National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for regional economic models

  1. Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b <Refurbished Projects Wind Farm JumpWesternEconomic

  2. A regional economic impact model for identifying the relationship between transportation investments and economic development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freyre, German Eleodoro

    1989-01-01

    Impacts 21 3. 5 Past Applications of the REIMHS Model 22 I V PROPOSED METHODOLOGY 24 4. 1 Project Classification Criteria 4. 2 Allocation of Project Costs 4. 3 Computation and Distribution of the Efficiency Savings 24 26 31 TABLE OF CONTENTS... OF CONTENTS Chapter Page I INTRODUCIION 1. 1 General Background 1. 2 Objectives of the Research 1. 3 Summary of Research Plan 1. 4 Thesis Organization II LITERATURE REVIEW I I I OVERVIEW OF THE REIMHS MODEL 14 3. 1 Distribution of the Monetary...

  3. Climate change and agriculture : global and regional effects using an economic model of international trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Empirical estimates of the economic welfare implications of the impact of climate change on global agricultural production are made. Agricultural yield changes resulting from climate scenarios associated with a doubling ...

  4. Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth Report Title: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth Report Title: Coal Production@nmsu.edu #12;Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth i Disclaimer This report States Government or any agency thereof. #12;Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Executive summary Background This report was prepared for the Environmental Conservation Branch, Environment Canada, Vancouver, by CoastWriters Research and environmental planners, to stakeholders in planning processes, to businessmen and community activists

  6. Toledo Regional Economic PlanToledo Regional Economic Plan Transportation and LogisticsTransportation and Logistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    Toledo Regional Economic PlanToledo Regional Economic Plan Transportation and LogisticsTransportation and Logistics Industry SectorIndustry Sector Submitted by:Submitted by: Transportation and Logistics Working GroupTransportation and Logistics Working Group September 2009September 2009 #12;22 Transportation

  7. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2013-06-06

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  8. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2012-10-10

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  9. Regional Economic Accounting (REAcct). A software tool for rapidly approximating economic impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Vargas, Vanessa N.; Loose, Verne William; Starks, Shirley J.; Ellebracht, Lory A.

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the Regional Economic Accounting (REAcct) analysis tool that has been in use for the last 5 years to rapidly estimate approximate economic impacts for disruptions due to natural or manmade events. It is based on and derived from the well-known and extensively documented input-output modeling technique initially presented by Leontief and more recently further developed by numerous contributors. REAcct provides county-level economic impact estimates in terms of gross domestic product (GDP) and employment for any area in the United States. The process for using REAcct incorporates geospatial computational tools and site-specific economic data, permitting the identification of geographic impact zones that allow differential magnitude and duration estimates to be specified for regions affected by a simulated or actual event. Using these data as input to REAcct, the number of employees for 39 directly affected economic sectors (including 37 industry production sectors and 2 government sectors) are calculated and aggregated to provide direct impact estimates. Indirect estimates are then calculated using Regional Input-Output Modeling System (RIMS II) multipliers. The interdependent relationships between critical infrastructures, industries, and markets are captured by the relationships embedded in the inputoutput modeling structure.

  10. Economic Disparities and Life Satisfaction in European Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelman, Andrew

    perspective is the evaluation of the effects of macro-variables that reflect the socio-economic environmentEconomic Disparities and Life Satisfaction in European Regions M. Grazia Pittau Æ Roberto Zelli Æ B.V. 2009 Abstract This paper investigates the role of economic variables in predicting regional

  11. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Gulf of Mexico Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flores, F.; Keyser, D.; Tegen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts for the Gulf of Mexico region.

  12. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Great Lakes Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Keyser, D.

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts identified by the study for the Great Lakes region.

  13. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Mid-Atlantic Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyser, D.; Tegen, S.; Flores, F.; Zammit, D.; Kraemer, M.; Miles, J.

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts for the Mid-Atlantic region.

  14. Chaos Models in Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorin Vlad; Paul Pascu; Nicolae Morariu

    2010-01-20

    The paper discusses the main ideas of the chaos theory and presents mainly the importance of the nonlinearities in the mathematical models. Chaos and order are apparently two opposite terms. The fact that in chaos can be found a certain precise symmetry (Feigenbaum numbers) is even more surprising. As an illustration of the ubiquity of chaos, three models among many other existing models that have chaotic features are presented here: the nonlinear feedback profit model, one model for the simulation of the exchange rate and one application of the chaos theory in the capital markets.

  15. Statewide and Electricity-Sector Models for Economic Assessments of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is an Assistant Professor of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Hawaii at Manoa. She teaches graduate/Pacific Region; energy policy; planning methods; and environmental valuation. She specializes in economicStatewide and Electricity-Sector Models for Economic Assessments of Hawai`i Clean Energy Policies

  16. Modeling regional power transfers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kavicky, J.A.; Veselka, T.D.

    1994-03-01

    The Spot Market Network (SMN) model was used to estimate spot market transactions and prices between various North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions for summer on-peak situations. A preliminary analysis of new or proposed additions to the transmission network was performed. The effects of alternative exempt wholesale generator (EWG) options on spot market transactions and the transmission system are also studied. This paper presents the SMN regional modelling approach and summarizes simulation results. Although the paper focuses on a regional network representation, a discussion of how the SMN model was used to represent a detailed utility-level network is also presented.

  17. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact: Four Regional Scenarios (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2014-11-01

    NREL's Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model for Offshore Wind, is a computer tool for studying the economic impacts of fixed-bottom offshore wind projects in the United States. This presentation provides the results of an analysis of four offshore wind development scenarios in the Southeast Atlantic, Great Lakes, Mid-Atlantic, and Gulf of Mexico regions.

  18. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Southeast Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-07-01

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts identified by the study for the Southeast (defined here as Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia).

  19. Urban Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.

    2006-01-01

    property taxation regional economics residential segregationexternalities urban economics urban production externalitiesproperty taxation regional economics residential segregation

  20. 11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polenske, Karen R.

    Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

  1. 11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polenske, Karen R.

    Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

  2. 11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polenske, Karen

    Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

  3. The implementation of the triple helix model of industry-university-government relations in Puerto Rico to promote knowledge-based regional economic development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramos-Maltés, Ana Lorena

    2010-01-01

    Puerto Rico, an island in the Caribbean, has long sought to develop a high-tech economy and has struggled in the process. Two initiatives, Puerto Rico TechnoEconomic Corridor (PRTEC) and the Eastern Central Technological ...

  4. Our Economic Impact: on the City of Birmingham and West Midlands Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    Our Economic Impact: on the City of Birmingham and West Midlands Region #12;2 Economic Impact Report The University of Birmingham has a major economic impact on the region as: The full Oxford Economics report can be found at www.birmingham.ac.uk/economic-impact an edUcaTor The University attracts

  5. HTGR Application Economic Model Users' Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.M. Gandrik

    2012-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Application Economic Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Application Economic Model calculates either the required selling price of power and/or heat for a given internal rate of return (IRR) or the IRR for power and/or heat being sold at the market price. The user can generate these economic results for a range of reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for up to 16 reactor modules; and for module ratings of 200, 350, or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Application Economic Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Application Economic Model. This model was designed for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel and engineering economics. Modification of the HTGR Application Economic Model should only be performed by users familiar with the HTGR and its applications, Excel, and Visual Basic.

  6. Global extreme events and their regional economic impact: 1996 update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, S.

    1996-12-31

    The meaning of global warming and its relevance to everyday life is explained. Simple thermodynamics is used to predict an oscillatory nature of the change in climate due to global warming. The regional economic impacts of global extreme events are what mankind needs to focus on in government and private sector policy and planning. The economic impact of global warming has been tracked by the Extreme Event Index (EEI) established by the Global Warming International Center (GWIC). This review will update the overall trend and the components of the EEI from 1960 to 1996. The regional components of the global EEI have provided an excellent gauge for measuring the statistical vulnerability of any geographical locality in climate related economic disasters. The author further explains why we no longer fully understand the nature and magnitudes of common phenomena such as storms and wind speeds because of these extreme events, precipitation and temperature oscillations, atmospheric thermal unrest, as well as the further stratification of clouds, and changes in the absorptive properties of clouds. Hurricane strength winds are increasingly common even in continental areas. The author links the increase in duration of the El Nino to global warming, and further predicts a high public health risk as a result of the earth`s transition to another equilibrium state in its young history.

  7. DOE Announces Webinars on an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model, Resources for Tribal Energy Efficiency Projects, and More DOE Announces Webinars on an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model, Resources for...

  8. Sandia Energy - Techno-Economic Modeling, Analysis, and Support

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling, Analysis, and Support Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Special Programs Techno-Economic Modeling, Analysis, and Support Techno-Economic...

  9. Fuel Cell Power Model for CHHP System Economics and Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Model for CHHP System Economics and Performance Analysis Fuel Cell Power Model for CHHP System Economics and Performance Analysis Presented at the Renewable Hydrogen Workshop, Nov....

  10. Economical ontological models for discrete quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernesto F. Galvao

    2009-07-10

    I use the recently proposed framework of ontological models [Harrigan et al., arXiv:0709.1149v2] to obtain economical models for results of tomographically complete sets of measurements on finite-dimensional quantum systems. I describe a procedure that simplifies the models by decreasing the number of necessary ontic states, and present an explicit model with just 33 ontic states for a qutrit.

  11. Designing landscapes for economy : designing regional landscape infrastructure to enable economic and environmental benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reul, Lindsay Kramer

    2012-01-01

    This thesis seeks to deploy landscape design as a regional economic development strategy. It investigates the relationship between economic activity and the built environment. Economies transition from one trend to the ...

  12. Economic Modelling using Constraint Logic Programming Nelson Donovan & David Gilbert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, David

    Economic Modelling using Constraint Logic Programming Nelson Donovan & David Gilbert Computer of constraint logic programming (CLP) in economic modelling through the design and implementation of two economic models. The first model, the Desai­ Henry model contains only linear equations while the second

  13. Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-02-26

    Brochure on the Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model for calculating the economic impacts of wind development.

  14. Appendix C5: Protected Resource Economics in the Northwest Region Protected Resources Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    habitat designation for th i l i f lthe economic analysis for salmon: · Hydropower damsy p · Non-hydropower

  15. New DOE Modeling Tool Estimates Economic Benefits of Offshore...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling Tool Estimates Economic Benefits of Offshore Wind Plants New DOE Modeling Tool Estimates Economic Benefits of Offshore Wind Plants October 1, 2013 - 3:28pm Addthis To help...

  16. New DOE Modeling Tool Estimates Economic Benefits of Offshore...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New DOE Modeling Tool Estimates Economic Benefits of Offshore Wind Plants New DOE Modeling Tool Estimates Economic Benefits of Offshore Wind Plants October 1, 2013 - 3:28pm Addthis...

  17. Reference wind farm selection for regional wind power prediction models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Reference wind farm selection for regional wind power prediction models Nils Siebert George.siebert@ensmp.fr, georges.kariniotakis@ensmp.fr Abstract Short-term wind power forecasting is recognized today as a major requirement for a secure and economic integration of wind generation in power systems. This paper deals

  18. Impact of Air Transportation on Regional Economic and Social Connectivity in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Ryan

    This paper identifies some of the forces that influence the impact of air transportation on regional connectivity and economic productivity in the United States. In light of recent threats to the financial viability of the ...

  19. Supersymmetric economical 3-3-1 model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. V. Dong; D. T. Huong; M. C. Rodriguez; H. N. Long

    2007-01-18

    The supersymmetric extension of the economical 3-3-1 model is presented. The constraint equations and the gauge boson identification establish a relation between the vacuum expectation values (VEVs) at the top and bottom elements of the Higgs triplet $\\chi$ and its supersymmetric counterpart $\\chi^\\prime$. Because of this relation, the exact diagonalization of neutral gauge boson sector has been performed. The gauge bosons and their associated Goldstone ones mix in the same way as in non-supersymmetric version. This is also correct in the case of gauginos. The eigenvalues and eigenstates in the Higgs sector are derived. The model contains a heavy neutral Higgs boson with mass equal to those of the neutral non-Hermitian gauge boson $X^0$ and a charged scalar with mass equal to those of the $W$ boson in the standard model, i. e. $ m_{\\varrho_1} = m_W$. This result is in good agreement with the present estimation: $m_{H^\\pm} > 79.3$ GeV, CL= 95 %. We also show that the boson sector and the fermion sector gain masses in the same way as in the non-supersymmetric case.

  20. Decision Analytic Modelling in the Economic Evaluation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakley, Jeremy

    Decision Analytic Modelling in the Economic Evaluation of Health Technologies A Consensus Statement when used for the economic evaluation of health technologies; there is limited guidanceforgoodmodelling developed in the context of broader healthcare and economic evaluations, for which ex- plicit guidelines

  1. Petroleum Refinery Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.

    2013-12-31

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are user-friendly tools utilized to estimate the economic impacts at the local level of constructing and operating fuel and power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Petroleum Refinery Model User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in employing and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the model estimates job creation, earning and output (total economic activity) for a given petroleum refinery. This includes the direct, indirect and induced economic impacts to the local economy associated with the refinery's construction and operation phases. Project cost and job data used in the model are derived from the most current cost estimations available. Local direct and indirect economic impacts are estimated using economic multipliers derived from IMPLAN software. By determining the regional economic impacts and job creation for a proposed refinery, the JEDI Petroleum Refinery model can be used to field questions about the added value refineries may bring to the local community.

  2. Advanced Small Modular Reactor Economics Model Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Thomas J.

    2014-10-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) research and development activities focus on four key areas: Developing assessment methods for evaluating advanced SMR technologies and characteristics; and Developing and testing of materials, fuels and fabrication techniques; and Resolving key regulatory issues identified by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and industry; and Developing advanced instrumentation and controls and human-machine interfaces. This report focuses on development of assessment methods to evaluate advanced SMR technologies and characteristics. Specifically, this report describes the expansion and application of the economic modeling effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Analysis of the current modeling methods shows that one of the primary concerns for the modeling effort is the handling of uncertainty in cost estimates. Monte Carlo–based methods are commonly used to handle uncertainty, especially when implemented by a stand-alone script within a program such as Python or MATLAB. However, a script-based model requires each potential user to have access to a compiler and an executable capable of handling the script. Making the model accessible to multiple independent analysts is best accomplished by implementing the model in a common computing tool such as Microsoft Excel. Excel is readily available and accessible to most system analysts, but it is not designed for straightforward implementation of a Monte Carlo–based method. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm requires in-spreadsheet scripting and statistical analyses or the use of add-ons such as Crystal Ball. An alternative method uses propagation of error calculations in the existing Excel-based system to estimate system cost uncertainty. This method has the advantage of using Microsoft Excel as is, but it requires the use of simplifying assumptions. These assumptions do not necessarily bring into question the analytical results. In fact, the analysis shows that the propagation of error method introduces essentially negligible error, especially when compared to the uncertainty associated with some of the estimates themselves. The results of these uncertainty analyses generally quantify and identify the sources of uncertainty in the overall cost estimation. The obvious generalization—that capital cost uncertainty is the main driver—can be shown to be an accurate generalization for the current state of reactor cost analysis. However, the detailed analysis on a component-by-component basis helps to demonstrate which components would benefit most from research and development to decrease the uncertainty, as well as which components would benefit from research and development to decrease the absolute cost.

  3. Regional weather modeling on parallel computers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baillie, C.; Michalakes, J.; Skalin, R.; Mathematics and Computer Science; NOAA Forecast Systems Lab.; Norwegian Meteorological Inst.

    1997-01-01

    This special issue on 'regional weather models' complements the October 1995 special issue on 'climate and weather modeling', which focused on global models. In this introduction we review the similarities and differences between regional and global atmospheric models. Next, the structure of regional models is described and we consider how the basic algorithms applied in these models influence the parallelization strategy. Finally, we give a brief overview of the eight articles in this issue and discuss some remaining challenges in the area of adapting regional weather models to parallel computers.

  4. Economic assessment model architecture for AGC/AVLIS selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoglund, R.L.

    1984-05-24

    The economic assessment model architecture described provides the flexibility and completeness in economic analysis that the selection between AGC and AVLIS demands. Process models which are technology-specific will provide the first-order responses of process performance and cost to variations in process parameters. The economics models can be used to test the impacts of alternative deployment scenarios for a technology. Enterprise models provide global figures of merit for evaluating the DOE perspective on the uranium enrichment enterprise, and business analysis models compute the financial parameters from the private investor's viewpoint.

  5. Direct Use of Natural Gas: Economic Fuel Choices from the Regional Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct Use of Natural Gas: Economic Fuel Choices from the Regional Power System and Consumer's Perspective Council document 2012-01 Background Is it better to use natural gas directly in water heaters; total-energy efficiency, fuel switching, direct use of gas, and others. The natural gas companies

  6. Impacts of Regional Electricity Prices and Building Type on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; Campbell, C.; Clark, N.

    2012-12-01

    To identify the impacts of regional electricity prices and building type on the economics of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, 207 rate structures across 77 locations and 16 commercial building types were evaluated. Results for expected solar value are reported for each location and building type. Aggregated results are also reported, showing general trends across various impact categories.

  7. Regions in Energy Market Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, W.

    2007-02-01

    This report explores the different options for spatial resolution of an energy market model--and the advantages and disadvantages of models with fine spatial resolution. It examines different options for capturing spatial variations, considers the tradeoffs between them, and presents a few examples from one particular model that has been run at different levels of spatial resolution.

  8. Regions in Energy Market Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    This report explores the different options for spatial resolution of an energy market model and the advantages and disadvantages of models with fine spatial resolution. It examines different options for capturing spatial variations, considers the tradeoffs between them, and presents a few examples from one particular model that has been run at different levels of spatial resolution.

  9. Transmission Line Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

    2013-10-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are freely available, user-friendly tools that estimate the potential economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The Transmission Line JEDI model can be used to field questions about the economic impacts of transmission lines in a given state, region, or local community. This Transmission Line JEDI User Reference Guide was developed to provide basic instruction on operating the model and understanding the results. This guide also provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data contained in the model.

  10. Regional Climate Modeling: Progress, Challenges, and Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuqing; Leung, Lai R.; McGregor, John L.; Lee, Dong-Kyou; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Ding, Yihui; Kimura, Fujio

    2004-12-01

    Regional climate modeling with regional climate models (RCMs) has matured over the past decade and allows for meaningful utilization in a broad spectrum of applications. In this paper, latest progresses in regional climate modeling studies are reviewed, including RCM development, applications of RCMs to dynamical downscaling for climate change assessment, seasonal climate predictions and climate process studies, and the study of regional climate predictability. Challenges and potential directions of future research in this important area are discussed, with the focus on those to which less attention has been given previously, such as the importance of ensemble simulations, further development and improvement of regional climate modeling approach, modeling extreme climate events and sub-daily variation of clouds and precipitation, model evaluation and diagnostics, applications of RCMs to climate process studies and seasonal predictions, and development of regional earth system models. It is believed that with both the demonstrated credibility of RCMs’ capability in reproducing not only monthly to seasonal mean climate and interannual variability but also the extreme climate events when driven by good quality reanalysis and the continuous improvements in the skill of global general circulation models (GCMs) in simulating large-scale atmospheric circulation, regional climate modeling will remain an important dynamical downscaling tool for providing the needed information for assessing climate change impacts and seasonal climate predictions, and a powerful tool for improving our understanding of regional climate processes. An internationally coordinated effort can be developed with different focuses by different groups to advance regional climate modeling studies. It is also recognized that since the final quality of the results from nested RCMs depends in part on the realism of the large-scale forcing provided by GCMs, the reduction of errors and improvement in physics parameterizations in both GCMs and RCMs remain a priority for climate modeling community.

  11. The Evaluation of Multimodal Transportation Systems for Economic Efficiency and Other Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    urban economyand and economic evaluations. for devising andThen, we the economic evaluation modeling in Intermodal oftransportation for the economic evaluation of regional

  12. Evaluation of Economic Impact of Three-Dimensional Modeling in Precast Concrete Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sacks, Rafael

    Evaluation of Economic Impact of Three-Dimensional Modeling in Precast Concrete Engineering Rafael (IT); Concrete, precast; Economic factors; Three-dimensional models. Introduction "The application to this; but the funda- mental reason undoubtedly was economic." (Mitchell 1977). Intuitive assessments

  13. An Economic Model for Pricing Tiered Network Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Economic Model for Pricing Tiered Network Services Qian Lv, George N. Rouskas Department networks offering tiered services and corresponding price structures, a model that has become preva- lent-) optimal service tiers, we then employ game-theoretic techniques to find an optimal price for each service

  14. The MIT EPPA6 Model: Economic Growth, Energy Use,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The MIT EPPA6 Model: Economic Growth, Energy Use, and Food Consumption Y.-H. Henry Chen, Sergey for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR of global environment and energy challenges, thereby contributing to informed debate about climate change

  15. Using Sensitivity Analysis to Create Simplified Economic Models for Regression Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothermel, Gregg

    Keywords Regression testing, test case prioritization, regression test selection, economic models tradeoffs. Economic models can help practitioners and re- searchers assess methodologies relative sensitivity anal- ysis to examine our model analytically and assess the factors that are most important

  16. Model Conservation Standards COST-EFFECTIVENESS AND ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY OF THE MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and savings assumptions used to establish the efficiency level that achieves all electricity savings and assumptions used to determine whether the regionally cost-effective efficiency levels are economically of the states in the region have revised their energy codes. Consequently, many of the conservation measures

  17. Assessment of the Value, Impact, and Validity of the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Suite of Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billman, L.; Keyser, D.

    2013-08-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), use input-output methodology to estimate gross (not net) jobs and economic impacts of building and operating selected types of renewable electricity generation and fuel plants. This analysis provides the DOE with an assessment of the value, impact, and validity of the JEDI suite of models. While the models produce estimates of jobs, earnings, and economic output, this analysis focuses only on jobs estimates. This validation report includes an introduction to JEDI models, an analysis of the value and impact of the JEDI models, and an analysis of the validity of job estimates generated by JEDI model through comparison to other modeled estimates and comparison to empirical, observed jobs data as reported or estimated for a commercial project, a state, or a region.

  18. Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Small Wind: JEDI Model in the Works (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2012-06-01

    This presentation covers the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's role in economic impact analysis for wind power Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, JEDI results, small wind JEDI specifics, and a request for information to complete the model.

  19. The MIT EPPA6 Model: Economic Growth, Energy Use, and Food Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Y.-H.H.

    The MIT Economic Projection and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model has been broadly applied on energy and climate policy analyses. In this paper, we provide an updated version of the model based on the most recent global economic ...

  20. Regional Economics, Roberta Capello, Routledge, New York, 2007, xxi + 322 pp., Pbk, 32.50, ISBN 978-0-415-39521-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oort, Frank van

    Regional Economics, Roberta Capello, Routledge, New York, 2007, xxi + 322 pp., Pbk, £32.50, ISBN 978-0-415-39521-2 This is a new textbook on regional economics, dealing with agglomeration advantages related to the location of firms and households, and to economic growth. The book makes clear

  1. Applying waste logistics modeling to regional planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holter, G.M.; Khawaja, A.; Shaver, S.R.; Peterson, K.L.

    1995-05-01

    Waste logistics modeling is a powerful analytical technique that can be used for effective planning of future solid waste storage, treatment, and disposal activities. Proper waste management is essential for preventing unacceptable environmental degradation from ongoing operations, and is also a critical part of any environmental remediation activity. Logistics modeling allows for analysis of alternate scenarios for future waste flowrates and routings, facility schedules, and processing or handling capacities. Such analyses provide an increased understanding of the critical needs for waste storage, treatment, transport, and disposal while there is still adequate lead time to plan accordingly. They also provide a basis for determining the sensitivity of these critical needs to the various system parameters. This paper discusses the application of waste logistics modeling concepts to regional planning. In addition to ongoing efforts to aid in planning for a large industrial complex, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is currently involved in implementing waste logistics modeling as part of the planning process for material recovery and recycling within a multi-city region in the western US.

  2. Economic, Hydrologic and Environmental Appraisal of Texas Inter-basin Water Transfers: Model Development and Initial Appraisal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Yongxia; McCarl, Bruce A.

    2007-01-01

    ). Models with economic considerations tend to cover only restricted areas, for example, the Edwards aquifer and Nueces, Frio and Guadalupe-Blanco basin regions (Gillig et al, 2001; Watkins Jr & McKinney, 2000). Much of the research has been localized...

  3. The Future of Food Demand: Understanding Differences in Global Economic Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valin, Hugo; Sands, Ronald; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; Nelson, Gerald; Ahammad, Helal; Blanc, Elodie; Bodirsky, Benjamin; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Kyle, G. Page; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Paltsev, S.; Rolinski, Susanne; Tabeau, Andrzej; van Meijl, Hans; von Lampe, Martin; Willenbockel, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the capacity of agricultural systems to feed the world population under climate change requires a good prospective vision on the future development of food demand. This paper reviews modeling approaches from ten global economic models participating to the AgMIP project, in particular the demand function chosen and the set of parameters used. We compare food demand projections at the horizon 2050 for various regions and agricultural products under harmonized scenarios. Depending on models, we find for a business as usual scenario (SSP2) an increase in food demand of 59-98% by 2050, slightly higher than FAO projection (54%). The prospective for animal calories is particularly uncertain with a range of 61-144%, whereas FAO anticipates an increase by 76%. The projections reveal more sensitive to socio-economic assumptions than to climate change conditions or bioenergy development. When considering a higher population lower economic growth world (SSP3), consumption per capita drops by 9% for crops and 18% for livestock. Various assumptions on climate change in this exercise do not lead to world calorie losses greater than 6%. Divergences across models are however notable, due to differences in demand system, income elasticities specification, and response to price change in the baseline.

  4. Economic transition, industrial location and corporate networks: Remaking the Sunan Model in Wuxi City, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Yehua Dennis

    Economic transition, industrial location and corporate networks: Remaking the Sunan Model in Wuxi-9155, USA Keywords: Sunan model Economic restructuring Industrial location Corporate network Wuxi China a b of institutional changes, economic transition and spatial restructuring. TVEs have been replaced by do- mestic

  5. Economics Definitions, Methods, Models, and Analysis Procedures for Homeland Security Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economics Definitions, Methods, Models, and Analysis Procedures for Homeland Security Applications, Programmer Computational Economics Group January 29, 2010 SAND2010-4315 #12;2 This page intentionally blank #12;3 Economics Definitions, Methods, Models, and Analysis Procedures for Homeland Security

  6. Challenges and successes with economic and business development models at the local level: The Quatsino experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Challenges and successes with economic and business development models at the local level: 534 Title of Project: Challenges and successes with economic and business development models !)*+#&,+( In this case study, I examine the economic development and business development experiences of the Quatsino

  7. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer...

  8. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer...

  9. A Hydro-Economic Approach to Representing Water Resources Impacts in Integrated Assessment Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirshen, Paul H.; Strzepek, Kenneth, M.

    2004-01-14

    Grant Number DE-FG02-98ER62665 Office of Energy Research of the U.S. Department of Energy Abstract Many Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) divide the world into a small number of highly aggregated regions. Non-OECD countries are aggregated geographically into continental and multiple-continental regions or economically by development level. Current research suggests that these large scale aggregations cannot accurately represent potential water resources-related climate change impacts. In addition, IAMs do not explicitly model the flow regulation impacts of reservoir and ground water systems, the economics of water supply, or the demand for water in economic activities. Using the International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade (IMPACT) model of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) as a case study, this research implemented a set of methodologies to provide accurate representation of water resource climate change impacts in Integrated Assessment Models. There were also detailed examinations of key issues related to aggregated modeling including: modeling water consumption versus water withdrawals; ground and surface water interactions; development of reservoir cost curves; modeling of surface areas of aggregated reservoirs for estimating evaporation losses; and evaluating the importance of spatial scale in river basin modeling. The major findings include: - Continental or national or even large scale river basin aggregation of water supplies and demands do not accurately capture the impacts of climate change in the water and agricultural sector in IAMs. - Fortunately, there now exist gridden approaches (0.5 X 0.5 degrees) to model streamflows in a global analysis. The gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with national boundaries. This combined with GIS tools, high speed computers, and the growing availability of socio-economic gridded data bases allows assignment of demands to river basins to create hydro-economic zones that respect as much as possible both political and hydrologic integrity in different models. - To minimize pre-processing of data and add increased flexibility to modeling water resources and uses, it is recommended that water withdrawal demands be modeled, not consumptive requirements even though this makes the IAM more complex. - IAMs must consider changes in water availability for irrigation under climate change; ignoring them is more inaccurate than ignoring yield changes in crops under climate change. - Determining water availability and cost in river basins must include modeling streamflows, reservoirs and their operations, and ground water and its interaction with surface water. - Scale issues are important. The results from condensing demands and supplies in a large complex river basin to one node can be misleading for all uses under low flow conditions and instream flow uses under all conditions. Monthly is generally the most accurate scale for modeling river flows and demands. Challenges remain in integrating hydrologic units with political boundaries but the gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with political boundaries. - Using minimal reservoir cost data, it is possible to use basin topography to estimate reservoir storage costs. - Reservoir evaporation must be considered when assessing the usable water in a watershed. Several methods are available to estimate the relationship between aggregated storage surface area and storage volume. - For existing or future IAMs that can not use the appropriate aggregation for water, a water preprocessor may be required due the finer scale of hydrologic impacts.

  10. A Study of the Economic Impact of Water Impoundment Through Validity Testing of a Comparitive-Projection Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, J. E.; Heideman, K. E.

    1969-01-01

    An established economic simulation model for reservoir development was applied to ten reservoir projects throughout Texas. The model as a predictor of economic impact was given a difficult test because of the diversity of geographic, economic...

  11. Regional, Economic, and Environmental Implications of Dual Ethanol Technologies in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerrero Compean, Roberto

    Climate change, food security, and energy efficiency have become universal challenges for global economic development and environmental conservation that demand in-depth multidisciplinary research. Biofuels have emerged ...

  12. Regional, economic, and environmental effects of traditional and biotechnologically enhanced ethanol production processes in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerrero Compeán, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Climate change, food security, and energy efficiency have become universal challenges for global economic development and environmental conservation that demand in-depth multidisciplinary research. Biofuels have emerged ...

  13. Economic and Distributed Model Predictive Control of Nonlinear Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidarinejad, Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    optimization and control for intentionally transient processpredictive control and optimization of processes : enablingoperation. Within process control, the economic optimization

  14. Diamond Lattice Model of Semicrystalline Polyethylene in the Amorphous Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond Lattice Model of Semicrystalline Polyethylene in the Amorphous Region Zhong­Hui Duan Abstract The statistics of polyethylene chains in the amorphous region between two crystallites have been as models of the chain molecules in the amorphous region of semicrystalline polyethylene, both

  15. A Framework for Modeling Uncertainty in Regional Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    climate models). The modeling framework revolves around the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MITA Framework for Modeling Uncertainty in Regional Climate Change Erwan Monier, Xiang Gao, Jeffery processes of policy development and implementation, climate change research needs to focus on improving

  16. Fuel Cell Power Model for CHHP System Economics and Performance Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.

    2009-11-16

    Presentation about Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model used to analyze the economics and performance of combined heat, hydrogen, and power (CHHP) systems.

  17. Webinar: DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model, originally presented on May 22, 2012.

  18. Regional Short-Term Energy Model (RSTEM) Overview

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The Regional Short-Term Energy Model (RSTEM) utilizes estimated econometric relationships for demand, inventories and prices to forecast energy market outcomes across key sectors and selected regions throughout the United States.

  19. Regional catalytic economic impacts and noise-damage costs of aviation growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Ryan Aung Min, 1973-

    2008-01-01

    There is growing recognition that transportation or infrastructure improvements can have longer-term catalytic impacts economic productivity, which are in addition to the direct, indirect, or induced household spending ...

  20. JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable...

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    project owners, and others interested in the economic impacts from new electricity generation projects. JEDI's user-friendly design allows novices to explore the statewide...

  1. Coupling of a regional atmospheric model (RegCM3) and a regional oceanic model (FVCOM) over the maritime continent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Jun

    Climatological high resolution coupled climate model simulations for the maritime continent have been carried out using the regional climate model (RegCM) version 3 and the finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) ...

  2. Project Title Economic Modeling & Unconventional Gas Resource Appraisal Program Line Tough Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    support to assess the economic viability of new tough gas plays (tight gas, shale gas, CBM). Project are illustrated using the US shale gas plays as case templates. Discounted cash flow models are applied1 Project Title Economic Modeling & Unconventional Gas Resource Appraisal Program Line Tough Gas

  3. Modeling the Impact of Product Portfolio on the Economic and Environmental Performance of Recycling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahmus, Jeffrey B.

    hrough the development of a general model of electronics recycling systems, the effect of product portfolio choices on economic and environmental system performance is explored. The general model encompasses the three main ...

  4. Environmental and Resource Economics Household Energy Demand in Urban China: Accounting for regional prices and rapid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    growth, China's energy consumption is rising at one of the fastest rates in the world, almost 8% per year, in particular, household electricity use rose by 12.6% per year, and natural gas by 19.5% in the last decade1Environmental and Resource Economics Household Energy Demand in Urban China: Accounting

  5. Non-Economic Obstacles to Wind Deployment: Issues and Regional Differences (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2014-05-01

    This presentation provides an overview of national obstacles to wind deployment, with regional assessments. A special mention of offshore projects and distributed wind projects is provided. Detailed maps examine baseline capacity, military and flight radar, golden and bald eagle habitat, bat habitat, whooping crane habitat, and public lands. Regional deployment challenges are also discussed.

  6. How regional authorities can achieve economic development through investments in the logistics sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Taimur, 1973-

    2004-01-01

    Lessons for how a regional authority should develop its logistics sector are learned through case studies on four areas (section 2). In addition, a "logistics attractiveness" ranking framework is developed and applied ...

  7. F region above kauai: Measurement, model, modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.Y.; Sjolander, G.W.; Oran, E.S.; Young, T.R.; Bernhardt, P.A.; Da Rosa, A.V.

    1980-08-01

    A detailed description and analysis is presented of the Lagopedo II results. The rocket was launched on September 11, 1977. Prior to an explosive chemical release a rocket-borne ion mass spectrometer and dual-frequency beacon measured the ion composition and electron content of the undisturbed F region above Kauai, Hawaii. These results are compared to a detailed calculation of ionospheric ion denities. Considerable H/sub 2/O outgassing produced measurable 18/sup +/(H/sub 2/O/sup +/) and 19/sup +/(H/sub 3/O/sup +/) currents which together with O/sup +/ current were used to determine the H/sup 3/O/sup +//H/sub 2/O/sup +/ dissociative recombination rate ratio. The explosive event at 283 km swept clean a l-km-radius region. The boundary of the ionic void was characterized by a steep gradient in the ion density. Results for the first 60 s after the event are presented which show changes in ambient ion species 14/sup +/, 16/sup +/, 30/sup +/, new reactant species 15/sup +/, 17/sup +/, 18/sup +/, 19/sup +/, 27/sup +/, and 46/sup +/, and evidence of ionic depletion by sweeping.

  8. A Java Library Implementation of the Gold-Food Economic Model in Repast and MASON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1 A Java Library Implementation of the Gold-Food Economic Model in Repast and MASON Christopher K, 2008 Abstract We present a robust, extensible Java library for agent-based economic simulations et al. [8]. We implement the library on top of both the Repast and MASON agent-based Java toolkits

  9. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United States: Four Regional Scenarios

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAandSummary Areas of the country thatFernaldOffshore Wind Jobs and Economic

  10. Full employment and competition in the Aspen economic model: implications for modeling acts of terrorism.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprigg, James A.; Ehlen, Mark Andrew

    2004-11-01

    Acts of terrorism could have a range of broad impacts on an economy, including changes in consumer (or demand) confidence and the ability of productive sectors to respond to changes. As a first step toward a model of terrorism-based impacts, we develop here a model of production and employment that characterizes dynamics in ways useful toward understanding how terrorism-based shocks could propagate through the economy; subsequent models will introduce the role of savings and investment into the economy. We use Aspen, a powerful economic modeling tool developed at Sandia, to demonstrate for validation purposes that a single-firm economy converges to the known monopoly equilibrium price, output, and employment levels, while multiple-firm economies converge toward the competitive equilibria typified by lower prices and higher output and employment. However, we find that competition also leads to churn by consumers seeking lower prices, making it difficult for firms to optimize with respect to wages, prices, and employment levels. Thus, competitive firms generate market ''noise'' in the steady state as they search for prices and employment levels that will maximize profits. In the context of this model, not only could terrorism depress overall consumer confidence and economic activity but terrorist acts could also cause normal short-run dynamics to be misinterpreted by consumers as a faltering economy.

  11. Sensitivity Analysis of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model for Economic Controlled Variable Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Sensitivity Analysis of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model for Economic operation conducted on an activated sludge process model based on the test-bed benchmark simulation model no. 1 (BSM1) and the activated sludge model no. 1 (ASM1). The objective is to search for a control

  12. Regional Dynamics Model (REDYN) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergyRedfield1989) Jump to:|OpenRegenesisDynamics Model

  13. Economic Fundamentals in Local Housing Markets: Evidence from U.S. Metropolitan Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Min; Quigley, John M.

    2006-01-01

    patterns of house price development are depicted in Figurethe predicted housing price developments from the same model

  14. Economic fundamentals in local housing markets: Evidence from US metropolitan regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Min; Quigley, John M.

    2006-01-01

    patterns of house price development are To accomplish this,the predicted housing price developments from the same model

  15. Predicting Regional Economic Indices using Big Data of Individual Bank Card Transactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobolevsky, Stanislav; Bojic, Iva; Arias, Juan Murillo; Ratti, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    For centuries quality of life was a subject of studies across different disciplines. However, only with the emergence of a digital era, it became possible to investigate this topic on a larger scale. Over time it became clear that quality of life not only depends on one, but on three relatively different parameters: social, economic and well-being measures. In this study we focus only on the first two, since the last one is often very subjective and consequently hard to measure. Using a complete set of bank card transactions recorded by Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria (BBVA) during 2011 in Spain, we first create a feature space by defining various meaningful characteristics of a particular area performance through activity of its businesses, residents and visitors. We then evaluate those quantities by considering available official statistics for Spanish provinces (e.g., housing prices, unemployment rate, life expectancy) and investigate whether they can be predicted based on our feature space. For the purpos...

  16. High order hybrid discontinuous Galerkin regional ocean modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ueckermann, Mattheus Percy

    2014-01-01

    Accurate modeling of physical and biogeochemical dynamics in coastal ocean regions is required for multiple scientific and societal applications, covering a wide range of time and space scales. However, in light of the ...

  17. A Framework for Modeling Uncertainty in Regional Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    In this study, we present a new modeling framework and a large ensemble of climate projections to investigate the uncertainty in regional climate change over the US associated with four dimensions of uncertainty. The sources ...

  18. Capturing Natural Resource Dynamics in Top-Down Energy?Economic Equilibrium Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Da

    2015-10-20

    Top-down energy-economic modeling approaches often use deliberately simple techniques to represent heterogeneous resource inputs to production. We show that for some policies, such as feed-in tariffs (FIT) for renewable ...

  19. Estimating the Market Penetration of Residential Cool Storage Technology Using Economic Cost Modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weijo, R. O.; and Brown, D. R.

    1988-01-01

    This study estimated the market penetration for residential cool storage technology using economic cost modeling. Residential cool storage units produce and store chill during off-peak periods of the day to be used during times of peak electric...

  20. Webinar: DOE Updates JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC1.1) Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, DOE Updates JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC1.1) Model, originally presented on December 11, 2012.

  1. Economic Model Predictive Control of Nonlinear Process Systems Using Empirical Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALANQAR, ANAS WAEL

    2015-01-01

    define the average economic cost index as: J e = t f Z t f kon the average economic cost index, which are kmol/m 3 , areperiod. LEMPC, the economic cost index is 15.70, while the

  2. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: Offshore Wind User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

    2013-06-01

    The Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed by NREL and MRG & Associates, is a spreadsheet based input-output tool. JEDI is meant to be a user friendly and transparent tool to estimate potential economic impacts supported by the development and operation of offshore wind projects. This guide describes how to use the model as well as technical information such as methodology, limitations, and data sources.

  3. The Informal Sector and Economic Development in Latin America: A Brief Study of the Chilean Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jordan

    2010-07-14

    AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN LATIN AMERICA: A BRIEF STUDY OF THE CHILEAN MODEL A Senior Scholars Thesis by JORDAN LEE Submitted to the Office of Undergraduate Research Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR December 2009 Major: International Studies THE INFORMAL SECTOR AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN LATIN AMERICA: A BRIEF STUDY OF THE CHILEAN MODEL A Senior Scholars Thesis by JORDAN LEE...

  4. Economic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-06-01

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) mandated that minimum energy efficiency standards be established for classes of refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers, freezers, clothes dryers, water heaters, room air conditioners, home heating equipment, kitchen ranges and ovens, central air conditioners, and furnaces. EPCA requires that standards be designed to achieve the maximum improvement in energy efficiency that is technologically feasible and economically justified. Following the introductory chapter, Chapter Two describes the methodology used in the economic analysis and its relationship to legislative criteria for consumer product efficiency assessment; details how the CPES Value Model systematically compared and evaluated the economic impacts of regulation on the consumer, manufacturer and Nation. Chapter Three briefly displays the results of the analysis and lists the proposed performance standards by product class. Chapter Four describes the reasons for developing a baseline forecast, characterizes the baseline scenario from which regulatory impacts were calculated and summarizes the primary models, data sources and assumptions used in the baseline formulations. Chapter Five summarizes the methodology used to calculate regulatory impacts; describes the impacts of energy performance standards relative to the baseline discussed in Chapter Four. Also discussed are regional standards and other program alternatives to performance standards. Chapter Six describes the procedure for balancing consumer, manufacturer, and national impacts to select standard levels. Details of models and data bases used in the analysis are included in Appendices A through K.

  5. A Spatial Analysis of Multivariate Output from Regional Climate Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sain, Steve

    , Columbus, OH 43210, ncressie@stat.osu.edu. 1 #12;1 Introduction Many processes in the Earth system cannot, etc. Climate models attempt to represent this system, as well as to incorporate anthropogenic forcingsA Spatial Analysis of Multivariate Output from Regional Climate Models Stephan R. Sain,1 Reinhard

  6. Economic analysis and assessment of syngas production using a modeling approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hakkwan; Parajuli, Prem B.; Yu, Fei; Columbus, Eugene P.

    2011-08-10

    Economic analysis and modeling are essential and important issues for the development of current feedstock and process technology for bio-gasification. The objective of this study was to develop an economic model and apply to predict the unit cost of syngas production from a micro-scale bio-gasification facility. An economic model was programmed in C++ computer programming language and developed using a parametric cost approach, which included processes to calculate the total capital costs and the total operating costs. The model used measured economic data from the bio-gasification facility at Mississippi State University. The modeling results showed that the unit cost of syngas production was $1.217 for a 60 Nm-3 h-1 capacity bio-gasifier. The operating cost was the major part of the total production cost. The equipment purchase cost and the labor cost were the largest part of the total capital cost and the total operating cost, respectively. Sensitivity analysis indicated that labor costs rank the top as followed by equipment cost, loan life, feedstock cost, interest rate, utility cost, and waste treatment cost. The unit cost of syngas production increased with the increase of all parameters with exception of loan life. The annual cost regarding equipment, labor, feedstock, waste treatment, and utility cost showed a linear relationship with percent changes, while loan life and annual interest rate showed a non-linear relationship. This study provides the useful information for economic analysis and assessment of the syngas production using a modeling approach.

  7. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Heating Oil Price Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The regional residential heating oil price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

  8. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Propane Price Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The regional residential propane price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 Census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

  9. ECONOMIC MODELING OF THE GLOBAL ADOPTION OF CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECONOMIC MODELING OF THE GLOBAL ADOPTION OF CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES J. R. Mc of carbon capture and sequestration technologies as applied to electric generating plants. The MIT Emissions, is used to model carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies based on a natural gas combined cycle

  10. The muon anomalous magnetic moment in the supersymmetric economical 3-3-1 model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. T. Binh; D. T. Huong; H. N. Long

    2015-04-14

    We investigate the muon anomalous magnetic moment in the context of the supersymmetric version of the economical 3-3-1 model. We compute the 1-loop contribution of super-partner particles. We show that contribution of superparticle loop becomes significant when \\tan \\gamma is large. We investigate for both small and large values of $\\tan \\gamma$. We find the region of the parameter space where the slepton masses are of a few hundreds GeV is favour by the muon g-2 for small \\tan \\gamma (\\tan \\gamma \\sim 5 ). Numerical estimation gives the mass of supersymmetric particle, the mass of gauginos m_G \\sim 700 GeV and light slepton mass m_{\\tilde{L}} is of order O (100) GeV. When \\tan{\\gamma} is large (\\tan{\\gamma} \\sim 60), the mass of charged slepton m_{\\tilde{L}} and the mass of gauginos m_G\\sim O(1) TeV while the mass of sneutrino \\sim 450 GeV is in the reach of LHC.

  11. The muon anomalous magnetic moment in the supersymmetric economical 3-3-1 model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binh, D T; Long, H N

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the muon anomalous magnetic moment in the context of the supersymmetric version of the economical 3-3-1 model. We compute the 1-loop contribution of super-partner particles. We show that contribution of superparticle loop becomes significant when \\tan \\gamma is large. We investigate for both small and large values of $\\tan \\gamma$. We find the region of the parameter space where the slepton masses are of a few hundreds GeV is favour by the muon g-2 for small \\tan \\gamma (\\tan \\gamma \\sim 5 ). Numerical estimation gives the mass of supersymmetric particle, the mass of gauginos m_G \\sim 700 GeV and light slepton mass m_{\\tilde{L}} is of order O (100) GeV. When \\tan{\\gamma} is large (\\tan{\\gamma} \\sim 60), the mass of charged slepton m_{\\tilde{L}} and the mass of gauginos m_G\\sim O(1) TeV while the mass of sneutrino \\sim 450 GeV is in the reach of LHC.

  12. The muon anomalous magnetic moment in the supersymmetric economical 3-3-1 model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. T. Binh; D. T. Huong; H. N. Long

    2015-11-06

    We investigate the muon anomalous magnetic moment in the context of the supersymmetric version of the economical 3-3-1 model. We compute the 1-loop contribution of super-partner particles. We show that contribution of superparticle loop becomes significant when \\tan \\gamma is large. We investigate for both small and large values of $\\tan \\gamma$. We find the region of the parameter space where the slepton masses are of a few hundreds GeV is favour by the muon g-2 for small \\tan \\gamma (\\tan \\gamma \\sim 5 ). Numerical estimation gives the mass of supersymmetric particle, the mass of gauginos m_G \\sim 700 GeV and light slepton mass m_{\\tilde{L}} is of order O (100) GeV. When \\tan{\\gamma} is large (\\tan{\\gamma} \\sim 60), the mass of charged slepton m_{\\tilde{L}} and the mass of gauginos m_G\\sim O(1) TeV while the mass of sneutrino \\sim 450 GeV is in the reach of LHC.

  13. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model Geothermal User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.; Augustine, C.; Goldberg, M.

    2012-09-01

    The Geothermal Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is an Excel-based user-friendly tools that estimates the economic impacts of constructing and operating hydrothermal and Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) power generation projects at the local level for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Model Geothermal User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

  14. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - About JEDI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial Toolkit The Geospatial Toolkit is anModels Models The

  15. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Advanced Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial Toolkit The Geospatial Toolkit is anModels Models

  16. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Downloading the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial Toolkit The Geospatial Toolkit is anModels ModelsJEDI

  17. Incorporating Control Performance Tuning into Economic Model Predictive Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olanrewaju, Olumuyiwa I.; Maciejowski, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    [1] A. Singh, J. Forbes, P. Vermeer, and S. Woo, “Model-based real-time optimization of automotive gasoline blending operations,” Journal of Process Control, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 43 – 58, 2000. [2] A. Toumi and S. Engell, “Optimization-based control...

  18. Qualitative modeling and simulation of socio--economic phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brajnik, Giorgio

    ­ straints may be related to the exhaustion of non--renewable energy sources or to the pollution level qualitative reasoning techniques to model the following problem: a central authority must determine on its formulation, would provide an authority with time--paths for (perhaps optimal) energy--use, anti

  19. Adjoint modeling for atmospheric pollution process sensitivity at regional scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    , a strong pollution event was documented over Paris as part of the Etude et Simulation de la Qualite´ de l'airAdjoint modeling for atmospheric pollution process sensitivity at regional scale Laurent Menut 1998 the pollution event changes from a well-marked ozone plume issued from Paris to a more general

  20. Spatial Models for Groundwater Behavioral Analysis in Regions of Maharashtra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Spatial Models for Groundwater Behavioral Analysis in Regions of Maharashtra M.Tech Dissertation In this project we have performed spatial analysis of groundwater data in Thane and Latur districts of Maharashtra Groundwater Survey and Development Agency, Maharashtra), shape files for watershed boundaries and drainage

  1. A regional modeling study of the entraining Mediterranean outflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozgökmen, Tamay M.

    A regional modeling study of the entraining Mediterranean outflow X. Xu,1,2 E. P. Chassignet,3 J. F­dependent entrainment parameterization of Xu et al. (2006). Given realistic topography and sufficient resolution of the outflow plume, and most importantly, the localized, strong entrainment that has been observed to occur

  2. Division of Economics and Business Working Paper Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Division of Economics and Business Working Paper Series A Simple Mineral Market Model: Can of Economics and Business Working Paper No. 2012-05 July 2012 Title: A Simple Mineral Market Model: Can and the structural transformation that accompanies economic development in an emerging region is specified. Using

  3. Economic and Physical Modeling of Land Use in GCAM 3.0 and an Application to Agricultural Productivity, Land, and Terrestrial Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Edmonds, James A.

    2014-09-01

    We explore the impact of changes in agricultural productivity on global land use and terrestrial carbon using the new agriculture and land use modeling approach developed for Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) version 3.0. This approach models economic land use decisions with regional, physical, and technological specificity while maintaining economic and physical integration with the rest of the GCAM model. Physical land characteristics and quantities are tracked explicitly, and crop production practices are modeled discretely to facilitate coupling with physical models. Economic land allocation is modeled with non-linear functions in a market equilibrium rather than through a constrained optimization. In this paper, we explore three scenarios of future agriculture productivity in all regions of the globe over this century, ranging from a high growth to a zero growth level. The higher productivity growth scenario leads to lower crop prices, increased production of crops in developing nations, preservation of global forested lands and lower terrestrial carbon emissions. The scenario with no productivity improvement results in higher crop prices, an expansion of crop production in the developed world, loss of forested lands globally, and higher terrestrial carbon emissions.

  4. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Interpreting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial Toolkit The Geospatial Toolkit is anModels

  5. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Limitations of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial Toolkit The Geospatial Toolkit is anModelsJEDI

  6. Essays in Energy Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spurlock, Cecily Anna

    2013-01-01

    of work,” Journal of Labor Economics, pp. 209–236. Chen, X.Regional science and urban economics, 12(3), 313–324.2009): “Psychology and economics: Evidence from the field,”

  7. Essays in Environmental Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foreman, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Regional Sci- ence and Urban Economics, 22(1):103–121, MarchBridge. Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, 14(2):pp.Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, 5(1):66 – 88,

  8. CIM-EARTH: Community integrated model of economic and resource trajectories for humankind.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, J.; Foster, I.; Judd, K.; Moyer, E.; Munson, T.; Univ. of Chicago; Hoover Inst.

    2010-01-01

    Climate change is a global problem with local climatic and economic impacts. Mitigation policies can be applied on large geographic scales, such as a carbon cap-and-trade program for the entire U.S., on medium geographic scales, such as the NOx program for the northeastern U.S., or on smaller scales, such as statewide renewable portfolio standards and local gasoline taxes. To enable study of the environmental benefits, transition costs, capitalization effects, and other consequences of mitigation policies, we are developing dynamic general equilibrium models capable of incorporating important climate impacts. This report describes the economic framework we have developed and the current Community Integrated Model of Economic and Resource Trajectories for Humankind (CIM-EARTH) instance.

  9. Acclimate--a model for economic damage propagation. Part 1: basic formulation of damage transfer within a global supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levermann, Anders

    failure, price responses and adaptive changes in the economic supply network. The underlying global supply network is based on data from multi-regional input­output tables. Transportation times are derived from

  10. Regional-Scale Climate Change: Observations and Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond S. Bradley; Henry F. Diaz

    2010-12-14

    This collaborative proposal addressed key issues in understanding the Earthâ??s climate system, as highlighted by the U.S. Climate Science Program. The research focused on documenting past climatic changes and on assessing future climatic changes based on suites of global and regional climate models. Geographically, our emphasis was on the mountainous regions of the world, with a particular focus on the Neotropics of Central America and the Hawaiian Islands. Mountain regions are zones where large variations in ecosystems occur due to the strong climate zonation forced by the topography. These areas are particularly susceptible to changes in critical ecological thresholds, and we conducted studies of changes in phonological indicators based on various climatic thresholds.

  11. A Dynamic Network Economic Model of a Service-Oriented Internet with Price and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Nagurney Department of Operations and Information Management, Isenberg School of Management, Uni- versity-mail: dongl@som.umass.edu Sara Saberi Department of Operations and Information Management, Isenberg SchoolA Dynamic Network Economic Model of a Service-Oriented Internet with Price and Quality Competition

  12. Challenges in Using an Economic Cost Model for Software Engineering Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Hoek, André

    1 Challenges in Using an Economic Cost Model for Software Engineering Simulation Emily Oh André van dynamics underlying real-world software engineering processes. We are constructing a new approach to software engineering education that is based on the use of an educa- tional software engineering simulation

  13. Using Control Theory to Model the Long-term Economic Effects of Wildfire1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using Control Theory to Model the Long-term Economic Effects of Wildfire1 Hayley Hesseln,2 Douglas of control theory. It explores the long-term relationships among the factors of production and the choice@CNR.Colostate.edu. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-173. 1999. 107 #12;Session III Using Control Theory

  14. Economic Nonlinear Model Predictive Control for the Optimization of Gas Pipeline Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Compressor 4 Commercial Industry Power Plant LDC 3 Suppliers, 12 Demand nodes, 5 Compressors Sinusoidal Flowrates Industry: N6,12,13,19,21 Commercial: N30,32,34,35 Power Plant: N4,25 LDC: N23 Pcontract = 500 kEconomic Nonlinear Model Predictive Control for the Optimization of Gas Pipeline Networks EWO

  15. Estimating Water Quality Pollution Impacts Based on Economic Loss Models in Urbanization Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Qian

    Estimating Water Quality Pollution Impacts Based on Economic Loss Models in Urbanization Process Abstract: The study investigates water quality pollution impacts on urbanization by analyzing temporal the greatest contributors of surface water quality pollution from 1996 to 2003. High values existed

  16. Modeling Economic Resilience and Animal Disease Outbreaks in the Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Hen-I

    2012-02-14

    to utilize a combined epidemic and economic modeling framework to evaluate animal disease management strategies which can be used to reduce the potential losses in an unusual event such as FMD outbreaks. In this study, we compare the welfare changes among...

  17. MODELING/GIS, RISK ASSESSMENT, ECONOMIC IMPACT A Probabilistic Risk Assessment for Deployed Military Personnel After

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    MODELING/GIS, RISK ASSESSMENT, ECONOMIC IMPACT A Probabilistic Risk Assessment for Deployed a retrospective probabilistic risk assessment for military personnel potentially exposed to insecticides during, and cypermethrin used for residual sprays. We used the risk quotient (RQ) method for our risk assessment (estimated

  18. Representing energy technologies in top-down economic models using bottom-up information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    take energy and other prices as exogenous and, therefore, may overestimate the potential penetrationRepresenting energy technologies in top-down economic models using bottom-up information J.R. Mc 02139, USA c Laboratory for Energy and the Environment, M.I.T., Cambridge, MA 02139, USA Available

  19. Forthcoming: Journal of Applied Business and Economics (2011) Integrating Financial Statement Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Forthcoming: Journal of Applied Business and Economics (2011) Integrating Financial Statement Modeling and Sales Forecasting Using EViews John T. Cuddington Colorado School of Mines Irina Khindanova of the financial forecasts. INTRODUCTION In most business school programs students are exposed to financial

  20. Disaggregated greenhouse gas emission inventories from agriculture via a coupled economic-ecosystem model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    systems in the federal state of Baden-Wu¨rttemberg, Southwest Germany. EFEM is an economic farm production-ecosystem model; Agricultural production systems; Stocking rates 1. Introduction In Germany, agriculture Kaltschmitt a , Ju¨rgen Zeddies b a Institute for Energy and Environment, Torgauer Str. 116, D-04347 Leipzig

  1. Modeling Zero Energy Building: technical and economical optimization Maria Ferrara1-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Modeling Zero Energy Building: technical and economical optimization Maria Ferrara1-2 , Joseph by the recast of Energy Performance of Buildings. The aim of this work is to provide a useful method to deal combines the use of TRNSYS, building energy simulation program, with GenOpt, Generic Optimization program

  2. Downscaling Global Land Cover Projections from an Integrated Assessment Model for Use in Regional Analyses: Results and Evaluation for the US from 2005 to 2095

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Huang, Maoyi; Wolf, Julie; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-06-05

    Projections of land cover change generated from Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and other economic-based models can be applied for analyses of environmental impacts at subregional and landscape scales. For those IAM and economic models that project land use at the sub-continental or regional scale, these projections must be downscaled and spatially distributed prior to use in climate or ecosystem models. Downscaling efforts to date have been conducted at the national extent with relatively high spatial resolution (30m) and at the global extent with relatively coarse spatial resolution (0.5 degree).

  3. Using Weather Data and Climate Model Output in Economic Analyses of Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auffhammer, Maximilian; Hsiang, Solomon M.; Schlenker, Wolfram; Sobel, Adam H.

    2013-06-28

    Economists are increasingly using weather data and climate model output in analyses of the economic impacts of climate change. This article introduces a set of weather data sets and climate models that are frequently used, discusses the most common mistakes economists make in using these products, and identifies ways to avoid these pitfalls. We first provide an introduction to weather data, including a summary of the types of datasets available, and then discuss five common pitfalls that empirical researchers should be aware of when using historical weather data as explanatory variables in econometric applications. We then provide a brief overview of climate models and discuss two common and significant errors often made by economists when climate model output is used to simulate the future impacts of climate change on an economic outcome of interest.

  4. Accidental symmetries and massless quarks in the economical 3-3-1 model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Montero; B. L. Sánchez-Vega

    2014-11-10

    In the framework of a 3-3-1 model with a minimal scalar sector, known as the economical 3-3-1 model, we study its capabilities of generating realistic quark masses. After a detailed study of the symmetries of the model, before and after the spontaneous symmetry breaking, we find a remaining axial symmetry that prevents some quarks to gain mass at all orders in perturbation theory. Since this accidental symmetry is anomalous, we also consider briefly the possibility to generate their masses for non-perturbative effects. However, we find that non-perturbative effects are not enough to generate the measured masses for that three massless quarks. Hence, these results imply that the economical 3-3-1 model is not a realistic description of the electroweak interaction and it has to be modified.

  5. On the need and use of models to explore the role of economic confidence:a survey.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprigg, James A.; Paez, Paul J.; Hand, Michael S.

    2005-04-01

    Empirical studies suggest that consumption is more sensitive to current income than suggested under the permanent income hypothesis, which raises questions regarding expectations for future income, risk aversion, and the role of economic confidence measures. This report surveys a body of fundamental economic literature as well as burgeoning computational modeling methods to support efforts to better anticipate cascading economic responses to terrorist threats and attacks. This is a three part survey to support the incorporation of models of economic confidence into agent-based microeconomic simulations. We first review broad underlying economic principles related to this topic. We then review the economic principle of confidence and related empirical studies. Finally, we provide a brief survey of efforts and publications related to agent-based economic simulation.

  6. On linking an Earth system model to the equilibrium carbon representation of an economically optimizing land use model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Mao, Jiafu; Patel, Pralit L.; Shi, Xiaoying; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, Peter E.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2014-01-01

    Human activities are significantly altering biogeochemical cycles at the global scale, posing a significant problem for earth system models (ESMs), which may incorporate static land-use change inputs but do not actively simulate policy or economic forces. One option to address this problem is a to couple an ESM with an economically oriented integrated assessment model. Here we have implemented and tested a coupling mechanism between the carbon cycles of an ESM (CLM) and an integrated assessment (GCAM) model, examining the best proxy variables to share between the models, and quantifying our ability to distinguish climate- and land-use-driven flux changes. CLM’s net primary production and heterotrophic respiration outputs were found to be the most robust proxy variables by which to manipulate GCAM’s assumptions of long-term ecosystem steady state carbon, with short-term forest production strongly correlated with long-term biomass changes in climate-change model runs. By leveraging the fact that carbon-cycle effects of anthropogenic land-use change are short-term and spatially limited relative to widely distributed climate effects, we were able to distinguish these effects successfully in the model coupling, passing only the latter to GCAM. By allowing climate effects from a full earth system model to dynamically modulate the economic and policy decisions of an integrated assessment model, this work provides a foundation for linking these models in a robust and flexible framework capable of examining two-way interactions between human and earth system processes.

  7. Renewable Power Options for Electrical Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burman, K.; Keller, J.; Kroposki, B.; Lilienthal, P.; Slaughter, R.; Glassmire, J.

    2011-11-01

    The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) is working with a team led by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess the economic and technical feasibility of increasing the contribution of renewable energy in Hawaii. This part of the HCEI project focuses on working with Kaua'i Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC) to understand how to integrate higher levels of renewable energy into the electric power system of the island of Kaua'i. NREL partnered with KIUC to perform an economic and technical analysis and discussed how to model PV inverters in the electrical grid.

  8. Economic assessment of CO? capture and disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckaus, Richard S.; Jacoby, Henry D.; Ellerman, A. Denny.; Leung, Wing-Chi.; Yang, Zili.

    A multi-sector multi-region general equilibrium model of economic growth and emissions is used to explore the conditions that will determine the market penetration of CO2 capture and disposal technology.

  9. Agent-based Versus Macroscopic Modeling of Competition and Business Processes in Economics and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kononovicius, Aleksejus; Daniunas, Valentas

    2012-01-01

    We present examples of agent-based and stochastic models of competition and business processes in economics and finance. We start from as simple as possible models, which have microscopic, agent-based, versions and macroscopic treatment in behavior. Microscopic and macroscopic versions of herding model proposed by Kirman and Bass diffusion of new products are considered in this contribution as two basic ideas. Further we demonstrate that general herding behavior can be considered as a background of nonlinear stochastic model of financial fluctuations.

  10. Hydro-economic models: Concepts, design, applications, and future prospects Julien J. Harou a,*, Manuel Pulido-Velazquez b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    Review Hydro-economic models: Concepts, design, applications, and future prospects Julien J. Harou of Frank Ward, Associate Editor Keywords: Hydro-economic models Integrated water resource management (IWRM and space will increasingly motivate efforts to address water scarcity and reduce water conflicts. Hydro

  11. Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Xiaoming

    2012-01-01

    Process Design and Economic Evaluation A DissertationProcess Design and Economic Evaluation by Xiaoming Lu Doctorprocess simulation and economic evaluation methodology is

  12. Developing a Regional Integrated Assessment Model (RIAM) Framework PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Benjamin L. Preston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    responses of human systems. This project seeks to apply a regional IAM framework to the Gulf Coast region issues, and energy supply issues are all occurring simultaneous- ly, but for which integrated modeling regionalized to develop a new regional IAM capability (Regional Global Change Assessment Model *RCGAM+). RCGAM

  13. California Wintertime Precipitation in Regional and Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, P M

    2009-04-27

    In this paper, wintertime precipitation from a variety of observational datasets, regional climate models (RCMs), and general circulation models (GCMs) is averaged over the state of California (CA) and compared. Several averaging methodologies are considered and all are found to give similar values when model grid spacing is less than 3{sup o}. This suggests that CA is a reasonable size for regional intercomparisons using modern GCMs. Results show that reanalysis-forced RCMs tend to significantly overpredict CA precipitation. This appears to be due mainly to overprediction of extreme events; RCM precipitation frequency is generally underpredicted. Overprediction is also reflected in wintertime precipitation variability, which tends to be too high for RCMs on both daily and interannual scales. Wintertime precipitation in most (but not all) GCMs is underestimated. This is in contrast to previous studies based on global blended gauge/satellite observations which are shown here to underestimate precipitation relative to higher-resolution gauge-only datasets. Several GCMs provide reasonable daily precipitation distributions, a trait which doesn't seem tied to model resolution. GCM daily and interannual variability is generally underpredicted.

  14. Probabilistic policy experiments : the use of energy-economic-environmental models in the climate change policy process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margolis, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper uses the Edmonds-Reilly model to explore an alternative approach for using energy-economic-environmental models when analyzing future CO2 emissions. This approach--conducting probabilistic policy experiments--can ...

  15. 11.481J / 1.284J / ESD.192J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Change, Spring 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polenske, Karen R.

    Surveys theories of regional growth, factor mobility, clustering, industrial restructuring, learning regions, and global supply chains from a political-economy perspective. Examines/critiques accounting frameworks including ...

  16. 11.481J / 1.284J / ESD.192J Analyzing & Accounting for Regional Economic Change, Spring 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polenske, Karen R.

    Surveys theories of regional growth, factor mobility, clustering, industrial restructuring, learning regions, and global supply chains from a political-economy perspective. Examines/critiques accounting frameworks including ...

  17. 11.481J / 1.284J / ESD.284J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Change, Spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polenske, Karen R.

    Surveys theories of regional growth, factor mobility, clustering, industrial restructuring, learning regions, and global supply chains from a political-economy perspective. Examines/critiques accounting frameworks including ...

  18. An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environmental changes. Being data-driven, the Program uses extensive Earth system and economic data and models System Model (IGSM), an integrated assessment model that couples an Earth system model of intermediate's Integrated Global System Model. Through this integrated model, the Program seeks to: discover new

  19. Continuous VRML output fromContinuous VRML output from regional circulation models: aregional circulation models: a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Continuous VRML output fromContinuous VRML output from regional circulation models: aregional and volume to viewview ·· Generate Virtual Reality Modeling LanguageGenerate Virtual Reality ModelingDesktop or laptop PC with web browser ­­ High speed/large RAM not essentialHigh speed/large RAM not essential

  20. Economics definitions, methods, models, and analysis procedures for Homeland Security applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Loose, Verne William; Vargas, Vanessa N.; Smith, Braeton J.; Warren, Drake E.; Downes, Paula Sue; Eidson, Eric D.; Mackey, Greg Edward

    2010-01-01

    This report gives an overview of the types of economic methodologies and models used by Sandia economists in their consequence analysis work for the National Infrastructure Simulation&Analysis Center and other DHS programs. It describes the three primary resolutions at which analysis is conducted (microeconomic, mesoeconomic, and macroeconomic), the tools used at these three levels (from data analysis to internally developed and publicly available tools), and how they are used individually and in concert with each other and other infrastructure tools.

  1. Static and Impulsive Models of Solar Active Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Patsourakos; J. A. Klimchuk

    2008-08-20

    The physical modeling of active regions (ARs) and of the global coronal is receiving increasing interest lately. Recent attempts to model ARs using static equilibrium models were quite successful in reproducing AR images of hot soft X-ray (SXR) loops. They however failed to predict the bright EUV warm loops permeating ARs: the synthetic images were dominated by intense footpoint emission. We demonstrate that this failure is due to the very weak dependence of loop temperature on loop length which cannot simultaneously account for both hot and warm loops in the same AR. We then consider time-dependent AR models based on nanoflare heating. We demonstrate that such models can simultaneously reproduce EUV and SXR loops in ARs. Moreover, they predict radial intensity variations consistent with the localized core and extended emissions in SXR and EUV AR observations respectively. We finally show how the AR morphology can be used as a gauge of the properties (duration, energy, spatial dependence, repetition time) of the impulsive heating.

  2. Economics Undergraduate BSc Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Economics Undergraduate BSc Economics BSc Economics and Politics #12;www.bath.ac.uk/economics Welcome to the Department of Economics The Department has a strong international research reputation in mainstream economics. Our teaching is internationally respected and our students are in demand by employers

  3. Economics Postgraduate MSc Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Economics Postgraduate MSc Economics MSc Economics & Finance MSc International Money & Banking #12;www.bath.ac.uk/economics Welcome to the Department of Economics The Department offers a range. The Department has a strong international research reputation in mainstream economics. Our teaching and research

  4. Economic and policy implications of pandemic influenza.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Braeton J.; Starks, Shirley J.; Loose, Verne W.; Brown, Theresa Jean; Warren, Drake E.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

    2010-03-01

    Pandemic influenza has become a serious global health concern; in response, governments around the world have allocated increasing funds to containment of public health threats from this disease. Pandemic influenza is also recognized to have serious economic implications, causing illness and absence that reduces worker productivity and economic output and, through mortality, robs nations of their most valuable assets - human resources. This paper reports two studies that investigate both the short- and long-term economic implications of a pandemic flu outbreak. Policy makers can use the growing number of economic impact estimates to decide how much to spend to combat the pandemic influenza outbreaks. Experts recognize that pandemic influenza has serious global economic implications. The illness causes absenteeism, reduced worker productivity, and therefore reduced economic output. This, combined with the associated mortality rate, robs nations of valuable human resources. Policy makers can use economic impact estimates to decide how much to spend to combat the pandemic influenza outbreaks. In this paper economists examine two studies which investigate both the short- and long-term economic implications of a pandemic influenza outbreak. Resulting policy implications are also discussed. The research uses the Regional Economic Modeling, Inc. (REMI) Policy Insight + Model. This model provides a dynamic, regional, North America Industrial Classification System (NAICS) industry-structured framework for forecasting. It is supported by a population dynamics model that is well-adapted to investigating macro-economic implications of pandemic influenza, including possible demand side effects. The studies reported in this paper exercise all of these capabilities.

  5. The Central Region in M100: Observations and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. H. Knapen; J. E. Beckman; C. H. Heller; I. Shlosman; R. S. de Jong

    1995-06-19

    We present new high-resolution observations of the center of the late-type spiral M100 (NGC 4321) supplemented by 3D numerical modeling of stellar and gas dynamics, including star formation (SF). NIR imaging has revealed a stellar bar, previously inferred from optical and 21 cm observations, and an ovally-shaped ring-like structure in the plane of the disk. The K isophotes become progressively elongated and skewed to the position angle of the bar (outside and inside the `ring') forming an inner bar-like region. The galaxy exhibits a circumnuclear starburst in the inner part of the K `ring'. Two maxima of the K emission have been observed to lie symmetrically with respect to the nucleus and equidistant from it slightly leading the stellar bar. We interpret the twists in the K isophotes as being indicative of the presence of a double inner Lindblad resonance (ILR) and test this hypothesis by modeling the gas flow in a self-consistent gas + stars disk embedded in a halo, with an overall NGC4321-like mass distribution. We have reproduced the basic morphology of the region (the bar, the large scale trailing shocks, two symmetric K peaks corresponding to gas compression maxima which lie at the caustic formed by the interaction of a pair of trailing and leading shocks in the vicinity of the inner ILR, both peaks being sites of SF, and two additional zones of SF corresponding to the gas compression maxima, referred usually as `twin peaks').

  6. An economic model incorporating shrimp growth and water quality parameters into a budget-simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Jerrell Scott

    1979-01-01

    for Future Research. LIST OF REFERENCES APPENDIX A: POND CONSTRUCTION AND VOLUME. APPENDIX B: THE COMPUTER MODEL 127 131 134 139 146 VITA 175 LIST OF TABLES Number Page 1 Price (dollars per pound) for the size classes 36-40 and 51-60 tails per... present value and return on equity, however, no de- tailed budgeting or biology was incorporated. In Adams' study a bio-economic model was designed to assimilate production data from current pond cultuze operations, develop financial analyses, simulate...

  7. Regionalization of subsurface stormflow parameters of hydrologic models: Derivation from regional analysis of streamflow recession curves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Sheng; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Ali, Melkamu; Leng, Guoyong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Wang, Shaowen; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-07-21

    Subsurface stormflow is an important component of the rainfall–runoff response, especially in steep terrain. Its contribution to total runoff is, however, poorly represented in the current generation of land surface models. The lack of physical basis of these common parameterizations precludes a priori estimation of the stormflow (i.e. without calibration), which is a major drawback for prediction in ungauged basins, or for use in global land surface models. This paper is aimed at deriving regionalized parameterizations of the storage–discharge relationship relating to subsurface stormflow from a top–down empirical data analysis of streamflow recession curves extracted from 50 eastern United States catchments. Detailed regression analyses were performed between parameters of the empirical storage–discharge relationships and the controlling climate, soil and topographic characteristics. The regression analyses performed on empirical recession curves at catchment scale indicated that the coefficient of the power-law form storage–discharge relationship is closely related to the catchment hydrologic characteristics, which is consistent with the hydraulic theory derived mainly at the hillslope scale. As for the exponent, besides the role of field scale soil hydraulic properties as suggested by hydraulic theory, it is found to be more strongly affected by climate (aridity) at the catchment scale. At a fundamental level these results point to the need for more detailed exploration of the co-dependence of soil, vegetation and topography with climate.

  8. Improvement of snowpack simulations in a regional climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, J.; Miller, N.L.

    2011-01-10

    To improve simulations of regional-scale snow processes and related cold-season hydroclimate, the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3), developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), was coupled with the Pennsylvania State University/NCAR fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5). CLM3 physically describes the mass and heat transfer within the snowpack using five snow layers that include liquid water and solid ice. The coupled MM5–CLM3 model performance was evaluated for the snowmelt season in the Columbia River Basin in the Pacific Northwestern United States using gridded temperature and precipitation observations, along with station observations. The results from MM5–CLM3 show a significant improvement in the SWE simulation, which has been underestimated in the original version of MM5 coupled with the Noah land-surface model. One important cause for the underestimated SWE in Noah is its unrealistic land-surface structure configuration where vegetation, snow and the topsoil layer are blended when snow is present. This study demonstrates the importance of the sheltering effects of the forest canopy on snow surface energy budgets, which is included in CLM3. Such effects are further seen in the simulations of surface air temperature and precipitation in regional weather and climate models such as MM5. In addition, the snow-season surface albedo overestimated by MM5–Noah is now more accurately predicted by MM5–CLM3 using a more realistic albedo algorithm that intensifies the solar radiation absorption on the land surface, reducing the strong near-surface cold bias in MM5–Noah. The cold bias is further alleviated due to a slower snowmelt rate in MM5–CLM3 during the early snowmelt stage, which is closer to observations than the comparable components of MM5–Noah. In addition, the over-predicted precipitation in the Pacific Northwest as shown in MM5–Noah is significantly decreased in MM5 CLM3 due to the lower evaporation resulting from the longer snow duration.

  9. The Evaluation of Transportation and Land Use Plans Using Linked Economic and GIS Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Robert A.

    1995-01-01

    urban economyand and economic evaluations. for devlsing andAttempts to base the economic evaluation travel no state isEvaluation of Transportation and Land Use Plans Using Linked Economic

  10. Process and economic model of in-field heavy oil upgrading using aqueous pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsness, C. B., LLNL

    1997-01-21

    A process and economic model for aqueous pyrolysis in-field upgrading of heavy oil has been developed. The model has been constructed using the ASPEN PLUS chemical process simulator. The process features cracking of heavy oil at moderate temperatures in the presence of water to increase oil quality and thus the value of the oil. Calculations with the model indicate that for a 464 Mg/day (3,000 bbl/day) process, which increases the oil API gravity of the processed oil from 13.5{degree} to 22.4{degree}, the required value increase of the oil would need to be at least $2.80/Mg{center_dot}{degree}API($0.40/bbl{center_dot}{degree}API) to make the process economically attractive. This level of upgrading has been demonstrated in preliminary experiments with candidate catalysts. For improved catalysts capable of having the coke make and increasing the pyrolysis rate, a required price increase for the oil as low as $1.34/Mg{center_dot}{degree}API ($0.21/bbl{center_dot}{degree}API)has been calculated.

  11. Bilepton contributions to the neutrinoless double beta decay in the economical 3-3-1 model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soa, D. V. [Hanoi University of Education, Department of Physics (Viet Nam)], E-mail: dvsoa@assoc.iop.vast.ac.vn; Dong, P. V., E-mail: pvdong@iop.vast.ac.vn; Huong, T. T.; Long, H. N. [VAST, Institute of Physics (Viet Nam)

    2009-05-15

    A new bound of the mixing angle between charged gauge bosons (the standard-model W and the bilepton Y) in the economical 3-3-1 model is given. Possible contributions of the charged bileptons to the neutrinoless double beta (({beta}{beta}){sub 0{nu}}) decay are discussed. We show that the ({beta}{beta}){sub 0{nu}} decay in this model is due to both the Majorana {sub L} and Dirac {sub D} neutrino masses. If the mixing angle is in the range of the ratio of neutrino masses {sub L}/{sub D}, the Majorana and Dirac masses are comparable to each other and both may give the main contribution to the decay. As a result, constraints on the bilepton mass are given.

  12. Regional scale cropland carbon budgets: evaluating a geospatial agricultural modeling system using inventory data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Sahajpal, Ritvik; West, Tristram O.; Thomson, Allison M.; Xu, Min; Zhao, Kaiguang; LeDuc, Stephen D.; Williams, Jimmy R.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate quantification and clear understanding of regional scale cropland carbon (C) cycling is critical for designing effective policies and management practices that can contribute toward stabilizing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, extrapolating site-scale observations to regional scales represents a major challenge confronting the agricultural modeling community. This study introduces a novel geospatial agricultural modeling system (GAMS) exploring the integration of the mechanistic Environmental Policy Integrated Climate model, spatially-resolved data, surveyed management data, and supercomputing functions for cropland C budgets estimates. This modeling system creates spatially-explicit modeling units at a spatial resolution consistent with remotely-sensed crop identification and assigns cropping systems to each of them by geo-referencing surveyed crop management information at the county or state level. A parallel computing algorithm was also developed to facilitate the computationally intensive model runs and output post-processing and visualization. We evaluated GAMS against National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) reported crop yields and inventory estimated county-scale cropland C budgets averaged over 2000–2008. We observed good overall agreement, with spatial correlation of 0.89, 0.90, 0.41, and 0.87, for crop yields, Net Primary Production (NPP), Soil Organic C (SOC) change, and Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), respectively. However, we also detected notable differences in the magnitude of NPP and NEE, as well as in the spatial pattern of SOC change. By performing crop-specific annual comparisons, we discuss possible explanations for the discrepancies between GAMS and the inventory method, such as data requirements, representation of agroecosystem processes, completeness and accuracy of crop management data, and accuracy of crop area representation. Based on these analyses, we further discuss strategies to improve GAMS by updating input data and by designing more efficient parallel computing capability to quantitatively assess errors associated with the simulation of C budget components. The modularized design of the GAMS makes it flexible to be updated and adapted for different agricultural models so long as they require similar input data, and to be linked with socio-economic models to understand the effectiveness and implications of diverse C management practices and policies.

  13. Economic advancement or social exclusion? : less-educated workers, cost-of-living and migration in high-tech regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarro Díaz, Criseida

    2005-01-01

    Several high-tech regions today show signs of displacement and exclusion of low-skill workers from the employment and wage benefits of a booming economy. Whether high-tech activities are responsible for these trends or if ...

  14. Integrated Dynamic Gloabal Modeling of Land Use, Energy and Economic Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atul Jain, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL Brian O'Neill, NCAR, Boulder, CO

    2009-10-14

    The overall objective of this collaborative project is to integrate an existing general equilibrium energy-economic growth model with a biogeochemical cycles and biophysical models in order to more fully explore the potential contribution of land use-related activities to future emissions scenarios. Land cover and land use change activities, including deforestation, afforestation, and agriculture management, are important source of not only CO2, but also non-CO2 GHGs. Therefore, contribution of land-use emissions to total emissions of GHGs is important, and consequently their future trends are relevant to the estimation of climate change and its mitigation. This final report covers the full project period of the award, beginning May 2006, which includes a sub-contract to Brown University later transferred to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) when Co-PI Brian O'Neill changed institutional affiliations.

  15. Future regional climate change in the ten hydrologic regions of California: A climate modeling investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, Lisa C

    2005-01-01

    4) Central Coast; (5) Tulare Lake; (6) San Joaquin; (7) San4) Central Coast, (5) Tulare Lake, (6) San Joaquin River, (the smallest increase is in the Tulare Lake region. Median

  16. User`s guide to the META-Net economic modeling system. Version 1.2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamont, A.

    1994-11-24

    In a market economy demands for commodities are met through various technologies and resources. Markets select the technologies and resources to meet these demands based on their costs. Over time, the competitiveness of different technologies can change due to the exhaustion of resources they depend on, the introduction of newer, more efficient technologies, or even shifts in user demands. As this happens, the structure of the economy changes. The Market Equilibrium and Technology Assessment Network Modelling System, META{center_dot}Net, has been developed for building and solving multi-period equilibrium models to analyze the shifts in the energy system that may occur as new technologies are introduced and resources are exhausted. META{center_dot}Net allows a user to build and solve complex economic models. It models` a market economy as a network of nodes representing resources, conversion processes, markets, and end-use demands. Commodities flow through this network from resources, through conversion processes and market, to the end-users. META{center_dot}Net then finds the multiperiod equilibrium prices and quantities. The solution includes the prices and quantities demanded for each commodity along with the capacity additions (and retirements) for each conversion process, and the trajectories of resource extraction. Although the changes in the economy are largely driven by consumers` behavior and the costs of technologies and resources, they are also affected by various government policies. These can include constraints on prices and quantities, and various taxes and constraints on environmental emissions. META{center_dot}Net can incorporate many of these mechanisms and evaluate their potential impact on the development of the economic system.

  17. Economic Model Predictive Control of Nonlinear Process Systems Using Empirical Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALANQAR, ANAS WAEL

    2015-01-01

    4 Application to a Chemical Process Example 5 Conclusionsnonlinear processes. Chemical Engineering Science 2003, 58,based on Wiener models. Chemical Engineering Science 1998,

  18. rizona's grassland ecosystems are an integral part of the regional ecology, and they provide important social and economic values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    losses from conservation may work against it. Ecosystem services valuation can provide information about page 3 for information. #12;Grassland Ecosystem Services Arizona's grassland ecosystems provide manyA rizona's grassland ecosystems are an integral part of the regional ecology, and they provide

  19. A regional numerical ocean model of the circulation in the Bay of Biscay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drijfhout, Sybren

    A regional numerical ocean model of the circulation in the Bay of Biscay Y. Friocourt,1,2,3 B Peninsula and in the Bay of Biscay is investigated by means of a regional ocean model. In particular numerical ocean model of the circulation in the Bay of Biscay, J. Geophys. Res., 112, C09008, doi:10

  20. Aqaba's Old Town : proposed model for community development within the Aqaba Special Economic Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Husseini, Dalia Z. (Dalia Zuehir)

    2007-01-01

    As a recently designated Special Economic Zone in 2001 and Jordan's only port, Aqaba has been experiencing a major economic boom and rapid development at a scale previously unprecedented in Jordan. Under the governance of ...

  1. Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

    2015-01-01

    the GTAP-BIO framework. Climate Change Economics 2012, 03, (in the GTAP-BIO framework. Climate Change Economics 03 (03),Land Use Data for Climate Change Analysis. Routledge Press.

  2. Modeled regional climate change and California endemic oak ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kueppers, Lara M.

    pressure from cutting for fuel, grazing, conversion of woodlands to vineyards and orchards, water resource development, competition with inva- sive grasses, and urban expansion (1). Here, we report how the regional

  3. A method for the assessment of site-specific economic impacts of commercial and industrial biomass energy facilities. A handbook and computer model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    A handbook on ``A Method for the Assessment of Site-specific Econoomic Impacts of Industrial and Commercial Biomass Energy Facilities`` has been prepared by Resource Systems Group Inc. under contract to the Southeastern Regional Biomass Energy Program (SERBEP). The handbook includes a user-friendly Lotus 123 spreadsheet which calculates the economic impacts of biomass energy facilities. The analysis uses a hybrid approach, combining direct site-specific data provided by the user, with indirect impact multipliers from the US Forest Service IMPLAN input/output model for each state. Direct economic impacts are determined primarily from site-specific data and indirect impacts are determined from the IMPLAN multipliers. The economic impacts are given in terms of income, employment, and state and federal taxes generated directly by the specific facility and by the indirect economic activity associated with each project. A worksheet is provided which guides the user in identifying and entering the appropriate financial data on the plant to be evaluated. The WLAN multipliers for each state are included in a database within the program. The multipliers are applied automatically after the user has entered the site-specific data and the state in which the facility is located. Output from the analysis includes a summary of direct and indirect income, employment and taxes. Case studies of large and small wood energy facilities and an ethanol plant are provided as examples to demonstrate the method. Although the handbook and program are intended for use by those with no previous experience in economic impact analysis, suggestions are given for the more experienced user who may wish to modify the analysis techniques.

  4. Battery Ownership Model: A Tool for Evaluating the Economics of Electrified Vehicles and Related Infrastructure (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Keefe, M.; Brooker, A.; Johnson, C.; Mendelsohn, M.; Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.

    2010-11-01

    This presentation uses a vehicle simulator and economics model called the Battery Ownership Model to examine the levelized cost per mile of conventional (CV) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) in comparison with the cost to operate an electric vehicle (EV) under a service provider business model. The service provider is assumed to provide EV infrastructure such as charge points and swap stations to allow an EV with a 100-mile range to operate with driving profiles equivalent to CVs and HEVs. Battery cost, fuel price forecast, battery life, and other variables are examined to determine under what scenarios the levelized cost of an EV with a service provider can approach that of a CV. Scenarios in both the United States as an average and Hawaii are examined. The levelized cost of operating an EV with a service provider under average U.S. conditions is approximately twice the cost of operating a small CV. If battery cost and life can be improved, in this study the cost of an EV drops to under 1.5 times the cost of a CV for U.S. average conditions. In Hawaii, the same EV is only slightly more expensive to operate than a CV.

  5. Battery Ownership Model: A Tool for Evaluating the Economics of Electrified Vehicles and Related Infrastructure; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Keefe, M.; Brooker, A.; Johnson, C.; Mendelsohn, M.; Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.

    2011-01-01

    Electric vehicles could significantly reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and dependence on imported petroleum. However, for mass adoption, EV costs have historically been too high to be competitive with conventional vehicle options due to the high price of batteries, long refuel time, and a lack of charging infrastructure. A number of different technologies and business strategies have been proposed to address some of these cost and utility issues: battery leasing, battery fast-charging stations, battery swap stations, deployment of charge points for opportunity charging, etc. In order to investigate these approaches and compare their merits on a consistent basis, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a new techno-economic model. The model includes nine modules to examine the levelized cost per mile for various types of powertrain and business strategies. The various input parameters such as vehicle type, battery, gasoline, and electricity prices; battery cycle life; driving profile; and infrastructure costs can be varied. In this paper, we discuss the capabilities of the model; describe key modules; give examples of how various assumptions, powertrain configurations, and business strategies impact the cost to the end user; and show the vehicle's levelized cost per mile sensitivity to seven major operational parameters.

  6. Market disruption, cascading effects, and economic recovery:a life-cycle hypothesis model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprigg, James A.

    2004-11-01

    This paper builds upon previous work [Sprigg and Ehlen, 2004] by introducing a bond market into a model of production and employment. The previous paper described an economy in which households choose whether to enter the labor and product markets based on wages and prices. Firms experiment with prices and employment levels to maximize their profits. We developed agent-based simulations using Aspen, a powerful economic modeling tool developed at Sandia, to demonstrate that multiple-firm economies converge toward the competitive equilibria typified by lower prices and higher output and employment, but also suffer from market noise stemming from consumer churn. In this paper we introduce a bond market as a mechanism for household savings. We simulate an economy of continuous overlapping generations in which each household grows older in the course of the simulation and continually revises its target level of savings according to a life-cycle hypothesis. Households can seek employment, earn income, purchase goods, and contribute to savings until they reach the mandatory retirement age; upon retirement households must draw from savings in order to purchase goods. This paper demonstrates the simultaneous convergence of product, labor, and savings markets to their calculated equilibria, and simulates how a disruption to a productive sector will create cascading effects in all markets. Subsequent work will use similar models to simulate how disruptions, such as terrorist attacks, would interplay with consumer confidence to affect financial markets and the broader economy.

  7. Usefulness of the reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo model in regional flood frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribatet, Mathieu

    Usefulness of the reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo model in regional flood frequency; revised 3 May 2007; accepted 17 May 2007; published 3 August 2007. [1] Regional flood frequency analysis and the index flood approach. Results show that the proposed estimator is absolutely suited to regional

  8. Evaluation of Reconstructed Images of Regional Lung Changes Using a Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    Evaluation of Reconstructed Images of Regional Lung Changes Using a Model Robert P, Patterson1 A and Patterson 2004, Yang and Patterson 2010). In order to answer questions about regional lung changes, two regions were created in the posterior portion of the right lung where the resistivity can be independently

  9. Analysis of methods and models for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes in the agricultural sector of the US economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, J.M.

    1982-08-01

    Alternative methods for quantifying the economic impacts associated with future increases in the ambient concentration of CO/sub 2/ were examined. A literature search was undertaken, both to gain a better understanding of the ways in which CO/sub 2/ buildup could affect crop growth and to identify the different methods available for assessing the impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes on crop yields. The second task involved identifying the scope of both the direct and indirect economic impacts that could occur as a result of CO/sub 2/-induced changes in crop yields. The third task then consisted of a comprehensive literature search to identify what types of economic models could be used effectively to assess the kinds of direct and indirect economic impacts that could conceivably occur as a result of CO/sub 2/ buildup. Specific attention was focused upon national and multi-regional agricultural sector models, multi-country agricultural trade models, and macroeconomic models of the US economy. The fourth and final task of this research involved synthesizing the information gathered in the previous tasks into a systematic framework for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes related to agricultural production.

  10. Electroweak phase transition in the economical 3-3-1 model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vo Quoc Phong; Hoang Ngoc Long; Vo Thanh Van; Le Hoang Minh

    2015-07-24

    We consider the EWPT in the economical 3-3-1 (E331) model. Our analysis shows that the EWPT in the model is a sequence of two first-order phase transitions, $SU(3) \\rightarrow SU(2)$ at the TeV scale and $SU(2) \\rightarrow U(1)$ at the $100$ GeV scale. The EWPT $SU(3) \\rightarrow SU(2)$ is triggered by the new bosons and the exotic quarks; its strength is about $1 - 13$ if the mass ranges of these new particles are $10^2 \\,\\mathrm{GeV} - 10^3 \\,\\mathrm{GeV}$. The EWPT $SU(2) \\rightarrow U(1)$ is strengthened by only the new bosons; its strength is about $1 - 1.15$ if the mass parts of $H^0_1$, $H^\\pm_2$ and $Y^\\pm$ are in the ranges $10 \\,\\mathrm{GeV} - 10^2 \\,\\mathrm{GeV}$. The contributions of $H^0_1$ and $H^{\\pm}_2$ to the strengths of both EWPTs may make them sufficiently strong to provide large deviations from thermal equilibrium and B violation necessary for baryogenesis.

  11. Economic Model Predictive Control Theory: Computational Efficiency and Application to Smart Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    network, the stage cost index will also be considered as aperformance index or stage cost index) compared to theloop economic stage cost index (given and explained below)

  12. MODELLING GROUNDWATER FLOW ON THE REGIONAL SCALE IN THE UPPER DANUBE CATCHMENT (GERMANY)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    MODELLING GROUNDWATER FLOW ON THE REGIONAL SCALE IN THE UPPER DANUBE CATCHMENT (GERMANY) Roland.barthel@iws.uni-stuttgart.de Abstract. A groundwater flow model for the Upper Danube catchment (A=77,000km2 at gauge Passau, Germany coupled models. Modelling of groundwater flow, using coupled deterministic and hydrological approaches

  13. Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Third year report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowley, T.J.; North, G.R.; Smith, N.R.

    1994-05-01

    This report was prepared by the Applied Research Corporation (ARC), College Station, Texas, under subcontract to Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate studies task. The task supports site characterization work required for the selection of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository and is part of the Performance Assessment Scientific Support (PASS) Program at PNL. The work is under the overall direction of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), US Department of Energy Headquarters, Washington, DC. The scope of the report is to present the results of the third year`s work on the atmospheric modeling part of the global climate studies task. The development testing of computer models and initial results are discussed. The appendices contain several studies that provide supporting information and guidance to the modeling work and further details on computer model development. Complete documentation of the models, including user information, will be prepared under separate reports and manuals.

  14. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs III. From uniform-density to clumpy regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marin, F; Gaskell, C M

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that part of, if not all, scattering regions of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are clumpy. Hence. in this paper, we run radiative transfer models in the optical/UV for a variety of AGN reprocessing regions with different distributions of clumpy scattering media. We use the latest version of the Monte Carlo code STOKES presented in the first two papers of this series to model AGN reprocessing regions of increasing morphological complexity. We replace previously uniform-density media with up to thousands of constant-density clumps. We couple a continuum source to fragmented equatorial scattering regions, polar outflows, and toroidal, obscuring dust regions and investigate a wide range of geometries. We also consider different levels of fragmentation in each scattering region to evaluate importance of fragmentation for the net polarization of the AGN. We find that, in comparison with uniform-density models, equatorial distributions of gas and dust clouds result in grayer spectr...

  15. BioEarth: Envisioning and developing a new regional earth system model to inform natural and agricultural resource management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    a new regional earth system model to inform natural andsystems, coupled earth system models (EaSMs) are essential.coupled regional earth system models (EaSMs). Decision

  16. PROCEEDINGS OF THE WORKSHOP ON NATIONAL/REGIONAL ENERGY-ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING CONCEPTS, MAY 30 - JUNE 1, 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritschard, R.L.

    2010-01-01

    comprehensive list of model and data base assumptions and toe.g. , scenario, data base, model linkages, etc. , andfor regional models (largely due to data base constraints).

  17. Annual Report On Regional Aquifer Modeling And Data Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhiming

    .................................................................................. 13 3.1 Estimates based on 2-D flow, measured hydraulic gradients and field-based hydraulic........................................................................... 19 4.2 Model Calibrations, Using New Water Level Data from R-wells

  18. U.S.-MEXICO TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER; BILATERAL TECHNICAL EXCHANGES FOR SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC GROWTH IN THE BORDER REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez, Richard, D., Dr.

    2007-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) maintains a strong commitment to transfer the results of its science and technology programs to the private sector. The intent is to apply innovative and sometimes advanced technologies to address needs while simultaneously stimulating new commercial business opportunities. Such focused “technology transfer” was evident in the late 1990s as the results of DOE investments in environmental management technology development led to new tools for characterizing and remediating contaminated sites as well as handling and minimizing the generation of hazardous wastes. The Department’s Office of Environmental Management was attempting to reduce the cost, accelerate the schedule, and improve the efficacy of clean-up efforts in the nuclear weapons complex. It recognized that resulting technologies had broader world market applications and that their commercialization would further reduce costs and facilitate deployment of improved technology at DOE sites. DOE’s Albuquerque Operations Office (now part of the National Nuclear Security Administration) began in 1995 to build the foundation for a technology exchange program with Mexico. Initial sponsorship for this work was provided by the Department’s Office of Environmental Management. As part of this effort, Applied Sciences Laboratory, Inc. (ASL) was contracted by the DOE Albuquerque office to identify Mexico’s priority environmental management needs, identify and evaluate DOE-sponsored technologies as potential solutions for those needs, and coordinate these opportunities with decision makers from Mexico’s federal government. That work led to an improved understanding of many key environmental challenges that Mexico faces and the many opportunities to apply DOE’s technologies to help resolve them. The above results constituted, in large part, the foundation for an initial DOE-funded program to apply the Department’s technology base to help address some of Mexico’s challenging environmental issues. The results also brought focus to the potential contributions that DOE’s science and technology could make for solving the many difficult, multi-generational problems faced by hundreds of bi-national communities along the 2,000-mile shared border of the United States and Mexico. Efforts to address these U.S.-Mexico border issues were initially sponsored by the DOE’s Albuquerque and Carlsbad offices. In subsequent years, the U.S. Congress directed appropriations to DOE’s Carlsbad office to address public health, safety and security issues prevalent within U.S.-Mexico border communities. With ASL’s assistance, DOE’s Albuquerque office developed contacts and formed partnerships with interested U.S and Mexican government, academic, and commercial organizations. Border industries, industrial effluents, and public health conditions were evaluated and documented. Relevant technologies were then matched to environmental problem sets along the border. Several technologies that were identified and subsequently supported by this effort are now operational in a number of U.S.-Mexico border communities, several communities within Mexico’s interior states, and in other parts of Latin America. As a result, some serious public health threats within these communities caused by exposure to toxic airborne pollutants have been reduced. During this time, DOE’s Carlsbad office hosted a bilateral conference to establish a cross-border consensus on what should be done on the basis of these earlier investigative efforts. Participating border region stakeholders set an agenda for technical collaborations. This agenda was supported by several Members of Congress who provided appropriations and directed DOE’s Carlsbad office to initiate technology demonstration projects. During the following two years, more than 12 private-sector and DOE-sponsored technologies were demonstrated in partnership with numerous border community stakeholders. All technologies were well received and their effectiveness at addressing health, safety and security issues w

  19. Modeling Long-Range Transportation and Land Use Scenarios for the Sacramento Region, Using Citizen-Generated Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Robert A.; Gao, Shengyi; Clay, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Barra. Comparison from the Sacramento Model Testbed. Transp.Management Policies in the Sacramento Region: Year Two.Land Use Scenarios for the Sacramento Region, Using Citizen-

  20. Three essays on behavioral economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Juanjuan

    2010-01-01

    Quarterly Journal of Economics, 112(2): 407-441. Crawford,Quarterly Journal of Economics, 121(4): 1133-1165. K?szegi,Models" The Review of Economics and Statistics, 79(4): 551-

  1. Borders as membranes :metaphors and models for improved policy in border regions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malczynski, Leonard A.; Passell, Howard David; Forster, Craig B. (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Cockerill, Kristan (Cockerill Consulting, Boone, NC)

    2005-10-01

    Political borders are controversial and contested spaces. In an attempt to better understand movement along and through political borders, this project applied the metaphor of a membrane to look at how people, ideas, and things ''move'' through a border. More specifically, the research team employed this metaphor in a system dynamics framework to construct a computer model to assess legal and illegal migration on the US-Mexico border. Employing a metaphor can be helpful, as it was in this project, to gain different perspectives on a complex system. In addition to the metaphor, the multidisciplinary team utilized an array of methods to gather data including traditional literature searches, an experts workshop, a focus group, interviews, and culling expertise from the individuals on the research team. Results from the qualitative efforts revealed strong social as well as economic drivers that motivate individuals to cross the border legally. Based on the information gathered, the team concluded that legal migration dynamics were of a scope we did not want to consider hence, available demographic models sufficiently capture migration at the local level. Results from both the quantitative and qualitative data searches were used to modify a 1977 border model to demonstrate the dynamic nature of illegal migration. Model runs reveal that current US-policies based on neo-classic economic theory have proven ineffective in curbing illegal migration, and that proposed enforcement policies are also likely to be ineffective. We suggest, based on model results, that improvement in economic conditions within Mexico may have the biggest impact on illegal migration to the U.S. The modeling also supports the views expressed in the current literature suggesting that demographic and economic changes within Mexico are likely to slow illegal migration by 2060 with no special interventions made by either government.

  2. Modeling Needs Related to the Regional Observing System in the Gulf of Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Needs Related to the Regional Observing System in the Gulf of Maine RARGOM Report 05-1 Theme Session 6-7 July, 2005 Cliff House Ogunquit, Maine Convened by Regional Association for Research on the Gulf of Maine Gulf of Maine Census of Marine Life Gulf of Maine Ocean Observing System Coastal

  3. Go to the Right of the Pillar: Modeling Unoccupied Regions for Robot Directives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skubic, Marjorie

    Go to the Right of the Pillar: Modeling Unoccupied Regions for Robot Directives Marjorie Skubic and Sam Blisard Dept. of Computer Engineering and Computer Science University of Missouri of regions that do not contain objects but may be referenced by objects in the environment, to compute target

  4. Coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator to Regional Climate Model Version 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

    A description of the coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) to Regional Climate Model version 3 (RegCM3) is presented. IBIS introduces several key advantages to RegCM3, most notably vegetation dynamics, the ...

  5. Modeling Regional Air Quality Using the Near-Explicit Master Chemical Mechanism 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jingyi

    2014-08-01

    structure, allowing an explicit calculation of SOA formation from individual model species. Earlier attempts in this area were aimed at developing mechanisms for regional SOA using a small number of representative species (Griffin et al., 2002b; Griffin...

  6. Mesoscale environmental models accompanying convection in the Texas HIPLEX region / by Mark Edward Humbert 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Mark Edward

    1980-01-01

    MESOSCALE ENVIRONMENTAL MODELS ACCOMPANYING CONVECTION IN THE TEXAS HIPLEX REGION A Thesis by MARK EDWARD HUMBERT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1980 Major Subject: Meteorology MESOSCALE ENVIRONMENTAL MODELS ACCOMPANYING CONVECTION IN THE TEXAS HIPLEX REGION A Thesis by MARK EDWARD HUMBERT Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Co ttee) (Head of Department) (Member...

  7. Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Economic Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Economic Impacts Prepared for The Hawaii Natural Energy Institute By Makena Coffman Department of Urban & Regional Planning University of Hawaii at Manoa December 2009 #12;i, a macroeconomic model of Hawaii's economy, representing macro and sector-level inter-linkages, has been created

  8. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Economic Development Impacts in the United States: Four Regional Scenarios Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United States: Four Regional Scenarios...

  9. Resource Planning Model: An Integrated Resource Planning and Dispatch Tool for Regional Electric Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this report, we introduce a new transparent regional capacity expansion model with high spatio-temporal resolution and detailed representation of dispatch. The development of this model, referred to as the Resource Planning Model (RPM), is motivated by the lack of a tool in the public domain that can be used to characterize optimal regional deployment of resources with detailed dispatch modeling. In particular, RPM is designed to evaluate scenarios of renewable technology deployment to meet renewable portfolio standard (RPS) and emission-reduction goals, and to project possible deployment levels for various projections of future technology and fuel prices.

  10. Resource Planning Model: An Integrated Resource Planning and Dispatch Tool for Regional Electric Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.; Drury, E.; Eurek, K.; Bodington, N.; Lopez, A.; Perry, A.

    2013-01-01

    This report introduces a new capacity expansion model, the Resource Planning Model (RPM), with high spatial and temporal resolution that can be used for mid- and long-term scenario planning of regional power systems. Although RPM can be adapted to any geographic region, the report describes an initial version of the model adapted for the power system in Colorado. It presents examples of scenario results from the first version of the model, including an example of a 30%-by-2020 renewable electricity penetration scenario.

  11. Temporal Models for Groundwater Level Prediction in Regions of Maharashtra Dissertation Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Temporal Models for Groundwater Level Prediction in Regions of Maharashtra Dissertation Report In this project work we perform analysis of groundwater level data in three districts of Maha- rashtra - Thane of these districts and developed seasonal models to represent the groundwater be- havior. Three different type

  12. Coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator to Regional Climate Model version 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

    2006-01-01

    Presented in this thesis is a description of the coupling of Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) to Regional Climate Model version 3 (RegCM3), and an assessment of the coupled model (RegCM3-IBIS). RegCM3 is a 3-dimensional, ...

  13. An improved model of the lightning electromagnetic field interaction with the D-region ionosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    14 March 2012. [1] We present an improved time-domain model of the lightning electromagnetic pulse. Introduction [2] Lightning discharges produce both an electromagnetic pulse (EMP), due to the rapid lightningAn improved model of the lightning electromagnetic field interaction with the D-region ionosphere R

  14. Abundance determinations in HII regions: model fitting versus Te-method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin

    2002-11-14

    The discrepancy between the oxygen abundances in high-metallicity HII regions determined through the Te-method (and/or through the corresponding "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibration) and that determined through the model fitting (and/or through the corresponding "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibration) is discussed. It is suggested to use the interstellar oxygen abundance in the solar vicinity, derived with very high precision from the high-resolution observations of the weak interstellar absorption lines towards the stars, as a "Rosetta stone" to verify the validity of the oxygen abundances derived in HII regions with the Te-method at high abundances. The agreement between the value of the oxygen abundance at the solar galactocentric distance traced by the abundances derived in HII regions through the Te-method and that derived from the interstellar absorption lines towards the stars is strong evidence in favor of that i) the two-zone model for Te seems to be a realistic interpretation of the temperature structure within HII regions, and ii) the classic Te-method provides accurate oxygen abundances in HII regions. It has been concluded that the "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibrations must be based on the HII regions with the oxygen abundances derived with the Te-method but not on the existing grids of the models for HII regions.

  15. Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua’i: Economics and Performance Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) is working with a team led by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess the economic and technical feasibility of increasing the contribution of renewable energy in Hawaii.

  16. Statistical Models for Solar Flare Interval Distribution in Individual Active Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuki Kubo

    2008-02-01

    This article discusses statistical models for solar flare interval distribution in individual active regions. We analyzed solar flare data in 55 active regions that are listed in the GOES soft X-ray flare catalog. We discuss some problems with a conventional procedure to derive probability density functions from any data set and propose a new procedure, which uses the maximum likelihood method and Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) to objectively compare some competing probability density functions. We found that lognormal and inverse Gaussian models are more likely models than the exponential model for solar flare interval distribution in individual active regions. The results suggest that solar flares do not occur randomly in time; rather, solar flare intervals appear to be regulated by solar flare mechanisms. We briefly mention a probabilistic solar flare forecasting method as an application of a solar flare interval distribution analysis.

  17. Land-use change trajectories up to 2050: insights from a global agro-economic model comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, Christoph; van Meijl, Hans; Kyle, G. Page; Nelson, Gerald C.; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Gurgel, Angelo; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Popp, Alexander; Sands, Ronald; Tabeau, Andrzej; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; von Lampe, Martin; Wise, Marshall A.; Blanc, Elodie; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Kavallari, Aikaterini; Valin, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Changes in agricultural land use have important implications for environmental services. Previous studies of agricultural land-use futures have been published indicating large uncertainty due to different model assumptions and methodologies. In this article we present a first comprehensive comparison of global agro-economic models that have harmonized drivers of population, GDP, and biophysical yields. The comparison allows us to ask two research questions: (1) How much cropland will be used under different socioeconomic and climate change scenarios? (2) How can differences in model results be explained? The comparison includes four partial and six general equilibrium models that differ in how they model land supply and amount of potentially available land. We analyze results of two different socioeconomic scenarios and three climate scenarios (one with constant climate). Most models (7 out of 10) project an increase of cropland of 10–25% by 2050 compared to 2005 (under constant climate), but one model projects a decrease. Pasture land expands in some models, which increase the treat on natural vegetation further. Across all models most of the cropland expansion takes place in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. In general, the strongest differences in model results are related to differences in the costs of land expansion, the endogenous productivity responses, and the assumptions about potential cropland.

  18. Investigation of the Summer Climate of the Contiguous United States and Mexico Using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castro, Christopher L.

    to observations. The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) is also well represented in both RAMS and NARR, but the Baja Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Part I: Model Climatology (1950­2002) CHRISTOPHER L. CASTRO* Department downscaled using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to generate a regional climate model (RCM

  19. Representing energy technologies in top-down economic models using bottom-up information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, James R.; Reilly, John M.; Herzog, Howard J.

    This paper uses bottom-up engineering information as a basis for modeling new technologies within the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, a computable general equilibrium model of the world economy. ...

  20. Static and Dynamic Modeling of a Solar Active Region. I: Soft X-Ray Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry P. Warren; Amy R. Winebarger

    2006-09-01

    Recent simulations of solar active regions have shown that it is possible to reproduce both the total intensity and the general morphology of the high temperature emission observed at soft X-ray wavelengths using static heating models. There is ample observational evidence, however, that the solar corona is highly variable, indicating a significant role for dynamical processes in coronal heating. Because they are computationally demanding, full hydrodynamic simulations of solar active regions have not been considered previously. In this paper we make first application of an impulsive heating model to the simulation of an entire active region, AR8156 observed on 1998 February 16. We model this region by coupling potential field extrapolations to full solutions of the time-dependent hydrodynamic loop equations. To make the problem more tractable we begin with a static heating model that reproduces the emission observed in 4 different \\textit{Yohkoh} Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT) filters and consider dynamical heating scenarios that yield time-averaged SXT intensities that are consistent with the static case. We find that it is possible to reproduce the total observed soft X-ray emission in all of the SXT filters with a dynamical heating model, indicating that nanoflare heating is consistent with the observational properties of the high temperature solar corona.

  1. Developing Livestock Facility Type Information from USDA Agricultural Census Data for Use in Epidemiological and Economic Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melius, C; Robertson, A; Hullinger, P

    2006-10-24

    The epidemiological and economic modeling of livestock diseases requires knowing the size, location, and operational type of each livestock facility within the US. At the present time, the only national database of livestock facilities that is available to the general public is the USDA's 2002 Agricultural Census data, published by the National Agricultural Statistics Service, herein referred to as the 'NASS data.' The NASS data provides facility data at the county level for various livestock types (i.e., beef cows, milk cows, cattle on feed, other cattle, total hogs and pigs, sheep and lambs, milk goats, and angora goats). However, the number and sizes of facilities for the various livestock types are not independent since some facilities have more than one type of livestock, and some livestock are of more than one type (e.g., 'other cattle' that are being fed for slaughter are also 'cattle on feed'). In addition, any data tabulated by NASS that could identify numbers of animals or other data reported by an individual respondent is suppressed by NASS and coded with a 'D.'. To be useful for epidemiological and economic modeling, the NASS data must be converted into a unique set of facility types (farms having similar operational characteristics). The unique set must not double count facilities or animals. At the same time, it must account for all the animals, including those for which the data has been suppressed. Therefore, several data processing steps are required to work back from the published NASS data to obtain a consistent database for individual livestock operations. This technical report documents data processing steps that were used to convert the NASS data into a national livestock facility database with twenty-eight facility types. The process involves two major steps. The first step defines the rules used to estimate the data that is suppressed within the NASS database. The second step converts the NASS livestock types into the operational facility types used by the epidemiological and economic model. Comparison of the resulting database with an independent survey of farms in central California shows excellent agreement between the numbers of farms for the various facility types. This suggests that the NASS data are well suited for providing a consistent set of county-level information on facility numbers and sizes that can be used in epidemiological and economic models.

  2. BioEarth: Envisioning and developing a new regional earth system model to inform natural and agricultural resource management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    systems, coupled earth system models (EaSMs) are essential.a new regional earth system model to inform natural andthe Community Earth System Model (CESM; www2.cesm.ucar.edu)

  3. Incorporating Stakeholder Decision Support Needs into an Integrated Regional Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, Jennie S.; Moss, Richard H.; Runci, Paul J.; Anderson, K. L.; Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2012-03-21

    A new modeling effort exploring the opportunities, constraints, and interactions between mitigation and adaptation at regional scale is utilizing stakeholder engagement in an innovative approach to guide model development and demonstration, including uncertainty characterization, to effectively inform regional decision making. This project, the integrated Regional Earth System Model (iRESM), employs structured stakeholder interactions and literature reviews to identify the most relevant adaptation and mitigation alternatives and decision criteria for each regional application of the framework. The information is used to identify important model capabilities and to provide a focus for numerical experiments. This paper presents the stakeholder research results from the first iRESM pilot region. The pilot region includes the Great Lakes Basin in the Midwest portion of the United States as well as other contiguous states. This geographic area (14 states in total) permits cohesive modeling of hydrologic systems while also providing gradients in climate, demography, land cover/land use, and energy supply and demand. The results from the stakeholder research indicate that iRESM should prioritize addressing adaptation alternatives in the water resources, urban infrastructure, and agriculture sectors, such as water conservation, expanded water quality monitoring, altered reservoir releases, lowered water intakes, urban infrastructure upgrades, increased electric power reserves in urban areas, and land use management/crop selection changes. Regarding mitigation alternatives, the stakeholder research shows a need for iRESM to focus on policies affecting the penetration of renewable energy technologies, and the costs and effectiveness of energy efficiency, bioenergy production, wind energy, and carbon capture and sequestration.

  4. Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locatelli, R.

    A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model ...

  5. Regional Modeling of Dust Mass Balance and Radiative Forcing over East Asia using WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Siyu; Zhao, Chun; Qian, Yun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, J.; Huang, Zhongwei; Bi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wu; Shi, Jinsen; Yang, Lei; Li, Deshuai; Li, Jinxin

    2014-12-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to investigate the seasonal and annual variations of mineral dust over East Asia during 2007-2011, with a focus on the dust mass balance and radiative forcing. A variety of measurements from in-stu and satellite observations have been used to evaluate simulation results. Generally, WRF-Chem reproduces not only the column variability but also the vertical profile and size distribution of mineral dust over and near the dust source regions of East Asia. We investigate the dust lifecycle and the factors that control the seasonal and spatial variations of dust mass balance and radiative forcing over the seven sub-regions of East Asia, i.e. source regions, the Tibetan Plateau, Northern China, Southern China, the ocean outflow region, and Korea-Japan regions. Results show that, over the source regions, transport and dry deposition are the two dominant sinks. Transport contributes to ~30% of the dust sink over the source regions. Dust results in a surface cooling of up to -14 and -10 W m-2, atmospheric warming of up to 20 and 15 W m-2, and TOA cooling of -5 and -8 W m-2 over the two major dust source regions of East Asia, respectively. Over the Tibetan Plateau, transport is the dominant source with a peak in summer. Over identified outflow regions, maximum dust mass loading in spring is contributed by the transport. Dry and wet depositions are the comparably dominant sinks, but wet deposition is larger than dry deposition over the Korea-Japan region, particularly in spring (70% versus 30%). The WRF-Chem simulations can generally capture the measured features of dust aerosols and its radaitve properties and dust mass balance over East Asia, which provides confidence for use in further investigation of dust impact on climate over East Asia.

  6. Design of a next-generation regional weather research and forecast model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalakes, J.

    1999-01-13

    The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model is a new model development effort undertaken jointly by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and a number of collaborating institutions and university scientists. The model is intended for use by operational NWP and university research communities, providing a common framework for idealized dynamical studies, fill physics numerical weather prediction, air-quality simulation, and regional climate. It will eventually supersede large, well-established but aging regional models now maintained by the participating institutions. The WRF effort includes re-engineering the underlying software architecture to produce a modular, flexible code designed from the outset to provide portable performance across diverse computing architectures. This paper outlines key elements of the WRF software design.

  7. Implementation of an Urban Parameterization Scheme into the Regional Climate Model COSMO-CLM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    July 2012, in final form 23 April 2013) ABSTRACT As the nonhydrostatic regional model of the Consortium of urbanization on the environment, the authors extend its surface-layer parameterization by the Town Energy on spatial scales below ;3 km. 1. Introduction Since the level of world urbanization crossed the 50% mark

  8. A MODIFIED GAMBLER'S RUIN MODEL POLYETHYLENE CHAINS IN THE AMORPHOUS REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A MODIFIED GAMBLER'S RUIN MODEL OF POLYETHYLENE CHAINS IN THE AMORPHOUS REGION Zhong­Hui Duan and Louis N. Howard Department of Mathematics The Florida State University ABSTRACT. Polyethylene chainsM 3 +O(M 2 ). INTRODUCTION Semicrystalline polyethylene formed from melt generally consists

  9. Detecting changes in seasonal precipitation extremes using regional climate model projections: Implications for managing fluvial flood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, Hayley

    further demonstrates that existing precautionary allowances for climate change used for flood managementClick Here for Full Article Detecting changes in seasonal precipitation extremes using regional climate model projections: Implications for managing fluvial flood risk H. J. Fowler1 and R. L. Wilby2

  10. Bayesian Monte Carlo analysis applied to regional-scale inverse emission modeling for reactive trace gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    the a priori uncertainties in anthropogenic NOx and volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions: (1) The a posteriori probability density function (pdf) for NOx emissions is not modified in its averageBayesian Monte Carlo analysis applied to regional-scale inverse emission modeling for reactive

  11. Static and flowing regions in granular collapses down channels: Insights from a sedimenting shallow water model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huppert, Herbert

    Static and flowing regions in granular collapses down channels: Insights from a sedimenting shallow extend the model of Larrieu 2006 to include an estimation for the interface between the static, 043301 2007 . An empirical sedimentation term Ls and the instantaneous removal of a static deposit wedge

  12. Spatial variability of regional model simulated JuneSeptember mean precipitation over West Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    made with the CCSR/GISS RM3, driven by synchronous data from NCEP reanalysis. A five-member ensemble for a single season was generated by staggering the initial conditions of each member by 36 hr within] Regional climate model (RCM) simulations are driven by synchronous lateral boundary conditions (LBC

  13. A Prototype Integrated Transportation Land-use Model for the Lausanne Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierlaire, Michel

    of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering Ecole Polytechnique F´ed´erale de Lausanne transp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3.2 Demographic Transition Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3.3 Development Project-Morges Region in 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 6 UrbanSim Submodels Estimated for the Lausanne-Morges Re

  14. Polar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotko, William

    of electric potential, field-aligned current and Poynting flux derived from the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry globalPolar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations P. D submitted to J. Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 15 June 2007 #12;with updated simulation results

  15. Polar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotko, William

    of electric potential, field-aligned current and Poynting flux derived from the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry globalPolar-region distributions of Poynting flux: Global models compared with observations P. D from the Preprint submitted to J. Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 11 July 2008 #12;DMSP F13

  16. Sensitivity of economic performance of the nuclear fuel cycle to simulation modeling assumptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnet, Nicéphore

    2007-01-01

    Comparing different nuclear fuel cycles and assessing their implications require a fuel cycle simulation model as complete and realistic as possible. In this thesis, methodological implications of modeling choices are ...

  17. Development of the Mathematics of Learning Curve Models for Evaluating Small Modular Reactor Economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Thomas J.

    2014-03-01

    This report documents the efforts to perform dynamic model validation on the Eastern Interconnection (EI) by modeling governor deadband. An on-peak EI dynamic model is modified to represent governor deadband characteristics. Simulation results are compared with synchrophasor measurements collected by the Frequency Monitoring Network (FNET/GridEye). The comparison shows that by modeling governor deadband the simulated frequency response can closely align with the actual system response.

  18. Virtues of simple hydro-economic optimization: Baja California, Mexico J. Medellin-Azuara a,*, L.G. Mendoza-Espinosa b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    Virtues of simple hydro-economic optimization: Baja California, Mexico J. Medelli´n-Azuara a,*, L in revised form 1 May 2009 Accepted 22 May 2009 Available online 26 June 2009 Keywords: Hydro-economic models simple hydro-economic optimization to investigate a wide range of regional water system management

  19. Wetland model in an earth systems modeling framework for regional environmental policy analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awadalla, Sirein Salah

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate incorporating a wetland component into a land energy and water fluxes model, the Community Land Model (CLM). CLM is the land fluxes component of the Integrated Global Systems ...

  20. REGIONAL SEISMIC AMPLITUDE MODELING AND TOMOGRAPHY FOR EARTHQUAKE-EXPLOSION DISCRIMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, W R; Pasyanos, M E; Matzel, E; Gok, R; Sweeney, J; Ford, S R; Rodgers, A J

    2008-07-08

    We continue exploring methodologies to improve earthquake-explosion discrimination using regional amplitude ratios such as P/S in a variety of frequency bands. Empirically we demonstrate that such ratios separate explosions from earthquakes using closely located pairs of earthquakes and explosions recorded on common, publicly available stations at test sites around the world (e.g. Nevada, Novaya Zemlya, Semipalatinsk, Lop Nor, India, Pakistan, and North Korea). We are also examining if there is any relationship between the observed P/S and the point source variability revealed by longer period full waveform modeling (e. g. Ford et al 2008). For example, regional waveform modeling shows strong tectonic release from the May 1998 India test, in contrast with very little tectonic release in the October 2006 North Korea test, but the P/S discrimination behavior appears similar in both events using the limited regional data available. While regional amplitude ratios such as P/S can separate events in close proximity, it is also empirically well known that path effects can greatly distort observed amplitudes and make earthquakes appear very explosion-like. Previously we have shown that the MDAC (Magnitude Distance Amplitude Correction, Walter and Taylor, 2001) technique can account for simple 1-D attenuation and geometrical spreading corrections, as well as magnitude and site effects. However in some regions 1-D path corrections are a poor approximation and we need to develop 2-D path corrections. Here we demonstrate a new 2-D attenuation tomography technique using the MDAC earthquake source model applied to a set of events and stations in both the Middle East and the Yellow Sea Korean Peninsula regions. We believe this new 2-D MDAC tomography has the potential to greatly improve earthquake-explosion discrimination, particularly in tectonically complex regions such as the Middle East. Monitoring the world for potential nuclear explosions requires characterizing seismic events and discriminating between natural and man-made seismic events, such as earthquakes and mining activities, and nuclear weapons testing. We continue developing, testing, and refining size-, distance-, and location-based regional seismic amplitude corrections to facilitate the comparison of all events that are recorded at a particular seismic station. These corrections, calibrated for each station, reduce amplitude measurement scatter and improve discrimination performance. We test the methods on well-known (ground truth) datasets in the U.S. and then apply them to the uncalibrated stations in Eurasia, Africa, and other regions of interest to improve underground nuclear test monitoring capability.

  1. Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

    2015-01-01

    uncertainty of full carbon accounting of forest ecosystemsA. ; Hopson, E. , Proper accounting for time increases crop-use change modeling in GTEM: Accounting for forest sinks.

  2. Economic Model For a Return on Investment Analysis of United States Government High Performance Computing (HPC) Research and Development (R & D) Investment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, Earl C.; Conway, Steve; Dekate, Chirag

    2013-09-30

    This study investigated how high-performance computing (HPC) investments can improve economic success and increase scientific innovation. This research focused on the common good and provided uses for DOE, other government agencies, industry, and academia. The study created two unique economic models and an innovation index: 1 A macroeconomic model that depicts the way HPC investments result in economic advancements in the form of ROI in revenue (GDP), profits (and cost savings), and jobs. 2 A macroeconomic model that depicts the way HPC investments result in basic and applied innovations, looking at variations by sector, industry, country, and organization size. ? A new innovation index that provides a means of measuring and comparing innovation levels. Key findings of the pilot study include: IDC collected the required data across a broad set of organizations, with enough detail to create these models and the innovation index. The research also developed an expansive list of HPC success stories.

  3. ECONOMIC MODELING OF CO2 CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION Sean Biggs, Howard Herzog, John Reilly, Henry Jacoby

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of carbon capture and sequestration technologies using the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model. We model two of the most promising carbon capture and sequestration technologies, one, technological, and social issues of carbon capture and sequestration technologies. In 1997, the President

  4. A review on regional convection-permitting climate modeling: Demonstrations, prospects, and challenges

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prein, Andreas; Langhans, Wolfgang; Fosser, Giorgia; Ferrone, Andrew; Ban, Nikolina; Goergen, Klaus; Keller, Michael; Tolle, Merja; Gutjahr, Oliver; Feser, Frauke; et al

    2015-05-27

    Regional climate modeling using convection permitting models (CPMs) emerges as a promising framework to provide more reliable climate information on regional to local scales compared to traditionally used large-scale models (LSMs). CPMs do not use convection parameterization schemes, known as a major source of errors and uncertainties, and have more accurate surface and orography elds. The drawback of CPMs is their high demand on computational resources. For this reason, the CPM climate simulations only appeared a decade ago. In this study we aim to provide a common basis for CPM climate simulations by giving a holistic review of the topic.more »The most important components in CPM, such as physical parameterizations and dynamical formulations are discussed, and an outlook on required future developments and computer architectures that would support the application of CPMs is given. Most importantly, this review presents the consolidated outcome of studies that addressed the added value of CPM climate simulations compared to LSMs. Most improvements are found for processes related to deep convection (e.g., precipitation during summer), for mountainous regions, and for the soil-vegetation-atmosphere interactions. The climate change signals of CPM simulations reveal increases in short and extreme rainfall events and an increased ratio of liquid precipitation at the surface (a decrease of hail) potentially leading to more frequent ash oods. Concluding, CPMs are a very promising tool for future climate research. However, coordinated modeling programs are crucially needed to assess their full potential and support their development.« less

  5. Particle dynamics in a non-flaring solar active region model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Threlfall, J; Neukirch, T; Parnell, C E

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate and characterise particle behaviour in a (observationally-driven) 3D MHD model of the solar atmosphere above a slowly evolving, non-flaring active region. We use a relativistic guiding-centre particle code to investigate particle acceleration in a single snapshot of the 3D MHD simulation. Despite the lack of flare-like behaviour in the active region, direct acceleration of electrons and protons to non-thermal energies ($\\lesssim420$MeV) was found, yielding spectra with high-energy tails which conform to a power law. Examples of particle dynamics, including particle trapping caused by local electric rather than magnetic field effects, are observed and discussed, together with implications for future experiments which simulate non-flaring active region heating and reconnection.

  6. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Macro Bridge Procedure to Update Regional Macroeconomic Forecasts with National Macroeconomic Forecasts

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    The Regional Short-Term Energy Model (RSTEM) uses macroeconomic variables such as income, employment, industrial production and consumer prices at both the national and regional1 levels as explanatory variables in the generation of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO). This documentation explains how national macroeconomic forecasts are used to update regional macroeconomic forecasts through the RSTEM Macro Bridge procedure.

  7. A study on the background and clustering seismicity in the Taiwan region by using point process models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yuh-Ing

    A study on the background and clustering seismicity in the Taiwan region by using point process), A study on the background and clustering seismicity in the Taiwan region by using point process models, J the shallow seismicity occurring in the Taiwan region during the 20th century using a stochastic declustering

  8. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: One-dimensional soil thaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Jeffrey M.

    Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport Freezing and thawing a b s t r a c t Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have of powerful simulators of cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport have emerged in recent years

  9. 1. Botterweg, P., et al., The EUROSEM-GRIDSEM modeling system for erosion analyses under different natural and economic conditions. Ecological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinton, John

    1. Botterweg, P., et al., The EUROSEM-GRIDSEM modeling system for erosion analyses under different natural and economic conditions. Ecological Modelling, 1998. 108(1-3): p. 115-129. 2. Cai, Q.G., et al, China. Catena, 2005. 59(1): p. 19-33. 3. Folly, A., J.N. Quinton, and R.E. Smith, Evaluation

  10. Modeling the determinants of industry political power: industry winners in the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kardell, Amy Louise

    2004-09-30

    This study uses qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) to examine the basis of industry political power by assessing conditions of economic interdependence and political action associated with the passage of the Economic ...

  11. Comparative study of Regional Urban Growth (RUG) model projections for new EU members in central Europe and the Baltic States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langner, Pawel

    2009-11-26

    Urban modelling and land-cover changes are well discussed in literature and are in a focal point of many researches. Regional urban growth (RUG) model for central Europe and the Baltic States projects land-cover changes ...

  12. Global warming and climate change - predictive models for temperate and tropical regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malini, B.H.

    1997-12-31

    Based on the assumption of 4{degree}C increase of global temperature by the turn of 21st century due to the accumulation of greenhouse gases an attempt is made to study the possible variations in different climatic regimes. The predictive climatic water balance model for Hokkaido island of Japan (a temperate zone) indicates the possible occurrence of water deficit for two to three months, which is a unknown phenomenon in this region at present. Similarly, India which represents tropical region also will experience much drier climates with increased water deficit conditions. As a consequence, the thermal region of Hokkaido which at present is mostly Tundra and Micro thermal will change into a Meso thermal category. Similarly, the moisture regime which at present supports per humid (A2, A3 and A4) and Humid (B4) climates can support A1, B4, B3, B2 and B1 climates indicating a shift towards drier side of the climatic spectrum. Further, the predictive modes of both the regions have indicated increased evapotranspiration rates. Although there is not much of change in the overall thermal characteristics of the Indian region the moisture regime indicates a clear shift towards the aridity in the country.

  13. Preliminary design capability enhancement via development of rotorcraft operating economics model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giansiracusa, Michael P

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to develop a means of predicting direct operating cost (DOC) for new commercial rotorcraft early in the design process. This project leverages historical efforts to model operating costs in ...

  14. Financing smallholder agribusiness in Zambia: an economic analysis of the ZATAC model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mwanamambo, Brian Namushi

    2009-05-15

    This study investigates the case of a Zambian institution providing credit for smallholder agribusiness commercialization and compares this lender’s model with the major microfinance institutions, to identify specific mechanisms employed...

  15. A reduced-form statistical climate model suitable for coupling with economic emissions projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabin, Gregory S

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we use models based on past data and scientific analysis to determine possible future states of the environment. We attempt to improve the equations for temperature and greenhouse gas concentration used in ...

  16. A multiscale MDCT image-based breathing lung model with time-varying regional ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Youbing, E-mail: youbing-yin@uiowa.edu [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States) [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Radiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Choi, Jiwoong, E-mail: jiwoong-choi@uiowa.edu [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States) [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Hoffman, Eric A., E-mail: eric-hoffman@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Tawhai, Merryn H., E-mail: m.tawhai@auckland.ac.nz [Auckland Bioengineering Institute, The University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand); Lin, Ching-Long, E-mail: ching-long-lin@uiowa.edu [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States) [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A novel algorithm is presented that links local structural variables (regional ventilation and deforming central airways) to global function (total lung volume) in the lung over three imaged lung volumes, to derive a breathing lung model for computational fluid dynamics simulation. The algorithm constitutes the core of an integrative, image-based computational framework for subject-specific simulation of the breathing lung. For the first time, the algorithm is applied to three multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) volumetric lung images of the same individual. A key technique in linking global and local variables over multiple images is an in-house mass-preserving image registration method. Throughout breathing cycles, cubic interpolation is employed to ensure C{sub 1} continuity in constructing time-varying regional ventilation at the whole lung level, flow rate fractions exiting the terminal airways, and airway deformation. The imaged exit airway flow rate fractions are derived from regional ventilation with the aid of a three-dimensional (3D) and one-dimensional (1D) coupled airway tree that connects the airways to the alveolar tissue. An in-house parallel large-eddy simulation (LES) technique is adopted to capture turbulent-transitional-laminar flows in both normal and deep breathing conditions. The results obtained by the proposed algorithm when using three lung volume images are compared with those using only one or two volume images. The three-volume-based lung model produces physiologically-consistent time-varying pressure and ventilation distribution. The one-volume-based lung model under-predicts pressure drop and yields un-physiological lobar ventilation. The two-volume-based model can account for airway deformation and non-uniform regional ventilation to some extent, but does not capture the non-linear features of the lung.

  17. Phase transition free regions in the Ising model via the Kac-Ward operator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcin Lis

    2015-05-17

    We investigate the spectral radius and operator norm of the Kac-Ward transition matrix for the Ising model on a general planar graph. We then use the obtained results to identify regions in the complex plane where the free energy density limits are analytic functions of the inverse temperature. The bound turns out to be optimal in the case of isoradial graphs, i.e. it yields criticality of the self-dual Z-invariant coupling constants.

  18. Inverse modeling of NOx emissions at regional scale over northern France: Preliminary investigation of the second-order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallet, Vivien

    Inverse modeling of NOx emissions at regional scale over northern France: Preliminary investigation time distribution of NOx emissions is robust. Citation: Que´lo, D., V. Mallet, and B. Sportisse (2005), Inverse modeling of NOx emissions at regional scale over northern France: Preliminary investigation

  19. Improving the Contribution of Economic Models in Evaluating Industrial Energy Efficiency Improvements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laitner, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    Traditional representation of improved end-use efficiency in the manufacturing sector has tended to assume “a net cost” perspective. In other words, the assumption for many models is that any change within the energy end-use patterns must imply a...

  20. Development of the Mathematics of Learning Curve Models for Evaluating Small Modular Reactor Economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T. J. [ORNL

    2014-02-01

    The cost of nuclear power is a straightforward yet complicated topic. It is straightforward in that the cost of nuclear power is a function of the cost to build the nuclear power plant, the cost to operate and maintain it, and the cost to provide fuel for it. It is complicated in that some of those costs are not necessarily known, introducing uncertainty into the analysis. For large light water reactor (LWR)-based nuclear power plants, the uncertainty is mainly contained within the cost of construction. The typical costs of operations and maintenance (O&M), as well as fuel, are well known based on the current fleet of LWRs. However, the last currently operating reactor to come online was Watts Bar 1 in May 1996; thus, the expected construction costs for gigawatt (GW)-class reactors in the United States are based on information nearly two decades old. Extrapolating construction, O&M, and fuel costs from GW-class LWRs to LWR-based small modular reactors (SMRs) introduces even more complication. The per-installed-kilowatt construction costs for SMRs are likely to be higher than those for the GW-class reactors based on the property of the economy of scale. Generally speaking, the economy of scale is the tendency for overall costs to increase slower than the overall production capacity. For power plants, this means that doubling the power production capacity would be expected to cost less than twice as much. Applying this property in the opposite direction, halving the power production capacity would be expected to cost more than half as much. This can potentially make the SMRs less competitive in the electricity market against the GW-class reactors, as well as against other power sources such as natural gas and subsidized renewables. One factor that can potentially aid the SMRs in achieving economic competitiveness is an economy of numbers, as opposed to the economy of scale, associated with learning curves. The basic concept of the learning curve is that the more a new process is repeated, the more efficient the process can be made. Assuming that efficiency directly relates to cost means that the more a new process is repeated successfully and efficiently, the less costly the process can be made. This factor ties directly into the factory fabrication and modularization aspect of the SMR paradigm—manufacturing serial, standardized, identical components for use in nuclear power plants can allow the SMR industry to use the learning curves to predict and optimize deployment costs.

  1. College of Arts & Sciences Economics, BA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    1/15/2009 College of Arts & Sciences Economics, BA Broad Learning Goals A. Theory: Mastery of basic economic theory. B. Institutional Context: Familiarity with institutions that shape economic behavior. C, evaluate and critique economic models. E. Communication F. Economic Citizenship Student Learning Outcomes A

  2. North American Carbon Program (NACP) Regional Interim Synthesis: Terrestrial Biospheric Model Intercomparision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntzinger, Deborah [University of Michigan; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Michalak, Anna [University of Michigan; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Jacobson, Andrew [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Baker, Ian [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Chen, Jing M. [University of Toronto; Davis, Kenneth [Pennsylvania State University; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Jain, Atul [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Liu, Shuguang [United States Geological Survey, Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (USGS EROS); Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Neilson, Ronald [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Poulter, Ben [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Tian, Hanqin [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Tomelleri, Enrico [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Viovy, Nicolas [National Center for Scientific Research, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Xiao, Jingfeng [Purdue University; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere can be improved through direct observations and experiments, as well as through modeling activities. Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding to much larger terrestrial regions. Although models vary in their specific goals and approaches, their central role within carbon cycle science is to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms currently controlling carbon exchange. Recently, the North American Carbon Program (NACP) organized several interim-synthesis activities to evaluate and inter-compare models and observations at local to continental scales for the years 2000-2005. Here, we compare the results from the TBMs collected as part of the regional and continental interim-synthesis (RCIS) activities. The primary objective of this work is to synthesize and compare the 19 participating TBMs to assess current understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle in North America. Thus, the RCIS focuses on model simulations available from analyses that have been completed by ongoing NACP projects and other recently published studies. The TBM flux estimates are compared and evaluated over different spatial (1{sup o} x 1{sup o} and spatially aggregated to different regions) and temporal (monthly and annually) scales. The range in model estimates of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) for North America is much narrower than estimates of productivity or respiration, with estimates of NEP varying between -0.7 and 2.2 PgC yr{sup -1}, while gross primary productivity and heterotrophic respiration vary between 12.2 and 32.9 PgC yr{sup -1} and 5.6 and 13.2 PgC yr{sup -1}, respectively. The range in estimates from the models appears to be driven by a combination of factors, including the representation of photosynthesis, the source and of environmental driver data and the temporal variability of those data, as well as whether nutrient limitation is considered in soil carbon decomposition. The disagreement in current estimates of carbon flux across North America, including whether North America is a net biospheric carbon source or sink, highlights the need for further analysis through the use of model runs following a common simulation protocol, in order to isolate the influences of model formulation, structure, and assumptions on flux estimates.

  3. Hollow cathode theory and experiment. II. A two-dimensional theoretical model of the emitter region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.

    2005-12-01

    Despite their long history and wide range of applicability that includes electric propulsion, detailed understanding of the driving physics inside orificed hollow cathodes remains elusive. The theoretical complexity associated with the multicomponent fluid inside the cathode, and the difficulty of accessing empirically this region, have limited our ability to design cathodes that perform better and last longer. A two-dimensional axisymmetric theoretical model of the multispecies fluid inside an orificed hollow cathode is presented. The level of detail attained by the model is allowed by its extended system of governing equations not solved for in the past within the hollow cathode. Such detail is motivated in part by the need to quantify the effect(s) of the plasma on the emitter life, and by the need to build the foundation for future modeling that will assess erosion of the keeper plate. Results from numerical simulations of a 1.2-cm-diam cathode operating at a discharge current of 25 A and a gas flow rate of 5 SCCM show that approximately 10 A of electron current, and 3.45 A of ion current return back to the emitter surface. The total emitted electron current is 33.8 A and the peak emitter temperature is found to be 1440 K. Comparisons with the measurements suggest that anomalous heating of the plasma is possible near the orifice region. The model predicts heavy species temperatures as high as 2034 K and peak voltage drops near the emitting surface not exceeding 8 V.

  4. Solar surface emerging flux regions: a comparative study of radiative MHD modeling and Hinode SOT observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. C. M. Cheung; M. Schuessler; T. D. Tarbell; A. M. Title

    2008-10-31

    We present results from numerical modeling of emerging flux regions on the solar surface. The modeling was carried out by means of 3D radiative MHD simulations of the rise of buoyant magnetic flux tubes through the convection zone and into the photosphere. Due to the strong stratification of the convection zone, the rise results in a lateral expansion of the tube into a magnetic sheet, which acts as a reservoir for small-scale flux emergence events at the scale of granulation. The interaction of the convective downflows and the rising magnetic flux undulates it to form serpentine field lines emerging into the photosphere. Observational characteristics including the pattern of emerging flux regions, the cancellation of surface flux and associated high speed downflows, the convective collapse of photospheric flux tubes, the appearance of anomalous darkenings, the formation of bright points and the possible existence of transient kilogauss horizontal fields are discussed in the context of new observations from the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope. Implications for the local helioseismology of emerging flux regions are also discussed.

  5. Economic Crisis and the Logistics Industry: Financial Insecurity for Warehouse Workers in the Inland Empire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonacich, Edna; De Lara, Juan David

    2009-01-01

    Growing the SACOG Region’s Logistics Sector: How Much, HowEconomic Crisis and the Logistics Industry Acknowledgements13 Economic Crisis and the Logistics Industry: Financial

  6. Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a CoupledLand Surface Mesoscale Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

    2004-07-01

    The land surface has been shown to form strong feedbacks with climate due to linkages between atmospheric conditions and terrestrial ecosystem exchanges of energy, momentum, water, and trace gases. Although often ignored in modeling studies, land management itself may form significant feedbacks. Because crops are harvested earlier under drier conditions, regional air temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture, for example, affect harvest timing, particularly of rain-fed crops. This removal of vegetation alters the land surface characteristics and may, in turn, affect regional climate. We applied a coupled climate(MM5) and land-surface (LSM1) model to examine the effects of early and late winter wheat harvest on regional climate in the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility in the Southern Great Plains, where winter wheat accounts for 20 percent of the land area. Within the winter wheat region, simulated 2 m air temperature was 1.3 C warmer in the Early Harvest scenario at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Soils in the harvested area were drier and warmer in the top 10 cm and wetter in the 10-20 cm layer. Midday soils were 2.5 C warmer in the harvested area at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Harvest also dramatically altered latent and sensible heat fluxes. Although differences between scenarios diminished once both scenarios were harvested, the short-term impacts of land management on climate were comparable to those from land cover change demonstrated in other studies.

  7. NREL: Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) Model - Model Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial Toolkit TheCompetitiveMattPhotoQualitative Model

  8. Full-fuel-cycle approach to vehicle emissions modeling: A case study of gasoline in the southeastern region of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, S.R.; Gupta, M. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Greening, L.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The use of full-fuel-cycle analysis as a scientific, economic, and policy tool for the evaluation of alternative sources of transportation energy has become increasingly widespread. However, consistent methods for performance of these types of analyses are only now becoming recognized and utilized. The work presented here provides a case study of full-fuel-cycle analysis methods applied to the evaluation of gasoline in the southeastern region of the United States. Results of the study demonstrate the significance of nonvehicle processes, such as fuel refining, in terms of energy expenditure and emissions production. Unique to this work is the application of the MOBILE5 mobile emissions model in the full-fuel-cycle analysis. Estimates of direct and indirect greenhouse gas production are also presented and discussed using the full-fuel-cycle analysis method.

  9. An Electricity-focused Economic Input-output Model: Life-cycle Assessment and Policy Implications of Future Electricity Generation Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the environmental impacts associated with electricity consumption, and that interstate trading tends to makeAn Electricity-focused Economic Input-output Model: Life-cycle Assessment and Policy Implications of Future Electricity Generation Scenarios Joe Marriott Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements

  10. Improvements to Regional Explosion Identification using Attenuation Models of the Lithosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasyanos, M E; Walter, W R

    2009-03-30

    Regional P/S amplitudes have been recognized as an effective discriminant between earthquakes and explosions. While closely spaced earthquake and explosions generally discriminate easily, the application of this technique to broad regions has been hampered by large variations in the amplitude of regional phases due to the attenuation structure of the crust and upper mantle. Making use of a recent P-wave and S-wave attenuation model of the lithosphere, we have found that correcting the events using our amplitude methodology significantly reduces the scattering in the earthquake population. We demonstrate an application of this technique to station NIL (Nilore, Pakistan) using broad area earthquakes and the 1998 Indian nuclear explosion recorded at the station using the Pn/Lg discriminant in the 1-2 Hz passband. We find that the explosion, which is lost in the scatter of the earthquakes in the uncorrected discriminant, clearly separates by correcting for the attenuation structure. We see a similar reduction in scatter and separation for the Pn/Sn and Pg/Lg discriminants in the same passband.

  11. ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF A WIDE AREA RELEASE OF ANTHRAX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF A WIDE AREA RELEASE OF ANTHRAX May 2009 Prepared Regional Technology Center for Homeland Security Economic Impacts of a Wide Area Release of Anthrax KS .................................................................................................................................................. 1 Categories of Economic Impacts

  12. A One-Dimensional (1-D) Three-Region Model for a Bubbling Fluidized-Bed Adsorber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Andrew; Miller, David C.

    2012-01-01

    A general one-dimensional (1-D), three-region model for a bubbling fluidized-bed adsorber with internal heat exchangers has been developed. The model can predict the hydrodynamics of the bed and provides axial profiles for all temperatures, concentrations, and velocities. The model is computationally fast and flexible and allows for any system of adsorption and desorption reactions to be modeled, making the model applicable to any adsorption process. The model has been implemented in both gPROMS and Aspen Custom Modeler, and the behavior of the model has been verified.

  13. MODELING SUPER-FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES OBSERVED BY SDO IN ACTIVE REGION FUNNELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofman, L.; Liu, W.; Title, A.; Aschwanden, M.

    2011-10-20

    Recently, quasi-periodic, rapidly propagating waves have been observed in extreme ultraviolet by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument in about 10 flare/coronal mass ejection (CME) events thus far. A typical example is the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/CME event that exhibited arc-shaped wave trains propagating in an active region (AR) magnetic funnel with {approx}5% intensity variations at speeds in the range of 1000-2000 km s{sup -1}. The fast temporal cadence and high sensitivity of AIA enabled the detection of these waves. We identify them as fast magnetosonic waves driven quasi-periodically at the base of the flaring region and develop a three-dimensional MHD model of the event. For the initial state we utilize the dipole magnetic field to model the AR and include gravitationally stratified density at coronal temperature. At the coronal base of the AR, we excite the fast magnetosonic wave by periodic velocity pulsations in the photospheric plane confined to a funnel of magnetic field lines. The excited fast magnetosonic waves have similar amplitude, wavelength, and propagation speeds as the observed wave trains. Based on the simulation results, we discuss the possible excitation mechanism of the waves, their dynamical properties, and the use of the observations for coronal MHD seismology.

  14. A nanoflare model for active region radiance: application of artificial neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bazarghan; H. Safari; D. E. Innes; E. Karami; S. K. Solanki

    2008-12-20

    Context. Nanoflares are small impulsive bursts of energy that blend with and possibly make up much of the solar background emission. Determining their frequency and energy input is central to understanding the heating of the solar corona. One method is to extrapolate the energy frequency distribution of larger individually observed flares to lower energies. Only if the power law exponent is greater than 2, is it considered possible that nanoflares contribute significantly to the energy input. Aims. Time sequences of ultraviolet line radiances observed in the corona of an active region are modelled with the aim of determining the power law exponent of the nanoflare energy distribution. Methods. A simple nanoflare model based on three key parameters (the flare rate, the flare duration time, and the power law exponent of the flare energy frequency distribution) is used to simulate emission line radiances from the ions Fe XIX, Ca XIII, and Si iii, observed by SUMER in the corona of an active region as it rotates around the east limb of the Sun. Light curve pattern recognition by an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) scheme is used to determine the values. Results. The power law exponents, alpha 2.8, 2.8, and 2.6 for Fe XIX, Ca XIII, and Si iii respectively. Conclusions. The light curve simulations imply a power law exponent greater than the critical value of 2 for all ion species. This implies that if the energy of flare-like events is extrapolated to low energies, nanoflares could provide a significant contribution to the heating of active region coronae.

  15. Heat and freshwater exchange on the Antarctic continental1" shelf in a regional coupled climate model2"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Edwin

    Heat and freshwater exchange on the Antarctic continental1" shelf in a regional coupled climate, South Korea 120-749. Email:21" cyoo@cims.nyu.edu.22" #12;2" Abstract23" Understanding heat. This study analyzes the heat and freshwater budget using a regional25" coupled climate model, which has been

  16. On an improved sub-regional water resources management representation for integration into earth system models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voisin, Nathalie; Li, Hongyi; Ward, Duane L.; Huang, Maoyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-09-30

    Human influence on the hydrologic cycle includes regulation and storage, consumptive use and overall redistribution of water resources in space and time. Representing these processes is essential for applications of earth system models in hydrologic and climate predictions, as well as impact studies at regional to global scales. Emerging large-scale research reservoir models use generic operating rules that are flexible for coupling with earth system models. Those generic operating rules have been successful in reproducing the overall regulated flow at large basin scales. This study investigates the uncertainties of the reservoir models from different implementations of the generic operating rules using the complex multi-objective Columbia River Regulation System in northwestern United States as an example to understand their effects on not only regulated flow but also reservoir storage and fraction of the demand that is met. Numerical experiments are designed to test new generic operating rules that combine storage and releases targets for multi-purpose reservoirs and to compare the use of reservoir usage priorities, withdrawals vs. consumptive demand, as well as natural vs. regulated mean flow for calibrating operating rules. Overall the best performing implementation is the use of the combined priorities (flood control storage targets and irrigation release targets) operating rules calibrated with mean annual natural flow and mean monthly withdrawals. The challenge of not accounting for groundwater withdrawals, or on the contrary, assuming that all remaining demand is met through groundwater extractions, is discussed.

  17. Global and regional modeling of clouds and aerosols in the marine boundary layer during VOCALS: the VOCA intercomparison

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wyant, M. C.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Wood, Robert; Carmichael, Gregory; Clarke, A. D.; Fast, Jerome D.; George, R.; Gustafson, William I.; Hannay, Cecile; Lauer, Axel; et al

    2015-01-09

    A diverse collection of models are used to simulate the marine boundary layer in the southeast Pacific region during the period of the October–November 2008 VOCALS REx (VAMOS Ocean Cloud Atmosphere Land Study Regional Experiment) field campaign. Regional models simulate the period continuously in boundary-forced free-running mode, while global forecast models and GCMs (general circulation models) are run in forecast mode. The models are compared to extensive observations along a line at 20° S extending westward from the South American coast. Most of the models simulate cloud and aerosol characteristics and gradients across the region that are recognizably similar tomore »observations, despite the complex interaction of processes involved in the problem, many of which are parameterized or poorly resolved. Some models simulate the regional low cloud cover well, though many models underestimate MBL (marine boundary layer) depth near the coast. Most models qualitatively simulate the observed offshore gradients of SO2, sulfate aerosol, CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentration in the MBL as well as differences in concentration between the MBL and the free troposphere. Most models also qualitatively capture the decrease in cloud droplet number away from the coast. However, there are large quantitative intermodel differences in both means and gradients of these quantities. Many models are able to represent episodic offshore increases in cloud droplet number and aerosol concentrations associated with periods of offshore flow. Most models underestimate CCN (at 0.1% supersaturation) in the MBL and free troposphere. The GCMs also have difficulty simulating coastal gradients in CCN and cloud droplet number concentration near the coast. The overall performance of the models demonstrates their potential utility in simulating aerosol–cloud interactions in the MBL, though quantitative estimation of aerosol–cloud interactions and aerosol indirect effects of MBL clouds with these models remains uncertain.« less

  18. Global and regional modeling of clouds and aerosols in the marine boundary layer during VOCALS: the VOCA intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyant, M. C.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Wood, Robert; Carmichael, Gregory; Clarke, A. D.; Fast, Jerome D.; George, R.; Gustafson, William I.; Hannay, Cecile; Lauer, Axel; Lin, Yanluan; Morcrette, J. -J.; Mulcahay, Jane; Saide, Pablo; Spak, S. N.; Yang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    A diverse collection of models are used to simulate the marine boundary layer in the southeast Pacific region during the period of the October–November 2008 VOCALS REx (VAMOS Ocean Cloud Atmosphere Land Study Regional Experiment) field campaign. Regional models simulate the period continuously in boundary-forced free-running mode, while global forecast models and GCMs (general circulation models) are run in forecast mode. The models are compared to extensive observations along a line at 20° S extending westward from the South American coast. Most of the models simulate cloud and aerosol characteristics and gradients across the region that are recognizably similar to observations, despite the complex interaction of processes involved in the problem, many of which are parameterized or poorly resolved. Some models simulate the regional low cloud cover well, though many models underestimate MBL (marine boundary layer) depth near the coast. Most models qualitatively simulate the observed offshore gradients of SO2, sulfate aerosol, CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentration in the MBL as well as differences in concentration between the MBL and the free troposphere. Most models also qualitatively capture the decrease in cloud droplet number away from the coast. However, there are large quantitative intermodel differences in both means and gradients of these quantities. Many models are able to represent episodic offshore increases in cloud droplet number and aerosol concentrations associated with periods of offshore flow. Most models underestimate CCN (at 0.1% supersaturation) in the MBL and free troposphere. The GCMs also have difficulty simulating coastal gradients in CCN and cloud droplet number concentration near the coast. The overall performance of the models demonstrates their potential utility in simulating aerosol–cloud interactions in the MBL, though quantitative estimation of aerosol–cloud interactions and aerosol indirect effects of MBL clouds with these models remains uncertain.

  19. FINANCIAL ECONOMICS RESOURCE ECONOMICS AND POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    ECONOMICS FINANCIAL ECONOMICS RESOURCE ECONOMICS AND POLICY Program of Study The School of Economics at the University of Maine provides excellent opportunities for graduate students to study applied economics, financial economics, and policy analysis. The School of Economics administers the Master

  20. Variables Affecting Economic Development of Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

    2008-07-01

    NREL's JEDI Wind model performed an analysis of wind-power-related economic development drivers. Economic development benefits for wind and coal were estimated using NREL's JEDI Wind and JEDI Coal models.

  1. Economic Model | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear Profile 2010Mesoscopy andSavingYear 14-04Documents EDO

  2. Cogeneration Economics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mongon, A.

    1984-01-01

    Cogeneration of heat power is today receiving more attention by energy economists and policy makers - The enormous escalation of energy prices over the last decade has made energy efficiency an important economic factor for most energy users...

  3. Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan, Vol. 82, No. 6, pp. 1599--1628, 2004 1599 Regional Climate Modeling: Progress, Challenges, and Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    , and development of regional earth system models. It is believed that with the demonstrated credibility of RCMs

  4. Integrated Economic-Epidemic Modeling of Avian Influenza Mitigation Options: A Case Study of an Outbreak in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egbendewe-Mondzozo, Aklesso

    2011-02-22

    possible policy in the face of such an event, this dissertation does an economic evaluation of the implications of using two mitigation strategies: one corresponding to the currently response strategy; and the other an OIE recommended one utilizing...

  5. Theoretical modeling of propagation of magneto-acoustic waves in magnetic regions below sunspots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Khomenko; A. Kosovichev; M. Collados; K. Parchevsky; V. Olshevsky

    2008-12-10

    We use 2D numerical simulations and eikonal approximation, to study properties of MHD waves traveling below the solar surface through the magnetic structure of sunspots. We consider a series of magnetostatic models of sunspots of different magnetic field strengths, from 10 Mm below the photosphere to the low chromosphere. The purpose of these studies is to quantify the effect of the magnetic field on local helioseismology measurements by modeling waves excited by sub-photospheric sources. Time-distance propagation diagrams and wave travel times are calculated for models of various field strength and compared to the non-magnetic case. The results clearly indicate that the observed time-distance helioseismology signals in sunspot regions correspond to fast MHD waves. The slow MHD waves form a distinctly different pattern in the time-distance diagram, which has not been detected in observations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the solution in the short-wavelength (eikonal) approximation, providing its validation. The frequency dependence of the travel times is in a good qualitative agreement with observations.

  6. Essays in Labor Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harker Roa, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Eco- nomicQuarterly Journal of Economics, August 1996, 111, 779-804. [Journal of Development Economics, 1996, 50, 297-312. [5

  7. Application of an automatic approach to calibrate the NEMURO nutrientphytoplanktonzooplankton food web model in the Oyashio region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­phytoplankton­zooplankton food web model in the Oyashio region Shin-ichi Ito a, , Naoki Yoshie b , Takeshi Okunishi c , Tsuneo without ontogenetic vertical migration of the large zooplankton functional group. Determining or averaged state variables were used, in whether state variables were model functional groups or were

  8. Real Estate Prices and Economic Cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.

    2002-01-01

    in construction and price development were synchronized with3 Models of Housing price Development Based on EconomicTable 4 Models of Housing Price Development Based on Lagged

  9. An assessment of possible climate change in the Australian region based on intercomparison of general circulation modeling results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whetton, P.H.; Pittock, A.B.; Haylock, M.R. ); Rayner, P.J. )

    1994-03-01

    To assist in estimating likely future climate change in the Australian region, the authors examine the results of four different general circulation modeling experiments run to assess the equilibrium impact of doubling greenhouse gases. The results examined were the most recent available at the time of study from various research centers in North America and Europe, as well as those of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). The approach used is, first, to assess the quality of the control (1 x CO[sub 2]) simulations from each of the models of mean sea level (MSL) pressure and precipitation in the Australian region by comparing these with the corresponding observed patterns; and, second, to then analyze the 2 x CO[sub 2] results of only those model experiments with the best control simulations. Of the models examined two are chosen on the basis of their simulation of current climate in the region: the CSIRO four-level model (CSIRO4) and the United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO) model. For conditions of equivalent doubling of CO[sub 2], both models show substantial increases in surface air temperature of around 4[degrees]-6[degrees] inland and 2[degrees]-4[degrees]C in coastal regions. Both models show decreased MSL pressure over the Australian continent and increases in rainfall over northern, central, and eastern Australia, particularly in the summer half of the year. The CSIRO4 model, but not the UKMO model, also shows increased pressure to the south of the continent and decreased winter rainfall in southwest and southern Australia. Generally, field significance tests show the pattern and magnitude of the changes to be significant of CSIRO4 (for which the necessary monthly simulated data were available). 42 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Exact solution of the van der Waals model in the critical region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adriano Barra; Antonio Moro

    2015-05-01

    The celebrated van der Waals model describes simple fluids in the thermodynamic limit and predicts the existence of a critical point associated to the gas-liquid phase transition. However the behaviour of critical isotherms according to the equation of state, where a gas-liquid phase transition occurs, significantly departs from experimental observations. The correct critical isotherms are heuristically re-established via the Maxwell equal areas rule. A long standing open problem in mean field theory is concerned with the analytic description of van der Waals isotherms for a finite size system that is consistent, in the thermodynamic limit, with the Maxwell prescription. Inspired by the theory of nonlinear conservation laws, we propose a novel mean field approach, based on statistical mechanics, that allows to calculate the van der Waals partition function for a system of large but finite number of particles $N$. Our partition function naturally extends to the whole space of thermodynamic variables, reproduces, in the thermodynamic limit $N\\to \\infty$, the classical results outside the critical region and automatically encodes Maxwell's prescription. We show that isothermal curves evolve in the space of thermodynamic variables like nonlinear breaking waves and the criticality is explained as the mechanism of formation of a classical hydrodynamic shock.

  11. Environment and the Lifetime of Tropical Deep Convection in a Cloud-Permitting Regional Model Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-08-01

    By applying a cloud tracking algorithm to tropical convective systems simulated by a regional high resolution model, the study documents environmental conditions before and after convective systems are initiated over ocean and land by following them during their lifetime. The comparative roles of various environmental fields in affecting the lifetime of convection are also quantified. The statistics of lifetime, maximum area, propagation speed and direction of the simulated deep convection agrees well with geostationary satellite observations. Over ocean, convective systems enhance surface fluxes through the associated wind gusts as well as cooling and drying of the boundary layer. A significant relationship is found between the mean surface fluxes during their lifetime and the longevity of the systems which in turn is related to the initial intensity of the moist updraft and to a lesser extent upper level shear. Over land, on the other hand, convective activity suppresses surface fluxes through cloud cover and the lifetime of convection is related to the upper level shear during their lifetime and strength of the heat fluxes several hours before the initiation of convection. For systems of equal lifetime, those over land are significantly more intense than those over ocean especially during early stages of their lifetime.

  12. Bio-Economic Analyses of Biofuel-Based Integrated Farm Drainage Management Systems on Marginal Land in a Salinity and Drainage Impacted Region: The Case of California's Central Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levers, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    digestion in global bio-energy production: potential andand potential energy production. We develop a bio- economic

  13. Assessing the economic impact of indirect liquefaction process improvements: Volume 1, Development of the integrated indirect liquefaction model and baseline case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, D.; Tomlinson, G.C. (Mitre Corp., McLean, VA (USA). Civil Systems Div.)

    1990-10-01

    This report documents the development of an integrated indirect liquefaction system model, which processes input coal to refined liquid products, and the model's application in the analysis of a baseline case. The baseline case uses Shell gasification of coal followed by gas cleaning to produce a clean synthesis gas for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The raw liquid products are refined to produce gasoline and diesel. Costs of liquid products have been estimated for the baseline plant. The model also alloys many sensitivity studies to be performed so that the economic impacts of research and development advances can be quantified. When used in this manner, the model can provide research guidance for future indirect liquefaction studies. 18 refs., 12 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. Fuel economizer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zwierzelewski, V.F.

    1984-06-26

    A fuel economizer device for use with an internal combustion engine fitted with a carburetor is disclosed. The fuel economizer includes a plate member which is mounted between the carburetor and the intake portion of the intake manifold. The plate member further has at least one aperture formed therein. One tube is inserted through the at least one aperture in the plate member. The one tube extends longitudinally in the passage of the intake manifold from the intake portion toward the exit portion thereof. The one tube concentrates the mixture of fuel and air from the carburetor and conveys the mixture of fuel and air to a point adjacent but spaced away from the inlet port of the internal combustion engine.

  15. Economic feasibility of bagasse charcoal in Haiti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamimoto, Lynn K. (Lynn Kam Oi)

    2005-01-01

    The economics of implementing bagasse-based charcoal manufacturing in Haiti was investigated. From these main inputs, three different manufacturing economic scenarios were modeled using a simple, dynamic excel spreadsheet. ...

  16. Techno-economic Modeling of the Integration of 20% Wind and Large-scale Energy Storage in ERCOT by 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross Baldick; Michael Webber; Carey King; Jared Garrison; Stuart Cohen; Duehee Lee

    2012-12-21

    This study�¢����s objective is to examine interrelated technical and economic avenues for the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) grid to incorporate up to and over 20% wind generation by 2030. Our specific interests are to look at the factors that will affect the implementation of both high level of wind power penetration (> 20% generation) and installation of large scale storage.

  17. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: One-dimensional soil thaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freezing and thawing a b s t r a c t Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have. Simulated and/or observed climate change impacts in cryogenic soils include permafrost degradation, active that include the dynamic freeze­thaw process have been tested against analytical solutions, such as the Neumann

  18. USING THE UTAH ENERGY BALANCE SNOW MELT MODEL TO QUANTIFY SNOW AND GLACIER MELT IN THE HIMALAYAN REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    USING THE UTAH ENERGY BALANCE SNOW MELT MODEL TO QUANTIFY SNOW AND GLACIER MELT IN THE HIMALAYAN of glacier ice as a substrate and generation of melt from the ice substrate when seasonal snow has melted for the entire domain. Therefore, regional variability in snow and glacier melting is computed. Outflow can

  19. Volumetric 3D Modeling of the X-ray Emission Region within the Planetary Nebula BD+303639

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dewey, Daniel

    a b c d N WE S N S FB E W B F Volumetric 3D Modeling of the X-ray Emission Region within://space.mit.edu/hydra/v3d.html **ISIS and APED are available via http://space.mit.edu/CXC/ISIS Approach - Volumetric 3D

  20. A MODEL FOR THE STRENGTH OF THE AS-DEPOSITED REGIONS OF LOW-ALLOY STEEL WELD METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    true average strain ~ true plastic strain in softer phase of a dual-phase steel ~I true plastic strain in harder phase of a dual-phase steel UTS true strain at ultimate tensile stress y true strain at yieldingCHAPTER 5 A MODEL FOR THE STRENGTH OF THE AS-DEPOSITED REGIONS OF LOW-ALLOY STEEL WELD METALS 5

  1. Modeling of Multiphase Flow in the Near-Wellbore Region of the Reservoir under Transient Conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, He

    2010-07-14

    .......................................................................................................... 144 APPENDIX A: GAS-WATER TWO PHASE FLOW IMPES ALGORITHMS ..... 149 APPENDIX B: BLACK OIL PVT CHARACTERIZATION .................................. 158 APPENDIX C: SOFTWARE STRUCTURE ........................................................... 175... profile in the near-wellbore region ..................... 61 Fig. 6.2 Realistic fabricated PVT data lay out the correct trends upon pressure and create appropriate fluid compressibility for pressure oscillation in the near-wellbore region...

  2. Aeroelastic Modeling of Offshore Turbines and Support Structures in Hurricane-Prone Regions (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damiani, R.

    2014-03-01

    US offshore wind turbines (OWTs) will likely have to contend with hurricanes and the associated loading conditions. Current industry standards do not account for these design load cases (DLCs), thus a new approach is required to guarantee that the OWTs achieve an appropriate level of reliability. In this study, a sequentially coupled aero-hydro-servo-elastic modeling technique was used to address two design approaches: 1.) The ABS (American Bureau of Shipping) approach; and 2.) The Hazard Curve or API (American Petroleum Institute) approach. The former employs IEC partial load factors (PSFs) and 100-yr return-period (RP) metocean events. The latter allows setting PSFs and RP to a prescribed level of system reliability. The 500-yr RP robustness check (appearing in [2] and [3] upcoming editions) is a good indicator of the target reliability for L2 structures. CAE tools such as NREL's FAST and Bentley's' SACS (offshore analysis and design software) can be efficiently coupled to simulate system loads under hurricane DLCs. For this task, we augmented the latest FAST version (v. 8) to include tower aerodynamic drag that cannot be ignored in hurricane DLCs. In this project, a 6 MW turbine was simulated on a typical 4-legged jacket for a mid-Atlantic site. FAST-calculated tower base loads were fed to SACS at the interface level (transition piece); SACS added hydrodynamic and wind loads on the exposed substructure, and calculated mudline overturning moments, and member and joint utilization. Results show that CAE tools can be effectively used to compare design approaches for the design of OWTs in hurricane regions and to achieve a well-balanced design, where reliability levels and costs are optimized.

  3. THE ECONOMIC SITUATION IN THE ECE REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of domestic demand Upturn in world energy and commodity prices (for exporting countries) Increase in FDI in some countries, esp. Russia #12;The short-term outlook Growth forecasts for western Europe and eastern

  4. Essays in Labor Economics and Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakovlev, Evgeny

    2012-01-01

    Russian Style." Journal of Public Economics 76(3):337-368Examples)”, RAND Journal of Economics, Summer. Bertrand,Quarterly Journal of Economics 119(1):249-275. Bhattacharya,

  5. Essays in Applied Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crost, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    A. D. 2008, Review of Economics and Statistics, 90, 191J. 2008, Journal of Health Economics, 27, 218 Blattman, C. &Ilmakunnas, P. 2009, Health Economics, 18, 161 Caliendo,

  6. Essays in Regulatory Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerrero, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, 58(2) (Journal of Environmental Economics and Management (2009), inevidence. ” Eastern Economics Journal, 23 (3) (1997), 253-

  7. Essays in behavioral economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eil, David Holding

    2011-01-01

    Essays in Behavioral Economics A dissertation submitted inDoctor of Philosophy in Economics by David Holding Eilfunction,” The Review of Economics and Statistics, 1995,

  8. Essays in Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazzi, Samuel Ali

    are weak,” Review of Economics and Statistics, 2004, 86,Essays in Development Economics A dissertation submitted indegree Doctor of Philosophy in Economics by Samuel Ali Bazzi

  9. Essays in Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romem, Israel Hadas

    2013-01-01

    Science and Urban Economics 41 (1), 67 – 76. Anenberg, E. (Dynamics. Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2012-48.University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations

  10. Essays in Labor Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Donald Eric

    2010-01-01

    staff at IRLE and the Economics Depart- ment, especiallyof New Employees,” Review of Economics and Statistics, 1985,Firm Level,” Journal of Labor Economics, 1993, 11, 442–470.

  11. Ecological economizer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, E.M.

    1992-06-16

    This patent describes an engine economizer system adapted to supply an internal combustion engine with a heated air and water vapor mixture. It comprises a containment vessel, the vessel having: water level control means, an engine coolant fluid circuit, an engine lubricant circuit, an elongated air passage, air disbursement means, a water reservoir, air filter means, a vacuum aspiration port, and engine induction means associated with one of the carburetor and intake manifold and adapted to draw in the heated air and water vapor mixture by means of a hose connection to the aspiration port.

  12. Modeling regional transportation demand in China and the impacts of a national carbon constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kishimoto, Paul

    2015-01-30

    Climate and energy policy in China will have important and uneven impacts on the country’s regionally heterogeneous transport system. In order to simulate these impacts, transport sector detail is added to a multi-sector, ...

  13. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 4. Western Solar Utilization Network Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Western Solar Utilization Network Region. (WHK)

  14. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 1. Northeast Solar Energy Center Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Northeast Solar Energy Center Region. (WHK).

  15. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 3. Southern Solar Energy Center Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Southern Solar Energy Center Region. (WHK)

  16. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    basin, Nepal Himalaya, in Snow and Glacier Hydrology, vol.274, 198–210. INTEGRATED SNOW AND GLACIERMELT MODEL Journalon water availability in snow-dominated regions, Nature,

  17. Verifying the Accuracy of Land Use Models Used in Transportation and Air Quality: A Case Study in the Sacramento, California Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodier, Caroline J.

    2005-01-01

    A Case Study in the Sacramento Region (Ph.D. Dissertation,Analysis using the Sacramento MEPLAN Land Use Transportationin the MEPLAN model of Sacramento. ” Transportation Research

  18. Essays in Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keats, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Discontinuity Designs in Economics," Journal of EconomicJournal of Development Economics 87(1): 57-75. [21] Ozier,Journal of Development Economics 94, 151-163. [9] Delavande,

  19. On economic bicameralism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreras, Isabelle, 1975-

    2004-01-01

    (cont.) for both economic profitability and democratic justice, is explored after the roots of the idea of economic bicameralism in socio-economic history and existing socio-economic institutions (such as Works Councils) ...

  20. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix J: The Regional Portfolio Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................................................................................ 10 Capacity and Costs Related to Capacity ............................................................................................... 15 Variable Capacity.......................................................................................................................... 28 Modeling Energy-Limited Resources

  1. Economics & Finance Degree options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    90 Economics & Finance Degree options MA or BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Applied Economics Economics Financial Economics BA (International Honours Degree) Economics (See page 43) MA or BSc (Joint Honours Degrees) Economics and one of: Geography Management Mathematics MA (Joint Honours Degrees

  2. Economics & Finance Degree options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    98 Economics & Finance Degree options MA or BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Applied Economics Economics Financial Economics BA (International Honours Degree) Economics (See page 51) MA or BSc (Joint Honours Degrees) Economics and one of: Geography Management Mathematics MA (Joint Honours Degrees

  3. Economic Model Predictive Control: Handling Preventive Actuator and Sensor Maintenance and Application to Transport-Reaction Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lao, Liangfeng

    2015-01-01

    for CFD on the simulation of biogas combustion in bluff-bodydevelop its CFD model considering both the combustion in thedevelop its CFD model considering both the combustion in the

  4. Implementation and evaluation of online gas-phase chemistry within a regional climate model (RegCM-CHEM4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shalaby, A. K.; Zakey, A. S.; Tawfik, A. B.; Solmon, F.; Giorgi, Filippo; Stordal, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Steiner, A. L.

    2012-05-22

    The RegCM-CHEM4 is a new online climate-chemistry model based on the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) regional climate model (RegCM4). Tropospheric gas-phase chemistry is integrated into the climate model using the condensed version of the Carbon Bond Mechanism (CBM-Z; Zaveri and Peters, 1999) with a fast solver based on radical balances. We evaluate the model over Continental Europe for two different time scales: (1) an event-based analysis of the ozone episode associated with the heat wave of August 2003 and (2) a climatological analysis of a sixyear simulation (2000-2005). For the episode analysis, model simulations show good agreement with European Monitoring and Evaluation Program (EMEP) observations of hourly ozone over different regions in Europe and capture ozone concentrations during and after the August 2003 heat wave event. For long-term climate simulations, the model captures the seasonal cycle of ozone concentrations with some over prediction of ozone concentrations in non-heat wave summers. Overall, the ozone and ozone precursor evaluation shows the feasibility of using RegCM-CHEM4 for decadal-length simulations of chemistry-climate interactions.

  5. Modeling the Oil Transition: A Summary of the Proceedings of the DOE/EPA Workshop on the Economic and Environmental Implications of Global Energy Transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L

    2007-02-01

    The global energy system faces sweeping changes in the next few decades, with potentially critical implications for the global economy and the global environment. It is important that global institutions have the tools necessary to predict, analyze and plan for such massive change. This report summarizes the proceedings of an international workshop concerning methods of forecasting, analyzing, and planning for global energy transitions and their economic and environmental consequences. A specific case, it focused on the transition from conventional to unconventional oil and other energy sources likely to result from a peak in non-OPEC and/or global production of conventional oil. Leading energy models from around the world in government, academia and the private sector met, reviewed the state-of-the-art of global energy modeling and evaluated its ability to analyze and predict large-scale energy transitions.

  6. Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a Coupled Land Surface Mesoscale Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

    2004-01-01

    winter wheat belt on the mesoscale environment, Monthlygeneration Penn State/NCAR mesoscale model (MM5), NCAR,in a Coupled Land Surface Mesoscale Model H.S. Cooley Energy

  7. Forest dynamics at regional scales: predictive models constrained with inventory data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lines, Emily

    2012-06-12

    by scaling from key tree-level processes, but models typically have no climate dependency. In this thesis I demonstrate how large-scale national inventories combined with improvements in computational methods mean that models that incorporate the climate...

  8. A Habitat-based Wind-Wildlife Collision Model with Application to the Upper Great Plains Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forcey, Greg, M.

    2012-08-28

    Most previous studies on collision impacts at wind facilities have taken place at the site-specific level and have only examined small-scale influences on mortality. In this study, we examine landscape-level influences using a hierarchical spatial model combined with existing datasets and life history knowledge for: Horned Lark, Red-eyed Vireo, Mallard, American Avocet, Golden Eagle, Whooping Crane, red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat. These species were modeled in the central United States within Bird Conservation Regions 11, 17, 18, and 19. For the bird species, we modeled bird abundance from existing datasets as a function of habitat variables known to be preferred by each species to develop a relative abundance prediction for each species. For bats, there are no existing abundance datasets so we identified preferred habitat in the landscape for each species and assumed that greater amounts of preferred habitat would equate to greater abundance of bats. The abundance predictions for bird and bats were modeled with additional exposure factors known to influence collisions such as visibility, wind, temperature, precipitation, topography, and behavior to form a final mapped output of predicted collision risk within the study region. We reviewed published mortality studies from wind farms in our study region and collected data on reported mortality of our focal species to compare to our modeled predictions. We performed a sensitivity analysis evaluating model performance of 6 different scenarios where habitat and exposure factors were weighted differently. We compared the model performance in each scenario by evaluating observed data vs. our model predictions using spearmans rank correlations. Horned Lark collision risk was predicted to be highest in the northwestern and west-central portions of the study region with lower risk predicted elsewhere. Red-eyed Vireo collision risk was predicted to be the highest in the eastern portions of the study region and in the forested areas of the western portion; the lowest risk was predicted in the treeless portions of the northwest portion of the study area. Mallard collision risk was predicted to be highest in the eastern central portion of the prairie potholes and in Iowa which has a high density of pothole wetlands; lower risk was predicted in the more arid portions of the study area. Predicted collision risk for American Avocet was similar to Mallard and was highest in the prairie pothole region and lower elsewhere. Golden Eagle collision risk was predicted to be highest in the mountainous areas of the western portion of the study area and lowest in the eastern portion of the prairie potholes. Whooping Crane predicted collision risk was highest within the migration corridor that the birds follow through in the central portion of the study region; predicted collision risk was much lower elsewhere. Red bat collision risk was highly driven by large tracts of forest and river corridors which made up most of the areas of higher collision risk. Silver-haired bat and hoary bat predicted collision risk were nearly identical and driven largely by forest and river corridors as well as locations with warmer temperatures, and lower average wind speeds. Horned Lark collisions were mostly influenced by abundance and predictions showed a moderate correlation between observed and predicted mortality (r = 0.55). Red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat predictions were much higher and shown a strong correlations with observed mortality with correlations of 0.85, 0.90, and 0.91 respectively. Red bat collisions were influenced primarily by habitat, while hoary bat and silver-haired bat collisions were influenced mainly by exposure variables. Stronger correlations between observed and predicted collision for bats than for Horned Larks can likely be attributed to stronger habitat associations and greater influences of weather on behavior for bats. Although the collision predictions cannot be compared among species, our model outputs provide a convenient and easy landscape-level tool to quick

  9. Investigation of global and regional BWR instabilities with a four heated-channel Reduced Order Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    and regional Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) instabilities is described. The ROM contains three sub. Introduction Over the past decades, the concept of linear analysis to study the stability of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) has become one of the most commonly-used methodologies in reactor diagnostics. Conceptually

  10. Ability of a global three-dimensional model to locate regional events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Nikolai

    is that the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), irrespec- tive of its current status, has motivated greater; revised 31 March 2003; accepted 29 April 2003; published 30 July 2003. [1] We assess the ability events using regional travel time data alone (epicentral distances Assessments are based

  11. Coronal energy input and dissipation in a solar active region 3D MHD model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourdin, Philippe-A; Peter, Hardi

    2015-01-01

    Context. We have conducted a 3D MHD simulation of the solar corona above an active region in full scale and high resolution, which shows coronal loops, and plasma flows within them, similar to observations. Aims. We want to find the connection between the photospheric energy input by field-line braiding with the coronal energy conversion by Ohmic dissipation of induced currents. Methods. To this end we compare the coronal energy input and dissipation within our simulation domain above different fields of view, e.g. for a small loops system in the active region (AR) core. We also choose an ensemble of field lines to compare, e.g., the magnetic energy input to the heating per particle along these field lines. Results. We find an enhanced Ohmic dissipation of currents in the corona above areas that also have enhanced upwards-directed Poynting flux. These regions coincide with the regions where hot coronal loops within the AR core are observed. The coronal density plays a role in estimating the coronal temperatur...

  12. PROCEEDINGS OF THE WORKSHOP ON NATIONAL/REGIONAL ENERGY-ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING CONCEPTS, MAY 30 - JUNE 1, 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritschard, R.L.

    2010-01-01

    system with an energy demand forecast. T. R. Lakshmanan,economic and total energy demand forecasts. with basic

  13. Deformed shell model results for neutrinoless double beta decay of nuclei in A=60-90 region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Sahu; V. K. B. Kota

    2015-03-20

    Nuclear transition matrix elements (NTME) for the neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{70}$Zn, $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se nuclei are calculated within the framework of the deformed shell model based on Hartree-Fock states. For $^{70}$Zn, jj44b interaction in $^{2}p_{3/2}$, $^{1}f_{5/2}$, $^{2}p_{1/2}$ and $^{1}g_{9/2}$ space with $^{56}$Ni as the core is employed. However, for $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se nuclei, a modified Kuo interaction with the above core and model space are employed. Most of our calculations in this region were performed with this effective interaction. However, jj44b interaction has been found to be better for $^{70}$Zn. The above model space was used in many recent shell model and interacting boson model calculations for nuclei in this region. After ensuring that DSM gives good description of the spectroscopic properties of low-lying levels in these three nuclei considered, the NTME are calculated. The deduced half-lives with these NTME, assuming neutrino mass is 1 eV, are $1.1 \\times 10^{26}$ yr, $2.3 \\times 10^{27}$ yr and $2.2 \\times 10^{24}$ yr for $^{70}$Zn, $^{80}$Se and $^{82}$Se, respectively.

  14. Transforming the representation of the boundary layer and low clouds for high-resolution regional climate modeling: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Hsin-Yuan; Hall, Alex

    2013-07-24

    Stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds in subtropical oceanic regions (e.g., Southeast Pacific) cover thousands of square kilometers and play a key role in regulating global climate (e.g., Klein and Hartmann, 1993). Numerical modeling is an essential tool to study these clouds in regional and global systems, but the current generation of climate and weather models has difficulties in representing them in a realistic way (e.g., Siebesma et al., 2004; Stevens et al., 2007; Teixeira et al., 2011). While numerical models resolve the large-scale flow, subgrid-scale parameterizations are needed to estimate small-scale properties (e.g. boundary layer turbulence and convection, clouds, radiation), which have significant influence on the resolved scale due to the complex nonlinear nature of the atmosphere. To represent the contribution of these fine-scale processes to the resolved scale, climate models use various parameterizations, which are the main pieces in the model that contribute to the low clouds dynamics and therefore are the major sources of errors or approximations in their representation. In this project, we aim to 1) improve our understanding of the physical processes in thermal circulation and cloud formation, 2) examine the performance and sensitivity of various parameterizations in the regional weather model (Weather Research and Forecasting model; WRF), and 3) develop, implement, and evaluate the advanced boundary layer parameterization in the regional model to better represent stratocumulus, shallow cumulus, and their transition. Thus, this project includes three major corresponding studies. We find that the mean diurnal cycle is sensitive to model domain in ways that reveal the existence of different contributions originating from the Southeast Pacific land-masses. The experiments suggest that diurnal variations in circulations and thermal structures over this region are influenced by convection over the Peruvian sector of the Andes cordillera, while the mostly dry mountain-breeze circulations force an additional component that results in semi-diurnal variations near the coast. A series of numerical tests, however, reveal sensitivity of the simulations to the choice of vertical grid, limiting the possibility of solid quantitative statements on the amplitudes and phases of the diurnal and semidiurnal components across the domain. According to our experiments, the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) boundary layer scheme and the WSM6 microphysics scheme is the combination of schemes that performs best. For that combination, mean cloud cover, liquid water path, and cloud depth are fairly wellsimulated, while mean cloud top height remains too low in comparison to observations. Both microphysics and boundary layer schemes contribute to the spread in liquid water path and cloud depth, although the microphysics contribution is slightly more prominent. Boundary layer schemes are the primary contributors to cloud top height, degree of adiabaticity, and cloud cover. Cloud top height is closely related to surface fluxes and boundary layer structure. Thus, our study infers that an appropriate tuning of cloud top height would likely improve the low-cloud representation in the model. Finally, we show that entrainment governs the degree of adiabaticity, while boundary layer decoupling is a control on cloud cover. In the intercomparison study using WRF single-column model experiments, most parameterizations show a poor agreement of the vertical boundary layer structure when compared with large-eddy simulation models. We also implement a new Total-Energy/Mass- Flux boundary layer scheme into the WRF model and evaluate its ability to simulate both stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds. Result comparisons against large-eddy simulation show that this advanced parameterization based on the new Eddy-Diffusivity/Mass-Flux approach provides a better performance than other boundary layer parameterizations.

  15. Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

    2009-08-15

    Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within cover types. Biases in predicted weekly average regional latent heat fluxes were smaller than for NEE, but larger than for either ecosystem respiration or assimilation alone. However, spatial and diurnal variations of hundreds of W m{sup -2} in latent heat fluxes were common. We conclude that, in this heterogeneous system, characterizing vegetation cover type and LAI at the scale of spatial variation are necessary for accurate estimates of bottom-up, regional NEE and surface energy fluxes.

  16. A Guide for Using the Transient Ground-Water Flow Model of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joan B. Blainey; Claudia C. Faunt, and Mary C. Hill

    2006-05-16

    This report is a guide for executing numerical simulations with the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. Model inputs, including observations of hydraulic head, discharge, and boundary flows, are summarized. Modification of the DVRFS transient ground-water model is discussed for two common uses of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and model simulations with only steady-state conditions.

  17. Essays on Modeling the Economic Impacts of a Foreign Animal Disease on the United States Agricultural Sector 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagerman, Amy Deann

    2011-02-22

    enter the movement restriction zone. Early detection reduces the median loss and the standard deviation of losses. Vaccination does not reduce the median disease loss, but does have a smaller standard deviation of loss which would indicate it is a... standard disease mitigation strategies like detection, slaughter, vaccination and movement restrictions. Impacts will be estimated at the local affected region level and at the national aggregate level. Specifically we use a framework integrating...

  18. Hadron Production Model Developments and Benchmarking in the 0.7 - 12 GeV Energy Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. V. Mokhov; K. K. Gudima; S. I. Striganov

    2014-08-29

    Driven by the needs of the intensity frontier projects with their Megawatt beams, e.g., ESS, FAIR and Project X, and their experiments, the event generators of the MARS15 code have been recently improved. After thorough analysis and benchmarking against data, including the newest ones by the HARP collaboration, both the exclusive and inclusive particle production models were further developed in the crucial for the above projects - but difficult from a theoretical standpoint - projectile energy region of 0.7 to 12 GeV. At these energies, modelling of prompt particle production in nucleon-nucleon and pion-nucleon inelastic reactions is now based on a combination of phase-space and isobar models. Other reactions are still modeled in the framework of the Quark-Gluon String Model. Pion, kaon and strange particle production and propagation in nuclear media are improved. For the alternative inclusive mode, experimental data on large-angle (> 20 degrees) pion production in hadron-nucleus interactions are parameterized in a broad energy range using a two-source model. It is mixed-and-matched with the native MARS model that successfully describes low-angle pion production data. Predictions of both new models are - in most cases - in a good agreement with experimental data obtained at CERN, JINR, LANL, BNL and KEK.

  19. Modeling the resuspension of radionuclides in Ukranian regions impacted by Chernobyl fallout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, S.K.; Thiessen, K.M.; Hoffman, F.O. [SENES Oak Ridge Inc., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-01

    Following the 1986 Chernobyl event, large amounts of radioactive materials were deposited in nearby areas. Concentrations of various radionuclides were measured in air and surface soil. To study the resuspension of radioactive particulate, three different exposure situations were developed on the basis of the collected data under the auspices of the international BIOMOVS II (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) project. Modelers were asked to predict seasonal air concentrations and resuspension factors at several locations at different distances from Chernobyl for six successive years following the accident. Measurements of radionuclide deposition on topsoil were provided for each site along with information on soil, vegetation, land use, surface roughness, meteorology, and climate. In this paper, the three exposure situations are described, along with the initial data set provided to the modelers; two modeling approaches used to make the endpoint predictions are also presented. After the model predictions were submitted, the measured air concentrations and resuspension factors were released to the modelers. Generally, the predictions were well within an order of magnitude of the measured values. Time-dependent trends in predictions and measurements were in good agreement with one of the models, which (a) explicitly accounted for loss processes in soil and (b) used calibration to improve its predictive capabilities. Reasons for variations between predictions and measurements, suggestions for the improvement of models, and conclusions from the model validation study are presented. 12 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Comparisons of box model calculations and measurements of formaldehyde from the 1997 North Atlantic Regional Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comparisons of box model calculations and measurements of formaldehyde from the 1997 North Atlantic October 2001; accepted 16 November 2001; published 18 April 2002. [1] Formaldehyde (CH2O) measurements: formaldehyde, photochemical modeling, aircraft measurements, North Atlantic troposphere 1. Introduction [2

  1. Simulation of a Polar Low Case in the North Atlantic with different regional numerical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zahn, Matthias

    by the DWD (German Weather Service) by means of their forecast model HRM (High Resolution Model) and another University Press, Cambridge. (a) CLM (b) REMO (c) HRM, DWD (d) BWK Figure 1: 1(a)- 1(c)10m wind velocity pressure from CLM and REMO simulations and HRM analysis, DWD, respectively, at 15/10/93, 6:00, 1(d) surface

  2. Integrated Canada-U.S. Power Sector Modeling with the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, A.; Eurek, K.; Mai, T.; Perry, A.

    2013-02-01

    The electric power system in North America is linked between the United States and Canada. Canada has historically been a net exporter of electricity to the United States. The extent to which this remains true will depend on the future evolution of power markets, technology deployment, and policies. To evaluate these and related questions, we modify the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to include an explicit representation of the grid-connected power system in Canada to the continental United States. ReEDS is unique among long-term capacity expansion models for its high spatial resolution and statistical treatment of the impact of variable renewable generation on capacity planning and dispatch. These unique traits are extended to new Canadian regions. We present example scenario results using the fully integrated Canada-U.S. version of ReEDS to demonstrate model capabilities. The newly developed, integrated Canada-U.S. ReEDS model can be used to analyze the dynamics of electricity transfers and other grid services between the two countries under different scenarios.

  3. Formation and eruption of an active region sigmoid. I. A study by nonlinear force-free field modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Chaowei; Feng, Xueshang [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory for Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wu, S. T.; Hu, Qiang, E-mail: cwjiang@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: wus@uah.edu, E-mail: qh0001@uah.edu [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the formation and eruption of an active region (AR) sigmoid in AR 11283. To follow the quasi-static evolution of the coronal magnetic field, we reconstruct a time sequence of static fields using a recently developed nonlinear force-free field model constrained by vector magnetograms. A detailed analysis of the fields compared with observations suggests the following scenario for the evolution of the region. Initially, a new bipole emerges into the negative polarity of a preexisting bipolar AR, forming a null-point topology between the two flux systems. A weakly twisted flux rope (FR) is then built up slowly in the embedded core region, largely through flux cancellation, forming a bald patch separatrix surface (BPSS). The FR grows gradually until its axis runs into a torus instability (TI) domain, and the BPSS also develops a full S-shape. The combined effects of the TI-driven expansion of the FR and the line tying at the BP tear the FR into two parts with the upper portion freely expelled and the lower portion remaining behind the postflare arcades. This process dynamically perturbs the BPSS and results in the enhanced heating of the sigmoid and the rope. The accelerated expansion of the upper-portion rope strongly pushes its envelope flux near the null point and triggers breakout reconnection at the null, which further drives the eruption. We discuss the important implications of these results for the formation and disruption of the sigmoid region with an FR.

  4. Cogeneration: Economics and politics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prince, R.G.H.; Poole, M.L.

    1996-12-31

    Cogeneration is a well established process for supplying heat and electricity from a single fuel source. Its feasibility and implementation in any particular case depend on technical, economic and internal and external {open_quotes}cultural{close_quotes} factors, including government policies. This paper describes the current status of small scale industrial cogeneration in Australia. A model has been developed to analyse the technical and economic aspects of retrofitting gas turbine cogeneration in the size range 3 to 30MW to industrial sites. The model demonstrates that for typical Australian energy cost data, the payback and the size of the optimized cogeneration plant depend strongly on electricity buyback prices. Also reviewed are some of the {open_quotes}cultural{close_quotes} factors which often militate against an otherwise economic installation, and government policies which may retard cogeneration by concern about local air emissions or favor it as increasing efficiency of energy use and reducing greenhouse emissions. A case study of a small gas turbine plant in Australia is outlined. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Dynamic interactions between electricity prices and the regional economy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bethapudi, Daniel Naveen

    2005-08-29

    In this thesis we study characterize the dynamic relationships among two electricity price variables (residential and commercial) and six regional economic variables in order to examine each individual variable??s role in regional economic activity...

  6. Deformation of layered rocks in the ramp regions of thrust faults: a study with rock models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Judith Savaso

    1985-01-01

    wall at an S/Lr of 0. 20. " . . . . . . " "" . . -" . 43 17 Diagram showing the thrust belt terminology used to refer to locations and structures in the models. . . . . . 47 18 Deformation maps of configuration A models layered with lead and a... of configuration A. 65 xi LIST OF FIGURES (continued) Figure Page 25 Plot of slip across the lowest lead or mica unit of the veneer at the apex of the anticline above the ramp (location c) versus S/Lr for models of configurations A and B. 67 26 27 Plot...

  7. Predicting hurricane regional landfall rates: comparing local and basin-wide track model approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, T; Hall, Tim; Jewson, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    We compare two methods for making predictions of the climatological distribution of the number of hurricanes making landfall along short sections of the North American coastline. The first method uses local data, and the second method uses a basin-wide track model. Using cross-validation we show that the basin-wide track model gives better predictions for almost all parts of the coastline. This is the first time such a comparison has been made, and is the first rigourous justification for the use of basin-wide track models for predicting hurricane landfall rates and hurricane risk.

  8. Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4 »ProgrammingScience (SC) Regional &

  9. From Connectivity Models to Region Labels: Identifying Foci of a Neurological Disorder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkataraman, Archana

    We propose a novel approach to identify the foci of a neurological disorder based on anatomical and functional connectivity information. Specifically, we formulate a generative model that characterizes the network of ...

  10. START: Status and Region Aware Taxi Mobility Model for Urban Vehicular Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yu

    networks [1]­[3] play a critical role in building smart cities and supporting comprehensive urban, and other important tasks of smart cities. Mobility models for mobile networks [4], [5] have been well

  11. Modeled Neutron Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the region of Iriduim and Gold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, R D; Dietrich, F S; Kelley, K; Escher, J; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2008-02-26

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from osmium (Z = 76) to gold (Z = 79). Of particular interest are the cross sections on Ir and Au including reactions on isomeric targets.

  12. Dynamical Coupled-Channel Model of Meson Production Reactions in the Nucleon Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.-S. H. Lee; A. Matsuyama; T. Sato

    2006-11-15

    A dynamical coupled-channel model is presented for investigating the nucleon resonances (N*) in the meson production reactions induced by pions and photons. Our objective is to extract the N* parameters and to investigate the meson production reaction mechanisms for mapping out the quark-gluon substructure of N* from the data. The model is based on an energy-independent Hamiltonian which is derived from a set of Lagrangians by using a unitary transformation method.

  13. Using Economic Input/Output Tables to Predict a Country’s Nuclear Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weimar, Mark R.; Daly, Don S.; Wood, Thomas W.

    2010-07-15

    Both nuclear power and nuclear weapons programs should have (related) economic signatures which are detectible at some scale. We evaluated this premise in a series of studies using national economic input/output (IO) data. Statistical discrimination models using economic IO tables predict with a high probability whether a country with an unknown predilection for nuclear weapons proliferation is in fact engaged in nuclear power development or nuclear weapons proliferation. We analyzed 93 IO tables, spanning the years 1993 to 2005 for 37 countries that are either members or associates of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The 2009 OECD input/output tables featured 48 industrial sectors based on International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC) Revision 3, and described the respective economies in current country-of-origin valued currency. We converted and transformed these reported values to US 2005 dollars using appropriate exchange rates and implicit price deflators, and addressed discrepancies in reported industrial sectors across tables. We then classified countries with Random Forest using either the adjusted or industry-normalized values. Random Forest, a classification tree technique, separates and categorizes countries using a very small, select subset of the 2304 individual cells in the IO table. A nation’s efforts in nuclear power, be it for electricity or nuclear weapons, are an enterprise with a large economic footprint -- an effort so large that it should discernibly perturb coarse country-level economics data such as that found in yearly input-output economic tables. The neoclassical economic input-output model describes a country’s or region’s economy in terms of the requirements of industries to produce the current level of economic output. An IO table row shows the distribution of an industry’s output to the industrial sectors while a table column shows the input required of each industrial sector by a given industry.

  14. Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Regulatory Frameworks Governing Production, Processing, Transmission, and Distribution Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United States: Four Regional...

  15. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United States: Four Regional Scenarios S. Tegen, D. Keyser, and F. Flores-Espino National Renewable Energy Laboratory J....

  16. Essays on health economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shafrin, Jason T.

    2009-01-01

    The Quarterly Journal of Economics Davidson SM, Manheim LM,The Quarterly Journal of Economics 84(3): 488-500. Atella V,data. Journal of Health Economics 27(3): 770-785. Averett S

  17. Essays in Team Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tumlinson, Justin

    2011-01-01

    3] Becker, G. , The Economics of Discrimination. UniversityEngland and Wales. ”Labour Economics, 7 (2000): 603-28. [5]The Bell Journal of Economics, 13 (1982): [11] Judge, T.

  18. Essays in Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Joan Hamory

    2009-01-01

    Handbook of Development Economics, Volume I (pp. 713-762).Journal of Development Economics, 81, 80-96. Behrman, JereJournal of Development Economics, 79, 349-373. Dercon,

  19. Essays in Financial Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shabani, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Journal of Financial Economics 92:66–91. [7] Chen, J. , H.G.Journal of Financial Economics 66:171–205. [8] Harrison,Journal of Financial Economics 66:207–239. [15] Keown,

  20. Essays in monetary economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghent, Andra C.

    2008-01-01

    rium. Journal of Urban Economics 9, 332-348. Whelan, K. ,Framework. Journal of Monetary Economics 12, 383-398. Chari,Journal of Monetary Economics 46, 281-313. Fernald, J. ,

  1. Essays in Public Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liscow, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    a Battleground. ” Defense Economics, 2: 219-233. Bailey, TA,Quarterly Journal of Economics, 112: 1057-1090. Coakley, J.Goldin, C. 1973. “The Economics of Emancipation. ” Journal

  2. Essays on International Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cravino, Javier Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Journal of International Economics, Vol. 65, 375–99. [33]Journal of Monetary Economics, Vol. 51, No. 1, pp. 1–32. [Trade”, Journal of Monetary Economics, Vol. 54, No. 6, pp.

  3. Review: Forest Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helman, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Review: Forest Economics By Daowei Zhang and Peter H. PearsePearse, Peter H. Forest Economics. Vancouver, BC: UBC Press,Zhang and Pearse's Forest Economics presents a clear and

  4. Essays in Applied Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rider, Jessica Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, 41(1):82, [8]hard times. Journal of Health Economics, [31] C.J. Ruhm. AreJournal of Agricultural Economics, 87(5):1159– [2] J.K.

  5. Essays in Environmental Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallagher, Justin

    2011-01-01

    sites. RAND Journal of Economics, 27(3), 1996. [57] Robertequations. Journal of Urban Economics, 10(1), July 1981. [Quarterly Journal of Economics, 116(1), February 2001. [16

  6. Essays in labor economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, Tiffany

    2011-01-01

    Journal of Population Economics , 15(4), 667-682. Akerlof,A. & Rachel E. Kranton. (2000). Economics and Identity.Quarterly Journal of Economics , 115(3), 715-753. Albanesi,

  7. Essays in Public Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Insook

    2013-01-01

    Evasion and Labour Supply" Economics Let- ters, 3(1): 53-among Siblings" Review of Economics and Statistics, 86 (2):Quarterly Journal of Economics, 87 (4): 608-626. [22

  8. Essays in Financial Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohn, Sung Bin

    2012-01-01

    Journal of Financial Economics, 67, 149– Asquith, P. and D.Journal of Financial Economics, 15, 61–89. Back, K. and J.The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 113, 869–902. Blanchard,

  9. Essays in Public Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wingender, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 117(4), 1329-1368.eds. , Handbook of Labor Economics, Vol.3. Bound, J. ,Journal of Labor Economics, 19(1), 22-64. Chen, X. and

  10. Observing and modelling f-region ionospheric dynamics using the (OII) 7320a emission. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, S.S.

    1992-01-01

    Limb-scan observations of Doppler line profiles from the (OII) lambda 7320A emission at F-Region altitudes, made with the Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) on the Dynamics Explorer-2 (DE-2) spacecraft, have been analyzed to provide measurements of the meridional component of the ion convection velocity along the instrument line-of-sight. The DE-2 results presented here demonstrate the first spaceborne use of the remote-sensing Doppler techniques for measurements of ionospheric convection. The FPI meridional ion drift measurements have been compared with nearly simultaneous in situ ion drift measurements from the Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA) on DE 2. Once allowance is made for the temporal lag between the in situ and remote measurements, the results from the two techniques are found to be in good agreement, within specified experimental errors, giving confidence in the FPI measurements.

  11. Neutron lifetimes behavior analysis considering the two-region kinetic model in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonnelli, Eduardo; Diniz, Ricardo

    2014-11-11

    This is a complementary work about the behavior analysis of the neutron lifetimes that was developed in the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor facility. The macroscopic neutron noise technique was experimentally employed using pulse mode detectors for two stages of control rods insertion, where a total of twenty levels of subcriticality have been carried out. It was also considered that the neutron reflector density was treated as an additional group of delayed neutrons, being a sophisticated approach in the two-region kinetic theoretical model.

  12. Assessment of Uncertainties in the Response of the African Monsoon Precipitation to Land Use change simulated by a regional model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-02-22

    Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Although the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubs and an increase in surface air temperature.

  13. Occupy economic anthropology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer, B

    2012-01-01

    House. Hann, C. & K. Hart 2011. Economic anthropology:University of Minnesota Press. Hart, K. , J. -L. Laville &works, Chris Hann and Keith Hart’s Economic anthropology (

  14. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS): Development for Parallel Processing Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirne, Walfredo

    on the mesoscale (horizontal scales from 2 km to 2000 km) for purposes ranging from operational weather forecasting and simulating convective clouds, mesoscale convective systems, cirrus clouds, and precipitating weather systems models that had a great deal of overlap, the CSU cloud/mesoscale mode (Tripoli and Cotton, 1982

  15. Multitarget region tracking based on short-sight modeling of background and color distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mille, Julien

    as well as non-parametric modeling of color statistics, we develop an energy-minimization based approach of color statistics and shapes of objects over time and space [1][2]. Most often, the energy is derived for tracking in real scenes with cluttered backgrounds, where statistical color data is highly scattered

  16. Modeling the Dynamics of Desakota Regions: Global - Local Nexus in the Taipei Metropolitan Area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Bing-Sheng

    2010-10-12

    in 1991, focuses on how internal domestic and local forces drive the specific rural-urban transformation in Asia. However, the McGee-Ginsburg model does not emphasize the importance of globalization on Asian urbanization. To fill the gap, this study...

  17. Realistic Shell-Model Calculations for Nuclei in the Region of Shell Closures off Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Covello; L. Coraggio; A. Gargano

    1998-07-24

    We have performed realistic shell-model calculations for nuclei around doubly magic 100Sn and 132Sn using an effective interaction derived from the Bonn A nucleon-nucleon potential. The results are in remarkably good agreement with the experimental data showing the ability of our effective interaction to provide an accurate description of nuclear structure properties.

  18. An Evaluation of High Order Spatial Accuracy Algorithms for Modeling Fixed and Rotary Wing Tip regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 An Evaluation of High Order Spatial Accuracy Algorithms for Modeling Fixed and Rotary Wing Tip Nielsen Engineering and Research, Inc., Mountain View, CA 94043-2212 Yi Liu, Radhika Gupta, and L. N. Sankar School of Aerospace Engineering, Georgia Tech, Atlanta, GA 30332-0150 ABSTRACT Several high order

  19. Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the Jobs and Economic Development Benefits model. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the Jobs and Economic Development Benefits model section on the Wind Powering America website.

  20. 2D versus 1D ground-motion modelling for the Friuli region, north-eastern Italy1 W. Imperatori1, *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    12 evaluate how the 2D (in the NW-SE direction) geological structure of the Friuli (NE Italy) basin13-studied regions, such as California, 3D geological structure models are often used for4 ground-motion modelling analyses, different 1D models are9 chosen for different stations to better characterize the structure

  1. Complex Chemistry in Star-Forming Regions: An Expanded Gas-Grain Warm-up Chemical Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robin T. Garrod; Susanna L. Widicus Weaver; Eric Herbst

    2008-03-08

    Gas-phase processes were long thought to be the key formation mechanisms for complex organic molecules in star-forming regions. However, recent experimental and theoretical evidence has cast doubt on the efficiency of such processes. Grain-surface chemistry is frequently invoked as a solution, but until now there have been no quantitative models taking into account both the high degree of chemical complexity and the evolving physical conditions of star-forming regions. Here, we introduce a new gas-grain chemical network, wherein a wide array of complex species may be formed by reactions involving radicals. The radicals we consider (H, OH, CO, HCO, CH3, CH3O, CH2OH, NH and NH2) are produced primarily by cosmic ray-induced photodissociation of the granular ices formed during the colder, earlier stages of evolution. The gradual warm-up of the hot core is crucial to the formation of complex molecules, allowing the more strongly-bound radicals to become mobile on grain surfaces. This type of chemistry is capable of reproducing the high degree of complexity seen in Sgr B2(N), and can explain the observed abundances and temperatures of a variety of previously detected complex organic molecules, including structural isomers. Many other complex species are predicted by this model, and several of these species may be detectable in hot cores. Differences in the chemistry of high- and low-mass star-formation are also addressed; greater chemical complexity is expected where evolution timescales are longer.

  2. Y. Hossein Farzin Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    and supply modeling and estimation, economics of alternative energy sources and energy security, climate, Tehran University, Iran, 1972 D.Phil. Thesis: "Competition in the Market for an Exhaustible Resource Economics, The Environment and Economic Development, Economics of Energy and Environment, Advanced

  3. SERA Scenarios of Early Market Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Introductions: Modeling Framework, Regional Markets, and Station Clustering; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.

    2015-03-23

    This presentation provides an overview of the Scenario Evaluation and Regionalization Analysis (SERA) model, describes the methodology for developing scenarios for hydrogen infrastructure development, outlines an example "Hydrogen Success" scenario, and discusses detailed scenario metrics for a particular case study region, the Northeast Corridor.

  4. An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change: the MIT IGSM-CAM (version 1.0)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    This paper describes a computationally efficient framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model ...

  5. First Structure Formation: I. Primordial Star Forming Regions in hierarchical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Abel; Peter Anninos; Michael L. Norman; Yu Zhang

    1997-05-17

    We investigate the possibility of very early formation of primordial star clusters from high-\\sigma perturbations in cold dark matter dominated structure formation scenarios. For this we have developed a powerful 2-level hierarchical cosmological code with a realistic and robust treatment of multi-species primordial gas chemistry, paying special attention to the formation and destruction of hydrogen molecules, non-equilibrium ionization, and cooling processes. We performed 3-D simulations at small scales and at high redshifts and find that, analogous to simulations of large scale structure, a complex system of filaments, sheets, and spherical knots at the intersections of filaments form. On the mass scales covered by our simulations (5x10^5 - 1x10^9\\Ms) that collapse at redshifts z>25, we find that only at the spherical knots can enough H2 be formed (n_{H_2}/n_H > 5x10^-4) to cool the gas appreciably. Quantities such as the time dependence of the formation of H2 molecules, the final H2 fraction, and central densities from the simulations are compared to the theoretical predictions of Abel (1995) and Tegmark et al. (1997) and found to agree remarkably well. Comparing the 3-D results to an isobaric collapse model we further discuss the possible implications of the extensive merging of small structure that is inherent in hierarchical models. Typically only 5-8% percent of the total baryonic mass in the collapsing structures is found to cool significanlty. Assuming the Padoan (1995) model for star formation our results would predict the first stellar systems to be as small as ~30\\Ms. Some implications for primordial globular cluster formation scenarios are also discussed.

  6. A solar active region loop compared with a 2D MHD model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gontikakis, C; Dara, H C; Tsinganos, K

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed a coronal loop observed with the Normal Incidence Spectrometer (NIS), which is part of the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The measured Doppler shifts and proper motions along the selected loop strongly indicate unidirectional flows. Analysing the Emission Measure Curves of the observed spectral lines, we estimated that the temperature along the loop was about 380000 K. We adapted a solution of the ideal MHD steady equations to our set of measurements. The derived energy balance along the loop, as well as the advantages/disadvantages of this MHD model for understanding the characteristics of solar coronal loops are discussed.

  7. A solar active region loop compared with a 2D MHD model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Gontikakis; G. J. D. Petrie; H. C. Dara; K. Tsinganos

    2005-03-31

    We analyzed a coronal loop observed with the Normal Incidence Spectrometer (NIS), which is part of the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The measured Doppler shifts and proper motions along the selected loop strongly indicate unidirectional flows. Analysing the Emission Measure Curves of the observed spectral lines, we estimated that the temperature along the loop was about 380000 K. We adapted a solution of the ideal MHD steady equations to our set of measurements. The derived energy balance along the loop, as well as the advantages/disadvantages of this MHD model for understanding the characteristics of solar coronal loops are discussed.

  8. space holder Fisheries Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;space holder Fisheries Economics of the United States, 2011 Economics and Social Analysis Citation: National Marine Fisheries Service. 2012. Fisheries Economics of the United States, 2011. U/publication/index.html. A copy of this report may be obtained from: Economics and Social Analysis Division

  9. DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND FINANCE ANNUAL REPORT AY 2013-2014 School of Business 5 Liberty St and change to the Department of Economics and Finance. A revised economics curriculum, a new finance major the department will be divided into two. The Department of Economics will be chaired by Calvin Blackwell

  10. Experimental Economics: Where Next?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strien, Sebastian van

    Experimental Economics: Where Next? Ken Binmore Economics Dept University College Gower Street London WC1E 6BT United Kingdom Avner Shaked Economics Dept Bonn University Adenauerallee 24 53113 Bonn Germany Abstract: Where should experimental economics go next? This paper uses the literature on inequity

  11. 1 Economics The study of economics investigates the consequences of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    1 Economics ECONOMICS The study of economics investigates the consequences of scarcity, which forces people, organizations and governments to choose among competing objectives. Economics looks, unemployment, inflation, economic growth and the use and distribution of resources within and across nations

  12. DC High School Science Bowl Regionals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This event is the Washington, D.C. High School Regional competition for the US National Science Bowl. The regional competition is run by the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, and the...

  13. Long-term projections of national, regional, and state population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, J.F.; South, D.W.

    1986-07-01

    The projections prepared by the US Bureau of the Census are the best available projections of total US population. The DRI projections of population at the regional and state level to the year 2008 are the best available and are consistent with the US Bureau of the Census projections of total US population. The DRI regional and state projections can be extended from 2008 to 2030 with a simple model based on economic opportunity, although an even simpler model - constant shares - is used for the 1985 test runs. The US Bureau of the Census prepares the best available projections of the US age-sex distribution.

  14. Gaseous Chemistry and Aerosol Mechanism Developments for Version 3.5.1 of the Online Regional Model, WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Lowe, Douglas; Utembe, Steve; Allan, James D.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Fast, Jerome D.; Hodnebrog, Oivind; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; McFiggans, Gordon

    2014-11-08

    We have made a number of developments in the regional coupled model WRF-Chem, with the aim of making the model more suitable for prediction of atmospheric composition and of interactions between air quality and weather. We have worked on the European domain, with a particular focus on making the model suitable for the study of night time chemistry and oxidation by the nitrate radical in the UK atmosphere. A reduced form of the Common Reactive Intermediates gas-phase chemical mechanism (CRIv2-R5) has been implemented to enable more explicit simulation of VOC degradation. N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry has been added to the existing sectional MOSAIC aerosol module, and coupled to both the CRIv2-R5 and existing CBM-Z gas phase scheme. Modifications have also been made to the sea-spray aerosol emission representation, allowing the inclusion of primary organic material in sea-spray aerosol. Driven by appropriate emissions, wind fields and chemical boundary conditions, implementation of the different developments is illustrated in order to demonstrate the impact that these changes have in the North-West European domain. These developments are now part of the freely available WRF-Chem distribution.

  15. Moisture Flux Convergence in Regional and Global Climate Models: Implications for Droughts in the Southwestern United States Under Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yanhong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Salathe, E.; Dominguez, Francina; Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-05-10

    The water cycle of the southwestern United States (SW) is dominated by winter storms that maintain a positive annual net precipitation. Analysis of the control and future climate from four pairs of regional and global climate models (RCMs and GCMs) shows that the RCMs simulate a higher fraction of transient eddy moisture fluxes because the hydrodynamic instabilities associated with flow over complex terrain are better resolved. Under global warming, this enables the RCMs to capture the response of transient eddies to increased atmospheric stability that allows more moisture to converge on the windward side of the mountains by blocking. As a result, RCMs simulate enhanced transient eddy moisture convergence in the SW compared to GCMs, although both robustly simulate drying due to enhanced moisture divergence by the divergent mean flow in a warmer climate. This enhanced convergence leads to reduced susceptibility to hydrological change in the RCMs compared to GCMs.

  16. FY08 LDRD Final Report Regional Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bader, D C; Chin, H; Caldwell, P M

    2009-05-19

    An integrated, multi-model capability for regional climate change simulation is needed to perform original analyses to understand and prepare for the impacts of climate change on the time and space scales that are critical to California's future environmental quality and economic prosperity. Our intent was to develop a very high resolution regional simulation capability to address consequences of climate change in California to complement the global modeling capability that is supported by DOE at LLNL and other institutions to inform national and international energy policies. The California state government, through the California Energy Commission (CEC), institutionalized the State's climate change assessment process through its biennial climate change reports. The bases for these reports, however, are global climate change simulations for future scenarios designed to inform international policy negotiations, and are primarily focused on the global to continental scale impacts of increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. These simulations do not meet the needs of California public and private officials who will make major decisions in the next decade that require an understanding of climate change in California for the next thirty to fifty years and its effects on energy use, water utilization, air quality, agriculture and natural ecosystems. With the additional development of regional dynamical climate modeling capability, LLNL will be able to design and execute global simulations specifically for scenarios important to the state, then use those results to drive regional simulations of the impacts of the simulated climate change for regions as small as individual cities or watersheds. Through this project, we systematically studied the strengths and weaknesses of downscaling global model results with a regional mesoscale model to guide others, particularly university researchers, who are using the technique based on models with less complete parameterizations or coarser spatial resolution. Further, LLNL has now built a capability in state-of-the-science mesoscale climate modeling that complements that which it has in global climate simulation, providing potential sponsors with an end-to-end simulation and analysis program.

  17. Forest fires: from economic assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    1 Forest fires: from economic assessment to governance Laura Secco, Davide Pettenella and Mauro context) Contribute of ongoing research (A model to quantify forest fires costs) Proposal for future research (An ACF approach to stakeholders analysis) Final remarks Background Background - 1 Forest fires

  18. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettenmaier, Dennis P

    2013-04-08

    Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.

  19. 0 | P a g e Economic Impact of Medical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    for Consideration 7 Economic Impact Evaluation of Medical School Models 8 Facility Considerations 10 Key Findings 110 | P a g e Economic Impact of Medical Education Expansion in Nevada EconomicImpact Assessment Table of Contents Page Introduction 2 Evaluation of Market Needs 3 Medical School Models

  20. Attached-sunspace designs: a nationwide economic appraisal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, F.; Kirschner, C.

    1980-01-01

    Performance estimates for attached-sunspace passive solar heated residences have recently been incorporated into the Los Alamos/UNM EASE III model. These estimates are used to analyze the economic performance of a fixed dimension sunspace design when attached to a pre-existing single family residential unit. The sunspace is a passive design which can be easily and effectively adapted to a retrofit situation. Several key parameters are carefully evaluated for the sunspace retrofit design. These include loan or mortgage terms, ownership period, resale potential and competing conventional fuel prices. General economic and design parameters are combined in a variant of life cycle costing to evaluate the feasibility of both owner-built and contractor-built attached sunspaces for 220 regions in the contiguous United States. This evaluation is made for two conventional fuel types - natural gas and electric resistance - and for three resale values - 0%, 100%, and 200%. Results show that the prospect for conventional fuel displacement through retrofit of attached sunspaces is very good with the design's economic performance enhanced in regions with expensive conventional fuel alternatives.

  1. 11.437 Financing Economic Development, Fall 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seidman, Karl F.

    Focuses on financing tools and program models to support local economic development. Includes an overview of private capital markets and financing sources to understand capital market imperfections that constrain economic ...

  2. An experimental study of the oil evolution in critical piston ring pack regions and the effects of piston and ring designs in an internal combustion engine utilizing two-dimensional laser induced fluorescence and the impact on maritime economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vokac, Adam, 1978-

    2004-01-01

    Faced with increasing concern for lubricating, oil consumption and engine friction, it is critical to understand the oil transport mechanisms in the power cylinder system. Lubricating oil travels through distinct regions ...

  3. Water Resources Policy & Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Water Resources Policy & Economics FOR 4984 Selected Course Topics · Appropriative and riparian water institutions · Incentives for conservation · Water rights for in-stream environmental use · Surface water-groundwater management · Water quality regulations · Water markets · Economic and policy

  4. Economic Assessment Environmental impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - ". Economic Assessment Environmental impact Statement NESHAPS for Radionuclides Background Economic Assessment Environmental Impact Statement for NESHAPS Radionuclides VOLUME 3 BACKGROUND Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) for Radionuclides. An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS

  5. Essays in labor economics and the economics of education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Jaime Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Quarterly Journal of Economics. Kane, Thomas J. and CeciliaEducational Aspirations. ” Economics of Education Review,Educational Attainment. ” Economics of Education Review, 19:

  6. Essays in Energy Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MYERS, ERICA CATHERINE

    2014-01-01

    to wholesale electricity prices in Germany. We focus on theWholesale Electricity Prices in Germany,” Economics Letters,

  7. Force-free field modeling of twist and braiding-induced magnetic energy in an active-region corona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thalmann, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical concept that braided magnetic field lines in the solar corona may dissipate a sufficient amount of energy to account for the brightening observed in the active-region (AR) corona has only recently been substantiated by high-resolution observations. From the analysis of coronal images obtained with the High Resolution Coronal Imager, first observational evidence of the braiding of magnetic field lines was reported by Cirtain et al. (hereafter CG13). We present nonlinear force-free reconstructions of the associated coronal magnetic field based on Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager vector magnetograms. We deliver estimates of the free magnetic energy associated with a braided coronal structure. Our model results suggest (?100 times) more free energy at the braiding site than analytically estimated by CG13, strengthening the possibility of the AR corona being heated by field line braiding. We were able to appropriately assess the coronal free energy by using vector field measurements and we attribute the lower energy estimate of CG13 to the underestimated (by a factor of 10) azimuthal field strength. We also quantify the increase in the overall twist of a flare-related flux rope that was noted by CG13. From our models we find that the overall twist of the flux rope increased by about half a turn within 12 minutes. Unlike another method to which we compare our results, we evaluate the winding of the flux rope's constituent field lines around each other purely based on their modeled coronal three-dimensional field line geometry. To our knowledge, this is done for the first time here.

  8. The economics of US greenhouse gas emissions reduction policy : assessing distributional effects across households and the 50 United States using a recursive dynamic computable general equilibrium (CGE) model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Look, Wesley Allen

    2013-01-01

    The political economy of US climate policy has revolved around state- and district- level distributional economics, and to a lesser extent household-level distribution questions. Many politicians and analysts have suggested ...

  9. Economic benefits of an economizer system: Energy savings and reduced sick leave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Seppanen, Olli; Faulkner, David; Huang, Joe

    2004-02-01

    This study estimated the health, energy, and economic benefits of an economizer ventilation control system that increases outside air supply during mild weather to save energy. A model of the influence of ventilation rate on airborne transmission of respiratory illnesses was used to extend the limited data relating ventilation rate with illness and sick leave. An energy simulation model calculated ventilation rates and energy use versus time for an office building in Washington, D.C. with fixed minimum outdoor air supply rates, with and without an economizer. Sick leave rates were estimated with the disease transmission model. In the modeled 72-person office building, our analyses indicate that the economizer reduces energy costs by approximately $2000 and, in addition, reduces sick leave. The annual financial benefit of the decrease in sick leave is estimated to be between $6,000 and $16,000. This modeling suggests that economizers are much more cost effective than currently recognized.

  10. Ecosystem-scale Selenium Model for the San Francisco Bay-Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration Implementation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presser, Theresa S.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2013-01-01

    experimental ponds. Water, Air, and Soil Pollution 62(1–2):Pollution [SFBRWQCB] California San Francisco Bay Regional Water

  11. in Economics and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Torre, Leon

    Master's in Economics and Finance ­ #12;2 3 "A research-centred institution with a personal REASONS TO STUDY The Master's in Economics and Finance programme targets students wishing to obtain a comprehensive and rigorous education in Economics and Finance. It emphasizes the complementary nature

  12. WORKING PAPER Resource Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WORKING PAPER 2008-07 REPA Resource Economics & Policy Analysis Research Group Department of Economics University of Victoria Forest-mill integration: a transaction costs perspective Kurt Niquidet, Moeltne, and Johnson) 2003-06 ­ Climate Change and Forest Ecosystem Sinks: Economic Analysis (van Kooten

  13. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic Using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassano, John

    2013-06-30

    The primary research task completed for this project was the development of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM). This involved coupling existing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land models using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupler (CPL7). RACM is based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model, the CICE sea ice model, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. A secondary research task for this project was testing and evaluation of WRF for climate-scale simulations on the large pan-Arctic model domain used in RACM. This involved identification of a preferred set of model physical parameterizations for use in our coupled RACM simulations and documenting any atmospheric biases present in RACM.

  14. Technology Policy and Economic Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borrus, Michael; Stowsky, Jay

    1997-01-01

    economic growth) and the Pentagon’s Technology Reinvestment20 Tassey, Technology and Economic Growth: Implications forTechnology Policy and Economic Growth Michael Borrus Jay

  15. Three Essays on Financial Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, Haonan

    2011-01-01

    Journal of Financial Economics, February 2003, 67 (2), 217–Journal of Financial Economics, March 2008, 87 (3), 706–739.International Finance and Economics, 2008. Schiozer, Rafael

  16. Essays in Economics and Institutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schihl, Michael Kristjian

    2010-01-01

    to (the New) Institutional Economics . . . . .3.4.2Governance. Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, 7:Journal of Development Economics, 77(2):341–366, August

  17. Assessing the state-level consequences of global warming: Socio-economic and energy demand impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, B.M. Gailmard, S.; Marsh, D.; Septoff, A.

    1996-12-31

    The large body of research on climate change has begun to recognize a significant deficiency: the lack of analysis of the impact of climate change at a spatial level consistent with the anticipated occurrence of climate change. Climate change is likely to vary by region, while impact analysis has focused on much larger political units. Clearly, adaptation/mitigation strategies must be developed at a level consistent with political and policy-making processes. This paper specifically addresses this deficiency by identifying the potential socio-economic and energy demand consequences of climate change for subnational regions. This is accomplished via the development and application of a regional simultaneous equation, econometric simulation model that focuses on five states (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin) in the Great Lakes region of the US. This paper presents a process for obtaining state-specific assessments of the consequences of climate change for the socio-economic system. As such, it provides an indication of which economic sectors are most sensitive to climate change for a specific state (Indiana), a set of initial mitigation/adaptation strategies for this state, and the results of testing these strategies in the policy analysis framework enabled by the model. In addition, the research demonstrates an effective methodology for assessing impacts and policy implications of climate change at a level consistent with policy making authority.

  18. Essays on monetary economics and financial economics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sok Won

    2009-06-02

    In this dissertation three different economic issues have been analyzed. The first issue is whether monetary policy rules can improve forecasting accuracy of inflation. The second is whether the preference of a central bank is symmetry or not...

  19. Numerical Simulation of Inter-basin Groundwater Flow into Northern Yucca Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Using the Death Valley Regional Flow System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pohlmann Karl,Ye Ming

    2012-03-01

    Models of groundwater flow for the Yucca Flat area of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) are under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for corrective action investigations of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU). One important aspect of these models is the quantity of inter-basin groundwater flow from regional systems to the north. This component of flow, together with its uncertainty, must be properly accounted for in the CAU flow models to provide a defensible regional framework for calculations of radionuclide transport that will support determinations of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine contaminant boundary. Because characterizing flow boundary conditions in northern Yucca Flat requires evaluation to a higher level of detail than the scale of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU model can efficiently provide, a study more focused on this aspect of the model was required.

  20. A three-dimensional numerical model of predevelopment conditions in the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Agnese, F.A.; O'Brien, G.M.; Faunt, C.C.; Belcher, W.R.; San Juan, Carma

    2002-11-22

    In the early 1990's, two numerical models of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy. In general, the two models were based on the same basic hydrogeologic data set. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy requested that the U.S. Geological Survey develop and maintain a ground-water flow model of the Death Valley region in support of U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of developing this ''second-generation'' regional model was to enhance the knowledge and understanding of the ground-water flow system as new information and tools are developed. The U.S. Geological Survey also was encouraged by the U.S. Department of Energy to cooperate to the fullest extent with other Federal, State, and local entities in the region to take advantage of the benefits of their knowledge and expertise. The short-term objective of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system project was to develop a steady-stat e representation of the predevelopment conditions of the ground-water flow system utilizing the two geologic interpretations used to develop the previous numerical models. The long-term objective of this project was to construct and calibrate a transient model that simulates the ground-water conditions of the study area over the historical record that utilizes a newly interpreted hydrogeologic conceptual model. This report describes the result of the predevelopment steady-state model construction and calibration.

  1. Data Center Economizer Cooling with Tower Water; Demonstration of a Dual Heat Exchanger Rack Cooling Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Steve

    2014-01-01

    LBNL-XXXXX Data Center Economizer Cooling with Tower Water;included a water- side economizer. This model estimated theand without a water-side economizer and including or not

  2. Economic Impacts of the Arkstorm Scenario1 Ian Sue Wing1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wing, Ian Sue

    Economic Impacts of the Arkstorm Scenario1 Ian Sue Wing1 ; Adam Z. Rose2 ; and Anne M. Wein3 2 3 equilibrium model of the California economy to perform this economic consequence analysis.8 Economic and wind damages, economic impacts; business18 interruption; economic resilience; computable general

  3. Direct Entry Accounting and Economics School of Business and Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Direct Entry ­ Accounting and Economics School of Business and Economics Accounting Students who.acis.canterbury.ac.nz #12;Direct Entry ­ Accounting and Economics School of Business and Economics Economics In order to obtain direct entry to 200 level economics (ECON 206 and ECON 207/208) in their first year of university

  4. Determining Greenland Ice Sheet sensitivity to regional climate change: one-way coupling of a 3-D thermo-mechanical ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, Nicole-Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model By Nicole-ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model Copyrightice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model by Nicole-

  5. Megacity impacts on regional ozone formation: observations and WRF-Chem modeling for the MIRAGE-Shanghai field campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Tie, X. : Analysis of ozone and VOCs measured in Shanghai: AMegacity impacts on regional ozone formation terminations inand Tie, X. : Study of ozone “weekend effect” in Shanghai,

  6. Economic Development | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Economic Development Carbon Fiber Cluster Strategy Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy Entrepreneurial Development Programs Oak Ridge Science and Technology Park Economic...

  7. NET ECONOMIC VALUES OF RECREATIONISTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;NET ECONOMIC VALUES OF RECREATIONISTS FOR OUTDOOR EXPERIENCES IN THE FRASER RIVER BASIN Crane of Economic Values 2.1 Water Resource Economic Values 2.2 Net Economic Values of Recreationists 2.3 Estimating Net Economic Value 2.4 Estimation Problems Review of Net Economic Value Estimates 3.1 Summary

  8. Modeling the Summertime Climate of Southwest Asia: The Role of Land Surface Processes in Shaping the Climate of Semiarid Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcella, Marc P.

    Presented is a study on the role of land surface processes in determining the summertime climate over the semiarid region of southwest Asia. In this region, a warm surface air temperature bias of 3.5°C is simulated in the ...

  9. A long Saharan dust event over the western Mediterranean: Lidar, Sun photometer observations, and regional dust modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    over the Mediterranean region (http://www.bsc.es/projects/earthscience/ DREAM/) considering four of dust exported annually from northern Africa (Sahara-Sahel region) are still not reliable, and range]. Once in the atmosphere, dust particles interact with solar and thermal radiation, modulating the Earth

  10. Agent-Based Computing Center on Social and Economic Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    ­ `Computational economics' means numerical analysis of conventional (e.g., rational, equilibrium) models ­ `Computational finance' involves numerical solution of stochastic PDEs ­ `Computational game theory' involvesAgent-Based Computing in Economics Rob Axtell Center on Social and Economic Dynamics The Brookings

  11. SWAMC Economic Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 27th Annual Southwest Alaska Economic Summit and Business Meeting is a three-day conference covering energy efficiency planning, information on Alaska programs, and more.

  12. Essays on Environmental Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Qu

    2015-01-01

    Keohane. "Market effects of environmental regulation: coal,utility." Journal of Environmental Economics and ManagementEconomy of Market-Based Environmental Policy: the US Acid

  13. Economics (College of Arts and Sciences) The economics major focuses on economics as a social science.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miles, Will

    Economics (College of Arts and Sciences) The economics major focuses on economics as a social in the world? What types of political regimes best promote economic development? Are resource-rich developing countries cursed? Are drug cartels economically sound? Can humans work towards a better economic basis

  14. Long-run Implications of a Forest-based Carbon Sequestration Policy on the United States Economy: A Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Modeling Approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monge, Juan

    2012-10-19

    The economic impacts of a government-funded, forest-based sequestration program were analyzed under two different payment schemes. The impacts were obtained by developing a regional, static CGE model built to accommodate a modified IMPLAN SAM for a...

  15. ECONOMIC IMPACT OF THE CLEANTECH SECTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Joydeep

    ! ECONOMIC IMPACT OF THE CLEANTECH SECTOR In the Austin-Round Rock-San Marcos MSA Prepared by: #12 Manufacturing $2.5 Billion Cleantech contributes $2.5 Billion to Austin's regional GDP. 20,000 Jobs Cleantech directly employs 20,000 people in the Austin MSA. Rapid Growth Employment in cleantech is projected to grow

  16. Economic Impacts Associated With Commercializing Fuel Cell Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impacts Associated With Commercializing Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles in California: An Analysis of the California Road Map Using the JOBS H2 Model Economic Impacts Associated With...

  17. The economics of real estate brokerage and contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wignall, Christopher David

    2009-01-01

    Introduction . . . . . . . . 3.2 Real Estate Brokerage . .DIEGO The Economics of Real Estate Brokerage and Contracts Ain the model of real estate brokerage with heterogeneous

  18. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 2. Mid-American Solar Energy Complex Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Mid-American Solar Energy Complex Region. (WHK)

  19. Wind Economic Development (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the economic development benefits of wind energy. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the economic development benefits section on the Wind Powering America website.

  20. Economic Evaluation of Radiopharmaceutical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to industry needs and appointed a subcommittee of Manufacturers of Radioactive Reference Standards Radiation Division Physics Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology #12;Economic Evaluation of Standards and Technology by Albert N. Link Professor of Economics University of North Carolina at Greensboro

  1. Geothermal : Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Whatcom County, Washington.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesser, Jonathan A.

    1992-07-01

    This report estimates the local economic impacts that could be anticipated from the development of a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power plant in eastern Whatcom County, Washington, near Mt. Baker, as shown in Figure 1. The study was commissioned by the Bonneville Power Administration to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Whatcom County was chosen due to both identified geotherrnal resources and developer interest. The analysis will focus on two phases: a plant construction phase, including well field development, generating plant construction, and transmission line construction; and an operations phase. Economic impacts will occur to the extent that construction and operations affect the local economy. These impacts will depend on the existing structure of the Whatcom County economy and estimates of revenues that may accrue to the county as a result of plant construction, operation, and maintenance. Specific impacts may include additional direct employment at the plant, secondary impacts from wage payments being used to purchase locally produced goods and services, and impacts due to expenditures of royalty and tax payments received by the county. The basis for the analysis of economic impacts in this study is the US Forest Service IMPLAN input-output modeling system.

  2. Effect of Component Failures on Economics of Distributed Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubin, Barry T.

    2012-02-02

    This report describes an applied research program to assess the realistic costs of grid connected photovoltaic (PV) installations. A Board of Advisors was assembled that included management from the regional electric power utilities, as well as other participants from companies that work in the electric power industry. Although the program started with the intention of addressing effective load carrying capacity (ELCC) for utility-owned photovoltaic installations, results from the literature study and recommendations from the Board of Advisors led investigators to the conclusion that obtaining effective data for this analysis would be difficult, if not impossible. The effort was then re-focused on assessing the realistic costs and economic valuations of grid-connected PV installations. The 17 kW PV installation on the University of Hartford's Lincoln Theater was used as one source of actual data. The change in objective required a more technically oriented group. The re-organized working group (changes made due to the need for more technically oriented participants) made site visits to medium-sized PV installations in Connecticut with the objective of developing sources of operating histories. An extensive literature review helped to focus efforts in several technical and economic subjects. The objective of determining the consequences of component failures on both generation and economic returns required three analyses. The first was a Monte-Carlo-based simulation model for failure occurrences and the resulting downtime. Published failure data, though limited, was used to verify the results. A second model was developed to predict the reduction in or loss of electrical generation related to the downtime due to these failures. Finally, a comprehensive economic analysis, including these failures, was developed to determine realistic net present values of installed PV arrays. Two types of societal benefits were explored, with quantitative valuations developed for both. Some societal benefits associated with financial benefits to the utility of having a distributed generation capacity that is not fossil-fuel based have been included into the economic models. Also included and quantified in the models are several benefits to society more generally: job creation and some estimates of benefits from avoiding greenhouse emissions. PV system failures result in a lowering of the economic values of a grid-connected system, but this turned out to be a surprisingly small effect on the overall economics. The most significant benefit noted resulted from including the societal benefits accrued to the utility. This provided a marked increase in the valuations of the array and made the overall value proposition a financially attractive one, in that net present values exceeded installation costs. These results indicate that the Department of Energy and state regulatory bodies should consider focusing on societal benefits that create economic value for the utility, confirm these quantitative values, and work to have them accepted by the utilities and reflected in the rate structures for power obtained from grid-connected arrays. Understanding and applying the economic benefits evident in this work can significantly improve the business case for grid-connected PV installations. This work also indicates that the societal benefits to the population are real and defensible, but not nearly as easy to justify in a business case as are the benefits that accrue directly to the utility.

  3. WRF-Chem model predictions of the regional impacts of N2O5 heterogeneous processes on night-time chemistry over north-western Europe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lowe, Douglas; Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Morgan, Will; Allan, James D.; Utembe, Steve; Ouyang, Bin; Aruffo, Eleonora; Le Breton, Michael; Zaveri, Rahul A.; di Carlo, Piero; et al

    2015-02-09

    Chemical modelling studies have been conducted over north-western Europe in summer conditions, showing that night-time dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) heterogeneous reactive uptake is important regionally in modulating particulate nitrate and has a~modest influence on oxidative chemistry. Results from Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model simulations, run with a detailed volatile organic compound (VOC) gas-phase chemistry scheme and the Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC) sectional aerosol scheme, were compared with a series of airborne gas and particulate measurements made over the UK in July 2010. Modelled mixing ratios of key gas-phase species were reasonably accurate (correlationsmore »with measurements of 0.7–0.9 for NO2 and O3). However modelled loadings of particulate species were less accurate (correlation with measurements for particulate sulfate and ammonium were between 0.0 and 0.6). Sulfate mass loadings were particularly low (modelled means of 0.5–0.7 ?g kg?1air, compared with measurements of 1.0–1.5 ?g kg?1air). Two flights from the campaign were used as test cases – one with low relative humidity (RH) (60–70%), the other with high RH (80–90%). N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry was found to not be important in the low-RH test case; but in the high-RH test case it had a strong effect and significantly improved the agreement between modelled and measured NO3 and N2O5. When the model failed to capture atmospheric RH correctly, the modelled NO3 and N2O5 mixing ratios for these flights differed significantly from the measurements. This demonstrates that, for regional modelling which involves heterogeneous processes, it is essential to capture the ambient temperature and water vapour profiles. The night-time NO3 oxidation of VOCs across the whole region was found to be 100–300 times slower than the daytime OH oxidation of these compounds. The difference in contribution was less for alkenes (× 80) and comparable for dimethylsulfide (DMS). However the suppression of NO3 mixing ratios across the domain by N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry has only a very slight, negative, influence on this oxidative capacity. The influence on regional particulate nitrate mass loadings is stronger. Night-time N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry maintains the production of particulate nitrate within polluted regions: when this process is taken into consideration, the daytime peak (for the 95th percentile) of PM10 nitrate mass loadings remains around 5.6 ?g kg?1air, but the night-time minimum increases from 3.5 to 4.6 ?g kg?1air. The sustaining of higher particulate mass loadings through the night by this process improves model skill at matching measured aerosol nitrate diurnal cycles and will negatively impact on regional air quality, requiring this process to be included in regional models.« less

  4. Richard C. Ready Department of Agricultural Economics and Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Richard C. Ready Department of Agricultural Economics and Economics Montana State University, University of Wisconsin, Madison: Agricultural Economics Major Field: Environmental and Resource Economics 2. M.A. - 1985, University of Wisconsin, Madison: Agricultural Economics 3. B.S - 1981, Cornell

  5. For additional information, contact: Department of Agricultural Economics & Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barge, Marcy

    For additional information, contact: Department of Agricultural Economics & Economics Montana State.montana.edu/econ agecon@montana.edu 1 2 AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS & ECONOMICS KELLY GORHAM 1 Austin Owens traveled to Greece as mentors for students in Economics 101 4 Chris Stoddard was the recipient of a MSU Cox Family Faculty

  6. Economics Faculty Advising Do you have economics industry specific questions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Economics Faculty Advising Do you have economics industry specific questions? Are you planning to attend graduate school for economics and want more information? Are you looking to build a relationship with an economics faculty member? Below are the Economics Faculty Advisors for Spring 2015 semester. The advisor

  7. China, India and the Commodity Boom: Economic and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coxhead, Ian

    China, India and the Commodity Boom: Economic and Environmental Implications for Low of Life Sciences and 2 La Trobe University 1. INTRODUCTION THE emergence of China and India as major and regional economic integration (Tongzon, 2005; Haddad, 2007; Athukorala, 2009). India's rapid growth

  8. Demolitions Produce Recyclable Materials for Organization Promoting Economic Activity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demolitions have helped generate more than 8 million pounds of metal at the Piketon site for recycling, further promoting economic activity in the region thanks to the American Recovery and...

  9. 14.581 International Economics I, Spring 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donaldson, Dave

    This course covers, with a focus on both theory and empirics, advanced topics in international trade (as well as inter-regional trade and economic geography). It includes the study of positive issues, such as: Why do ...

  10. NOAA 2015 Regional Coast Resilience Grant Program | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    regions, communities, and economic sectors to the negative impacts from extreme weather events, climate hazards, and changing ocean conditions. Successful proposals will...

  11. Survey of Transmission Cost Allocation Methodologies for Regional Transmission Organizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, S.; Porter, K.; Mudd, C.; Rogers, J.

    2011-02-01

    The report presents transmission cost allocation methodologies for reliability transmission projects, generation interconnection, and economic transmission projects for all Regional Transmission Organizations.

  12. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: TOWARDS ADVANCED UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTIVE CAPABILITY OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARCTIC USING A HIGH-RESOLUTION REGIONAL ARCTIC CLIMATE SYSTEM MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutowski, William J.

    2013-02-07

    The motivation for this project was to advance the science of climate change and prediction in the Arctic region. Its primary goals were to (i) develop a state-of-the-art Regional Arctic Climate system Model (RACM) including high-resolution atmosphere, land, ocean, sea ice and land hydrology components and (ii) to perform extended numerical experiments using high performance computers to minimize uncertainties and fundamentally improve current predictions of climate change in the northern polar regions. These goals were realized first through evaluation studies of climate system components via one-way coupling experiments. Simulations were then used to examine the effects of advancements in climate component systems on their representation of main physics, time-mean fields and to understand variability signals at scales over many years. As such this research directly addressed some of the major science objectives of the BER Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) regarding the advancement of long-term climate prediction.

  13. Regional refining models for alternative fuels using shale and coal synthetic crudes: identification and evaluation of optimized alternative fuels. Annual report, March 20, 1979-March 19, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sefer, N.R.; Russell, J.A.

    1980-11-01

    The initial phase has been completed in the project to evaluate alternative fuels for highway transportation from synthetic crudes. Three refinery models were developed for Rocky Mountain, Mid-Continent and Great Lakes regions to make future product volumes and qualities forecast for 1995. Projected quantities of shale oil and coal oil syncrudes were introduced into the raw materials slate. Product slate was then varied from conventional products to evaluate maximum diesel fuel and broadcut fuel in all regions. Gasoline supplement options were evaluated in one region for 10% each of methanol, ethanol, MTBE or synthetic naphtha in the blends along with syncrude components. Compositions and qualities of the fuels were determined for the variation in constraints and conditions established for the study. Effects on raw materials, energy consumption and investment costs were reported. Results provide the basis to formulate fuels for laboratory and engine evaluation in future phases of the project.

  14. A preliminary regional PBPK model of lung metabolism for improving species dependent descriptions of 1,3-butadiene and its metabolites

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Campbell, Jerry; Van Landingham, Cynthia; Crowell, Susan; Gentry, Robinan; Kaden, Debra; Fiebelkorn, Stacy; Loccisano, Anne; Clewell, Harvey

    2015-06-12

    1,3-Butadiene (BD), a volatile organic chemical (VOC), is used in synthetic rubber production and other industrial processes. It is detectable at low levels in ambient air as well as in tobacco smoke and gasoline vapors. Inhalation exposures to high concentrations of BD have been associated with lung cancer in both humans and experimental animals, although differences in species sensitivity have been observed. Metabolically active lung cells such as Pulmonary Type I and Type II epithelial cells and club cells (Clara cells)1 are potential targets of BD metabolite-induced toxicity. Metabolic capacities of these cells, their regional densities, and distributions vary throughoutmore »the respiratory tract as well as between species and cell types. Here we present a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for BD that includes a regional model of lung metabolism, based on a previous model for styrene, to provide species-dependent descriptions of BD metabolism in the mouse, rat, and human. Since there are no in vivo data on BD pharmacokinetics in the human, the rat and mouse models were parameterized to the extent possible on the basis of in vitro metabolic data. Where it was necessary to use in vivo data, extrapolation from rat to mouse was performed to evaluate the level of uncertainty in the human model. A kidney compartment and description of downstream metabolism were also included in the model to allow for eventual use of available urinary and blood biomarker data in animals and humans to calibrate the model for estimation of BD exposures and internal metabolite levels. Results from simulated inhalation exposures to BD indicate that incorporation of differential lung region metabolism is important in describing species differences in pulmonary response and that these differences may have implications for risk assessments of human exposures to BD.« less

  15. TENNESSEE BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC OUTLOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    TENNESSEE BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC OUTLOOK THE STATE'S ECONOMIC OUTLOOK SPRING 2015 #12;Matthew N Knoxville, Tennessee TENNESSEE BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC OUTLOOK THE STATE'S ECONOMIC OUTLOOK SPRING 2015 #12;ii | SPRING 2015 TENNESSEE BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC OUTLOOK The preparation of this report was financed in part

  16. Three Essays on Development Economics and Behavioral Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Changcheng

    2012-01-01

    Quarterly Journal of Economics, 112 (2), 407-441. Crawford,Quarterly Journal of Economics, 116(4), 1233-1260. Gul,Quarterly Journal of Economics, 112 (2), 407-441. Carlin, B.

  17. Organizational Project Management Maturity Model (OPM3) to Improve Ministery of Construction and Housing (MOCAH) Within Kurdistan Regional Government 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mustafa, Azad Jabbar

    2015-05-06

    The Organizational Project Management Maturity Model (OPM3®), a standard developed by the Project Management Institute (PMI), has become an effective model to help an organization successfully implement strategies and achieve its objectives...

  18. Remote Sensing-based Estimates of Potential Evapotranspiration for Hydrologic Modeling in the Upper Colorado River Basin Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barik, Muhammad Ghulam

    2014-01-01

    evapotranspiration equations and their relevance to stream flow modeling in semi-arid environments.evapotranspiration equations and their relevance to stream flow modeling in semi-arid environments.evapotranspiration equations and their relevance to stream flow modeling in semi-arid environments.

  19. Evaluation of the accuracy of the EPA model for BOD5 prediction in various climatic regions of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koutny, Jessica Leigh

    2000-01-01

    model demonstrated removal rates for BOD?, TSS, fecal coliform, ammonium, and phosphorus of 80.0%, 70.9%, 87.1%, 34.7%, and 22.7%, respectively. These data provided the basis for evaluating the EPA model. A sensitivity analysis of the EPA model...

  20. Economics 480: Economic Institutions and Economic Performance in a Global Context Montana State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    1 Economics 480: Economic Institutions and Economic Performance in a Global Context Montana State University Spring 2009 Rob Fleck Andy Hanssen Property Rights, Economic Performance, and the Origins of Democracy: Lessons from Ancient Greece Instructors: Rob Fleck and Andy Hanssen (professors of economics

  1. Essays in Empirical Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozier, Owen Whitfield

    2010-01-01

    story,” Journal of Development Economics, 91(1), 128–139.Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, 58(4), 450–474.to Learn,” Review of Economics and Statistics, 91(3), 437–

  2. Three Essays on Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakagawa, Hideyuki

    2013-01-01

    Journal of Public Economics 89(4): 705-727. Gertler, P andJournal of Labour Economics , Vol. 17, No. 2, April, 2010Smoothing”, Journal of Economics Perspectives , 9(3), 103-

  3. Three essays in labor economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Liang Choon

    2010-01-01

    Quarterly Journal of Economics, vol. 123 (3), pp. 1111-1159.Kibbutz,” Journal of Public Economics, vol. 93, pp. 498-511.Quarterly Journal of Economics, vol. 106(40), pp. 979-

  4. Essays in Behavioral Health Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montoy, Juan Carlos Cantu

    2012-01-01

    The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 121(3): 1063–1102, 2006.Quarterly Journal of Economics, 116(1): 55–79, 2001. D.Quarterly Journal of Economics, 116(4): 1149–87, 2001. G.

  5. DOE Updates JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC1...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Updates JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC1.1) Model DOE Updates JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC1.1) Model Download the presentation slides from the...

  6. Estimating the Economic Costs of Espionage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Rich; Bennett, J. Ethan; Boles, Jillian R.; Goodoien, David M.; Irving, Jeff W.; Kuhlman, Phillip B.; White, Amanda K.

    2010-01-01

    constructed a model to identify the severity of an incident of economic espionage and its consequences on the U.S. economy. The model was designed for use by federal government employees with the intent that the federal government could apply publically...

  7. Dynamic downscaling of 22-year CFS winter seasonal hindcasts with the UCLA-ETA regional climate model over the United

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Yongkang

    Dynamic downscaling of 22-year CFS winter seasonal hindcasts with the UCLA-ETA regional climate for Environmental Prediction Climate Forecast System (NCEP CFS), winter season predictions over the contiguous in the study. CFS over-predicts the precipitation in eastern and western US by as much as 45 and 90

  8. Heat and freshwater exchange on the Antarctic continental1 shelf in a regional coupled climate model2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, David

    Heat and freshwater exchange on the Antarctic continental1 shelf in a regional coupled climate exchange with the atmosphere and sea ice dominates the annual cycle in heat29 and freshwater content;2 Abstract23 Understanding heat and freshwater content change in the Antarctic shelf seas is important

  9. Essays in environmental economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deryugina, Tatyana

    2012-01-01

    This thesis examines various aspects of environmental economics. The first chapter estimates how individuals' beliefs about climate change are affected by local weather fluctuations. Climate change is a one-time uncertain ...

  10. Essays in financial economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edmans, Alex

    2007-01-01

    This thesis consists of three essays in financial economics. Chapter 1 is entitled "Inside Debt." Existing theories advocate the use of cash and equity in executive compensation. However, recent empirical studies have ...

  11. Essays on development economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruthbah, Ummul Hasanath

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation is a collection of three independent papers in empirical development economics. The first chapter studies the effect of a family planning program in Bangladesh, which successfully reduced fertility, on ...

  12. Ethics of economic sanctions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Elizabeth Anne

    2013-07-02

    The ethics of economic sanctions is an issue that has been curiously neglected by philosophers and political theorists. Only a handful of philosophical journal articles and book chapters have ever been published on the ...

  13. Essays in financial economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ru, Hong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    This thesis considers three empirical essays on financial economics. The first chapter examines the effect of government credit on firm investment, employment, debt, profitability, and survival by using unique data from ...

  14. SWAMC Economic Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the Southwest Alaska Municipal Conference (SWAMC), the 27th Annual Southwest Alaska Economic Summit and Business Meeting is a three-day conference covering energy efficiency planning,...

  15. Essays on financial economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vargas Mendoza, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    This thesis consists of three independent essays on Financial Economics. In chapter one I investigate the possible mispricing of European-style options in the Mexican Stock Exchange. The source of this problem is that when ...

  16. A Multi-Model Analysis of the Regional and Sectoral Roles of Bioenergy in Near- and Long-Term CO2 Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Klein, David; McCollum, David; Tavoni, Massimo; van der Zwaan, Bob; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2013-11-01

    We study the near term and the longer term the contribution of bioenergy in different LIMITS scenarios as modeled by the participating models in the LIMITS project. With These scenarios have proven useful for exploring a range of outcomes for bioenergy use in response to both regionally diverse near term policies and the transition to a longer-term global mitigation policy and target. The use of several models has provided a source of heterogeneity in terms of incorporating uncertain assumptions about future socioeconomics and technology, as well as different paradigms for how the world may respond to policies. The results have also highlighted the heterogeneity and versatility of bioenergy itself, with different types of resources and applications in several energy sectors. In large part due to this versatility, the contribution of bioenergy to climate mitigation is a robust response across all models, despite their differences.

  17. Final Technical Report for Collaborative Research: Regional climate-change projections through next-generation empirical and dynamical models, DE-FG02-07ER64429

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smyth, Padhraic

    2013-07-22

    This is the final report for a DOE-funded research project describing the outcome of research on non-homogeneous hidden Markov models (NHMMs) and coupled ocean-atmosphere (O-A) intermediate-complexity models (ICMs) to identify the potentially predictable modes of climate variability, and to investigate their impacts on the regional-scale. The main results consist of extensive development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling specifically within the non-stationary climate change context together with the development of parallelized software; application of NHMMs to downscaling of rainfall projections over India; identification and analysis of decadal climate signals in data and models; and, studies of climate variability in terms of the dynamics of atmospheric flow regimes.

  18. Renewable Energy Economic Potential

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The report describes a geospatial analysis method to estimate the economic potential of several renewable resources available for electricity generation in the United States. Economic potential, one measure of renewable generation potential, is defined in this report as the subset of the available resource technical potential where the cost required to generate the electricity (which determines the minimum revenue requirements for development of the resource) is below the revenue available in terms of displaced energy and displaced capacity.

  19. Behavioral Economics Applied to Energy Demand Analysis: A Foundation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Neoclassical economics has shaped our understanding of human behavior for several decades. While still an important starting point for economic studies, neoclassical frameworks have generally imposed strong assumptions, for example regarding utility maximization, information, and foresight, while treating consumer preferences as given or external to the framework. In real life, however, such strong assumptions tend to be less than fully valid. Behavioral economics refers to the study and formalizing of theories regarding deviations from traditionally-modeled economic decision-making in the behavior of individuals. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has an interest in behavioral economics as one influence on energy demand.

  20. BioEarth: Envisioning and developing a new regional earth system model to inform natural and agricultural resource management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    model for complex terrain. Water Resour Res 30:1665–1679systems (e.g. , land, air, or water). The interconnectednessof nitrogen, carbon, and water present daunting management

  1. CULTURE, ECONOMIC STRUCTURE, AND THE DYNAMICS OF ECOLOGICAL ECONOMIC SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fournier, John J.F.

    CULTURE, ECONOMIC STRUCTURE, AND THE DYNAMICS OF ECOLOGICAL ECONOMIC SYSTEMS By John M. Anderies B are developed and analyzed in an attempt to better un- derstand the interaction of culture, economic structure, and the dynamics of human ecological economic systems. Speci cally, how does the ability of humans to change

  2. Regional Radiological Security Partnership in Southeast Asia – Increasing the Sustainability of Security Systems at the Site-Level by Using a Model Facility Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamberlain, Travis L.; Dickerson, Sarah; Ravenhill, Scott D.; Murray, Allan; Morris, Frederic A.; Herdes, Gregory A.

    2009-10-07

    In 2004, Australia, through the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), created the Regional Security of Radioactive Sources (RSRS) project and partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to form the Southeast Asian Regional Radiological Security Partnership (RRSP). The intent of the RRSP is to cooperate with countries in Southeast Asia to improve the security of their radioactive sources. This Southeast Asian Partnership supports objectives to improve the security of high risk radioactive sources by raising awareness of the need and developing national programs to protect and control such materials, improve the security of such materials, and recover and condition the materials no longer in use. The RRSP has utilized many tools to meet those objectives including: provision of physical protection upgrades, awareness training, physical protection training, regulatory development, locating and recovering orphan sources, and most recently - development of model security procedures at a model facility. This paper discusses the benefits of establishing a model facility, the methods employed by the RRSP, and three of the expected outcomes of the Model Facility approach. The first expected outcome is to increase compliance with source security guidance materials and national regulations by adding context to those materials, and illustrating their impact on a facility. Second, the effectiveness of each of the tools above is increased by making them part of an integrated system. Third, the methods used to develop the model procedures establishes a sustainable process that can ultimately be transferred to all facilities beyond the model. Overall, the RRSP has utilized the Model Facility approach as an important tool to increase the security of radioactive sources, and to position facilities and countries for the long term secure management of those sources.

  3. Assessing the CAM5 Physics Suite in the WRF-Chem Model: Implementation, Resolution Sensitivity, and a First Evaluation for a Regional Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Gustafson, William I.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Singh, Balwinder

    2014-05-06

    A suite of physical parameterizations (deep and shallow convection, turbulent boundary layer, aerosols, cloud microphysics, and cloud fraction) from the global climate model Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) has been implemented in the regional model Weather Research and Forecasting with chemistry (WRF-Chem). A downscaling modeling framework with consistent physics has also been established in which both global and regional simulations use the same emissions and surface fluxes. The WRF-Chem model with the CAM5 physics suite is run at multiple horizontal resolutions over a domain encompassing the northern Pacific Ocean, northeast Asia, and northwest North America for April 2008 when the ARCTAS, ARCPAC, and ISDAC field campaigns took place. These simulations are evaluated against field campaign measurements, satellite retrievals, and ground-based observations, and are compared with simulations that use a set of common WRF-Chem Parameterizations. This manuscript describes the implementation of the CAM5 physics suite in WRF-Chem provides an overview of the modeling framework and an initial evaluation of the simulated meteorology, clouds, and aerosols, and quantifies the resolution dependence of the cloud and aerosol parameterizations. We demonstrate that some of the CAM5 biases, such as high estimates of cloud susceptibility to aerosols and the underestimation of aerosol concentrations in the Arctic, can be reduced simply by increasing horizontal resolution. We also show that the CAM5 physics suite performs similarly to a set of parameterizations commonly used in WRF-Chem, but produces higher ice and liquid water condensate amounts and near-surface black carbon concentration. Further evaluations that use other mesoscale model parameterizations and perform other case studies are needed to infer whether one parameterization consistently produces results more consistent with observations.

  4. Statistical Modelling of the Relationship Between Main Development Region Sea Surface Temperature and Atlantic Basin Hurricane Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binter, R; Khare, S; Binter, Roman; Jewson, Stephen; Khare, Shree

    2007-01-01

    We are building a hurricane number prediction scheme that relies, in part, on statistical modelling of the empirical relationship between Atlantic sea surface temperatures and Atlantic basin hurricane numbers. We test out a number of simple statistical models for this relationship, using data from 1900 to 2005 and data from 1950 to 2005, and for both all hurricane numbers and intense hurricane numbers.

  5. Incorporation of aqueous reaction kinetics and biodegradation into TOUGHREACT: Application of a multi-region model to hydrobiogeoChemical transport of denitrification and sulfate reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tianfu

    2008-01-01

    Region: quartz calcite gypsum goethite Hydro- Region: Na + ,minerals gypsum and goethite were assumed to be initiallyChem-Region, Fe generated from goethite dissolution and HS

  6. Ecosystem feedbacks to climate change in California: Development, testing, and analysis using a coupled regional atmosphere and land-surface model (WRF3-CLM3.5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subin, Z.M.; Riley, W.J.; Kueppers, L.M.; Jin, J.; Christianson, D.S.; Torn, M.S.

    2010-11-01

    A regional atmosphere model [Weather Research and Forecasting model version 3 (WRF3)] and a land surface model [Community Land Model, version 3.5 (CLM3.5)] were coupled to study the interactions between the atmosphere and possible future California land-cover changes. The impact was evaluated on California's climate of changes in natural vegetation under climate change and of intentional afforestation. The ability of WRF3 to simulate California's climate was assessed by comparing simulations by WRF3-CLM3.5 and WRF3-Noah to observations from 1982 to 1991. Using WRF3-CLM3.5, the authors performed six 13-yr experiments using historical and future large-scale climate boundary conditions from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The land-cover scenarios included historical and future natural vegetation from the Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System-Century 1 (MC1) dynamic vegetation model, in addition to a future 8-million-ha California afforestation scenario. Natural vegetation changes alone caused summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature changes of -0.7 to +1 C in regions without persistent snow cover, depending on the location and the type of vegetation change. Vegetation temperature changes were much larger than the 2-m air temperature changes because of the finescale spatial heterogeneity of the imposed vegetation change. Up to 30% of the magnitude of the summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature increase and 70% of the magnitude of the 1600 local time (LT) vegetation temperature increase projected under future climate change were attributable to the climate-driven shift in land cover. The authors projected that afforestation could cause local 0.2-1.2 C reductions in summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature and 2.0-3.7 C reductions in 1600 LT vegetation temperature for snow-free regions, primarily because of increased evapotranspiration. Because some of these temperature changes are of comparable magnitude to those projected under climate change this century, projections of climate and vegetation change in this region need to consider these climate-vegetation interactions.

  7. Conceptual Model Summary Report Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Along Arches Province of Midwestern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-06-30

    A conceptual model was developed for the Arches Province that integrates geologic and hydrologic information on the Eau Claire and Mt. Simon formations into a geocellular model. The conceptual model describes the geologic setting, stratigraphy, geologic structures, hydrologic features, and distribution of key hydraulic parameters. The conceptual model is focused on the Mt. Simon sandstone and Eau Claire formations. The geocellular model depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array that may be imported into the numerical simulations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, geotechnical test results, and reservoir tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional (3D) grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mt. Simon injection wells. The final geocellular model covers an area of 600 km by 600 km centered on the Arches Province. The geocellular model includes a total of 24,500,000 cells representing estimated porosity and permeability distribution. CO{sub 2} injection scenarios were developed for on-site and regional injection fields at rates of 70 to 140 million metric tons per year.

  8. Economic Growth, Poverty and Inequality: Indian Experience of Reforms and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivobokova, Tatyana

    Economic Growth, Poverty and Inequality: Indian Experience of Reforms and Development Panchanan Das suggest that the faster economic growth causes higher incidence of poverty and inequality. Income inequality across regions is rising at an alarming rate due to higher economic growth during the reform

  9. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Sensitivity Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Shropshire; Kent Williams; J.D. Smith; Brent Boore

    2006-12-01

    A fuel cycle economic analysis was performed on four fuel cycles to provide a baseline for initial cost comparison using the Gen IV Economic Modeling Work Group G4 ECON spreadsheet model, Decision Programming Language software, the 2006 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis report, industry cost data, international papers, the nuclear power related cost study from MIT, Harvard, and the University of Chicago. The analysis developed and compared the fuel cycle cost component of the total cost of energy for a wide range of fuel cycles including: once through, thermal with fast recycle, continuous fast recycle, and thermal recycle.

  10. Impact of natural and anthropogenic aerosols on stratocumulus and precipitation in the Southeast Pacific: A regional modeling study using WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Qing; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.; Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Berg, Larry K.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Morrison, H.

    2012-09-28

    Cloud-system resolving simulations with the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model are used to quantify the impacts of regional anthropogenic and oceanic emissions on changes in aerosol properties, cloud macro- and microphysics, and cloud radiative forcing over the Southeast Pacific (SEP) during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) (15 Oct–Nov 16, 2008). The effects of oceanic aerosols on cloud properties, precipitation, and the shortwave forcing counteract those of anthropogenic aerosols. Despite the relatively small changes in Na concentrations (2-12%) from regional oceanic emissions, their net effect (direct and indirect) on the surface shortwave forcing is opposite and comparable or even larger in magnitude compared to those of regional anthropogenic emissions over the SEP. Two distinct regions are identified in the VOCALS-REx domain. The near-coast polluted region is characterized with strong droplet activation suppression of small particles by sea-salt particles, the more important role of the first than the second indirect effect, low surface precipitation rate, and low aerosol-cloud interaction strength associated with anthropogenic emissions. The relatively clean remote region is characterized with large contributions of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN, number concentration denoted by NCCN) and droplet number concentrations (Nd) from non-local sources (lateral boundaries), a significant amount of surface precipitation, and high aerosol-cloud interactions under a scenario of five-fold increase in anthropogenic emissions. In the clean region, cloud properties have high sensitivity (e.g., 13% increase in cloud-top height and a 9% surface albedo increase) to the moderate increase in CCN concentration (?Nccn = 13 cm-3; 25%) produced by a five-fold increase in regional anthropogenic emissions. The increased anthropogenic aerosols reduce the precipitation amount over the relatively clean remote ocean. The reduction of precipitation (as a cloud water sink) more than doubles the wet scavenging timescale, resulting in an increased aerosol lifetime in the marine boundary layer. Therefore, the aerosol impacts on precipitation are amplified by the positive feedback of precipitation on aerosol. The positive feedback ultimately alters the cloud micro- and macro-properties, leading to strong aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. The higher sensitivity of clouds to anthropogenic aerosols over this region is also related to a 16% entrainment rate increase due to anthropogenic aerosols. The simulated aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions are stronger at night over the clean marine region, while during the day, solar heating results in more frequent decoupling, thinner clouds, reduced precipitation, and reduced sensitivity to anthropogenic emissions. The simulated high sensitivity to the increased anthropogenic emissions over the clean region suggests that the perturbation of the clean marine environment with anthropogenic aerosols may have a larger effect on climate than that of already polluted marine environments.

  11. BAYESIANSTATISTICS in Health Economics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakley, Jeremy

    aprimeron BAYESIANSTATISTICS in Health Economics and Outcomes Research BS EHC Centre for Bayesian Statistics in Health Economics BAYESIAN INITIATIVE IN HEALTH ECONOMICS & OUTCOMES RESEARCH #12;APrimeronBayesianStatisticsLuceO'Hagan #12;aprimeron BAYESIANSTATISTICS in Health Economics and Outcomes Research Bayesian Initiative

  12. Department of Economics Financial Aid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Haiying

    Department of Economics Financial Aid: Availability and Requirements in the Department of Economics The Department of Economics has several sources of financial aid for domestic and international students Assistantships in the Department of Economics The predominant form of financial aid is the graduate research

  13. Unconventional gas outlook: resources, economics, and technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drazga, B.

    2006-08-15

    The report explains the current and potential of the unconventional gas market including country profiles, major project case studies, and new technology research. It identifies the major players in the market and reports their current and forecasted projects, as well as current volume and anticipated output for specific projects. Contents are: Overview of unconventional gas; Global natural gas market; Drivers of unconventional gas sources; Forecast; Types of unconventional gas; Major producing regions Overall market trends; Production technology research; Economics of unconventional gas production; Barriers and challenges; Key regions: Australia, Canada, China, Russia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States; Major Projects; Industry Initiatives; Major players. Uneconomic or marginally economic resources such as tight (low permeability) sandstones, shale gas, and coalbed methane are considered unconventional. However, due to continued research and favorable gas prices, many previously uneconomic or marginally economic gas resources are now economically viable, and may not be considered unconventional by some companies. Unconventional gas resources are geologically distinct in that conventional gas resources are buoyancy-driven deposits, occurring as discrete accumulations in structural or stratigraphic traps, whereas unconventional gas resources are generally not buoyancy-driven deposits. The unconventional natural gas category (CAM, gas shales, tight sands, and landfill) is expected to continue at double-digit growth levels in the near term. Until 2008, demand for unconventional natural gas is likely to increase at an AAR corresponding to 10.7% from 2003, aided by prioritized research and development efforts. 1 app.

  14. Statistical Modelling of the Relationship Between Main Development Region Sea Surface Temperature and \\emph{Landfalling} Atlantic Basin Hurricane Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binter, R; Khare, S; Binter, Roman; Jewson, Stephen; Khare, Shree

    2007-01-01

    We are building a hurricane number prediction scheme that relies, in part, on statistical modelling of the empirical relationship between Atlantic sea surface temperatures and landfalling hurricane numbers. We test out a number of simple statistical models for that relationship, using data from 1900 to 2005 and data from 1950 to 2005, and for both all hurricane numbers and intense hurricane numbers. The results are very different from the corresponding analysis for basin hurricane numbers.

  15. The economic impact of the Department of Energy on the State of New Mexico Fiscal Year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lansford, R.R. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). New Mexico Agricultural Experiment Station; Adcock, L.D.; Gentry, L.M. [Dept. of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Office of Energy, Science and Technology; Ben-David, S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Economics

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provides a major source of economic benefits in New Mexico, second only to the activities of the U.S. Department of Defense. The agency`s far-reaching economic influence within the state is the focus of this report. Economic benefits arising from the various activities and functions of both the Department and its contractors have accrued to the state continuously for over 45 years. For several years, DOE/Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) have maintained inter-industry, input-output modeling capabilities to assess DOE`s impacts on the state of New Mexico and the other substate regions most directly impacted by DOE activities. One of the major uses of input-output techniques is to assess the effects of developments initiated outside the economy such as federal DOE monies that flow into the state, on an economy.

  16. Economic Incentives for Cybersecurity: Using Economics to Design Technologies Ready for Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vishik, Claire; Sheldon, Frederick T; Ott, David

    2013-01-01

    Cybersecurity practice lags behind cyber technology achievements. Solutions designed to address many problems may and do exist but frequently cannot be broadly deployed due to economic constraints. Whereas security economics focuses on the cost/benefit analysis and supply/demand, we believe that more sophisticated theoretical approaches, such as economic modeling, rarely utilized, would derive greater societal benefits. Unfortunately, today technologists pursuing interesting and elegant solutions have little knowledge of the feasibility for broad deployment of their results and cannot anticipate the influences of other technologies, existing infrastructure, and technology evolution, nor bring the solutions lifecycle into the equation. Additionally, potentially viable solutions are not adopted because the risk perceptions by potential providers and users far outweighs the economic incentives to support introduction/adoption of new best practices and technologies that are not well enough defined. In some cases, there is no alignment with redominant and future business models as well as regulatory and policy requirements. This paper provides an overview of the economics of security, reviewing work that helped to define economic models for the Internet economy from the 1990s. We bring forward examples of potential use of theoretical economics in defining metrics for emerging technology areas, positioning infrastructure investment, and building real-time response capability as part of software development. These diverse examples help us understand the gaps in current research. Filling these gaps will be instrumental for defining viable economic incentives, economic policies, regulations as well as early-stage technology development approaches, that can speed up commercialization and deployment of new technologies in cybersecurity.

  17. Economical wind protection - underground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiesling, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    Earth-sheltered buildings inherently posess near-absolute occupant protection from severe winds. They should sustain no structural damage and only minimal facial damage. Assuming that the lower-hazard risk attendant to this type of construction results in reduced insurance-premium rates, the owner accrues economic benefits from the time of construction. Improvements to aboveground buildings, in contrast, may not yield early economic benefits in spite of a favorable benefit-to-cost ratio. This, in addition to sensitivity to initial costs, traditionalism in residential construction, and lack of professional input to design, impede the widespread use of underground improvements and the subsequent economic losses from severe winds. Going underground could reverse the trend. 7 references.

  18. Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courtney Lane

    2011-12-20

    As the Department of Energy stated in its 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, there will need to be enhanced outreach efforts on a national, state, regional, and local level to communicate wind development opportunities, benefits and challenges to a diverse set of stakeholders. To help address this need, PennFuture was awarded funding to create the Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute to provide general education and outreach on wind energy development across Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Over the course of the two-year grant period, PennFuture used its expertise on wind energy policy and development in Pennsylvania and expanded it to other states in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture accomplished this through reaching out and establishing connections with policy makers, local environmental groups, health and economic development organizations, and educational institutions and wind energy developers throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture conducted two regional wind educational forums that brought together wind industry representatives and public interest organizations from across the region to discuss and address wind development in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture developed the agenda and speakers in collaboration with experts on the ground in each state to help determine the critical issue to wind energy in each location. The sessions focused on topics ranging from the basics of wind development; model ordinance and tax issues; anti-wind arguments and counter points; wildlife issues and coalition building. In addition to in-person events, PennFuture held three webinars on (1) Generating Jobs with Wind Energy; (2) Reviving American Manufacturing with Wind Power; and (3) Wind and Transmission. PennFuture also created a web page for the institute (http://www.midatlanticwind.org) that contains an online database of fact sheets, research reports, sample advocacy letters, top anti-wind claims and information on how to address them, wind and wildlife materials and sample model ordinances. Video and presentations from each in-person meeting and webinar recordings are also available on the site. At the end of the two-year period, PennFuture has accomplished its goal of giving a unified voice and presence to wind energy advocates in the Mid-Atlantic region. We educated a broad range of stakeholders on the benefits of wind energy and gave them the tools to help make a difference in their states. We grew a database of over 500 contacts and hope to continue the discussion and work around the importance of wind energy in the region.

  19. SIGMOIDAL ACTIVE REGION ON THE SUN: COMPARISON OF A MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICAL SIMULATION AND A NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savcheva, A.; Van Ballegooijen, A.; DeLuca, E.; Pariat, E.; Aulanier, G.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we show that when accurate nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) models are analyzed together with high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, we can determine the physical causes for the coronal mass ejection (CME) eruption on 2007 February 12. We compare the geometrical and topological properties of the three-dimensional magnetic fields given by both methods in their pre-eruptive phases. We arrive at a consistent picture for the evolution and eruption of the sigmoid. Both the MHD simulation and the observed magnetic field evolution show that flux cancellation plays an important role in building the flux rope. We compute the squashing factor, Q, in different horizontal maps in the domains. The main shape of the quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) is very similar between the NLFFF and MHD models. The main QSLs lie on the edge of the flux rope. While the QSLs in the NLFFF model are more complex due to the intrinsic large complexity in the field, the QSLs in the MHD model are smooth and possess lower maximum value of Q. In addition, we demonstrate the existence of hyperbolic flux tubes (HFTs) in both models in vertical cross sections of Q. The main HFT, located under the twisted flux rope in both models, is identified as the most probable site for reconnection. We also show that there are electric current concentrations coinciding with the main QSLs. Finally, we perform torus instability analysis and show that a combination between reconnection at the HFT and the resulting expansion of the flux rope into the torus instability domain is the cause of the CME in both models.

  20. Implications of Model Configurations on Capacity Planning Decisions: Scenario Case Studies of the Western Interconnection and Colorado Region using the Resource Planning Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this report, we analyze the impacts of model configuration and detail in capacity expansion models, computational tools used by utility planners looking to find the least cost option for planning the system and by researchers or policy makers attempting to understand the effects of various policy implementations. The present analysis focuses on the importance of model configurations—particularly those related to capacity credit, dispatch modeling, and transmission modeling—to the construction of scenario futures. Our analysis is primarily directed toward advanced tools used for utility planning and is focused on those impacts that are most relevant to decisions with respect to future renewable capacity deployment. To serve this purpose, we develop and employ the NREL Resource Planning Model to conduct a case study analysis that explores 12 separate capacity expansion scenarios of the Western Interconnection through 2030.