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1

Land reform, regional planning and socioeconomic development in Brazil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

baseline study of PCT settings 96 4.1 Introduction 96 4.2 Access to land under the Land Bill Programme 99 4.3 Agriculture and livestock production on PCT settlements 111 4.4 The standard of living of PCT beneficiaries 119 4.5 The surveyed sites vis... of governance for plan-led land reform 145 Figure 5.3: An illustrative diagram for the regional planning cycle 180 10 ABBREVIATIONS CONTAG National Confederation of Agricultural Workers FUNDEB Basic Education Fund HDI...

Souza, Saulo

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

2

Wind Development on Tribal Lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

3

Ecosystem feedbacks to climate change in California: Development, testing, and analysis using a coupled regional atmosphere and land-surface model (WRF3-CLM3.5)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A regional atmosphere model [Weather Research and Forecasting model version 3 (WRF3)] and a land surface model [Community Land Model, version 3.5 (CLM3.5)] were coupled to study the interactions between the atmosphere and possible future California land-cover changes. The impact was evaluated on California's climate of changes in natural vegetation under climate change and of intentional afforestation. The ability of WRF3 to simulate California's climate was assessed by comparing simulations by WRF3-CLM3.5 and WRF3-Noah to observations from 1982 to 1991. Using WRF3-CLM3.5, the authors performed six 13-yr experiments using historical and future large-scale climate boundary conditions from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The land-cover scenarios included historical and future natural vegetation from the Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System-Century 1 (MC1) dynamic vegetation model, in addition to a future 8-million-ha California afforestation scenario. Natural vegetation changes alone caused summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature changes of -0.7 to +1 C in regions without persistent snow cover, depending on the location and the type of vegetation change. Vegetation temperature changes were much larger than the 2-m air temperature changes because of the finescale spatial heterogeneity of the imposed vegetation change. Up to 30% of the magnitude of the summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature increase and 70% of the magnitude of the 1600 local time (LT) vegetation temperature increase projected under future climate change were attributable to the climate-driven shift in land cover. The authors projected that afforestation could cause local 0.2-1.2 C reductions in summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature and 2.0-3.7 C reductions in 1600 LT vegetation temperature for snow-free regions, primarily because of increased evapotranspiration. Because some of these temperature changes are of comparable magnitude to those projected under climate change this century, projections of climate and vegetation change in this region need to consider these climate-vegetation interactions.

Subin, Z.M.; Riley, W.J.; Kueppers, L.M.; Jin, J.; Christianson, D.S.; Torn, M.S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

21 Sustainable Land Management and Global Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

427 21 Sustainable Land Management and Global Development: Factors Affecting Land Users' Efforts for Sustainable Development: Foundations, Experiences, and Perspectives 428 North-South perspectives 21 the concept of sustainable develop- ment and a clearer focus on operational implications, Hurni and colleagues

Richner, Heinz

5

Land Information Systems in Developing Countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

development. Afrika-Studiesentrum, Lieden: Andersson, Sune (1986). Cadastre as a Base for Land Information-378. Andersson, Sune (1988). Examples and Lessons in LIS. International Federation of Surveyors- FIG Land Information System Workshop. Bali, Indonesia: FIG. 253-256. Andersson, Sune (1988). Problems and Issues

California at Santa Barbara, University of

6

Development of High Resolution Land Surface Parameters for the Community Land Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a growing need for high-resolution land surface parameters as land surface models are being applied at increasingly higher spatial resolution offline as well as in regional and global models. The default land surface parameters for the most recent version of the Community Land Model (i.e. CLM 4.0) are at 0.5° or coarser resolutions, released with the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Plant Functional Types (PFTs), vegetation properties such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), Stem Area Index (SAI), and non-vegetated land covers were developed using remotely sensed datasets retrieved in late 1990’s and the beginning of this century. In this study, we developed new land surface parameters for CLM 4.0, specifically PFTs, LAI, SAI and non-vegetated land cover composition, at 0.05° resolution globally based on the most recent MODIS land cover and improved MODIS LAI products. Compared to the current CLM 4.0 parameters, the new parameters produced a decreased coverage by bare soil and trees, but an increased coverage by shrub, grass, and cropland. The new parameters result in a decrease in global seasonal LAI, with the biggest decrease in boreal forests; however, the new parameters also show a large increase in LAI in tropical forest. Differences between the new and the current parameters are mainly caused by changes in the sources of remotely sensed data and the representation of land cover in the source data. Advantages and disadvantages of each dataset were discussed in order to provide guidance on the use of the data. The new high-resolution land surface parameters have been used in a coupled land-atmosphere model (WRF-CLM) applied to the western U.S. to demonstrate their use in high-resolution modeling. A remapping method from the latitude/longitude grid of the CLM data to the WRF grids with map projection was also demonstrated. Future work will include global offline CLM simulations to examine the impacts of source data resolution and subsequent land parameter changes on simulated land surface processes.

Ke, Yinghai; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Coleman, Andre M.; Li, Hongyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

7

Bureau of Land Management Oil Shale Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bureau of Land Management Oil Shale Development Unconventional Fuels Conference University of Utah May 17, 2011 #12;#12;Domestic Oil Shale Resources Primary oil shale resources in the U.S. are in the Green River Formation in Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. 72 % of this oil shale resource is on Federal

Utah, University of

8

Regional patterns of agricultural land use and deforestation in Colombia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional patterns of agricultural land use and deforestation in Colombia Andre´s Etter a, Australia c Facultad de Estudios Ambientales y Rurales, Universidad Javeriana, Bogota´, Colombia Received 14, including Colombia. However, the location and extent of deforestation and associated ecological impacts

Queensland, University of

9

Regional Development Authorities (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation authorizes the establishment of local development authorities in Indiana. A development authority established under this law may acquire, construct, equip, own, lease, and finance...

10

Simulated watershed responses to land cover changes using the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulated watershed responses to land cover changes using the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation Old Main Hill, Logan, UT, 84322-8200, USA Abstract: In this work, we used the Regional Hydro

Tarboton, David

11

Sustainable Development and Land Use Committee Minutes of Meeting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Sustainable Development and Land Use Committee Minutes of Meeting 10 March 2008 7:00 p.m. - 9 will coordinate with a student the Sustainable Development Audit before Dr. Bardati leaves Bishop's University. Motion: Proceed with the Sustainable Development Audit in accordance with the CREPUQ guidelines. Proposed

12

Developing a Regional Recovery Framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract A biological attack would present an unprecedented challenge for local, state, and federal agencies; the military; the private sector; and individuals on many fronts ranging from vaccination and treatment to prioritization of cleanup actions to waste disposal. To prepare the Seattle region to recover from a biological attack, the Seattle Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) partners collaborated with military and federal agencies to develop a Regional Recovery Framework for a Biological Attack in the Seattle Urban Area. The goal was to reduce the time and resources required to recover and restore wide urban areas, military installations, and other critical infrastructure following a biological incident by providing a coordinated systems approach. Based on discussions in small workshops, tabletop exercises, and interviews with emergency response agency staff, the partners identified concepts of operation for various areas to address critical issues the region will face as recovery progresses. Key to this recovery is the recovery of the economy. Although the Framework is specific to a catastrophic, wide-area biological attack using anthrax, it was designed to be flexible and scalable so it could also serve as the recovery framework for an all-hazards approach. The Framework also served to coalesce policy questions that must be addressed for long-term recovery. These questions cover such areas as safety and health, security, financial management, waste management, legal issues, and economic development.

Lesperance, Ann M.; Olson, Jarrod; Stein, Steven L.; Clark, Rebecca; Kelly, Heather; Sheline, Jim; Tietje, Grant; Williamson, Mark; Woodcock, Jody

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Navajo-Hopi Land Commission Renewable Energy Development Project (NREP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO), a Navajo Nation executive branch agency has conducted activities to determine capacity-building, institution-building, outreach and management activities to initiate the development of large-scale renewable energy - 100 megawatt (MW) or larger - generating projects on land in Northwestern New Mexico in the first year of a multi-year program. The Navajo Hopi Land Commission Renewable Energy Development Project (NREP) is a one year program that will develop and market a strategic business plan; form multi-agency and public-private project partnerships; compile site-specific solar, wind and infrastructure data; and develop and use project communication and marketing tools to support outreach efforts targeting the public, vendors, investors and government audiences.

Thomas Benally, Deputy Director,

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Land and Water Developments (Newfoundland and Labrador)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This policy applies to public water supply areas designated by the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. The policy limits development in public water supply areas unless they meet specific...

15

Land conversion in Amazonia and Northern South America : influences on regional hydrology and ecosystem response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A numerical model of the terrestrial biosphere (Ecosystem Demography Model) is compbined with an atmospheric model (Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) to investigate how land conversion in the Amazon and ...

Knox, Ryan Gary

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Exploration and Development of Oil and Gas on School and Public Lands (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute authorizes the Board of School Lands and Funds to lease school and public lands under its jurisdiction for oil and gas exploration and development purposes.

17

Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii)....

18

Networked Systems for Developing Regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the Bottom of the Pyramid !! Amartya Sen: Development as Freedom !! Paul Collier: The Bottom Billion

Subramanian, Lakshminarayanan

19

Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a CoupledLand Surface Mesoscale Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The land surface has been shown to form strong feedbacks with climate due to linkages between atmospheric conditions and terrestrial ecosystem exchanges of energy, momentum, water, and trace gases. Although often ignored in modeling studies, land management itself may form significant feedbacks. Because crops are harvested earlier under drier conditions, regional air temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture, for example, affect harvest timing, particularly of rain-fed crops. This removal of vegetation alters the land surface characteristics and may, in turn, affect regional climate. We applied a coupled climate(MM5) and land-surface (LSM1) model to examine the effects of early and late winter wheat harvest on regional climate in the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility in the Southern Great Plains, where winter wheat accounts for 20 percent of the land area. Within the winter wheat region, simulated 2 m air temperature was 1.3 C warmer in the Early Harvest scenario at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Soils in the harvested area were drier and warmer in the top 10 cm and wetter in the 10-20 cm layer. Midday soils were 2.5 C warmer in the harvested area at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Harvest also dramatically altered latent and sensible heat fluxes. Although differences between scenarios diminished once both scenarios were harvested, the short-term impacts of land management on climate were comparable to those from land cover change demonstrated in other studies.

Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Tree Biomass Estimates on Forest Land in California's North Coast Region1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tree Biomass Estimates on Forest Land in California's North Coast Region1 Tian-Ting Shih2 Tree biomass is one essential component in a forest ecosystem and is getting more attention nowadays due to its sequestration, energy production, and other natural and social resources uses and impacts. A biomass estimator

Standiford, Richard B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Development Of Regional Climate Mitigation Baseline For A DominantAgro-Ecological Zone Of Karnataka, India  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Setting a baseline for carbon stock changes in forest andland use sector mitigation projects is an essential step for assessingadditionality of the project. There are two approaches for settingbaselines namely, project-specific and regional baseline. This paperpresents the methodology adopted for estimating the land available formitigation, for developing a regional baseline, transaction cost involvedand a comparison of project-specific and regional baseline. The studyshowed that it is possible to estimate the potential land and itssuitability for afforestation and reforestation mitigation projects,using existing maps and data, in the dry zone of Karnataka, southernIndia. The study adopted a three-step approach for developing a regionalbaseline, namely: i) identification of likely baseline options for landuse, ii) estimation of baseline rates of land-use change, and iii)quantification of baseline carbon profile over time. The analysis showedthat carbon stock estimates made for wastelands and fallow lands forproject-specific as well as the regional baseline are comparable. Theratio of wasteland Carbon stocks of a project to regional baseline is1.02, and that of fallow lands in the project to regional baseline is0.97. The cost of conducting field studies for determination of regionalbaseline is about a quarter of the cost of developing a project-specificbaseline on a per hectare basis. The study has shown the reliability,feasibility and cost-effectiveness of adopting regional baseline forforestry sectormitigation projects.

Sudha, P.; Shubhashree, D.; Khan, H.; Hedge, G.T.; Murthy, I.K.; Shreedhara, V.; Ravindranath, N.H.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Western Region Renewable Energy Markets: Implications for the Bureau of Land Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to provide the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) with an overview of renewable energy (RE) generation markets, transmission planning efforts, and the ongoing role of the BLM RE projects in the electricity markets of the 11 states (Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming) that comprise the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Region. This analysis focuses on the status of, and projections for, likely development of non-hydroelectric renewable electricity from solar (including photovoltaic [PV] and concentrating solar power [CSP]), wind, biomass and geothermal resources in these states. Absent new policy drivers and without the extension of the DOE loan guarantee program and Treasury's 1603 program, state RPS requirements are likely to remain a primary driver for new RE deployment in the western United States. Assuming no additional policy incentives are implemented, projected RE demand for the WECC states by 2020 is 134,000 GWh. Installed capacity to meet that demand will need to be within the range of 28,000-46,000 MW.

Haase, S.; Billman, L.; Gelman, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Irrigation cooling effect: Regional climate forcing by land-use change Lara M. Kueppers,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of temperature. The potentially confounding impact of land-cover and land- use change on trends in temperature signal caused by greenhouse gas increases. Citation: Kueppers, L.M., M. A. Snyder, and L. C. Sloan (2007-use change are known to alter local, regional and global climate. For example, conversion of natural vegeta

Kueppers, Lara M.

24

ENHANCEMENT OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SINKS THROUGH RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINE LANDS IN THE APPALACHIAN REGION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S.D.I. Office of Surface Mining (OSM) estimates that there are approximately 1 million acres of abandoned mine land (AML) in the Appalachian region. AML lands are classified as areas that were inadequately reclaimed or were left unreclaimed prior to the passage of the 1977 Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and where no federal or state laws require any further reclamation responsibility to any company or individual. Reclamation and afforestation of these sites have the potential to provide landowners with cyclical timber revenues, generate environmental benefits to surrounding communities, and sequester carbon in the terrestrial ecosystem. Through a memorandum of understanding, the OSM and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have decided to investigate reclaiming and afforesting these lands for the purpose of mitigating the negative effects of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This study determined the carbon sequestration potential of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), one of the major reclamation as well as commercial species, planted on West Virginia AML sites. Analyses were conducted to (1) calculate the total number of tons that can be stored, (2) determine the cost per ton to store carbon, and (3) calculate the profitability of managing these forests for timber production alone and for timber production and carbon storage together. The Forest Management Optimizer (FORMOP) was used to simulate growth data on diameter, height, and volume for northern red oak. Variables used in this study included site indices ranging from 40 to 80 (base age 50), thinning frequencies of 0, 1, and 2, thinning percentages of 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40, and a maximum rotation length of 100 years. Real alternative rates of return (ARR) ranging from 0.5% to 12.5% were chosen for the economic analyses. A total of 769,248 thinning and harvesting combinations, net present worths, and soil expectation values were calculated in this study. Results indicate that the cost per ton to sequester carbon ranges from $6.54 on site index 80 land at a 12.5% ARR to $36.68 on site index 40 land at an ARR of 0.5%. Results also indicate that the amount of carbon stored during one rotation ranges between 38 tons per acre on site index 40 land to 58 tons per acre on site index 80 land. The profitability of afforestation on these AML sites in West Virginia increases as the market price for carbon increases from $0 to $100 per ton.

Gary D. Kronrad

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Soil Carbon Change and Net Energy Associated with Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: A Regional Modeling Perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of marginal lands (MLs) for biofuel production has been contemplated as a promising solution for meeting biofuel demands. However, there have been concerns with spatial location of MLs, their inherent biofuel potential, and possible environmental consequences with the cultivation of energy crops. Here, we developed a new quantitative approach that integrates high-resolution land cover and land productivity maps and uses conditional probability density functions for analyzing land use patterns as a function of land productivity to classify the agricultural lands. We subsequently applied this method to determine available productive croplands (P-CLs) and non-crop marginal lands (NC-MLs) in a nine-county Southern Michigan. Furthermore, Spatially Explicit Integrated Modeling Framework (SEIMF) using EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) was used to understand the net energy (NE) and soil organic carbon (SOC) implications of cultivating different annual and perennial production systems.

Bandaru, Varaprasad; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Link, Robert P.; Zhang, Xuesong; Post, W. M.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Land reform and economic development : case study on Romania  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Few social arrangements have affected so many people for so long in human history, as the laws and customs governing the ownership and use of land. Taking Romania as a case study, this thesis focuses on the institutional ...

Vidican Sgouridis, Georgeta.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

LANDS WITH WILDERNESS CHARACTERISTICS, RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN CONSTRAINTS, AND LAND EXCHANGES: CROSS-JURISDICTIONAL MANAGEMENT AND IMPACTS ON UNCONVENTIONAL FUEL DEVELOPMENT IN UTAH’S UINTA BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utah is rich in oil shale and oil sands resources. Chief among the challenges facing prospective unconventional fuel developers is the ability to access these resources. Access is heavily dependent upon land ownership and applicable management requirements. Understanding constraints on resource access and the prospect of consolidating resource holdings across a fragmented management landscape is critical to understanding the role Utah’s unconventional fuel resources may play in our nation’s energy policy. This Topical Report explains the historic roots of the “crazy quilt” of western land ownership, how current controversies over management of federal public land with wilderness character could impact access to unconventional fuels resources, and how land exchanges could improve management efficiency. Upon admission to the Union, the State of Utah received the right to title to more than one-ninth of all land within the newly formed state. This land is held in trust to support public schools and institutions, and is managed to generate revenue for trust beneficiaries. State trust lands are scattered across the state in mostly discontinuous 640-acre parcels, many of which are surrounded by federal land and too small to develop on their own. Where state trust lands are developable but surrounded by federal land, federal land management objectives can complicate state trust land development. The difficulty generating revenue from state trust lands can frustrate state and local government officials as well as citizens advocating for economic development. Likewise, the prospect of industrial development of inholdings within prized conservation landscapes creates management challenges for federal agencies. One major tension involves whether certain federal public lands possess wilderness character, and if so, whether management of those lands should emphasize wilderness values over other uses. On December 22, 2010, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar issued Secretarial Order 3310, Protecting Wilderness Characteristics on Lands Managed by the Bureau of Land Management. Supporters argue that the Order merely provides guidance regarding implementation of existing legal obligations without creating new rights or duties. Opponents describe Order 3310 as subverting congressional authority to designate Wilderness Areas and as closing millions of acres of public lands to energy development and commodity production. While opponents succeeded in temporarily defunding the Order’s implementation and forcing the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to adopt a more collaborative approach, the fundamental questions remain: Which federal public lands possess wilderness characteristics and how should those lands be managed? The closely related question is: How might management of such resources impact unconventional fuel development within Utah? These questions remain pressing independent of the Order because the BLM, which manages the majority of federal land in Utah, is statutorily obligated to maintain an up-to-date inventory of federal public lands and the resources they contain, including lands with wilderness characteristics. The BLM is also legally obligated to develop and periodically update land use plans, relying on information obtained in its public lands inventory. The BLM cannot sidestep these hard choices, and failure to consider wilderness characteristics during the planning process will derail the planning effort. Based on an analysis of the most recent inventory data, lands with wilderness characteristics — whether already subject to mandatory protection under the Wilderness Act, subject to discretionary protections as part of BLM Resource Management Plan revisions, or potentially subject to new protections under Order 3310 — are unlikely to profoundly impact oil shale development within Utah’s Uinta Basin. Lands with wilderness characteristics are likely to v have a greater impact on oil sands resources, particularly those resources found in the southern part of the state. Management requirements independent of l

Keiter, Robert; Ruple, John; Holt, Rebecca; Tanana, Heather; McNeally, Phoebe; Tribby, Clavin

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Feasibility Study for Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project Objective: The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians (MBCI) conducted a study of the feasibility of siting a renewable energy biomass-based installation on tribal lands. The purpose of the study was to determine whether such an installation can be economically sustainable, as well as consistent with the cultural, social, and economic goals of the Tribe. Scope: To achieve the goal of the feasibility study, the following tasks were carried out: (1) Resource availability assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine the availability of both poultry litter and wood residues for use in the proposed facility. (2) Power utilization assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine the potential market size for power produced, the existing infrastructure for delivering power to that market, and the costs and economic returns for doing so. (3) Technology review--The objective of this review was to identify one, or more, technical options for detailed economic and technical assessment. The study considered a range of feedstock and product mixtures of poultry litter; wood residues as feedstock; and electrical power and other ancillary products as outputs. Distributed power sources was also examined. Technologies ranging from gasification to systems that produce both power and value-added chemicals were considered. Technologies selected for detailed review were those that can be sized to process the amount of available feed (poultry litter, or poultry litter and wood residues), and that also appear to make economic sense in terms of the value of their inputs. The technology review leaned heavily on the experience from similar prior DOE projects, particularly those conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). NREL was involved in a consultative role, so that the project team could leverage their experience. (4) Systems Design(s)--Based on the technology review, a pre-conceptual design for an installation was developed. This included identification of unit operations and equipment, maintenance, manpower, feedstock requirements, and output (power and any other ancillary products). Energy and mass flows were identified. (5) Manpower development assessment--The objectives of this assessment was to identify training needs for the selected option(s), and determine how they can best be met. Using the manpower estimates from the pre-conceptual system design, skills and training needs were to be identified. A plan for providing the needed manpower was to be developed, and any associated costs determined. (6) Economic assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine the economic viability and sustainability of the technology option(s) identified through the technical review option. The costs of bringing the feedstock to the proposed facility were combined with nominal operation costs and potential production distribution costs to identify total costs. Revenue from power distribution (and, possibly, from sale of ancillary products) were combined with any possible government credits or payments to identify gross revenue. Economic viability was determined by net revenue and return on investment. A business plan for the selected option was to be produced that would consider long-term sustainability of the project. (7) MBCI compatibility assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine whether the renewable energy technology was compatible with the MBCI's cultural, social and economic values. As part of this assessment, the environmental impacts and benefits were to be determined (Environmental stewardship is an important part of the Choctaw culture.). The effects of a project on employment were projected. The compatibility of the renewable energy project with MBCI cultural and social values were determined. Most importantly, the compatibility of the renewable energy installation with the MBCIs economic development goals and directions were determined. A project team led by the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians (MBCI) conducted the feasibility study. The team included th

John Hendrix, Project Director; Charles Weir, Project Manager; Dr. John Plodinec, Technology Advisor; Dr. Steve Murray, Economic Advisor

2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

29

Assessment of Uncertainties in the Response of the African Monsoon Precipitation to Land Use change simulated by a regional model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Although the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubs and an increase in surface air temperature.

Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin-Ho

2014-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

30

Investigating the Nexus of Climate, Energy, Water, and Land at Decision-Relevant Scales: The Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA) is an innovative modeling system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to simulate interactions among natural and human systems at scales relevant to regional decision making. PRIMA brings together state-of-the-art models of regional climate, hydrology, agriculture, socioeconomics, and energy systems using a flexible coupling approach. The platform can be customized to inform a variety of complex questions and decisions, such as the integrated evaluation of mitigation and adaptation options across a range of sectors. Research into stakeholder decision support needs underpins the platform's application to regional issues, including uncertainty characterization. Ongoing numerical experiments are yielding new insights into the interactions among human and natural systems on regional scales with an initial focus on the energy-land-water nexus in the upper U.S. Midwest. This paper focuses on PRIMA’s functional capabilities and describes some lessons learned to date about integrated regional modeling.

Kraucunas, Ian P.; Clarke, Leon E.; Dirks, James A.; Hathaway, John E.; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Huang, Maoyi; Jin, Chunlian; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Li, Hongyi; Moss, Richard H.; Peterson, Marty J.; Rice, Jennie S.; Scott, Michael J.; Thomson, Allison M.; Voisin, Nathalie; West, Tristram O.

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

31

Oregon Land Conservation and Development Commission | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty, Michigan: EnergyOpenBarterVirginia.Land or WaterbodyFacility

32

The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx): Goals, platforms, and field operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) was an international field program designed to make observations of poorly understood but critical components of the coupled climate system of the southeast Pacific. This region is characterized by strong coastal upwelling, the coolest SSTs in the tropical belt, and is home to the largest subtropical stratocumulus deck on Earth. The field intensive phase of VOCALS-REx took place during October and November 2008 and constitutes a critical part of a broader CLIVAR program (VOCALS) designed to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding, model simulations, and predictions of the southeastern Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system, on diurnal to interannual timescales. The other major components of VOCALS are a modeling program with a model hierarchy ranging from the local to global scales, and a suite of extended observations from regular research cruises, instrumented moorings, and satellites. The two central themes of VOCALS-REx focus upon (a) links between aerosols, clouds and precipitation and their impacts on marine stratocumulus radiative properties, and (b) physical and chemical couplings between the upper ocean and the lower atmosphere, including the role that mesoscale ocean eddies play. A set of hypotheses designed to be tested with the combined field, monitoring and modeling work in VOCALS is presented here. A further goal of VOCALS-REx is to provide datasets for the evaluation and improvement of large-scale numerical models. VOCALS-REx involved five research aircraft, two ships and two surface sites in northern Chile. We describe the instrument payloads and key mission strategies for these platforms and give a summary of the missions conducted.

Wood, R.; Springston, S.; Mechoso, C. R.; Bretherton, C. S.; A.Weller, R.; Huebert, B.; Straneo, F.; Albrecht, B. A.; Coe, H.; Allen, G.; Vaughan, G.; Daum, P.; Fairall, C.; Chand, D.; Klenner, L. G.; Garreaud, R.; Grados, C.; Covert, D. S.; Bates, T. S.; Krejci, R.; Russell, L. M.; Szoeke, S. d.; Brewer, A.; Yuter, S. E.; Chaigneau, A.; Toniazzo, T.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Abel, S. J.; Brown, W. O. J.; Williams, S.; Fochesatto, J.; Brioude, J.; Bower, K. N

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

33

Land development approaches in the context of land scarcity : case study, Byblos, Lebanon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this study is to provide a general understanding for guiding urban development in secondary cities in Lebanon. An existing site in the Byblos Metropolitan Area is utilized as a reference to this study. The ...

Asdourian, Avedis

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

FRONTAGE ROADS: AN ASSESSMENT OF LEGAL ISSUES, DESIGN DECISIONS, COSTS, OPERATIONS, AND LAND-DEVELOPMENT DIFFERENCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FRONTAGE ROADS: AN ASSESSMENT OF LEGAL ISSUES, DESIGN DECISIONS, COSTS, OPERATIONS, AND LAND with lower household incomes, lower population densities, lower percentages of bike trips to work, lower in constructing a solid, formal policy for all states and regions to follow in providing access along new

Kockelman, Kara M.

35

Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

36

Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

37

Sustainable Development & Land Use Committee Meeting Meeting 2010-2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

students. Katrina will do a presentation to help students approach their schools about becoming bottle water free. 5. Construction Progress Update - M. Caron Energy Efficiency with Ameresco - Michel Caron Development Audit - M. Caron - Amanda Hamel has been hired to do the Sustainable Development Audit - the audit

38

EA-1856: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant for Economic Development Purposes, Piketon, Ohio  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of conveyance of land and facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, in Piketon, Ohio, for economic development purposes.

39

Developing a TeraGrid Based Land Surface Hydrology and Weather Modeling Interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developing a TeraGrid Based Land Surface Hydrology and Weather Modeling Interface Hsin-I Chang1 iclimate@purdue.edu -------------------- -------------------- 1 INTRODUCTION Real world hydrologic cyberinfrastructure (CI) has been articulated in many workshops and meetings of the environmental and hydrologic

Jiang, Wen

40

Climate and Land Use Change Processes in East Africa While some regions of East Africa are being preserved as natural areas, others, including the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate and Land Use Change Processes in East Africa While some regions of East Africa are being to agriculture. Some members of the Maasai tribe, traditionally a pastoral people, are changing to changes in climate. The land use box will involve further modeling of the effects of these concurrent

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Reduction of tropical land region precipitation variability via transpiration Jung-Eun Lee1*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA 2. Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers, The State exhibit low intraseasonal precipitation variability despite high annual-mean precipitation. Analyzing simulations of the NCAR atmospheric model coupled to the Community Land Model with and without transpiration

Neelin, J. David

42

Geography, Economic Policy and Regional Development in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geography, Economic Policy and Regional Development in China Sylvie Démurger, Jeffrey D. Sachs and Regional Development in China Sylvie Démurger Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) Centre d Woo Economics Department University of California, Davis wtwoo@ucdavis.edu Shuming Bao China Data

43

Assessing the Feasibility of Renewable Energy Development and Energy Efficiency Deployment on Tribal Lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) is committed to preserving our natural environment and reducing the amount of fossil fuels consumed while developing "green" business manufacturing jobs on tribal lands. The Tribe's Comprehensive Strategic Plan seeks to diversify the Tribal Economy through the creation of alternative energy businesses, such as wind, solar and bio-mass facilities while protecting the waters of Lake Superior, tribal inland lakes and streams. In addition, the Community desired to utilize clean/green energy resources to promote the self-sufficiency of the Tribal Nation. The objective of the study is to preserve our environment and maintain our cultural goals of using the resources of the land wisely. To reduce our consumption of fossil fuels, mercury and carbon dioxide emissions, which harm our water and land; we have decided to evaluate the opportunities of utilizing wind power. Preliminary projections show that we may eliminate pollution from our land in a cost effective manner. This study will evaluate wind capacity and our current energy consumption while projecting the feasibility of converting to wind power for operations at our major facilities. This project will study the feasibility of wind power at two locations for the purpose of reducing the Tribe's reliance upon fossil fuels and creating business opportunities, jobs and revenue for the community.

Nominelli, Gregg R.

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

44

THE DEVELOPMENT MODEL ELECTRONIC COMMERCE OF REGIONAL AGRICULTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DEVELOPMENT MODEL ELECTRONIC COMMERCE OF REGIONAL AGRICULTURE Jun Kang* , Lecai Cai, Hongchan, Fax: +86-813-5505966, Email: kj_sky@126.com Abstract: With the developing of the agricultural information, it is inevitable trend of the development of agricultural electronic commercial affairs

Boyer, Edmond

45

Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

50-47676 March 2010 Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets Final Subcontract Report 15 October 2007 - 15 March 2009 3TIER Seattle, Washington National...

46

"CENTRU" REGION Natural and Antropic Potential Development Perspectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fauna, flora, geologic, and geomorphic variety 43 % of the Romanian protected areas can be found"CENTRU" REGION Natural and Antropic Potential ­ Development Perspectives REGIUNEA CENTRU Potential natural si antropic- Perspective de dezvoltare SIMION CRETU Agentia pentru Dezvoltare Regionala CENTRU

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

47

Between hot opposition and lukewarm support : innovation and community in land planning and development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research on two innovative developments in the Mountain West region of the United States validates an argument by Donald Schon that effective "coordination of conflicting frames" represents a "more promising line of attack" ...

Mammen, Taylor G

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

A validation of heat and carbon fluxes from highresolution land surface and regional models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) or regional climate models (RCMs) [Alessandri et al., 2007; Steiner et al., 2009]. [3., 2006; Alessandri et al., 2007; Jarlan et al., 2008; Steiner et al., 2009]. However, the SVAT models models do not account for the role of terrestrial vegetation in the carbon cycle variability [Alessandri

D'Andrea, Fabio

49

Community Land Model Version 3.0 (CLM3.0) Developer's Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the guidelines adopted for software development of the Community Land Model (CLM) and serves as a reference to the entire code base of the released version of the model. The version of the code described here is Version 3.0 which was released in the summer of 2004. This document, the Community Land Model Version 3.0 (CLM3.0) User's Guide (Vertenstein et al., 2004), the Technical Description of the Community Land Model (CLM) (Oleson et al., 2004), and the Community Land Model's Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (CLM-DGVM): Technical Description and User's Guide (Levis et al., 2004) provide the developer, user, or researcher with details of implementation, instructions for using the model, a scientific description of the model, and a scientific description of the Dynamic Global Vegetation Model integrated with CLM respectively. The CLM is a single column (snow-soil-vegetation) biogeophysical model of the land surface which can be run serially (on a laptop or personal computer) or in parallel (using distributed or shared memory processors or both) on both vector and scalar computer architectures. Written in Fortran 90, CLM can be run offline (i.e., run in isolation using stored atmospheric forcing data), coupled to an atmospheric model (e.g., the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM)), or coupled to a climate system model (e.g., the Community Climate System Model Version 3 (CCSM3)) through a flux coupler (e.g., Coupler 6 (CPL6)). When coupled, CLM exchanges fluxes of energy, water, and momentum with the atmosphere. The horizontal land surface heterogeneity is represented by a nested subgrid hierarchy composed of gridcells, landunits, columns, and plant functional types (PFTs). This hierarchical representation is reflected in the data structures used by the model code. Biophysical processes are simulated for each subgrid unit (landunit, column, and PFT) independently, and prognostic variables are maintained for each subgrid unit. Vertical heterogeneity is represented by a single vegetation layer, 10 layers for soil, and up to five layers for snow, depending on the snow depth. For computational efficiency, gridcells are grouped into ''clumps'' which are divided in cyclic fashion among distributed memory processors. Additional parallel performance is obtained by distributing clumps of gridcells across shared memory processors on computer platforms that support hybrid Message Passing Interface (MPI)/OpenMP operation. Significant modifications to the source code have been made over the last year to support efficient operation on newer vector architectures, specifically the Earth Simulator in Japan and the Cray X1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Homan et al., 2004). These code modifications resulted in performance improvements even on the scalar architectures widely used for running CLM presently. To better support vectorized processing in the code, subgrid units (columns and PFTs) are grouped into ''filters'' based on their process-specific categorization. For example, filters (vectors of integers) referring to all snow, non-snow, lake, non-lake, and soil covered columns and PFTs within each clump are built and maintained when the model is run. Many loops within the scientific subroutines use these filters to indirectly address the process-appropriate subgrid units.

Hoffman, FM

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

50

of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management in the development of a programmatic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental impact statement for a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands resources on public lands, with an emphasis on the lands offering the best geologic prospects in

unknown authors

51

Development of a total landed cost and risk analysis model for global strategic sourcing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total landed cost and supply chain risk analysis are methods that many companies use to assess strategic sourcing decisions. For this project, landed cost is defined as those costs associated with material movement from a ...

Feller, Brian (Brian C.)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Pluralistic Modelling Approaches to Simulating Climate-Land Change Interactions in East Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with atmospheric trends such as greenhouse gas concentrations, to loop back to regional and global climate change dynamics (Giorgi and Mearns 1999). Developing robust forecasts of land use change is essential in the proper simulation of land-climate interactions. Forecasts of land use at regional scales require several

53

Development of technology for the design of shallow land burial facilities at arid sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Los Alamos field research program involving technology development for arid shallow land burial (SLB) sites is described. Field data are presented for an integrated field experiment, which was designed to test individual SLB component experiments related to erosion control, biobarriers, and subsurface capillary and migration barriers. Field tests of biointrusion barriers at waste disposal sites and in experimental plots are reported. The results of a joint DOE/NRC experiment to evaluate leaching and transport of sorbing (Cs, Sr, Li) and nonsorbing (I, Br) solutes in sandy silt backfill are presented for steady-state and unsteady-state flow conditions. A capillary barrier experiment performed in a large caisson (3-m diameter, 6.1 m deep) is described and a year's worth of field data is presented.

Nyhan, J.W.; Abeele, W.V.; Drennon, B.J.; Herrera, W.J.; Lopez, E.A.; Langhorst, G.J.; Stallings, E.A.; Walker, R.D.; Martinez, J.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Downscaling Global Land Cover Projections from an Integrated Assessment Model for Use in Regional Analyses: Results and Evaluation for the US from 2005 to 2095  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Projections of land cover change generated from Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and other economic-based models can be applied for analyses of environmental impacts at subregional and landscape scales. For those IAM and economic models that project land use at the sub-continental or regional scale, these projections must be downscaled and spatially distributed prior to use in climate or ecosystem models. Downscaling efforts to date have been conducted at the national extent with relatively high spatial resolution (30m) and at the global extent with relatively coarse spatial resolution (0.5 degree).

West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Huang, Maoyi; Wolf, Julie; Thomson, Allison M.

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

55

EA-1927: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant for Economic Development Purposes, Paducah, Kentucky  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE’s Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office is preparing an EA for a proposal to convey DOE land and facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant to the Paducah Area Community Reuse Organization and potentially other parties in furtherance of reindustrialization and reuse for economic development purposes.

56

A Multi-Objective Analysis of Regional Transportation and Land Development Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Admistration (2001). Annual Energy Outlook. Energyin its 2001 Annual Energy Outlook assembles available

Rodier, Caroline J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

1 Forecasting Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Urban Regions: 2 Microsimulation of Land Use and Transport Patterns in Austin, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

45 rural demands for travel and energy.46 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA 2005 2030 household energy 26 demands and GHG emissions estimates are compared under five different land use the highest rates of increase. Average energy consumption per household is estimated to fall over 30 time (by

Kockelman, Kara M.

58

Developing Clean Energy Projects on Tribal Lands: Data and Resources for Tribes (Book)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a outreach brochure (booklet) for the DOE Office of Indian Energy summarizing the renewable energy technology potential on tribal lands. The booklet features tech potential maps for various technologies, information about the activities of DOE-IE, and resources for Tribes.

Not Available

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis of Biorefinery Siting Based on Cellulosic Feedstock Grown on Marginal Lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. ARRA support for this project and to the PNNL Joint Global Change Research Institute enabled us to create an advanced computing infrastructure to execute millions of simulations, conduct post-processing calculations, store input and output data, and visualize results. These computing resources included two components installed at the Research Data Center of the University of Maryland. The first resource was 'deltac': an 8-core Linux server, dedicated to county-level and state-level simulations and PostgreSQL database hosting. The second resource was the DOE-JGCRI 'Evergreen' cluster, capable of executing millions of simulations in relatively short periods. ARRA funding also supported a PhD student from UMD who worked on creating the geodatabases and executing some of the simulations in this study. Using a physically based classification of marginal lands, we simulated production of cellulosic feedstocks from perennial mixtures grown on these lands in the US Midwest. Marginal lands in the western states of the US Midwest appear to have significant potential to supply feedstocks to a cellulosic biofuel industry. Similar results were obtained with simulations of N-fertilized perennial mixtures. A detailed spatial analysis allowed for the identification of possible locations for the establishment of 34 cellulosic ethanol biorefineries with an annual production capacity of 5.6 billion gallons. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided simulation results on the potential of perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. The results of this study will be submitted to the USDOE Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework as a way to contribute to the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

EA-1915: Conveyance of Approximately 1,641 Acres of Unimproved Land to the Tri-City Development Council, the Local Community Reuse Organization, Richland, WA  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of conveyance of approximately 1,641 acres of unimproved land at DOE’s Hanford Site, Richland, Washington to the Tri-City Development Council (TRIDEC), the local community reuse organization (CRO).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) : does it give indigenous peoples more control over development of their lands in the Philippines?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 1998 Indigenous Peoples Rights Act (IPRA) grants indigenous peoples (IPs) in the Philippines the right to Free, Prior, and Informed Consent (FPIC) with regard to development projects undertaken on their ancestral lands. ...

Co, Ronilda R. (Ronilda Rosario)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Regional Nuclear Workforce Development in the Central Savannah...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the entire Southeastern U.S. The study, conducted by the international consulting firm of Booz Allen Hamilton, is the first regional analysis focused on filling both new positions...

63

THE DEVELOPMENT OF SYNTHETIC SOIL MATERIALS FOR THE SUCCESSFUL RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINED LAND SITES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abandoned mine sites associated with coal and metal mining across the western United States have been left as unproductive wastelands. The availability of soil materials or other materials to support the restoration of the vegetative cover and enhance the recovery of such areas is limited. The restoration of these areas often requires the use of available amendments such as organic waste products or to help stabilize the soil. Many of the organic waste products, including sewage sludge, clarifier sludge, fly ash sludge, and other by-products from the agricultural industries such as compost can be employed for beneficial uses. This study looked at the feasibility of applying organic waste products to a mine soil in Montana to increase soil fertility and enhance plant productivity. Waste rock samples were tested for acid forming potential via acid base accounting. Samples cores were constructed and leached with simulated rainwater to determine amendment affect on metal leaching. A greenhouse study was completed to determine the most suitable amendment(s) for the field mine land site. Results from the acid base accounting indicate that acid formed from the waste rock would be neutralized with the alkalinity in the system. Results also show that metals in solution are easily held by organics from the amendments and not allowed to leach in to the surrounding water system. Data from the greenhouse study indicated that the amendment of sewage sludge was most promising. Application of 2% sewage sludge along with 1% sewage sludge plus 1% clarifier sludge, 2% compost, and no treatment were used for mine land application. Initial results were encouraging and it appears that sewage sludge may be a good reclamation option for mine lands.

Song Jin

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Introduction Debates on the trajectories and mechanisms of regional development have been  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

no place on earth has been untouched by globalization, the relations of regions with the global economy intensified in the context of heightened globalization and regional competition (Pike et al, 2006). While regionalism, there is an increasing voice arguing for globalizing regional development (Coe et al, 2004

Wei, Yehua Dennis

65

Managing carbon in a multiple use world: The implications of land-use decision context for carbon management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in developing countries, land management in the U.S. to enhance carbon sequestration would occur against carbon sequestration through land use is perceived or implemented in one region of the U.S., and howManaging carbon in a multiple use world: The implications of land-use decision context for carbon

Neff, Jason

66

Area development plan of the geothermal potential in planning region 8, Roosevelt - Custer area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal resource data, the Roosevelt-Custer Region development plan, and energy, economic, and institutional considerations are presented. Environmental considerations and water availability are discussed. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Urban land-use regulations and housing markets in developing countries: Evidence from Indonesia on the importance of enforcement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

poverty: ?ndings from Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Land UseAfrican cities of Dar es Salaam, Addis Ababa, and Nairobi.

Monkkonen, P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Regional Nuclear Workforce Development in the Central Savannah River Area  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising ScienceRecent SRELRecyclingProjectsRegional

69

Early lineage restriction and regional segregation during mammalian heart development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cardiac development arises from two sources of mesoderm progenitors, the first (FHF) and the second heart field (SHF). Mesp1 has been proposed to mark the most primitive multipotent cardiac progenitors common for both heart fields. Here, using...

Lescroart, Fabienne; Chabab, Samira; Lin, Xionghui; Rulands, Steffen; Paulissen, Catherine; Rodolosse, Annie; Auer, Herbert; Achouri, Younes; Dubois, Christine; Bondue, Antoine; Simons, Benjamin D.; Blanpain, Cédric

2014-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

70

How regional authorities can achieve economic development through investments in the logistics sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lessons for how a regional authority should develop its logistics sector are learned through case studies on four areas (section 2). In addition, a "logistics attractiveness" ranking framework is developed and applied ...

Khan, Taimur, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Spatial data analysis of regional development in Greater Beijing, China, in a GIS environment*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial data analysis of regional development in Greater Beijing, China, in a GIS environment: Regional development, GIS, exploratory spatial data analysis, spatial regression, Greater Beijing 1@geog.utah.edu) Received: 2 May 2005 / Accepted: 20 October 2006 Abstract. This study investigates spatial dependence

Wei, Yehua Dennis

72

Game theory and real options : analysis of land value and strategic decisions in real estate development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis investigates the use of the game theory and the real options theory in real estate development at the strategic level, trying empirically to explain different economic observations among different metropolitan ...

So, Chun Kit (Chun Kit Timothy)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

The effects of the sequence of land development on the property valuation and taxation of Bryan, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reasons. First, the assessing rrethod is more defined and more uniformly standard. Second, the city lists separate valuations for land and improvements. 1970, Cit -Land Briefly reviewing the assessment method, the land value is calculated...'IHE ~ OF THE SEQUENCE OF IAND DEVEIDPMENT ON THE PROPERTY VALUATION AND TAXATION OF BRYAN, TEXAS A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas %&1 University in partial fulfi11rrent of the reguireaents for the degree of MASTER...

Sorensen, Gary Lynn

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Tribal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 12-page brochure provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tribal Energy Program and describes the financial, technical, and educational assistance it provides to help tribes develop their renewable energy resources and reduce their energy consumption.

Not Available

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Workshop proceedings: Developing the scientific basis for long-term land management of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Responses to a survey on the INEEL Comprehensive Facility and Land Use Plan (US DOE 1996a) indicated the need for additional discussion on environmental resources, disturbance, and land use issues on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). As a result, in September 1997, a workshop evaluated the existing scientific basis and determined future data needs for long-term land management on the INEEL. This INEEL Long-Term Land Management Workshop examined existing data on biotic, abiotic, and heritage resources and how these resources have been impacted by disturbance activities of the INEEL. Information gained from this workshop will help guide land and facility use decisions, identify data gaps, and focus future research efforts. This report summarizes background information on the INEEL and its long-term land use planning efforts, presentations and discussions at the workshop, and the existing data available at the INEEL. In this document, recommendations for future INEEL land use planning, research efforts, and future workshops are presented. The authors emphasize these are not policy statements, but comments and suggestions made by scientists and others participating in the workshop. Several appendices covering land use disturbance, legal drivers, land use assumptions and workshop participant comments, workshop participants and contributors, and the workshop agenda are also included.

Sperber, T.D.; Reynolds, T.D. [eds.] [Environmental Science and Research Foundation, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Breckenridge, R.P. [ed.] [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Recreation Data Creator /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Recreation Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

77

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Ungulates Data Creator /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Ungulates Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

78

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Agriculture Data Creator /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Agriculture Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

79

BUSINESSES AS ONE OF THE KEY ELEMENTS OF A REGION'S SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BUSINESSES AS ONE OF THE KEY ELEMENTS OF A REGION'S SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT of sustainable development should be taken into account by these actors. Businesses (especially SMEs) whose aim-words : sustainable development, territory, businesses, governance, stakeholders Mots-clés : développement durable

80

Development of Frameworks for Robust Regional Climate Modeling PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Moetasim Ashfaq  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

goals of climate modeling. Water supports the ecosystems as well as a wide range of human activities to improve region- al predictions of the hydrologic cycle to address climate change impacts, adaptationDevelopment of Frameworks for Robust Regional Climate Modeling PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Moetasim

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

From Regionalisation to Territorial Management: the role of the "Regional" Development Agencies in Turkey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Turkey Benoît Montabone UMR CNRS 6590 ESO - Rennes Université Européenne de Bretagne ­ Rennes 2 benoit.montabone@uhb.fr Abstract : The creation of Regional Development Agencies at the regional scale in Turkey introduces new, Regionalisation, Endogenous Growth, Territorial Management, Turkey. Résumé : La récente mise en place d

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

82

EA-2000: Proposed Land Transfer to Develop a General Aviation Airport at the East Tennessee Technology Park Heritage Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of the proposed land transfer to the Metropolitan Knoxville Airport Authority for the development of a general aviation airport at the East Tennessee Technology Park Heritage Center, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download No downloads found for this office.

83

Digital hydrographic, land use/land cover, and hydrologic unit boundary files for the Death Valley region of southern Nevada and southeastern California processed from US Geological Survey 1:100,000- and 1:250,000-scale digital data files  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Digital hydrographic and land-use/land-cover data have been compiled into a digital geographic data base for an {approx}100,000-km{sup 2} area of the Southern Great Basin, the Death Valley region of southern Nevada and SE California, located between lat 35{degree}N, long 115{degree}W and lat 38{degree}N, long 118{degree}W. This region includes the Nevada Test Site at Yucca Mountain and adjacent parts of southern Nevada and eastern California. The data base was compiled from USGS data files distributed by the USGS Earth Scinece Information Center. The data files were converted into six thematic ARC/INFO map coverages representing the Death Valley region.

Turner, A.K.; D`Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Development of a Decision Support Geographic Information System for land restoration programs in the Leon, Lampasas, and Bosque River Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and livestock production these historically predominant grasslands provide. The result has been an interest and public investment in land restoration programs such as the removal and management of brush via landowner cost-share. Implementation of a publicly...

Jones, Jason Samuel

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

85

Field Document No.50 REGIONAL WOOD ENERGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME IN ASIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND TOMORROW IN ASIA #12;This publication is printed by the FAO Regional Wood Energy Development Programme wood energy data, leading to best estimates of future consumption. It also tries to estimate development in other relevant sectors like agriculture and energy is also strongly recommended. The document

86

Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact: Four Regional Scenarios (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL's Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model for Offshore Wind, is a computer tool for studying the economic impacts of fixed-bottom offshore wind projects in the United States. This presentation provides the results of an analysis of four offshore wind development scenarios in the Southeast Atlantic, Great Lakes, Mid-Atlantic, and Gulf of Mexico regions.

Tegen, S.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Winter Semester 2008/09 Development Econoomics III: Regional Perspectives on Economic Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Amartya Sen: Hunger and Public Action, Ch. 10, P. 179-203 5. Dreze, Jean and Amartya Sen: Hunger, Economic and Social Progress in LA, 1999 Report. Dreze, J. and A. Sen. 1995. India Economic Development

Krivobokova, Tatyana

88

Winter Semester 2013/14 Development Economics III: Regional Perspectives on Economic Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Amartya Sen: Hunger and Public Action, Ch. 10, P. 179-203 5. Dreze, Jean and Amartya Sen: Hunger Report. Dreze, J. and A. Sen. 1995. India Economic Development and Social Opportunity. New York: Oxford

Krivobokova, Tatyana

89

Land-use Leakage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International “offsets” are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Characterization of seven United States coal regions. The development of optimal terrace pit coal mining systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report characterizes seven United State coal regions in the Northern Great Plains, Rocky Mountain, Interior, and Gulf Coast coal provinces. Descriptions include those of the Fort Union, Powder River, Green River, Four Corners, Lower Missouri, Illinois Basin, and Texas Gulf coal resource regions. The resource characterizations describe geologic, geographic, hydrologic, environmental and climatological conditions of each region, coal ranks and qualities, extent of reserves, reclamation requirements, and current mining activities. The report was compiled as a basis for the development of hypothetical coal mining situations for comparison of conventional and terrace pit surface mining methods, under contract to the Department of Energy, Contract No. DE-AC01-79ET10023, entitled The Development of Optimal Terrace Pit Coal Mining Systems.

Wimer, R.L.; Adams, M.A.; Jurich, D.M.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

University of Arizona Geography and Regional Development 696O Adaptation and Resilience in Water Resources Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, urban growth, energy demand, and global food trade alter water in coupled human-natural systemsUniversity of Arizona Geography and Regional Development 696O 1 Adaptation and Resilience in Water syllabus] As we enter an era of drastically heightened pressure on water resources combined with greater

Scott, Christopher

92

University of Arizona Geography and Regional Development 696O Adaptation and Resilience in Water Resources Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demand, and global food trade alter water in coupled human-natural systems. This seminar addressesUniversity of Arizona Geography and Regional Development 696O 1 Adaptation and Resilience in Water-4393) Office hours: by appointment Seminar summary [from course catalog] Climate change, urban growth, energy

93

Energy and land use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

Not Available

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Pacific Northwest Region MAPS dataset retrospective analysis Project Title: USFS Region Six MAPS Dataset Re-analysis for the Development of Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacific Northwest Region MAPS dataset ­ retrospective analysis Project Title: USFS Region Six MAPS Dataset Re-analysis for the Development of Management and Climate Change Support Tools for Landbird) demographic dataset may reveal how predicted patterns of climate-related forest fragmentation, pest outbreak

DeSante, David F.

95

Design plan for development of the worldwide port system (WPS) regional integrated cargo database (ICDB)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Worldwide Port System (WPS) Regional Integrated Cargo Database (ICDB) is a major military computer system that provides visibility over international cargo. Development started in early 1993 and implementation began on the West Coast in August of 1995. The Design Plan coordinated developmental efforts for the ICDB and its related processes. A Design Plan was especially important because the ICDB was developed at multiple sites by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Military Traffic Management Command personnel. A Design Plan was essential to ensure that a consistent design was maintained throughout all modules, that functional and technical requirements were accomplished, that all components and processes worked together successfully, and that the development schedule was met. This plan described ICDB modules and tasks within each module. It documented responsibilities and dependencies by module and presented a schedule for development, testing, and integration.

Truett, L.F.; Rollow, J.P.; Shipe, P.C.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Economic and Physical Modeling of Land Use in GCAM 3.0 and an Application to Agricultural Productivity, Land, and Terrestrial Carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explore the impact of changes in agricultural productivity on global land use and terrestrial carbon using the new agriculture and land use modeling approach developed for Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) version 3.0. This approach models economic land use decisions with regional, physical, and technological specificity while maintaining economic and physical integration with the rest of the GCAM model. Physical land characteristics and quantities are tracked explicitly, and crop production practices are modeled discretely to facilitate coupling with physical models. Economic land allocation is modeled with non-linear functions in a market equilibrium rather than through a constrained optimization. In this paper, we explore three scenarios of future agriculture productivity in all regions of the globe over this century, ranging from a high growth to a zero growth level. The higher productivity growth scenario leads to lower crop prices, increased production of crops in developing nations, preservation of global forested lands and lower terrestrial carbon emissions. The scenario with no productivity improvement results in higher crop prices, an expansion of crop production in the developed world, loss of forested lands globally, and higher terrestrial carbon emissions.

Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Edmonds, James A.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Figure 9. Conceptual model for regionally divergent responses of the air-land fluxes to CO2 fertilization, which increases the water-use efficiency of photosynthesis. In dry regions where  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parameterizations of these processes in models of Mediterranean- climate lands and obtaining a baseline for assessing changes. Acknowledgments NYK is supported by a NOAA Climate and Global Change postdoctoral.1 (2006). I. Y. Fung, S. C. Doney, K. Lindsay, J. John, Evolution of carbon sinks in a changing climate

Krakauer, Nir Y.

98

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Forestry Data Creator /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Forestry Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed by Natural

99

Title: Canada Land Inventory: 1966 Land Use Data Creator /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Canada Land Inventory: 1966 Land Use Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed by Natural Resources

100

Minerals on School and Public Lands  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Commissioner of School and Public Lands is authorized to lease the mineral interests of such lands for development. Section 5-7 of the SD Codified Laws describes provisions for the leasing of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Landholders, Residential Land Conversion, and Market Signals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

465– Margulis: Landholders, Residential Land Conversion, and1983. An Analysis of Residential Developer Location FactorsHow Regulation Affects New Residential Development. New

Margulis, Harry L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

INVESTIGATIONS ON THE IMPACTS OF LAND-COVER CHANGES AND/OR INCREASED CO2 CONCENTRATIONS ON FOUR REGIONAL WATER CYCLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REGIONAL WATER CYCLES AND THEIR INTERACTIONS WITH THE GLOBAL WATER CYCLE By Zhao Li RECOMMENDED-COVER CHANGES AND/OR INCREASED CO2 CONCENTRATIONS ON FOUR REGIONAL WATER CYCLES AND THEIR INTERACTIONS WITH THE GLOBAL WATER CYCLE A THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the University of Alaska Fairbanks In Partial

Moelders, Nicole

103

Development Approaches for Sustainable Use of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

land use and population densities 27 Figure 7: Criteria and results of the assessment of water Regional Development in Rural Africa, Part IV Urs Wiesmann, 2008 (revised edition [19981]) #12; #12;Sustainable Regional Development in Rural Africa Part IV Development Approaches for Sustainable Use of Water

Richner, Heinz

104

Connecting Land Use and Transportation Toward Sustainable Development: A Case Study of Houston-Galveston Metropolitan Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of sustainable development; rather it has been defined and applied according to the goals and objectives of each agent or organization (Beatley 1995; Litman and Burwell 2006). There is, however, a widely used concept of sustainable development defined...

Lee, Jae Su

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

105

Regional variations in US residential sector fuel prices: implications for development of building energy performance standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Energy Performance Standards for New Buildings presented life-cycle-cost based energy budgets for single-family detached residences. These energy budgets varied with regional climatic conditions but were all based on projections of national average prices for gas, oil and electricity. The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking indicated that further analysis of the appropriateness of various price measures for use in setting the Standards was under way. This part of that ongoing analysis addresses the availability of fuel price projections, the variation in fuel prices and escalation rates across the US and the effects of aggregating city price data to the state, Region, or national level. The study only provides a portion of the information required to identify the best price aggregation level for developing of the standards. The research addresses some of the economic efficiency considerations necessary for design of a standard that affects heterogeneous regions. The first section discusses the effects of price variation among and within regions on the efficiency of resource allocation when a standard is imposed. Some evidence of the extreme variability in fuel prices across the US is presented. In the second section, time series, cross-sectional fuel price data are statistically analyzed to determine the similarity in mean fuel prices and price escalation rates when the data are treated at increasing levels of aggregation. The findings of this analysis are reported in the third section, while the appendices contain price distributions details. The last section reports the availability of price projections and discusses some EIA projections compared with actual prices.

Nieves, L.A.; Tawil, J.J.; Secrest, T.J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Water, earth, and fire: Land use and environmental planning in the New Jersey Pine Barrens  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each major chapter in this land-use planning case study begins with an introductory overview of the historical and ecological context of land-use patterns and the resources on which people depend. Juxtaposed with these scientific analyses is a series of profiles of area residents and their view of the Pine Barrens. The concluding chapters present recommendations designed to help develop a regional plan for the area.

Berger, J.; Sinton, J.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Health assessment for Royal Hardage Industrial Hazardous Waste Land Disposal Facility, Criner, Oklahoma, Region 6. CERCLIS No. OKD000400093. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Royal Hardage Industrial Hazardous Waste Land Disposal Facility (Hardage/Criner) National Priorities List Site is located in Criner, McClain County, Oklahoma. The site is located in an agricultural area. There are volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and several heavy metals present in the groundwater and soil, and VOCs in surface water and sediment. The Record of Decision signed November 1986 selected several remedial actions which included excavation of the primary source material and separation of the wastes for treatment, solids to be disposed of in an on-site landfill that meets Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements, organic liquids to be incinerated, and inorganic liquids to be treated by other means as necessary. The site is currently in the remedial-design phase.

Not Available

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Delaware Land Protection Act (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Land Protection Act requires the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control to work with the Delaware Open Space Council to develop standards and criteria for determining the...

109

Land and Facility Use Planning  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Land and Facility Use Planning process provides a way to guide future site development and reuse based on the shared long-term goals and objectives of the Department, site and its stakeholders. Does not cancel other directives.

1996-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

110

Regional deformation of the Sierra de San Luis, Argentina: Implications for the Paleozoic development of western Gondwana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional deformation of the Sierra de San Luis, Argentina: Implications for the Paleozoic San Luis, central Argentina, provide evidence for the Early to Middle Paleozoic development, S. J., and C. Simpson (2004), Regional deformation of the Sierra de San Luis, Argentina

Whitmeyer, Steven J.

111
112

Dynamic valuation model For wind development in regard to land value, proximity to transmission lines, and capacity factor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developing a wind farm involves many variables that can make or break the success of a potential wind farm project. Some variables such as wind data (capacity factor, wind rose, wind speed, etc.) are readily available in ...

Nikandrou, Paul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Waterfowl Wildlife Data Creator /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Waterfowl Wildlife Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

114

Best Practices for Wind Energy Development in the Great Lakes Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report offers a menu of 18 different, yet complementary, preferred practices and policies. The best practices cover all phases of the wind energy development process - from the policies that allow for wind development, to the sustainable operation of a wind project, to the best practices for decommissioning a spent turbine - including applications for offshore wind. Each best practice describes the opportunities and challenges (pros and cons), and offers a case example that illustrates how that best practice is being utilized by a particular jurisdiction or wind project. The practices described in this publication were selected by a diverse group of interests from the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative that included environmental groups, industry, academia, and federal, state and local government regulators. The practices were identified through a year-long process that included a literature review, online survey and interviews with individuals from the public, private and non-profit sectors. Optimally, a suite of these best practices would be applied in an appropriate combination to fit the conditions of a particular wind project or a set of wind projects within a given locality or region.

Pebbles, Victoria; Hummer, John; Haven, Celia

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

115

Development of Electronics for the ATF2 Interaction Point Region Beam Position Monitor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanometer resolution beam position monitors have been developed to measure and control beam position stability at the interaction point region of ATF2. The position of the beam has to be measured to within a few nanometers at the interaction point. In order to achieve this performance, electronics for the low-Q IP-BPM was developed. Every component of the electronics have been simulated and checked on the bench and using the ATF2 beam. We will explain each component and define their working range. Then, we will show the performance of the electronics measured with beam signal. ATF2 is a final focus test beam line for ILC in the framework of the ATF international collaboration. The new beam line was constructed to extend the extraction line at ATF, KEK, Japan. The first goal of ATF2 is the acheiving of a 37 nm vertical beam size at focal point (IP). The second goal is to stabilize the beam at the focal point at a few nanometer level for a long period in order to ensure the high luminosity. To achieve these goals a high resolution IP-BPM is essential. In addition for feedback applications a low-Q system is desirable.

Kim, Youngim; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Heo, Ae-young; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Kim, Eun-San; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Boogert, Stewart; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Honda, Yosuke; /KEK, Tsukuba; Tauchi, Toshiaki; /KEK, Tsukuba; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; /KEK, Tsukuba; May, Justin; /SLAC; McCormick, Douglas; /SLAC; Smith, Tonee; /SLAC

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

116

Regulatory Considerations for Developing Generation Projects...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Generation Projects on Federal Lands Regulatory Considerations for Developing Generation Projects on Federal Lands Presentation covers regulatory considerations for developing...

117

Development of a Remotely Operated NDE System for Inspection of Hanford's Double Shell Waste Tank Knuckle Regions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents work performed at the PNNL in FY01 to support development of a Remotely Operated NDE (RONDE) system capable of inspecting the knuckle region of Hanford's DSTs. The development effort utilized commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) technology wherever possible and provided a transport and scanning device for implementing the SAFT and T-SAFT techniques.

Pardini, Allan F; Alzheimer, James M; Crawford, Susan L; Diaz, Aaron A; Gervais, Kevin L; Harris, Robert V; Riechers, Douglas M; Samuel, Todd J; Schuster, George J; Tucker, Joseph C

2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

118

Pressure-State-Response in Land Resource Changes, Lake Tana Basin, Ethiopia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pressure-State-Response in Land Resource Changes, Lake Tana Basin, Ethiopia Birru Yitaferu, Amhara Regional Agricultural Research Institute, Ethiopia; Hans Hurni, Centre for Development and Environment (CDE), University of Bern, Switzerland; Gete Zeleke, Global Mountain Program, Ethiopia Lake Tana Basin (LTB

Richner, Heinz

119

EA-1212: Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to lease undeveloped land that is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, to...

120

Promoting Rural Development from a Territorial Perspective: The Case of The Yeguare Region, Honduras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

development was to expand the knowledge about the impacts of a territorial model of development in rural Honduras. Also, policymakers and project stakeholders may use this information to plan, design and implement more effective development programs, and may...

Borja Borja, Ivan M.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Soils and agricultural development in the region of Al-Qassim, Saudi Arabia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The process of agricultural development and its related problems is. a serious economic difficulty facing the developing countries throughout the world. In Saudi Arabia such… (more)

Al-Jerash, Mohammed Abdullah

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Urban growth pattern and sustainable development: a comparative study of municipalities in the Seoul Metropolitan Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main purpose of this study was to obtain a better understanding of the impact of urban growth and change on sustainability based on a comparative study of municipalities comprising Gyeonggi Province within the Seoul Metropolitan Region, Korea...

Paek, Seunggeun

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

Mediating regional development : how metalworking firms forged lasting linkages with steel in Ciudad, Guayana, Venezuela  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ever since the late 1950s, planners have lured large firms to lagging regions with the expectation that they will trigger local industrial activity. According to the literatures on unbalanced growth, growth poles, foreign ...

Döhnert, Sylvia, 1970-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this segment of work, our goal was to review methods for estimating tree survival, growth, yield and value of forests growing on surface mined land in the eastern coalfields of the USA, and to determine the extent to which carbon sequestration is influenced by these factors. Public Law 95-87, the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), mandates that mined land be reclaimed in a fashion that renders the land at least as productive after mining as it was before mining. In the central Appalachian region, where prime farmland and economic development opportunities for mined land are scarce, the most practical land use choices are hayland/pasture, wildlife habitat, or forest land. Since 1977, the majority of mined land has been reclaimed as hayland/pasture or wildlife habitat, which is less expensive to reclaim than forest land, since there are no tree planting costs. As a result, there are now hundreds of thousands of hectares of grasslands and scrublands in various stages of natural succession located throughout otherwise forested mountains in the U.S. A literature review was done to develop the basis for an economic feasibility study of a range of land-use conversion scenarios. Procedures were developed for both mixed hardwoods and white pine under a set of low product prices and under a set of high product prices. Economic feasibility is based on land expectation values. Further, our review shows that three types of incentive schemes might be important: (1) lump sum payment at planting (and equivalent series of annual payments); (2) revenue incentive at harvest; and (3) benefit based on carbon volume.

Jonathan Aggett

2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Land Tenure, Land Use, and Land Reform at Dwesa–Cwebe, South Africa: Local Transformations and the Limits of the State  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Reverse Resettlement in South Africa’s Transkei. (Ph.D.Land and Development in South Africa's Black Rural Areas (the Land Question in South Africa, Michael de Klerk, ed. (

Fay, Derick A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

MODIS Collection 5 global land cover: Algorithm refinements and characterization of new datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

information is required to parameterize land surface processes in regional-to-global scale Earth system models

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

127

H.R. 817: A Bill to authorize the Secretary of Energy to lease lands within the naval oil shale reserves to private entities for the development and production of oil and natural gas. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bill would give the Secretary of Energy authority to lease lands within the Naval oil shale reserves to private entities for the purpose of surveying for and developing oil and gas resources from the land (other than oil shale). It also allows the Bureau of Land Management to be used as a leasing agent, establishes rules on royalties, and the sharing of royalties with the state, and covers the transfer of existing equipment.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

Bird Movements and Behaviors in the Gulf Coast Region: Relation to Potential Wind-Energy Developments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the possible impacts of wind development to birds along the lower Gulf Coast, including both proposed near-shore and offshore developments. The report summarizes wind resources in Texas, discusses timing and magnitude of bird migration as it relates to wind development, reviews research that has been conducted throughout the world on near- and offshore developments, and provides recommendations for research that will help guide wind development that minimizes negative impacts to birds and other wildlife resources.

Morrison, M. L.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Production of Wind or Solar Energy on School and Public Lands (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations govern the implementation and development of wind and solar resources on lands under the jurisdiction of the Board of Educational Lands and Funds

130

EA-1927: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Paducah Gaseous...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

27: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant for Economic Development Purposes, Paducah, Kentucky EA-1927: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the...

131

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural land final Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy Summary: agricultural production and land development in each...

132

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural land based Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 6 Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy Summary: Developing land use policies based on the agricultural...

133

E-Print Network 3.0 - asia regional developments Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for students to investigate the heritage and contemporary developments of Asia... , political science, sociology, and theology. Asia is defined broadly in this program as the...

134

Influence of Regional Development Policies and Clean Technology Adoption on Future Air Pollution Exposure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

development policies and clean technology adoption on futuredevelopment policies and clean technology adoption on futuredevelopment policies and clean technology adoption on future

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Energy Efficiency Investments in Public Facilities - Developing a Pilot Mechanism for Russia and Chelyabinsk Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Russian public sector buildings tend to be very inefficient, which creates vast opportunities for savings. This paper reviews opportunities to implement energy efficiency projects in Russian public buildings, created by new Russian legislation and regulations. Given Russia's limited experience with energy performance contracts (EPCs), a pilot project can help test an implementation mechanism. The authors use Chelyabinsk Region as an example to discuss opportunities, challenges and solutions to financing and implementing an EPC in Russia, navigating through federal requirements and specific local conditions.

Evans, Meredydd; Roshchanka, Volha; Parker, Steven A.; Baranovskiy, Aleksandr

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Geothermal Power Plants — Minimizing Land Use and Impact  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For energy production and development, geothermal power plants don't use much land compared to coal and nuclear power plants. And the environmental impact upon the land they use is minimal.

137

Conditions and effectiveness of land use as a mobility tool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation examines the potential of land use as a mobility tool to affect travel, a subject of long and ongoing policy debate. Land use strategies such as densification, mixed-use development, and non-driving-oriented ...

Zhang, Ming, 1963 Apr. 22-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Florida Environmental Land and Water Management Act (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The State Land Planning Agency, established within the Department of Economic Opportunity, has the authority to oversee land planning, zoning, and development activities in the state. The Agency is...

139

Marginal Lands: Concept, Assessment and Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Marginal lands have received wide attention for their potential to improve food security and support bioenergy production. However, environmental, ecosystem service, and sustainability concerns have been widely raised over the use of marginal land. Knowledge of the extent, location, and quality of marginal lands as well as their assessment and management are limited and diverse. This paper provides a review of the historical development of marginal concept, its application and assessment. Limitations and priority research needs of marginal land assessment and management were discussed.

Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL; Izaurralde, Dr. R. Cesar [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wang, Dali [ORNL; Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Tropical Africa: Land use, biomass, and carbon estimates for 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980 and describes a methodology that may be used to extend this data set to 1990 and beyond based on population and land cover data. The biomass data and carbon estimates are for woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with the possible magnitude of historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth`s land surface and includes those countries that for the most part are located in Tropical Africa. Countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea and in southern Africa (i.e., Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, and Western Sahara) have maximum potential biomass and land cover information but do not have biomass or carbon estimate. The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{sup TM} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass-carbon values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

Brown, S. [Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States). Western Ecology Division; Gaston, G. [Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States). National Research Council; Daniels, R.C. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

An update on land-ice modeling in the CESM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass loss from land ice, including the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets as well as smaller glacier and ice caps, is making a large and growing contribution to global sea-level rise. Land ice is only beginning to be incorporated in climate models. The goal of the Land Ice Working Group (LIWG) is to develop improved land-ice models and incorporate them in CESM, in order to provide useful, physically-based sea-level predictions. LJWG efforts to date have led to the inclusion of a dynamic ice-sheet model (the Glimmer Community Ice Sheet Model, or Glimmer-CISM) in the Community Earth System Model (CESM), which was released in June 2010. CESM also includes a new surface-mass-balance scheme for ice sheets in the Community Land Model. Initial modeling efforts are focused on the Greenland ice sheet. Preliminary results are promising. In particular, the simulated surface mass balance for Greenland is in good agreement with observations and regional model results. The current model, however, has significant limitations: The land-ice coupling is one-way; we are using a serial version of Glimmer-CISM with the shallow-ice approximation; and there is no ice-ocean coupling. During the next year we plan to implement two-way coupling (including ice-ocean coupling with a dynamic Antarctic ice sheet) with a parallel , higher-order version of Glimmer-CISM. We will also add parameterizations of small glaciers and ice caps. With these model improvements, CESM will be able to simulate all the major contributors to 21st century global sea-level rise. Results of the first round of simulations should be available in time to be included in the Fifth Assessment Report (ARS) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Lipscomb, William H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

142

From negotiation to auction : Land-Conveyance Reform in China and its institutional and social impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The land market and the associated land-development-control mechanism in China have been experiencing a series of reforms since the 1990s, of which Land Conveyance Reform (LCR) in 2004 is a very recent and an important ...

Chen, Zhiyu (Zhiyu Jerry)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Agriculture and the Environment X, Delivering Multiple Benefits from our Land: Sustainable Development in Practice (2014) SEAWEED AND THE REWORKING OF OLD AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wilson1 and BA Harvie1,2 1 Scotland's Rural College (SRUC), King's Buildings, West Mains Road, EdinburghAgriculture and the Environment X, Delivering Multiple Benefits from our Land: Sustainable IMPROVED SUSTAINABILITY AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES OGG Knox1 , T-J Marsden2 , S Warnick2 , MN Scherbatskoy3 , D

144

Solar Land Lease Issues Below is a list of issues developed in consultation with staff at the State Energy Office, the N.C. Solar Center and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

landowners should investigate in considering a lease offered for land used for a solar farm (the list exist for a solar farm and possibly to secure agreements for the sale of power from the project. 3. Make. It discusses a number of background requirements for solar farms as well as major elements of lease documents

145

LAND USE CHANGE IN BRAZIL: INTEGRATING ECOLOGY, ECONOMICS AND POLICY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for smaller farmers to buy land and increased the incentives for migrating to the frontier generating a race attracted migrants from others regions, searching for agricultural land ; It remains a frontier region the financial support to wait the advance of frontier to eventually begin any activity; #12;Also

146

Development of Regional Coastal Ocean Observatories and the Potential Benefits to Marine Sanctuaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-static SeaSonde surface current radars; and (3) a growing fleet of autonomous underwater vehicles and nowcasting/forecasting models. The construction of the observatories is being fueled by the rapid development

Moline, Mark

147

Skill development among student affairs professionals in the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators Region III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contact; communication; personnel management; fiscal management; professional development; research, evaluation, and assessment; legal issues; technology, and diversity. For each skill category, fifteen learning methods were identified. A usable response...

Roberts, Darby Michelle

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Chesapeake Forest Lands are most of the former land holdings of the Chesapeake Forest Products Company, which now includes more than 66,000 acres in five lower Eastern Shore counties. These...

149

School Land Board (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The School Land Board oversees the use of land owned by the state or held in trust for use and benefit by the state or one of its departments, boards, or agencies. The Board is responsible for...

150

Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets for the Hawaiian Islands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 2009, AWS Truepower was engaged by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a set of wind resource and plant output data for the Hawaiian Islands. The objective of this project was to expand the methods and techniques employed in the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) to include the state of Hawaii.

Manobianco, J.; Alonge, C.; Frank, J.; Brower, M.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Development of regional climate scenarios in the Netherlands -involvement of users  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the impacts of climate change + for adaptation strategies To ensure that the developed climate scenarios required, because users' requirements can be very diverse and may change over time Meetings with climate of users and limitations to deliver certain types of climate data Adapt information and communication

Haak, Hein

152

A regional economic impact model for identifying the relationship between transportation investments and economic development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF CONTENTS Chapter Page I INTRODUCIION 1. 1 General Background 1. 2 Objectives of the Research 1. 3 Summary of Research Plan 1. 4 Thesis Organization II LITERATURE REVIEW I I I OVERVIEW OF THE REIMHS MODEL 14 3. 1 Distribution of the Monetary... Investment Among the Relevant Highway Industries 14 3. 2 Estimation of Monetary Benefits Associated with Efficiency, Mobility, and Safety Improvements I 6 3. 3 Development of Matrix of Integrated Results 21 3. 4 Multiplier Matrices and the Resulting...

Freyre, German Eleodoro

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

UNECE-Transport for Sustainable Development in the ECE Region | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,Save Energy Now Jump to:Development Reports Jump to:

154

Best Practices for Sustainable WInd Energy Development in the Great Lakes Region and Beyond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document offers a menu of 18 different, yet complimentary preferred practices and policies. The best practices cover all phases of the wind energy development process - from the policies that allow for wind development, to the sustainable operation of a wind project, to the best practices for decommissioning a spent turbine - including applications for offshore wind. The practices include those that have been previously tested and proven effective, as well as new practices that were identified by experts in the field as needed for future wind developments. Each best practice includes information about the opportunities and challenges (pros and cons), and offers a case example that illustrates how that best practice is being utilized by a particular jurisdiction or wind project. The practices described in this publication were selected by a diverse group of interests from the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative that included environmental groups, industry, and federal, state and local government regulators. They were identified through a year long process that included a literature review, online survey and interviews with individuals from the public, private and non-profit sectors.

Great Lakes Commission; Victoria Pebbles; John Hummer; Celia Haven

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

155

Measurement of attitudes toward commercial development of geothermal energy in Federal Region IX. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey was conducted of ten target study groups and subgroups for Klamath Falls, Oregon, and Susanville, California: local government, current and potential industry at the site, relocators to the site, current and potential financial community, regulators, and current and potential promoters and developers. The results of benchmark attitudinal measurement is presented separately for each target group. A literature review was conducted and Macro-environmental attitudes of a sample of local government and industry personnel at the sites were assessed. An assessment of capabilities was made which involved two measurements. The first was a measurement of a sample of promoters, developers, and industrial service companies active at the site to determine infrastructure capabilities required by industry for geothermal plants. The second measurement involved analyzing a sample of industry management in the area and defining their requirements for plant retrofit and expansion. Finally, the processes used by the study group to analyze information to reach commitment and regulatory decisions that significantly impact on geothermal energy projects at the site were identified and defined.

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Hydroelectric Resources on State Lands (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter authorizes the leasing of state lands for the development of hydroelectric resources. It provides regulations for the granting and duration of leases, as well as for the inspection of...

157

Management and Use of Public Lands (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation may elect to lease its lands for the development of mineral interests (defined herein as petroleum, natural gas, coal, ore, rock and any other...

158

Wilderness designation of Bureau of Land Management lands and impacts on the availability of energy resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1964 Congress mandated the establishment of the National Wilderness Preservation System - a collection of federal lands dedicated to the preservation of selected parts of our once vast wilderness. Because wilderness management precludes many traditional land uses, controversy has plagued the efforts of land-management agencies to select and recommend areas for wilderness inclusion. This study examines potential impacts on the supply of energy resources from the possible withdrawal by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) of some part of the 24.3 million acres of public lands now under study for inclusion in the wilderness system. Except for uranium, the energy-resource potential of the total WSA-acreage is low. Wilderness designation of some WSAs is therefore not expected to cause serious impacts on the future availability of energy resources. Because the significance of land withdrawals by the BLM will depend to some extent on the availability of other federal lands for mineral activities, an up-to-date estimate of the current and future status-of-access to western federal lands for mineral activities was prepared. Overall conclusions of the report are that (1) the inclusion of some BLM land in the National Wilderness Preservation System will not interfere with the nation's required supply of energy resources, (2) there is sufficient federal land currently available in the West for mineral activities, (3) the availability of western federal land for mineral activities will increase in the future, (4) the administration should continue to support the major land-review programs, and (5) the administration should accelerate the review process for WSAs in regions that have a high energy-resource potential.

Oakes, E.H.; Voelker, A.H.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Sustainable Land Management Through Market-Oriented Commodity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Market-Oriented Commodity Development: Case studies from Ethiopia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Land Management Through Market-Oriented...

160

Geothermal Direct-Use — Minimizing Land Use and Impact  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

With geothermal direct-use applications, land use issues usually only arise during exploration and development when geothermal reservoirs are located in or near urbanized areas, critical habitat...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Bureau of Land Management, Colorado collaborate to advance efficient...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colorado collaborate to advance efficient geothermal development Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Memorandum: Bureau of Land Management, Colorado...

162

Gaseous Chemistry and Aerosol Mechanism Developments for Version 3.5.1 of the Online Regional Model, WRF-Chem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have made a number of developments in the regional coupled model WRF-Chem, with the aim of making the model more suitable for prediction of atmospheric composition and of interactions between air quality and weather. We have worked on the European domain, with a particular focus on making the model suitable for the study of night time chemistry and oxidation by the nitrate radical in the UK atmosphere. A reduced form of the Common Reactive Intermediates gas-phase chemical mechanism (CRIv2-R5) has been implemented to enable more explicit simulation of VOC degradation. N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry has been added to the existing sectional MOSAIC aerosol module, and coupled to both the CRIv2-R5 and existing CBM-Z gas phase scheme. Modifications have also been made to the sea-spray aerosol emission representation, allowing the inclusion of primary organic material in sea-spray aerosol. Driven by appropriate emissions, wind fields and chemical boundary conditions, implementation of the different developments is illustrated in order to demonstrate the impact that these changes have in the North-West European domain. These developments are now part of the freely available WRF-Chem distribution.

Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Lowe, Douglas; Utembe, Steve; Allan, James D.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Fast, Jerome D.; Hodnebrog, Oivind; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; McFiggans, Gordon

2014-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

163

VOCALS: The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

VOCALS (VAMOS* Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) is an international CLIVAR program the major goal of which is to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding of the Southeast Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system on diurnal to inter-annual timescales. The principal program objectives are: 1) the improved understanding and regional/global model representation of aerosol indirect effects over the SEP; 2) the elimination of systematic errors in the region of coupled atmospheric-ocean general circulation models, and improved model simulations and predictions of the coupled climate in the SEP and global impacts of the system variability. VOCALS is organized into two tightly coordinated components: 1) a Regional Experiment (VOCALSREx), and 2) a Modeling Program (VOCALS-Mod). Extended observations (e.g. IMET buoy, satellites, EPIC/PACS cruises) will provide important additional contextual datasets that help to link the field and the modeling components. The coordination through VOCALS of observational and modeling efforts (Fig. 3) will accelerate the rate at which field data can be used to improve simulations and predictions of the tropical climate variability [Copied from the Vocals Program Summary of June 2007, available as a link from the VOCALS web at http://www.eol.ucar.edu/projects/vocals/]. The CLIVAR sponsored program to under which VOCALS falls is VAMOS, which stands for Variability of the American Monsoon Systems.

Wood, Robert (VOCALS-REx PI, University of Washington); Bretherton, Christopher (GEWEX/GCSS Representative, University of Washington); Huebert, Barry (SOLAS Representative, University of Hawaii); Mechoso, Roberto C. (VOCALS Science Working Group Chair, UCLA); Weller, Robert (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

164

Leveraging Regional Exploration to Develop Geologic Framework for CO2 Storage in Deep Formations in Midwestern United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Obtaining subsurface data for developing a regional framework for geologic storage of CO{sub 2} can require drilling and characterization in a large number of deep wells, especially in areas with limited pre-existing data. One approach for achieving this objective, without the prohibitive costs of drilling costly standalone test wells, is to collaborate with the oil and gas drilling efforts in a piggyback approach that can provide substantial cost savings and help fill data gaps in areas that may not otherwise get characterized. This leveraging with oil/gas drilling also mitigates some of the risk involved in standalone wells. This collaborative approach has been used for characterizing in a number of locations in the midwestern USA between 2005 and 2009 with funding from U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE award: DE-FC26-05NT42434) and in-kind contributions from a number of oil and gas operators. The results are presented in this final technical report. In addition to data collected under current award, selected data from related projects such as the Midwestern Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} storage project at and near the Mountaineer Plant, and the drilling of the Ohio Stratigraphic well in Eastern Ohio are discussed and used in the report. Data from this effort are also being incorporated into the MRCSP geologic mapping. The project activities were organized into tracking and evaluation of characterization opportunities; participation in the incremental drilling, basic and advanced logging in selected wells; and data analysis and reporting. Although a large number of opportunities were identified and evaluated, only a small subset was carried into the field stage. Typical selection factors included reaching an acceptable agreement with the operator, drilling and logging risks, and extent of pre-existing data near the candidate wells. The region of study is primarily along the Ohio River Valley corridor in the Appalachian Basin, which underlies large concentrations of CO{sub 2} emission sources. In addition, some wells in the Michigan basin are included. Assessment of the geologic and petrophysical properties of zones of interest has been conducted. Although a large number of formations have been evaluated across the geologic column, the primary focus has been on evaluating the Cambrian sandstones (Mt. Simon, Rose Run, Kerbel) and carbonates layers (Knox Dolomite) as well as on the Silurian-Devonian carbonates (Bass Island, Salina) and sandstones (Clinton, Oriskany, Berea). Factors controlling the development of porosity and permeability, such as the depositional setting have been explored. In northern Michigan the Bass Islands Dolomite appears to have favorable reservoir development. In west central Michigan the St. Peter sandstone exhibits excellent porosity in the Hart and Feuring well and looks promising. In Southeastern Kentucky in the Appalachian Basin, the Batten and Baird well provided valuable data on sequestration potential in organic shales through adsorption. In central and eastern Ohio and western West Virginia, the majority of the wells provided an insight to the complex geologic framework of the relatively little known Precambrian through Silurian potential injection targets. Although valuable data was acquired and a number of critical data gaps were filled through this effort, there are still many challenges ahead and questions that need answered. The lateral extent to which favorable potential injection conditions exist in most reservoirs is still generally uncertain. The prolongation of the characterization of regional geologic framework through partnership would continue to build confidence and greatly benefit the overall CO{sub 2} sequestration effort.

Neeraj Gupta

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

165

Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Control Lands (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

No regulated activity or development is allowed to take place on lands used for flood control purposes unless a permit is obtained. These regulations describe provisions for the application,...

166

Land application of sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book is the proceedings of a workshop held in Las Vegas, NV in 1985 entitled Effects of Sewage Sludge Quality and Soil Properties on Plant Uptake of Sludge-Applied Trace Constituents. The workshop was in response to the need to utilize the most current available information in the development of regulations and criteria to safely apply and manage the land application of municipal sewage sludge. The participants were undoubtedly the most knowledgeable of this subject matter, and were divided into five separate but related task groups. The groups addressed the following sludge-related topics: (1) role of soil properties on accumulation of trace element by crops; (2) role of sludge properties on accumulation of trace elements by crops; (3) influence of long-term application on accumulation of trace elements by crops; (4) transfer of trace elements to the food chain, and (5) effects of trace organics in agroecosystems and their risk assessment to humans. The text, therefore, parallels those of the results of the task groups. The five main chapters followed a similar format, i.e., having an introduction section, a comprehensive literature review, discussion of recent and current data, and synthesis of the most relevant information.

Page, A.L.; Logan, T.J.; Ryan, J.A. (eds.)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Local Governance, Creativity and Regional Development in Newfoundland and Labrador Lessons for Policy and Practice from Two Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..........................................18 Greg Spencer ­ Social Dimensions of Creativity and Innovation in Canadian City-Regions: A Brief............................................................................9 Innovation and Creativity in City-Regions................................................................................10 Innovation and Creativity in Small Cities on the Periphery

deYoung, Brad

168

Methods to Develop Energy Baselines for California's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and implement land use and transportation policies designed to reduce energy consumption and its negative Program, Transportation Research Office Phone: 9163271315 Email: dgallagh@energy.state.ca.us DrMethods to Develop Energy Baselines for California's Regions Transportation Energy Research PIER

169

Annual Proceedings of Vidzeme University of Applied Sciences "ICTE in Regional Development", 2009/2010 INTRODUCTION TO TECHNOLOGIES ACCEPTANCE AND SUSTAINABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and sustainability assessment is vital for technology developers and investors in the decision making process becauseAnnual Proceedings of Vidzeme University of Applied Sciences "ICTE in Regional Development", 2009/2010 61 INTRODUCTION TO TECHNOLOGIES ACCEPTANCE AND SUSTAINABILITY MODELLING Zane Barkane, Egils Ginters

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

170

Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South Park, Park County, Colorado 2003 Delivery Colorado State University #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South place from unique wetlands to high quality grasslands to the bristlecone pine forests to its alpine

171

Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitions in southern Amazonia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008 Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitionsto atmospheric carbon emissions, including forest conversionthe major sources of emissions from fires in this region.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Hadron Production Model Developments and Benchmarking in the 0.7 - 12 GeV Energy Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Driven by the needs of the intensity frontier projects with their Megawatt beams, e.g., ESS, FAIR and Project X, and their experiments, the event generators of the MARS15 code have been recently improved. After thorough analysis and benchmarking against data, including the newest ones by the HARP collaboration, both the exclusive and inclusive particle production models were further developed in the crucial for the above projects - but difficult from a theoretical standpoint - projectile energy region of 0.7 to 12 GeV. At these energies, modelling of prompt particle production in nucleon-nucleon and pion-nucleon inelastic reactions is now based on a combination of phase-space and isobar models. Other reactions are still modeled in the framework of the Quark-Gluon String Model. Pion, kaon and strange particle production and propagation in nuclear media are improved. For the alternative inclusive mode, experimental data on large-angle (> 20 degrees) pion production in hadron-nucleus interactions are parameterized in a broad energy range using a two-source model. It is mixed-and-matched with the native MARS model that successfully describes low-angle pion production data. Predictions of both new models are - in most cases - in a good agreement with experimental data obtained at CERN, JINR, LANL, BNL and KEK.

N. V. Mokhov; K. K. Gudima; S. I. Striganov

2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

173

Uncertainty Discounting for Land-Based Carbon Sequestration Man-Keun Kim  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Uncertainty Discounting for Land-Based Carbon Sequestration By Man-Keun Kim Post Doctoral Fellow Discounting for Land-Based Carbon Sequestration Abstract The effect of various stochastic factors like weather% to 10% for the East Texas region. #12;3 Uncertainty Discounting for Land-Based Carbon Sequestration 1

McCarl, Bruce A.

174

A study of land reform and its impact in the Greater Letaba Local Municipality of the Mopani District in the Limpopo Province.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Since the dawn of democracy in South Africa, numerous land reform projects have been approved by the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform. This… (more)

Malahlela, Tebogo.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Environmental technology and policy development in a regional system : transboundary water management and pollution prevention in southeastern Europe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to surmount the barriers to transboundary integration and coordination of environmental technology and regulatory policy in Southeastern Europe, the environmental capabilities and needs of the region are discussed, ...

Electris, Christi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

A framework for benchmarking land models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land models, which have been developed by the modeling community in the past few decades to predict future states of ecosystems and climate, have to be critically evaluated for their performance skills of simulating ecosystem responses and feedback to climate change. Benchmarking is an emerging procedure to measure performance of models against a set of defined standards. This paper proposes a benchmarking framework for evaluation of land model performances and, meanwhile, highlights major challenges at this infant stage of benchmark analysis. The framework includes (1) targeted aspects of model performance to be evaluated, (2) a set of benchmarks as defined references to test model performance, (3) metrics to measure and compare performance skills among models so as to identify model strengths and deficiencies, and (4) model improvement. Land models are required to simulate exchange of water, energy, carbon and sometimes other trace gases between the atmosphere and land surface, and should be evaluated for their simulations of biophysical processes, biogeochemical cycles, and vegetation dynamics in response to climate change across broad temporal and spatial scales. Thus, one major challenge is to select and define a limited number of benchmarks to effectively evaluate land model performance. The second challenge is to develop metrics of measuring mismatches between models and benchmarks. The metrics may include (1) a priori thresholds of acceptable model performance and (2) a scoring system to combine data–model mismatches for various processes at different temporal and spatial scales. The benchmark analyses should identify clues of weak model performance to guide future development, thus enabling improved predictions of future states of ecosystems and climate. The near-future research effort should be on development of a set of widely acceptable benchmarks that can be used to objectively, effectively, and reliably evaluate fundamental properties of land models to improve their prediction performance skills.

Luo, Yiqi; Randerson, J.; Abramowitz, G.; Bacour, C.; Blyth, E.; Carvalhais, N.; Ciais, Philippe; Dalmonech, D.; Fisher, J.B.; Fisher, R.; Friedlingstein, P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Hoffman, F. M.; Huntzinger, Deborah; Jones, C.; Koven, C.; Lawrence, David M.; Li, D.J.; Mahecha, M.; Niu, S.L.; Norby, Richard J.; Piao, S.L.; Qi, X.; Peylin, P.; Prentice, I.C.; Riley, William; Reichstein, M.; Schwalm, C.; Wang, Y.; Xia, J. Y.; Zaehle, S.; Zhou, X. H.

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

177

Productivity, livelihood and risk in large-scale land acquisition and contract farming   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent reports on “land and water grabs” in low-income countries gained attention in the international development community as these forms of investments in agricultural land often cause human rights violations and negative environmental impacts...

Gärtner, Elisa

2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

178

The gift of good, vacant land : urban agriculture and redevelopment in the city of Baltimore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Urban agriculture in US cities has historically been treated as an interim land use, deemed only appropriate when real estate markets do not support the development of vacant land. However, urban agriculture in the 21st ...

Cook, Andrew (Andrew John)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Effects of planning and policy decisions on residential land use in Singapore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study of current land use in Singapore shows that through effective long-term space planning, the island city-state has maintained an adequate stock of developable residential land to meet its most ambitious maximum ...

Davis, Noel R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

National Forest Land Scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Community Right to Buy. Communities are encouraged to register an interest in the land they wish to buy Ministers to make a late registration of interest. When Forestry Commission Scotland decides to sell, a community organisation could consider the opportunities for working in partnership with Forestry Commission

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Clearing Debris from Land  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

level. Burial ? Tree debris can be buried, but the cost is high. ? Use a chipping machine to eliminate smaller branches and reduce the amount of burial space needed. Landfill ? You can place tree debris in erosion gullies (where the land is not prac...

McFarland, Mark L.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

182

Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Land and Water Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Land and Water Resources Submitted to Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, SLH 2007, Part III, "The primary objective of the bioenergy master plan shall be to develop a Hawaii of any bioenergy crops in Hawaii is the availability of the land and water necessary to produce

183

Geospatial Analysis of Renewable Energy Technical Potential on Tribal Lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical report uses an established geospatial methodology to estimate the technical potential for renewable energy on tribal lands for the purpose of allowing Tribes to prioritize the development of renewable energy resources either for community scale on-tribal land use or for revenue generating electricity sales.

Doris, E.; Lopez, A.; Beckley, D.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Environment and Land in Bushbuckridge, South Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environment and Land in Bushbuckridge, South Africa © 2002, Professor Robert Thornton Department of Anthropology University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa Acknowledgements: Research), and by the Centre for Science Development, Human Sciences Research Council, Pretoria, South Africa. Printed:24 April

185

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

Brown, S.

2002-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

186

Aggressive landing maneuvers for unmanned aerial vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VTOL (Vertical Take Off and Landing) vehicle landing is considered to be a critically difficult task for both land, marine, and urban operations. This thesis describes one possible control approach to enable landing of ...

Bayraktar, Selcuk

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Utilizing CLASIC observations and multiscale models to study the impact of improved Land surface representation on modeling cloud- convection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CLASIC experiment was conducted over the US southern great plains (SGP) in June 2007 with an objective to lead an enhanced understanding of the cumulus convection particularly as it relates to land surface conditions. This project was design to help assist with understanding the overall improvement of land atmosphere convection initiation representation of which is important for global and regional models. The study helped address one of the critical documented deficiency in the models central to the ARM objectives for cumulus convection initiation and particularly under summer time conditions. This project was guided by the scientific question building on the CLASIC theme questions: What is the effect of improved land surface representation on the ability of coupled models to simulate cumulus and convection initiation? The focus was on the US Southern Great Plains region. Since the CLASIC period was anomalously wet the strategy has been to use other periods and domains to develop the comparative assessment for the CLASIC data period, and to understand the mechanisms of the anomalous wet conditions on the tropical systems and convection over land. The data periods include the IHOP 2002 field experiment that was over roughly same domain as the CLASIC in the SGP, and some of the DOE funded Ameriflux datasets.

Niyogi, Devdutta S. [Purdue

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

188

Renewable Energy Development on Federal Lands 2014  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Through presentations and panel discussions, attendees at this conference will have the opportunity to:

189

Ewing Land Development Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It isInformationexplains a4Evendale, Ohio:Fieldblog/2781 en

190

Is Florida's Growth Management Act protecting agricultural lands?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Florida has experienced more population growth over the past half century than any other state, which has led to some of the most extensive urban development on valuable agricultural lands. To address this and other impacts ...

Lloyd, Stephen (Stephen Charles Rhys)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Deployment of Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency on Indian Lands  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Up to $7 million in funding is available to accelerate clean energy development on tribal lands. Through this funding opportunity announcement (FOA), the Tribal Energy Program, in cooperation with...

192

ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Environmental Database Development and Management · Storm Water Modeling #12;ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS CEMML of environmental managers. The Center provides assistance to environmental managers in compliance areas such as air

193

www.extension.ucdavis.edu/landuse Land Use and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

includes courses on land use, environmental law and policy, natural resources management, water policy, water quality management, housing and community development, transportation management, GIS applications.......................................................................13 A Low Impact Design Approach to Storm Water Management........................................13

Thomases, Becca

194

Land use and climate change in Miami-Dade County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Miami-Dade County, Florida, was one of the earliest jurisdictions to adopt a climate change plan in 1993. Land use features prominently in this plan as a means to reduce greenhouse gases through development patterns that ...

Peckett, Haley Rose

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Computer program design for land treatment systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Municipal Sludge Land Application expert System (MuSLAXS)is as expert system developed for site assessment and design analysis of municipal sludge application on agricultural land. The system has knowledge on the technical and regulatory aspects of sludge land application and understanding of soil-plant systems for South Carolina. It can be effectively used outside South Carolina with modifications to incorporate specific regulations on land treatment and soil and crop database. A database supports this expert system and provides appropriate default values for sludge and soil characteristics, and fertilizer recommendations for crops commonly grown in South Carolina. Information on the sludge characteristics is gathered from the user, if it is available, or it is retrieved from the sludge database. Based on the recommendations by the EPA and the expert, a list of 22 constituents, for which the sludge should be analyzed is developed. This list includes: total solids, volatile solids, total nitrogen (TNK), ammonia-nitrogen, organic-nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sulfur, cadmium, copper, lead, nickel, zinc, PCBs, calcium, magnesium, chromium, boron, arsenic, aluminum, cobalt, and molybdenum.

White, R.K. (Clemson Univ. SC (USA)); Jantrania, A.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Regional Review on Status and Trends in Aquaculture Development in North America: Canada and the United States of America — 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic Zone. Highlights of the bill include: a permitting process;economic zone; encourage the development of environmentally responsible offshore aquaculture by authorizing offshore aquaculture operations and research; establish a permitting process

Olin, Paul G.; Smith, James; Nabi, Rashed

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Regional Review on Status and Trends in Aquaculture Development in North America: Canada and the United States of America — 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a high-energy, low-phosphorous feed developed by thea better FCR and reduced phosphorous waste as compared withan overall reduction in phosphorous output by 36 percent.

Olin, Paul G.; Smith, James; Nabi, Rashed

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Spreading lagooned sewage sludge on farm land: A case history  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of a project involving the application of approximately 265,000 cubic meters of lagooned sewage sludge from a metropolitan area on privately-owned farm land in an adjacent, rural county. The sludge application project was initiated to enable use of the land occupied by the lagoons for expansion of the sewage treatment plant. The procedures developed will be valuable to those proposing to practice land disposal of stabilized sludge as part of the Nation`s resource conservation program.

Robson, C.M.; Sommers, L.E.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Idaho National Laboratory Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land and facility use planning and decisions at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site are guided by a comprehensive site planning process in accordance with Department of Energy Policy 430.1, 'Land and Facility Use Policy,' that integrates mission, economic, ecologic, social, and cultural factors. The INL Ten-Year Site Plan, prepared in accordance with Department of Energy Order 430.1B, 'Real Property Asset Management,' outlines the vision and strategy to transform INL to deliver world-leading capabilities that will enable the Department of Energy to accomplish its mission. Land use planning is the overarching function within real property asset management that integrates the other functions of acquisition, recapitalization, maintenance, disposition, real property utilization, and long-term stewardship into a coordinated effort to ensure current and future mission needs are met. All land and facility use projects planned at the INL Site are considered through a formal planning process that supports the Ten-Year Site Plan. This Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report describes that process. The land use planning process identifies the current condition of existing land and facility assets and the scope of constraints across INL and in the surrounding region. Current land use conditions are included in the Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report and facility assets and scope of constraints are discussed in the Ten-Year Site Plan. This report also presents the past, present, and future uses of land at the INL Site that are considered during the planning process, as well as outlining the future of the INL Site for the 10, 30, and 100-year timeframes.

No name listed on publication

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis (Revised)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than half of the electricity produced in the southeastern states is fuelled by coal. Although the region produces some coal, most of the states depend heavily on coal imports. Many of the region's aging coal power facilities are planned for retirement within the next 20 years. However, estimates indicate that a 20% increase in capacity is needed over that time to meet the rapidly growing demand. The most common incentives for energy efficiency in the Southeast are loans and rebates; however, total public spending on energy efficiency is limited. The most common state-level policies to support renewable energy development are personal and corporate tax incentives and loans. The region produced 1.8% of the electricity from renewable resources other than conventional hydroelectricity in 2009, half of the national average. There is significant potential for development of a biomass market in the region, as well as use of local wind, solar, methane-to-energy, small hydro, and combined heat and power resources. Options are offered for expanding and strengthening state-level policies such as decoupling, integrated resource planning, building codes, net metering, and interconnection standards to support further clean energy development. Benefits would include energy security, job creation, insurance against price fluctuations, increased value of marginal lands, and local and global environmental paybacks.

McLaren, J.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Evaluating land application effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Philadelphia, PA Water Department embarked on a land application program of its treated wastewater sludge in 1977. Initially, liquid sludge averaging from 1-5% solids was applied to approximately 400 acres of corn, soybeans, and sod at rates sufficient to supply crop nitrogen needs. During the 1978 through 1984 growing seasons, crops and soils were monitored for heavy metals (bioavailability of cadmium, copper, nickel, chromium, lead and zinc) and in 1984 for PCB accumulation. This report summarizes results of the monitoring program until 1984.

Sarkis, K. (Philadelphia Water Department, PA (USA))

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Proposed Conveyance of Land  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for4-16HamadaBaO/Al2O3 leanProposalConveyance of Land at the

203

2014 REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014 REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK #12;2014 REGIONAL ECONOMIC OUTLOOK 2014 Overview The Cincinnati USA Partnership for Economic Development and the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce are pleased to present the 2014 Regional Economic Outlook. This report was prepared by the Cincinnati USA Partnership's Regional

Boyce, Richard L.

204

Absentee Landowners Near a Military Installation in Texas: Use, Motivation, and Emotional Tie to their Land  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................................................... 97 Family land. ........................................................................................................................... 98 Leasing land.... ......................................................................................................................... 117 Leasing land. ....................................................................................................................... 118 Hunting on land...

Dankert, Amber 1980-

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

205

AWEA Wind Energy Regional Summit: Northeast  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The AWEA Wind Energy Northeast Regional Summit will connect you with New England-area wind energy professionals and offers the opportunity to discuss significant issues related to land-based and...

206

A Subbasin-based framework to represent land surface processes in an Earth System Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Realistically representing spatial heterogeneity and lateral land surface processes within and between modeling units in earth system models is important because of their implications to surface energy and water exchange. The traditional approach of using regular grids as computational units in land surface models and earth system models may lead to inadequate representation of lateral movements of water, energy and carbon fluxes, especially when the grid resolution increases. Here a new subbasin-based framework is introduced in the Community Land Model (CLM), which is the land component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Local processes are represented assuming each subbasin as a grid cell on a pseudo grid matrix with no significant modifications to the existing CLM modeling structure. Lateral routing of water within and between subbasins is simulated with the subbasin version of a recently-developed physically based routing model, Model for Scale Adaptive River Routing (MOSART). As an illustration, this new framework is implemented in the topographically diverse region of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The modeling units (subbasins) are delineated from high-resolution Digital Elevation Model while atmospheric forcing and surface parameters are remapped from the corresponding high resolution datasets. The impacts of this representation on simulating hydrologic processes are explored by comparing it with the default (grid-based) CLM representation. In addition, the effects of DEM resolution on parameterizing topography and the subsequent effects on runoff processes are investigated. Limited model evaluation and comparison showed that small difference between the averaged forcing can lead to more significant difference in the simulated runoff and streamflow because of nonlinear horizontal processes. Topographic indices derived from high resolution DEM may not improve the overall water balance, but affect the partitioning between surface and subsurface runoff. More systematic analyses are needed to determine the relative merits of the subbasin representation compared to the commonly used grid-based representation, especially when land surface models are approaching higher resolutions.

Tesfa, Teklu K.; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Sun, Yu; Liu, Ying

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

207

Baselines For Land-Use Change In The Tropics: Application ToAvoided Deforestation Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although forest conservation activities particularly in thetropics offer significant potential for mitigating carbon emissions,these types of activities have faced obstacles in the policy arena causedby the difficulty in determining key elements of the project cycle,particularly the baseline. A baseline for forest conservation has twomain components: the projected land-use change and the correspondingcarbon stocks in the applicable pools such as vegetation, detritus,products and soil, with land-use change being the most difficult toaddress analytically. In this paper we focus on developing and comparingthree models, ranging from relatively simple extrapolations of pasttrends in land use based on simple drivers such as population growth tomore complex extrapolations of past trends using spatially explicitmodels of land-use change driven by biophysical and socioeconomicfactors. The three models of the latter category used in the analysis atregional scale are The Forest Area Change (FAC) model, the Land Use andCarbon Sequestration (LUCS) model, and the Geographical Modeling (GEOMOD)model. The models were used to project deforestation in six tropicalregions that featured different ecological and socioeconomic conditions,population dynamics, and uses of the land: (1) northern Belize; (2) SantaCruz State, Bolivia; (3) Parana State in Brazil; (4) Campeche, Mexico;(5) Chiapas, Mexico; and (6) Michoacan, Mexico. A comparison of all modeloutputs across all six regions shows that each model produced quitedifferent deforestation baseline. In general, the simplest FAC model,applied at the national administrative-unit scale, projected the highestamount of forest loss (four out of six) and the LUCS model the leastamount of loss (four out of five). Based on simulations of GEOMOD, wefound that readily observable physical and biological factors as well asdistance to areas of past disturbance were each about twice as importantas either sociological/demographic or economic/infrastructure factors(less observable) in explaining empirical land-use patterns. We proposefrom the lessons learned, a methodology comprised of three main steps andsix tasks can be used to begin developing credible baselines. We alsopropose that the baselines be projected over a 10-year period because,although projections beyond 10 years are feasible, they are likely to beunrealistic for policy purposes. In the first step, an historic land-usechange and deforestation estimate is made by determining the analyticdomain (size of the region relative to the size of proposed project),obtaining historic data, analyzing candidate historic baseline drivers,and identifying three to four major drivers. In the second step, abaseline of where deforestation is likely to occur --a potential land-usechange (PLUC) map is produced using a spatial model such as GEOMOD thatuses the key drivers from step one. Then rates of deforestation areprojected over a 10-year baseline period using any of the three models.Using the PLUC maps, projected rates of deforestation, and carbon stockestimates, baselineprojections are developed that can be used for projectGHG accounting and crediting purposes: The final step proposes that, atagreed interval (eg, +10 years), the baseline assumptions about baselinedrivers be re-assessed. This step reviews the viability of the 10-yearbaseline in light of changes in one or more key baseline drivers (e.g.,new roads, new communities, new protected area, etc.). The potentialland-use change map and estimates of rates of deforestation could beredone at the agreed interval, allowing the rates and changes in spatialdrivers to be incorporated into a defense of the existing baseline, orderivation of a new baseline projection.

Brown, Sandra; Hall, Myrna; Andrasko, Ken; Ruiz, Fernando; Marzoli, Walter; Guerrero, Gabriela; Masera, Omar; Dushku, Aaron; Dejong,Ben; Cornell, Joseph

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Land Stewardship | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Improvements are implemented with consideration of adjacent land uses, owners, and political entities. Success is defined when measurable parameters are achieved. Scope The team...

209

Comparing and modeling land use organization in cities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The advent of geolocated ICT technologies opens the possibility of exploring how people use space in cities, bringing an important new tool for urban scientists and planners, especially for regions where data is scarce or not available. Here we apply a functional network approach to determine land use patterns from mobile phone records. The versatility of the method allows us to run a systematic comparison between Spanish cities of various sizes. The method detects four major land use types that correspond to different temporal patterns. The proportion of these types, their spatial organization and scaling show a strong similarity between all cities that breaks down at a very local scale, where land use mixing is specific to each urban area. Finally, we introduce a model inspired by Schelling's segregation, able to explain and reproduce these results with simple interaction rules between different land uses.

Lenormand, Maxime; Cantú-Ros, Oliva G; Louail, Thomas; Herranz, Ricardo; Barthelemy, Marc; Frías-Martínez, Enrique; Miguel, Maxi San; Ramasco, José J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant land management plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On October 30, 1992, the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act became law. This Act transferred the responsibility for the management of the WIPP Land Withdrawal Area (WILWA) from the Secretary of the Interior to the Secretary of Energy. In accordance with sections 3(a)(1) and (3) of the Act, these lands {open_quotes}{hor_ellipsis}are withdrawn from all forms of entry, appropriation, and disposal under the public land laws{hor_ellipsis}{close_quotes}and are reserved for the use of the Secretary of Energy {open_quotes}{hor_ellipsis}for the construction, experimentation, operation, repair and maintenance, disposal, shutdown, monitoring, decommissioning, and other activities, associated with the purposes of WIPP as set forth in the Department of Energy National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear Energy Act of 1980 and this Act.{close_quotes}. As a complement to this LMP, a MOU has been executed between the DOE and the BLM, as required by section 4(d) of the Act. The state of New Mexico was consulted in the development of the MOU and the associated Statement of Work (SOW).

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Bloom, fruit development, and embryo development of peaches in a mild-winter region, and use of percent dry weight of ovule as a maturity index  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Station, Texas (lat. 30 35'N, long. 96 21'S; elevation 96 meters) was established in 1935 and began developing early-ripening, medium chilling-requirement (CR) (350-700 CR) cultivars in the 1970's and low CR (100-300 CR) cultivars in the 1980's... by the CR of the cultivar and the heat unit accumulation after chilling. In higher latitudes, the influence of CR on time of ripening is minimized because all cultivars, regardless of CR, have their chilling requirement satisfied during the winter...

Bacon, Terry A

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Autonomous land navigation in a structured environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a hardware and software system developed to perform autonomous navigation of a land vehicle in a structured environment. The vehicle used for development and testing of the system was the Jeep Cherokee Mobile Robotics Testbed Vehicle developed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque. Since obstacle detection and avoidance have not yet been incorporated into the system, a structured environment is postulated that presumes the paths to be traversed are free of obstacles. The system performs path planning and execution based on maps constructed using the vehicle's on board navigation system and map-maker. The system software, hardware and performance data are discussed.

Klarer, P.R. (Sandia National Lab., Advanced Technology Div., Albuquerque, NM (US))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Autonomous land navigation in a structured environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a hardware and software system developed to perform autonomous navigation of a land vehicle in a structured environment. The vehicle used for development and testing of the system was the Jeep Cherokee Mobile Robotics Testbed Vehicle developed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque. Since obstacle detection and avoidance have not yet been incorporated into the system, a structured environment is postulated that presumes the paths to be traversed are free of obstacles. The system performs path planning and execution based on maps constructed using the vehicle's onboard navigation system and mapmaker. The system software, hardware, and performance data are discussed. 6 refs.

Klarer, P.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

E-Print Network 3.0 - appalachian mined lands Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Appalachian State... of land-use history on the forest development of the Illinois Ozark Hills. B.S. Forest Science - Forest... AND RESEARCH APPOINTMENTS Assistant Professor...

215

Rock, Mineral, Coal, Oil, and Gas Resources on State Lands (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter authorizes and regulates prospecting permits and mining leases for the exploration and development of rock, mineral, oil, coal, and gas resources on state lands.

216

The potential use of land readjustment as an urban redevelopment strategy in the United States : assessing net economic value  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The land readjustment method of land assembly has an extensive international history, but is virtually unknown to professional planners and real estate developers in the United States. Its potential benefits are many. It ...

Schrock, Melissa (Melissa Alaine)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

ICTSD Project on Trade and Sustainable Land Management International Centre for Trade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Sustainable Development Selected Issue Briefs ICTSD Programme on Agricultural Trade and Sustainable Development Trade and Sustainable Land Management in Drylands August 2007 #12;#12;August 2007 ICTSD Programme on Agricultural Trade and Sustainable Development Trade and Sustainable Land Management in Drylands Selected Issue

218

Tuesday, March 14, 2006 SPECIAL SESSION: PHOENIX LANDING SITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polar cap have been characterized. This situation changed early in 2002 when large amounts of water ice. Regional melting and atmos- pheric exchange will affect all the soils. Science goal #1: Study the history of the Phoenix Mission Landing Site [#1910] The Phoenix mission will study the subsurface ice discovered in 2002

Rathbun, Julie A.

219

Sustainable bioenergy production from marginal lands in the US Midwest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-term measurements of global warming impact coupled with spatially explicit modeling suggests that both climate benefits and the production potential of cellulosic crops grown on marginal lands of the US North Central region are substantial but will be insufficient to meet long-term biofuel needs.

Gelfand, Ilya; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Gross, Katherine L.; Robertson, G. P.

2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

220

LAND USE CHANGE IN BRAZIL: INTEGRATING ECOLOGY, ECONOMICS AND POLICY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for smaller farmers to buy land and increased the incentives for migrating to the frontier generating a race ; It remains a frontier region, mainly due to the long distance from main centers; Almost 85% of its original the financial support to wait the advance of frontier to eventually begin any activity; #12;Also

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Penobscot Indian Nation's Strategic Energy Planning Efficiency on tribal Lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy grant provided the resources to evaluate the wind, hydro, biomass, geothermal and solar resource potential on all Penobscot Indian Naiton's Tribal lands. The two objectives address potential renewable energy resources available on tribal lands and energy efficiency measures to be taken after comprehensive energy audits of commercial facilities. Also, a Long Term Strategic Energy Plan was developed along with a plan to reduce high energy costs.

Sockalexis, Mike; Fields, Brenda

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

222

Oil and Gas on Public Lands (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The School Land Board may choose to lease lands for the production of oil and natural gas, on the condition that oil and gas resources are leased together and separate from other minerals. Lands...

223

An economic analysis of land use alternatives on CRP land trees after the CRP contracts expire in east Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Classification of east Texas region by Texas Forest Service Classification of east Texas region by Texas Agricultural Experiment Station Stumpage prices in current dollars ($/mbf) Stumpage prices in 1993 dollars ($/mbf) Pulpwood prices in current dollars... planting (Bates). Marginal pasturelands in or adjacent to riparian areas or land that would contribute to the protection of water quality became eligible for CRP provided trees were planted (USDA 1990, Bates). The Illinois Forest Department Act...

Arekere, Marigowda Dhananjaya

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Reduction of tropical land region precipitation variability via transpiration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tropical rainforests are known to exhibit low intraseasonal precipitation variability compared with oceanic areas with similar mean precipitation in observations and models. In the present study, the potential role of ...

Lee, Jung-Eun

225

Expectations of land value in rural and suburban regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Timberland has become a new and emerging asset class among investors. Institutional investors have committed large amounts of capital through the private equity market. Timber real estate investment trusts (REITs) have ...

Carlson, Dianna Marie

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Coupling the High Complexity Land Surface Model ACASA to the Mesoscale Model WRF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) is coupled with the Advanced Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm (ACASA), a high complexity land surface model. Although WRF is a state-of-the-art regional ...

Xu, L.

227

Isenberg and Potvin 1 Financing REDD in Developing Countries: A Supply and Demand Analysis.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an active participant in several regional negotiations in Latin2 America.3 4 Introduction5 Land use change constituent of15 total global CO2 emissions. In Latin America, for example, tropical deforestation is the16 at the centre of negotiations on a renewed international2 climate regime. Developing countries made it clear

Potvin, Catherine

228

Minerals on Public Lands (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Any tract of land that belongs to the state, including islands, salt and freshwater lakes, bays, inlets, marshes, and reefs owned by the state within tidewater limits, the part of the Gulf of...

229

Northeast Region Sustainable Development Partnership  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: History, Benefits, Conditions for Success...................... 56 D. Project Staff and Participants

Levinson, David M.

230

Aerosol Indirect Effect on the Grid-scale Clouds in the Two-way Coupled WRF-CMAQ: Model Description, Development, Evaluation and Regional Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study implemented first, second and glaciations aerosol indirect effects (AIE) on resolved clouds in the two-way coupled WRF-CMAQ modeling system by including parameterizations for both cloud drop and ice number concentrations on the basis of CMAQpredicted aerosol distributions and WRF meteorological conditions. The performance of the newly-developed WRF-CMAQ model, with alternate CAM and RRTMG radiation schemes, was evaluated with the observations from the CERES satellite and surface monitoring networks (AQS, IMPROVE, CASTNet, STN, and PRISM) over the continental U.S. (CONUS) (12-km resolution) and eastern Texas (4-km resolution) during August and September of 2006. The results at the AQS surface sites show that in August, the NMB values for PM2.5 over the eastern/western U.S (EUS/WUS) and western U.S. (WUS) are 5.3% (?0.1%) and 0.4% (-5.2%) for WRF-CMAQ/CAM (WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG), respectively. The evaluation of PM2.5 chemical composition reveals that in August, WRF-CMAQ/CAM (WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG) consistently underestimated the observed SO4 2? by -23.0% (-27.7%), -12.5% (-18.9%) and -7.9% (-14.8%) over the EUS at the CASTNet, IMPROVE and STN sites, respectively. Both models (WRF-CMAQ/CAM, WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG) overestimated the observed mean OC, EC and TC concentrations over the EUS in August at the IMPROVE sites. Both models generally underestimated the cloud field (SWCF) over the CONUS in August due to the fact that the AIE on the subgrid convective clouds was not considered when the model simulations were run at the 12 km resolution. This is in agreement with the fact that both models captured SWCF and LWCF very well for the 4-km simulation over the eastern Texas when all clouds were resolved by the finer domain. Both models generally overestimated the observed precipitation by more than 40% mainly because of significant overestimation in the southern part of the CONUS in August. The simulations of WRF-CMAQ/CAM and WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG show dramatic improvements for SWCF, LWCF, COD, cloud fractions and precipitation over the ocean relative to those of WRF default cases in August. The model performance in September is similar to that in August except for greater overestimation of PM2.5 due to the overestimations of SO4 2-, NH4 +, NO3 -, and TC over the EUS, less underestimation of clouds (SWCF) over the land areas due to about 10% lower SWCF values and less convective clouds in September.

Yu, Shaocai; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Wong, David; Gilliam, R.; Alapaty, Kiran; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong

2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

231

US Fish and Wildlife Service lands biomonitoring operations manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is Volume 1 of an operations manual designed to facilitate the development of biomonitoring strategies for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands. It is one component of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands Biomonitoring Operations Manual. The Volume contains the Introduction to the Manual, background information on monitoring, and procedures for developing a biomonitoring strategy for Service lands. The purpose of the Biomonitoring Operations Manual is to provide an approach to develop and implement biomonitoring activities to assess the status and trends of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service trust resources. It also provides field sampline methods and documentation protocols for contaminant monitoring activities. The strategy described in the Manual has been designed as a stand alone process to characterize the presence of contaminants on lands managed by the Service. This process can be sued to develop a monitoring program for any tract of real estate with potential threats from on- or off-site contaminants. Because the process was designed to address concerns for Service lands that span the United States from Alaska to the Tropical Islands, it has a generic format that can be used in al types of ecosystems, however, significant site specific informtion is required to complete the Workbook and make the process work successfully.

Rope, R.C.; Breckenridge, R.P.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Land Reclamation Program annual report, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Argonne Land Reclamation Program, sponsored by the United States Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, is a joint effort of two Argonne divisions: Energy and Environmental Systems and Environmental Impact Studies. The program is carried out by a multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers and has three primary objectives: (1) to develop energy-efficient and cost-effective mining and reclamation techniques; (2) to assist industry in evaluating the viability of environmental regulations and demonstrating techniques to meet these regulations; and (3) to supply data and evaluation techniques to decisionmakers concerned with trade-offs between energy development and environmental quality. Six integrated field research sites have been established to address problems associated with surface mining operations. This program relies heavily on input from industry and has developed working arrangements with coal companies at each of the current mining sites. A major area of interest is the development of a ten-year environmental mining and reclamation research plan for the Assistant Secretary for Environment. The Land Reclamation Program assigns the highest priority to the transfer to users of information generated by its research.

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

A Physically Based Runoff Routing Model for Land Surface and Earth System Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new physically based runoff routing model, called the Model for Scale Adaptive River Transport (MOSART), has been developed to be applicable across local, regional, and global scales. Within each spatial unit, surface runoff is first routed across hillslopes and then discharged along with subsurface runoff into a ‘‘tributary subnetwork’’ before entering the main channel. The spatial units are thus linked via routing through the main channel network, which is constructed in a scale-consistent way across different spatial resolutions. All model parameters are physically based, and only a small subset requires calibration.MOSART has been applied to the Columbia River basin at 1/ 168, 1/ 88, 1/ 48, and 1/ 28 spatial resolutions and was evaluated using naturalized or observed streamflow at a number of gauge stations. MOSART is compared to two other routing models widely used with land surface models, the River Transport Model (RTM) in the Community Land Model (CLM) and the Lohmann routing model, included as a postprocessor in the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model package, yielding consistent performance at multiple resolutions. MOSART is further evaluated using the channel velocities derived from field measurements or a hydraulic model at various locations and is shown to be capable of producing the seasonal variation and magnitude of channel velocities reasonably well at different resolutions. Moreover, the impacts of spatial resolution on model simulations are systematically examined at local and regional scales. Finally, the limitations ofMOSART and future directions for improvements are discussed.

Li, Hongyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Wu, Huan; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

234

Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change Changes · Due to ­ Climate Change ­ Land Cover / Land Use Change ­ Interaction of Climate and Land Cover Change · Resolution ­ Space ­ Time Hydro-Climatic Change · Variability vs. Change (Trends) · Point data

235

Mid-21st Century Changes to Surface Hydrology Over the Los Angeles Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regional climate and hydrology modeling. Earth Interactions,Brutsaert, W. , 2005. Hydrology: An Introduction. New York:advanced land-surface/hydrology model with the Penn State/

Schwartz, Marla Ann

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Autonomous land navigation: A demonstration of retrotraverse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a hardware and software system developed to perform autonomous navigation of a land vehicle in a structured environment. The vehicle used for development and testing of the system was the Jeep Cherokee Mobile Robotics Testbed Vehicle developed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque. Since obstacle detection/avoidance has not yet been incorporated into the system, a structured environment is postulated that presumes the paths to be traversed are obstacle-free. The system performs path planning and execution (following) based on maps constructed using the vehicle's navigation system and onboard map-maker. The system configuration allows a map to be generated and stored during teleoperation of the vehicle, which may then be inverted and autonomously followed to perform ''retrotraverse'' back to the path start point. The system software, hardware, and performance data are discussed. 9 refs.

Klarer, P.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Regional Climate Model Projections for the State of Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global climate models do not have sufficient spatial resolution to represent the atmospheric and land surface processes that determine the unique regional heterogeneity of the climate of the State of Washington. If future large-scale weather patterns interact differently with the local terrain and coastlines than current weather patterns, local changes in temperature and precipitation could be quite different from the coarse-scale changes projected by global models. Regional climate models explicitly simulate the interactions between the large-scale weather patterns simulated by a global model and the local terrain. We have performed two 100-year climate simulations using the Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). One simulation is forced by the NCAR Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) and the second is forced by a simulation of the Max Plank Institute, Hamburg, global model (ECHAM5). The mesoscale simulations produce regional changes in snow cover, cloudiness, and circulation patterns associated with interactions between the large-scale climate change and the regional topography and land-water contrasts. These changes substantially alter the temperature and precipitation trends over the region relative to the global model result or statistical downscaling. To illustrate this effect, we analyze the changes from the current climate (1970-1999) to the mid 21st century (2030-2059). Changes in seasonal-mean temperature, precipitation, and snowpack are presented. Several climatological indices of extreme daily weather are also presented: precipitation intensity, fraction of precipitation occurring in extreme daily events, heat wave frequency, growing season length, and frequency of warm nights. Despite somewhat different changes in seasonal precipitation and temperature from the two regional simulations, consistent results for changes in snowpack and extreme precipitation are found in both simulations.

Salathe, E.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun; Zhang, Yongxin

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

238

Harmonization of Land-Use Scenarios for the Period 1500-2100: 600 Years of Global Gridded Annual Land-Use Transitions, Wood Harvest, and Resulting Secondary Lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In preparation for the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international community is developing new advanced Earth System Models (ESM) to assess the combined effects of human activities (e.g. land use and fossil fuel emissions) on the carbon-climate system. In addition, four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios of the future (2005-2100) are being provided by four Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) teams to be used as input to the ESMs for future carbon-climate projections (Moss et al., 2010). The diversity of approaches and requirements among IAMs and ESMs for tracking land-use change, along with the dependence of model projections on land-use history, presents a challenge for effectively passing data between these communities and for smoothly transitioning from the historical estimates to future projections. Here, a harmonized set of land-use scenarios are presented that smoothly connects historical reconstructions of land use with future projections, in the format required by ESMs.

Hurtt, George; Chini, Louise Parsons; Frolking, Steve; Betts, Richard; Feddema, Johannes; Fischer, Gavin M.; Fisk, J.P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Houghton, R. A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Jones, C.; Kindermann, G.; Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Goldeweijk, Kees K.; Riahi, Keywan; Shevliakova, Elena; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, P.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wang, Y.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

239

Postirradiation evaluations of capsules HANS-1 and HANS-2 irradiated in the HFIR target region in support of fuel development for the advanced neutron source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the design, fabrication, irradiation, and evaluation of two capsule tests containing U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel particles in contact with aluminum. The tests were in support of fuel qualification for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor, a high-powered research reactor that was planned for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. At the time of these tests, the fuel consisted of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, containing highly enriched uranium dispersed in aluminum at a volume fraction of {approximately}0.15. The extremely high thermal flux in the target region of the High Flux Isotope Reactor provided up to 90% burnup in one 23-d cycle. Temperatures up to 450{degrees}C were maintained by gamma heating. Passive SiC temperature monitors were employed. The very small specimen size allowed only microstructural examination of the fuel particles but also allowed many specimens to be tested at a range of temperatures. The determination of fission gas bubble morphology by microstructural examination has been beneficial in developing a fuel performance model that allows prediction of fuel performance under these extreme conditions. The results indicate that performance of the reference fuel would be satisfactory under the ANS conditions. In addition to U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, particles of U{sub 3}Si, UAl{sub 2}, UAl{sub x}, and U{sub 3}O{sub 8} were tested.

Hofman, G.L.; Snelgrove, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Copeland, G.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Possibilities and limitations of life cycle assessment (LCA) in the development of waste utilization systems - Applied examples for a region in Northern Germany  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Against the background of increasing concerns about climate change, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions has become an integral part of processes in both the waste management and the energy industries. This is reflected in the development of new waste treatment concepts, in which domestic and commercial waste is treated with the aim of utilizing its energy content, while at the same time recycling as much of its material content as possible. Life cycle assessment (LCA) represents a method of assessing the environmental relevance of a waste management system, the basis of which is a material flow analysis of the system in question. GHG emissions from different options for thermal treatment and energy recovery from waste as applied to a region in Northern Germany have been analyzed by the LCA approach and an indicative LCA, which only considers those emissions resulting from operating stages of the system. Operating stages have the main share of emissions compared to pre-processing stages. Results show that through specific separation of waste material flows and highly efficient energy recovery, thermal treatment and energy generation from waste can be optimized resulting in reduction of emissions of greenhouse gases. There are also other areas of waste utilization, currently given little attention, such as the solar drying of sewage sludge, which can considerably contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.

Wittmaier, M. [Institute for Recycling and Environmental Protection at Bremen University of Applied Sciences GmbH, Neustadtswall 30, 28199 Bremen (Germany)], E-mail: wittmaier@hs-bremen.de; Langer, S.; Sawilla, B. [Institute for Recycling and Environmental Protection at Bremen University of Applied Sciences GmbH, Neustadtswall 30, 28199 Bremen (Germany)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies; (2) model biomass productivity and associated environmental impacts of annual cellulosic feedstocks; (3) simulate production of perennial biomass feedstocks grown on marginal lands; and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. We used the EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) model to simulate biomass productivity and environmental impacts of annual and perennial cellulosic feedstocks across much of the USA on both croplands and marginal lands. We used data from LTER and eddy-covariance experiments within the study region to test the performance of EPIC and, when necessary, improve its parameterization. We investigated three scenarios. In the first, we simulated a historical (current) baseline scenario composed mainly of corn-, soybean-, and wheat-based rotations as grown existing croplands east of the Rocky Mountains in 30 states. In the second scenario, we simulated a modified baseline in which we harvested corn and wheat residues to supply feedstocks to potential cellulosic ethanol biorefineries distributed within the study area. In the third scenario, we simulated the productivity of perennial cropping systems such as switchgrass or perennial mixtures grown on either marginal or Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) lands. In all cases we evaluated the environmental impacts (e.g., soil carbon changes, soil erosion, nitrate leaching, etc.) associated with the practices. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided initial simulation results on the potential of annual and perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Distributive analysis of rural land size and price relationships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

manuscript. :ABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter Page I. IN:RODUCTION The Problem Objectives of the Study 1 2 II. PREVIOUS RESEARCH U. S. Aggregate Studies Texas and Regional Studies 5 6 III. ECONOMIC THEORY AND LAND VALUES IV. HYPOTHESES AND METHODOLOGY... 12 Market Movements Frictional Adjustments Economies of Size 12 1". 13 Factors of Consideration Market Division Methodology Bases Percentages Blocks Groups Appreciation Market Distribution 15 17 18 19 20 20 23 24 The Models...

Rothe, Robert Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

243

Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape, Density,TiO2(110). |Gas-phaseDeveloping a

244

Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape, Density,TiO2(110). |Gas-phaseDeveloping amagnetic

245

HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to serve as "go-to" organization to catalyze PA Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Economy development #12;FundingHYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA Melissa Klingenberg, PhDMelissa Klingenberg, PhD #12;Hydrogen ProgramHydrogen Program Air Products

246

Assessing Naturalness in Northern Great Lakes Forests Based on Historical Land-Cover and Vegetation Changes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was developed to assess to what degree landscapes represent a natural state. Protected areas are often regarded Land-use history Á Land-use change Á Naturalness Á Logging Á Great Lakes Á Protected areas Introduction the question to what degree protected areas represent a natural state. To assess this question conservation

247

Analytic solutions for the land temperature in an Earth system model of intermediate Mark Williamson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analytic solutions for the land temperature in an Earth system model of intermediate complexity. Analytic solutions for the temporal evolution of the land temperature are obtained for an Earth system and atmosphere radiation balance in a developing EMIC project named GENIE (Grid Enabled Integrated Earth system

Williamson, Mark

248

Feasibility Analysis of Aircraft Landing Scheduling for Non-Controlled Airports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feasibility Analysis of Aircraft Landing Scheduling for Non-Controlled Airports AIAA-2004 airports Air traffic control automation system development Trajectory analysis Aircraft landing scheduling aircraft scheduling will become the key operational issue at non-controlled airports as the operation

Valasek, John

249

Standard BYU QuikSCAT and Seawinds Land/Ice Image Products David G. Long  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standard BYU QuikSCAT and Seawinds Land/Ice Image Products David G. Long Revised By: Brandon R originally designed for wind observation, scatterometers have proven useful in a variety of land and ice developed and applied to the data. These algorithms produce images of the surface o at enhanced resolution

Long, David G.

250

Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Office of Conservation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands From Open Energy...

251

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also...

252

Mapping Savanna Land Change of Belize   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was assessed using a confusion matrix. The results of the research confirmed the capabilities of Landsat imagery for mapping savannas and their land use. The classification of forest and savanna along with major land use pressures from agriculture...

Wilson, Lauren

2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

253

GEORGE LEA FOUNDER'S SCHOLARSHIP PUBLIC LANDS FOUNDATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 GEORGE LEA FOUNDER'S SCHOLARSHIP PUBLIC LANDS FOUNDATION P.O. Box 7226 Arlington, VA 22207 Scholarship Application Form This scholarship is being offered by the Public Lands Foundation, a national non

254

Sale of Water Resource Land (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule requires an eight month advance notice period whenever a consumer-owned water utility intends to transfer water resource land, defined as any land or real property owned by a water...

255

Marginal, Erodible Land Retirement Policy (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is state policy to encourage the retirement of marginal, highly erodible land, particularly land adjacent to public waters and drainage systems, from crop production and to reestablish a cover...

256

Coastal Public Lands Management Act (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The coastal public lands of the state are managed in accordance with the following principles: (a) The natural resources of the surface land, including their aesthetic value and their ability to...

257

Land & Water Conservation Program Conservation Easements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Land & Water Conservation Program Conservation Easements: A Step by Step Guide PRELIMINARY STEPS: Step 1: Landowner expresses interest in land conservation. Step 2: Discuss the land with the landowner officially designated as prime. Source: municipal conservation commission or NH DES, Wetlands Bureau.* o Deer

New Hampshire, University of

258

LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter WM LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN By T.T. Taber and S.A. Kinney In U.S. Geological........................................WM-1 Map Information for the Williston Basin Land Use And Land Cover Map.........................................................WM-2 Map Information for the Williston Basin Subsurface Ownership map

259

Autonomous Landing of MAVs on an Arbitrarily Textured Landing Site using Onboard Monocular Vision  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Autonomous Landing of MAVs on an Arbitrarily Textured Landing Site using Onboard Monocular Vision a novel solution for micro aerial vehicles (MAVs) to autonomously search for and land on an arbitrary landing site using real- time monocular vision. The autonomous MAV is provided with only one single

Zell, Andreas

260

Biological assessment for the transfer of the DP land tract  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to transfer to the County of Los Alamos up to 10-ha (25-ac) of federal land located in Technical Area-21 to be developed for commercial uses. Previous studies for the proposed land transfer area indicate that potential habitat for four threatened, endangered, and sensitive species occurs in or adjacent to the proposed land transfer area. These include the northern goshawk (federal species of concern), Mexican spotted owl (federal threatened), the spotted bat (federal species of concern, state threatened), die peregrine falcon (federal endangered, state endangered), and the. In order to determine the possible influences of the land transfer on these organisms, information from species-specific surveys was collected. These surveys were used to confirm the presence of these species or to infer their absence in or near the project area. It was concluded that none of die above mentioned species occur in the project area. Stretches of the stream channel within Los Alamos Canyon have been identified as palustrine and riverine, temporarily flooded wetlands. The proposed land transfer should not affect these wetlands.

Keller, D.C.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Emerging factors associated with the decline of a gray fox population and multi-scale land cover associations of mesopredators in the Chicago metropolitan area.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Statewide surveys of furbearers in Illinois indicate gray (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) and red (Vulpes vulpes) foxes have experienced substantial declines in relative abundance, whereas other species such as raccoons (Procyon lotor) and coyotes (Canis latrans) have exhibited dramatic increases during the same time period. The cause of the declines of gray and red foxes has not been identified, and the current status of gray foxes remains uncertain. Therefore, I conducted a large-scale predator survey and tracked radiocollared gray foxes from 2004 to 2007 in order to determine the distribution, survival, cause-specific mortality sources and land cover associations of gray foxes in an urbanized region of northeastern Illinois, and examined the relationships between the occurrence of gray fox and the presence other species of mesopredators, specifically coyotes and raccoons. Although generalist mesopredators are common and can reach high densities in many urban areas their urban ecology is poorly understood due to their secretive nature and wariness of humans. Understanding how mesopredators utilize urbanized landscapes can be useful in the management and control of disease outbreaks, mitigation of nuisance wildlife issues, and gaining insight into how mesopredators shape wildlife communities in highly fragmented areas. I examined habitat associations of raccoons, opossums (Didelphis virginiana), domestic cats (Felis catus), coyotes, foxes (gray and red), and striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) at multiple spatial scales in an urban environment. Gray fox occurrence was rare and widely dispersed, and survival estimates were similar to other studies. Gray fox occurrence was negatively associated with natural and semi-natural land cover types. Fox home range size increased with increasing urban development suggesting that foxes may be negatively influenced by urbanization. Gray fox occurrence was not associated with coyote or raccoon presence. However, spatial avoidance and mortality due to coyote predation was documented and disease was a major mortality source for foxes. The declining relative abundance of gray fox in Illinois is likely a result of a combination of factors. Assessment of habitat associations indicated that urban mesopredators, particularly coyotes and foxes, perceived the landscape as relatively homogeneous and that urban mesopredators interacted with the environment at scales larger than that accommodated by remnant habitat patches. Coyote and fox presence was found to be associated with a high degree of urban development at large and intermediate spatial scales. However, at a small spatial scale fox presence was associated with high density urban land cover whereas coyote presence was associated with urban development with increased forest cover. Urban habitats can offer a diversity of prey items and anthropogenic resources and natural land cover could offer coyotes daytime resting opportunities in urban areas where they may not be as tolerated as smaller foxes. Raccoons and opossums were found to utilize moderately developed landscapes with interspersed natural and semi-natural land covers at a large spatial scale, which may facilitate dispersal movements. At intermediate and small spatial scales, both species were found to utilize areas that were moderately developed and included forested land cover. These results indicated that raccoons and opossums used natural areas in proximity to anthropogenic resources. At a large spatial scale, skunk presence was associated with highly developed landscapes with interspersed natural and semi-natural land covers. This may indicate that skunks perceived the urban matrix as more homogeneous than raccoons or opossums. At an intermediate spatial scale skunks were associated with moderate levels of development and increased forest cover, which indicated that they might utilize natural land cover in proximity to human-dominated land cover. At the smallest spatial scale skunk presence was associated with forested land cover surrounded by a suburban matrix. Compared to raccoon

Willingham, Alison N.; /Ohio State U.; ,

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Incorporating Stakeholder Decision Support Needs into an Integrated Regional Earth System Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new modeling effort exploring the opportunities, constraints, and interactions between mitigation and adaptation at regional scale is utilizing stakeholder engagement in an innovative approach to guide model development and demonstration, including uncertainty characterization, to effectively inform regional decision making. This project, the integrated Regional Earth System Model (iRESM), employs structured stakeholder interactions and literature reviews to identify the most relevant adaptation and mitigation alternatives and decision criteria for each regional application of the framework. The information is used to identify important model capabilities and to provide a focus for numerical experiments. This paper presents the stakeholder research results from the first iRESM pilot region. The pilot region includes the Great Lakes Basin in the Midwest portion of the United States as well as other contiguous states. This geographic area (14 states in total) permits cohesive modeling of hydrologic systems while also providing gradients in climate, demography, land cover/land use, and energy supply and demand. The results from the stakeholder research indicate that iRESM should prioritize addressing adaptation alternatives in the water resources, urban infrastructure, and agriculture sectors, such as water conservation, expanded water quality monitoring, altered reservoir releases, lowered water intakes, urban infrastructure upgrades, increased electric power reserves in urban areas, and land use management/crop selection changes. Regarding mitigation alternatives, the stakeholder research shows a need for iRESM to focus on policies affecting the penetration of renewable energy technologies, and the costs and effectiveness of energy efficiency, bioenergy production, wind energy, and carbon capture and sequestration.

Rice, Jennie S.; Moss, Richard H.; Runci, Paul J.; Anderson, K. L.; Malone, Elizabeth L.

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

263

Obama Administration Releases Roadmap for Solar Energy Development...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Releases Roadmap for Solar Energy Development on Public Lands Obama Administration Releases Roadmap for Solar Energy Development on Public Lands July 24, 2012 - 4:00pm Addthis News...

264

Southern Region Watershed Management Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coordinators and the organization, management and activities of the Southern Region Water Quality Planning1 Southern Region Watershed Management Project September 15, 2000 to September 14, 2005 Terminal responding to water quality and conservation issues with educational assistance, technology development

265

Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final ''Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement'' (HCP EIS) is being used by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its nine cooperating and consulting agencies to develop a comprehensive land-use plan (CLUP) for the Hanford Site. The DOE will use the Final HCP EIS as a basis for a Record of Decision (ROD) on a CLUP for the Hanford Site. While development of the CLUP will be complete with release of the HCP EIS ROD, full implementation of the CLUP is expected to take at least 50 years. Implementation of the CLUP would begin a more detailed planning process for land-use and facility-use decisions at the Hanford Site. The DOE would use the CLUP to screen proposals. Eventually, management of Hanford Site areas would move toward the CLUP land-use goals. This CLUP process could take more than 50 years to fully achieve the land-use goals.

N /A

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: TOWARDS ADVANCED UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTIVE CAPABILITY OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARCTIC USING A HIGH-RESOLUTION REGIONAL ARCTIC CLIMATE SYSTEM MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The motivation for this project was to advance the science of climate change and prediction in the Arctic region. Its primary goals were to (i) develop a state-of-the-art Regional Arctic Climate system Model (RACM) including high-resolution atmosphere, land, ocean, sea ice and land hydrology components and (ii) to perform extended numerical experiments using high performance computers to minimize uncertainties and fundamentally improve current predictions of climate change in the northern polar regions. These goals were realized first through evaluation studies of climate system components via one-way coupling experiments. Simulations were then used to examine the effects of advancements in climate component systems on their representation of main physics, time-mean fields and to understand variability signals at scales over many years. As such this research directly addressed some of the major science objectives of the BER Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) regarding the advancement of long-term climate prediction.

Gutowski, William J.

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

267

Control of flowering time and spike development in cereals: the earliness per se Eps-1 region in wheat, rice, and Brachypodium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spring growth habit) carrying the Eps-A m 1 allele for latewinter growth habit) carrying the Eps-A m 1 allele for earlyPCR) markers flanking the Eps-A m 1 region (Table 1), and

Faricelli, Maria E.; Valárik, Miroslav; Dubcovsky, Jorge

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed its Phase I program in December 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership Phase I project was to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. Many other goals were accomplished on the way to this objective, including (1) analysis of CO{sub 2} storage options in the region, including characterization of storage capacities and transportation options, (2) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} sources, (3) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} separation and capture technologies employed in the region, (4) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region, (5) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, and (6) assessing and initiating public knowledge and acceptance of possible sequestration approaches. Results of the Southwest Partnership's Phase I evaluation suggested that the most convenient and practical ''first opportunities'' for sequestration would lie along existing CO{sub 2} pipelines in the region. Action plans for six Phase II validation tests in the region were developed, with a portfolio that includes four geologic pilot tests distributed among Utah, New Mexico, and Texas. The Partnership will also conduct a regional terrestrial sequestration pilot program focusing on improved terrestrial MMV methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region. The sixth and final validation test consists of a local-scale terrestrial pilot involving restoration of riparian lands for sequestration purposes. The validation test will use desalinated waters produced from one of the geologic pilot tests. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state government agencies and universities, five major electric utility companies, seven oil, gas and coal companies, three federal agencies, the Navajo Nation, several NGOs, and the Western Governors Association. This group is continuing its work in the Phase II Validation Program, slated to conclude in 2009.

Brian McPherson

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration potential of forests growing on 14 mined sites in a seven-state region in the Midwestern and Eastern Coalfields. Carbon contents of these forests were compared to adjacent forests on non-mined land. The study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each location. The treatments include three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Soil samples were collected from each plot to characterize the sites prior to treatment. Analysis of soil samples was completed and these data are being used to prepare fertilizer prescriptions. Fertilizer prescripts will be developed for each site. Fertilizer will be applied during the second quarter 2004. Data are included as appendices in this report. As part of our economic analysis of mined land reforestation, we focused on the implications of a shift in reforestation burden from the landowner to the mine operator. Results suggest that the reforestation of mined lands as part of the mining operation creates a viable and profitable forest enterprise for landowners with greater potential for carbon sequestration.

J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

270

Impacts of Array Configuration on Land Use Requirements for Large-Scale Photovoltaic Deployment in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land use is often cited as an important issue for renewable energy technologies. In this paper we examine the relationship between land-use requirements for large-scale photovoltaic (PV) deployment in the U.S. and PV-array configuration. We estimate the per capita land requirements for solar PV and find that array configuration is a stronger driver of energy density than regional variations in solar insolation. When deployed horizontally, the PV land area needed to meet 100% of an average U.S. citizen's electricity demand is about 100 m{sup 2}. This requirement roughly doubles to about 200 m{sup 2} when using 1-axis tracking arrays. By comparing these total land-use requirements with other current per capita land uses, we find that land-use requirements of solar photovoltaics are modest, especially when considering the availability of zero impact 'land' on rooftops. Additional work is need to examine the tradeoffs between array spacing, self-shading losses, and land use, along with possible techniques to mitigate land-use impacts of large-scale PV deployment.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Impacts of Array Configuration on Land-Use Requirements for Large-Scale Photovoltaic Deployment in the United States: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land use is often cited as an important issue for renewable energy technologies. In this paper we examine the relationship between land-use requirements for large-scale photovoltaic (PV) deployment in the U.S. and PV-array configuration. We estimate the per capita land requirements for solar PV and find that array configuration is a stronger driver of energy density than regional variations in solar insolation. When deployed horizontally, the PV land area needed to meet 100% of an average U.S. citizen's electricity demand is about 100 m2. This requirement roughly doubles to about 200 m2 when using 1-axis tracking arrays. By comparing these total land-use requirements with other current per capita land uses, we find that land-use requirements of solar photovoltaics are modest, especially when considering the availability of zero impact 'land' on rooftops. Additional work is need to examine the tradeoffs between array spacing, self-shading losses, and land use, along with possible techniques to mitigate land-use impacts of large-scale PV deployment.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Rutgers Regional Report # Regional Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, population, income, and building permits over a 32-year period from 1969 to 2001 for the 31-county Tri counties of the Tri-State (Connecticut, New Jersey, and New York) Region have been divided for analytical the nation and the Tri-State Region. What has not been fully documented, however, is the apparent shift

Garfunkel, Eric

273

Mined land reclamation by biological reactivation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mine reclamation technique, developed in Europe, restores land to full productivity within two years without topsoil replacement. The method deliberately reestablishes within one year following mining, the required biological balance between microbes, enzymes, and trace elements in the rock spoil rather than waiting five or more years for natural processes to restore balance. The technique is called Biological Reactivation (BR). This paper discusses the feasibility of BR reclamation after surface mining operations in the US. Staff of the Ohio Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute completed an OSM-sponsored research project on BR in which physical and chemical tests characterized 140 spoil samples obtained from 10 surface mining operations. Test results indicated that Biological Reactivation technology could be effectively applied, at least in the test areas sampled within Appalachia. Preliminary estimates make clear that the new technique reduces reclamation costs on prime farmland by approximately 95% compared to topsoil segregation and replacement methods.

Gozon, J.S.; Konya, C.J.; Lukovic, S.S.; Lundquist, R.G.; Olah, J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within cover types. Biases in predicted weekly average regional latent heat fluxes were smaller than for NEE, but larger than for either ecosystem respiration or assimilation alone. However, spatial and diurnal variations of hundreds of W m{sup -2} in latent heat fluxes were common. We conclude that, in this heterogeneous system, characterizing vegetation cover type and LAI at the scale of spatial variation are necessary for accurate estimates of bottom-up, regional NEE and surface energy fluxes.

Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED EARTH OBSERVATIONS AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 3, NO. 3, SEPTEMBER 2010 219 Impacts of Climate Change and Land Use Changes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

governed by eco- nomic development and air pollution regulations [3]. Variations in incident solar, SEPTEMBER 2010 219 Impacts of Climate Change and Land Use Changes on Land Surface Radiation and Energy Budgets Abstract--Land surface radiation and energy budgets are critical to address a variety

Liang, Shunlin

276

Urban land subdivision : a case for more practical by-laws, Kaohsiung, Taiwan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis, dealing with the land subdivision in urban areas, evaluates inefficiency of the case studies resulting from inadequate and improper existing by-laws in Kaohsiung and provides guidelines for urban development. ...

Chen, Hsueh-Jane

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

What Drives Land Cover Change in Eastern Escarpment of Wello, Ethiopia?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What Drives Land Cover Change in Eastern Escarpment of Wello, Ethiopia? Amare Bantider, Dilla University, Ethiopia; Hans Hurni, Centre for Development and Environment (CDE), University of Bern, Switzerland; Gete Zeleke, Global Mountain Program, Ethiopia Multiple factors, many operating concomitantly

Richner, Heinz

278

Long-term land use future scenarios for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to facilitate decision regarding environmental restoration activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the United States Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) conducted analyses to project reasonable future land use scenarios at the INEL for the next 100 years. The methodology for generating these scenarios included: review of existing DOE plans, policy statements, and mission statements pertaining to the INEL; review of surrounding land use characteristics and county developments policies; solicitation of input from local, county, state and federal planners, policy specialists, environmental professionals, and elected officials; and review of environmental and development constraints at the INEL site that could influence future land use.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Land-Based Wind Potential Changes in the Southeastern United States (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advancements in utility-scale wind turbine technology and pricing have vastly increased the potential land area where turbines can be deployed in the United States. This presentation quantifies the new developable land potential (e.g., capacity curves), visually identifies new areas for possible development (e.g., new wind resource maps), and begins to address deployment barriers to wind in new areas for modern and future turbine technology.

Roberts, J. O.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Bioenergy Sustainability at the Regional Scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To meet national goals for biofuels production, there are going to be large increases in acreage planted to dedicated biofuels crops. These acreages may be in perennial grasses, annual crops, short rotation woody crops, or other types of vegetation and may involve use of existing cropland, marginal lands, abandoned lands or conversion of forest land. The establishment of bioenergy crops will affect ecological processes and their interactions and thus have an influence on ecosystem services provided by the lands on which these crops are grown. The regional-scale effects of bioenergy choices on ecosystem services need special attention because they often have been neglected yet can affect the ecological, social and economic aspects of sustainability. A regional-scale perspective provides the opportunity to make more informed choices about crop selection and management, particularly with regard to water quality and quantity issues, and also about other aspects of ecological, social, and economic sustainability. We give special attention to cellulosic feedstocks because of the opportunities they provide. Adopting an adaptive management approach for biofuels feedstock production planning will be possible to a certain extent if there is adequate monitoring data on the effects of changes in land use. Effects on water resources are used as an example and existing understanding of water resource effects are analyzed in detail. Current results indicate that there may be water quality improvements coupled with some decreases in available water for downstream uses.

Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Lowrance, Richard [USDA-ARS Southeast Watershed Research Laboratory, Tifton, Georgia; Robertson, G. Phillip [W.K. Kellogg Biological Station and Great Lakes Bioenergy Research

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The International Center for Materials Research (ICMR) at UC Santa Barbara announces its Developing Region grant competition for the 2010/2011 academic year.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The project that the travel is related to must have a materials component and be specifically related and Development Seed Grants: These grants will help fund materials related research projects and development and collaborations for novel materials applications. Projects could include the development of specialized devices

Rubloff, Gary W.

282

New Technologies to Reclaim Arid Lands User's Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Under conventional technologies to mitigate these impacts, it is estimated that up to 35 percent of revegetation projects in arid areas will fail due to unpredictable natural environmental conditions, such as drought, and reclamation techniques that were inadequate to restore vegetative cover in a timely and cost-effective manner. New reclamation and restoration techniques are needed in desert ranges to help mitigate the adverse effects of military training and other activities to arid-land environments. In 1999, a cooperative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the US. Department of Defense (DoD), and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on mitigating military impacts in arid lands. As arid lands are impacted due to DoD and DOE activities, biological and soil resources are gradually lost and the habitat is altered. A conceptual model of that change in habitat quality is described for varying levels of disturbance in the Mojave Desert. As the habitat quality degrades and more biological and physical resources are lost from training areas, greater costs are required to return the land to sustainable levels. The purpose of this manual is to assist land managers in recognizing thresholds associated with habitat degradation and provide reclamation planning and techniques that can reduce the costs of mitigation for these impacted lands to ensure sustainable use of these lands. The importance of reclamation planning is described in this manual with suggestions about establishing project objectives, scheduling, budgeting, and selecting cost-effective techniques. Reclamation techniques include sections describing: (1) erosion control (physical, chemical, and biological), (2) site preparation, (3) soil amendments, (4) seeding, (5) planting, (6) grazing and weed control, (7) mulching, (8) irrigation, and (9) site protection. Each section states the objectives of the technique, the principles, an in-depth look at the techniques, and any special considerations as it relates to DoD or DOE lands. The need for monitoring and remediation is described to guide users in monitoring reclamation efforts to evaluate their cost-effectiveness. Costs are provided for the proposed techniques for the major deserts of the southwestern U.S. showing the average and range of costs. A set of decision tools are provided in the form of a flow diagram and table to guide users in selecting effective reclamation techniques to achieve mitigation objectives. Recommendations are provided to help summarize key reclamation principles and to assist users in developing a successful program that contributes to sustainable uses of DoD and DOE lands. The users manual is helpful to managers in communicating to installation management the needs and consequences of training decisions and the costs required to achieve successful levels of sustainable use. This users manual focuses on the development of new reclamation techniques that have been implemented at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, and are applicable to most arid land reclamation efforts.

W. K. Ostler

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Global Biofuels Modeling and Land Use  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biofuels Modeling and Land Use DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Strategic Analysis & Cross-cutting Sustainability March 25 2015 Gbadebo Oladosu...

284

Albeni Falls land acquisitions.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Idaho The Bonneville Power Administration is working with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game to acquire and manage two parcels of land in northern Idaho to preserve,...

285

Chapter 37 Land Disposal Restrictions (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This administrative regulation establishes requirements for land disposal of hazardous waste. These include- surface impound exemptions, prohibitions on disposal and storage and treatment standards...

286

Sustainable Land Management in Northern Namibia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and low water holding capacity (Bolivia) #12;Perspective Similar soil (Kavango) #12;Increased Demand for Food + Energy Production Expansion onto Less Resilient Lands Reduced Production per Unit Area

287

Sustainable Development Within The Region Strategies and The Complex Social System: What Can Turkey and U.S.A. learn from Skåne, Sweden.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Thanks primarily to the international community, sustainable development has in recent decades been more in the forefront. Many communities around the world are taking part… (more)

Tepecik, Asl?

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Freedom of Information and Petroleum Development in the Gulf of Guinea Region| A Comparative Analysis of the Legal Frameworks in Nigeria, Ghana, and Liberia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Recent discoveries of oil and natural gas in the Gulf of Guinea have renewed interest in petroleum development in West Africa. This news is… (more)

Calhoun, John Paul

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Land Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with modern, large wind power plants (defined as greater than 20 megawatts (MW) and constructed after 2000). The analysis discusses standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature, and then discusses their applicability to wind power plants. The report identifies two major 'classes' of wind plant land use: 1) direct impact (i.e., disturbed land due to physical infrastructure development), and 2) total area (i.e., land associated with the complete wind plant project). The analysis also provides data for each of these classes, derived from project applications, environmental impact statements, and other sources. It attempts to identify relationships among land use, wind plant configuration, and geography. The analysts evaluated 172 existing or proposed projects, which represents more than 26 GW of capacity. In addition to providing land-use data and summary statistics, they identify several limitations to the existing wind project area data sets, and suggest additional analysis that could aid in evaluating actual land use and impacts associated with deployment of wind energy.

Denholm, P.; Hand, M.; Jackson, M.; Ong, S.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The impacts of land use-induced land cover change on climate extremes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Simulations from the CSIRO Mk3L climate model, coupled to the CABLE land surface model, indicate that climate extremes indices are significantly affected by land use-induced… (more)

Avila, Francia Bismonte

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Development Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Programme 2007 - 2010 The aim of the Timber Development Programme (TDP) is "to contribute to the sustainable development to underpin sustainable forest management and support economic growth and employment acrossDevelopment Timber Development Programme 2007 - 2010 #12;2 | Timber Development Programme 2007

292

Regional issue identification and assessment: study methodology. First annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall assessment methodologies and models utilized for the first project under the Regional Issue Identification and Assessment (RIIA) program are described. Detailed descriptions are given of the methodologies used by lead laboratories for the quantification of the impacts of an energy scenario on one or more media (e.g., air, water, land, human and ecology), and by all laboratories to assess the regional impacts on all media. The research and assessments reflected in this document were performed by the following national laboratories: Argonne National Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report contains five chapters. Chapter 1 briefly describes the overall study methodology and introduces the technical participants. Chapter 2 is a summary of the energy policy scenario selected for the RIIA I study and Chapter 3 describes how this scenario was translated into a county-level siting pattern of energy development. The fourth chapter is a detailed description of the individual methodologies used to quantify the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of the scenario while Chapter 5 describes how these impacts were translated into comprehensive regional assessments for each Federal Region.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A Dynamic Simulation of the Indirect Land Use Implications of Recent Biofuel Production and Use in the United States.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The global indirect land use change (ILUC) implications of biofuel use in the United States of America (USA) from 2001 to 2010 are evaluated with a dynamic general equilibrium model. The effects of biofuels production on agricultural land area vary by year; from a net expansion of 0.17 ha per 1000 gallons produced (2002) to a net contraction of 0.13 ha per 1000 gallons (2018) in Case 1 of our simulation. In accordance with the general narrative about the implications of biofuel policy, agricultural land area increased in many regions of the world. However, oil-export dependent economies experienced agricultural land contraction because of reductions in their revenues. Reducing crude oil imports is a major goal of biofuel policy, but the land use change implications have received little attention in the literature. Simulations evaluating the effects of doubling supply elasticities for land and fossil resources show that these parameters can significantly influence the land use change estimates. Therefore, research that provides empirically-based and spatially-detailed agricultural land-supply curves and capability to project future fossil energy prices is critical for improving estimates of the effects of biofuel policy on land use.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Parcel-Level Land Architecture and Land Surface Temperature in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parcel-Level Land Architecture and Land Surface Temperature in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area Xiaoxiao Li1, Yun Ouyang1, Billie Turner II1,2, Sharon Harlan3, Anthony Brazel2 1 School of Sustainability system architecture--composition and configuration of different land-cover classes--on LST in the central

Hall, Sharon J.

295

Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration carbon sequestration Climate change Soil carbon change Historically, Florida soils stored the largest in Florida (FL) have acted as a sink for carbon (C) over the last 40 years. · Climate interacting with land

Grunwald, Sabine

296

Office of Inspector General report on audit of proposal to acquire land at the Fernald Environmental Management Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (Department) obtained an appraisal and developed a cost estimate to acquire 78 to 100 acres of privately-held land adjoining the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) as an additional buffer for a waste disposal facility. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the proposed purchase of land was essential to support the site`s mission. The Department obtained an appraisal and developed a cost estimate to acquire the additional land without confirming that av lid need for the land existed. If the land is acquired, the Department could spend between $655,000 and $2.2 million unnecessarily. Additionally, the Department could incur unnecessary maintenance and security costs to maintain the land after acquisition. It was recommended that the Manager, Ohio Field Office, dismiss the proposal to acquire the additional land. Management agreed with the recommendation, stating that the acquisition could not be justified at this time. However, management did not agree with the finding that the Department obtained an appraisal and developed a cost estimate without confirming that a valid need for the land existed. Management stated that the appraisal and cost estimate were principal and necessary to determining whether a need for the land existed. It was concluded that the appraisal and cost estimate should not have been performed because a valid need for the land was never established. Also, it was concluded that it would be inappropriate to reconsider the proposal to acquire the land at a later date if additional funds become available, unless a valid need for the land is first established.

NONE

1997-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

297

The implementation of the triple helix model of industry-university-government relations in Puerto Rico to promote knowledge-based regional economic development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Puerto Rico, an island in the Caribbean, has long sought to develop a high-tech economy and has struggled in the process. Two initiatives, Puerto Rico TechnoEconomic Corridor (PRTEC) and the Eastern Central Technological ...

Ramos-Maltés, Ana Lorena

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Biofuels and indirect land use change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation October 2011 #12;About this study), Malaysian Palm Oil Board, National Farmers Union, Novozymes, Northeast Biofuels Collaborative, Patagonia Bio contributed views on a confidential basis. #12;1Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation

299

Economic Benefit of Land Conservation in Protecting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by plants instead of traveling into the water system #12;Water Storage on Conservation Lands · Upland areas.9 billion · In terms of water quality and groundwater purification, returns of $13.2 billion estimated #12Economic Benefit of Land Conservation in Protecting Water Resources November 2, 2011 Presented by

Demers, Nora Egan

300

SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL TRAWL FISH LANDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

346; SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL TRAWL FISH LANDINGS IN NEW ENGLAND, 1958 SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT-FISHERIES Na 346 #12;#12;United States Department of the Interior, Fred A. Seaton, Secretary FishKernan, Director SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL TRAWL-FISH LANDINGS IN NEW ENGLAND, 1958 by Robert L. Edwards

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Practice Note Planning for brownfield land  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Practice Note Planning for brownfield land regeneration to woodland and wider green infrastructure 1FCPN022 Gail Atkinson and Kieron Doick March 2014 The regeneration of brownfield land to green of brownfield regeneration to woodland in order to inform project planning, raise awareness of lessons learnt

302

Improvement of snowpack simulations in a regional climate model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To improve simulations of regional-scale snow processes and related cold-season hydroclimate, the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3), developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), was coupled with the Pennsylvania State University/NCAR fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5). CLM3 physically describes the mass and heat transfer within the snowpack using five snow layers that include liquid water and solid ice. The coupled MM5–CLM3 model performance was evaluated for the snowmelt season in the Columbia River Basin in the Pacific Northwestern United States using gridded temperature and precipitation observations, along with station observations. The results from MM5–CLM3 show a significant improvement in the SWE simulation, which has been underestimated in the original version of MM5 coupled with the Noah land-surface model. One important cause for the underestimated SWE in Noah is its unrealistic land-surface structure configuration where vegetation, snow and the topsoil layer are blended when snow is present. This study demonstrates the importance of the sheltering effects of the forest canopy on snow surface energy budgets, which is included in CLM3. Such effects are further seen in the simulations of surface air temperature and precipitation in regional weather and climate models such as MM5. In addition, the snow-season surface albedo overestimated by MM5–Noah is now more accurately predicted by MM5–CLM3 using a more realistic albedo algorithm that intensifies the solar radiation absorption on the land surface, reducing the strong near-surface cold bias in MM5–Noah. The cold bias is further alleviated due to a slower snowmelt rate in MM5–CLM3 during the early snowmelt stage, which is closer to observations than the comparable components of MM5–Noah. In addition, the over-predicted precipitation in the Pacific Northwest as shown in MM5–Noah is significantly decreased in MM5 CLM3 due to the lower evaporation resulting from the longer snow duration.

Jin, J.; Miller, N.L.

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

303

Meeting the Demand for Biofuels: Impact on Land Use and Carbon Mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research was to develop an integrated, interdisciplinary framework to investigate the implications of large scale production of biofuels for land use, crop production, farm income and greenhouse gases. In particular, we examine the mix of feedstocks that would be viable for biofuel production and the spatial allocation of land required for producing these feedstocks at various gasoline and carbon emission prices as well as biofuel subsidy levels. The implication of interactions between energy policy that seeks energy independence from foreign oil and climate policy that seeks to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions for the optimal mix of biofuels and land use will also be investigated. This project contributes to the ELSI research goals of sustainable biofuel production while balancing competing demands for land and developing policy approaches needed to support biofuel production in a cost-effective and environmentally friendly manner.

Khanna, Madhu; Jain, Atul; Onal, Hayri; Scheffran, Jurgen; Chen, Xiaoguang; Erickson, Matt; Huang, Haixiao; Kang, Seungmo.

2011-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

304

e-GTRSRS101Proceedings of the 15th Central Hardwood Forest Conference LAND-USE HISTORY AND RESULTING FOREST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND RESULTING FOREST SUCCESSION IN THE ILLINOIS OZARK HILLS Saskia L. van de Gevel and Charles M. Ruffner1 on forest development in the Ozark Hills of southern Illinois. By incorporating land-use history research719 e-GTR­SRS­101Proceedings of the 15th Central Hardwood Forest Conference LAND-USE HISTORY

305

Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development Near DOD Installations...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development Near DOD Installations: Making the Case for Land Use Compatitbility Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development Near DOD Installations:...

306

First Steps Toward Developing Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

This is a table on proposed DOE funds regarding the first steps toward developing renewable energy and energy efficiency on Tribal Lands. First Steps Toward Developing Renewable...

307

First Steps Toward Developing Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE funds, and proposed cost share for the tribes participating in developing renewable energy and energy efficiency on tribal lands. First Steps Toward Developing...

308

PUBLISHED ONLINE: 29 APRIL 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/NCLIMATE1505 Impacts of wind farms on land surface temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTERS PUBLISHED ONLINE: 29 APRIL 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/NCLIMATE1505 Impacts of wind farms on land a region in west-central Texas, where four of the world's largest wind farms are located7 . Our results farms relative to nearby non-wind-farm regions. We attribute this warming primarily to wind farms as its

Zhou, Liming

309

Diurnal and seasonal variations of wind farm impacts on land surface temperature over western Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diurnal and seasonal variations of wind farm impacts on land surface temperature over western Texas for the period of 2003­2011 over a region in West-Central Texas, where four of the world's largest wind farms by comparing the LST changes between wind farm pixels (WFPs) and nearby non wind farm pixels (NNWFPs) using

Zhou, Liming

310

MESA 2007MESA 2007MESA 2007MESA 2007 Panel :Before Nationalism: Land and Loyalty in the Middle EastPanel :Before Nationalism: Land and Loyalty in the Middle EastPanel :Before Nationalism: Land and Loyalty in the Middle EastPanel :Before Nationalism: Land  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nationalism". The title of Baki Tezcan's article is "The developpement of the use of Kurdistan to the attribution of the name Kurdistan to a region of eastern Anatolia under relative ottoman domination. For instance Tezcan argues "that the geographical name Kurdistan, or the land of the Kurds (literally the place

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

311

A Survey of Changes in Cloud Cover and Cloud Types over Land from Surface Observations, 197196  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, offsetting the small positive trend that had been found for the ocean, and resulting in no significant trend for the land­ocean average. Significant regional trends are found for many cloud types. The night trends agree of their effects on solar radiation, terrestrial radiation, and precipitation. These effects depend on cloud height

Hochberg, Michael

312

RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation dynamics in a Mediterranean coast and in regions that are expected to experience a mediterranean-type climate in the future. Samartin Á O. Heiri Á W. Tinner Institute of Plant Sciences and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research

Bern, Universität

313

Impact of land use and precipitation changes on surface temperature trends in Argentina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the introduction of satellite data. [5] It is not clear what causes this lack of apparent warming in this region studies [Lim et al., 2005, 2008] indicate that the response to global warming may be st to most other land areas, over most of Argentina there has been net cooling, not warming (about �0.04°C

Kalnay, Eugenia

314

Climate Policy 3 (2003) 149157 The climatic impacts of land surface change and carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere can reduce the build-up of carbon dioxide of the surface energy budget can affect the local, regional, and global climate. Given the goal of mitigatingClimate Policy 3 (2003) 149­157 The climatic impacts of land surface change and carbon management

Pielke, Roger A.

315

Planners' Perceptions of Land Use Planning Tools in the U.S. Pacific States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, tools, and strategies have been extensively applied in growth management or development management (Daniels, 1999; Porter, 2008), environmental land use planning (Beatley, Brower, & Schwab, 2002; Burby, 1998), emergency management and disaster..., 1999; Levy, 2009; Mantell et al., 1990; Porter, 2008), environmental land use planning for natural hazard mitigation (Berke, 1998; Beatley, 2009; Beatley et al., 2002; Berke & Beatley, 1992; Berke & Conroy, 2000; Burby et al., 2000; Godschalk et al...

Ge, Yue

2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

316

State and Regional Control of Geological Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States has economically recoverable coal reserves of about 261 billion tons, which is in excess of a 250-­?year supply based on 2009 consumption rates. However, in the near future the use of coal may be legally restricted because of concerns over the effects of its combustion on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Carbon capture and geologic sequestration offer one method to reduce carbon emissions from coal and other hydrocarbon energy production. While the federal government is providing increased funding for carbon capture and sequestration, recent congressional legislative efforts to create a framework for regulating carbon emissions have failed. However, regional and state bodies have taken significant actions both to regulate carbon and facilitate its capture and sequestration. This article explores how regional bodies and state government are addressing the technical and legal problems that must be resolved in order to have a viable carbon sequestration program. Several regional bodies have formed regulations and model laws that affect carbon capture and storage, and three bodies comprising twenty-­?three states—the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, the Midwest Regional Greenhouse Gas Reduction Accord, and the Western Climate initiative—have cap-­?and-­?trade programs in various stages of development. State property, land use and environmental laws affect the development and implementation of carbon capture and sequestration projects, and unless federal standards are imposed, state laws on torts and renewable portfolio requirements will directly affect the liability and viability of these projects. This paper examines current state laws and legislative efforts addressing carbon capture and sequestration.

Reitze, Arnold; Durrant, Marie

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the Phase I research conducted by the Midwest regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). The Phase I effort began in October 2003 and the project period ended on September 31, 2005. The MRCSP is a public/private partnership led by Battelle with the mission of identifying the technical, economic, and social issues associated with implementation of carbon sequestration technologies in its seven state geographic region (Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia) and identifying viable pathways for their deployment. It is one of seven partnerships that together span most of the U.S. and parts of Canada that comprise the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Regional Carbon Sequestration Program led by DOE's national Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The MRCSP Phase I research was carried out under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41981. The total value of Phase I was $3,513,513 of which the DOE share was $2,410,967 or 68.62%. The remainder of the cost share was provided in varying amounts by the rest of the 38 members of MRCSP's Phase I project. The next largest cost sharing participant to DOE in Phase I was the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority (OCDO). OCDO's contribution was $100,000 and was contributed under Grant Agreement No. CDO/D-02-17. In this report, the MRCSP's research shows that the seven state MRCSP region is a major contributor to the U. S. economy and also to total emissions of CO2, the most significant of the greenhouse gases thought to contribute to global climate change. But, the research has also shown that the region has substantial resources for sequestering carbon, both in deep geological reservoirs (geological sequestration) and through improved agricultural and land management practices (terrestrial sequestration). Geological reservoirs, especially deep saline reservoirs, offer the potential to permanently store CO2 for literally 100s of years even if all the CO2 emissions from the region's large point sources were stored there, an unlikely scenario under any set of national carbon emission mitigation strategies. The terrestrial sequestration opportunities in the region have the biophysical potential to sequester up to 20% of annual emissions from the region's large point sources of CO2. This report describes the assumptions made and methods employed to arrive at the results leading to these conclusions. It also describes the results of analyses of regulatory issues in the region affecting the potential for deployment of sequestration technologies. Finally, it describes the public outreach and education efforts carried out in Phase I including the creation of a web site dedicated to the MRCSP at www.mrcsp.org.

James J. Dooley; Robert Dahowski; Casie Davidson

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Regional Purchasing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST3 AÇORIANONews Media » 2014 Regional

319

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Land Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To reflect the requirement of section 4 of the Wastes Isolation Pilot Plant Land Withdrawal Act (the Act) (Public Law 102-579), this land management plan has been written for the withdrawal area consistent with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976. The objective of this document, per the Act, is to describe the plan for the use of the withdrawn land until the end of the decommissioning phase. The plan identifies resource values within the withdrawal area and promotes the concept of multiple-use management. The plan also provides opportunity for participation in the land use planning process by the public and local, State, and Federal agencies. Chapter 1, Introduction, provides the reader with the purpose of this land management plan as well as an overview of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Chapter 2, Affected Environment, is a brief description of the existing resources within the withdrawal area. Chapter 3, Management Objectives and Planned Actions, describes the land management objectives and actions taken to accomplish these objectives.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Reducing biosolids disposal costs using land application in forested areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Switching biosolids land application from a reclamation site to a forested site significantly reduced the cost of biosolids disposal at the Savannah River Site. Previous beneficial reuse programs focused on reclamation of existing borrow pits. While extremely beneficial, this program became very costly due to the regulatory requirements for groundwater monitoring, soil monitoring and frequent biosolids analyses. A new program was developed to reuse biosolids in forested areas where the biosolids could be used as a soil conditioner and fertilizer to enhance timber yield. The forested land application site was designed so that groundwater monitoring and soil monitoring could be eliminated while biosolids monitoring and site maintenance were minimized. Monitoring costs alone were reduced by 80%. Capital costs for site preparation were also significantly reduced since there was no longer a need for expensive groundwater monitoring wells.

Huffines, R.L.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Coal conversion siting on coal mined lands: water quality issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The siting of new technology coal conversion facilities on land disturbed by coal mining results in both environmental benefits and unique water quality issues. Proximity to mining reduces transportation requirements and restores disrupted land to productive use. Uncertainties may exist, however, in both understanding the existing site environment and assessing the impact of the new technology. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently assessing the water-related impacts of proposed coal conversion facilities located in areas disturbed by surface and underground coal mining. Past mining practices, leaving highly permeable and unstable fill, may affect the design and quality of data from monitoring programs. Current mining and dewatering, or past underground mining may alter groundwater or surface water flow patterns or affect solid waste disposal stability. Potential acid-forming material influences the siting of waste disposal areas and the design of grading operations. These and other problems are considered in relation to the uncertainties and potentially unique problems inherent in developing new technologies.

Triegel, E.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Vision-Based Precision Landings of a Tailsitter UAV.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??We present a method of performing precision landings of a vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) unmanned air vehicle (UAV) with the use of an onboard… (more)

Millet, Paul Travis 1982-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management as an Adaptation Strategy in the Built Environment Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management as an...

324

arid land: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and indirect land use change The case for mitigation 359 Practice Note Planning for brownfield land Renewable Energy Websites Summary: space can deliver multiple benefits to...

325

Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant of Access(California and Hawaii). Task 3: water resources

326

Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Product, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the Earth’s atmosphere have increased dramatically in the past 100 years due to deforestation, land use change, and fossil fuel combustion. These humancaused, higher levels of CO{sub 2} may enhance the atmospheric greenhouse effect and may contribute to climate change. Many reclaimed coal-surface mine areas in the eastern U.S. are not in productive use. Reforestation of these lands could provide societal benefits, including sequestration of atmospheric carbon. The goal of this project was to determine the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on the tens of thousands of hectares of mined land and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from large-scale application of forest restoration procedures. We developed a mine soil quality model that can be used to estimate the suitability of selected mined sites for carbon sequestration projects. Across the mine soil quality gradient, we tested survival and growth performance of three species assemblages under three levels of silvicultural. Hardwood species survived well in WV and VA, and survived better than the other species used in OH, while white pine had the poorest survival of all species at all sites. Survival was particularly good for the site-specific hardwoods planted at each site. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Grassland to forest conversion costs may be a major contributor to the lack of reforestation of previously reclaimed mine lands in the Appalachian coal-mining region. Otherwise profitable forestry opportunities may be precluded by these conversion costs, which for many combinations of factors (site class, forest type, timber prices, regeneration intensity, and interest rate) result in negative land expectation values. Improved technology and/or knowledge of reforestation practices in these situations may provide opportunities to reduce the costs of converting many of these sites as research continues into these practices. It also appears that in many cases substantial payments, non-revenue values, or carbon values are required to reach “profitability” under the present circumstances. It is unclear when, or in what form, markets will develop to support any of these add-on values to supplement commercial forestry revenues. However, as these markets do develop, they will only enhance the viability of forestry on reclaimed mined lands, although as we demonstrate in our analysis of carbon payments, the form of the revenue source may itself influence management, potentially mitigating some of the benefits of reforestation. For a representative mined-land resource base, reforestation of mined lands with mixed pine-hardwood species would result in an average estimated C accumulation in forms that can be harvested for use as wood products or are likely to remain in the soil C pool at ~250 Mg C ha{sup -1} over a 60 year period following reforestation. The “additionality” of this potential C sequestration was estimated considering data in scientific literature that defines C accumulation in mined-land grasslands over the long term. Given assumptions detailed in the text, these lands have the potential to sequester ~180 Mg C ha{sup -1}, a total of 53.5 x 10{sup 6} Mg C, over 60 years, an average of ~900,000 Mg C / yr, an amount equivalent to about 0.04% of projected US C emissions at the midpoint of a 60-year period (circa 2040) following assumed reforestation. Although potential sequestration quantities are not great relative to potential national needs should an energy-related C emissions offset requirement be developed at some future date, these lands are available and unused for other economically valued purposes and many possess soil and site properties that are well-suited to reforestation. Should such reforestation occur, it would also produce ancillary benefits by providing env

Burger, James A

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

327

2015 Tribal Lands and Environment Forum  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) are hosting the annual Tribal Lands and Environment Forum. The four-day forum will feature special trainings, field trips, and breakout...

328

Land Assemblage Tax Credit Program (Missouri)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Land Assemblage Tax Credit Programs the redevelopment of blighted areas in Missouri into productive use. Redevelopers must incur acquisition costs for at least 50 acres of 75+ acre parcels,...

329

Land Application of Organic Fertilizers or Amendments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applying organic materials to your land can add beneficial nutrients to the soil. But when too much is applied, or when it is applied incorrectly, organic material can cause environmental problems. This publication will help you select the proper...

Harmel, Daren; Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2007-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

330

A framework for benchmarking land models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their inclu- sion in Earth system models (ESMs). State-of-land models cou- pled to Earth system models should simulateland models within Earth system models, however, can help

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Biomass Energy and Competition for Land  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe an approach for incorporating biomass energy production and competition for land into the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, a computable general equilibrium model of the world economy, ...

Reilly, John

332

Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Virginia Marine Resources Commission has jurisdiction over submerged lands off the state's coast and in inland rivers and streams, wetlands and tidal wetlands, coastal sand dunes and beaches,...

333

A study of algal biomass potential in selected Canadian regions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A dynamic assessment model has been developed for evaluating the potential algal biomass and extracted biocrude productivity and costs, using nutrient and water resources available from waste streams in four regions of Canada (western British Columbia, Alberta oil fields, southern Ontario, and Nova Scotia). The purpose of this model is to help identify optimal locations in Canada for algae cultivation and biofuel production. The model uses spatially referenced data across the four regions for nitrogen and phosphorous loads in municipal wastewaters, and CO{sub 2} in exhaust streams from a variety of large industrial sources. Other data inputs include land cover, and solar insolation. Model users can develop estimates of resource potential by manipulating model assumptions in a graphic user interface, and updated results are viewed in real time. Resource potential by location can be viewed in terms of biomass production potential, potential CO{sub 2} fixed, biocrude production potential, and area required. The cost of producing algal biomass can be estimated using an approximation of the distance to move CO{sub 2} and water to the desired land parcel and an estimation of capital and operating costs for a theoretical open pond facility. Preliminary results suggest that in most cases, the CO{sub 2} resource is plentiful compared to other necessary nutrients (especially nitrogen), and that siting and prospects for successful large-scale algae cultivation efforts in Canada will be driven by availability of those other nutrients and the efficiency with which they can be used and re-used. Cost curves based on optimal possible siting of an open pond system are shown. The cost of energy for maintaining optimal growth temperatures is not considered in this effort, and additional research in this area, which has not been well studied at these latitudes, will be important in refining the costs of algal biomass production. The model will be used by NRC-IMB Canada to identify promising locations for both demonstration and pilot-scale algal cultivation projects, including the production potential of using wastewater, and potential land use considerations.

Passell, Howard David; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Development of a Performance and Processing Property Acceptance Region for Cementitious Low-Level Waste Forms at Savannah River Site - 13174  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Saltstone Production and Disposal Facilities (SPF and SDF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have been treating decontaminated salt solution, a low-level aqueous waste stream (LLW) since facility commissioning in 1990. In 2012, the Saltstone Facilities implemented a new Performance Assessment (PA) that incorporates an alternate design for the disposal facility to ensure that the performance objectives of DOE Order 435.1 and the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) of Fiscal Year 2005 Section 3116 are met. The PA performs long term modeling of the waste form, disposal facility, and disposal site hydrogeology to determine the transport history of radionuclides disposed in the LLW. Saltstone has been successfully used to dispose of LLW in a grout waste form for 15 years. Numerous waste form property assumptions directly impact the fate and transport modeling performed in the PA. The extent of process variability and consequence on performance properties are critical to meeting the assumptions of the PA. The SPF has ensured performance property acceptability by way of implementing control strategies that ensure the process operates within the analyzed limits of variability, but efforts continue to improve the understanding of facility performance in relation to the PA analysis. A similar understanding of the impact of variability on processing parameters is important from the standpoint of the operability of the production facility. The fresh grout slurry properties (particularly slurry rheology and the rate of hydration and structure formation) of the waste form directly impact the pressure and flow rates that can be reliably processed. It is thus equally important to quantify the impact of variability on processing parameters to ensure that the design basis assumptions for the production facility are maintained. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has been pursuing a process that will ultimately establish a property acceptance region (PAR) to incorporate elements important to both processability and long-term performance properties. This process involves characterization of both emplaced product samples from the disposal facility and laboratory-simulated samples to demonstrate the effectiveness of the lab simulation. With that basis confirmed, a comprehensive variability study using non-radioactive simulants will define the acceptable PAR, or 'operating window' for Saltstone production and disposal. This same process will be used in the future to evaluate new waste streams for disposal or changes to the existing process flowsheet. (authors)

Staub, Aaron V. [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Reigel, Marissa M. [Savannah River National Lab, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Lab, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Land Use Regulations, Compliance and Land Markets in Argentina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

policy that enables incremental housing development in Argentina anddecades. Argentina does not have a national urban policy,ARGENTINA way housing is actually accessed by most lower-income households, as housing policy

Monkkonen, P; Ronconi, L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Land-use practices in Ouro Preto do Oeste, Rondonia, Brazil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Road development and colonization projects have brought about wide-scale deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. The state of Rondonia, located in the western Amazon Basin, best exemplifies the problems related to land-use changes because it has the highest rates of deforestation in the Amazon Basin. In order to identify the main land-use practices in Rondonia, interviews with local farmers were carried out in the central part of Rondonia, in the PIC (Integrated Colonization Project) Ouro Preto do Oeste. This is the oldest colonization project in the state. The governmental colonization programs attracted migrants to the area through the construction of roads and infrastructure necessary for the colonists to occupy the land for agricultural practices. The interviews were done on lots of the PIC Ouro Preto and in PAD Urupa to define the background of the colonists, their land-use practices, their economic situation, and their relationships with governmental institutions.

Pedlowski, M.A.; Dale, V.H.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Issues Associated with the Conveyance and Transfer of DOE Lands under Public Law 105-119  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Public Law 105-119 (Law) was enacted in November 1997 as part of the Defense Authorization Act of 1998 (Act). The Law specifically requires the US Department of Energy (DOE) to identify lands that are suitable for conveyance or transfer at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) within 90 days after enactment of the Act. In general, suitable lands include those parcels that are not required to meet the national security missions assigned to DOE at LANL within a ten year period beginning on the date of enactment of the Act. Additional suitability criteria are addressed below and include the need to establish clear title to the land and to restore areas contaminated with hazardous wastes. This proposed change in future land ownership is intended to serve as the final settlement of DOE community assistance obligations with respect to LANL and Los Alamos County and to stimulate economic development.

Ladino, A.G.

1999-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

338

The LandScan Global Population Distribution Project: Current State of the Art and Prospective Innovation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in remote sensing, dasymetric mapping techniques, and the ever-increasing availability of spatial datasets have enhanced global human population distribution databases. These datasets demonstrate an enormous improvement over the conventional use of choropleth maps to represent population distribution and are vital for analysis and planning purposes including humanitarian response, disease mapping, risk analysis, and evacuation modeling. Dasymetric mapping techniques have been employed to address spatial mismatch, but also to develop finer resolution population distributions in areas of the world where subnational census data are coarse or non-existent. One such implementation is the LandScan Global model which provides a 30 arc-second global population distribution based on ancillary datasets such as land cover, slope, proximity to roads, and settlement locations. This work will review the current state of the LandScan model, future innovations aimed at increasing spatial and demographic resolution, and situate LandScan within the landscape of other global population distribution datasets.

Rose, Amy N [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Global climate change, land management, and biosolids application to semiarid grasslands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global climate change combined with improper land management, including over-grazing, can lead to a severe reduction in plant cover and soil productivity. This process is especially common in arid and semiarid regions with sparse vegetation cover. New and innovative methods of land management are needed to restore and maintain these ecosystems in a productive and sustainable state. Research conducted in New Mexico on the Rio Puerco Resource Area and the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge has shown that biosolids (municipal sewage sludge) application to semiarid grasslands can increase soil nutrient availability, increase plant cover and productivity, and decrease surface runoff and soil erosion without harming environmental quality.

Loftin, S.R. [Forest Service, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Hanford land disposal restrictions plan for mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the early 1940s, the Hanford Site has been involved in the production and purification of nuclear defense materials. These production activities have resulted in the generation of large quantities of liquid and solid radioactive mixed waste. This waste is subject to regulation under authority of both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and the Atomic Energy Act. The State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) have entered into an agreement, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) to bring Hanford Site Operations into compliance with dangerous waste regulations. The Tri-Party Agreement was amended to require development of the Hanford Land Disposal Restrictions Plan for Mixed Wastes (this plan) to comply with land disposal restrictions requirements for radioactive mixed waste. The Tri-Party Agreement requires, and the this plan provides, the following sections: Waste Characterization Plan, Storage Report, Treatment Report, Treatment Plan, Waste Minimization Plan, a schedule, depicting the events necessary to achieve full compliance with land disposal restriction requirements, and a process for establishing interim milestones. 34 refs., 28 figs., 35 tabs.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Towards sustainable land stewardship : reframing development in Wisconsin's dairy gateway  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Changing economic realities in the dairy industry have profoundly affected the viability of the dairy farming community in Wisconsin. In addition they face mounting local opposition to dairy modernization and expansion, ...

Finlayson, Ian James, 1974-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Bishop's University Minutes Sustainable Development & Land Use Committee Meeting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the merged committee: 1) Sustainability, Building and Grounds; 2) Sustainable Campus. Drew suggested starting

343

Hawaii's Rainforest Crunch: Land, People, and Geothermal Development | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer CountyCorridor |Information Abandonment ReportWhat Has

344

Beijing Ideal land Technology Development Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine:Barbers PointEnergy Information3082151°,Indiana:BeijingPower orIdeal

345

Role of land surface processes in South American monsoon development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the La Plata Basin in South America. J. Hydrometeor. , 3,of precipitation over South America. J. Climate, 15, Weaver,climate exist over South America? J. Climate, 11, 1020–1040.

Xue, Y; de Sales, F; Li, W P; Mechoso, C R; Nobre, C A; Juang, H M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Land-incentivized joint ventures for infrastructure development in India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the next 20 years, it is projected that India will make the transition from a primarily rural economy to one in which more than half of its 1.1 billion strong population will live in urban areas. As this demographic ...

Hingorani, Pritika

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

LAND USE AND ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS FROM SHALE DEVELOPMENT IN  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington, DCKickoff MeetingKuda TrainingCeramic.# .

348

Sustainable Land Management Through Market-Oriented Commodity Development:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g GrantAtlas (PACAOpenSummersideJump to: navigation, Place: SanCase

349

Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrange County is a county in Florida.

350

Regulatory Considerations for Developing Generation Projects on Federal Lands  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartmentnews-flashes OfficeTexas |4Webinar May 23, 2012 |JayMason

351

Twin Cities Regional Bicycle System Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Twin Cities Regional Bicycle System Study Developing a Regional Bicycle Network CTS Research Corridors Analysis Results Proposed Regional Bicycle Network Critical Bicycle Links Next Steps Introduction #12;3 Improve knowledge base of regional bicycle transportation system and learn · How on

Minnesota, University of

352

Hanford Federal Facility state of Washington leased land  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared to provide information concerning past solid and hazardous waste management practices for all leased land at the US DOE Hanford Reservation. This report contains sections including land description; land usage; ground water, air and soil monitoring data; and land uses after 1963. Numerous appendices are included which provide documentation of lease agreements and amendments, environmental assessments, and site surveys.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Institutional Arrangements for Effective Groundwater Management to Halt Land Subsidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of groundwater use and development but political entities with adequate scope to deal with the problem were either unwilling or unable to engage in regional water management. Indeed, these political organizations and other institutions may have actually...

Brah, W. L.; Jones, L. L.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Community Land Use Planning on First Nations Reserves and the Influence of Land Tenure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Associate Professor Joan Phillip Supervisor Lands Manager Penticton Indian Band Date Defended to Joan Phillip, PIB's land manager and my committee member and project mentor, for helping to guide me Armstrong. Your classes, writings, and conversations opened a world of learning and introspection that I

355

Agriculture, Land Use, Energy and Carbon Emission Impacts of Global Biofuel Mandates to Mid-Century  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three potential future scenarios of expanded global biofuel production are presented here utilizing the GCAM integrated assessment model. These scenarios span a range that encompasses on the low end a continuation of existing biofuel production policies to two scenarios that would require an expansion of current targets as well as an extension of biofuels targets to other regions of the world. Conventional oil use is reduced by 4-8% in the expanded biofuel scenarios, which results in a decrease of in CO2 emissions on the order of 1-2 GtCO2/year by mid-century from the global transportation sector. The regional distribution of crop production is relatively unaffected, but the biofuels targets do result in a marked increase in the production of conventional crops used for energy. Producer prices of sugar and corn reach levels about 12% and 7% above year 2005 levels, while the increased competition for land causes the price of food crops such as wheat, although not used for bioenergy in this study, to increase by 1 to 2%. The amount of land devoted to growing all food crops and dedicated bioenergy crops is increased by about 10% by 2050 in the High biofuel case, with concurrent decreases in other uses of land such as forest and pasture. In both of the expanded biofuels cases studied, there is an increase in net cumulative carbon emissions for the first couple of decades due to these induced land use changes. However, the difference in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels expansion decline by about 2035 as the reductions in energy system emissions exceed further increases in emissions from land use change. Even in the absence of a policy that would limit emissions from land use change, the differences in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels scenarios reach zero by 2050, and are decreasing further over time in both cases.

Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Regional Revolving Loan Trust Fund (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Regional Revolving Loan Trust Fund Program, coordinated by the Empire State Development program, is operated in six regions by nonprofit organizations and provides working capital loans (up to ...

357

Influence of Dynamic Land Use and Land Cover Change on Simulated Global Terrestrial Carbon and Nitrogen Cycles, Climate-carbon Cycle Feedbacks, and Interactions with Rising CO2 and Anthropogenic Nitrogen Deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous work has demonstrated the sensitivity of terrestrial net carbon exchange to disturbance history and land use patterns at the scale of individual sites or regions. Here we show the influence of land use and land cover dynamics over the historical period 1850-present on global-scale carbon, nutrient, water, and energy fluxes. We also explore the spatial and temporal details of interactions among land use and disturbance history, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide consentation, and increasing anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. Our simulations show that these interactions are significant, and that their importance grows over time, expressed as a fraction of the independent forcing terms. We conclude with an analysis of the influence of these interactions on the sign and magnitude of global climate-carbon cycle feedbacks.

Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Hurtt, George C [University of Hew Hampshire

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

INTERNATIONAL REGIONAL SCIENCE REVIEW (Vol. 25, No. 2, 2002)Walker et al. / LAND USE IN FOREST FRONTIERS LAND USE AND LAND COVER CHANGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for inputs (including labor), outputs, and capital. The risk model is specified and estimated, using survey that integrates demography with market-based factors such as transportation costs and accessibility. In essence and Resource Use in the Amazon (SBR-95-11965)," and also by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Walker, Robert T.

359

Wastewater management utilizing land application for the Boston Harbor-Eastern Massachusetts Metropolitan Area. Technical data. Volume 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, NED, in cooperation with several agencies under the administration of the Technical Subcommittee on Boston Harbor, is directing a segment of the Wastewater Management Study for Eastern Massachusetts which proposed the utilization of land application methods to further treat and make use of conventionally treated wastewaters. The entire wastewater management study for Eastern Massachusetts consisted of five alternatives. Four of the conceptual alternatives are being prepared under the direction of the Metropolitan District Commission (MDC). The land application alternative is labeled Concept 5 and provides land application treatment for effluents from five of the regional waste treatment plant locations described in Concept 4. The report presented herein constitutes the land-oriented treatment system known as Concept 5.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Regional Summary Pacific Region Management Context  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, for the Eastern Pacific Ocean, and the Western and Central Pacific Fishery Commission, for the Western PacificRegional Summary Pacific Region Management Context The Pacific Region includes California, Oregon, and Washington. Federal fisheries in this region are managed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Use of composts in revegetating arid lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compost has been suggested as a soil amendment for arid lands at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The operating contractor of the site, Westinghouse Hanford Company, requested that the Pacific Northwest Laboratory conduct a literature review to compile additional information on the use of compost amendments and their benefits. This report provides background information on the factors needed for plant growth and the consequences of severe soil disturbance. This report also discussed the characteristics of composts relative to other amendments and how they each affect plant growth. Finally,regulatory requirements that could affect land application of sludge-based compost on the Hanford Site are reviewed.

Brandt, C.A.; Hendrickson, P.L.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

NOAAlNMFS Developments Regional Fishery Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, G.H.C. Reid & Company, Inc., Pago Pago, American Samoa. Acid Rain Detected In Isolated Areas Globally Acidity - some occurring naturally, some from manmade causes - has been found in rain in five announced. The Commerce Department agency said acid rain from manmade causes was found in St. G

363

TODs Result in Efficient Use of Land and Infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,608 Southeast Michigan COG Detroit, MI 18 4,586 East-West Gateway Coordinating Council St. Louis, MO 19 4,573 Atlanta Regional Commission Atlanta, GA 20 4,409 North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority Newark, NJ 22 4,096 Chicago Area Transportation...,505,748 Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, IL-IN-WI 4 6,003,967 Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX 5 5,826,742 Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD 6 5,539,949 Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX 7 5,463,857 Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Miami Beach, FL 8 5,290,400 Washington...

Morphis, A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Ecological perspectives of land use history: The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to gather information on the land use history of the Arid Land Ecology (ALE) Reserve so that current ecological research could be placed within a historical perspective. The data were gathered in the early 1980s by interviewing former users of the land and from previously published research (where available). Interviews with former land users of the ALE Reserve in Benton County, Washington, revealed that major land uses from 1880 to 1940 were homesteading, grazing, oil/gas production, and road building. Land use practices associated with grazing and homesteading have left the greatest impact on the landscape. Disturbed sites where succession is characterized by non-native species, plots where sagebrush was railed away, and sheep trails are major indications today of past land uses. Recent estimates of annual bunchgrass production do ALE do not support the widespread belief that bunchgrass were more productive during the homesteading era, though the invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Jim Hill mustard (Sisymbrium altissium), and other European alien plant species has altered pre-settlement succession patterns. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Hinds, N R; Rogers, L E

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Spatial Models for Groundwater Behavioral Analysis in Regions of Maharashtra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial Models for Groundwater Behavioral Analysis in Regions of Maharashtra M.Tech Dissertation on groundwater and classified the years into good year if water levels are above the seasonal model in that year such as land-use, local hydrogeology. #12;Contents 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Spatial Models

Sohoni, Milind

366

Wind Generation on Winnebago Tribal Lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Winnebago Wind Energy Study evaluated facility-scale, community-scale and commercial-scale wind development on Winnebago Tribal lands in northeastern Nebraska. The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska has been pursuing wind development in various forms for nearly ten years. Wind monitoring utilizing loaned met towers from NREL took place during two different periods. From April 2001 to April 2002, a 20-meter met tower monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas Casino on the far eastern edge of the Winnebago reservation in Iowa. In late 2006, a 50-meter tower was installed, and subsequently monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas site from late 2006 through late 2008. Significant challenges with the NREL wind monitoring equipment limited the availability of valid data, but based on the available data, average wind speeds between 13.6 – 14.3 miles were indicated, reflecting a 2+/3- wind class. Based on the anticipated cost of energy produced by a WinnaVegas wind turbine, and the utility policies and rates in place at this time, a WinnaVegas wind project did not appear to make economic sense. However, if substantial grant funding were available for energy equipment at the casino site, and if either Woodbury REC backup rates were lower, or NIPCO was willing to pay more for wind power, a WinnaVegas wind project could be feasible. With funding remaining in the DOE-funded project budget,a number of other possible wind project locations on the Winnebago reservation were considered. in early 2009, a NPPD-owned met tower was installed at a site identified in the study pursuant to a verbal agreement with NPPD which provided for power from any ultimately developed project on the Western Winnebago site to be sold to NPPD. Results from the first seven months of wind monitoring at the Western Winnebago site were as expected at just over 7 meters per second at 50-meter tower height, reflecting Class 4 wind speeds, adequate for commercial development. If wind data collected in the remaining months of the twelve-month collection period is consistent with that collected in the first seven months, the Western Winnebago site may present an interesting opportunity for Winnebago. Given the distance to nearby substations, and high cost of interconnection at higher voltage transmission lines, Winnebago would likely need to be part of a larger project in order to reduce power costs to more attractive levels. Another alternative would be to pursue grant funding for a portion of development or equipment costs, which would also help reduce the cost of power produced. The NREL tower from the WinnaVegas site was taken down in late 2008, re-instrumented and installation attempted on the Thunderway site south of the Winnebago community. Based on projected wind speeds, current equipment costs, and the project’s proximity to substations for possible interconnection, a Thunderway community-scale wind project could also be feasible.

Multiple

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

367

Division of Water, Part 666: Regulation for Administration and Management of the Wild, Scenic and Recreational Rivers System in New York State Excepting Private Land in the Adirondack Park (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act establishes statewide regulations for the management, protection, enhancement and control of land use and development in river areas on all designated wild, scenic and recreational rivers...

368

abortus ure2 region: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

more than any other region.1 These are the: 1) Western Alaska community development quota (CDQ) program; 2 226 North Pacific Regional Summary North Pacific Environmental...

369

DOI Bureau of Indian Affairs Mineral Development Grants to Help with Development of Tribal Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of the Interior, through the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) is offering grants to federally-recognized Tribes and tribal energy resource development organizations for projects that help the development of a tribal energy and mineral resource inventory, a tribal energy and mineral resource on Indian land, or for the development of a report necessary to the development of energy and mineral resources on Indian lands.

370

Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development Near DOD Installations...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Aimone, P.E. National Security Global Business Battelle Memorial Institute Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development near DOD Installations Making the Case for Land Use...

371

Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic Using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary research task completed for this project was the development of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM). This involved coupling existing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land models using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupler (CPL7). RACM is based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model, the CICE sea ice model, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. A secondary research task for this project was testing and evaluation of WRF for climate-scale simulations on the large pan-Arctic model domain used in RACM. This involved identification of a preferred set of model physical parameterizations for use in our coupled RACM simulations and documenting any atmospheric biases present in RACM.

Cassano, John [Principal Investigator

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

372

Arid Lands Ecology Facility management plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) facility is a 312-sq-km tract of land that lies on the western side of the Hanford Site in southcentral Washington. The US Atomic Energy Commission officially set aside this land area in 1967 to preserve shrub-steppe habitat and vegetation. The ALE facility is managed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) for ecological research and education purposes. In 1971, the ALE facility was designated the Rattlesnake Hills Research Natural Area (RNA) as a result of an interagency federal cooperative agreement, and remains the largest RNA in Washington. it is also one of the few remaining large tracts of shrub-steppe vegetation in the state retaining a predominant preeuropean settlement character. This management plan provides policy and implementation methods for management of the ALE facilities consistent with both US Department of Energy Headquarters and the Richland Field Office decision (US Congress 1977) to designate and manage ALE lands as an RNA and as a component of the DOE National Environmental Research Park System.

None

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Land Tenure Center 50th Anniversary Celebration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to produce food to feed their own populations and to supply products designed to meet international market concessions/acquisitions. Jeff Dorsey will present recent findings about how water rights fit into land rights, and Glen Reynolds to talk about the Tribal "recovery" of treaty rights over water with the status

Sheridan, Jennifer

374

2012 Landes Bioscience. Do not distribute.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-type calcium channels, which involved a proline rich domain (PRD) in the intracellular II­III loop-9; May/June 2012; © 2012 Landes Bioscience RESEARCH PAPER RESEARCH PAPER Introduction Calcium influx through voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) mediates a range of key physiological functions

Scott, John D.

375

Land Use Baseline Report Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is to serve as a resource for Savannah River Site managers, planners, and SRS stakeholders by providing a general description of the site and land-use factors important to future use decisions and plans. The intent of this document is to be comprehensive in its review of SRS and the surrounding area.

Noah, J.C.

1995-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

376

www.publiclandsday.org Public Lands Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

awareness of local public lands and issues #12;www.publiclandsday.org Facebook.com - Fan Page http://www.facebook.com/pages/create.php #12;www.publiclandsday.org Facebook Fan Page http://www.facebook.com/pages/create.php #12;www.publiclandsday.org Facebook Fan Page #12;www.publiclandsday.org Facebook Fan Page #12;www.publiclandsday.org Facebook Event

US Army Corps of Engineers

377

The land use climate change energy nexus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Landscape ecology focuses on the spatial patterns and processes of ecological and human interactions. These patterns and processes are being altered both by changing human resource-management practices and changing climate conditions associated, in part, with increases in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. Dominant resource extraction and land management activities involve energy, and the use of fossil energy is one of the key drivers behind increasing greenhouse gas emissions as well as land-use changes. Alternative energy sources (such as wind, solar, nuclear, and bioenergy) are being explored to reduce greenhouse gas emission rates. Yet, energy production, including alternative-energy options, can have a wide range of effects on land productivity, surface cover, albedo, and other factors that affect carbon, water and energy fluxes and, in turn, climate. Meanwhile, climate influences the potential output, relative efficiencies and sustainability of alternative energy sources. Thus climate change, energy choices, and land-use change are linked, and any analysis in landscape ecology that considers one of these factors should consider them all. This analysis explores the implications of those linkages and points out ecological patterns and processes that may be affected by these interactions.

Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for professionalism and hard work. Sincerely, Dr. Lee Barber, Director Center for Environmental Management of MilitaryCenter for Environmental Management of Military Lands 1490 Campus Delivery Fort Collins, Colorado extent been due to our ability to address our sponsors' natural and cultural resource management

379

Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

380

Recent Trends in Land Tenure in Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and a live- stock program was instituted. Long term cash leases presented problems during this period of fluctuating commodity prices, One- year farm rental agreements, on the other hand, failed to provide the necessary inducements for the long... ............................................................................. 24 Effect of changes in land tenure on community institutions .................... 25 Landlord-tenant relations ........................................................................................ 26 Farm rental agreements...

Motheral, Joe

1944-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Landing Footprint Computation for Entry Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

footprint provides critical information for mission planning in both nominal and abort situations, and solving a family of optimal control problems rapidly and reliably is a daunting task. Thus the challenge portion3 of the Shuttle Abort Flight Manager (SAFM) generates landing footprints in a manner

Mease, Kenneth D.

382

Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, transport, and fate of pollutants in soil, air, and water; improving and protecting land, air, and water, Policy and Management Agricultural Industries and Marketing The Department occupies the entire Soil are predominantly occupied by Soil Morphology and Genesis, Environmental Biophysics, and Atmospheric Sciences, plus

Minnesota, University of

383

Regional Districts, Commissions, and Authorities (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation establishes a number of regional districts, commissions, and authorities with the power to implement regulations and development plans for protected park and recreational areas.

384

Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative (GoMRC), a year-long project funded by NASA. The GoMRC project was organized around end user outreach activities, a science applications team, and a team for information technology (IT) development. Key outcomes are summarized below for each of these areas. End User Outreach ? Successfully engaged federal and state end users in project planning and feedback ? With end user input, defined needs and system functional requirements ? Conducted demonstration to End User Advisory Committee on July 9, 2007 and presented at Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA) meeting of Habitat Identification committee ? Conducted significant engagement of other end user groups, such as the National Estuary Programs (NEP), in the Fall of 2007 ? Established partnership with SERVIR and Harmful Algal Blooms Observing System (HABSOS) programs and initiated plan to extend HABs monitoring and prediction capabilities to the southern Gulf. ? Established a science and technology working group with Mexican institutions centered in the State of Veracruz. Key team members include the Federal Commission for the Protection Against Sanitary Risks (COFEPRIS), the Ecological Institute (INECOL) a unit of the National Council for science and technology (CONACYT), the Veracruz Aquarium (NOAA’s first international Coastal Ecology Learning Center) and the State of Veracruz. The Mexican Navy (critical to coastal studies in the Southern Gulf) and other national and regional entities have also been engaged. ? Training on use of SERVIR portal planned for Fall 2007 in Veracruz, Mexico Science Applications ? Worked with regional scientists to produce conceptual models of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) ecosystems ? Built a logical framework and tool for ontological modeling of SAV and HABs ? Created online guidance for SAV restoration planning ? Created model runs which link potential future land use trends, runoff and SAV viability ? Analyzed SAV cover change at five other bays in the Gulf of Mexico to demonstrate extensibility of the analytical tools ? Initiated development of a conceptual model for understanding the causes and effects of HABs in the Gulf of Mexico IT Tool Development ? Established a website with the GoMRC web-based tools at www.gomrc.org ? Completed development of an ArcGIS-based decision support tool for SAV restoration prioritization decisions, and demonstrated its use in Mobile Bay ? Developed a web-based application, called Conceptual Model Explorer (CME), that enables non-GIS users to employ the prioritization model for SAV restoration ? Created CME tool enabling scientists to view existing, and create new, ecosystem conceptual models which can be used to document cause-effect relationships within coastal ecosystems, and offer guidance on management solutions. ? Adapted the science-driven advanced web search engine, Noesis, to focus on an initial set of coastal and marine resource issues, including SAV and HABs ? Incorporated map visualization tools with initial data layers related to coastal wetlands and SAVs

Judd, Kathleen S.; Judd, Chaeli; Engel-Cox, Jill A.; Gulbransen, Thomas; Anderson, Michael G.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Guzy, Michael; hardin, danny; Estes, Maury

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Soil erosion and conservation as affcted by land use and land tenure, El Pital Watershed, Nicaragua  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This trend is associated with increased fragmentation of farms associated with the agrarian reform activities of the 1980's, during which many of the large land-holdings were confiscated and redistributed to many peasant families. Also the increasing...

Somarriba-Chang, Matilde de los Angeles

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Characterizing the Impact of Land Use and Land Cover Change on Freshwater Inflows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in mean annual and winter precipitation. Analyses of Landsat images of the watershed using an unsupervised classification method showed an increase in forest, urban and irrigated land by 13, 42 and 7%, respectively, from 1987 to 2002. Urbanized areas were...

Ferijal, Teuku

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropogenic land-use change Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Non-Proximal Ecosystem Service Summary: Anthropogenic Land Cover Change Wetlandswater management Dams River Engineering Land use impervious surfaces... Anthropogenic land...

388

Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands (970) 491-2748 cemml@cemml.colostate.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to provide training realism while minimizing risk to natural and cultural resources. Damage repair areas and ranges to minimize hazards to soldiers, equipment, and natural and cultural resources while land managers in developing short- and long-range LRAM plans to take maximum advantage of limited

389

Scenarios of Future Socio-Economics, Energy, Land Use, and Radiative Forcing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This chapter explores uncertainty in future scenarios of energy, land use, emissions and radiative forcing that span the range in the literature for radiative forcing, but also consider uncertainty in two other dimensions, challenges to mitigation and challenges to adaptation. We develop a set of six scenarios that we explore in detail including the underlying the context in which they are set, assumptions that drive the scenarios, the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), used to produce quantified implications for those assumptions, and results for the global energy and land-use systems as well as emissions, concentrations and radiative forcing. We also describe the history of scenario development and the present state of development of this branch of climate change research. We discuss the implications of alternative social, economic, demographic, and technology development possibilities, as well as potential stabilization regimes for the supply of and demand for energy, the choice of energy technologies, and prices of energy and agricultural commodities. Land use and land cover will also be discussed with the emphasis on the interaction between the demand for bioenergy and crops, crop yields, crop prices, and policy settings to limit greenhouse gas emissions.

Eom, Jiyong; Moss, Richard H.; Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.; Kopp, Roberrt; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick W.; Patel, Pralit L.; Thomson, Allison M.; Wise, Marshall A.; Zhou, Yuyu

2013-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

390

A Spatial Simulation Model of Land Use Changes in a Piedmont County in Georgia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Spatial Simulation Model of Land Use Changes in a Piedmont County in Georgia Monica Goigel Turner* Institute of Ecology University of Georgia Athens, Georgia ABSTRACT A spatial simulation model was developed be explicitly included in simulation models to gain an understanding of landscape level phenomena, and at least

Turner, Monica G.

391

Texas sea breeze: fact or fiction? : an investigation of Texas climate records for a sea-land breeze signature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the region near the coast. The manner in which temperature, humidity, and wind should behave is influenced by the sea-land breeze on the climatic scale is first established. As a whole the coastal stations show varying amounts of evidence of a signature...

Ostermeier, Gregory

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

392

Preliminary studies on physical and chemical processes in the subsurface system in the land reclaimed from the sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the north-eastern shores of Penny's Bay. After reclamation the total groundwater head in the entire model: Land reclamation, coastal process, groundwater flow, physiochemical reactions 1) Introduction Most that reclamation may change the regional groundwater regime, including groundwater level, interface between

Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

393

Symposium Essay: The Energy-Land Use Nexus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This Symposium Essay explores the contours of the 'energy-land use nexus' – the rich set of interrelationships between land use and energy production and consumption. This underexplored nexus encapsulates barriers and ...

Outka, Uma

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act of 1975 (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act of 1975 aims to prevent the environmental degradation of streams and land resources, and to provide reasonable remedies for the depletion of these...

395

Spectral behavior of the coupled land-atmosphere system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main objective of this thesis is to understand the daily cycle of the energy coupling between the land and the atmosphere in response to a forcing of incoming radiation at their common boundary, the land surface. This ...

Gentine, Pierre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Chapter 10. Land Application of Biosolids Gregory K. Evanylo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 10. Land Application of Biosolids Gregory K. Evanylo Department of Crop and Soil..................................................................................................................... 228 What are biosolids and how are they different from sewage sludge?......................... 228 Benefits of land application of biosolids

Kaye, Jason P.

397

Relative efficiency of land surface energy balance components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[1] The partitioning of available energy into dissipative fluxes over land surfaces is dependent on the state variable of the surface energy balance (land surface temperature) and the state variable of the surface water ...

Bateni, S. M.

398

Land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I present work on several topics related to land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium: the first two research chapters invoke ideas related to land-atmosphere interaction to better understand ...

Cronin, Timothy (Timothy Wallace)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Precipitation, Recycling, and Land Memory: An Integrated Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A synthesis of several approaches to quantifying land–atmosphere interactions is presented. These approaches use data from observations or atmospheric reanalyses applied to atmospheric tracer models and stand-alone land ...

Dirmeyer, Paul A.

400

Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference November 18, 2014 10:00AM CST to November 20, 2014 4:00PM CST Richland Community College...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

CULTURAL RESOURCES SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CULTURAL RESOURCES SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS CEMML | 1490) provides assistance to military land managers for technical support in cultural resources management planning and compliance. The goal is to ensure that these diverse, nonrenewable resources are adequately

402

RADBOUDUNIVERSITY NIJMEGEN, THE NETHERLANDS ICT for Ethiopia's land  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADBOUDUNIVERSITY NIJMEGEN, THE NETHERLANDS ICT for Ethiopia's land administration Bachelor Thesis Information Science Sander van Hooft 7/15/2009 Supervisor: Luca Consoli, Phd. #12;ICT for Ethiopia........................................................................................... 5 4.1 Ethiopia's history of land administration

Lucas, Peter

403

BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND USE PLANNING: BACKCOUNTRY TOURISM PERSPECTIVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND USE PLANNING: BACKCOUNTRY TOURISM PERSPECTIVES by Rebekah Edwards-Craig B of Research Project: British Columbia Land Use Planning: Backcountry Tourism Perspectives Supervisory, including the backcountry tourism and outdoor recreation sectors, at a disadvantage in such planning

404

CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON: COSTS, and J. Kadyszewski (Winrock International). 2007. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use Curves, and Pilot Actions for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock

405

Stable water isotope simulation by current land-surface schemes:Results of IPILPS phase 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase 1 of isotopes in the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (iPILPS) compares the simulation of two stable water isotopologues ({sup 1}H{sub 2} {sup 18}O and {sup 1}H{sup 2}H{sup 16}O) at the land-atmosphere interface. The simulations are off-line, with forcing from an isotopically enabled regional model for three locations selected to offer contrasting climates and ecotypes: an evergreen tropical forest, a sclerophyll eucalypt forest and a mixed deciduous wood. Here we report on the experimental framework, the quality control undertaken on the simulation results and the method of intercomparisons employed. The small number of available isotopically-enabled land-surface schemes (ILSSs) limits the drawing of strong conclusions but, despite this, there is shown to be benefit in undertaking this type of isotopic intercomparison. Although validation of isotopic simulations at the land surface must await more, and much more complete, observational campaigns, we find that the empirically-based Craig-Gordon parameterization (of isotopic fractionation during evaporation) gives adequately realistic isotopic simulations when incorporated in a wide range of land-surface codes. By introducing two new tools for understanding isotopic variability from the land surface, the Isotope Transfer Function and the iPILPS plot, we show that different hydrological parameterizations cause very different isotopic responses. We show that ILSS-simulated isotopic equilibrium is independent of the total water and energy budget (with respect to both equilibration time and state), but interestingly the partitioning of available energy and water is a function of the models' complexity.

Henderson-Sellers, A.; Fischer, M.; Aleinov, I.; McGuffie, K.; Riley, W.J.; Schmidt, G.A.; Sturm, K.; Yoshimura, K.; Irannejad, P.

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

An appraisal of the Texas veterans' land program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Mr. L. C. Jackson, Executive Secretary of the Veterans' Land Board, who made the Land Board records available for this study. Credit also belongs to the many veterans who gave information concerning their land purchases. Finally, the writer 'V... is indebted to his wife, Virginia Dorries^ for reading the disserta- tion and offering valuable suggestions. m CONTENTS I. Introduction and historical background--------------------- - 1 II. Provisions for a Veterans* Land Board purchase--------------- 1...

Dorries, W. L.

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

The use and tenure of land in Oklahoma held primarily for its mineral potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Undeveloped Subsurface Rights on the Agricultural Economy of Oklahoma?. One of the specific objectives of that project, and the part examined here, was to "study the impact of speculative holding of land for oil development on land use and tenure..., Conservation Measures on Rental Farms . * . . 4 7 11. Type of Tenure on Sample Tracts . . . . . 5 5 12* Type and Length of Lease on Sample Tracts . . . 5 8 13* Rental Payment on Sample Tracts . . . . . 6 0 14. Tenant*s Opinion of His Lease on Sample Tract...

Parcher, L. A.

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership- Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership to demonstrate the viability and safety of CO2 storage in a regionally significant subsurface formation in Toole County, Montana and to promote the commercialization of future anthropogenic carbon storage in this region.

409

Drive-access transit : a regional analytical framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A framework for analyzing drive-access transit at a regional level is developed in this research. This framework is intended primarily for in-house use by regional transit agencies, yet has implications for the regional ...

Sorensen, James B

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Land Mine Detection at TJNAF | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadoreConnecticut Regions National11-12,JanuaryKentucky RegionsLand Mine

411

Late Quaternary history of Washington Land, North Greenland OLE BENNIKE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Late Quaternary history of Washington Land, North Greenland OLE BENNIKE Bennike, O. 2002 (September): Late Quaternary history of Washington Land, North Greenland. Boreas, Vol. 31, 260­272. Oslo. ISSN 0300-9483. During the last glacial stage, Washington Land in western North Greenland was probably completely inun

Ingólfsson, Ólafur

412

Land Acquisition Prepared by: Ben Floyd, Economic & Engineering Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Land Acquisition Prepared by: Ben Floyd, Economic & Engineering Services May 2004 Introduction Land taxpayer pockets"), and require no specific economic return to justify the expenditure. · There is also a general perception that long-term negative economic impacts may result if additional lands are taken out

413

MSU Departmental Assessment Plan Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSU Departmental Assessment Plan 2007-2009 Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences (cross-college) #12;Student Outcomes Assessment Plan Land Resources and Environmental Sciences Department The Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences (LRES) will undertake a continuing assessment

Maxwell, Bruce D.

414

Measuring the poverty reduction potential of land in rural Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring the poverty reduction potential of land in rural Mexico Frederico Finan, Elisabeth debate on the role of land as an instrument for poverty reduction, we analyze the conditions under which access to land reduces poverty in Mexican rural communities. Semi-parametric regression results show

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

415

PETROLEUM LAND MANAGEMENT (PLMA) Bachelor of Commerce Degree  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PETROLEUM LAND MANAGEMENT (PLMA) Bachelor of Commerce Degree The Haskayne School of Business offers a Bachelor of commerce degree with a concentration in Petroleum Land Management that prepares graduates average, and other documentation. Two third-year courses, PLMA 475 (Introduction to Petroleum Land

Habib, Ayman

416

Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy Kurt R. Richter University of California Agricultural Issues Center October 2009 #12;Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy II University of California Agricultural Issues Center #12;Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy III Making

Ferrara, Katherine W.

417

Diurnal Characteristics of Precipitation Features Over the East Pacific: A Comparison of the EPIC and TEPPS Regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

over the central American land mass. Sub-MCS features in both regions have a broad peak extending change in solar insolation (Hendon and Woodberry, 1993). Indeed, it has been argued that the ability

Rutledge, Steven

418

Guide for revegetation of mined land in Eastern United States using municipal sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of municipal sewage sludge to reclaim and revegetate land disturbed by mining activity could deal with two major problems (the 60% of land still unreclaimed and the increasing problem of finding landfills for sewage sludge disposal). An alternative to using sludge as an agricultural fertilizer (and possibly introducing heavy metals into the food chain) is to reclaim marginal and disturbed lands. Guidelines for metal loadings in sludge application for reclamation suggest following those developed for agricultural applications. Regulations to date only cover cadmium, but the guidelines include lead, zinc, curium, and niobium. Other regulations cover permit applications, public participation, site investigations, constraints based on the sludge characteristics, and the selection and management of vegetations. A monitoring program is necessary to assure compliance. The appendix identifies appropriate plants for revegetation. 97 references, 12 figures, 12 tables.

Sopper, W.E.; Seaker, E.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Sludge fertilization of state forest land in Northern Michigan. Final report, June 1980-March 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A five-year research-demonstration project to examine the logistic, economic, environmental and sociological aspects of municipal wastewater sludge application was conducted on State Forest land occupied by forest types of major commercial importance in northern Michigan. The procedures utilized for site preparation, sludge transportation and sludge application proved to be cost-effective and made possible uniform distribution of sludge upon the forest floor. As the public comes to recognize the environmental hazards and economic limitations inherent with incineration and the value of sludge as a byproduct resource, forest land application should receive increasing attention as a major sludge management alternative. State regulatory and resource management authorities are committed to use of the newly developed technology in addressing waste management and land management issues.

Brockway, D.G.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Limited development as a tool for agricultural preservation in Massachusetts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Limited development offers the hope of turning market development pressure which threatens open land into a means for financing its protection. In theory, the profit from developing a small portion of a parcel can be used ...

Tuttle, William D. (William Davis)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Enhancing regional security agreements through cooperative monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper proposes that strengthening regional capabilities for formulating and implementing arms control and confidence-building measures is a tangible method of enhancing regional security. It discusses the importance of developing a regional infrastructure for arms control and confidence building and elucidates the role of technology in facilitating regional arms control and confidence-building agreements. In addition, it identifies numerous applications for regional cooperative monitoring in the areas of arms control, resource management, international commerce and disaster response. The Cooperative Monitoring Center at Sandia National Laboratories, whose aim is to help individual countries and regions acquire the tools they need to develop their own solutions to regional problems, is discussed briefly. The paper ends with recommendations for establishing regional cooperative monitoring centers.

Pregenzer, A.L.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Using sludge on land raises more than crops  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Applying sludge to croplands has been one solution to the dilemma of accumulating sewage. At the present time, approximately 25 percent of all sludge disposal programs are conducted as land application, specifically land reclamation and agricultural utilization. The application of sludge to croplands is developing from a small and scattered program into a large-scaled program because of the prohibition of ocean dumping of sludge, increased costs for incineration of sludge and its pollution control, and an increasing national production of over 280 million tons/yr of wet sludge. Agricultural utilization of sewage sludge has several notable benefits including the recycling of essential and trace nutrients, improvement of marginal soil with organic matter, increased crop yield, and direct costs comparable to commercial fertilizers. However, cropland utilization of sewage sludge may involve risks if proper management is not followed. Besides the risk of metal contamination of soil and plants which has received considerable notoriety, the overall environmental impact of sludge application programs must also consider the public health hazards of nitrate (Ntheta/sub 3/) pollution and the spread of pathogenic (disease-causing) organisms, and any odor nuisance which may be associated with these programs.

Gerardi, M.H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Is the northern high latitude land-based CO2 sink weakening?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies indicate that, historically, terrestrial ecosystems of the northern high latitude region may have been responsible for up to 60% of the global net land-based sink for atmospheric CO2. However, these regions have recently experienced remarkable modification of the major driving forces of the carbon cycle, including surface air temperature warming that is significantly greater than the global average and associated increases in the frequency and severity of disturbances. Whether arctic tundra and boreal forest ecosystems will continue to sequester atmospheric CO2 in the face of these dramatic changes is unknown. Here we show the results of model simulations that estimate a 41 Tg C yr-1 sink in the boreal land regions from 1997 to 2006, which represents a 73% reduction in the strength of the sink estimated for previous decades in the late 20th Century. Our results suggest that CO2 uptake by the region in previous decades may not be as strong as previously estimated. The recent decline in sink strength is the combined result of 1) weakening sinks due to warming-induced increases in soil organic matter decomposition and 2) strengthening sources from pyrogenic CO2 emissions as a result of the substantial area of boreal forest burned in wildfires across the region in recent years. Such changes create positive feedbacks to the climate system that accelerate global warming, putting further pressure on emission reductions to achieve atmospheric stabilization targets.

Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The; Gurney, Kevin R [Arizona State University; Burnside, Todd [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Technical guidance for siting criteria development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technical guidance to support the formulation and comparison of possible siting criteria for nuclear power plants has been developed in four areas: (1) consequences of hypothetical severe nuclear-power-plant accidents, (2) characteristics of population distributions about current reactor sites, (3) site availability within the continental United States, and (4) socioeconomic impacts of reactor siting. The impact on consequences of source-term magnitude, meteorology, population distribution, and emergency response have been analyzed. Population distributions about current sites were analyzed to identify statistical characteristics, time trends, and regional differences. A site-availability data bank was constructed for the continential United States. The data bank contains information about population densities, seismicity, topography, water availability, and land-use restrictions. Finally, the socioeconomic impacts of rural-industrialization projects, energy boomtowns, and nuclear power plants were examined to determine their nature, magnitude, and dependence on site demography and remoteness.

Aldrich, D.C.; Sprung, J.L.; Alpert, D.J.; Diegert, K.; Ostmeyer, R.M.; Ritchie, L.T.; Strip, D.R.; Johnson, J.D.; Hansen, K.; Robinson, J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Production costs and supply of biomass by U.S. Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Biofuels Feedstock Development Program has attempted to estimate the cost of producing dedicated energy crops for several regions of the United States. Switchgrass and hybrid poplar have been chosen as representative herbaceous and woody crop species for the estimation. A full economic cost accounting approach is used. This means that not only are out-of-pocket cash expenses (e.g. fertilizers, chemicals, seeds, fuel, repairs) estimated, but fixed costs (e.g., overhead, taxes) and the costs of owned resources (e.g., producer`s own labor, equipment depreciation, land values) are also estimated as part of the cost of producing dedicated energy crops. The costs are estimated as enterprise budgets which means that costs of producing energy crops are estimated as separate entities, and not estimated in context of the entire farm management structure. Competitiveness of energy crops with conventional crops vary by region. Breakeven prices are regional averages. Breakeven prices for poplar are higher than for switchgrass in all regions, in large part due to the higher cost of producing poplars.

Walsh, M.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Keystone Center convened and facilitated a year-long Dialogue on "Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions" to develop recommendations that will help address the difficult and contentious issues related to expansions of regional electric transmission systems that are needed for reliable and economic transmission of power within and across regions. This effort brought together a cross-section of affected stakeholders and thought leaders to address the problem with the collective wisdom of their experience and interests. Transmission owners sat at the table with consumer advocates and environmental organizations. Representatives from regional transmission organizations exchanged ideas with state and federal regulators. Generation developers explored common interests with public power suppliers. Together, the Dialogue participants developed consensus solutions about how to begin unraveling some of the more intractable issues surrounding identification of need, allocation of costs, and reaching consensus on siting issues that can frustrate the development of regional transmission infrastructure. The recommendations fall into three broad categories: 1. Recommendations on appropriate institutional arrangements and processes for achieving regional consensus on the need for new or expanded transmission infrastructure 2. Recommendations on the process for siting of transmission lines 3. Recommendations on the tools needed to support regional planning, cost allocation, and siting efforts. List of Dialogue participants: List of Dialogue Participants: American Electric Power American Transmission Company American Wind Energy Association California ISO Calpine Corporation Cinergy Edison Electric Institute Environmental Defense Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Great River Energy International Transmission Company ISO-New England Iowa Public Utility Board Kanner & Associates Midwest ISO National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates National Grid Northeast Utilities PA Office of Consumer Advocates Pacific Gas & Electric Corporation Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission PJM Interconnection The Electricity Consumers Resource Council U.S. Department of Energy US Department of the Interior Van Ness Feldman Western Interstate Energy Board Wind on the Wires Wisconsin Public Service Commission Xcel Energy

The Keystone Center

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

Northwest Regional Technology Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Northwest Regional Technology Center for Homeland Security The Northwest Regional Technology Center and deployment of technologies that are effective homeland security solutions for the region, and accelerate technology transfer to the national user community. Foster a collaborative spirit across agencies

428

Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United. Building from their work on environmental costs and benefits associated with biofuel production, ORNL positively impact the sustainability of the biofuels industry. Building understanding of land-use change from

429

Rutgers Cooperative Extension graduated 27 New Jersey landscapers and land care providers from their first Organic Land Care Certification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the waste recycling process that naturally occurs in a forest or grassland. "In the case of organic land-day program where they learned new skills related to sustainable, environ- mentally-friendly land care practices that im- prove soil health, pro- mote biodiversity, and reduce negative im- pacts on home land

Goodman, Robert M.

430

NE Oregon Wildlife Project "Precious Lands"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NE Oregon Wildlife Project "Precious Lands" Managed by The Nez Perce Tribe Angela C. Sondenaa, Ph Oct 1996 Helm 10,306 $2,660,674.00 Sept 1998 Graham Tree farm 158 $402,453.00 Aug 1999 Beach Ranch 1 of shrub sub-canopy Project Goals: 40-70% tree canopy cover 35-65% shrub canopy cover > 3.5 snags 6-10" dbh

431

Bureau of Land Management- Campground, Utah  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has remote field stations in Arizona, California, Utah, Idaho, and Alaska. This photograph shows the field station at Red Cliffs Campground in Utah's Cedar City District. Photovoltaic power systems allow the people working in these remote areas to have the convenience of continuous power. "The comfort and convenience of having 24-hour continuous power has been greatly appreciated by the users," said Trent Duncan of BLM, the mechanical engineer for the project.

432

LMA MSW solution of the solar neutrino problem and first KamLAND results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The first KamLAND results are in a very good agreement with the predictions made on the basis of the solar neutrino data and the LMA realization of the MSW mechanism. We perform a combined analysis of the KamLAND (rate, spectrum) and the solar neutrino data with a free boron neutrino flux f_B. The best fit values of neutrino parameters are Delta m^2 = 7.3e-5 eV^2, tg^2 theta = 0.41 and f_B = 1.05 with the 1 sigma intervals: Delta m^2 = (6.2 - 8.4)e-5 eV^2, tg^2 theta = 0.33 - 0.54. We find the 3 sigma upper bounds: Delta m^2 4e-5 eV^2. At 99% C.L. the KamLAND spectral result splits the LMA region into two parts with the preferred one at Delta m^2 solar neutrino and KamLAND results are considered.

P. C. de Holanda; A. Yu. Smirnov

2002-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

433

WORK PROGRAMME 2010 REGIONS OF KNOWLEDGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of regional players in enhancing science and technology based development. Its purpose is to enable regions to strengthen their capacity for investing in and conducting research and technological development activities components of the cluster; · business entities (large enterprises and SMEs as defined in the EC

Milano-Bicocca, Università

434

Non-Economic Obstacles to Wind Deployment: Issues and Regional Differences (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of national obstacles to wind deployment, with regional assessments. A special mention of offshore projects and distributed wind projects is provided. Detailed maps examine baseline capacity, military and flight radar, golden and bald eagle habitat, bat habitat, whooping crane habitat, and public lands. Regional deployment challenges are also discussed.

Baring-Gould, I.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

MAPS Stations on National Wildlife Refuges in the USFWS Pacific Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAPS Stations on National Wildlife Refuges in the USFWS Pacific Region Current Status and Future ............................................................................................. 3 Capture Rates of Adult Birds at MAPS Stations on NWR Lands .................... 3 Identifying ................................................................................. 4 Identifying Gaps in the Distribution of MAPS Stations in the Pacific Region ...... 5 Assessing

DeSante, David F.

436

Western oil shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 7: an ecosystem simulation of perturbations applied to shale oil development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is outlined on activities leading toward evaluation of ecological and agricultural impacts of shale oil development in the Piceance Creek Basin region of northwestern Colorado. After preliminary review of the problem, it was decided to use a model-based calculation approach in the evaluation. The general rationale and objectives of this approach are discussed. Previous studies were examined to characterize climate, soils, vegetation, animals, and ecosystem response units. System function was methodically defined by developing a master list of variables and flows, structuring a generalized system flow diagram, constructing a flow-effects matrix, and conceptualizing interactive spatial units through spatial matrices. The process of developing individual mathematical functions representing the flow of matter and energy through the various system variables in different submodels is discussed. The system model diagram identified 10 subsystems which separately account for flow of soil temperatures, soil water, herbaceous plant biomass, shrubby plant biomass, tree cover, litter biomass, shrub numbers, animal biomass, animal numbers, and land area. Among these coupled subsystems there are 45 unique kinds of state variables and 150 intra-subsystem flows. The model is generalizeable and canonical so that it can be expanded, if required, by disaggregating some of the system state variables and allowing for multiple ecological response units. It integrates information on climate, surface water, ecology, land reclamation, air quality, and solid waste as it is being developed by several other task groups.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Lower Sioux Wind Feasibility & Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the process and findings of a Wind Energy Feasibility Study (Study) conducted by the Lower Sioux Indian Community (Community). The Community is evaluating the development of a wind energy project located on tribal land. The project scope was to analyze the critical issues in determining advantages and disadvantages of wind development within the Community. This analysis addresses both of the Community's wind energy development objectives: the single turbine project and the Commerical-scale multiple turbine project. The main tasks of the feasibility study are: land use and contraint analysis; wind resource evaluation; utility interconnection analysis; and project structure and economics.

Minkel, Darin

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Watershed response and land energy feedbacks under climate change depend upon groundwater.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human induced climate change will have a significant impact on the hydrologic cycle, creating changes in fresh water resources, land cover, and feedbacks that are difficult to characterize, which makes it an issue of global importance. Previous studies have not included subsurface storage in climate change simulations and feedbacks. A variably-saturated groundwater flow model with integrated overland flow and land surface model processes is used to examine the interplay between coupled water and energy processes under climate change conditions. A case study from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) USA, an important agricultural region that is susceptible to drought, is used as the basis for three scenarios simulations using a modified atmospheric forcing dataset to reflect predicted effects due to human-induced climate change. These scenarios include an increase in the atmospheric temperature and variations in rainfall amount and are compared to the present-day climate case. Changes in shallow soil saturation and groundwater levels are quantified as well as the corresponding energy fluxes at the land surface. Here we show that groundwater and subsurface lateral flow processes are critical in understanding hydrologic response and energy feedbacks to climate change and that certain regions are more susceptible to changes in temperature, while others to changes in precipitation. This groundwater control is critical for understanding recharge and drought processes, possible under future climate conditions.

Maxwell, R M; Kollet, S J

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

439

Appalachia's new region-wide CDFI : building local community with global capital?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Appalachian Regional Commission is currently working with a major foundation on the development of a new regional Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI), Appalachian Community Capital. By connecting ...

Spicer, Jason S. (Jason Simpson)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we determined that by grinding the soil samples to a finer particle size of less than 250 ?m (sieve No. 60), the effect of mine soil coal particle size on the extent to which these particles will be oxidized during the thermal treatment of the carbon partitioning procedure will be eliminated, thus making the procedure more accurate and precise. In the second phase of the carbon sequestration project, we focused our attention on determining the sample size required for carbon accounting on grassland mined fields in order to achieve a desired accuracy and precision of the final soil organic carbon (SOC) estimate. A mine land site quality classification scheme was developed and some field-testing of the methods of implementation was completed. The classification model has been validated for softwoods (white pine) on several reclaimed mine sites in the southern Appalachian coal region. The classification model is a viable method for classifying post-SMCRA abandoned mined lands into productivity classes for white pine. A thinning study was established as a random complete block design to evaluate the response to thinning of a 26-year-old white pine stand growing on a reclaimed surface mine in southwest Virginia. Stand parameters were projected to age 30 using a stand table projection. Site index of the stand was found to be 32.3 m at base age 50 years. Thinning rapidly increased the diameter growth of the residual trees to 0.84 cm yr{sup -1} compared to 0.58 cm yr{sup -1} for the unthinned treatment; however, at age 26, there was no difference in volume or value per hectare. At age 30, the unthinned treatment had a volume of 457.1 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} but was only worth $8807 ha{sup -1}, while the thinned treatment was projected to have 465.8 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1}, which was worth $11265 ha{sup -1} due to a larger percentage of the volume being in sawtimber size classes.

Burger, James A

2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Conservation Regional ConservationRegional Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Northwest Power and Conservation Council Regional ConservationRegional Conservation Update and Conservation CouncilConservation Council January 24, 2007 #12;slide 2 Northwest Power and Conservation Council?"" #12;slide 3 Northwest Power and Conservation Council PNW Energy Efficiency AchievementsPNW Energy

442

Montserrat-Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

elements and goals of a regional framework which was developed from an urgent political commitment to manage the effects of climate change on development. The CDKN is...

443

Spatial and Temporal Dynamics: Residential Development Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to examine neighborhood and residential development patterns and investigate dynamic processes in northwest Harris County, Texas, along the U.S. Highway 290 transportation corridor from 1945 to 2006. Researchers have identified different patterns of land...

Park, Joung Im

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

444

On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Land Use License | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey, Washington:Lakeville, MN) Jump to:LamarJump to:Lanco Solar Pvt LtdLand

446

Land-Use Change Data Analysis  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington,LM-04-XXXX OfficeLand and Facility Use Policy

447

Land and Renewable Resources | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs space Combined Routes12thnearPortalLand and

448

Albeni Falls land acquisitions.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICE OF RESEARCH ANDCONTACTS GeorgeLand acquisitions benefi t

449

Land Use Change in theLand Use Change in the United States:United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Accommodating a Growing Biofuels Market Amelia French M.S. Candidate University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Turhollow, R.L.Graham, B.J. Stokes, and D.C. Erbach. 2005. Biomass as feedstock for a bioenergy/Demand of Biofuels? Traditional Crops Perennials Changing Markets Higher Market Values More Land Use #12

Gray, Matthew

450

Quantifying land cover in a semi-arid region of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydraulic conductivity within each sub-basin for the STATSGO and SSURGO models of the Upper Sabinal River watershed.............................................. 146 40 Sub-basin daily average water yield results by month (in millimeters... of H2O) for the STATSGO (STAT) and SSURGO (SSUR) models of the Upper Sabinal River watershed............................................................... 152 41 Sub-basin daily average soil water content results by month (in...

Peschel, Joshua Michael

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

451

Land use change and soil nutrient transformations in the Los Haitises region of the Dominican Republic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Potential denitrification, microbial biomass C and N, and microbial respiration gK1 dry soil were mineralization, net nitrification, microbial biomass C, and microbial respiration were all significantly greater activity and C storage through its effect on SOM quality and quantity. While agriculture can significantly

Templer, Pamela

452

Institutional arrangements and land reallocation during transition : a regional analysis of small farms in Romania  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

My dissertation examines an unexpected outcome of post-socialist agricultural transformation in the Central and Eastern European countries. Contrary to the initial expectations of Neoliberal transition policy-makers, various ...

Vidican Sgouridis, Georgeta

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

The Yalahau Regional Wetland Survey: Ancient Maya Land Use in Northern Quintana Roo, Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

variable deficiencies in phosphorous, potassium, and zinc. ”Calcisols are rich in phosphorous but low in nitrogen andof the root system, and phosphorous retention is another

Leonard, Daniel Ian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

The Yalahau Regional Wetland Survey: Ancient Maya Land Use in Northern Quintana Roo, Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Features in Southern Campeche: New Perspectives on theArchaeological Reconnaissance in Campeche, Quintana Roo, andpatterns in wetlands in Campeche and Belize (see review by

Leonard, Daniel Ian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

The Yalahau Regional Wetland Survey: Ancient Maya Land Use in Northern Quintana Roo, Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

maintained by the Kay Kutz ecotourism outfit in San Angel.4.5 km, ending at an ecotourism camp (with several bungalowrun by the Puerta Verde ecotourism network. From the camp, a

Leonard, Daniel Ian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

The Yalahau Regional Wetland Survey: Ancient Maya Land Use in Northern Quintana Roo, Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the common reed (Phragmites australis [Cav. ] Trin. ex.of 4-m tall reeds (Phragmites australis). Surface elevationand common reed (Phragmites australis). Common herbs are the

Leonard, Daniel Ian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

An international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need to capture important climate feedbacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, called Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results (Friedlingstein et al., 2006). This work suggests that a more rigorous set of global offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are needed. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) was designed to meet this need by providing a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). Recently, a similar effort in Europe, called the International Land Model Benchmark (ILAMB) Project, was begun to assess the performance of European land surface models. These two projects will now serve as prototypes for a proposed international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for those models participating in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). Initially used for model validation for terrestrial biogeochemistry models in the NCAR Community Land Model (CLM), C-LAMP incorporates a simulation protocol for both offline and partially coupled simulations using a prescribed historical trajectory of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Models are confronted with data through comparisons against AmeriFlux site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA Globalview flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site measurements. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the CLM version 3 in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): the CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon-nitrogen (CN) model of Thornton. Comparisons of the CLM3 offline results against observational datasets have been performed and are described in Randerson et al. (2009). CLM version 4 has been evaluated using C-LAMP, showing improvement in many of the metrics. Efforts are now underway to initiate a Nitrogen-Land Model Intercomparison Project (N-LAMP) to better constrain the effects of the nitrogen cycle in biosphere models. Presented will be new results from C-LAMP for CLM4, initial N-LAMP developments, and the proposed land-biosphere model benchmarking activity.

Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Randerson, James T [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Bonan, Gordon [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Erickson III, David J [ORNL; Fung, Inez [University of California, Berkeley

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Application of Municipal Sewage Sludge to Forest and Degraded Land  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper summarizes research done over a decade at the Savannah River Site and elsewhere in the South evaluating the benefits of land application of municipal wastes. Studies have demonstrated that degraded lands, ranging from borrow pits to mine spoils can be successfully revegetated using a mixture of composed municipal sewage sludge and other amendments. The studies have demonstrated a practical approach to land application and restoration.

D.H. Marx, C. R. Berry, and P. P. Kormanik

1995-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

459

Sustainable biomass products development and evaluation, Hamakua project. Final draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PICHTR Sustainable Biomass Energy Program was developed to evaluate the potential to cultivate crops for energy production as an alternative use of lands made available by the closing of large sugar plantations. In particular, the closing of the Hamakua Sugar Company on the island of Hawaii brought a great deal of attention to the future of agriculture in this region and in the state. Many options were proposed. Several promising alternatives had been proposed for cane lands. These included dedicated feedstock supply systems (DFSS) for electrical energy production, cultivation of sugarcane to produce ethanol and related by-products, and the production of feed and crops to support animal agriculture. Implementation of some of the options might require preservation of large tracts of land and maintenance of the sugar mills and sugar infrastructure. An analysis of the technical, financial, and other issues necessary to reach conclusions regarding the optimal use of these lands was required. At the request of the Office of State Planning and Senator Akaka`s office, the Pacific International Center for High Technology Research (PICHTR) established and coordinated a working group composed of state, county, federal, and private sector representatives to identify sustainable energy options for the use of idle sugar lands on the island of Hawaii. The Sustainable Biomass Energy Program`s Hamakua Project was established to complete a comprehensive evaluation of the most viable alternatives and assess the options to grow crops as a source of raw materials for the production of transportation fuel and/or electricity on the island of Hawaii. The motivation for evaluating biomass to energy conversion embraced the considerations that Hawaii`s energy security would be improved by diversifying the fuels used for transportation and reducing dependency on imported fossil fuels. The use of waste products as feedstocks could divert wastes from landfills.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Name Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

transmission facilities on federal lands. In most instances, the Departments of Agriculture or Interior will be the Lead Agency, since they have jurisdiction over most of the...

462

Land Reclamation and the Resource Extraction Reclamation Act (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Environmental Protection's Mining Program is responsible for enacting and implementing regulations pertaining to land reclamation. The program primarily focuses on the reclamation...

463

Energy Corridors on Federal Lands | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Federal Lands in States Identified by EPAct 2005 (August 2011) Related Links West-wide Energy Corridor Programmatic EIS Information Center East-wide Energy Corridor Programmatic...

464

Bureau of Land Management - Notice of Intent to Conduct Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conduct Geothermal Resource Exploration Operations Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Bureau of Land Management - Notice of Intent to Conduct...

465

Iowa Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter establishes remediation standards for land, other than standards for water quality, hazardous conditions, underground storage tanks, and groundwater protection, which are discussed in...

466

What's Happening in the Texas Farm and Ranch Land Market.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the 1963 Texas land market activity is based on information JJ. obtained from 26 sample counties in 16 of the 17 type-of-farming area\\. In each sample county, specific data were obtained from warranty deed recortl\\ cri all bona fide sales containing 20... farm and ranch income has fluctuated. Results of the 196r land market study deviated from this pattern. Land prices continued to ~icr and volume of land sales increased, reversing its position from the trend of a constant decrease. Net farm and ranch...

Andrews, F. B.; Wooten, A. B.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

CALIFORNIA ENERGY EFFECT OF LAND USE CHOICES ON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Manager Natural Gas and Special Projects Office Rosella Shapiro Deputy Director Fuels and Transportation to Efficient Land Use Planning .................................................................. 2 Trends

468

Land Acquisition protects fish habitat in Wahkiakum County -...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(BPA) is proposing to fund the Columbia Land Trust (CLT) through its contract with the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (LCREP) to acquire 305 acres of hillside forest,...

469

Reclamation of Land Used for Mineral Mining (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation aims to provide for the rehabilitation and conservation of land affected by the mining of minerals through proper planning, proper use of appropriate methods of mining,...

470

Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on Water Resource Management Address: Kalanimoku Building 1151 Punchbowl Street Room 227 Place: Honolulu, Hawaii Zip:...

471

Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Forestry...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Forestry and Wildlife Address: Kalanimoku Building 1151 Punchbowl St., Room 325 Place: Honolulu, Hawaii Zip:...

472

Precision Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters with KamLAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

default and new reactor-spectra calculations are given inusing the default reactor-spectrum calculation presented incores for reactor neutrino flux calculations for the KamLAND

ODonnell, Thomas Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Precision Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters with KamLAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

default and new reactor-spectra calculations are given inusing the default reactor-spectrum calculation presented incores for reactor neutrino flux calculations for the KamLAND

O'Donnell, Thomas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Ultracompact HII Regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review some recent observational results on the properties of ultracompact HII regions, in particular the presence of extended continuum emission surrounding ultracompact sources and the discovery of a new class of so-called ``Hypercompact'' HII regions. In addition, we discuss recent attempts to probe the density structure within UC HII regions using the technique of spectral index analysis.

Stan Kurtz; Jose Franco

2001-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

475

Greenhouse gas policy influences climate via direct effects of land-use change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proposed climate mitigation measures do not account for direct biophysical climate impacts of land-use change (LUC), nor do the stabilization targets modeled for the 5th Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). To examine the significance of such effects on global and regional patterns of climate change, a baseline and alternative scenario of future anthropogenic activity are simulated within the Integrated Earth System Model, which couples the Global Change Assessment Model, Global Land-use Model, and Community Earth System Model. The alternative scenario has high biofuel utilization and approximately 50% less global forest cover compared to the baseline, standard RCP4.5 scenario. Both scenarios stabilize radiative forcing from atmospheric constituents at 4.5 W/m2 by 2100. Thus, differences between their climate predictions quantify the biophysical effects of LUC. Offline radiative transfer and land model simulations are also utilized to identify forcing and feedback mechanisms driving the coupled response. Boreal deforestation is found to strongly influence climate due to increased albedo coupled with a regional-scale water vapor feedback. Globally, the alternative scenario yields a 21st century warming trend that is 0.5 °C cooler than baseline, driven by a 1 W/m2 mean decrease in radiative forcing that is distributed unevenly around the globe. Some regions are cooler in the alternative scenario than in 2005. These results demonstrate that neither climate change nor actual radiative forcing are uniquely related to atmospheric forcing targets such as those found in the RCP’s, but rather depend on particulars of the socioeconomic pathways followed to meet each target.

Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.; Chini, Louise M.; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter; Hurtt, George; Wise, Marshall A.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Afro-Peruvian Identity and Its Connection with the Land:The Guayabo-Chincha Case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was important as part of identity formation. I seek to answer how the land supports the culture of the community, the bases of El Guayabo positive identity, how El Guayabo community developed more positive identity than other Afro communities on the coast... they have chosen an apparently random settlement pattern and unique house design. This part of the work emphases the symbolization process as it relates to the formation of the El Guayabo cultural landscape. Chapter five pursues the affirmation...

Ramirez Castello, Carola Lucia

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

477

Understanding Regional Economic Growth in India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding Regional Economic Growth in India Jeffrey D. Sachs, Nirupam Bajpai and Ananthi Ramiah Papers #12;Understanding Regional Economic Growth in India Jeffrey D. Sachs Center for International Development (CID) Harvard University Ananthi_Ramiah@harvard.edu This paper was prepared for the Asian Economic

478

Alamo Area Regional Public Transportation Coordination Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KFH GROUP, INC. ALAMO AREA REGIONAL PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN Developed for: The Alamo Area Council of Governments and the San Antonio-Bexar County Metropolitan Planning Organization By: KFH Group..............................................................................................................................4 SUMMARY OF TRAVEL PATTERNS IN THE ALAMO REGION...............................................9 COORDINATION AND SERVICE ALTERNATIVES .................................................................16 COORDINATED TRANSPORTATION: PLANNED...

Alamo Area Council of Governments

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

479

What difference does local participation make? : contexts of engagement in regional conservation planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

development companies, the regional association of governments, the transportation and water districts, the local energy

Lee, Caroline Worthen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Groundwater depletion in the Middle East from GRACE with implications for transboundary water management in the Tigris-Euphrates-Western Iran region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Marand Plain, Northwest Iran, Iranian Int. J. Sci. , 6(2008), Land subsidence in Iran caused by wide- spread waterTigris-Euphrates-Western Iran region, Water Resour. Res. ,

Voss, Katalyn A; Famiglietti, James S; Lo, MinHui; de Linage, Caroline; Rodell, Matthew; Swenson, Sean C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional land development" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

31 TAC, Part 4, Chapter 155, Subchapter C Exploration and Development...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration and Development of Geothermal Energy and Associated Resources on Permanent School Fund Land Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal...

482

Global Soil Change: Land Use, Soil and Water SWS4231C, SWS5234  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the soil system to withstand global-scale perturbations (e.g., climate or land use change, spread Properties 4. Land Use Change Impacts on Soils 5. Land Use and Agriculture (Irrigation and Fertilization In Soil) 6. Land Use and Soil Erosion 7. Climate Change Impacts on Soils 8. Land Use-Climate

Ma, Lena

483

Archaeology in the Kilauea East Rift Zone: Part 1, Land-use model and research design, Kapoho, Kamaili and Kilauea Geothermal Subzones, Puna District, Hawaii Island  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Puna Geothermal Resource Subzones (GRS) project area encompasses approximately 22,000 acres centered on the Kilauea East Rift Zone in Puna District, Hawaii Island. The area is divided into three subzones proposed for geothermal power development -- Kilauea Middle East Rift, Kamaili and Kapoho GRS. Throughout the time of human occupation, eruptive episodes along the rift have maintained a dynamic landscape. Periodic volcanic events, for example, have changed the coastline configuration, altered patterns of agriculturally suitable sediments, and created an assortment of periodically active, periodically quiescent, volcanic hazards. Because of the active character of the rift zone, then, the area`s occupants have always been obliged to organize their use of the landscape to accommodate a dynamic mosaic of lava flow types and ages. While the specific configuration of settlements and agricultural areas necessarily changed in response to volcanic events, it is possible to anticipate general patterns in the manner in which populations used the landscape through time. This research design offers a model that predicts the spatial results of long-term land-use patterns and relates them to the character of the archaeological record of that use. In essence, the environmental/land-use model developed here predicts that highest population levels, and hence the greatest abundance and complexity of identifiable prehistoric remains, tended to cluster near the coast at places that maximized access to productive fisheries and agricultural soils. With the possible exception of a few inland settlements, the density of archaeological remains expected to decrease with distance from the coastline. The pattern is generally supported in the regions existing ethnohistoric and archaeological record.

Burtchard, G.C.; Moblo, P. [International Archaeological Research Inst., Inc., Honolulu, HI (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

[working paper] Regional Economic Capacity, Economic Shocks,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 [working paper] Regional Economic Capacity, Economic Shocks, and Economic that makes them more likely to resist economic shocks or to recover quickly from of resilience capacity developed by Foster (2012) is related to economic resilience

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

485

The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use Suhail Ahmad  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use by Suhail Ahmad B.E., Avionics Engineering National, Technology and Policy Program #12;#12;3 The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use by Suhail Ahmad Submitted of Master of Science in Technology and Policy ABSTRACT The use of biofuels in domestic transportation sector

486

Land Use and natUraL resoUrces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................9 Cultural Resource Management: CEQA, NEPA and Section 106 and Natural Resources Department UC Davis Extension #12;3 COnTEnTs Land Use PLanning Community InvolvementLand Use and natUraL resoUrces spring 2014 new Courses: Tribal Water Law and Policy Effective

California at Davis, University of

487

Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Economies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this study is to examine the marginal lands in Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies and evaluate their biomass productivity potential. Twelve categories of marginal lands are identified using the Global Agro-Ecological Zones system of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.

Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae State of Hawaii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae Production State of Hawaii Prepared for the U.S. Department agency thereof. #12;Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae Production State of Hawaii Prepared by Mele University of Hawaii at Manoa August 2011 #12;i Executive Summary Algae are considered to be a viable crop

489

FERTILISER APPLICATION IN LAND REGENERATION BPG NOTE 7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and are covered in BPG Note 6: Application of sewage sludges and composts. When to apply fertiliser MineralFERTILISER APPLICATION IN LAND REGENERATION BPG NOTE 7 Best Practice Guidance for Land Regeneration to solve any mineral deficiencies that may arise later. The best way to decide whether further applications

490

Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil Christian Azar Department of Physical policies are warranted if use of degraded lands for bioenergy plantations is desired. 1. Introduction There are two main categories of bioenergy: residues and dedicated plantations. In this paper, we exclusively

491

Climate change and land use in Florida: Interdependencies and opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change and land use in Florida: Interdependencies and opportunities Stephen Mulkey, Ph June 2007 Revised 30 September 2007 #12;Climate change and land use ­ Report to the Century Commission - S. Mulkey, June 2007 2 Executive summary Over this century anthropogenic climate change will present

Watson, Craig A.

492

Global Ice and Land Climate Studies Using Scatterometer Image Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Global Ice and Land Climate Studies Using Scatterometer Image Data David G. Long Brigham Young CA 91109 ben@pacific.jpl.nasa.gov Sasan.Saatchi@jpl.nasa.gov Cheryl Bertoia U. S. National Ice Center: Long, D. G., M. R. Drinkwater, B. Holt, S. Saatchi, and C. Bertoia, Global ice and land climate studies

Long, David G.

493

In this issue: New Tax Incentives for Land in Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this issue: · New Tax Incentives for Land in Conservation · Florida's Outstanding Tree Farmers Quantifies Economic Impact of Private, Working Forests · New Longleaf Book for Landowners and Foresters · Get Landowners and Resource Professionals Volume 16, No. 4 Spring 2010 New Tax Incentives for Land

Watson, Craig A.

494

National Forest Land Scheme case study Broadford and Strath Community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Forest Land Scheme case study Broadford and Strath Community Company: Broadford Wood.forestry.gov.uk/nfls1National Forest Land Scheme case study #12;BSCC has almost 200 members: voting membership is open covers the IV42 and IV49 post codes: about 240km2 . Much of the area comprises moorland and hills

495

National Forest Land Scheme case study Kilfinan Community Forest Company  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;The hill grazing land that became Acharossan Forest was acquired by the Forestry Commission in 1963National Forest Land Scheme case study Kilfinan Community Forest Company: Acharossan Forest The applicant Kilfinan Community Forest Company (KCFC) is a charitable company limited by guarantee established

496

Simulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper Santa Cruz River Water Issue: Introduction and Context This research project addresses a chronic water management issue in Arizona: management and allocation of water supplies in areas undergoing rapid growth and land use changes

Fay, Noah

497

Land Use and natUraL resoUrces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Land Use and natUraL resoUrces summer 2012 Including: Climate Change and Local Planning Strategies Overview of Environmental Statistics Green Building Design Studio CONTINuING AND PrOFessIONAL eDuCATION #12Ndar........................................................................................................................4 laNd USe plaNNiNg Climate Change and Local Planning Strategies

California at Davis, University of

498

MSU Departmental Assessment Plan Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSU Departmental Assessment Plan 2009-2010 Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences: Ecology and Environmental Sciences (cross-college) #12;Student Outcomes Assessment Plan Land Resources Department Head: Tracy M. Sterling Assessment Coordinator: Cathy Zabinski Degrees/Majors/Options Offered

Maxwell, Bruce D.

499

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's (SECARB) Phase I program focused on promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and commercial deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. The SECARB program, and its subsequent phases, directly support the Global Climate Change Initiative's goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by the year 2012. Work during the project's two-year period was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix''. The SECARB team was successful in accomplishing its tasks to define the geographic boundaries of the region; characterize the region; identify and address issues for technology deployment; develop public involvement and education mechanisms; identify the most promising capture, sequestration, and transport options; and prepare action plans for implementation and technology validation activity. Milestones accomplished during Phase I of the project are listed below: (1) Completed preliminary identification of geographic boundaries for the study (FY04, Quarter 1); (2) Completed initial inventory of major sources and sinks for the region (FY04, Quarter 2); (3) Completed initial development of plans for GIS (FY04, Quarter 3); (4) Completed preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues (FY04, Quarter 4); (5) Assessed safety, regulatory and permitting issues (FY05, Quarter 1); (6) Finalized inventory of major sources/sinks and refined GIS algorithms (FY05, Quarter 2); (7) Refined public involvement and education mechanisms in support of technology development options (FY05, Quarter 3); and (8) Identified the most promising capture, sequestration and transport options and prepared action plans (FY05, Quarter 4).

Kenneth J. Nemeth

2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

500

Sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes: Mean state and interannual variability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines the sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes (LSP) using an atmospheric general circulation model both uncoupled (with prescribed SSTs) and coupled to an oceanic general circulation model. The emphasis is on the interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes, which have first order influence on the surface energy and water budgets. The sensitivity to those processes is represented by the differences between model simulations, in which two land surface schemes are considered: 1) a simple land scheme that specifies surface albedo and soil moisture availability, and 2) the Simplified Simple Biosphere Model (SSiB), which allows for consideration of interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical process. Observational datasets are also employed to assess the reality of model-revealed sensitivity. The mean state sensitivity to different LSP is stronger in the coupled mode, especially in the tropical Pacific. Furthermore, seasonal cycle of SSTs in the equatorial Pacific, as well as ENSO frequency, amplitude, and locking to the seasonal cycle of SSTs are significantly modified and more realistic with SSiB. This outstanding sensitivity of the atmosphere-ocean system develops through changes in the intensity of equatorial Pacific trades modified by convection over land. Our results further demonstrate that the direct impact of land-atmosphere interactions on the tropical climate is modified by feedbacks associated with perturbed oceanic conditions ("indirect effect" of LSP). The magnitude of such indirect effect is strong enough to suggest that comprehensive studies on the importance of LSP on the global climate have to be made in a system that allows for atmosphere-ocean interactions.

Ma, Hsi-Yen; Xiao, Heng; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z