks that can be used to objectively, effectively, and reliably evaluate fundamental properties of land models

  3. A framework for benchmarking land models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yiqi; Randerson, James T.; Hoffman, Forrest; Norby, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Land models, which have been developed by the modeling community in the past few decades to predict future states of ecosystems and climate, have to be critically evaluated for their performance skills of simulating ecosystem responses and feedback to climate change. Benchmarking is an emerging procedure to measure performance of models against a set of defined standards. This paper proposes a benchmarking framework for evaluation of land model performances and, meanwhile, highlights major challenges at this infant stage of benchmark analysis. The framework includes (1) targeted aspects of model performance to be evaluated, (2) a set of benchmarks as defined references to test model performance, (3) metrics to measure and compare performance skills among models so as to identify model strengths and deficiencies, and (4) model improvement. Land models are required to simulate exchange of water, energy, carbon and sometimes other trace gases between the atmosphere and land surface, and should be evaluated for their simulations of biophysical processes, biogeochemical cycles, and vegetation dynamics in response to climate change across broad temporal and spatial scales. Thus, one major challenge is to select and define a limited number of benchmarks to effectively evaluate land model performance. The second challenge is to develop metrics of measuring mismatches between models and benchmarks. The metrics may include (1) a priori thresholds of acceptable model performance and (2) a scoring system to combine data model mismatches for various processes at different temporal and spatial scales. The benchmark analyses should identify clues of weak model performance to guide future development, thus enabling improved predictions of future states of ecosystems and climate. The near-future research effort should be on development of a set of widely acceptable benchmarks that can be used to objectively, effectively, and reliably evaluate fundamental properties of land models

  4. Using MCDA and GIS for hazardous waste landfill siting considering land scarcity for waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feo, Giovanni De; Gisi, Sabino De

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Wasting land for the siting of hazardous waste landfills must be avoided. • The siting procedure is based on a land use map of potentially suitable areas. • All the waste facilities of the management system are simultaneously considered. • A case study is developed considering two multi-criteria techniques. • An innovative criteria weighting tool (PSW) is used in combination with the AHP. - Abstract: The main aim of this study was to develop a procedure that minimizes the wasting of space for the siting of hazardous waste landfills as part of a solid waste management system. We wanted to tackle the shortage of land for waste disposal that is a serious and growing problem in most large urban regions. The procedure combines a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) approach with a geographical information system (GIS). The GIS was utilised to obtain an initial screening in order to eliminate unsuitable areas, whereas the MCDA was developed to select the most suitable sites. The novelty of the proposed siting procedure is the introduction of a new screening phase before the macro-siting step aimed at producing a “land use map of potentially suitable areas” for the siting of solid waste facilities which simultaneously takes into consideration all plant types. The issue of obtaining sites evaluations of a specific facility was coupled with the issue of not wasting land appropriate to facilitate other types of waste management options. In the developed case study, the use of an innovative criteria weighting tool (the “Priority Scale”) in combination with the Analytic Hierarchy Process was useful to easier define the priorities of the evaluation criteria in comparison with other classic methods such as the Paired Comparison Technique in combination with the Simple Additive Weighting method.

  5. California State Lands Commission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lands Commission Jump to: navigation, search Logo: California State Lands Commission Name: California State Lands Commission Abbreviation: CSLC Address: 100 Howe Ave., Suite 100...

  6. Texas General Land Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Land Office Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Texas General Land Office Name: Texas General Land Office Address: 1700 Congress Ave Place: Austin, Texas Zip: 78701 Website:...

  7. IDRISI Land Change Modeler | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IDRISI Land Change Modeler Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IDRISI Land Change Modeler AgencyCompany Organization: Clark Labs Sector: Land Focus Area:...

  8. Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use Changes: 1850 to 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houghton, R.A.

    2001-02-22

    The database documented in this numeric data package, a revision to a database originally published by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) in 1995, consists of annual estimates, from 1850 through 1990, of the net flux of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere resulting from deliberate changes in land cover and land use, especially forest clearing for agriculture and the harvest of wood for wood products or energy. The data are provided on a year-by-year basis for nine regions (North America, South and Central America, Europe, North Africa and the Middle East, Tropical Africa, the Former Soviet Union, China, South and Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Developed Region) and the globe. Some data begin earlier than 1850 (e.g., for six regions, areas of different ecosystems are provided for the year 1700) or extend beyond 1990 (e.g., fuelwood harvest in South and Southeast Asia, by forest type, is provided through 1995). The global net flux during the period 1850 to 1990 was 124 Pg of carbon (1 petagram = 10{sup 15} grams). During this period, the greatest regional flux was from South and Southeast Asia (39 Pg of carbon), while the smallest regional flux was from North Africa and the Middle East (3 Pg of carbon). For the year 1990, the global total net flux was estimated to be 2.1 Pg of carbon.

  9. Geospatial Analysis of Renewable Energy Technical Potential on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doris, E.; Lopez, A.; Beckley, D.

    2013-02-01

    This technical report uses an established geospatial methodology to estimate the technical potential for renewable energy on tribal lands for the purpose of allowing Tribes to prioritize the development of renewable energy resources either for community scale on-tribal land use or for revenue generating electricity sales.

  10. Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (HI-SCALE) Science Plan (Program Document) | SciTech Connect Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) Science Plan Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) Science Plan Cumulus convection is an important component in the atmospheric radiation budget and hydrologic cycle over the Southern Great Plains and over many regions of the world, particularly during the

  11. Biogenic sulfur emissions in the SURE region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, D.F.; Farwell, S.O.; Robinson, E.; Pack, M.R.

    1980-09-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the magnitude of biogenic sulfur emissions from the northeastern United States - defined as the EPRI Sulfate Regional Experiment (SURE) study area. Initial laboratory efforts developed and validated a portable sulfur sampling system and a sensitive, gas chromatographic analytical detection system. Twenty-one separate sites were visited in 1977 to obtain a representative sulfur emission sampling of soil orders, suborders, and wetlands. The procedure determined the quantity of sulfur added to sulfur-free sweep air by the soil flux as the clean air was blown through the dynamic enclosure set over the selected sampling area. This study represents the first systematic sampling for biogenic sulfur over such a wide range of soils and such a large land area. The major impacts upon the measured sulfur flux were found to include soil orders, temperature, sunlight intensity, tidal effects along coastal areas. A mathematical model was developed for biogenic sulfur emissions which related these field variables to the mean seasonal and annual ambient temperatures regimes for each SURE grid and the percentage of each soil order within each grid. This model showed that at least 53,500 metric tons (MT) of biogenic sulfur are emitted from the SURE land surfaces and approximately 10,000 MT are emitted from the oceanic fraction of the SURE grids. This equates to a land sulfur flux of nearly 0.02 gram of sulfur per square meter per yr, or about 0.6% of the reported anthropogenic emissions withn the SURE study area. Based upon these data and the summertime Bermuda high clockwise circulation of maritime air across Florida and the Gulf Coast states northward through the SURE area, the total land biogenic sulfur emission contribution to the SURE area atmospheric sulfur burden might approach 1 to 2.5% of the anthropogenic.

  12. Renewable Energy Development on Federal Lands 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through presentations and panel discussions, attendees at this conference will have the opportunity to:

  13. AWEA Wind Energy Regional Summit: Northeast

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The AWEA Wind Energy Northeast Regional Summit will connect you with New England-area wind energy professionals and offers the opportunity to discuss significant issues related to land-based and...

  14. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.

    2002-04-16

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  15. EA-1915: Proposed Conveyance of Land at the Hanford Site, Richland,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Washington | Department of Energy 15: Proposed Conveyance of Land at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1915: Proposed Conveyance of Land at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary The EA assesses the potential environmental effects of conveying approximately 1,641 acres of Hanford Site land to the local economic development organization, the Tri-City Development Council (TRIDEC), a DOE-recognized Community Reuse Organization. TRIDEC has requested the transfer of land located

  16. Rich land Operations Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TG Department of Energy Rich land Operations Office P.O. Box 550 AES Richland, Washington 99352 CERTIFIED MAIL NOV~ 2 10 2009 Mr. Gerald Pollet Heart of America Northwest 1314 N.E. 5 6 th Street Suite 100 Seattle, Washington 98105 Dear Mr. Pollet: FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT REQUEST (FOI 2009-0054) The purpose of this letter is to inform you that we have withdrawn our response dated September 14, 2009, and have issued the following determination regarding item 8 of your request. In response to

  17. Rich land Operations Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rich land Operations Office P.O. Box 550 July 10, 2009 CERTIFIED MAIL Mr. Ryan Jarvis Heart of America Northwest 1314 N.E. 56h" Street Suite 100 Seattle, Washington 98105 Dear Mr. Jarvis: FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT REQUEST (FOI 2009-0054) Pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOJA), you requested the following information as stated below: 1. "The RCRA permit (both Parts A and B) for the mixed waste disposal trenches 31 and 34 located in the 200 West area of Hanford, including,

  18. Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaren, Joyce

    2011-04-01

    More than half of the electricity produced in the southeastern states is fuelled by coal. Although the region produces some coal, most of the states depend heavily on coal imports. Many of the region's aging coal power facilities are planned for retirement within the next 20 years. However, estimates indicate that a 20% increase in capacity is needed over that time to meet the rapidly growing demand. The most common incentives for energy efficiency in the Southeast are loans and rebates; however, total public spending on energy efficiency is limited. The most common state-level policies to support renewable energy development are personal and corporate tax incentives and loans. The region produced 1.8% of the electricity from renewable resources other than conventional hydroelectricity in 2009, half of the national average. There is significant potential for development of a biomass market in the region, as well as use of local wind, solar, methane-to-energy, small hydro, and combined heat and power resources. Options are offered for expanding and strengthening state-level policies such as decoupling, integrated resource planning, building codes, net metering, and interconnection standards to support further clean energy development. Benefits would include energy security, job creation, insurance against price fluctuations, increased value of marginal lands, and local and global environmental paybacks.

  19. Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaren, J.

    2011-04-01

    More than half of the electricity produced in the southeastern states is fuelled by coal. Although the region produces some coal, most of the states depend heavily on coal imports. Many of the region's aging coal power facilities are planned for retirement within the next 20 years. However, estimates indicate that a 20% increase in capacity is needed over that time to meet the rapidly growing demand. The most common incentives for energy efficiency in the Southeast are loans and rebates; however, total public spending on energy efficiency is limited. The most common state-level policies to support renewable energy development are personal and corporate tax incentives and loans. The region produced 1.8% of the electricity from renewable resources other than conventional hydroelectricity in 2009, half of the national average. There is significant potential for development of a biomass market in the region, as well as use of local wind, solar, methane-to-energy, small hydro, and combined heat and power resources. Options are offered for expanding and strengthening state-level policies such as decoupling, integrated resource planning, building codes, net metering, and interconnection standards to support further clean energy development. Benefits would include energy security, job creation, insurance against price fluctuations, increased value of marginal lands, and local and global environmental paybacks.

  20. Evaluating California local land use plan's environmental impact reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang Zhenghong Bright, Elise; Brody, Samuel

    2009-02-15

    Local land use planning has profound impacts on environmental quality; however, few empirical studies have been conducted to systematically measure local land use plans' environmental assessment quality and to identify the factors influencing it. This paper analyzes the quality of 40 Environmental Impact Reports (EIRs) of local jurisdictions' land use plans in California. A plan evaluation protocol defined by five core components and sixty-three indicators is developed to measure the quality of local land use plans' EIRs. The descriptive results indicate that the local jurisdictions produce relatively good quality on its EIRs, but there is still much room for improvement. There are large variations in the quality of EIRs across local jurisdictions. The regression results further highlight three major factors that can significantly influence local land use plan's EIR quality: number of planners, plan updating ability, and development pressure.

  1. From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES earth system modeling; climate change; land use Word Cloud More ...

  2. Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

    2012-03-28

    physics options in GWRF for global scale modeling in 2001 at a horizontal grid resolution of 1° x 1°. GU-WRF model output was evaluated using observational datasets from a variety of sources including surface based observations (NCDC and BSRN), model reanalysis (NCEP/ NCAR Reanalysis and CMAP), and remotely-sensed data (TRMM) to evaluate the ability of GU-WRF to simulate atmospheric variables at the surface as well as aloft. Explicit treatment of nanoparticles produced from new particle formation in GU-WRF/Chem-MADRID was achieved by expanding particle size sections from 8 to 12 to cover particles with the size range of 1.16 nm to 11.6m. Simulations with two different nucleation parameterizations were conducted for August 2002 over a global domain at a 4º by 5º horizontal resolution. The results are evaluated against field measurement data from the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Real Time Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as satellite and reanalysis data. We have also explored the relationship between clean marine aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses were carried out over 15 regions selected to be representative of different areas of the global ocean for the time period from June 2006 to April 2011. We show that for very low (less than 4 m s-1) and very high (more than 12 m s-1) wind speed conditions the mean CALIPSO-derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) has little dependency on the surface wind speed. For an intermediate (between 4 and 12 m s-1) marine AOD was linearly correlated with the surface wind speed values, with a slope of 0.0062 s m-1. Results of our study suggest that considerable improvements to both optical properties of marine aerosols and their production mechanisms can be

  3. Regulatory Considerations for Developing Generation Projects on Federal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lands | Department of Energy Generation Projects on Federal Lands Regulatory Considerations for Developing Generation Projects on Federal Lands Presentation covers regulatory considerations for developing generation projects on federal lands. Download the presentation on regulatory considerations for developing generation projects on federal lands. (309.17 KB) More Documents & Publications Coordinating Interstate ElectricTransmission Siting: An Introduction to the Debate Comments

  4. Utilizing CLASIC observations and multiscale models to study the impact of improved Land surface representation on modeling cloud- convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niyogi, Devdutta S.

    2013-06-07

    The CLASIC experiment was conducted over the US southern great plains (SGP) in June 2007 with an objective to lead an enhanced understanding of the cumulus convection particularly as it relates to land surface conditions. This project was design to help assist with understanding the overall improvement of land atmosphere convection initiation representation of which is important for global and regional models. The study helped address one of the critical documented deficiency in the models central to the ARM objectives for cumulus convection initiation and particularly under summer time conditions. This project was guided by the scientific question building on the CLASIC theme questions: What is the effect of improved land surface representation on the ability of coupled models to simulate cumulus and convection initiation? The focus was on the US Southern Great Plains region. Since the CLASIC period was anomalously wet the strategy has been to use other periods and domains to develop the comparative assessment for the CLASIC data period, and to understand the mechanisms of the anomalous wet conditions on the tropical systems and convection over land. The data periods include the IHOP 2002 field experiment that was over roughly same domain as the CLASIC in the SGP, and some of the DOE funded Ameriflux datasets.

  5. Idaho National Laboratory Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    No name listed on publication

    2011-08-01

    Land and facility use planning and decisions at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site are guided by a comprehensive site planning process in accordance with Department of Energy Policy 430.1, 'Land and Facility Use Policy,' that integrates mission, economic, ecologic, social, and cultural factors. The INL Ten-Year Site Plan, prepared in accordance with Department of Energy Order 430.1B, 'Real Property Asset Management,' outlines the vision and strategy to transform INL to deliver world-leading capabilities that will enable the Department of Energy to accomplish its mission. Land use planning is the overarching function within real property asset management that integrates the other functions of acquisition, recapitalization, maintenance, disposition, real property utilization, and long-term stewardship into a coordinated effort to ensure current and future mission needs are met. All land and facility use projects planned at the INL Site are considered through a formal planning process that supports the Ten-Year Site Plan. This Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report describes that process. The land use planning process identifies the current condition of existing land and facility assets and the scope of constraints across INL and in the surrounding region. Current land use conditions are included in the Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report and facility assets and scope of constraints are discussed in the Ten-Year Site Plan. This report also presents the past, present, and future uses of land at the INL Site that are considered during the planning process, as well as outlining the future of the INL Site for the 10, 30, and 100-year timeframes.

  6. Land Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Land Energy Place: North Yorkshire, United Kingdom Zip: YO62 5DQ Sector: Biomass, Renewable Energy Product: A renewable-energy company...

  7. Winning the Future: Navajo-Hopi Land Commission Leverages DOE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (PV) renewable energy project on the 22,000-acre Paragon-Bisti Solar Ranch in northwestern New Mexico. ... to develop renewable energy resources on our lands," said NHLCO ...

  8. Final Land Configuration for the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stegen, R. L.; Kapinos, J. M.; Wehner, J. P.; Snyder, B.; Davis, R. W.

    2006-07-01

    Closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) has been completed. The future land use of the site is designated as a National Wildlife Refuge. A joint effort between Kaiser-Hill, Department of Energy, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Environmental Protection Agency, State of Colorado, and other stakeholders was initiated to provide direction for developing the final land configuration. Through early identification of issues and developing mutually agreeable solutions, the final land configuration of the site was successfully completed. (authors)

  9. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant land management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    On October 30, 1992, the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act became law. This Act transferred the responsibility for the management of the WIPP Land Withdrawal Area (WILWA) from the Secretary of the Interior to the Secretary of Energy. In accordance with sections 3(a)(1) and (3) of the Act, these lands {open_quotes}{hor_ellipsis}are withdrawn from all forms of entry, appropriation, and disposal under the public land laws{hor_ellipsis}{close_quotes}and are reserved for the use of the Secretary of Energy {open_quotes}{hor_ellipsis}for the construction, experimentation, operation, repair and maintenance, disposal, shutdown, monitoring, decommissioning, and other activities, associated with the purposes of WIPP as set forth in the Department of Energy National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear Energy Act of 1980 and this Act.{close_quotes}. As a complement to this LMP, a MOU has been executed between the DOE and the BLM, as required by section 4(d) of the Act. The state of New Mexico was consulted in the development of the MOU and the associated Statement of Work (SOW).

  10. Land reclamation beautifies coal mines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coblentz, B.

    2009-07-15

    The article explains how the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiments station, MAFES, has helped prepare land exploited by strip mining at North American Coal Corporation's Red Hills Mine. The 5,800 acre lignite mine is over 200 ft deep and uncovers six layers of coal. About 100 acres of land a year is mined and reclaimed, mostly as pine plantations. 5 photos.

  11. A Subbasin-based framework to represent land surface processes in an Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesfa, Teklu K.; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Sun, Yu; Liu, Ying

    2014-05-20

    Realistically representing spatial heterogeneity and lateral land surface processes within and between modeling units in earth system models is important because of their implications to surface energy and water exchange. The traditional approach of using regular grids as computational units in land surface models and earth system models may lead to inadequate representation of lateral movements of water, energy and carbon fluxes, especially when the grid resolution increases. Here a new subbasin-based framework is introduced in the Community Land Model (CLM), which is the land component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Local processes are represented assuming each subbasin as a grid cell on a pseudo grid matrix with no significant modifications to the existing CLM modeling structure. Lateral routing of water within and between subbasins is simulated with the subbasin version of a recently-developed physically based routing model, Model for Scale Adaptive River Routing (MOSART). As an illustration, this new framework is implemented in the topographically diverse region of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The modeling units (subbasins) are delineated from high-resolution Digital Elevation Model while atmospheric forcing and surface parameters are remapped from the corresponding high resolution datasets. The impacts of this representation on simulating hydrologic processes are explored by comparing it with the default (grid-based) CLM representation. In addition, the effects of DEM resolution on parameterizing topography and the subsequent effects on runoff processes are investigated. Limited model evaluation and comparison showed that small difference between the averaged forcing can lead to more significant difference in the simulated runoff and streamflow because of nonlinear horizontal processes. Topographic indices derived from high resolution DEM may not improve the overall water balance, but affect the partitioning between surface and subsurface runoff

  12. Can land management and biomass utilization help mitigate global warming?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlamadinger, B.; Lauer, M.

    1996-12-31

    With rising concern about the increase of the CO{sub 2} concentration in the earth`s atmosphere there is considerable interest in various land-use based mitigation options, like afforestation of surplus agricultural land with or without subsequent harvest; improved forest management; strategies that rely on wood plantations managed in short rotation or agricultural crops with high yields to produce bioenergy, timber and other biomass products. In the first step of this study, the net carbon benefits of such strategies will be calculated per unit of land, i.e., per hectare, because it is assumed that land is the limiting resource for such strategies in the future, and thus, the benefits per unit land need to be optimized. For these calculations a computer model has been developed. The results take into account the time dependence of carbon storage in the biosphere and are shown graphically both for land and for plantation systems with constant output of biomass over time. In the second step, these results will be combined with data on available land for Austria. The potential contribution of each of the above strategies towards mitigating the Austrian CO{sub 2} emissions will be demonstrated. A comparison to other renewable mitigation options, like solar thermal or photovoltaics, will be drawn in terms of available land resources and overall CO{sub 2} reductions.

  13. Bioenergy and Land Use Change

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-07-26

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratoy has developed a new system dynamics global LUC model intended to examine LUC attributed to biofuel production. The model represents major global, stocks, flows and produces results under different food and biofuel demand assumptions, with flexible regional divisions. This model is not intended to generate precise numerical estimates, but instead to provide insights into the drivers and dynamic interactions of LUC, population, dietary choices, and biofuel policy.

  14. Land-Use Change Data Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review 4.1.2.40 Land-Use Change Data Analysis 03/25/2015 Analysis & Sustainability Nagendra Singh (PI) Keith Kline, Rebecca Efroymson, Raju Vatsavai, Huina Mao, Erica Pham, Budhendra Bhaduri. Oak Ridge National Laboratory This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 Presentation name Goal Statement Project Goal Design and develop scalable tools and assessment methods to establish scientific basis for

  15. Baselines For Land-Use Change In The Tropics: Application ToAvoided Deforestation Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Sandra; Hall, Myrna; Andrasko, Ken; Ruiz, Fernando; Marzoli, Walter; Guerrero, Gabriela; Masera, Omar; Dushku, Aaron; Dejong,Ben; Cornell, Joseph

    2007-06-01

    Although forest conservation activities particularly in thetropics offer significant potential for mitigating carbon emissions,these types of activities have faced obstacles in the policy arena causedby the difficulty in determining key elements of the project cycle,particularly the baseline. A baseline for forest conservation has twomain components: the projected land-use change and the correspondingcarbon stocks in the applicable pools such as vegetation, detritus,products and soil, with land-use change being the most difficult toaddress analytically. In this paper we focus on developing and comparingthree models, ranging from relatively simple extrapolations of pasttrends in land use based on simple drivers such as population growth tomore complex extrapolations of past trends using spatially explicitmodels of land-use change driven by biophysical and socioeconomicfactors. The three models of the latter category used in the analysis atregional scale are The Forest Area Change (FAC) model, the Land Use andCarbon Sequestration (LUCS) model, and the Geographical Modeling (GEOMOD)model. The models were used to project deforestation in six tropicalregions that featured different ecological and socioeconomic conditions,population dynamics, and uses of the land: (1) northern Belize; (2) SantaCruz State, Bolivia; (3) Parana State in Brazil; (4) Campeche, Mexico;(5) Chiapas, Mexico; and (6) Michoacan, Mexico. A comparison of all modeloutputs across all six regions shows that each model produced quitedifferent deforestation baseline. In general, the simplest FAC model,applied at the national administrative-unit scale, projected the highestamount of forest loss (four out of six) and the LUCS model the leastamount of loss (four out of five). Based on simulations of GEOMOD, wefound that readily observable physical and biological factors as well asdistance to areas of past disturbance were each about twice as importantas either sociological/demographic or economic

  16. File:03CAAStateLandLeasingProcessAndLandAccessROWs.pdf | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    03CAAStateLandLeasingProcessAndLandAccessROWs.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:03CAAStateLandLeasingProcessAndLandAccessROWs.pdf Size of...

  17. File:03-CO-b - ROW Process for State Land Board Land.pdf | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CO-b - ROW Process for State Land Board Land.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:03-CO-b - ROW Process for State Land Board Land.pdf Size of...

  18. File:03-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:03-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599...

  19. Analysis of Renewable Energy Potential on U. S. National Forest Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zvolanek, E.; Kuiper, J.; Carr, A.; Hlava, K.

    2013-12-13

    largest area of all the NFS units, with 900,637 acres. While more rigorous studies are needed for siting geothermal plants, especially those regarding the geological characteristics of specific sites, current results suggest a significant potential for geothermal power generation within many NFS units. The first phase of analysis for solar and wind resources sought to replicate the 2005 NREL methodology using updated source data.1 The total acres meeting the criteria for all NFS lands were lower in the updated assessment compared to the 2005 NREL analysis because the earlier assessment included all land that fell within NFS administrative boundaries rather than only NFS-managed land within them. Acreages were again lower when refined screening factors were added, as would be expected. These remaining areas are of greater interest because they adhere to a broader set of criteria. As this study illustrates, GIS data availability for renewable energy resources and major screening factors has reached a point where national screening level studies can effectively assess the levels and spatial distributions for potentially renewable energy technology development. More detailed siting studies, land use planning, and environmental compliance assessments are essential before individual projects can be permitted and built. However, this study can serve to inform resource managers and planners of where these technologies are most likely to be investigated and proposed; help prioritize efforts to continue informed and sustainable development of renewable power generation within the United States; and help characterize the role of the USFS in this arena. The authors caution against using the areas reported in the results as a final and definitive estimate of suitability for these technologies. The analysis is most useful for determining locations that should be examined more fully, and for identifying regional and national trends.

  20. Sustainable bioenergy production from marginal lands in the US Midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelfand, Ilya; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Gross, Katherine L.; Robertson, G. P.

    2013-01-24

    Long-term measurements of global warming impact coupled with spatially explicit modeling suggests that both climate benefits and the production potential of cellulosic crops grown on marginal lands of the US North Central region are substantial but will be insufficient to meet long-term biofuel needs.

  1. Montana State Land Board | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Land Board Jump to: navigation, search Name: Montana State Land Board Place: Helena, Montana Website: dnrc.mt.govLandBoardStaff.as References: Webpage1 This article is a stub....

  2. Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GeothermalLand Use < Geothermal(Redirected from Land Use) Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT GeothermalLand Use Planning Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  3. EA-365 Centre Land Trading Limited | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Centre Land Trading Limited EA-365 Centre Land Trading Limited Order Authorizing Centre Land Trading Limited to export electric energy to Canada EA-365 Centre Land Trading Limited ...

  4. Colorado State Board of Land Commissioners Strategic Plan | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library Land Use Plan: Colorado State Board of Land Commissioners Strategic Plan Abstract The Colorado State Board of Land Commissioners (State Land Board)...

  5. Aerosol Indirect Effect on the Grid-scale Clouds in the Two-way Coupled WRF-CMAQ: Model Description, Development, Evaluation and Regional Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Shaocai; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Wong, David; Gilliam, R.; Alapaty, Kiran; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong

    2014-10-24

    This study implemented first, second and glaciations aerosol indirect effects (AIE) on resolved clouds in the two-way coupled WRF-CMAQ modeling system by including parameterizations for both cloud drop and ice number concentrations on the basis of CMAQpredicted aerosol distributions and WRF meteorological conditions. The performance of the newly-developed WRF-CMAQ model, with alternate CAM and RRTMG radiation schemes, was evaluated with the observations from the CERES satellite and surface monitoring networks (AQS, IMPROVE, CASTNet, STN, and PRISM) over the continental U.S. (CONUS) (12-km resolution) and eastern Texas (4-km resolution) during August and September of 2006. The results at the AQS surface sites show that in August, the NMB values for PM2.5 over the eastern/western U.S (EUS/WUS) and western U.S. (WUS) are 5.3% (?0.1%) and 0.4% (-5.2%) for WRF-CMAQ/CAM (WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG), respectively. The evaluation of PM2.5 chemical composition reveals that in August, WRF-CMAQ/CAM (WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG) consistently underestimated the observed SO4 2? by -23.0% (-27.7%), -12.5% (-18.9%) and -7.9% (-14.8%) over the EUS at the CASTNet, IMPROVE and STN sites, respectively. Both models (WRF-CMAQ/CAM, WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG) overestimated the observed mean OC, EC and TC concentrations over the EUS in August at the IMPROVE sites. Both models generally underestimated the cloud field (SWCF) over the CONUS in August due to the fact that the AIE on the subgrid convective clouds was not considered when the model simulations were run at the 12 km resolution. This is in agreement with the fact that both models captured SWCF and LWCF very well for the 4-km simulation over the eastern Texas when all clouds were resolved by the finer domain. Both models generally overestimated the observed precipitation by more than 40% mainly because of significant overestimation in the southern part of the CONUS in August. The simulations of WRF-CMAQ/CAM and WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG show dramatic improvements for SWCF, LWCF

  6. Arizona State Land Department | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Department Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Arizona State Land Department Name: Arizona State Land Department Abbreviation: ASLD Address: 1616 W. Adams St. Place: Phoenix, AZ Zip:...

  7. State Land Commission FAQ | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Land Commission FAQ Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: State Land Commission FAQ Abstract Frequently Asked Questions, California State...

  8. Quantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG Emissions Quantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG Emissions ...

  9. Elektra Basel Land EBL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basel Land EBL Jump to: navigation, search Name: Elektra Basel Land (EBL) Place: Liestal, Switzerland Zip: 4410 Product: Swiss utility with a possible investment interest in...

  10. Energy Corridors on Federal Lands

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    To improve energy delivery and enhance the electric transmission grid for the future, several government agencies currently are working together to establish a coordinated network of Federal energy corridors on Federal lands throughout the United States.

  11. Penobscot Indian Nation's Strategic Energy Planning Efficiency on tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sockalexis, Mike; Fields, Brenda

    2006-11-30

    The energy grant provided the resources to evaluate the wind, hydro, biomass, geothermal and solar resource potential on all Penobscot Indian Naiton's Tribal lands. The two objectives address potential renewable energy resources available on tribal lands and energy efficiency measures to be taken after comprehensive energy audits of commercial facilities. Also, a Long Term Strategic Energy Plan was developed along with a plan to reduce high energy costs.

  12. RE-Powering America's Land Mapper | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mapper RE-Powering America's Land Mapper The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) RE-Powering Mapper, a series of Google Earth files, makes it possible to view EPA's information about renewable energy potential on contaminated lands, landfills, and mine sites, alongside other information contained in Google Earth. This tool screens more than 66,000 EPA- and state-tracked sites, comprising over 35 million acres. Using screening criteria developed in collaboration with the U.S. Department of

  13. Tribal Lands Student Internship Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lands Student Internship Program Sandia National Laboratories National Renewable Energy Laboratories Department of Energy The Navajo Tribal Utility Authority 2003 Tribal Lands Program Interns * Shaun Tsabetsaye - Zuni - University of New Mexico - Electrical Engineering * Velissa Sandoval - Navajo/Zuni - University of Denver - Electrical Engineering * Keith Candelaria - Jemez/San Felipe - Dartmouth College - Environmental/Earth Science Several research methods used to understanding NTUA's O&M

  14. BPA Land Records PIA

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Enhanced with Improved Models for Cladding and Coolant Channels BISON Enhanced with Improved Models for Cladding and Coolant Channels January 29, 2013 - 10:54am Addthis Pin-scale Code Development Development of BISON for the engineering-scale simulation of nuclear fuel performance continued. Enhancements during this quarter include implementation of a nonlinear material model for Zircaloy cladding that simultaneously combines the phenomena of plasticity, thermal creep,

  15. Reclamation planning for abandoned mining subsidence lands in eastern China --- A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhenqi Hu; Hehe Gu

    1995-09-01

    China has a long history of coal mining and more than 96% of coal output is taken from underground mines each year. With the excavation of coal from underground, severe subsidence often results, which produces many subsidence lands. Since the Chinese government enacted a reclamation stipulation in 1989, many abandoned mining subsidence lands were produced before 1989. Therefore, reclamation of abandoned subsidence lands has become the focus of research activities in our country. This paper explores the principle and methods of reclamation planning for abandoned mining subsidence lands and presents a case study in eastern China. A 373 ha of abandoned mining subsidence land in Anhui province was selected as an experiment site. Since China is a developing country and land shortage is severe in this area, the high economic benefits from the reclaimed land was the final reclamation goal. Based on the topography of subsidence lands --- some parts of the abandoned lands were wetland or lake-like troughs, restoring farmlands and fishponds were chosen as post-reclamation land uses. The elevation of reclaimed lands was the key for restoring farmland successfully because of the high underground water level in this area, and the optimum fishpond size and side-slope design were the keys to reach high reclamation income. The HDP (Hydraulic Dredge Pump) reclamation technique was used for restoring farmland and creating fishpond. A farming and aquaculture plan for high economic benefits was also designed. This project will make farmers, who own the lands, richer through reclamation.

  16. Long Range Development Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scientific missions. Science drives the Lab's development. LRDPs establish a framework of land-use principles and policies to guide future growth and change through 2025. The plan...

  17. Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) program overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) enacted in 1984 required the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to evaluate all listed and characteristic hazardous wastes according to a strict schedule and to develop requirements by which disposal of these wastes would be protective of human health and the environment. The implementing regulations for accomplishing this statutory requirement are established within the Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) program. The LDR regulations (40 CFR Part 268) impose significant requirements on waste management operations and environmental restoration activities at DOE sites. For hazardous wastes restricted by statute from land disposal, EPA is required to set levels or methods of treatment that substantially reduce the waste`s toxicity or the likelihood that the waste`s hazardous constituents will migrate. Upon the specified LDR effective dates, restricted wastes that do not meet treatment standards are prohibited from land disposal unless they qualify for certain variances or exemptions. This document provides an overview of the LDR Program.

  18. NREL: Geothermal Technologies - U.S. Bureau of Land Management Looks to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL for Geothermal Technical Support U.S. Bureau of Land Management Looks to NREL for Geothermal Technical Support March 2, 2016 The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has entered into an interagency agreement with the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to provide technical support and assistance in the development of renewable energy from geothermal resources on public lands. This agreement represents an expansion of NREL's existing and developing

  19. Assessment of model estimates of land-atmosphere CO2 exchange across Northern Eurasia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rawlins, M. A.; McGuire, A. D.; Kimball, J. S.; Dass, P.; Lawrence, D.; Burke, E.; Chen, X.; Delire, C.; Koven, C.; MacDougall, A.; et al

    2015-07-28

    A warming climate is altering land-atmosphere exchanges of carbon, with a potential for increased vegetation productivity as well as the mobilization of permafrost soil carbon stores. Here we investigate land-atmosphere carbon dioxide (CO2) cycling through analysis of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) and its component fluxes of gross primary productivity (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) and soil carbon residence time, simulated by a set of land surface models (LSMs) over a region spanning the drainage basin of Northern Eurasia. The retrospective simulations cover the period 1960–2009 at 0.5° resolution, which is a scale common among many global carbon and climate modelmore » simulations. Model performance benchmarks were drawn from comparisons against both observed CO2 fluxes derived from site-based eddy covariance measurements as well as regional-scale GPP estimates based on satellite remote-sensing data. The site-based comparisons depict a tendency for overestimates in GPP and ER for several of the models, particularly at the two sites to the south. For several models the spatial pattern in GPP explains less than half the variance in the MODIS MOD17 GPP product. Across the models NEP increases by as little as 0.01 to as much as 0.79 g C m⁻² yr⁻², equivalent to 3 to 340 % of the respective model means, over the analysis period. For the multimodel average the increase is 135 % of the mean from the first to last 10 years of record (1960–1969 vs. 2000–2009), with a weakening CO2 sink over the latter decades. Vegetation net primary productivity increased by 8 to 30 % from the first to last 10 years, contributing to soil carbon storage gains. The range in regional mean NEP among the group is twice the multimodel mean, indicative of the uncertainty in CO2 sink strength. The models simulate that inputs to the soil carbon pool exceeded losses, resulting in a net soil carbon gain amid a decrease in residence time. Our analysis points to improvements in

  20. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Land use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6. Land use 6.1. Total land use, land use change, and forests This chapter presents estimates of carbon sequestration (removal from the atmosphere) and emissions (release into the atmosphere) from forests, croplands, grasslands, and residential areas (urban trees, grass clippings, and food scraps) in the United States. In 2008, land use, land use change, and forests were responsible for estimated net carbon sequestration of 940 MMTCO2e (Table 31), representing 16 percent of total U.S. CO2

  1. Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also...

  2. US Fish and Wildlife Service lands biomonitoring operations manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rope, R.C.; Breckenridge, R.P.

    1993-08-01

    This is Volume 1 of an operations manual designed to facilitate the development of biomonitoring strategies for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands. It is one component of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands Biomonitoring Operations Manual. The Volume contains the Introduction to the Manual, background information on monitoring, and procedures for developing a biomonitoring strategy for Service lands. The purpose of the Biomonitoring Operations Manual is to provide an approach to develop and implement biomonitoring activities to assess the status and trends of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service trust resources. It also provides field sampline methods and documentation protocols for contaminant monitoring activities. The strategy described in the Manual has been designed as a stand alone process to characterize the presence of contaminants on lands managed by the Service. This process can be sued to develop a monitoring program for any tract of real estate with potential threats from on- or off-site contaminants. Because the process was designed to address concerns for Service lands that span the United States from Alaska to the Tropical Islands, it has a generic format that can be used in al types of ecosystems, however, significant site specific informtion is required to complete the Workbook and make the process work successfully.

  3. A Physically Based Runoff Routing Model for Land Surface and Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hongyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Wu, Huan; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-06-13

    A new physically based runoff routing model, called the Model for Scale Adaptive River Transport (MOSART), has been developed to be applicable across local, regional, and global scales. Within each spatial unit, surface runoff is first routed across hillslopes and then discharged along with subsurface runoff into a tributary subnetwork before entering the main channel. The spatial units are thus linked via routing through the main channel network, which is constructed in a scale-consistent way across different spatial resolutions. All model parameters are physically based, and only a small subset requires calibration.MOSART has been applied to the Columbia River basin at 1/ 168, 1/ 88, 1/ 48, and 1/ 28 spatial resolutions and was evaluated using naturalized or observed streamflow at a number of gauge stations. MOSART is compared to two other routing models widely used with land surface models, the River Transport Model (RTM) in the Community Land Model (CLM) and the Lohmann routing model, included as a postprocessor in the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model package, yielding consistent performance at multiple resolutions. MOSART is further evaluated using the channel velocities derived from field measurements or a hydraulic model at various locations and is shown to be capable of producing the seasonal variation and magnitude of channel velocities reasonably well at different resolutions. Moreover, the impacts of spatial resolution on model simulations are systematically examined at local and regional scales. Finally, the limitations ofMOSART and future directions for improvements are discussed.

  4. Region Overview

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Power Plants: 1,858 (30% total U.S.) Coal-fired: 167 (30% total U.S.) Petroleum-fired: ... leading cause of natural gas processing plant disruptions in the East Coast Region from ...

  5. Region Overview

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Power Plants: 666 (11% total U.S.) Coal-fired: 46 (8% total U.S.) Petroleum-fired: 39 ... leading cause of natural gas processing plant disruptions in the Gulf Coast Region from ...

  6. Region Overview

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Power Plants: 429 (8% total U.S.) Coal-fired: 46 (8% total U.S.) Petroleum-fired: 26 ... leading cause of natural gas processing plant disruptions in the Rocky Mountain Region ...

  7. Region Overview

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Power Plants: 2,006 (30% total U.S.) Coal-fired: 274 (49% total U.S.) Petroleum-fired: ... leading cause of natural gas processing plant disruptions in the Midwest region from ...

  8. Region Overview

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Power Plants: 1,407 (24% total U.S.) Coal-fired: 24 (4% total U.S.) Petroleum-fired: 131 ... leading cause of natural gas processing plant disruptions in the West Coast Region's ...

  9. Bureau of Land Management - Table 1.4-1 - Land Use Planning Process...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Instructions: Bureau of Land Management - Table 1.4-1 - Land Use Planning Process StepsPermittingRegulatory...

  10. Harmonization of Land-Use Scenarios for the Period 1500-2100: 600 Years of Global Gridded Annual Land-Use Transitions, Wood Harvest, and Resulting Secondary Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurtt, George; Chini, Louise Parsons; Frolking, Steve; Betts, Richard; Feddema, Johannes; Fischer, Gavin M.; Fisk, J.P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Houghton, R. A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Jones, C.; Kindermann, G.; Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Goldeweijk, Kees K.; Riahi, Keywan; Shevliakova, Elena; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, P.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wang, Y.

    2011-08-08

    In preparation for the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international community is developing new advanced Earth System Models (ESM) to assess the combined effects of human activities (e.g. land use and fossil fuel emissions) on the carbon-climate system. In addition, four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios of the future (2005-2100) are being provided by four Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) teams to be used as input to the ESMs for future carbon-climate projections (Moss et al., 2010). The diversity of approaches and requirements among IAMs and ESMs for tracking land-use change, along with the dependence of model projections on land-use history, presents a challenge for effectively passing data between these communities and for smoothly transitioning from the historical estimates to future projections. Here, a harmonized set of land-use scenarios are presented that smoothly connects historical reconstructions of land use with future projections, in the format required by ESMs.