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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional assessment area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Bay area regional water recycling program  

SciTech Connect

The Bay Area Regional Water Recycling Project is a partnership of 19 water and wastewater agencies working to maximize San Francisco Bay Area water recycling. Benefits of the partnership are described, and the methodologies and analysis tools to implement the regional approach are identified.

Ritchie, S.; Bailey, M.; Raines, R.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Alderwood Area Service Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) proposal to build a new 115-kV transmission line and 115-12.5-kV, 25-MW substation in the Alderwood, Oregon, area is discussed in the attached Environmental Assessment. The proposed substation site has been relocated about 500 feet east of the site outlined in the Environmental Assessment, but in the same field. This is not a substantial change relevant to environmental concerns. Environmental impacts of the new site differ only in that: Two residences will be visually affected. The substation will be directly across Highway 36 from two houses and would be seen in their primary views. This impact will be mitigated by landscaping the substation to create a vegetative screen. To provide access to the new site and provide for Blachly-Lane Cooperative's distribution lines, a 60-foot-wide right-of-way about 200 feet long will be needed. The total transmission line length will be less than originally planned. However, the tapline into the substation will be about 50 feet longer. 4 figs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Wide Area Security Region Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report develops innovative and efficient methodologies and practical procedures to determine the wide-area security region of a power system, which take into consideration all types of system constraints including thermal, voltage, voltage stability, transient and potentially oscillatory stability limits in the system. The approach expands the idea of transmission system nomograms to a multidimensional case, involving multiple system limits and parameters such as transmission path constraints, zonal generation or load, etc., considered concurrently. The security region boundary is represented using its piecewise approximation with the help of linear inequalities (so called hyperplanes) in a multi-dimensional space, consisting of system parameters that are critical for security analyses. The goal of this approximation is to find a minimum set of hyperplanes that describe the boundary with a given accuracy. Methodologies are also developed to use the security hyperplanes, pre-calculated offline, to determine system security margins in real-time system operations, to identify weak elements in the system, and to calculate key contributing factors and sensitivities to determine the best system controls in real time and to assist in developing remedial actions and transmission system enhancements offline . A prototype program that automates the simulation procedures used to build the set of security hyperplanes has also been developed. The program makes it convenient to update the set of security hyperplanes necessitated by changes in system configurations. A prototype operational tool that uses the security hyperplanes to assess security margins and to calculate optimal control directions in real time has been built to demonstrate the project success. Numerical simulations have been conducted using the full-size Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) system model, and they clearly demonstrated the feasibility and the effectiveness of the developed technology. Recommendations for the future work have also been formulated.

Makarov, Yuri V.; Lu, Shuai; Guo, Xinxin; Gronquist, James; Du, Pengwei; Nguyen, Tony B.; Burns, J. W.

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region Liberty-Parker #2 230-kV Transmission Line Optical Power Ground Wire Repairs - Continuation Sheet Project Description The scope of work includes digging a trenching and burying a 1.25-inch OPGW conduit. The conduit trench will be about 4 feet deep and 10 inches wide, with warning tape placed above the conduit in the trench. Once the conduit has been placed, the trench will be backfilled with the original surface material. About 5.3 linear miles of trenching will be required, mostly within the existing dirt access road associated with the LIB-PAD #2 transmission line. Four pullboxes will be installed along the route. The pullboxes measure 2 feet by 3 feet by 2 feet and will be installed at least 24 inches below grade. An

5

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region Liberty-Parker #2 230-kV Transmission Line Optical Power Ground Wire Repairs - Continuation Sheet Project Description The scope of work includes digging a trenching and burying a 1.25-inch OPGW conduit. The conduit trench will be about 4 feet deep and 10 inches wide, with warning tape placed above the conduit in the trench. Once the conduit has been placed, the trench will be backfilled with the original surface material. About 5.3 linear miles of trenching will be required, mostly within the existing dirt access road associated with the LIB-PAD #2 transmission line. Four pullboxes will be installed along the route. The pullboxes measure 2 feet by 3 feet by 2 feet and will be installed at least 24 inches below grade. An

6

Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Details Activities (8) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: Body and surface wave tomography are two of the primary methods for estimation of regional scale seismic velocity variations. Seismic velocity is affected by temperature and rock composition in complex ways, but when combined with geologic and structural maps, relative temperature can in some cases be estimated. We present preliminary tomographic models for compressional and shear-wave velocity using local and regional earthquakes recorded by Earthscope Transportable Array stations, network

7

Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area (Redirected from Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Alaska Exploration Region: Alaska Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

8

Regional Transit System: Return on Investment Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional Transit System: Return on Investment Assessment May 2014 #12;1 Today's agenda Itasca transit options Enables strategic, efficient investment in long-term infrastructure, e.g., energy grid are investing heavily in transit; these regions include Denver, Salt Lake City and Dallas, all rapidly growing

Minnesota, University of

9

3000 Area Phase 1 environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is planning to sell the 3000 Area to prospective buyers. Environmental Services was requested by the WHC Economic Transition group to assess potential environmental liabilities in the area. Historical review of the area indicated that the site was the location of ``Camp Hanford`` in 1951 and has been used for a variety of purposes since then. The activities in the area have changed over the years. A number of Buildings from the area have been demolished and at least 15 underground storage tanks (USTs) have been removed. Part of the 3000 Area was identified as Operable Unit 1100-EM-3 in the Tri-Party Agreement and was cleaned up by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The cleanup included removal of contaminated soil and USTS. WHC and ICF KH had also performed sampling and analysis at some locations in the 3000 Area prior to USACE`s work on the Operable Unit 1100-EM-3. They removed a number of USTs and performed remediation.

Ranade, D.G.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Alaska Exploration Region: Alaska Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

11

Alamo Area Regional Public Transportation Coordination Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as gaps in coverage were identified by providers in San Antonio and in rural areas. Providers do not have enough vehicles or service flexibility to leave their respective service area to provide much needed medical transportation trips. ? Medical... destination, and 3) TxDOT-MTP will not adhere to a schedule and will not attempt to group trips, requiring one vehicle for one individual. ? Coordination issues ? Duplication of service issues were noted through the survey responses (both overlap...

Alamo Area Council of Governments

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

12

Area C borrow Site Habitat Assessment  

SciTech Connect

A habitat quality assessment was performed within selected portions of the proposed Area C Borrow Source. The previously identified Bitterbrush / Indian ricegrass stabilized dune element occurrence was determined to be better described as a sagebrush /needle-and-thread grass element occurrence of fair to good quality. A new habitat polygon is suggested adjacent to this element occurrence, which would also be sagebrush/needle-and-thread grass, but of poor quality. The proposed site of initial borrow site development was found to be a very low quality community dominated by cheatgrass.

Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Downs, Janelle L.

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

13

Seismic Hazard Assessment of the Sheki-Ismayilli Region, Azerbaijan  

SciTech Connect

Seismic hazard assessment is an important factor in disaster management of Azerbaijan Republic. The Shaki-Ismayilli region is one of the earthquake-prone areas in Azerbaijan. According to the seismic zoning map, the region is located in intensity IX zone. Large earthquakes in the region take place along the active faults. The seismic activity of the Shaki-Ismayilli region is studied using macroseismic and instrumental data, which cover the period between 1250 and 2003. Several principal parameters of earthquakes are analyzed: maximal magnitude, energetic class, intensity, depth of earthquake hypocenter, and occurrence. The geological structures prone to large earthquakes are determined, and the dependence of magnitude on the fault length is shown. The large earthquakes take place mainly along the active faults. A map of earthquake intensity has been developed for the region, and the potential seismic activity of the Shaki-Ismayilli region has been estimated.

Ayyubova, Leyla J. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29A, H. Javid Ave., Baku 1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

14

An Assessment Of The External Radiological Impact In Areas Of Greece With  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assessment Of The External Radiological Impact In Areas Of Greece With Assessment Of The External Radiological Impact In Areas Of Greece With Elevated Natural Radioactivity Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Assessment Of The External Radiological Impact In Areas Of Greece With Elevated Natural Radioactivity Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: In the present study, the radiological impact assessment in three selected areas of elevated natural radioactivity in Greece is attempted, based on measurements, theoretical relations, and simple model application. These areas are Milos - an island of volcanic origin in Cyclades Archipelago, Ikaria - an island in the Eastern Aegean Sea and Loutraki - a coastal area in mainland Greece. These areas are characterized by their

15

A Preliminary Regional Geothermal Assessment Of The Gulf Of Suez, Egypt |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regional Geothermal Assessment Of The Gulf Of Suez, Egypt Regional Geothermal Assessment Of The Gulf Of Suez, Egypt Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Preliminary Regional Geothermal Assessment Of The Gulf Of Suez, Egypt Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The tectonic setting of Egypt, in the northeastern corner of the African continent, suggests that it may possess significant geothermal resources, especially along its eastern margin. The most promising areas for geothermal development in the NW Red Sea-Gulf of Suez rift system are locations along the eastern shore of the Gulf of Suez that are characterized by surface thermal manifestations, including a cluster of hot springs with varied temperatures. The Gulf of Suez region is one of the most interesting geothermal areas in Egypt because of the high temperatures

16

1Assessment of Urban and Regional Research in the Netherlands, 2000-2006 Assessment of Urban  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1Assessment of Urban and Regional Research in the Netherlands, 2000-2006 Assessment of Urban and Regional Research in the Netherlands, 2000-2006 January 2008 #12;2 Assessment of Urban and Regional Research in the Netherlands, 2000-2006 Committee Prof. Robson (chair) Prof. Albrechts Prof. Bailey Prof

Utrecht, Universiteit

17

Ashland Area Support Substation Project : Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides wholesale electric service to the City of Ashland (the City) by transferring power over Pacific Power & Light Company`s (PP&L) 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines and through PP&L`s Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. The City distributes power over a 12.5-kV system which is heavily loaded during winter peak periods and which has reached the limit of its ability to serve peak loads in a reliable manner. Peak loads under normal winter conditions have exceeded the ratings of the transformers at both the Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. In 1989, the City modified its distribution system at the request of PP&L to allow transfer of three megawatts (MW`s) of electric power from the overloaded Ashland Substation to the Oak Knoll Substation. In cooperation with PP&L, BPA installed a temporary 6-8 megavolt-amp (MVA) 115-12.5-kV transformer for this purpose. This additional transformer, however, is only a temporary remedy. BPA needs to provide additional, reliable long-term service to the Ashland area through additional transformation in order to keep similar power failures from occurring during upcoming winters in the Ashland area. The temporary installation of another 20-MVA mobile transformer at the Ashland Substation and additional load curtailment are currently being studied to provide for sustained electrical service by the peak winter period 1992. Two overall electrical plans-of-service are described and evaluated in this report. One of them is proposed for action. Within that proposed plan-of-service are location options for the substation. Note that descriptions of actions that may be taken by the City of Ashland are based on information provided by them.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Appendix H Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment Urban Influence Areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Appendix H ­ Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment Urban Influence Areas Overview of the Urban and Community Forestry Layer 1. Start with Night Lights data and clip to Colorado Boundary code = 11020). a. Create a new shapefile called UrbanInfluenceAreas_withCapacity.shp. b. Add fields

19

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region.

20

Asia-Pacific Regional Climate Change Adaptation Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Asia-Pacific Regional Climate Change Adaptation Assessment Asia-Pacific Regional Climate Change Adaptation Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Asia-Pacific Regional Climate Change Adaptation Assessment Agency/Company /Organization: U.S. Agency for International Development Sector: Energy Topics: Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.usaid.gov/rdma/documents/RDMA_Asia-Pacific_Climate_Change_Adaptati Country: China, Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Laos, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Maldives, Mongolia, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Timor-Leste, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Vanuatu UN Region: Central Asia, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia References: Asia-Pacific Adaptation Assessment[1]

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional assessment area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

NETL: Carbon Storage - Simulation and Risk Assessment Focus Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation and Risk Assessment Simulation and Risk Assessment Carbon Storage Simulation and Risk Assessment Focus Area The Simulation and Risk Assessment Focus Area is an integrated effort to develop advanced simulation models of the subsurface and integrate the results into a risk assessment that includes both technical and programmatic risks. As the simulation models are refined with new data, the uncertainty surrounding the identified risks decreases, which in turn provides a more accurate risk assessment and mitigation plan for each project site. Both qualitative and quantitative protocols will be developed to ensure the safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2). Results from the simulation models will be incorporated into risk assessments on a project-by-project basis and on a larger basin-scale. As carbon capture and storage (CCS) becomes deployed in major basins, macro model results will be needed to manage reservoirs for pressure management, plume migration, and potential risks of multiple CO2 injection projects across the basin.

22

Development of Autonomous Magnetometer Rotorcraft For Wide Area Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Large areas across the United States and internationally are potentially contaminated with unexploded ordinance (UXO), with some ranges encompassing tens to hundreds of thousands of acres. Technologies are needed which will allow for cost effective wide area scanning with (1) near 100% coverage and (2) near 100% detection of subsurface ordnance or features indicative of subsurface ordnance. The current approach to wide area assessment is a multi-level one, in which medium - altitude fixed wing optical imaging is used for an initial site assessment. This assessment is followed with low altitude manned helicopter based magnetometry. Subsequent to this wide area assessment targeted surface investigations are performed using either towed geophysical sensor arrays or man portable sensors. In order to be an effective tool for small UXO detection, the sensing altitude for magnetic site investigations needs to be on the order of 1 to 3 meters. These altitude requirements mean that manned helicopter surveys will generally only be feasible in large, open and relatively flat terrains. While such surveys are effective in mapping large areas relatively fast there are substantial mobilization/demobilization, staffing and equipment costs associated with these surveys, resulting in costs of approximately $100-$150/acre. In addition, due to the low altitude there are substantial risks to pilots and equipment. Surface towed arrays provide highresolution maps but have other limitations, e.g. in their ability to navigate rough terrain effectively. Thus there is a need for other systems, which can be used for effective data collection. An Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) magnetometer platform is an obvious alternative. The motivation behind such a system is that it reduces risk to operators, is lower in initial and Operational and Maintenance (O&M) costs (and can thus potentially be applied to smaller sites) and has the potential of being more effective in terms of detection and possibly characterization (through the use of dynamic acquisition, i.e. survey mission in-flight reprioritization).

Mark D. McKay; Matthew O. Anderson

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Regional issue identification and assessment: study methodology. First annual report  

SciTech Connect

The overall assessment methodologies and models utilized for the first project under the Regional Issue Identification and Assessment (RIIA) program are described. Detailed descriptions are given of the methodologies used by lead laboratories for the quantification of the impacts of an energy scenario on one or more media (e.g., air, water, land, human and ecology), and by all laboratories to assess the regional impacts on all media. The research and assessments reflected in this document were performed by the following national laboratories: Argonne National Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report contains five chapters. Chapter 1 briefly describes the overall study methodology and introduces the technical participants. Chapter 2 is a summary of the energy policy scenario selected for the RIIA I study and Chapter 3 describes how this scenario was translated into a county-level siting pattern of energy development. The fourth chapter is a detailed description of the individual methodologies used to quantify the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of the scenario while Chapter 5 describes how these impacts were translated into comprehensive regional assessments for each Federal Region.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

McMinnville Area Support Transmission Project : Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

This document discusses a project to provide continuing reliable electrical service to the McMinnville, Oregon, area. BPA proposes to participate with the City of McMinnville Water and Light Department in constructing a new 230-kilovolt transmission line and substation. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment evaluating the proposed project. Reasons that constructing the line and substation would not cause significant environmental impact include: consistency with local land use plans, consistency of appearance with existing transmission and manufacturing facilities in the area, only slight effect on farmland, and avoidance of wetlands and other environmentally sensitive areas. A finding is included that there is no practicable alternative to locating the project within a 100-year floodplain. 1 fig.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Power Marketing - Sierra Nevada Region - Western Area Power Administra...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pool Resource Adequacy Capacity Plan Rates You are here: SN Home page > Power Marketing Power Marketing Depicts SNR's service area, which extends from northern and central...

26

Ark-Tex Area Regional Public Transportation Coordination Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Morris Counties. These counties have the greatest need outside their counties. ? The smaller towns of Atlanta, Clarksville, and New Boston can sustain a one-vehicle dial-a-ride service. Travel Patterns Work trip patterns were derived from... Report Transportation Coordination Plan 13 ? The Ark-Tex Region has four counties ranked in the lower half of the 254 Texas counties in terms of average household income. ? Related to the point above, vehicle ownership in the Ark-Tex Region...

Ark-Tex Council of Governments

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

27

Development of autonomous magnetometer rotorcraft for wide area assessment  

SciTech Connect

Large areas across the United States are potentially contaminated with UXO, with some ranges encompassing tens to hundreds of thousands of acres. Technologies are needed which will allow for cost effective wide area scanning with 1) near 100 % coverage and 2) near 100 % detection of subsurface ordnance or features indicative of subsurface ordnance. The current approach to wide area assessment is a multi-level one, in which medium - altitude fixed wing optical imaging is used for an initial site assessment. This assessment is followed with low altitude manned helicopter based magnetometry. Subsequent to this wide area assessment targeted surface investigations are performed using either towed geophysical sensor arrays or man portable sensors. In order to be an effective tool for small UXO detection, the sensing altitude for magnetic site investigations needs to be on the order of 1 – 3 meters. These altitude requirements mean that manned helicopter surveys will generally only be feasible in large, open and relatively flat terrains. While such surveys are effective in mapping large areas relatively fast there are substantial mobilization/demobilization, staffing and equipment costs associated with these surveys (resulting in costs of approximately $100-$150/acre). In addition, due to the low altitude there are substantial risks to pilots and equipment. Surface towed arrays provide high resolution maps but have other limitations, e.g. in their ability to navigate rough terrain effectively. There is thus a need for other systems which can be used for effective data collection. An UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) magnetometer platform is an obvious alternative. The motivation behind such a system is that it reduces risk to operators, is lower in initial and Operational and Maintenance (O&M) costs (and can thus potentially be applied to smaller sites) and has the potential of being more effective in terms of detection and possibly characterization (through the use of dynamic acquisition, i.e. survey mission inflight reprioritization). We describe and report on a one year effort with as primary goal to provide a recommendation to SERDP for a path forward in the implementation of one or more autonomous unmanned magnetometer rotorcraft platforms. This recommendation (which is provided in chapter 6) is based on the following three elements a) An assessment on the applicability of autonomous rotorcraft magnetometer systems to the current DoD site inventory, and an initial assessment of which type(s) of autonomous unmanned magnetometer rotorcraft platforms (in terms of performance characteristics such as payload, altitude, obstacle avoidance, production rate and flight time) would be most relevant to this inventory (chapter 3); b) An evaluation of the feasibility of assembling such platforms from commercial components (unmanned rotorcraft, control systems and sensors – both magnetometer sensors and supporting sensors). This evaluation included several highly successful field tests (chapter 4 and 5); c) A recommendation of the path forward, which includes a detailed outline of the efforts required in the design, assembly and testing of different modular platforms (chapter 6)

Roelof Versteeg; Matt Anderson; Les Beard; Eric Corban; Darryl Curley; Jeff Gamey; Ross Johnson; Dwight Junkin; Mark McKay; Jared Salzmann; Mikhail Tchernychev; Suraj Unnikrishnan; Scott Vinson

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Water Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Keith, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Keith, Et Al., Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Keith, Et Al., 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Keith, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References T. E. C. Keith, J. M. Thompson, R. A. Hutchinson, L. D. White (1992) Geochemistry Of Waters In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region, Alaska Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Water_Sampling_At_Valley_Of_Ten_Thousand_Smokes_Region_Area_(Keith,_Et_Al.,_1992)&oldid=386869" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities

29

The U.S. Geological Survey coal assessment of the Gulf Coastal region, a progress report  

SciTech Connect

The US Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a comprehensive assessment of the major coal regions of the country. This program, known as the National Coal Resource Assessment (NCRA), is focused on five major coal-bearing regions in the country: the Appalachian basin, Illinois basin, Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains, Colorado Plateau, and the Gulf Coast region. In this program, the authors are characterizing the quantity and quality of coals that are expected to be mined during the next 30 years. As part of this effort, they are conducting an evaluation of the stratigraphic setting, resource potential, and the quality of the lignites in five coal-producing areas within the Gulf Coast region. The results of these efforts will be a series of digital Geographic Information System (GIS) maps, text, and tables that will be published in a CD-ROM format. These products, along with a national summary CD-ROM, are expected to be completed by 1999. The assessment of the Gulf Coast region is focused primarily on four areas that are currently producing coal as shown in a figure. These areas are the: (1) Sabine area, which includes parts of northwest Louisiana and northeast Texas; (2) northeast Texas; (3) central Texas; and (4) south Texas. In addition, a fifth area in Mississippi has been evaluated because a new surface mine has been proposed for that area. The Gulf Coast coal region produces about 57 million short tons of coal annually from the states of Louisiana and Texas from Wilcox Group coals. The primary intervals of study for this project are the Wilcox Group (Paleocene-Eocene) and selected coal-producing intervals (such as the Eocene Jackson and Claiborne Groups, and Cretaceous Olmos Formation in south Texas) that are producing or have potential for producing coal in the near future. The objectives of this project are to provide high-quality, organized information and interpretations on the location, quality, and quantity of the coal to be mined in the Gulf Coast area during the next several decades in order to meet the needs of the region for reliable, low cost, environmentally-acceptable energy.

Warwick, P.D.; Aubourg, C.E.; Crowley, S.S. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)] [and others

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

Tanks Focus Area (TFA) Site Needs Assessment FY 1999  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the process used by the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to analyze and develop responses to technology needs submitted by five major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites with radioactive tank waste problems, and the initial results of the analysis. The sites are the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Savannah River Site (SRS), and West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). This is the fifth edition of the TFA site needs assessment. As with previous editions, this edition serves to provide the basis for accurately defining the TFA program for the upcoming fiscal year (FY), and adds definition to the program for up to 4 additional outyears. Therefore, this version distinctly defines the FY 2000 progrti and adds further definition to the FY 2001- FY 2004 program. Each year, the TFA reviews and amends its program in response to site users' science and technology needs.

RW Allen

1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

31

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky & Keith, 1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky & Keith, 1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Statistical analyses of geochemical data. References Lawrence G. Kodosky, Terry E. C. Keith (1993) Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations, Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Data_Acquisition-Manipulation_At_Valley_Of_Ten_Thousand_Smokes_Region_Area_(Kodosky_%26_Keith,_1993)&oldid=389784"

32

Regional Resource Area Mapping In Nevada Using The Usarray Seismic Network  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regional Resource Area Mapping In Nevada Using The Usarray Seismic Network Regional Resource Area Mapping In Nevada Using The Usarray Seismic Network Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Regional Resource Area Mapping In Nevada Using The Usarray Seismic Network Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: The Earthscope Transportable Array (TA) seismic network is a significant new development for regional seismic velocity modeling and potential geothermal resource development. While very sparse compared to exploration scale applications, this network nevertheless affords regional modelers with unprecedented resolution and uniformity of coverage. The network is funded by the National Science Foundation through a major earth sciences initiative called Earthscope (www.earthscope.org). The network is

33

Environmental Assessment -- Test Area North pool stabilization project update  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to update the ``Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project`` EA (DOE/EA-1050) and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) issued May 6, 1996. This update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of a drying process for the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear reactor core debris canisters now stored underwater in a facility on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A drying process was analyzed in the predecision versions of the EA released in 1995 but that particular process was determined to be ineffective and dropped from the EA/FONSI issued May 6, 1996. A new drying process was subsequently developed and is analyzed in Section 2.1.2 of this document. As did the 1996 EA, this update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of removing various radioactive materials from underwater storage, dewatering these materials, constructing a new interim dry storage facility, and transporting and placing the materials into the new facility. Also, as did the 1996 EA, this EA analyzes the removal, treatment and disposal of water from the pool, and placement of the facility into a safe, standby condition. The entire action would take place within the boundaries of the INEEL. The materials are currently stored underwater in the Test Area North (TAN) building 607 pool, the new interim dry storage facility would be constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) which is about 25 miles south of TAN.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Draft environmental assessment -- Test Area North pool stabilization project update  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to update the ``Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project`` EA (DOE/EA-1050) and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) issued May 6, 1996. This update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of a drying process for the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear reactor core debris canisters now stored underwater in a facility on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A drying process was analyzed in the predecision versions of the EA released in 1995 but that particular process was determined to be ineffective and dropped form the Ea/FONSI issued May 6, 1996. The origin and nature of the TMI core debris and the proposed drying process are described and analyzed in detail in this EA. As did the 1996 EA, this update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of removing various radioactive materials from underwater storage, dewatering these materials, constructing a new interim dry storage facility, and transporting and placing the materials into the new facility. Also, as did the 1996 EA, this EA analyzes the removal, treatment and disposal of water from the pool, and placement of the facility into a safe, standby condition. The entire action would take place within the boundaries of the INEEL. The materials are currently stored underwater in the Test Area North (TAN) building 607 pool, the new interim dry storage facility would be constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) which is about 25 miles south of TAN.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Region-to-area screening methodology for the Crystalline Repository Project  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to describe the Crystalline Repository Project's (CRP) process for region-to-area screening of exposed and near-surface crystalline rock bodies in the three regions of the conterminous United States where crystalline rock is being evaluated as a potential host for the second nuclear waste repository (i.e., in the North Central, Northeastern, and Southeastern Regions). This document indicates how the US Department of Energy's (DOE) General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories (10 CFR 960) were used to select and apply factors and variables for the region-to-area screening, explains how these factors and variable are to be applied in the region-to-area screening, and indicates how this methodology relates to the decision process leading to the selection of candidate areas. A brief general discussion of the screening process from the national survey through area screening and site recommendation is presented. This discussion sets the scene for detailed discussions which follow concerning the region-to-area screening process, the guidance provided by the DOE Siting Guidelines for establishing disqualifying factors and variables for screening, and application of the disqualifying factors and variables in the screening process. This document is complementary to the regional geologic and environmental characterization reports to be issued in the summer of 1985 as final documents. These reports will contain the geologic and environmental data base that will be used in conjunction with the methodology to conduct region-to-area screening.

none,

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A limited assessment and characterization of the solar radiation energy resources in the Caribbean region  

SciTech Connect

The objective of our work was to produce a preliminary assessment and characterization of the Caribbean region (Barbados, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Jamaica, and Panama) solar radiation energy resources. Such information will be used to estimate the performance of, and identify the most promising applications of, solar heat technologies in the Caribbean region. We expect the solar radiation resources in the Caribbean region to be very location specific. Sunny areas will have an annual direct-beam resource of about 3,000 kWhm/sup /minus 2// and a global solar radiation resource of about 2,500 kWhm/sup /minus 2//. Cloud-covered areas will have annual solar radiation resources of about 1,500 kWhm/sup /minus 2/ for both the direct-beam and the global solar radiation. Monthly levels of solar radiaion will vary markedly, ranging from an average of 9 to 3 kWhm/sup /minus 2//day/sup /minus 1// for the direct-beam and from an average of 7 to 4 kWhm/sup /minus 2//day/sup /minus 1// for the global solar radiation. The Caribbean region is comparable to the Great Plains region of the US, in terms of annual solar radiation resources; however, thorough ''prospecting'' is required to avoid areas having very low amounts of solar radiation.

Hulstrom, R.L.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Test Area North (TAN) Pool is located within the fenced TAN facility boundaries on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The TAN pool stores 344 canisters of core debris from the March, 1979, Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 reactor accident; fuel assemblies from Loss-of-Fluid Tests (LOFT); and Government-owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies. The LOFT and government owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies are hereafter referred to collectively as {open_quotes}commercial fuels{close_quotes} except where distinction between the two is important to the analysis. DOE proposes to remove the canisters of TMI core debris and commercial fuels from the TAN Pool and transfer them to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim dry storage until an alternate storage location other than at the INEL, or a permanent federal spent nuclear fuel (SNF) repository is available. The TAN Pool would be drained and placed in an industrially and radiologically safe condition for refurbishment or eventual decommissioning. This environmental assessment (EA) identifies and evaluates environmental impacts associated with (1) constructing an Interim Storage System (ISS) at ICPP; (2) removing the TMI and commercial fuels from the pool and transporting them to ICPP for placement in an ISS, and (3) draining and stabilizing the TAN Pool. Miscellaneous hardware would be removed and decontaminated or disposed of in the INEL Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). This EA also describes the environmental consequences of the no action alternative.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Soil Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky & Soil Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky & Keith, 1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky & Keith, 1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area Exploration Technique Soil Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The purpose of this paper is to examine whether statistical analysis of encrustation chemistries, when supplemented with petrologic data, can identify the individual processes that generate and degrade fumarolic encrustations. Knowledge of these specific processes broadens the applications of fumarolic alteration studies. Geochemical data for a

39

Mercury Vapor At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky, 1989)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Vapor At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky, 1989) Mercury Vapor At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky, 1989) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky, 1989) Exploration Activity Details Location Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area Exploration Technique Mercury Vapor Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes One-hundred twelve samples were collected from relatively unaltered air-fall ejecta along two Novarupta Basin traverse lines (Fig. 5). One hundred eighty-two samples were taken from active/fossil fumaroles in Novarupta Basin (22 sites, Fig. 5), fossil fumaroles (41 sites) and air-fall tephra (2 sites) within and immediately adjacent to the remainder of the VTTS (Fig. 6). In total, 294 samples were collected from 127 sites

40

Soil Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky, 1989)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky, 1989) Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky, 1989) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky, 1989) Exploration Activity Details Location Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area Exploration Technique Soil Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes One-hundred twelve samples were collected from relatively unaltered air-fall ejecta along two Novarupta Basin traverse lines (Fig. 5). One hundred eighty-two samples were taken from active/fossil fumaroles in Novarupta Basin (22 sites, Fig. 5), fossil fumaroles (41 sites) and air-fall tephra (2 sites) within and immediately adjacent to the remainder of the VTTS (Fig. 6). In total, 294 samples were collected from 127 sites

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional assessment area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Results for the IFAS Assessment of Non-Native Plants in Florida's Natural Areas October 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results for the IFAS Assessment of Non-Native Plants in Florida's Natural Areas October 2012 Page 1 Assessment of Non-Native Plants in Florida's Natural Areas October 2012 Page 2 North Central South North, S Index Score/Index Category # of experts / literature Assessed: July 2005 Abrus precatorius L M M L H H H

Watson, Craig A.

42

California South/West Bay Area Regional Middle School Science Bowl  

Office of Science (SC) Website

California South/West California South/West Bay Area Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Middle School Rules, Forms, and Resources Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov California Regions California South/West Bay Area Regional Middle School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Ray Ng Email: RayNg97@gmail.com Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, March 8, 2014

43

Geothermal-resource assessment of the Steamboat-Routt Hot Springs area, Colorado. Resources Series 22  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of the Steamboat Springs region in northwest Colorado was initiated and carried out in 1980 and 1981. The goal of this program was to delineate the geological features controlling the occurrence of the thermal waters (temperatures in excess of 68/sup 0/F (20/sup 0/C)) in this area at Steamboat Springs and 8 miles (12.8 km) north at Routt Hot Springs. Thermal waters from Heart Spring, the only developed thermal water source in the study area, are used in the municipal swimming pool in Steamboat Springs. The assessment program was a fully integrated program consisting of: dipole-dipole, Audio-magnetotelluric, telluric, self potential and gravity geophysical surveys, soil mercury and soil helium geochemical surveys; shallow temperature measurements; and prepartion of geological maps. The investigation showed that all the thermal springs appear to be fault controlled. Based on the chemical composition of the thermal waters it appears that Heart Spring in Steamboat Springs is hydrologically related to the Routt Hot Springs. This relationship was further confirmed when it was reported that thermal waters were encountered during the construction of the new high school in Strawberry Park on the north side of Steamboat Springs. In addition, residents stated that Strawberry Park appears to be warmer than the surrounding country side. Geological mapping has determined that a major fault extends from the Routt Hot Springs area into Strawberry Park.

Pearl, R.H.; Zacharakis, T.G.; Ringrose, C.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Figure 1. Nicaragua at night. The circled area is the Bluefields region.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Instead, they advocate a focus on rural electrification for this region3 . blueEnergy blueEnergy%3 . The electrification rate in rural areas of Nicaragua, where 45% of the population lives, is a meager 25% 2 (Figure 1 are connected to an electric grid, rural areas outside of these cities are not. Due to geographic barriers

Kammen, Daniel M.

45

Assessment Urban and Regional Research in the Netherlands 2000-2006 Assessment of Urban and Regional Research in the Netherlands, 2000-2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment Urban and Regional Research in the Netherlands 2000-2006 1 Assessment of Urban and Regional Research in the Netherlands, 2000-2006 January 2008 Committee Prof. Robson (chair) Prof. Albrechts Research in the Netherlands 2000-2006 2 Table of contents 1 Introduction 4 1.1. Evaluation protocol 4 1

van Rooij, Robert

46

An anticipatory integrated assessment of regional acidification: The RAINS-Asia model  

SciTech Connect

Across large parts of Asia, air pollution problems are becoming more and more evident. Rainfall in some areas, including China, Japan, and Thailand, has been measured to be 10 times more acidic than unpolluted rain. Increasing evidence of acidification damage to ecosystems such as surface waters, soils, and economically important crops, is beginning to appear. In addition, urban air quality in many areas of the region continues to decrease. Current economic forecasts predict continued rapid economic growth in the region, which will bring with it increasing emissions of air pollutants, especially sulfur. The total primary energy demand in Asia currently doubles every twelve years (as compared to a world average of every 28 years). Coal is expected to continue to be the dominant energy source, with coal demand projected to increase by 65 percent per year, a rate that outpaces regional economic growth. If current trends in economic development and energy use in Asia continue, emissions of sulfur dioxide, one of the key components in acid rain, will more than triple within the next 30 years. Many ecosystems will be unable to continue to absorb these increased levels of pollution without harmful effects, thus creating a potential danger for irreversible environmental damage in many areas. In view of the potential environmental consequences of projected growth in Asian energy consumption, emissions, and air pollution, the World Bank, together with the Asian Development Bank, have funded a project to develop and implement an integrated assessment model for the acid deposition phenomenon in Asia. The Regional Air Pollution INformation and Simulation model for Asia (RAINS-Asia) is a software tool to help decision makers assess and project future trends in emissions, transport, and deposition of air pollutants, and their potential environmental effects.

Amann, M. [International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg (Austria); Carmichael, G.R. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Foell, W. [Resource Management Associates, Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site The PAs are used to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment and provide the Department Of Energy with reasonable assurance that the removal from service of the Savannah River Site tank farm underground radioactive waste tanks and ancillary equipment will meet defined performance objectives for the protection of human health and the environment into the future. First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site - Part 1 First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site - Part 2

48

Assessment of the Geothermal Potential Within the BPA Marketing Area.  

SciTech Connect

The potential of geothermal energy is estimated that can be used for direct heat applications and electrical power generation within the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) marketing area. The BPA marketing area includes three principal states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho and portions of California, Montana, Wyoming, Nevada, and Utah bordering on these three states. This area covers approximately 384,000 square miles and has an estimated population of 6,760,000. The total electrical geothermal potential within this marketing area is 4077 MW/sub e/ from hydrothermal resources and 16,000 MW/sub e/ from igneous systems, whereas the total thermal (wellhead) potential is 16.15 x 10/sup 15/ Btu/y. Approximately 200 geothermal resource sites were initially identified within the BPA marketing area. This number was then reduced to about 100 sites thought to be the most promising for development by the year 2000. These 100 sites, due to load area overlap, were grouped into 53 composite sites; 21-3/4 within BPA preference customer areas and 31-1/4 within nonpreference customer areas. The geothermal resource potential was then estimated for high-temperature (> 302/sup 0/F = 150/sup 0/C), intermediate-temperature (194 to 302/sup 0/F = 90 to 150/sup 0/C), and low-temperature (< 194/sup 0/F = 90/sup 0/C) resources.

Lund, John W.; Allen, Eliot D.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

SURVEY AND ASSESSMENT OF THE "ALAMOSA MARSHES" AREA, SAN LUIS VALLEY, COLORADO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SURVEY AND ASSESSMENT OF THE "ALAMOSA MARSHES" AREA, SAN LUIS VALLEY, COLORADO Colorado Natural Heritage Program College of Natural Resources, 8002 Campus Delivery Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-8002 #12;SURVEY AND ASSESSMENT OF THE "ALAMOSA MARSHES" AREA, SAN LUIS VALLEY, COLORADO

50

AUTOMATED UTILITY SERVICE AREA ASSESSMENT UNDER EMERGENCY CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect

All electric utilities serve power to their customers through a variety of functional levels, notably substations. The majority of these components consist of distribution substations operating at lower voltages while a small fraction are transmission substations. There is an associated geographical area that encompasses customers who are served, defined as the service area. Analysis of substation service areas is greatly complicated by several factors: distribution networks are often highly interconnected which allows a multitude of possible switching operations; also, utilities dynamically alter the network topology in order to respond to emergency events. As a result, the service area for a substation can change radically. A utility will generally attempt to minimize the number of customers outaged by switching effected loads to alternate substations. In this manner, all or a portion of a disabled substation's load may be served by one or more adjacent substations. This paper describes a suite of analytical tools developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), which address the problem of determining how a utility might respond to such emergency events. The estimated outage areas derived using the tools are overlaid onto other geographical and electrical layers in a geographic information system (GIS) software application. The effects of a power outage on a population, other infrastructures, or other physical features, can be inferred by the proximity of these features to the estimated outage area.

G. TOOLE; S. LINGER

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Tanks Focus Area Site Needs Assessment FY 2000  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the Tanks Focus Area (TFA's) process of collecting, analyzing, and responding to high-level radioactive tank waste science and technology needs developed from across the DOE complex in FY 2000. The document also summarizes each science and technology need, and provides an initial prioritization of TFA's projected work scope for FY 2001 and FY 2002.

Allen, Robert W.

2000-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

52

Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM Massachusetts Wind Energy Area  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's development of three delineated leasing area options for the Massachusetts (MA) WEA and the technical evaluation of these leasing areas. The overarching objective of this study is to develop a logical process by which the MA WEA can be subdivided into non-overlapping leasing areas for BOEM's use in developing an auction process in a renewable energy lease sale. NREL worked with BOEM to identify an appropriate number of leasing areas and proposed three delineation alternatives within the MA WEA based on the boundaries announced in May 2012. A primary output of the interagency agreement is this report, which documents the methodology, including key variables and assumptions, by which the leasing areas were identified and delineated.

Musial, W.; Parker, Z.; Fields, M.; Scott, G.; Elliott, D.; Draxl, C.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

The soundscape of nature areas: assessment and review of research approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The soundscape of nature areas: assessment and review of research approaches M. Weber DCMR requires authorities to delineate (nature) areas where the acoustic quality is good, and to protect as maximum allowed levels (e.g. 40 dB Lday) and specific activities near or in these nature areas were

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

54

Status of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) activities in the Nordic Region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The status of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) activities in the Nordic Region (period ... the most important ones. All aspects of LCA methodology are used: 90% use impact...

Ole J. Hanssen

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Regional summary and recommended study areas for the Texas Panhandle portion of the Permian Basin  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the regional geologic and environmental characterizations that have been completed for the Permian region of study, and describes the procedure used to identify study areas for the next phase of investigation. The factors evaluated in the Permian region fall into three broad areas: health and safety, environmental and socioeconomic, and engineering and economic considerations. Health and safety considerations included salt depth and thickness, faults, seismic activity, groundwater, salt dissolution, energy and mineral resources, presence of boreholes, and interactive land uses. Salt depth and thickness was the key health and safety factor, and when mapped, provded to be a discriminator. The evaluation of environmental and socioeconomic conditions focused primarily on the presence of urban areas and on designated land uses such as parks, wildlife areas, and historic sites. Engineering and economic considerations centered primarily on salt depth, which was already evaluated in the health and safety area. The Palo Duro and Dalhart basins are recommended for future studies on the basis of geology. In these two basins, salt depth and thickness appear promising, and there is less likelihood of past or future oil and gas exploratory holes. Environmental and socioeconomic factors did not preclude any of the basins from further study. 66 references, 16 figures, 2 tables.

Not Available

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

8th International Conference on LCA in the Agri-Food Sector, Rennes, France, 2-4 October 2012 Life Cycle Assessment at the regional scale: innovative insights  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8th International Conference on LCA in the Agri-Food Sector, Rennes, France, 2-4 October 2012 1 in groundwater irrigated areas worldwide are manifold and the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is very relevant for assessing these impacts. But a regional LCA can not be done by transferring the "stan- dard" product

Boyer, Edmond

57

Assessing the land use suitability of mined areas in Appalachia  

SciTech Connect

The Land Use Decision Methodology (LUDM) is a planning framework for mined area land use planning. The LUDM was developed to consider the range of institutional and environmental factors that impact reclamation and land use planning for mined lands. The LUDM was developed as a generalized planning framework rather than a complex/rigid methodology. A matrix that supports the detailed site analysis component of the LUDM was also developed. The matrix has utility for illustrating the impacts that a number of mining related conditions/environmental problems can exert on the environmental feasibility and economics of alternative reclamation plans.

Gorton, W.T.; Yuill, C.B.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Tanks Focus Area site needs assessment FY 2000  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the process used by the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to analyze and develop responses to technology needs submitted by five major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites with radioactive tank waste problems, and the initial results of the analysis. The sites are the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Savannah River Site (SRS), and West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). During the past year, the TFA established a link with DOE's Fernald site to exchange, on a continuing basis, mutually beneficial technical information and assistance.

RW Allen

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

59

Tanks focus area site needs assessment FY 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Tanks Focus Area`s (TFA`s) mission is to manage an integrated technology development program that results in the application of technology to safely and efficiently accomplish tank waste remediation across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The TFA uses a systematic process for developing its annual program that draws from the tanks technology development needs expressed by four DOE tank waste sites - Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The process is iterative and involves six steps: (1) Site needs identification and documentation, (2) Site communication of priority needs, (3) Technical response development, (4) Review technical responses, (5) Develop program planning documents, and (6) Review planning documents. This document describes the outcomes of the first two steps: site needs identification and documentation, and site communication of priority needs. It also describes the initial phases of the third and fourth steps: technical response development and review technical responses. Each site`s Site Technology Coordination Group (STCG) was responsible for developing and delivering priority tank waste needs. This was accomplished using a standardized needs template developed by the National STCG. The standard template helped improve the needs submission process this year. The TFA received the site needs during December 1996 and January 1997.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Tanks Focus Area FY 1996 Site Needs Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Tanks Focus Area`s (TFA`s) mission is to manage an integrated technology development program that results in the application of technology to safely and efficiently accomplish tank waste remediation across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The TFA uses a systematic process for developing its annual program that draws from the tanks technology development needs expressed by four DOE tank waste sites--Hanford, Idaho, Oak Ridge, and Savannah River Sites. The process is iterative and involves four steps: (1) identify and validate tank technology needs at these four sites, (2) define a technical program that responds to these needs, (3) select specific tasks and schedules that accomplish program objectives, and (4) develop integrated teams to carry out selected tasks. This document describes the first of these four steps: identification of sites` tank technology needs. This step concentrates solely on needs identification, collection, and validation. Funding requirements and specific scope of responsive technical activities are not considered until later steps in program definition. This year, the collection and validation of site needs were accomplished through written input from the Site Technology Coordination Groups (STCGs). The TFA recognizes the importance of a continuing solid partnership with the sites through the STCG and DOE as well as contractor users and, therefore, ensured site participation and close coordination throughout the process.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional assessment area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Tanks Focus Area site needs assessment FY 1998  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the process used by the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to analyze and develop responses to technology needs submitted by four major US Department of Energy (DOE) sites with radioactive tank waste problems, and the initial results of the analysis. The sites are the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and Savannah River Site (SRS). This document describes the TFA`s process of collecting site needs, analyzing them, and creating technical responses to the sites. It also summarizes the information contained within the TFA needs database, portraying information provided by four major DOE sites with tank waste problems. The overall TFA program objective is to deliver a tank technology program that reduces the current cost, and the operational and safety risks of tank remediation. The TFA`s continues to enjoy close, cooperative relationships with each site. During the past year, the TFA has fostered exchanges of technical information between sites. These exchanges have proven to be healthy for all concerned. The TFA recognizes that site technology needs often change, and the TFA must be prepared not only to amend its program in response, but to help the sites arrive at the best technical approach to solve revised site needs.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Development of a regional groundwater flow model for the area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a study conducted to develop a regional groundwater flow model for the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer in the area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The model was developed to support Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-04 groundwater flow and transport studies. The products of this study are this report and a set of computational tools designed to numerically model the regional groundwater flow in the Eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. The objective of developing the current model was to create a tool for defining the regional groundwater flow at the INEL. The model was developed to (a) support future transport modeling for WAG 10-04 by providing the regional groundwater flow information needed for the WAG 10-04 risk assessment, (b) define the regional groundwater flow setting for modeling groundwater contaminant transport at the scale of the individual WAGs, (c) provide a tool for improving the understanding of the groundwater flow system below the INEL, and (d) consolidate the existing regional groundwater modeling information into one usable model. The current model is appropriate for defining the regional flow setting for flow submodels as well as hypothesis testing to better understand the regional groundwater flow in the area of the INEL. The scale of the submodels must be chosen based on accuracy required for the study.

McCarthy, J.M.; Arnett, R.C.; Neupauer, R.M. [and others

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Assessing Energetic Contributions to Binding from a Disordered Region in a Protein-Protein Interaction  

SciTech Connect

Many functional proteins are at least partially disordered prior to binding. Although the structural transitions upon binding of disordered protein regions can influence the affinity and specificity of protein complexes, their precise energetic contributions to binding are unknown. Here, we use a model protein-protein interaction system in which a locally disordered region has been modified by directed evolution to quantitatively assess the thermodynamic and structural contributions to binding of disorder-to-order transitions. Through X-ray structure determination of the protein binding partners before and after complex formation and isothermal titration calorimetry of the interactions, we observe a correlation between protein ordering and binding affinity for complexes along this affinity maturation pathway. Additionally, we show that discrepancies between observed and calculated heat capacities based on buried surface area changes in the protein complexes can be explained largely by heat capacity changes that would result solely from folding the locally disordered region. Previously developed algorithms for predicting binding energies of protein-protein interactions, however, are unable to correctly model the energetic contributions of the structural transitions in our model system. While this highlights the shortcomings of current computational methods in modeling conformational flexibility, it suggests that the experimental methods used here could provide training sets of molecular interactions for improving these algorithms and further rationalizing molecular recognition in protein-protein interactions.

S Cho; C Swaminathan; D Bonsor; M Kerzic; R Guan; J Yang; C Kieke; P Anderson; D Kranz; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Soil trampling in an Antarctic Specially Protected Area: tools to assess levels of human impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil trampling in an Antarctic Specially Protected Area: tools to assess levels of human impact P. TEJEDO1 , A. JUSTEL2 , J. BENAYAS3 *, E. RICO3 , P. CONVEY4 and A. QUESADA5 1 School of Biology, IE recognized within the Antarctic Treaty by designating protected areas. Since 1991 three classes of protected

Justel Eusebio, Ana

65

Assessment of Rooftop Area in Austin Energy's Service Territory Suitable for PV Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As part of the Solar America Cities program, Austin Energy proposed to perform an assessment of the rooftop area available for PV development within its service area. Austin Energy contracted with Clean Energy Associates (CEA) to perform the analysis. This report summarizes the project objectives, data sources and methodological approach employed, and results.

66

A Natural Heritage Assessment and Inventory of State Wildlife Area Wetlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Natural Heritage Assessment and Inventory of State Wildlife Area Wetlands 1998-99 Pilot Study) was contracted to conduct a ilot study of wetlands and riparian areas on several Colorado Division of Wildlife, and will be corporated into a wetlands database and the Natural Diversity Information System n HP e s secured

67

Assessment of the broadleaf crops leaf area index product from the Terra MODIS instrument  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the cultivated area (52%). The major con- centrations of this biome class are in Asia (39%), North America (22Assessment of the broadleaf crops leaf area index product from the Terra MODIS instrument Bin Tan a) and fraction vegetation absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR) products for broadleaf crops

Myneni, Ranga B.

68

5.2 FY14 Focus Area Self-Assessments 0913  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AFRD Focus Area Self-Assessments Selection of 2014 Focus Areas AFRD identified two Focus Areas that will be evaluated as part of the ES&H Self- Assessment process for Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14): Focus Area 1. Compressed Gas and Cryogen Safety This Focus Area was recommended by the AFRD ES&H Operations Committee and approved by the Division Director because of potential impact on safety of personnel and to evaluate compliance with requirements. Compressed gas and/or cryogens are used in most AFRD technical areas. The safe handling of compressed gas and cryogens is most closely associated with the 4th ISM Core Function, performing work within controls. A search of the Lessons Learned/Best Practices Database reveals three LBNL Lessons. Two of them are related to a 2013 injury at the ALS from losing control while handling

69

E AREA LOW LEVEL WASTE FACILITY DOE 435.1 PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect

This Performance Assessment for the Savannah River Site E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility was prepared to meet requirements of Chapter IV of the Department of Energy Order 435.1-1. The Order specifies that a Performance Assessment should provide reasonable assurance that a low-level waste disposal facility will comply with the performance objectives of the Order. The Order also requires assessments of impacts to water resources and to hypothetical inadvertent intruders for purposes of establishing limits on radionuclides that may be disposed near-surface. According to the Order, calculations of potential doses and releases from the facility should address a 1,000-year period after facility closure. The point of compliance for the performance measures relevant to the all pathways and air pathway performance objective, as well as to the impact on water resources assessment requirement, must correspond to the point of highest projected dose or concentration beyond a 100-m buffer zone surrounding the disposed waste following the assumed end of active institutional controls 100 years after facility closure. During the operational and institutional control periods, the point of compliance for the all pathways and air pathway performance measures is the SRS boundary. However, for the water resources impact assessment, the point of compliance remains the point of highest projected dose or concentration beyond a 100-m buffer zone surrounding the disposed waste during the operational and institutional control periods. For performance measures relevant to radon and inadvertent intruders, the points of compliance are the disposal facility surface for all time periods and the disposal facility after the assumed loss of active institutional controls 100 years after facility closure, respectively. The E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility is located in the central region of the SRS known as the General Separations Area. It is an elbow-shaped, cleared area, which curves to the northwest, situated immediately north of the Mixed Waste Management Facility. The E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility is comprised of 200 acres for waste disposal and a surrounding buffer zone that extends out to the 100-m point of compliance. Disposal units within the footprint of the low-level waste facilities include the Slit Trenches, Engineered Trenches, Component-in-Grout Trenches, the Low-Activity Waste Vault, the Intermediate-Level Vault, and the Naval Reactor Component Disposal Area. Radiological waste disposal operations at the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility began in 1994. E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility closure will be conducted in three phases: operational closure, interim closure, and final closure. Operational closure will be conducted during the 25-year operation period (30-year period for Slit and Engineered Trenches) as disposal units are filled; interim closure measures will be taken for some units. Interim closure will take place following the end of operations and will consist of an area-wide runoff cover along with additional grading over the trench units. Final closure of all disposal units in the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility will take place at the end of the 100-year institutional control period and will consist of the installation of an integrated closure system designed to minimize moisture contact with the waste and to serve as a deterrent to intruders. Radiological dose to human receptors is analyzed in this PA in the all-pathways analysis, the inadvertent intruder analysis and the air pathway analysis, and the results are compared to the relevant performance measures. For the all-pathways analysis, the performance measure of relevance is a 25-mrem/yr EDE to representative members of the public, excluding dose from radon and its progeny in air. For the inadvertent intruder, the applicable performance measures are 100-mrem/yr EDE and 500 mrem/yr EDE for chronic and exposure scenarios, respectively. The relevant performance measure for the air pathway is 10-mrem/yr EDE via the air pathway, excluding dose from radon and its progeny in air. Protecti

Wilhite, E

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

Energy and development in Central America. Volume I: regional assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an energy assessment of six Central American countries - Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama - to assist these countries in defining, planning, and meeting energy requirements implicit in their economic and social development goals and also to assist the U.S. Agency for International Development and other development organizations in defining energy programs in Central America.

Park, W.; Neves, C.; Trehan, R.; Ackerman, E.; Gallagher, W.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal energy storage. Volume 1. Regions 1 through 6  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: the Western Mountains; Alluvial Basins; Columbia LAVA Plateau; Colorado Plateau; High Plains; and Glaciated Central Region. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal-energy storage. Volume 2. Regions 7 through 12  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: Unglaciated Central Region; Glaciated Appalachians, Unglaciated Appalachians; Coastal Plain; Hawaii; and Alaska. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Using Exergy to Assess Regional and National Energy Utilization: A Comparative Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of exergy to assess energy-utilization efficiencies for energy systems is described. Furthermore, energy and exergy losses are compared, demonstrating that the latter ... or region, including flows of ene...

Marc A. Rosen

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Integrated modelling and assessment of regional groundwater resources in Germany and Benin, West Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Integrated modelling and assessment of regional groundwater resources in Germany and Benin, West.J.S. SONNEVELD [1] Institute of Hydraulic Engineering, Universitaet Stuttgart, Germany (Roland Conservation University of Bonn, Germany [3] Institute of Landscape Planning and Ecology, University

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

75

ASSESSING REGIONAL CLIMATE AND LOCAL LANDCOVER IMPACTS ON VEGETATION WITH REMOTE SENSING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landcover change alters not only the surface landscape but also regional carbon and water cycling. The objective of this study was to assess the potential impacts of landcover change across the Kansas River Basin (KRB) by ...

Lin, Pei-Ling

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

An Example of an INPRO Assessment of an INS in the Area of Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

Following a resolution of the General Conference of the IAEA in the year 2000 the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles, referred to as INPRO, was initiated. INPRO has defined requirements organized in a hierarchy of Basic Principles, User Requirements and Criteria (consisting of an indicator and an acceptance limit) to be met by innovative nuclear reactor systems (INS) in six areas, namely: economics, safety, waste management, environment, proliferation resistance, and infrastructure. If an INS meets all requirements in all areas it represents a sustainable system for the supply of energy, capable of making a significant contribution to meeting the energy needs of the 21. century. Draft manuals have been developed, for each INPRO area, to provide guidance for performing an assessment of whether an INS meets the INPRO requirements in a given area. The manuals set out the information that needs to be assembled to perform an assessment and provide guidance on selecting the acceptance limits and, for a given INS, for determining the value of the indicators for comparison with the associated acceptance limits. Each manual also includes an example of a specific assessment to illustrate the guidance. This paper discusses the example presented in the manual for performing an INPRO assessment in the area of waste management. The example, chosen solely for the purpose of illustrating the INPRO methodology, describes an assessment of an INS based on the DUPIC fuel cycle. It is assumed that uranium is mined, milled, converted, enriched, and fabricated into LWR fuel in Canada. The LWR fuel is assumed to be leased to a utility in the USA. The spent LWR fuel is assumed to be returned to Canada where it is processed into CANDU DUPIC fuel, which is then burned in CANDU reactors. The assessment steps and the results are presented in detail in the paper. The example illustrates an assessment performed for an INS at an early stage of development. (authors)

Allan, C.; Busurin, Y.; Depisch, F. [International Atomic Energy Agency, P.O. Box 100, Wagramer Strasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Environmental Assessment for the Replacement Source of Steam for A Area at the Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 OCTOBER 2006 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE REPLACEMENT SOURCE OF STEAM FOR A AREA AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE DOE/EA-1568 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE REPLACEMENT SOURCE OF STEAM FOR A AREA AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE OCTOBER 2006 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION ...............................................................................................1 1.1 Background ..............................................................................................1 1.2 Purpose and Need for Proposed Action.....................................................1 2.0 PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES

78

Assessment of Climate Change Effect to Regional and Global Biodiversity: a MetaAnalysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Climate Change Effect to Regional and Global Biodiversity: a Meta­Analysis Talk given on biodiversity main- tenance in regional ecosystems. Based on works by Hans van Houwelingen and colleagues, we. The effect of this change on biodiversity has been widely discussed where peer-review publications have

Breuer, Florian

79

Application of diversity to regional ecological assessment: a review with recommendations  

SciTech Connect

Species diversity is frequently considered a primary indicator of ecosystem health, stability, and resilience. As such, species diversity is commonly the major criterion upon which environmental impact statements and ecological assessments are based. This report describes the theoretical development and refinement of the concept of ecological diversity and the various mathematical expressions of diversity. Advantages and disadvantages of each diversity expression are discussed. The application and interpretation of diversity indices for different spatial scales (e.g., specific sites and regional assessments) and variables (e.g., species diversity, habitat diversity, landscape diversity) are contrasted. Recommendations indicate the appropriate diversity indices for regional ecological assessments.

Levenson, J.B.; Stearns, F.W.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

University Library Assessment of Signature Research Areas Page 1 of 6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University Library Assessment of Signature Research Areas Page 1 of 6 7. Water Security for Water Security Author: Jill Crawley-Low Assistant Dean (Services to Libraries) 1. Proposal Identification Full name of new centre: Global Institute for Water Security 2. Introduction Libraries

Saskatchewan, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional assessment area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Particles of Outdoor Origin Title Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Particles of Outdoor Origin Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Hering, Susanne V., Melissa M. Lunden, Marc L. Fischer, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Tracy L. Thatcher, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 41 Pagination 639-654 Abstract Time-resolved fine particle concentrations of nitrate, sulfate, and black carbon were examined to assess the appropriateness of using regional data and calculated air exchange rates to model indoor concentrations of particles from outdoor sources. The data set includes simultaneous, sub-hourly aerosol composition measurements at three locations: a regional monitoring site in Fresno, California, inside of an unoccupied residence in Clovis, California, located 6 km northeast of the regional site, and immediately outside of this same residence. Indoor concentrations of PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and black carbon were modeled using varying sets of inputs to determine the influence of three factors on model accuracy: the constraints of the simplified indoor-outdoor model, measured versus modeled air exchange rates, and local versus regional outdoor measurements.

82

Multi-Index Rain Detection: A New Approach for Regional Rain Area Detection from Remotely Sensed Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this article, a new approach called Multi-Index Rain Detection (MIRD) is suggested for regional rain area detection and was tested for India using Kalpana-1 satellite data. The approach was developed based on the following hypothesis: better ...

Shruti Upadhyaya; R. Ramsankaran

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Wind resource assessment of eastern coastal region of Saudi Arabia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleting oil and gas reserves, combined with growing concerns of global warming, have made it inevitable to seek energy from renewable energy sources such as wind. The utilization of energy from wind is becoming increasingly attractive and is being widely used/disseminated for substitution of oil-produced energy, and eventually to minimize atmospheric degradation. Quantitative assessment of wind resource is an important driving element in successful establishment of a wind farm/park at a given location. More often than not, windenergy resources are relatively better along coastlines. In the present study, hourly mean wind-speed data of the period 1986–1997 recorded at the solar radiation and meteorological station, Dhahran (26°32? N, 50°13? E, eastern coastal plain of Saudi Arabia), have been analyzed to present different characteristics of wind speed in considerable depth such as: yearly, monthly, diurnal variations of wind speed, etc. The long-term monthly average wind speeds for Dhahran range from 4.2–6.4 m/s. More importantly, the study deals with impact of hub height on wind energy generation. Attention has also been focussed on monthly average daily energy generation from different sizes of commercially available wind machines (150, 250, 600 kW) to identify optimum wind machine size from energy production point of view. It has been found that for a given 6 MW wind farm size, at 50 m hub height, cluster of 150 kW wind machines yields about 48% more energy as compared to 600 kW wind machines. Literature shows that commercial/residential buildings in Saudi Arabia consume an estimated 10–40% of the total electric energy generated. So, concurrently, as a case study, attempt has been made to investigate/examine the potential of utilizing hybrid (wind+diesel) energy conversion systems to meet the load requirements of hundred typical 2-bedroom residential buildings (with annual electrical energy demand of 3512 MWh). The hybrid systems considered in the present case-study consist of different combinations of wind machines (of various capacities), supplemented with battery storage and diesel back-up. The deficit energy generated from the back-up diesel generator and the number of operational hours of the diesel system to meet a specific annual electrical energy demand of 3512 \\{MWh\\} have also been presented. The diesel back-up system is operated at times when the power generated from wind energy conversion systems (WECS) fails to satisfy the load and when the battery storage is depleted. The evaluation of hybrid system shows that with seven 150 kW WECS and three days of battery storage, the diesel back-up system has to provide 17.5% of the load demand. However, in absence of battery storage, about 37% of the load needs to be provided by the diesel system.

M.A. Elhadidy; S.M. Shaahid

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area A-AX at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This document describes a groundwater assessment plan for the single-shell tank systems in Waste Management Area A-AX at the Hanford Site.

Narbutovskih, Susan M.; Chou, Charissa J.

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

85

A preliminary energy and environmental assessment of a micro wind turbine prototype in natural protected areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a preliminary energy and environmental analysis of a vertical-axis micro wind turbine with a nominal electric power of 3.7 kW. This prototype is called AM300. The main aim of the paper is to assess the amount of electric energy production of the AM300 and its feasible use in low wind speed areas. Furthermore, analyzing its low environmental impact, a potential installation in a natural protected area was considered. The turbine power curve was estimated by anemometric measurements. Furthermore, foreseeable prototype hybridization with PV array was analyzed. The environmental performance was assessed evaluating the soil, hydro geological, biodiversity and noise impacts. Finally, an analysis of the CO2 emissions avoided is reported. The obtained results show good sustainability perspectives.

Livio de Santoli; Angelo Albo; Davide Astiaso Garcia; Daniele Bruschi; Fabrizio Cumo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Integrity assessment plan for PNL 300 area radioactive hazardous waste tank system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), operated by Battelle Memorial Institute under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, operates tank systems for the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), that contain dangerous waste constituents as defined by Washington State Department of Ecology (WDOE) Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-040(18). Chapter 173-303-640(2) of the WAC requires the performance of integrity assessments for each existing tank system that treats or stores dangerous waste, except those operating under interim status with compliant secondary containment. This Integrity Assessment Plan (IAP) identifies all tasks that will be performed during the integrity assessment of the PNL-operated Radioactive Liquid Waste Systems (RLWS) associated with the 324 and 325 Buildings located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. It describes the inspections, tests, and analyses required to assess the integrity of the PNL RLWS (tanks, ancillary equipment, and secondary containment) and provides sufficient information for adequate budgeting and control of the assessment program. It also provides necessary information to permit the Independent, Qualified, Registered Professional Engineer (IQRPE) to approve the integrity assessment program.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Life cycle assessment of energy crop production with special attention to the establishment of regional biomass utilisation systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We conducted a life cycle assessment of energy crop production for bioethanol to clarify the potentialities of biomass utilisation systems in Japan, focusing on cumulative fossil energy demand and global warming potential. Their reductions were evaluated under two scenarios; one was improving cultivation technologies and breeding of new crop varieties, and the other was setting up of regional biomass utilisation systems, in which biomass resources from various industries were utilised mutually and effectively. It was proved that the improvement in cultivation technologies and the establishment of regional biomass utilisation systems have large potential for saving fossil fuel resources and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Although these results largely depend on scenarios including the lifetime and coverage area of agricultural machinery, and types of biomass utilisation, it was concluded that substitution of petrol by bioethanol converted from these energy crops has considerable potential for rendering our society more sustainable.

Susumu Uchida; Kiyotada Hayashi; Mitsuru Gau; Tsutomu Kajiyama; Shigekiyo Shirasawa; Hiroyuki Takahashi; Yoshifumi Terajima; Makoto Matsuoka; Masaru Yoshinaga

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program: Overview of Phase I Results  

SciTech Connect

The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program is an international effort designed to systematically investigate the uncertainties in regional scale projections of future climate and produce high resolution climate change scenarios using multiple regional climate models (RCMs) nested within atmosphere ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) forced with the A2 SRES scenario, with a common domain covering the conterminous US, northern Mexico, and most of Canada. The program also includes an evaluation component (Phase I) wherein the participating RCMs are nested within 25 years of NCEP/DOE global reanalysis II. The grid spacing of the RCM simulations is 50 km.

Mearns, L. O.; Arritt, R.; Biner, S.; Bukovsky, Melissa; McGinnis, Seth; Sain, Steve; Caya, Daniel; Correia Jr., James; Flory, Dave; Gutowski, William; Takle, Gene; Jones, Richard; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Moufouma-Okia, Wilfran; McDaniel, Larry; Nunes, A.; Qian, Yun; Roads, J.; Sloan, Lisa; Snyder, Mark A.

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

89

300 Area steam plant replacement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

Steam to support process operations and facility heating is currently produced by a centralized oil-fired plant located in the 300 Area and piped to approximately 26 facilities in the 300 Area. This plant was constructed during the 1940s and, because of tis age, is not efficient, requires a relatively large operating and maintenance staff, and is not reliable. The US Department of Energy is proposing an energy conservation measure for a number of buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. This action includes replacing the centralized heating system with heating units for individual buildings or groups of buildings, constructing new natural gas pipelines to provide a fuel source for many of these units and constructing a central control building to operate and maintain the system. A new steel-sided building would be constructed in the 300 Area in a previously disturbed area at least 400 m (one-quarter mile) from the Columbia River, or an existing 300 Area building would be modified and used. This Environmental Assessment evaluates alternatives to the proposed actions. Alternatives considered are: (1) the no action alternative; (2) use of alternative fuels, such as low-sulfur diesel oil; (3) construction of a new central steam plant, piping and ancillary systems; (4) upgrade of the existing central steam plant and ancillary systems; and (5) alternative routing of the gas distribution pipeline that is a part of the proposed action. A biological survey and culture resource review and survey were also conducted.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

A Multi-Model Assessment of Regional Climate Disparities Caused by Solar Geoengineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A Multi-Model Assessment of Regional Climate Disparities Caused by Solar Geoengineering Brunswick, NJ. 5 Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis, Environment Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 6 School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Robock, Alan

91

Efficiency assessment of using satellite data for crop area estimation in Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The knowledge of the crop area is a key element for the estimation of the total crop production of a country and, therefore, the management of agricultural commodities markets. Satellite data and derived products can be effectively used for stratification purposes and a-posteriori correction of area estimates from ground observations. This paper presents the main results and conclusions of the study conducted in 2010 to explore feasibility and efficiency of crop area estimation in Ukraine assisted by optical satellite remote sensing images. The study was carried out on three oblasts in Ukraine with a total area of 78,500 km2. The efficiency of using images acquired by several satellite sensors (MODIS, Landsat-5/TM, AWiFS, LISS-III, and RapidEye) combined with a field survey on a stratified sample of square segments for crop area estimation in Ukraine is assessed. The main criteria used for efficiency analysis are as follows: (i) relative efficiency that shows how much time the error of area estimates can be reduced with satellite images, and (ii) cost-efficiency that shows how much time the costs of ground surveys for crop area estimation can be reduced with satellite images. These criteria are applied to each satellite image type separately, i.e., no integration of images acquired by different sensors is made, to select the optimal dataset. The study found that only MODIS and Landsat-5/TM reached cost-efficiency thresholds while AWiFS, LISS-III, and RapidEye images, due to its high price, were not cost-efficient for crop area estimation in Ukraine at oblast level.

Francisco Javier Gallego; Nataliia Kussul; Sergii Skakun; Oleksii Kravchenko; Andrii Shelestov; Olga Kussul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Regional groundwater flow model for C, K. L. and P reactor areas, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC  

SciTech Connect

A regional groundwater flow model encompassing approximately 100 mi2 surrounding the C, K, L, and P reactor areas has been developed. The reactor flow model is designed to meet the planning objectives outlined in the General Groundwater Strategy for Reactor Area Projects by providing a common framework for analyzing groundwater flow, contaminant migration and remedial alternatives within the Reactor Projects team of the Environmental Restoration Department. The model provides a quantitative understanding of groundwater flow on a regional scale within the near surface aquifers and deeper semi-confined to confined aquifers. The model incorporates historical and current field characterization data up through Spring 1999. Model preprocessing is automated so that future updates and modifications can be performed quickly and efficiently. The CKLP regional reactor model can be used to guide characterization, perform scoping analyses of contaminant transport, and serve as a common base for subsequent finer-scale transport and remedial/feasibility models for each reactor area.

Flach, G.P.

2000-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

93

Economic assessment of regional bioenergy systems in Australia: a flow analysis application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a modelling tool that integrates Material Flow Analysis, energy production and Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions accounting for biomass flows at a regional scale. This tool allows comprehensive analysis of alternative systems for management of biomass waste and bioenergy production in regional areas. Different possible options for processing a range of biomass waste streams can be evaluated against multiple criteria including various environmental impacts and cost-effectiveness. The objective is to support the design of integrated biomass waste and bioenergy systems that maximise synergies and optimise tradeoffs between bioenergy production, GHG emissions, recycling of valuable soil nutrients and control of harmful contaminants. This analytical tool is applied to a major agricultural region in Australia, the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area. A scenario demonstrates how the construction of different types of bioenergy plant can offer valuable benefits with regard to renewable energy production, GHG emission reductions, increasing phosphorus cycling back to soils and reduced cadmium contamination.

Napat Jakrawatana; Stephen Moore; Iain MacGill

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

AREA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AREA AREA FAQ # Question Response 316 vs DCAA FAQ 1 An inquiry from CH about an SBIR recipient asking if a DCAA audit is sufficient to comply with the regulation or if they need to add this to their audit they have performed yearly by a public accounting firm. 316 audits are essentially A-133 audits for for-profit entities. They DO NOT replace DCAA or other audits requested by DOE to look at indirect rates or incurred costs or closeouts. DCAA would never agree to perform A-133 or our 316 audits. They don't do A-133 audits for DOD awardees. The purpose of the audits are different, look at different things and in the few instances of overlap, from different perspectives. 316

95

PV Analyst: Coupling ArcGIS with TRNSYS to assess distributed photovoltaic potential in urban areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents a means to extend the functionality of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in assessing distributed photovoltaic (PV) potential in urban areas, via the new ArcGIS extension: PV Analyst. A methodology is proposed for coupling ArcGIS with TRNSYS that enables the PV Analyst extension to use the capabilities of 4 and 5-parameter PV array performance models and the irradiance components in TRNSYS for solar energy simulations in geospatial contexts. Because PV Analyst is embedded within the ArcMap environment, part of ArcGIS software package, the strong capabilities of ArcGIS and other ArcGIS extensions such as 3D Analyst, Spatial Analyst and Tracking Analyst can be fully utilized with PV Analyst’s functionalities. This paper describes the concept and details of the extension development, as well as its application to the Pollock Commons area at the Pennsylvania State University.

Yosoon Choi; Jeffrey Rayl; Charith Tammineedi; Jeffrey R.S. Brownson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Assessing environmental risk of the retired filter bed area, Battelle West Jefferson  

SciTech Connect

Initial investigations conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy, Chicago Operations Office, and by Argonne National Laboratory used seismic refraction profiling, electrical resistivity depth sounding, conductivity profiling, magnetic gradiometry, and ground-penetrating radar to study environmental geophysics in the area of the Battelle West Jefferson site`s radiologically contaminated retired filter beds. The investigators used a combination of nonintrusive technologies and innovative drilling techniques to assess environmental risk at the filter beds and to improve understanding of the geology of the Big Darby Creek floodplain. The geophysical investigation, which showed that the preferred groundwater pathway is associated with a laterally extensive deposit of silty sand to sand that is less than 12 ft deep in the floodplain area, also guided the location of cone penetrometer test sites and piezometer installation. Cone penetrometer testing was useful for comparing continuous logging data with surface geophysical data in establishing correlations among unconsolidated materials.

Miller, S.F.; Thompson, M.D.; Glennon, M.A. [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Environmental Assessment for Proposed Corrective Measures at Material Disposal Area H within Technical Area 54 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

64 64 Environmental Assessment for Proposed Corrective Measures at Material Disposal Area H within Technical Area 54 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico June 14, 2004 Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Site Office EA for the Proposed Corrective Measures at MDA H within TA-54 at LANL DOE LASO June 14, 2004 iii Contents Acronyms and Terms..................................................................................................................................v Executive Summary ..................................................................................................................................vii 1.0 Purpose and Need ..............................................................................................................................1

98

Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.113  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary results for Version 4.113 of the Nevada National Security Site Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site performance assessment model are summarized. Version 4.113 includes the Fiscal Year 2011 inventory estimate.

Shott, G. J.

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Assessment of water resources in lead-zinc mined areas in Cherokee County, Kansas, and adjacent areas  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted to evaluate water-resources problems related to abandoned lead and zinc mines in Cherokee County, Kansas, and adjacent areas in Missouri and Oklahoma. Past mining activities have caused changes in the hydrogeology of the area. Lead and zinc mining has caused discontinuities and perforations in the confining shale west of the Pennsylvanian-Mississippian geologic contact (referred to as the western area), which have created artificial ground-water recharge and discharge areas. Recharge to the shallow aquifer (rocks of Mississippian age) through collapses, shafts, and drill holes in the shale has caused the formation of a groundwater ''mound'' in the vicinity of the Picher Field in Kansas and Oklahoma. Discharge of mine-contaminated ground water to Tar Creek occurs in Oklahoma from drill holes and shafts where the potentiometric surface of the shallow aquifer is above the land surface. Mining of ore in the shallow aquifer has resulted in extensive fracturing and removal of material, which has created highly transmissive zones and voids and increased ground-water storage properties of the aquifer. In the area east of the Pennsylvanian-Mississippian geologic contact (referred to as the eastern area), fractured rock and tailings on the land surface increased the amount of water available for infiltration to the shallow aquifer; in the western area, tailings on the impermeable shale created artificial, perched aquifer systems that slowly drain to surface streams. 45 refs., 23 figs., 21 tabs.

Spruill, T.B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Geological evaluation of Gulf Coast salt domes: overall assessment of the Gulf Interior Region  

SciTech Connect

The three major phases in site characterization and selection are regional studies, area studies, and location studies. This report characterizes regional geologic aspects of the Gulf Coast salt dome basins. It includes general information from published sources on the regional geology; the tectonic, domal, and hydrologic stability; and a brief description the salt domes to be investigated. After a screening exercise, eight domes were chosen for further characterization: Keechi, Oakwood, and Palestine Domes in Texas; Vacherie and Rayburn's domes in North Louisiana; and Cypress Creek and Richton domes in Mississippi. A general description of each, maps of the location, property ownership, and surface geology, and a geologic cross section were presented for each dome.

none,

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional assessment area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Regional economic impacts of changes in electricity rates resulting from Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This technical memorandum describes an analysis of regional economic impacts resulting from changes in retail electricity rates due to six power marketing programs proposed by Western Area Power Administration (Western). Regional economic impacts of changes in rates are estimated in terms of five key regional economic variables: population, gross regional product, disposable income, employment, and household income. The REMI (Regional Impact Models, Inc.) and IMPLAN (Impact Analysis for Planning) models simulate economic impacts in nine subregions in the area in which Western power is sold for the years 1993, 2000, and 2008. Estimates show that impacts on aggregate economic activity in any of the subregions or years would be minimal for three reasons. First, the utilities that buy power from Western sell only a relatively small proportion of the total electricity sold in any of the subregions. Second, reliance of Western customers on Western power is fairly low in each subregion. Finally, electricity is not a significant input cost for any industry or for households in any subregion.

Allison, T.; Griffes, P.; Edwards, B.K.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Low-to-moderate temperature geothermal resource assessment for Nevada: Area specific studies, final report for the period June 1, 1980-August 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect

The Hawthorne study area is located in Mineral County, Nevada and surrounds the municipality of the same name. It encompasses an area of approximately 310 sq. km (120 sq. mi), and most of the land belongs to the US Army Ammunition Plant. The energy needs of the military combined with those of the area population (over 5,000 residents) are substantial. The area is classified as having a high potential for direct applications using the evaluation scheme described in Trexler and others (1979). A variety of scientific techniques was employed during area-wide resource assessment. General geologic studies demonstrate the lithologic diversity in the area; these studies also indicate possible sources for dissolved fluid constituents. Geophysical investigations include aeromagnetic and gravity surveys which aid in defining the nature of regional, and to a lesser extent, local variations in subsurface configurations. Surface and near-surface structural features are determined using various types of photo imagery including low sun-angle photography. An extensive shallow depth temperature probe survey indicates two zones of elevated temperature on opposite sides of the Walker Lake basin. Temperature-depth profiles from several wells in the study area indicate significant thermal fluid-bearing aquifers. Fluid chemical studies suggest a wide spatial distribution for the resource, and also suggest a meteoric recharge source in the Wassuk Range. Finally, a soil-mercury survey was not a useful technique in this study area. Two test holes were drilled to conclude the area resource assessment, and thermal fluids were encountered in both wells. The western well has measured temperatures as high as 90 C (194 F) within 150 meters (500 ft) of the surface. Temperature profiles in this well indicate a negative temperature gradient below 180 meters (590 ft). The eastern hole had a bottom hole temperature of 61 C (142 F) at a depth of only 120 meters (395 ft). A positive gradient is observed to a total depth in the well.

Trexler, Dennis T.; Koeing, Brian A.; Flynn, Thomas; Bruce, James L.; Ghusn, George Jr.

1981-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

103

Savannah River Site H-Area Tank Farm Performance Assessment Scoping Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

H-Area Tank Farm Performance Assessment Scoping Meeting April 20-22, 2010 230 Green Blvd. Aiken Design Center Building Village at Woodside Aiken, SC DRAFT MEETING NOTES Tuesday, April 20, 2010 (8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.) Welcome and introductions made by Tom Gutmann, DOE-SR and Ginger Dickert, SRR. The meeting proceeded with discussion of the topics as identified in the Agenda. Review of General Information Package Consider development of functional requirements/key assumptions tracking process. Evaluate use of Hanford tool for tracking assumptions. Evaluate TRS IAEA-364 for potential updates to some factors (recently published). NRC will provide to DOE and SRR. Consider Features Events Processes (FEPs) style analysis to provide additional

104

DOEEA-1178 Assessment 300 Area Steam Plant Replacement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Assessment 300 Area Steam Plant Replacement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. March 1997 , DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liabili- ty or mponsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, appa- ratus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or s e m ' c e by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

105

Assessing the integrity of local area network materials accountability systems against insider threats  

SciTech Connect

DOE facilities rely increasingly on computerized systems to manage nuclear materials accountability data and to protect against diversion of nuclear materials or other malevolent acts (e.g., hoax due to falsified data) by insider threats. Aspects of modern computerized material accountability (MA) systems including powerful personal computers and applications on networks, mixed security environments, and more users with increased knowledge, skills and abilities help heighten the concern about insider threats to the integrity of the system. In this paper, we describe a methodology for assessing MA applications to help decision makers identify ways of and compare options for preventing or mitigating possible additional risks from the insider threat. We illustrate insights from applying the methodology to local area network materials accountability systems.

Jones, E.; Sicherman, A.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION ASSESSMENT AND INTERPRETATION, KLAMATH BASIN, OREGON-SWAN LAKE AND KLAMATH HILLS AREA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

survey of the Swan Lake Valley area, Oregon: Geonornicssurvey of the Swan Lake Valley Area, Oregon: GeonomicsKLAMATH BASIN, OREGON SWAN LAKE AND KLAMATH HILLS AREA M.

Stark, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION ASSESSMENT AND INTERPRETATION, KLAMATH BASIN, OREGON-SWAN LAKE AND KLAMATH HILLS AREA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KLAMATH BASIN, OREGON SWAN LAKE AND KLAMATH HILLS AREA M.survey of the Swan Lake Valley area, Oregon: Geonornicssurvey of the Swan Lake Valley Area, Oregon: Geonomics

Stark, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Assessment of water resources in lead-zinc mined areas in Cherokee County, Kansas, and adjacent areas  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted to evaluate water resources problems related to abandoned lead and zinc mines in Cherokee County, Kansas, and adjacent areas in Missouri and Oklahoma. Past mining activities have caused changes in the geohydrology of the area. Discharge of mine-contaminated groundwater to Tar Creek occurs in Oklahoma from drill holes and shafts where the potentiometric surface of the shallow aquifer is above the land surface. Pumping of the deep aquifer has resulted in a potential for downward movement of water from the shallow aquifer. Water from mines in the eastern area contained dissolved solids concentrations of < 500 mg/L a median pH of 3.9, sulfate concentrations that ranged between 98 and 290 mg/L, and median concentrations for zinc of 37,600 micrograms/L (ug/L) for lead of 240 ug/L, for cadmium of 180 ug/L, for iron of 70 ug/L, for manganese of 240 ug/L, and for silica of 15 mg/L. Water from mines in the western area contained dissolved solids concentrations of generally > 500 mg/L, a median pH of 6.8, sulfate concentrations that ranged between 170 and 2,150 mg/L, and median concentrations for zinc of 3,200 ug/L for lead of 0 ug/L. No conclusive evidence of lateral migration of water from the mines into domestic well water supplies in the shallow aquifer was found in the study area in Kansas. Effects of abandoned lead and zinc mines on tributaries of the Spring River in the eastern area are most severe in Short Creek. Drainage from tailings cause large concentrations of sulfate, zinc, and cadmium in Tar Creek in Kansas. Compared with four other major streams in the western area in Kansas, Tar Creek contained the largest low flow concentrations of sulfate (910 mg/L), zinc (5,800 ug/L), and cadmium (40 ug/L). 45 refs., 23 figs., 26 tabs.

Spruill, T.B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Geothermal exploration assessment and interpretation, Upper Klamah Lake Area, Klamath Basin, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Data from public and private sources on the Klamath Basin geothermal resource are reviewed, synthesized, and reinterpreted. In this, the second and final phase of the work, geological, remote sensing, geochemical, temperature gradient, gravity, aeromagnetic, and electrical resistivity data sets are examined. These data were derived from surveys concentrated on the east and west shores of Upper Klamath Lake. The geological, remote sensing, and potential field data suggest a few northeast-trending discontinuities, which cross the regional north-westerly strike. The near-surface distribution of warm water appears to be related to the intersections of these lineaments and northwest-trending faults. The groundwater geochemical data are reviewed and the various reservoir temperature estimates compared. Particular attention is given to specific electrical conductivities of waters as an interpretational aid to the subsurface resistivity results. A clear trend emerges in the Klamath Falls/Olene Gap area; hotter waters are associated with higher specific conductivities. In the Nuss Lake/Stukel Mountain area the opposite trend prevails, although the relationship is somewhat equivocal.

Stark, M.; Goldstein, N.E.; Wollenberg, H.A.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Geologic characterization report for the Paradox Basin Study Region, Utah Study Areas. Volume 6. Salt Valley  

SciTech Connect

Surface landforms in the Salt Valley Area are generally a function of the Salt Valley anticline and are characterized by parallel and subparallel cuestaform ridges and hogbacks and flat valley floors. The most prominent structure in the Area is the Salt Valley anticline. Erosion resulting from the Tertiary uplift of the Colorado Plateau led to salt dissolution and subsequent collapse along the crest of the anticline. Continued erosion removed the collapse material, forming an axial valley along the crest of the anticline. Paleozoic rocks beneath the salt bearing Paradox Formation consist of limestone, dolomite, sandstone, siltstone and shale. The salt beds of the Paradox Formation occur in distinct cycles separated by an interbed sequence of anhydrite, carbonate, and clastic rocks. The Paradox Formation is overlain by Pennsylvanian limestone; Permian sandstone; and Mesozoic sandstone, mudstone, conglomerate and shale. No earthquakes have been reported in the Area during the period of the historic record and contemporary seismicity appears to be diffusely distributed, of low level and small magnitude. The upper unit includes the Permian strata and upper Honaker Trail Formation. The current data base is insufficient to estimate ground-water flow rates and directions in this unit. The middle unit includes the evaporites in the Paradox Formation and no laterally extensive flow systems are apparent. The lower unit consists of the rocks below the Paradox Formation where permeabilities vary widely, and the apparent flow direction is toward the west. 108 refs., 39 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Software Quality Assurance Plan for GoldSim Models Supporting the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites Performance Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect

This Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) applies to the development and maintenance of GoldSim models supporting the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs). Two PA models have been approved by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as of November 2006 for the PA maintenance work undertaken by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). NNSA/NSO asked NSTec to assume the custodianship of the models for future development and maintenance. The models were initially developed by Neptune and Company (N&C).

Gregory J. Shott, Vefa Yucel

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

112

Technical Note: Seasonality in alpine water resources management – a regional assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Alpine regions are particularly affected by seasonal variations in water demand and water availability. Especially the winter period is critical from an operational point of view, as being characterised by high water demands due to tourism and low water availability due to the temporal storage of precipitation as snow and ice. The clear definition of summer and winter periods is thus an essential prerequisite for water resource management in alpine regions. This paper presents a GIS-based multi criteria method to determine the winter season. A snow cover duration dataset serves as basis for this analysis. Different water demand stakeholders, the alpine hydrology and the present day water supply infrastructure are taken into account. Technical snow-making and (winter) tourism were identified as the two major seasonal water demand stakeholders in the study area, which is the Kitzbueheler region in the Austrian Alps. Based upon different geographical datasets winter was defined as the period from December to March, and summer as the period from April to November. By determining potential regional water balance deficits or surpluses in the present day situation and in future, important management decisions such as water storage and allocation can be made and transposed to the local level. 1

Hydrology; D. Vanham; E. Fleischhacker; W. Rauch

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

An Integrated Assessment Framework for Uncertainty Studies in Global and Regional Climate Change: The IGSM-CAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes an integrated assessment framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model (IGSM), ...

Monier, Erwan

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

114

Turbine exhaust diffuser with region of reduced flow area and outer boundary gas flow  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exhaust diffuser system and method for a turbine engine. The outer boundary may include a region in which the outer boundary extends radially inwardly toward the hub structure and may direct at least a portion of an exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the hub structure. At least one gas jet is provided including a jet exit located on the outer boundary. The jet exit may discharge a flow of gas downstream substantially parallel to an inner surface of the outer boundary to direct a portion of the exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the outer boundary to effect a radially outward flow of at least a portion of the exhaust gas flow toward the outer boundary to balance an aerodynamic load between the outer and inner boundaries.

Orosa, John

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

115

An Economic, Hydrologic, and Environmental Assessment of Water Management Alternative Plans for the South Central Texas Region*1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Economic, Hydrologic, and Environmental Assessment of Water Management Alternative Plans. The economic, hydrologic, and environmental consequences of the "best" choice of regional water management plan, and water management plans. #12;3 An Economic, Hydrologic, and Environmental Assessment of Water Management

McCarl, Bruce A.

116

GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION ASSESSMENT AND INTERPRETATION, KLAMATH BASIN, OREGON-SWAN LAKE AND KLAMATH HILLS AREA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KLAMATH BASIN, OREGON SWAN LAKE AND KLAMATH HILLS AREA M.of the Swan Lake-Yonna Valley area, Klamath County, Oregon:

Stark, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the NTS  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Manual M 435.1-1 requires that performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs) for low-level waste (LLW) disposal facilities be maintained by the field offices. This plan describes the activities performed to maintain the PA and the CA for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This plan supersedes the Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (DOE/NV/11718--491-REV 1, dated September 2002). The plan is based on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 1999a), DOE Manual M 435.1-1 (DOE, 1999b), the DOE M 435.1-1 Implementation Guide DOE G 435.1-1 (DOE, 1999c), and the Maintenance Guide for PAs and CAs (DOE, 1999d). The plan includes a current update on PA/CA documentation, a revised schedule, and a section on Quality Assurance.

Vefa Yucel

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

118

First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site - Part 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRR-CWDA-2010-00128 SRR-CWDA-2010-00128 Revision 0 PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT for the H-AREA TANK FARM at the SAVANNAH RIVER SITE March 2011 Prepared by: Savannah River Remediation LLC Closure & Waste Disposal Authority Aiken, SC 29808 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Under Contract No. DE-AC09-09SR22505 Performance Assessment for the SRR-CWDA-2010-00128 H-Area Tank Farm at the Revision 0 Savannah River Site March 2011 Page ii of 864 REVISION SUMMARY REV. # DESCRIPTION DATE OF ISSUE 0a Initial issue to DOE-SR 09/17/2010

119

Baseline risk assessment of the perched water system at the INEL test reactor area  

SciTech Connect

A baseline health risk assessment (HRA) was prepared to evaluate potential risks to human health and the environment posed by the Perched Water System (PWS) at the Test Reactor Area (TRA). The PWS has been designated Operable Unit 2-12, one of the 13 operable units identified at TRA. During the period from 1962 to 1990, a total of 6770 million gal of water were discharged from the TRA to unlined surface ponds. Wastewater discharged to the surface ponds at TRA percolates downward through the surficial alluvium and the underlying basalt bedrock. A resulting shallow perched water zone has formed at the interface between the surficial sediments and the underlying basalt. Further downward movement of groundwater is again impeded by a low-permeability layer of silt, clay, and sand encountered at a depth of [approximately]150 ft. The deep perched water zone occurs on top of this low-permeability interbed. An evaluation was made as to whether potential risks for the PWS could justify implementing a remedial action. The risk evaluation consisted of two parts, the human health evaluation and the ecological evaluation.

Gordon, J.W.; Sinton, P.O. (Dames Moore, Denver, CO (United States)); Jensen, N. (DOE, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); McCormick, S. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Assessment of radiation exposure in the uranium mining and milling area of Mailuu Suu, Kyrgyzstan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The area of the town of Mailuu Suu, Kyrgyzstan, is polluted by radionuclides and heavy metals from tailing dumps and heaps resulting from the historic exploitation of uranium mines. In the frame of a European Commission-TACIS funded project, radiological assessment was performed for critical group members living in the city of Mailuu Suu, located downstream the tailings, or in the village of Kara Agach, partially located on a uranium mine waste dump. The actual external exposure is around 1.2 mSv a?1 at both locations and exposure from radon is around 3 mSv a?1 at Mailuu Suu and around 10 mSv a?1 at Kara Agach. Ingestion dose was negligible for a critical group member living at Mailuu Suu. At Kara Agach, however, under the hypothesis that all food and fodder is cultivated locally, exposure from ingestion is much higher (?10–30 mSv a?1). In case of an accidental scenario [(part of) Tailing 3 content thrust to river], estimated additional maximum doses result in 45 and 77 mSv for an adult and a child, respectively.

H. Vandenhove; L. Sweeck; D. Mallants; H. Vanmarcke; A. Aitkulov; O. Sadyrov; M. Savosin; B. Tolongutov; M. Mirzachev; J.J. Clerc; H. Quarch; A. Aitaliev

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional assessment area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

GIS-Based Regionalized Life Cycle Assessment: How Big Is Small Enough? Methodology and Case Study of Electricity Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

GIS-Based Regionalized Life Cycle Assessment: How Big Is Small Enough? ... Several data sets were combined to form a life cycle inventory database of all large electricity generators in the United States for the year 2005. ... The North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) defines 10 regions, mapped in section 5 of the SI, that have their own regulatory or technical independence. ...

Christopher L. Mutel; Stephan Pfister; Stefanie Hellweg

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

122

Assessing the Capability of a Regional-Scale Weather Model to Simulate Extreme Precipitation Patterns and Flooding in Central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing the Capability of a Regional-Scale Weather Model to Simulate Extreme Precipitation Patterns and Flooding in Central Texas MARLA R. KNEBL LOWREY AND ZONG-LIANG YANG Department of Geological 3 March 2008) ABSTRACT A regional-scale weather model is used to determine the potential for flood

Yang, Zong-Liang

123

An integrated assessment of global and regional water demands for electricity generation to 2095  

SciTech Connect

Electric power plants currently account for approximately one-half of the global industrial water withdrawal. While continued expansion of the electric sector seems likely into the future, the consequent water demands are quite uncertain, and will depend on highly variable water intensities by electricity technologies, at present and in the future. Using GCAM, an integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change, we first establish lower-bound, median, and upper-bound estimates for present-day electric sector water withdrawals and consumption by individual electric generation technologies in each of 14 geopolitical regions, and compare them with available estimates of regional industrial or electric sector water use. We then explore the evolution of global and regional electric sector water use over the next century, focusing on uncertainties related to withdrawal and consumption intensities for a variety of electric generation technologies, rates of change of power plant cooling system types, and rates of adoption of a suite of water-saving technologies. Results reveal that the water withdrawal intensity of electricity generation is likely to decrease in the near term with capital stock turnover, as wet towers replace once-through flow cooling systems and advanced electricity generation technologies replace conventional ones. An increase in consumptive use accompanies the decrease in water withdrawal rates; however, a suite of water conservation technologies currently under development could compensate for this increase in consumption. Finally, at a regional scale, water use characteristics vary significantly based on characteristics of the existing capital stock and the selection of electricity generation technologies into the future.

Davies, Evan; Kyle, G. Page; Edmonds, James A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area T  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes the data quality objectives process used to guide information gathering to further the assessment at WMA T.

Horton, Duane G.

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations  

SciTech Connect

Task 3 (Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of NORM, Heavy Metals, and Organics) and 4 (Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas) activities involved continued data analysis and report writing. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Region) was issued as a final report during the previous reporting period. Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Seafood Consumption and Use Patterns) activities included the preparation of the final report. There were no Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan) activities to report. Task 8 (Project Management and Deliverables) activities involved the submission of the necessary reports and routine management.

Gettleson, D.A.

1997-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

126

Regional assessment of environmental equity through GIS-based clustering and non-parametric statistical testing: a case study of Dallas County, Texas, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Previous GIS-based methods for assessing regional environmental equity issues tended to simplify the definition of impact area for a hazardous site by either directly adopting the pre-existing census unit or constructing a buffer with an arbitrary radius. Subsequent spatial analyses based on such a simplification support rather limited statistical analysis. The present paper reviews this methodological issue and proposes a more robust method combining statistical clustering, spatial overlay analysis, and non-parametric statistical testing for regional equity assessment. In this method, impact areas for individual population groups are derived through statistical clustering based on the internal data structure of multiple demographic variables, and facilities are tallied within each cluster zone to support a valid chi-square test. A case study on Dallas County, Texas, USA, demonstrated the advantages of this method, including data self-organisation for case-specific analysis, avoidance of arbitrariness of impact area definition, ability to provide a comprehensive evaluation based on multiple demographic characteristics, and statistical comparability with highly skewed data distribution.

Minhe Ji; T.S. Sunil

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Overview of the Quality and Completeness of Resource Assessment Data for the APEC Region  

SciTech Connect

The availability of information and data on the renewable energy resources (solar, wind, biomass, geothermal, and hydro) for renewable energy technologies is a critical element in the successful implementation of these technologies. This paper presents a comprehensive summary of published information on these resources for each of 1 8 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies. In the introductory sections, a discussion of the quality and completeness of this information is presented, along with recommendations on steps that need to be taken to facilitate the further development and deployment of renewable energy technologies throughout the APEC region. These sections are then followed by economy-specific reviews, and a complete bibliography and summary description for each citation. The major results of this survey are that a basis for understanding renewable energy resources is currently available for essentially all the economies, although there is a significant need to apply improved and updated resource assessment techniques in most. For example, most wind resource assessments rely on data collected at national weather stations, which often results in underestimates of the true potential wind resource within an economy. As a second example, solar resource assessments in most economies rely on an analysis of very simple sunshine record data, which results in large uncertainties in accurately quantifying the resource. National surveys of biomass, geothermal, and hydro resources are often lacking; in most cases, resources for these technologies were discussed for site-specific studies only. Thus, the major recommendations in this paper are to: ( 1 ) upgrade current or install new wind and solar measurement systems at key 'benchmark' locations to provide accurate, representative information on these resources; (2) apply advanced wind and solar resource assessment tools that rely on data quality assessment procedures, the use of satellite data, and models, and that can reliably interpolate the data collected at the benchmark sites; (3) conduct national surveys of biomass, geothermal, and hydro resources uniformly and consistently; and ( 4) establish a centralized data center that provides ready access to the most up-to-date and validated renewable resource data in all APEC economies.

Renne, D. S.; Pilasky, S.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Assessment of Pesticide Exposure in Female Population Living in Cotton Growing Areas of Punjab, Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Present study was conducted in the southern Punjab i.e. Multan and Bahawalpur Divisions, the major cotton growing areas of Pakistan. The field study was limited to a manageable geographical area where female cott...

Seema Tahir; Tahir Anwar

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Assessment of Natural Stream Sites for Hydroelectric Dams in the Pacific Northwest Region  

SciTech Connect

This pilot study presents a methodology for modeling project characteristics using a development model of a stream obstructing dam. The model is applied to all individual stream reaches in hydrologic region 17, which encompasses nearly all of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. Project site characteristics produced by the modeling technique include: capacity potential, principal dam dimensions, number of required auxiliary dams, total extent of the constructed impoundment boundary, and the surface area of the resulting reservoir. Aggregated capacity potential values for the region are presented in capacity categories including total, that at existing dams, within federal and environmentally sensitive exclusion zones, and the balance which is consider available for greenfield development within the limits of the study. Distributions of site characteristics for small hydropower sites are presented and discussed. These sites are screened to identify candidate small hydropower sites and distributions of the site characteristics of this site population are presented and discussed. Recommendations are made for upgrading the methodology and extensions to make the results more accessible and available on a larger scale.

Douglas G. Hall; Kristin L. Verdin; Randy D. Lee

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Groundwater quality assessment plan for single-shell waste management area B-BX-BY at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a first determination groundwater quality assessment at the Hanford Site. This work was performed for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, in accordance with the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement during the time period 1996--1998. The purpose of the assessment was to determine if waste from the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) B-BX-BY had entered the groundwater at levels above the drinking water standards (DWS). The resulting assessment report documented evidence demonstrating that waste from the WMA has, most likely, impacted groundwater quality. Based on 40 CFR 265.93 [d] paragraph (7), the owner-operator must continue to make the minimum required determinations of contaminant level and of rate/extent of migrations on a quarterly basis until final facility closure. These continued determinations are required because the groundwater quality assessment was implemented prior to final closure of the facility.

SM Narbutovskih

2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Groundwater impact assessment for the 216-U-17 Crib, 200 West Area  

SciTech Connect

As required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement milestone M-17-00A), this report assesses the impact to groundwater from discharge of process condensate to the ground at the 216-U-17 Crib. The assessment considers impacts associated with moisture movement through soil beneath the crib and the potential transport of contaminants to the groundwater.

Reidel, S.P.; Johnson, V.G.; Kline, N.W.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Crop specific green area index retrieval from MODIS data at regional scale by controlling pixel-target adequacy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Information on vegetation status can be retrieved from satellite observations by modelling and inverting canopy radiative transfer. Agricultural monitoring and yield forecasting could greatly benefit from such techniques by coupling crop growth models with crop specific information through data assimilation. An indicator which would be particularly interesting to obtain from remote sensing is the total surface of photosynthetically active plant tissue, or green area index (GAI). Currently, the major limitation is that the imagery that can be used operationally and economically over large areas with high temporal frequency has a coarse spatial resolution. This paper demonstrates how it is possible to characterise the regional crop specific GAI range along with its temporal dynamic using MODIS imagery by controlling the degree at which the observation footprints of the coarse pixels fall within the crop-specific mask delineating the target. This control is done by modelling the instrument's point spread function and by filtering out less reliable GAI estimations in both the spatial and temporal dimensions using thresholds on 3 variables: pixel purity, observation coverage and view zenith angle. The difference in performance between MODIS and fine spatial resolution to estimate the median GAI of a given crop over a 40 × 40 km study region can be reduced to a RMSE of 0.053 m2/m2. The consistency between fine and coarse spatial resolution GAI estimations suggests a possible instrument synergy whereby the high temporal resolution of MODIS provides the general GAI trajectory and while high spatial resolution can be used to estimate the local GAI spatial heterogeneity.

Grégory Duveiller; Frédéric Baret; Pierre Defourny

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

A watershed-based method for environmental vulnerability assessment with a case study of the Mid-Atlantic region  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents a method for environmental vulnerability assessment with a case study of the Mid-Atlantic region. The method is based on the concept of 'self-/peer-appraisal' of a watershed in term of vulnerability. The self-/peer-appraisal process is facilitated by two separate linear optimization programs. The analysis provided insights on the environmental conditions, in general, and the relative vulnerability pattern, in particular, of the Mid-Atlantic region. The suggested method offers a simple but effective and objective way to perform a regional environmental vulnerability assessment. Consequently the method can be used in various steps in environmental assessment and planning. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a method for regional environmental vulnerability assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is based on the self-/peer-appraisal concept in term of vulnerability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The analysis is facilitated by two separate linear optimization programs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method provides insights on the regional relative vulnerability pattern.

Tran, Liem T., E-mail: ltran1@utk.edu [Department of Geography, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); O& #x27; Neill, Robert V. [OTIE and Associates, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Elizabeth R. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

Benthic assessment of marine areas of particular ecological importance within the German Baltic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a strong salinity gradient (5 to 25 psu), four planned offshore Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) within into account that the German Baltic has a strong salinity gradient from the west (approx. 20­25 psu technique,andmeasurementofabioticfactors(salinity,oxygen,sediment parameters). The areas of interest were

Zettler, Michael

135

Regionalized Life Cycle Assessment: Computational Methodology and Application to Inventory Databases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life cycle assessment (LCA) studies have shown that site-dependent impact assessment for categories like acidification and eutrophication give more accurate and realistic results than site-generic assessments. ... In addition, we use indicators, developed by the CASES (cost assessment for sustainable energy systems) project, which assess the external costs of energy generation (38), and consider impacts on human health, agriculture, acidification damage to structures, and loss of biodiversity. ...

Christopher L. Mutel; Stefanie Hellweg

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

136

Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico region oil and gas operations  

SciTech Connect

Task 3 (Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of NORM, Heavy Metals, and Organics) activities included the continuation of the platform selection process. A revised sampling plan and a projected cost estimate were prepared for Task 3. A letter detailing the revised plan was sent to the Scientific Review Committee (SRC). Task 4 (Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas) activities involved receiving the final approval for sampling two facilities and requesting approval for a third alternative facility. A revised Task 4 sampling plan and projected estimated costs were prepared. The sampling plan was presented to the SRC for comment. Mobilization activities for the first quarterly sampling were initiated. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impactsof Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Region) activities included refining the model for estimating the impact of increased environmental compliance costs on remaining reserves in coastal and offshore fields. Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Seafood Consumption and Use Patterns) activities involved completion and field testing of most survey forms. Retail surveys were initiated and contacts were made with the Vietnamese community. Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan) work has included scheduling the presentation of information concerning this project at the DOE Contractor Review Meeting in July in Oklahoma. Task 8 (Project Management and Deliverables) activities have involved the submission of the necessary reports and routine management.

Gettleson, D.A.

1993-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

137

Gis-technologies for integrated assessment of the productive mining areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper describes the bases of a new application of GIS-technologies for integrated assessment and comparison of ... exemplified by a comparison of technological characteristics of coals, transportation and pow...

R. Yu. Zamaraev; V. N. Oparin; S. E. Popov; V. P. Potapov…

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Title Flood Assessment at the Proposed Area 6 Liquid Waste Treatment...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

CONSTANT 4.335862 Model Set 3: News Nob Apex PAGE 2 SINGLE-CHANNEL REGION ENERGY (FT) 0.5 DEPTH (FT) 0.3 DISCHARGE (CFS) 49 PROBABILITY OF DISCHARGE BEING EXCEEDED...

139

IMPACTS ASSESSMENT OF PLUG-IN HYBRID VEHICLES ON ELECTRIC UTILITIES AND REGIONAL U.S. POWER GRIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IMPACTS ASSESSMENT OF PLUG-IN HYBRID VEHICLES ON ELECTRIC UTILITIES AND REGIONAL U.S. POWER GRIDS National Laboratory(a) ABSTRACT The U.S. electric power infrastructure is a strategic national asset with the emerging plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) technology to meet the majority of the daily energy needs

140

RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area TX-TY  

SciTech Connect

WMA TX-TY contains underground, single-shell tanks that were used to store liquid waste that contained chemicals and radionuclides. Most of the liquid has been removed, and the remaining waste is regulated under the RCRA as modi¬fied in 40 CFR Part 265, Subpart F and Washington State’s Hazardous Waste Management Act . WMA TX-TY was placed in assessment monitoring in 1993 because of elevated specific conductance. A groundwater quality assessment plan was written in 1993 describing the monitoring activities to be used in deciding whether WMA TX-TY had affected groundwater. That plan was updated in 2001 for continued RCRA groundwater quality assessment as required by 40 CFR 265.93 (d)(7). This document further updates the assessment plan for WMA TX-TY by including (1) information obtained from ten new wells installed at the WMA after 1999 and (2) information from routine quarterly groundwater monitoring during the last five years. Also, this plan describes activities for continuing the groundwater assessment at WMA TX TY.

Horton, Duane G.

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional assessment area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Groundwater impact assessment report for the 216-Z-20 Crib, 200 West Area  

SciTech Connect

As required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order ([Tri-Party Agreement] Milestone M-17-00A), this report assesses the impact of wastewater discharges to the 216-Z-20 Crib on groundwater quality. The assessment reported herein extends the initial analysis conducted from 1989 through 1990 for the Liquid Effluent Study Final Project Report. Three primary issues are addressed in response to regulator concerns with the initial analysis: The magnitude and status of the soil column transuranic inventory. Potential interactions of wastewater with carbon tetrachloride from adjacent facilities. Preferential pathways created by unsealed monitoring wells.

Johnson, V.G.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Waste area grouping 2 Phase I task data report: Ecological risk assessment and White Oak Creek watershed screening ecological risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an ecological risk assessment for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 based on the data collected in the Phase I remedial investigation (RI). It serves as an update to the WAG 2 screening ecological risk assessment that was performed using historic data. In addition to identifying potential ecological risks in WAG 2 that may require additional data collection, this report serves to determine whether there are ecological risks of sufficient magnitude to require a removal action or some other expedited remedial process. WAG 2 consists of White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) main plant area, White Oak Lake (WOL), the White Oak Creek Embayment of the Clinch River, associated flood plains, and the associated groundwater. The WOC system drains the WOC watershed, an area of approximately 16.8 km{sup 2} that includes ORNL and associated WAGs. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminants released from ORNL and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent WAGs.

Efroymson, R.A.; Jackson, B.L.; Jones, D.S. [and others] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

A National Assessment of Promising Areas for Switchgrass, Hybrid Poplar, or Willow Energy Crop Production  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to systematically assess the cropland acreage that could support energy crops and the expected farm gate and delivered prices of energy crops. The assessment is based on output from two modeling approaches: (1) the Oak Ridge County-Level Energy Crop (ORECCL) database (1996 version) and (2) the Oak Ridge Integrated Bioenergy Analysis System (ORIBAS). The former provides county-level estimates of suitable acres, yields, and farmgate prices of energy crops (switchgrass, hybrid poplar, willow) for all fifty states. The latter estimates delivered feedstock prices and quantities within a state at a fine resolution (1 km2) and considers the interplay between transportation costs, farmgate prices, cropland density, and facility demand. It can be used to look at any type of feedstock given the appropriate input parameters. For the purposes of this assessment, ORIBAS has been used to estimate farmgate and delivered switchgrass prices in 11 states (AL, FL, GA, IA, M N, MO, ND, NE, SC, SD, and TN). Because the potential for energy crop production can be considered from several perspectives, and is evolving as policies, economics and our basic understanding of energy crop yields and production costs change, this assessment should be viewed as a snapshot in time.

Graham, R.L.; Walsh, M.E.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT TO SUPPORT CLOSURE OF SINGLE-SHELL TANK WASTE MANAGEMENT AREA C AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

Current proposed regulatory agreements (Consent Decree) at the Hanford Site call for closure of the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) C in the year 2019. WMA C is part of the SST system in 200 East area ofthe Hanford Site and is one of the first tank farm areas built in mid-1940s. In order to close WMA C, both tank and facility closure activities and corrective actions associated with existing soil and groundwater contamination must be performed. Remedial activities for WMA C and corrective actions for soils and groundwater within that system will be supported by various types of risk assessments and interim performance assessments (PA). The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) and the State ofWashington Department of Ecology (Ecology) are sponsoring a series of working sessions with regulators and stakeholders to solicit input and to obtain a common understanding concerning the scope, methods, and data to be used in the planned risk assessments and PAs to support closure of WMA C. In addition to DOE-ORP and Ecology staff and contractors, working session members include representatives from the U.S. Enviromnental Protection Agency, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), interested tribal nations, other stakeholders groups, and members of the interested public. NRC staff involvement in the working sessions is as a technical resource to assess whether required waste determinations by DOE for waste incidental to reprocessing are based on sound technical assumptions, analyses, and conclusions relative to applicable incidental waste criteria.

BERGERON MP

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

145

RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

A groundwater quality assessment plan was prepared for waste management area S-SX at the Hanford Site. Groundwater monitoring is conducted at this facility in accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) Part 265, Subpart F [and by reference of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-400(3)]. The facility was placed in assessment groundwater monitoring program status after elevated waste constituents and indicator parameter measurements (i.e., chromium, technetium-99 and specific conductance) in downgradient monitoring wells were observed and confirmed. A first determination, as allowed under 40 CFR 265.93(d), provides the owner/operator of a facility an opportunity to demonstrate that the regulated unit is not the source of groundwater contamination. Based on results of the first determination it was concluded that multiple source locations in the waste management area could account for observed spatial and temporal groundwater contamination patterns. Consequently, a continued investigation is required. This plan, developed using the data quality objectives process, is intended to comply with the continued investigation requirement. Accordingly, the primary purpose of the present plan is to determine the rate and extent of dangerous waste (hexavalent chromium and nitrate) and radioactive constituents (e.g., technetium-99) in groundwater and to determine their concentrations in groundwater beneath waste management area S-SX. Comments and concerns expressed by the Washington State Department of Ecology on the initial waste management area S-SX assessment report were addressed in the descriptive narrative of this plan as well as in the planned activities. Comment disposition is documented in a separate addendum to this plan.

Chou, C.J.; Johnson, V.G.

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

146

RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area B-BX-BY at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This document was prepared as a groundwater quality assessment plan revision for the single-shell tank systems in Waste Management Area B-BX-BY at the Hanford Site. Groundwater monitoring is conducted at this facility in accordance with 40 CFR Part 265, Subpart F. In FY 1996, the groundwater monitoring program was changed from detection-level indicator evaluation to a groundwater quality assessment program when elevated specific conductance in downgradient monitoring well 299 E33-32 was confirmed by verification sampling. During the course of the ensuing investigation, elevated technetium-99 and nitrate were observed above the drinking water standard at well 299-E33-41, a well located between 241-B and 241-BX Tank Farms. Earlier observations of the groundwater contamination and tank farm leak occurrences combined with a qualitative analysis of possible solutions, led to the conclusion that waste from the waste management area had entered the groundwater and were observed in this well. Based on 40 CFR 265.93 [d] paragraph (7), the owner-operator must continue to make the minimum required determinations of contaminant level and rate/extent of migrations on a quarterly basis until final facility closure. These continued determinations are required because the groundwater quality assessment was implemented prior to final closure of the facility.

Narbutovskih, Susan M.

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

147

Geothermal environmental assessment baseline study: vegetation and soils of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Resource Area  

SciTech Connect

Identification and elemental concentrations of indigenous soil and plant systems found on the Roosevelt Hot Spring KGRA are described. Twenty-three different soils and five separate plant communities are geographically mapped and identified. One hundred forty-seven plant species were identified. Forbs, shrubs, and grasses are represented by 58, 53, and 36 species respectively. Three sites, each measuring 25 hectares, were selected for long-term vegetative assessment. At these locations a permanent enclosure measuring 24.4 meters x 24.4 meters was constructed to assess long-term effects of livestock grazing. Biomass, plant species, percentage composition, ground cover and livestock carrying capacities were determined at each site. Surface soils and Artemisia tridentata leaf tissue were collected for elemental analysis.

Brown, K.W.; Wiersma, G.B.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Assessing water quality in Marine Protected Areas from Southern California, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite the regulatory mandate to maintain “natural water quality”, there are ?271 storm drain discharges that potentially threaten the 14 designated marine water quality protected areas in Southern California called Areas of Special Biological Significance (ASBS). After sampling 35 site-events, the geomean concentrations of total suspended solids, nutrients, total and dissolved trace metals, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the ocean following storm events were similar between reference drainages and ASBS discharge sites. Concentrations of chlorinated hydrocarbons were nondetectable and no post-storm sample exhibited significant toxicity to the endemic purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) near ASBS discharge sites. A reference-based threshold was developed and, despite the similarities in average concentrations, there were some individual ASBS discharge sites that were greater than reference background. Cumulatively across all ASBS, the constituents that were most frequently greater than the reference-based threshold were nutrients and general constituents, followed by dissolved and total trace metals.

Kenneth Schiff; Brenda Luk; Dominic Gregorio; Steve Gruber

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Assessment of the Emergency Management Program Training and Drills Functional Area at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, August 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LANL-2011-08-04 LANL-2011-08-04 Site: Los Alamos National Laboratory Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report of the Assessment of the Emergency Management Program Training and Drills Functional Area Dates of Activity : 08/01/2011 - 08/04/2011 Report Preparer: David Odland/Randy Griffin Activity Description/Purpose: Since the 2007 Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) inspection of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) emergency management program, HSS personnel have conducted periodic visits to follow-up on the corrective actions taken to address the findings in the review. This 2011 assessment was conducted to continue the corrective action follow-up activities and to support the Los Alamos Site Office (LASO) Emergency Management Program Manager in accomplishing

150

Error Control for the Polar Area Formula Suppose that we wish to derive a formula for finding the area of the region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

() M, f( i )2 - LM + 1 4 L2 2 f( i ) ± 1 2 L 2 f( i )2 + LM + 1 4 L2 2 Hence 1 2 f( i )2 - 1 2 LM2 + 1 8 L2 3 area of sector #i 1 2 f( i )2 + 1 2 LM2 + 1 8 L2 3 and the total area A obeys n i=1 1 2 f( i )2 - 1 2 LM2 + 1 8 L2 3 A n i=1 1 2 f( i )2 + 1 2 LM2 + 1 8 L2 3 1 2 n i=1 f( i )2 - 1 2 nLM

Feldman, Joel

151

The basis for cooperation in the Gulf Region: an assessment of the Gulf Cooperation Council.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), a regional alliance grouping the six oil- and gas-rich Arabian states of Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar,… (more)

Al-Zamat, Khalid Hamed S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Dynamically Coupled 3D Pollutant Dispersion Model for Assessing Produced Water Discharges in the Canadian Offshore Area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dynamically Coupled 3D Pollutant Dispersion Model for Assessing Produced Water Discharges in the Canadian Offshore Area ... The collected samples of produced water and seawater were analyzed by the COOGER (Centre for Offshore Oil and Gas Environmental Research) at the Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Environmental Engineering labrotary at the Concordia University, and the Trace Analysis Facility (TAF) at the University of Regina. ... In Offshore Oil and Gas Environmental Effects Monitoring Approaches and Technologies; Armsworthy, S. L.; Cranford, P. J.; Lee, K., Eds.; Battelle Memorial Institute: Columbus, OH 2005; pp 319– 342. ...

Lin Zhao; Zhi Chen; Kenneth Lee

2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

153

Performance assessment for the disposal of low-level waste in the 200 West Area Burial Grounds  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the findings of a performance assessment (PA) analysis for the disposal of solid low-level radioactive waste (LLW) in the 200 West Area Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG) in the northwest corner of the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. This PA analysis is required by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A (DOE 1988a) to demonstrate that a given disposal practice is in compliance with a set of performance objectives quantified in the order. These performance objectives are applicable to the disposal of DOE-generated LLW at any DOE-operated site after the finalization of the order in September 1988. At the Hanford Site, DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) has issued a site-specific supplement to DOE Order 5820.2A, DOE-RL 5820.2A (DOE 1993), which provides additiona I ce objectives that must be satisfied.

Wood, M.I.; Khaleel, R.; Rittmann, P.D.; Lu, A.H.; Finfrock, S.H.; DeLorenzo, T.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Serne, R.J.; Cantrell, K.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

GIS-based pre-mining land damage assessment for underground coal mines in high groundwater area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal mining cause different degrees of damage to both land and ecosystems. Evaluation of disturbed land is a fundamental and prerequisite work for land reclamation and rehabilitation. However, most of those evaluations were carried out when mining was under process or after it cease. This paper proposes an innovative assessment model for pre-evaluation which could be implemented before mining activity begins. A geographic information system (GIS) was constructed to evaluate land damage. Three natural condition factors and three geological condition factors were chosen for evaluation. The results show that: land damage was categorised as five degrees, which are negligible, slight, moderate, severe, and very severe. Furthermore, very severely damaged areas are mainly concentrated in the northwest part of the coal mine, whereas slight damaged areas are mainly concentrated in the southwest. The developed coupling technique was used to forecast land damage, and provide reference for reclamation work.

Wu Xiao; Zhenqi Hu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Canby Area Service Project : Substation and Associated Transmission Line : Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides power to Surprise Valley Electrification Corporation (SVEC) in Modoc County, California. BPA uses PacificCorp's substation and transmission facilities between Alturas and Canby, California to transfer power to SVEC's Canby Substation. In the next year, SVEC expects increased industrial, agricultural, and residential electric loads on their 69-kV transmission system south of Canby. SVEC's substation can accommodate only about 10 percent of the expected additional electric load. BPA's proposed action is intended to meet SVEC's increasing electric load. BPA proposes to meet SVEC's increasing energy load by tapping into BPA's existing BPA Malin-Warner 230-kV transmission line, and building an 7.9-mile transmission line to a new BPA substation. BPA proposes to build the new substation next to the west side of SVEC's Canby Substation (Figure 1). This new substation will allow SVEC to move the additional power over their existing transmission or distribution lines. This report is the environmental assessment of the potential impact of the proposed project. The assessment determined that no environmental impact statement'' is not required.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Canby Area Service Project substation and associated transmission line. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides power to Surprise Valley Electrification Corporation (SVEC) in Modoc County, California. BPA uses PacificCorp`s substation and transmission facilities between Alturas and Canby, California to transfer power to SVEC`s Canby Substation. In the next year, SVEC expects increased industrial, agricultural, and residential electric loads on their 69-kV transmission system south of Canby. SVEC`s substation can accommodate only about 10 percent of the expected additional electric load. BPA`s proposed action is intended to meet SVEC`s increasing electric load. BPA proposes to meet SVEC`s increasing energy load by tapping into BPA`s existing BPA Malin-Warner 230-kV transmission line, and building an 7.9-mile transmission line to a new BPA substation. BPA proposes to build the new substation next to the west side of SVEC`s Canby Substation (Figure 1). This new substation will allow SVEC to move the additional power over their existing transmission or distribution lines. This report is the environmental assessment of the potential impact of the proposed project. The assessment determined that no ``environmental impact statement`` is not required.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Program Plan for Revision of the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Saltstone Project, are embarking on the next revision to the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) performance assessment (PA). This program plan has been prepared to outline the general approach, scope, schedule and resources for the PA revision. The plan briefly describes the task elements of the PA process. It discusses critical PA considerations in the development of conceptual models and interpretation of results. Applicable quality assurance (QA) requirements are identified and the methods for implementing QA for both software and documentation are described. The plan identifies project resources supporting the core team and providing project oversight. Program issues and risks are identified as well as mitigation of those risks. Finally, a preliminary program schedule has been developed and key deliverables identified. A number of significant changes have been implemented since the last PA revision resulting in a new design for future SDF disposal units. This revision will encompass the existing and planned disposal units, PA critical radionuclides and exposure pathways important to SDF performance. An integrated analysis of the overall facility layout, including all disposal units, will be performed to assess the impact of plume overlap on PA results. Finally, a rigorous treatment of uncertainty will be undertaken using probabilistic simulations. This analysis will be reviewed and approved by DOE-SR, DOE-HQ and potentially the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This revision will be completed and ready for the start of the DOE review at the end of December 2006. This work supports a Saltstone Vault 2 fee-bearing milestone. This milestone includes completion of the Vault 2 module of the PA revision by the end of FY06.

Cook, James R.

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

158

Environmental assessment for operations, upgrades, and modifications in SNL/NM Technical Area IV  

SciTech Connect

The proposed action for this EA for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Technical Area IV, includes continuing existing operations, modification of an existing accelerator (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II) to support defnese-related Z-pinch experiments, and construction of two transformer oil storage tanks to support the expansion of the Advanced Pulsed Power Research Module, a single pulse accelerator. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE believes that the proposed action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA and CEQ NEPA implementing regulations in 40 CFR 1508.18 and 1508.27. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and a Finding of No Significant Impact is issued.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Social impact assessment of regional plans: a review of methods and issues and a recommended process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Social impact assessment (SIA) is defined and related to other policy analysis techniques. Conceptual problems in conducting SIA are reviewed. Various SIA methods are identified and evaluated for their probable e...

James C. Cramer; Thomas Dietz; Robert A. Johnston

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Assessment of Aerosol Radiative Impact over Oceanic Regions Adjacent to Indian Subcontinent using Multi-Satellite Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Using data from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments, we have retrieved regional distribution of aerosol column single scattering albedo (parameter indicative of the relative dominance of aerosol absorption and scattering effects), a most important, but least understood aerosol property in assessing its climate impact. Consequently we provide improved assessment of short wave aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) (on both regional and seasonal scales) estimates over this region. Large gradients in north-south ARF were observed as a consequence of gradients in single scattering albedo as well as aerosol optical depth. The highest ARF (-37 W m-2 at the surface) was observed over the northern Arabian Sea during June to August period (JJA). In general, ARF was higher over northern Bay of Bengal (NBoB) during winter and pre-monsoon period, whereas the ARF was higher over northern Arabian Sea (NAS) during the monsoon and post- monsoon period. The largest forcing observed over NAS during JJA is the consequence of large amounts of desert dust transported from the west Asian dust sources. High as well as seasonally invariant aerosol single scattering albedos (~0.98) were observed over the southern Indian Ocean region far from continents. The ARF estimates based on direct measurements made at a remote island location, Minicoy (8.3°N, 73°E) in the southern Arabian Sea are in good agreement with the estimates made following multisatellite analysis.

Satheesh, S. K.; Vinoj, V.; Krishnamoorthy, K.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional assessment area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada; Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that is is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.

NONE

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada; Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that it is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.

NONE

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Hydrophytes in the Mid-Atlantic Region: Ecology, Communities, Assessment, and Diversity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrophytes, or wetland plants, are the most conspicuous and perhaps most colorful element of wetland systems. In the mid-Atlantic region, hydrophytes have been the focus of many studies, resulting in a wealth...

Sarah J. Chamberlain; Denice Heller Wardrop…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

An Assessment of Air Service Accessibility in U.S. Metropolitan Regions, 2007-2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional accessibility to air transportation is often of interest to airport executives, politicians, and the general public due to the positive economic impacts of frequent commercial airline service. However, measuring ...

Wittman, M.D.

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

165

Air quality resolution for health impact assessment: influence of regional characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate how regional characteristics of population and background pollution might impact the selection of optimal air quality model resolution when calculating the human health impacts of changes to air quality. Using ...

Thompson, T. M.

166

Radiological performance assessment for the E-Area Vaults Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

The E-Area Vaults (EAVs) located on a 200 acre site immediately north of the current LLW burial site at Savannah River Site will provide a new disposal and storage site for solid, low-level, non-hazardous radioactive waste. The EAV Disposal Facility will contain several large concrete vaults divided into cells. Three types of structures will house four designated waste types. The Intermediate Level Non-Tritium Vaults will receive waste radiating greater than 200 mR/h at 5 cm from the outer disposal container. The Intermediate Level Tritium Vaults will receive waste with at least 10 Ci of tritium per package. These two vaults share a similar design, are adjacent, share waste handling equipment, and will be closed as one facility. The second type of structure is the Low Activity Waste Vaults which will receive waste radiating less than 200 mR/h at 5 cm from the outer disposal container and containing less than 10 Ci of tritium per package. The third facility, the Long Lived Waste Storage Building, provides covered, long term storage for waste containing long lived isotopes. Two additional types of disposal are proposed: (1) trench disposal of suspect soil, (2) naval reactor component disposal. To evaluate the long-term performance of the EAVs, site-specific conceptual models were developed to consider: (1) exposure pathways and scenarios of potential importance; (2) potential releases from the facility to the environment; (3) effects of degradation of engineered features; (4) transport in the environment; (5) potential doses received from radionuclides of interest in each vault type.

Cook, J.R.; Hunt, P.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1994-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Energy and development in Central America. Volume I: Regional assessment. Final report October 1979-February 1980  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an energy assessment of six Central American countries - Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama - to assist these countries in defining, planning, and meeting energy requirements implicit in their economic and social development goals and also to assist the U.S. Agency for International Development and other development organizations in defining energy programs in Central America.

Park, W.; Neves, C.; Trehan, R.; Ackerman, E.; Gallagher, W.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site - Part 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 of 864 8 of 864 1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This Performance Assessment (PA) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) was prepared to support the eventual removal from service of the H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) underground radioactive waste tanks and ancillary equipment. This PA provides the technical basis and results to be used in subsequent documents to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements identified below for removal from service and eventual final closure of the HTF. ï‚· U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 Change 1 ï‚· Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 61 Subpart C as identified in "Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2005," Section 3116 ï‚· South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC)

169

Shadow Review of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Transuranic Storage Area Retrieval Enclosue Restrieval Restart DOE Readiness Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ID-2011-09-22 ID-2011-09-22 Site: Idaho Site - Idaho Cleanup Project Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Shadow Review of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) Transuranic Storage Area-Retrieval Enclosure (TSA-RE) Retrieval Restart Department of Energy Readiness Assessment Dates of Activity : 09/20/2011 - 09/22/2011 Report Preparer: Aleem Boatright Activity Description/Purpose: A review of nuclear safety implementation verification review (IVR) procedures and processes was conducted at the Idaho Site from September 12-22, 2011. The scope originally included shadowing of the Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) Idaho Cleanup Project IVR for the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project (SBWTP).

170

First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site - Part 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

66 of 864 66 of 864 3.0 DISPOSAL FACILITY CHARACTERISTICS Section 3.1 provides information regarding site characteristics including detailed information furnished for those characteristics that influence the contaminant transport modeling assumptions provided in Chapter 4. ï‚· Section 3.1.1 provides a general description and layout of the site and the HTF to orient the reader and includes the current (as of 2009) estimated population distribution of the surrounding area as well as future land use planning for information purposes. ï‚· Section 3.1.2 describes meteorological and climatological data collection at SRS. This data collection determines appropriate modeling assumptions related to rainfall and temperature to assess the performance of the HTF closure cap presented in SRNL-ESB-

171

Shadow Review of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Transuranic Storage Area Retrieval Enclosue Restrieval Restart DOE Readiness Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ID-2011-09-22 ID-2011-09-22 Site: Idaho Site - Idaho Cleanup Project Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Shadow Review of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) Transuranic Storage Area-Retrieval Enclosure (TSA-RE) Retrieval Restart Department of Energy Readiness Assessment Dates of Activity : 09/20/2011 - 09/22/2011 Report Preparer: Aleem Boatright Activity Description/Purpose: A review of nuclear safety implementation verification review (IVR) procedures and processes was conducted at the Idaho Site from September 12-22, 2011. The scope originally included shadowing of the Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) Idaho Cleanup Project IVR for the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project (SBWTP).

172

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR REMOVAL ACTIONS AT THE TECHNICAL AREA III CLASSIFIED WASTE LANDFILL, SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES, NEW MEXICO - DOE/EA-1729  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR REMOVAL FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR REMOVAL ACTIONS AT THE TECHNICAL AREA III CLASSIFIED WASTE LANDFILL, SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES, NEW MEXICO DOE/EA-1729 August 2010 National Nuclear Security Administration Sandia Site Office P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-5400 DOE/EA-1729: Environmental Assessment for Removal Actions at the Technical Area III August 2010 Classified Waste Landfill, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico i TABLE OF CONTENTS Section 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION .................................................................... Page 1 1.1 Background .................................................................................................................................. 1

173

Rapid Assessment Survey for exotic organisms in southern California bays and harbors, and abundance in port and non-port areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in port and non-port areas A.N. Cohen1, *, L.H. Harris2 , B.L. Bingham3 , J.T. Carlton4 , J.W. Chapman5 port and non-port areas, a Rapid Assessment Survey of selected habitat types in sheltered waters were sampled to include the three major commercial port areas in southern California, non-port

174

Possibilities and limitations of life cycle assessment (LCA) in the development of waste utilization systems - Applied examples for a region in Northern Germany  

SciTech Connect

Against the background of increasing concerns about climate change, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions has become an integral part of processes in both the waste management and the energy industries. This is reflected in the development of new waste treatment concepts, in which domestic and commercial waste is treated with the aim of utilizing its energy content, while at the same time recycling as much of its material content as possible. Life cycle assessment (LCA) represents a method of assessing the environmental relevance of a waste management system, the basis of which is a material flow analysis of the system in question. GHG emissions from different options for thermal treatment and energy recovery from waste as applied to a region in Northern Germany have been analyzed by the LCA approach and an indicative LCA, which only considers those emissions resulting from operating stages of the system. Operating stages have the main share of emissions compared to pre-processing stages. Results show that through specific separation of waste material flows and highly efficient energy recovery, thermal treatment and energy generation from waste can be optimized resulting in reduction of emissions of greenhouse gases. There are also other areas of waste utilization, currently given little attention, such as the solar drying of sewage sludge, which can considerably contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.

Wittmaier, M. [Institute for Recycling and Environmental Protection at Bremen University of Applied Sciences GmbH, Neustadtswall 30, 28199 Bremen (Germany)], E-mail: wittmaier@hs-bremen.de; Langer, S.; Sawilla, B. [Institute for Recycling and Environmental Protection at Bremen University of Applied Sciences GmbH, Neustadtswall 30, 28199 Bremen (Germany)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

A Study to Assess Needed Improvements and Barriers in Planning and Delivering Agricultural Extension Activities in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to assess planning and delivering agricultural extension activities in the Kurdistan region of Iraq for future program implementation. The study was a descriptive research and used a modified Delphi technique...

Khoshnaw, Yousif Khalid

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

176

Environmental Assessment for the Transfer of 1100 AREA, Southern Rail Connection and Rolling Stock, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared to assess potential environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's proposed action: the transfer of the 1100 Area, southern rail connection and rolling stock to a non-federal entity. Impact information contained herein will be used by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Manager, to determine if the proposed action is a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. If the proposed action is determined to be major and significant, an environmental impact statement will be prepared. If the proposed action is determined not to be major and significant, a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) will be issued and the action can proceed. Criteria used to evaluate significance can be found in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1508.27. This EA was prepared in compliance with the ''National Environmental Policy Act'' (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the U.S. Department of Energy Implementing Procedures for NEPA (10 CFR 1021). The following is a description of each section of the EA. (1) Purpose and Need for Action. This provides a brief statement concerning the problem or opportunity the U.S. Department of Energy is addressing with the proposed action. As necessary, background information is provided. (2) Description of the Proposed Action. A description with sufficient detail to identify potential environmental impacts is provided. (3) Alternatives to the Proposed Action. Reasonable alternative actions, which would address the Purpose and Need, are described. A no action alternative, as required by 10 CFR 1021, also is described. (4) Affected Environment. This provides a brief description of the locale in which the proposed action takes place, and which may be environmentally impacted. (5) Environmental Impacts. The range of environmental impacts, beneficial and adverse, are described for the proposed action. Impacts of alternatives briefly are discussed. (6) Permits and Regulatory Requirements. A brief description of permits and regulatory requirements for the proposed action is provided. (7) Organizations Consulted. Any outside agencies, groups, or individuals contacted as part of environmental assessment documentation preparation are listed. (8) References. Documents used to provide information or data are listed. The appendices contain additional information necessary to support an understanding of the proposed action, alternatives, and potential impacts is provided. Comments resulting from review of the environmental assessment by states and tribes or other stakeholders and the response to those comments will be included in the appendices.

N /A

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Firmographic analysis in the previous coal mining area of Lens in the French NordPasdeCalais Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Firmographic analysis in the previous coal mining area of Lens in the French Nord: Department of Transport Economics and Sociology 20 rue Elisée Reclus BP 317 59666 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex and Technology for Transport, Development and Networks Address: Department of Transport Economics

Boyer, Edmond

178

Regional geological assessment of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence of the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins relative to potential storage/disposal of radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect

The thick and regionally extensive sequence of shales and associated clastic sedimentary rocks of Late Devonian and Early Mississippian age has been considered among the nonsalt geologies for deep subsurface containment of high-level radioactive wastes. This report examines some of the regional and basin-specific characteristics of the black and associated nonblack shales of this sequence within the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins of the north-central and eastern United States. Principal areas where the thickness and depth of this shale sequence are sufficient to warrant further evaluation are identified, but no attempt is made to identify specific storage/disposal sites. Also identified are other areas with less promise for further study because of known potential conflicts such as geologic-hydrologic factors, competing subsurface priorities involving mineral resources and groundwater, or other parameters. Data have been compiled for each basin in an effort to indicate thickness, distribution, and depth relationships for the entire shale sequence as well as individual shale units in the sequence. Included as parts of this geologic assessment are isopach, depth information, structure contour, tectonic elements, and energy-resource maps covering the three basins. Summary evaluations are given for each basin as well as an overall general evaluation of the waste storage/disposal potential of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence,including recommendations for future studies to more fully characterize the shale sequence for that purpose. Based on data compiled in this cursory investigation, certain rock units have reasonable promise for radioactive waste storage/disposal and do warrant additional study.

Lomenick, T.F.; Gonzales, S.; Johnson, K.S.; Byerly, D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region Parker-Gila 161-kV Transmission Line Maintenance, Cross Arm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parker-Gila 161-kV Transmission Line Maintenance, Cross Arm Parker-Gila 161-kV Transmission Line Maintenance, Cross Arm Replacements at Structure 0/7 - Continuation Sheet Special Conditions Biological Resources 1. To avoid impacts to nesting birds, project activities will be scheduled between August 1 and February 15, as feasible. Crews shall not cause injury or death to nesting birds, active nests, eggs, or nestlings. If evidence of a nesting bird is found in the project area, crews shall immediately stop work in that area until Western's Environmental Group has been contacted. 2. A qualified biologist will be present during all project activities and serve as the project's Biological Monitor. The Biological Monitor will be authorized by Western to temporarily halt construction activity if needed to prevent harm to desert tortoise. The Biological Monitor's

180

Health assessment for Nearshore/Tideflats, Tacoma, Washington, Region 10. CERCLIS No. WAD980726368. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Commencement Bay Nearshore/Tideflats project site is located in Pierce County, Washington and includes approximately 12 square miles of shallow water, shorelines, tideflats, and upland industrial/commercial sections in and around the City of Tacoma. Since the late 1800s, industrialization of the Commencement Bay area has resulted in many metals, such as lead and arsenic, and organic compounds, such as polychlorinated bipheny (PCBs) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs), being released into the marine environment. The waterways and the shoreline are impacted by over 400 potential pollutant sources, including storm drains, pulp mills, chemical plants, and oil refineries. Levels of contaminants in bottom fish and shell fish pose a potential public health concern for those consuming local seafood. Levels of contaminants in sediment, surface water, soil, and air may also pose potential public health concerns for remedial workers and those individuals involved in recreational and commercial activities at the site.

Not Available

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional assessment area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

Superfund record of decison (EPA Region 1): Fort Devens South Post impact area and area of contamination 41 groundwater and areas of contamination 25, 26, and 27, MA, July 5, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This Record of Decision (ROD) addresses AOCs 25 (Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Range), 26 (Zulu Ranges), an 27 (Hotel Range) and AOC 41 groundwater and a subset of the groundwater within the South Post Impact Area (SPIA). `No action` is the selected remedy for SPIA monitored-area groundwater, AOC 41 groundwater, and the surface water, sediment, and soils at the EOD, Zulu, and Hotel Ranges. Under this alternative, no formal remedial action will be taken and the site will be left `as is,` with no additional institutional controls, containment, removal, treatment, or other mitigating measures. Long-term groundwater monitoring will be conducted at the site under this `no action` ROD.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Wildfire Risk Assessment and Community Wildfire Protection in the Chilhowee Mountain Area of Blount County, East Tennessee.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The growing Wildland Urban Interface community in the Chilhowee Mountain area of Blount County, Tennessee, like many other forested areas in the mountains and hills… (more)

Chimchome, Piyarat

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Methodology for Assessing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Assessing Mitigation Options for On-Road Mobile Sources Project for the Houston-Galveston Area Council  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methodology for Assessing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Assessing Mitigation Options for On reductions in GHG, and b) use analytical tools/methods to assess the emissions reductions possible through and prioritized based on factors such as cost effectiveness, potential for emission reductions, and applicability

184

2013 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada; Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses  

SciTech Connect

The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs), with the results submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE 1999a, 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2013. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2013 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2013 include the following: • Development of a new Area 5 RWMS closure inventory estimate based on disposals through FY 2013 • Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis • Development of version 4.115 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA/CA model The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. The FY 2013 review of operations, facility design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D results for the Area 3 RWMS indicates no changes that would impact PA validity. The conclusion of the annual review is that all performance objectives can be met and the Area 3 RWMS PA remains valid. There is no need to the revise the Area 3 RWMS PA. Review of Area 5 RWMS operations, design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D activities indicates that no significant changes have occurred. The FY 2013 PA results, generated with the Area 5 RWMS v4.115 GoldSim PA model, indicate that there continues to be a reasonable expectation of meeting all performance objectives. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. A review of changes potentially impacting the CAs indicates that no significant changes occurred in FY 2013. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter the CAs results or conclusions were found. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the Yucca Flat Underground Test Area (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 97) source term, is scheduled for FY 2024, following the completion of the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan in FY 2015. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat Underground Test Area (CAU 98) results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the CAU 98 Closure Report in FY 2015. Near-term R&D efforts will focus on continuing development of the PA, CA, and inventory models for the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS.

Shott, Gregory [NSTec] [NSTec

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Assessment of fission product content of high-level liquid waste supernate on E-Area vault package criteria  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the tank farm`s high level waste supernate to determine any potential impacts on waste certification for the E-Area vaults (EAV). The Waste Acceptance Criteria procedure (i.e., WAC 3.10 of the 1S manual) imposes administrative controls on radioactive material in waste packages sent to the EAV, specifically on six fission products. Waste tank supernates contain various fission products, so any waste package containing material contaminated with supernate will contain these radioactive isotopes. This report develops the process knowledge basis for characterizing the supernate composition for these isotopes, so that appropriate controls can be implemented to ensure that the EAV WAC is met. Six fission products are listed in the SRS 1S Manual WAC 3.10: Se-79, which decays to bromine; Sr-90, which decays to niobium; Tc-99, which decays to ruthenium; Sn-126, which decays to tellurium; I-129, which decays to xenon; and Cs-137, which decays to barium.

Brown, D.F.

1994-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

186

Alaska Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Region Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Alaska Geothermal Region Details Areas (54) Power Plants (1) Projects (2) Techniques (0) Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States[1] Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States[2] References ↑ "Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States" ↑ "Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States" Geothermal Region Data State(s) Alaska Area 1,717,854 km²1,717,854,000,000 m² 663,091.644 mi² 18,490,808,670,600 ft² 2,054,553,384,000 yd² 424,490,312.67 acres USGS Resource Estimate for this Region Identified Mean Potential 677 MW677,000 kW

187

2008 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses  

SciTech Connect

The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) for each of the facilities, with the results submitted annually to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) performed an annual review in fiscal year (FY) 2008 by evaluating operational factors and research results that impact the continuing validity of the PAs and CAs. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2008 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

Draft Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment for the GILA-NORTH GILA TRANSMISSION LINE REBUILD AND UPGRADE PROJECT (DOE/EA-1948) December 2013 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region Prepared by Cooperating Agencies U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Yuma Area Office U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles District DRAFT Gila to North Gila Transmission Line Rebuild and Upgrade Project Environmental Assessment Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Yuma Area Office U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District Prepared by: December 2013 Gila to North Gila Transmission Line Rebuild and Upgrade Project

189

Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico region oil and gas operations. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1995  

SciTech Connect

Continental Shelf Associates, Inc. (CSA) was contracted to conduct a three-year study of the environmental and health related impacts of produced water and sand discharges from oil and gas operations. Data on naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), heavy metals, and hydrocarbons in water, sediment, and biota will be collected and evaluated. Health related impacts will be studied through field collections and analyses of commercially- and recreationally-important fish and shellfish tissues. Additionally, information on seafood catch, consumption, and use patterns for the Gulf of Mexico will be gathered and analyzed. The facilities to be studied will include both offshore and coastal facilities in the Gulf of Mexico. Coastal sites will be additionally studied to determine ecological recovery of impacted wetland and open bay areas. The economic impact of existing and proposed effluent federal and state regulations will also be evaluated. This report represents the thirteenth quarterly technical summary for the study ``Environmental and Economic Assessment of Discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations.`` Activities associated with Tasks 3 through 8 are discussed in this report.

Gettleson, D.A.

1995-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

Assessing regional scale predictions of aerosols, marine stratocumulus, and their interactions during VOCALS-REx using WRF-Chem  

SciTech Connect

This study assesses the ability of the recent chemistry version (v3.3) of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model to simulate boundary layer structure, aerosols, stratocumulus clouds, and energy fluxes over the Southeast Pacific Ocean. Measurements from the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) and satellite retrievals (i.e., products from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), and GOES-10) are used for this assessment. The Morrison double-moment microphysics scheme is newly coupled with interactive aerosols in the model. The 31-day (15 October-16 November 2008) WRF-Chem simulation with aerosol-cloud interactions (AERO hereafter) is also compared to a simulation (MET hereafter) with fixed cloud droplet number concentrations in the microphysics scheme and simplified cloud and aerosol treatments in the radiation scheme. The well-simulated aerosol quantities (aerosol number, mass composition and optical properties), and the inclusion of full aerosol-cloud couplings lead to significant improvements in many features of the simulated stratocumulus clouds: cloud optical properties and microphysical properties such as cloud top effective radius, cloud water path, and cloud optical thickness. In addition to accounting for the aerosol direct and semi-direct effects, these improvements feed back to the simulation of boundary-layer characteristics and energy budgets. Particularly, inclusion of interactive aerosols in AERO strengthens the temperature and humidity gradients within the capping inversion layer and lowers the marine boundary layer (MBL) depth by 130 m from that of the MET simulation. These differences are associated with weaker entrainment and stronger mean subsidence at the top of the MBL in AERO. Mean top-of-atmosphere outgoing shortwave fluxes, surface latent heat, and surface downwelling longwave fluxes are in better agreement with observations in AERO, compared to the MET simulation. Nevertheless, biases in some of the simulated meteorological quantities (e.g., MBL temperature and humidity) and aerosol quantities (e.g., underestimations of accumulation mode aerosol number) might affect simulated stratocumulus and energy fluxes over the Southeastern Pacific, and require further investigation. The well-simulated timing and outflow patterns of polluted and clean episodes demonstrate the model's ability to capture daily/synoptic scale variations of aerosol and cloud properties, and suggest that the model is suitable for studying atmospheric processes associated with pollution outflow over the ocean. The overall performance of the regional model in simulating mesoscale clouds and boundary layer properties is encouraging and suggests that reproducing gradients of aerosol and cloud droplet concentrations and coupling cloud-aerosol-radiation processes are important when simulating marine stratocumulus over the Southeast Pacific.

Yang Q.; Lee Y.; Gustafson Jr., W. I.; Fast, J. D.; Wang, H.; Easter, R. C.; Morrison, H.; Chapman, E. G.; Spak, S. N.; Mena-Carrasco, M. A.

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

191

Assessing regional scale predictions of aerosols, marine stratocumulus, and their interactions during VOCALS-REx using WRF-Chem  

SciTech Connect

In the recent chemistry version (v3.3) of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model, we have coupled the Morrison double-moment microphysics scheme with interactive aerosols so that full two-way aerosol-cloud interactions are included in simulations. We have used this new WRF-Chem functionality in a study focused on assessing predictions of aerosols, marine stratocumulus clouds, and their interactions over the Southeast Pacific using measurements from the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) and satellite retrievals. This study also serves as a detailed analysis of our WRF-Chem simulations contributed to the VOCALS model Assessment (VOCA) project. The WRF-Chem 31-day (October 15-November 16, 2008) simulation with aerosol-cloud interactions (AERO hereafter) is also compared to a simulation (MET hereafter) with fixed cloud droplet number concentrations assumed by the default in Morrison microphysics scheme with no interactive aerosols. The well-predicted aerosol properties such as number, mass composition, and optical depth lead to significant improvements in many features of the predicted stratocumulus clouds: cloud optical properties and microphysical properties such as cloud top effective radius, cloud water path, and cloud optical thickness, and cloud macrostructure such as cloud depth and cloud base height. These improvements in addition to the aerosol direct and semi-direct effects, in turn, feed back to the prediction of boundary-layer characteristics and energy budgets. Particularly, inclusion of interactive aerosols in AERO strengths temperature and humidity gradients within capping inversion layer and lowers the MBL depth by 150 m from that of the MET simulation. Mean top-of-the-atmosphere outgoing shortwave fluxes, surface latent heat, and surface downwelling longwave fluxes are in better agreement with observations in AERO, compared to the MET simulation. Nevertheless, biases in some of the simulated meteorological quantities (e.g., MBL temperature and humidity over the remote ocean) and aerosol quantities (e.g., overestimations of supermicron sea salt mass) might affect simulated stratocumulus and energy fluxes over the SEP, and require further investigations. Although not perfect, the overall performance of the regional model in simulating mesoscale aerosol-cloud interactions is encouraging and suggests that the inclusion of spatially varying aerosol characteristics is important when simulating marine stratocumulus over the southeastern Pacific.

Yang, Qing; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.; Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Morrison, H.; Lee, Y.- N.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Spak, S. N.; Mena-Carrasco, M. A.

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

192

2012 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses  

SciTech Connect

The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs), with the results submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE 1999a, 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2012. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2012 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2012 include the following: ? Release of a special analysis for the Area 3 RWMS assessing the continuing validity of the PA and CA ? Development of a new Area 5 RWMS closure inventory estimate based on disposals through FY 2012 ? Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis ? Development of version 4.114 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA model The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. The FY 2012 review of operations, facility design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D results for the Area 3 RWMS indicates no changes that would impact PA validity. A special analysis using the Area 3 RWMS v2.102 GoldSim PA model was prepared to update the PA results for the Area 3 RWMS in FY 2012. The special analysis concludes that all performance objectives can be met and the Area 3 RWMS PA remains valid. There is no need to the revise the Area 3 RWMS PA. Review of Area 5 RWMS operations, design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D activities indicates no significant changes other than an increase in the inventory disposed. The FY 2012 PA results, generated with the Area 5 RWMS v4.114 GoldSim PA model, indicate that there continues to be a reasonable expectation of meeting all performance objectives. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. A review of changes potentially impacting the CAs indicates that no significant changes occurred in FY 2012. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter CA results or conclusions were found. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the Underground Test Area source term (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 97), is scheduled for FY 2024, following the completion of the Yucca Flat CAU 97 Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan in FY 2016. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat CAU 98 results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the CAU 98 closure report in FY 2015. Near-term R&D efforts will focus on continuing development of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA/CA and inventory models.

Shott, G. [National Security Technologies, LLC

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

193

NREL: Energy Analysis: Resource Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Assessment Resource Assessment NREL has developed maps and tools to conduct renewable energy resource assessments at the state, national and international level. Around the world, interest is growing in renewable energy as a strategy to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and increase energy security. The starting point for new renewable energy projects is a characterization of the renewable resources available across a region, a resource assessment. NREL uses geospatial data sets to identify regions that are appropriate for renewable development and those that should be excluded such as water bodies, urban areas, cropland, forests, very steep terrain, and protected areas. Once resource data are available for a region, NREL can estimate the theoretical potential, or upper limit, for renewable energy in an area.

194

4.1 ON ISSUES OF TORNADO DAMAGE ASSESSMENT AND F-SCALE ASSIGNMENT IN AGRICULTURAL AREAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

established that the majority of the world's tornadoes occur in "tornado alley" of the United States plains region. The plains is generally characterized by an agrarian based economy and a relatively low population density. While the plains region receives the bulk of the tornadoes in the United States, from

195

Tecno-economic assessment of an off-grid PV-powered community kitchen for developing regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nowadays, around 1.44 billion people have still no access to electricity, most of them living in rural areas in South and Southeast Asia, and Sub-Saharan Africa. The major residential energy consumption in these regions is for cooking. This energy demand is covered by firewood, agricultural residues and/or animal dung, implying often exhausting work for the collection and causing deforestation. Solar thermal cooking systems have been developed and promoted, although their success has been limited. This paper follows another solar cooking approach by evaluating the option of combining an off-grid PV system (PV generator + battery) with very low demand electric cooking appliances. The PV-battery system to supply the load demand for the electric cooking appliances for communities of 50 persons has been calculated. Thereby, the five countries with the highest population without access to electricity have been taken into account: India, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Pakistan and Nigeria. The levelized energy cost is around 3 c€ per meal or less and the life cycle emissions of the PV-battery system (manufacturing, transport and decommissioning) are around 7 gCO2 per meal.

Rodolfo Dufo-López; Ghassan Zubi; Gian Vincenzo Fracastoro

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

2011 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses  

SciTech Connect

The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs), with the results submitted annually to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE, 1999a; 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2011. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2011 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R and D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R and D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2011 include the following: (1) Operation of a new shallow land disposal unit and a new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-compliant lined disposal unit at the Area 5 RWMS; (2) Development of new closure inventory estimates based on disposals through FY 2011; (3) Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis; (4) Development of version 2.102 of the Area 3 RWMS GoldSim PA model; and (5) Development of version 4.113 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA model. Analysis of the latest available data using the Area 5 RWMS v4.113 GoldSim PA model indicates that all performance objectives can be met. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. In FY 2011, there were no operational changes, monitoring results, or R and D results for the Area 3 RWMS that would impact PA validity. Despite the increase in waste volume and inventory at the Area 3 RWMS since 1996 when the PA was approved, the facility performance evaluated with the Area 3 RWMS PA GoldSim model, version 2.0 (with the final closure inventory), remains well below the performance objectives set forth in U.S. Department of Energy Order DOE O 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management' (DOE, 2001). The conclusions of the Area 3 RWMS PA remain valid. A special analysis was prepared to update the PA and CA results for the Area 3 RWMS in FY 2011. Release of the special analysis is planned for FY 2012. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter CA results or conclusions were found. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat Underground Test Area (UGTA) results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the closure report for the Frenchman Flat UGTA corrective action unit (CAU) in FY 2015. An industrial site, CAU 547, with corrective action sites near the Area 3 RWMS was found to have a significant plutonium inventory in 2009. CAU 547 will be evaluated for inclusion of future revisions or updates of the Area 3 RWMS CA. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the UGTA source terms, is expected in FY 2024, following the completion of the Yucca Flat CAU Corrective Action Decision Document, scheduled for FY 2023. Near-term R and D efforts will focus on continuing development of the Are

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

197

Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions Tim Griffis1, Xuhui Lee2, John Baker3, Peter, but mitigation strategies have been limited by the large uncertainties in both direct and indirect emission

Minnesota, University of

198

Final Environmental Assessment for Proposed Closure of the Airport Landfills Within Technical Area 73 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15 15 Final Environmental Assessment for Proposed Closure of the Airport Landfills Within Technical Area 73 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico May 22, 2005 Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Site Office Final EA for Proposed Closure of the Airport Landfills within TA-73 at LANL Page iii of viii Contents Acronyms and Terms .................................................................................................................. vi 1.0 Purpose and Need ................................................................................................. 1 1.1 Introduction.............................................................................................................

199

A 10-year content analysis to assess research theme areas in agricultural education: gap analysis of future research priorities in the discipline.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 10?YEAR CONTENT ANALYSIS TO ASSESS RESEARCH THEME AREAS IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION: GAP ANALYSIS OF FUTURE RESEARCH PRIORITIES IN THE DISCIPLINE A Dissertation by LESLIE DAWN JENKINS EDGAR Submitted to the Office of Graduate... IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION: GAP ANALYSIS OF FUTURE RESEARCH PRIORITIES IN THE DISCIPLINE A Dissertation by LESLIE DAWN JENKINS EDGAR Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Edgar, Leslie Dawn

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.110  

SciTech Connect

Results for Version 4.110 of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) performance assessment (PA) model are summarized. Version 4.110 includes the fiscal year (FY) 2010 inventory estimate, including a future inventory estimate. Version 4.110 was implemented in GoldSim 10.11(SP4). The following changes have been implemented since the last baseline model, Version 4.105: (1) Updated the inventory and disposal unit configurations with data through the end of FY 2010. (1) Implemented Federal Guidance Report 13 Supplemental CD dose conversion factors (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1999). Version 4.110 PA results comply with air pathway and all-pathways annual total effective dose (TED) performance objectives (Tables 2 and 3, Figures 1 and 2). Air pathways results decrease moderately for all scenarios. The time of the maximum for the air pathway open rangeland scenario shifts from 1,000 to 100 years (y). All-pathways annual TED increases for all scenarios except the resident scenario. The maximum member of public all-pathways dose occurs at 1,000 y for the resident farmer scenario. The resident farmer dose was predominantly due to technetium-99 (Tc-99) (82 percent) and lead-210 (Pb-210) (13 percent). Pb-210 present at 1,000 y is produced predominantly by radioactive decay of uranium-234 (U-234) present at the time of disposal. All results for the postdrilling and intruder-agriculture scenarios comply with the performance objectives (Tables 4 and 5, Figures 3 and 4). The postdrilling intruder results are similar to Version 4.105 results. The intruder-agriculture results are similar to Version 4.105, except for the Pit 6 Radium Disposal Unit (RaDU). The intruder-agriculture result for the Shallow Land Burial (SLB) disposal units is a significant fraction of the performance objective and exceeds the performance objective at the 95th percentile. The intruder-agriculture dose is due predominantly to Tc-99 (75 percent) and U-238 (9.5 percent). The acute intruder scenario results comply with all performance objectives (Tables 6 and 7, Figures 5 and 6). The acute construction result for the SLB disposal units decreases significantly with this version. The maximum acute intruder dose occurs at 1,000 y for the SLB disposal units under the acute construction scenario. The acute intruder dose is caused by multiple radionuclides including U-238 (31 percent), Th-229 (28 percent), plutonium-239 (8.6 percent), U-233 (7.8 percent), and U-234 (6.7 percent). All results for radon-222 (Rn-222) flux density comply with the performance objective (Table 8, Figure 7). The mean Pit 13 RaDU flux density is close to the 0.74 Bq m{sup -2} s{sup -1} limit.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional assessment area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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201

Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii). Task 3: water resources evaluation. Topical report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii). Task 3: water resources evaluation. Topical report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The fundamental objective of the water resources analysis was to assess the availability of surface and ground water for potential use as power plant make-up water in the major geothermal areas of California. The analysis was concentrated on identifying the major sources of surface and ground water, potential limitations on the usage of this water, and the

202

2009 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Wate Management Site (RWMS) Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) in fiscal year (FY) 2009. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2009 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of the Surveillance Program of the High-Level Waste Storage Tanks at Hanford :.I LALI iE REJ 163 ROOM 1t 4 F77L. -77 .:earmn OfEeg Asitn Sertr fo niomn 4 z. r...

204

Measurements of daily urinary uranium excretion in German peacekeeping personnel and residents of the Kosovo region to assess potential intakes of depleted uranium (DU)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Following the end of the Kosovo conflict, in June 1999, a study was instigated to evaluate whether there was a cause for concern of health risk from depleted uranium (DU) to German peacekeeping personnel serving in the Balkans. In addition, the investigations were extended to residents of Kosovo and southern Serbia, who lived in areas where DU ammunitions were deployed. In order to assess a possible DU intake, both the urinary uranium excretion of volunteer residents and water samples were collected and analysed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). More than 1300 urine samples from peacekeeping personnel and unexposed controls of different genders and age were analysed to determine uranium excretion parameters. The urine measurements for 113 unexposed subjects revealed a daily uranium excretion rate with a geometric mean of 13.9 ng/d (geometric standard deviation (GSD) = 2.17). The analysis of 1228 urine samples from the peacekeeping personnel resulted in a geometric mean of 12.8 ng/d (GSD = 2.60). It follows that both unexposed controls and peacekeeping personnel excreted similar amounts of uranium. Inter-subject variation in uranium excretion was high and no significant age-specific differences were found. The second part of the study monitored 24 h urine samples provided by selected residents of Kosovo and adjacent regions of Serbia compared to controls from Munich, Germany. Total uranium and isotope ratios were measured in order to determine DU content. 235U/238U ratios were within ± 0.3% of the natural value, and 236U/238U was less than 2 × 10? 7, indicating no significant DU in any of the urine samples provided, despite total uranium excretion being relatively high in some cases. Measurements of ground and tap water samples from regions where DU munitions were deployed did not show any contamination with DU, except in one sample. It is concluded that both peacekeeping personnel and residents serving or living in the Balkans, respectively, were not exposed to significant amounts of DU.

U. Oeh; N.D. Priest; P. Roth; K.V. Ragnarsdottir; W.B. Li; V. Höllriegl; M.F. Thirlwall; B. Michalke; A. Giussani; P. Schramel; H.G. Paretzke

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Results of Phase I groundwater quality assessment for single-shell tank waste management areas T and TX-TY at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a Phase I, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater quality assessment for the Richland Field Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE-RL) under the requirements of the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement. The purpose of the investigation was to determine if the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas (WMAs) T and TX-TY have impacted groundwater quality. Waste Management Areas T and TX-TY, located in the northern part of the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site, contain the 241-T, 241-TX, and 241-TY tank farms and ancillary waste systems. These two units are regulated under RCRA interim-status regulations (under 40 CFR 265.93) and were placed in assessment groundwater monitoring because of elevated specific conductance in downgradient wells. Anomalous concentrations of technetium-99, chromium, nitrate, iodine-129, and cobalt-60 also were observed in some downgradient wells. Phase I assessment, allowed under 40 CFR 265, provides the owner-operator of a facility with the opportunity to show that the observed contamination has a source other than the regulated unit. For this Phase I assessment, PNNL evaluated available information on groundwater chemistry and past waste management practices in the vicinity of WMAs T and TX-TY. Background contaminant concentrations in the vicinity of WMAs T and TX-TY are the result of several overlapping contaminant plumes resulting from past-practice waste disposal operations. This background has been used as baseline for determining potential WMA impacts on groundwater.

Hodges, F.N.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Economic Assessment and Impacts Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Vehicles on Electric Utilities And Regional U.S. Power Grids  

SciTech Connect

Part 2 provides an economic assessment of the impacts of PHEV adoption on vehicle owners and on electric utilities. The paper finds favorable impacts on LCC to vehicle owners, and average costs of power for both types of utilities.

Scott, Michael J.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Elliott, Douglas B.; Warwick, William M.

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

Economic Assessment And Impacts Assessment Of Plug-In Hybrid Vehicles On Electric Utilities And Regional U.S. Power Grids  

SciTech Connect

Part 2 provides an economic assessment of the impacts of PHEV adoption on vehicle owners and on electric utilities. The paper finds favorable impacts on LCC to vehicle owners, and average costs of power for both types of utilities.

Scott, Michael J.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Elliott, Douglas B.; Warwick, William M.

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

208

Remedial investigation report on waste area grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 4, Appendix C, Risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 is part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and is located on the United States Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE-ORR). The site lies southeast of Haw Ridge in Melton Valley and comprises approximately 32 ha (80 ac) [12 ha (30 ac) of forested area and the balance in grassed fields]. Waste Area Grouping 5 consists of several contaminant source areas for the disposal of low-level radioactive, transuranic (TRU), and fissile wastes (1959 to 1973) as well as inorganic and organic chemical wastes. Wastes were buried in trenches and auger holes. Radionuclides from buried wastes are being transported by shallow groundwater to Melton Branch and White Oak Creek. Different chemicals of potential concern (COPCs) were identified (e.g., cesium-137, strontium-90, radium-226, thorium-228, etc.); other constituents and chemicals, such as vinyl chloride, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, trichloroethene, were also identified as COPCs. Based on the results of this assessment contaminants of concern (COCs) were subsequently identified. The objectives of the WAG 5 Baseline Human Health Risk Assessment (BHHRA) are to document the potential health hazards (i.e., risks) that may result from contaminants on or released from the site and provide information necessary for reaching informed remedial decisions. As part of the DOE-Oak Ridge Operations (ORO), ORNL and its associated waste/contamination sites fall under the auspices of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), also known as Superfund under the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA). The results of the BHHRA will (1) document and evaluate risks to human health, (2) help determine the need for remedial action, (3) determine chemical concentrations protective of current and future human receptors, and (4) help select and compare various remedial alternatives.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Health assessment for Pasco Sanitary Landfill, Pasco, Franklin County, Washington, Region 10. CERCLIS No. WAD991281874. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

In compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as amended, Health Assessments are also prepared for non-NPL sites in response to requests from States and individuals. In the report, the presence and nature of health hazards at this site are assessed, and the public health implications specific to this site are evaluated. The Health Assessment is based on such factors as the nature, concentration, toxicity, and extent of contamination at the site; the existence of potential pathways for the human exposure; the size and nature of the community likely to be exposed; and any other information available.

Not Available

1990-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

210

Middle Snake Draft Assessment 59 May 2004 3 Biological Characterization and Status  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural area designations, pending further local assessment and refinement (ICBEMP 1997). Thirty percentMiddle Snake Draft Assessment 59 May 2004 3 Biological Characterization and Status 3.1 Biodiversity and Endemism Regional Context Two recent regional assessment efforts have identified portions of the Middle

211

Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Genetic Variability of Cell Wall Degradability for the Selection of Alfalfa with Improved Saccharification Efficiency Marc-Olivier Duceppe & Annick Bertrand & Sivakumar Pattathil & Jeffrey Miller & Yves Castonguay & Michael G. Hahn & Réal Michaud & Marie-Pier Dubé # Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2012 Abstract Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) has a high potential for sustainable bioethanol production, particularly because of its low reliance on N fertilizer. We assessed near-infrared reflec- tance spectroscopy (NIRS) as a high-throughput technique to measure cell wall (CW) degradability in a large number of lignified alfalfa stem samples. We also used a powerful immu- nological approach, glycome profiling, and chemical analyses to increase our knowledge of the composition of CW poly- saccharides of alfalfa stems with various levels

212

Assessing the Capability of a Regional-Scale Weather Model to Simulate Extreme Precipitation Patterns and Flooding in Central Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A regional-scale weather model is used to determine the potential for flood forecasting based on model-predicted rainfall. Extreme precipitation and flooding events are a significant concern in central Texas, due to both the high occurrence and ...

Marla R. Knebl Lowrey; Zong-Liang Yang

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Assessment of ground-based atmospheric observations for verification of greenhouse gas emissions from an urban region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...GHG concentrations, , and radon-222 from Heidelberg. Unfortunately...0) (http://vulcan.project.asu.edu) (27...emissions: method to support international climate agreements, National Research Council...emissions from an urban region. | International agreements to limit greenhouse...

Kathryn McKain; Steven C. Wofsy; Thomas Nehrkorn; Janusz Eluszkiewicz; James R. Ehleringer; Britton B. Stephens

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Cultural Resource Assessment of the Test Area North Demolition Landfill at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The proposed new demolition landfill at Test Area North on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) will support ongoing demolition and decontamination within the facilities on the north end of the INEEL. In June of 2003, the INEEL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, field surveys, and coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify all cultural resources that might be adversely affected by the project and to provide recommendations to protect those listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. These investigations showed that landfill construction and operation would affect two significant cultural resources. This report outlines protective measures to ensure that these effects are not adverse.

Brenda R. Pace

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Assessment of the ocean circulation in the Azores region as predicted by a numerical model assimilating altimeter data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) on the new perspectives in data assimilation). In the SIMAN project (SIMulation de l'Atlantique Nord Stream area (Blayo et al., 1996). It has been shown that the model is able to reproduce

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

216

A tiered approach for the human health risk assessment for consumption of vegetables from with cadmium-contaminated land in urban areas  

SciTech Connect

Consumption of vegetables that are grown in urban areas takes place worldwide. In developing countries, vegetables are traditionally grown in urban areas for cheap food supply. In developing and developed countries, urban gardening is gaining momentum. A problem that arises with urban gardening is the presence of contaminants in soil, which can be taken up by vegetables. In this study, a scientifically-based and practical procedure has been developed for assessing the human health risks from the consumption of vegetables from cadmium-contaminated land. Starting from a contaminated site, the procedure follows a tiered approach which is laid out as follows. In Tier 0, the plausibility of growing vegetables is investigated. In Tier 1 soil concentrations are compared with the human health-based Critical soil concentration. Tier 2 offers the possibility for a detailed site-specific human health risk assessment in which calculated exposure is compared to the toxicological reference dose. In Tier 3, vegetable concentrations are measured and tested following a standardized measurement protocol. To underpin the derivation of the Critical soil concentrations and to develop a tool for site-specific assessment the determination of the representative concentration in vegetables has been evaluated for a range of vegetables. The core of the procedure is based on Freundlich-type plant–soil relations, with the total soil concentration and the soil properties as variables. When a significant plant–soil relation is lacking for a specific vegetable a geometric mean of BioConcentrationFactors (BCF) is used, which is normalized according to soil properties. Subsequently, a ‘conservative’ vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor is calculated as basis for the Critical soil concentration (Tier 1). The tool to perform site-specific human health risk assessment (Tier 2) includes the calculation of a ‘realistic worst case’ site-specific vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor. -- Highlights: • A scientifically-based and practical procedure has been developed for assessing the human health risks from the consumption of vegetables. • Uptake characteristics of cadmium in a series of vegetables is represented by a vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor. • Calculations and measurement steps are combined.

Swartjes, Frank A., E-mail: frank.swartjes@rivm.nl; Versluijs, Kees W.; Otte, Piet F.

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Italy Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region Larderello Geothermal Area Mount Amiata Geothermal Area Travale-Radicondoli Geothermal Area Energy Generation Facilities within the Italy Geothermal Region Bagnore 3...

218

Health assessment for Industrial Latex Corporation, Wallington Borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NJD981178411. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as amended, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has prepared Health Assessment reports for sites currently on, or proposed for, the National Priorities List. In the report, the presence and nature of health hazards at this site are assessed, and the public health implications specific to this site are evaluated. The Health Assessment is based on such factors as the nature, concentration, toxicity, and extent of contamination at the site; the existence of potential pathways for the human exposure; the size and nature of the community likely to be exposed; and any other information available.

Not Available

1990-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

219

Brine and Gas Flow Patterns Between Excavated Areas and Disturbed Rock Zone in the 1996 Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for a Single Drilling Intrusion that Penetrates Repository and Castile Brine Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is located in southeastern New Mexico, is being developed for the geologic disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Waste disposal will take place in panels excavated in a bedded salt formation approximately 2000 ft (610 m) below the land surface. The BRAGFLO computer program which solves a system of nonlinear partial differential equations for two-phase flow, was used to investigate brine and gas flow patterns in the vicinity of the repository for the 1996 WIPP performance assessment (PA). The present study examines the implications of modeling assumptions used in conjunction with BRAGFLO in the 1996 WIPP PA that affect brine and gas flow patterns involving two waste regions in the repository (i.e., a single waste panel and the remaining nine waste panels), a disturbed rock zone (DRZ) that lies just above and below these two regions, and a borehole that penetrates the single waste panel and a brine pocket below this panel. The two waste regions are separated by a panel closure. The following insights were obtained from this study. First, the impediment to flow between the two waste regions provided by the panel closure model is reduced due to the permeable and areally extensive nature of the DRZ adopted in the 1996 WIPP PA, which results in the DRZ becoming an effective pathway for gas and brine movement around the panel closures and thus between the two waste regions. Brine and gas flow between the two waste regions via the DRZ causes pressures between the two to equilibrate rapidly, with the result that processes in the intruded waste panel are not isolated from the rest of the repository. Second, the connection between intruded and unintruded waste panels provided by the DRZ increases the time required for repository pressures to equilibrate with the overlying and/or underlying units subsequent to a drilling intrusion. Third, the large and areally extensive DRZ void volumes is a significant source of brine to the repository, which is consumed in the corrosion of iron and thus contributes to increased repository pressures. Fourth, the DRZ itself lowers repository pressures by providing storage for gas and access to additional gas storage in areas of the repository. Fifth, given the pathway that the DRZ provides for gas and brine to flow around the panel closures, isolation of the waste panels by the panel closures was not essential to compliance with the U.S. Environment Protection Agency's regulations in the 1996 WIPP PA.

ECONOMY,KATHLEEN M.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; VAUGHN,PALMER

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region oil and gas operation. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 October--31 December 1994  

SciTech Connect

Task 3 (Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of NORM, Heavy Metals, and Organics) work included analyses of samples. Task 4 (Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas) activities involved the continued analyses of samples and field sampling at Bay de Chene. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Region) activities included preparing a draft final report. Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Seafood Consumption and Use Patterns) work also involved preparing a draft final report. Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan) activities included a presentation at the Minerals Management Service Information Transfer Meeting for the Gulf of Mexico OCS Region. Task 8 (Project Management and Deliverables) activities involved the submission of the necessary reports and routine management.

Gettleson, D.A.

1995-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional assessment area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Downscaling Global Land Cover Projections from an Integrated Assessment Model for Use in Regional Analyses: Results and Evaluation for the US from 2005 to 2095  

SciTech Connect

Projections of land cover change generated from Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and other economic-based models can be applied for analyses of environmental impacts at subregional and landscape scales. For those IAM and economic models that project land use at the sub-continental or regional scale, these projections must be downscaled and spatially distributed prior to use in climate or ecosystem models. Downscaling efforts to date have been conducted at the national extent with relatively high spatial resolution (30m) and at the global extent with relatively coarse spatial resolution (0.5 degree).

West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Huang, Maoyi; Wolf, Julie; Thomson, Allison M.

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

222

Integrated assessment of Hadley Center (HadCM2) climate-change impacts on agricultural productivity and irrigation water supply in the conterminous United States: Part II. Regional agricultural production in 2030 and 2095  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A national assessment (NA) evaluated the potential consequences of climate change and variability on the agriculture, water resources, as well as other economic and natural resource sectors in the United States. As part of this process, we used scenarios of the HadCM2 GCM and the EPIC agroecosystem model to evaluate climate-change impacts on crop yields and ecosystem processes. Baseline climate data were obtained from national records for 1961–1990. The scenario runs for 2025–2034 and 2090–2099 were extracted from a HadCM2 run. EPIC was run on 204 representative farms under current climate and two 10-year periods centered on 2030 and 2095, each at CO2 concentrations of 365 and 560 ppm. Crops were simulated under both dryland and irrigated management, with irrigation water supply estimates taken from the HUMUS simulations in Paper 1. Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and California are projected to experience significant temperature increases by 2030. Slight cooling is expected by 2030 in Alabama, Florida, Maine, Montana, Idaho, and Utah. Larger areas are projected to experience increased warming by 2095. Uniform precipitation increases are expected by 2030 in the northeast. These increases are predicted to expand to the eastern half of the country by 2095. Regionally, dryland corn yields could increase, decrease or remain unchanged under the two scenarios. EPIC simulated yield increases for the Great Lakes, Corn Belt and Northeast regions. Simulated yields of irrigated corn were predicted to increase in almost all regions. Soybean yields could decrease in the Northern and Southern Plains, the Corn Belt, Delta, Appalachian, and Southeast regions and increase in the Lakes and Northeast regions. Simulated wheat yields exhibited upward trends under scenarios of climate-change. Evapotranspiration in dryland corn is expected to increase in both future periods while water-use efficiency will decrease. National corn production in 2030 and 2095 could be affected by changes in three major producing regions. In 2030, corn production could increase in the Corn Belt and Lakes regions but decrease in the Northern Plains leading to an overall decrease in national production. National wheat production is expected to increase during both future periods. A proxy indicator was developed to provide a sense of where in the country, and when water would be available to satisfy change in irrigation demand for corn and alfalfa production as these are influenced by the HadCM2 scenarios and CO2-fertilization. Irrigation requirement by irrigated crops declines under these scenarios as transpiration is suppressed.

R.César Izaurralde; Norman J. Rosenberg; Robert A. Brown; Allison M. Thomson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Regional groundwater modeling of the saturated zone in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Iterative Performance Assessment, Phase 2  

SciTech Connect

Results of groundwater modeling of the saturated zone in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain are presented. Both a regional (200 {times} 200 km) and subregional (50 {times} 50 km) model were used in the analyses. Simulations were conducted to determine the impact of various disruptive that might take place over the life span of a proposed Yucca Mountain geologic conditions repository on the groundwater flow field, as well as changes in the water-table elevations. These conditions included increases in precipitation and groundwater recharge within the regional model, changes in permeability of existing hydrogeologic barriers, a:nd the vertical intrusion of volcanic dikes at various orientations through the saturated zone. Based on the regional analysis, the rise in the water-table under Yucca Mountain due to various postulated conditions ranged from only a few meters to 275 meters. Results of the subregional model analysis, which was used to simulate intrusive dikes approximately 4 kilometers in length in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, showed water-table rises ranging from a few meters to as much as 103 meters. Dikes oriented approximately north-south beneath Yucca Mountain produced the highest water-table rises. The conclusions drawn from this analysis are likely to change as more site-specific data become available and as the assumptions in the model are improved.

Ahola, M.; Sagar, B. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

EA-1853: Final Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DOE/EA-1853 PERRIN RANCH WIND ENERGY INTERCONNECTION PROJECT COCONINO COUNTY, ARIZONA Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region P.O. Box 6457 Phoenix, Arizona 85005 Prepared by SWCA Environmental Consultants 3033 North Central Avenue, Suite 145 Phoenix, Arizona 85012 (602) 274-3831 www.swca.com July 2011 July 2011 i CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................................ 1 1. INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................ 1 1.1 BACKGROUND .......................................................................................................................... 1

225

Multi-criteria assessment of combined cooling, heating and power systems located in different regions in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As an efficient measure for rational use of energy, the combined cooling, heating and power (CCHP) system plays an increasingly important role in commercial buildings in Japan. In this study, aiming at examining the influences of building type and climate condition on the introduction of CCHP systems, four representative commercial building categories (hotel, hospital, store and office) located in six major climate zones in Japan are compared and evaluated. In order to have a comprehensive understanding about the performances of the assumed CCHP systems, besides simple assessment from energy, economic and environmental aspects, a multi-criteria evaluation method has been employed for the final determination. According to the assessment results, the CCHP systems in hotels and hospitals enjoy better overall performances than those in stores and offices. On the other hand, the potentials of energy-saving and CO2 emission reduction of the CCHP systems in the mild climate zones are smaller than that in other climate zones. In addition, the performances of CCHP systems in stores and offices located in Kagoshima are superior to those in other cities; while, CCHP systems in hospitals and hotels located in Sapporo illustrate better overall performance.

Qiong Wu; Hongbo Ren; Weijun Gao; Jianxing Ren

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Health assessment for H and H Incorporated Burn Site, Farrington, Virginia, Region 3. CERCLIS No. VAD980539878. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The H H Incorporated Burn Site, located in Hanover County, Virginia, contains a pit where dry printing ink residues were disposed of. Groundwater contaminants of concern (and maximum concentrations) include benzene (25 ppb), toluene (1180 ppb), chromium (110 ppb), barium (1,300 ppb), beryllium (20 ppb). Organics, including phthalates (131,000 ppb), vinyl chloride (3,600 ppb), toluene (82 ppb), and xylenes (45 ppb), were detected in leachate and/or runoff, presumably emanating from the pit area. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of human exposure to hazardous substances.

Not Available

1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

227

Using a Regional Chemical Transport Model for the Analysis of Gaseous and Particulate Air Pollutants in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air quality in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) is the subject of many studies due to concerns from high emissions and their adverse effects on public health and the environment. In this study, a high resolution simulation is performed...

Ali, Sajjad Ghulam

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

228

Los Azufres Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Michoaciin, Mexico Exploration Region: Transmexican Volcanic Belt GEA Development Phase: Coordinates:...

229

Health assessment for Motco, Incorporated, Texas City, Galveston County, Texas, Region 6. CERCLIS No. TXD980629851. Addendum. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The MOTCO National Priorities List (NPL) site is located in the City of LaMarque, Galveston County, Texas. The contaminants of concern consist of several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (semi-VOCs). Evidence of heavy metal contamination was also noted. Areas of highest contaminant concentration are in the subsurface soil, on-site pits, and shallow ground water. Population exposure to the site is limited due to location; those most likely to be exposed are unprotected remedial workers and trespassers. Although these groups might be exposed by skin contact with, ingestion of, or inhalation of contaminated soil and pit waste, there is no evidence that exposures to site contaminants are occurring. Therefore, the site is currently classified as no public health hazard. The ATSDR Health Activities Recommendation Panel (HARP) and the Texas Department of Health (TDH) have evaluated the MOTCO site for appropriate follow-up with respect to health activities.

Not Available

1992-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

230

Public health assessment for Reynolds Metals Company, Troutdale, Multnomah County, Oregon, Region 10. Cerclis No. ORD009412677. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Reynolds Metals Company in Troutdale, Oregon, is a primary aluminum plant. When operating, the plant produced wastes that were contaminated with aluminum, mercury, fluoride, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and cyanide. Studies are currently underway to determine the extent of environmental contamination and subsequent clean-up efforts which will be required. People may be exposed to contaminated soils and sediments in the area bordering the Columbia and Sandy rivers. Contamination at the site may have contributed to contamination of fish in the Columbia River, although it is difficult to determine what effect the site may have. Workers at the Reynolds site may also be exposed to contaminated soils and sediments, particularly those workers who are involved in outdoor activities.

NONE

1997-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

231

Property:GeothermalRegion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Name GeothermalRegion Property Name GeothermalRegion Property Type Page Pages using the property "GeothermalRegion" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area + Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region + Adak Geothermal Area + Alaska Geothermal Region + Aidlin Geothermal Facility + Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region + Akun Strait Geothermal Area + Alaska Geothermal Region + Akutan Fumaroles Geothermal Area + Alaska Geothermal Region + Akutan Geothermal Project + Alaska Geothermal Region + Alum Geothermal Area + Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region + Alum Geothermal Project + Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region + Alvord Hot Springs Geothermal Area + Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region +

232

Preliminary geohydrologic conceptual model of the Los Medanos region near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for the purpose of performance assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a geohydrologic conceptual model of the northern Delaware Basin to be used in modeling three-dimensional, regional ground-water flow for assessing the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the Los Medanos region near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Geochemical and hydrological evidence indicates that flow is transient in the Rustler Formation and the Capitan aquifer in response to changing geologic, hydrologic, and climatic conditions. Before the Pleistocene, ground-water flow in the Rustler Formation was generally eastward, but uneven tilting of the Delaware Basin lowered the regional base level and formed fractures in the evaporitic sequence of rocks approximately parallel to the basin axis. Dissolution along the fractures, coupled with erosion, formed Nash Draw. Also, the drop in base level resulted in an increase in the carrying power of the Pecos River, which began incising the Capitan/aquifer near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Erosion and downcutting released hydraulic pressure that caused a reversal in Rustler ground-water flow direction near the WIPP. Flow in the Rustler west of the WIPP is toward Nash Draw and eventually toward Malaga Bend; flow south of the WIPP is toward Malaga Bend. 126 refs., 70 figs., 18 tabs.

Brinster, K.F. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Energy Storage for Variable Renewable Energy Resource Integration - A Regional Assessment for the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP)  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses the following key questions in the discussion on the integration of renewable energy resources in the Pacific Northwest power grid: a) what will be the future balancing requirement to accommodate a simulated expansion of wind energy resources from 3.3 GW in 2008 to 14.4 GW in 2019 in the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP), and b) what are the most cost effective technological solutions for meeting the balancing requirements in the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP). A life-cycle analysis was performed to assess the least-cost technology option for meeting the new balancing requirement. The technologies considered in this study include conventional turbines (CT), sodium sulfur (NaS) batteries, lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries, pumped hydro energy storage (PH), and demand response (DR). Hybrid concepts that combine 2 or more of the technologies above are also evaluated. This analysis was performed with collaboration by the Bonneville Power Administration and funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Jin, Chunlian; Balducci, Patrick J.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Guo, Xinxin; Nguyen, Tony B.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

234

Regional characteristics, timing, and significance of dissolution and collapse features in Lower Cretaceous carbonate platform strata, Desoto Canyon area, offshore Alabama-Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crust ts rasota Arch Continental Crust Thick r s ional I'ust miles 100 200 0 100 200 km Boundaries between crustal types Figure 4. Structure map of the Pre-Louann basement in the study area. The map also shows the study area in relation... Cretaceous Unconformity James Limestone~ WILCOX MIOINAY Cl yl SELT IA McSh L r Euraw Tuacalooaa W P WILCOX Cia lon R play Bl fao n EUIaw I Ecalooaa L C *I 68 TARE TNANET141 rr / NF/ 1NN our clA/ CENO/ I N AN 3/ 6 r Paleocene...

Iannello, Christine

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

235

SPECIAL INQUIRY ON OFFICE OF SPECIAL COUNSEL WHISTLEBOLOWER DISCLOSURE FILE NO. DI-10-1231: ALLEGATIONS REGARDING WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION'S DESERT SOUTHWEST REGION, OAS-SR-11-01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SPECIAL INQUIRY ON OFFICE OF SPECIAL COUNSEL WHISTLEBOLOWER SPECIAL INQUIRY ON OFFICE OF SPECIAL COUNSEL WHISTLEBOLOWER DISCLOSURE FILE NO. DI-10-1231: ALLEGATIONS REGARDING WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION'S DESERT SOUTHWEST REGION, OAS-SR-11-01 The U.S. Office of Special Counsel requested the Department investigate a whistleblower disclosure that employees at the Western Area Power Administration's Desert Southwest Region engaged in conduct that constituted violation of law, rule or regulation; gross mismanagement; and gross waste of funds. Specifically, the disclosure alleged that Western had (a) improperly provided 90 megawatts per hour of free electric transmission to a full-service energy provider; and (b) violated Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Orders by continuing to allow the energy provider to receive free transmission. Our review did not substantiate the allegations.

236

Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West; Executive Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West Executive Summary David J. Hurlbut, Joyce McLaren, and Rachel Gelman National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. AROE.2000 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-57830 August 2013 Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308

237

Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(This page intentionally left blank) (This page intentionally left blank) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West David J. Hurlbut, Joyce McLaren, and Rachel Gelman National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. AROE.2000 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-57830 August 2013 Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308

238

First assessment of triclosan, triclocarban and paraben mass loads at a very large regional scale: Case of Paris conurbation (France)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The objective of this study was to examine the occurrence of parabens (5 congeners), triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC) at the scale of the Parisian sewer network and to provide representative knowledge on these compounds in France for a large area. For this purpose and in collaboration with the Parisian public sanitation service (SIAAP) in charge of the collect and treatment of the Parisian wastewater, this study focused on seven main sewer trunks of the Paris conurbation, accounting for 1 900 000 m3 d? 1, i.e., about 8 million inhabitants. Concentrations lying in the 2000–20 000 ng l? 1 ranges were found in wastewater, confirming the ubiquity of parabens, TCS and TCC in our environment and household products. Parabens (> 97%) and to a lesser extent TCS (68% in median) were mainly associated to the dissolved fraction, as demonstrated by low KD and KOC values. For the first time, this study also evaluated the pollutant mass loads per population equivalent (PE) of parabens, TCS and TCC at the large and representative scale of the Parisian conurbation. Hence, the median mass loads varied from 176 to 3040 ?g PE? 1 d? 1 for parabens and from 26 to 762 ?g PE? 1 d? 1 for TCS and TCC. Based on these results and according to the assumptions done, the extrapolation of the mass loads at the national scale pointed out an annual mass loads between 51.8 and 100.7 t y? 1 for methyl paraben (MeP) and between 11.2 and 23.5 t y? 1 for TCS. Mass loads per equivalent habitant and national mass loads are both extremely relevant and innovative data. Contrary to other countries, such data are nowadays rather difficult to gain in France and neither enquiry nor database provides access to information on the use and production of these chemicals. Since cosmetic industries are voluntarily and fully engaged in the substitution of parabens, triclosan and triclocarban in personal care product, this study could constitute a “time reference status” which could be used as a basis for future monitoring.

Johnny Gasperi; Darine Geara; Catherine Lorgeoux; Adèle Bressy; Sifax Zedek; Vincent Rocher; Antoine El Samrani; Ghassan Chebbo; Régis Moilleron

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Regional correlations and reservoir characterization studies of the Pennsylvanian system in the Anadarko Basin area of Western Oklahoma and the Panhandle of Texas  

SciTech Connect

Correlations problems have long existed between the Pennsylvanian marine clastics of the northeastern half of the Anadarko Basin and Shelf and the Pennsylvanian terrigenous washes of the extreme southwestern portion of the Anadarko Basin. These correlation problems have created nomenclature problems resulting in thousands of feet of washes often referred to on completion reports and production records as {open_quotes}granite wash{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}Atoka Wash{close_quotes} when much greater accuracy and specificity is both needed and possible. Few detailed cross-sections are available. Regional and field scale cross-sections were constructed which have been correlated well by well and field by field using nearly every deep well drilled in the basin. This process has provided for a high degree of consistency. These cross-sections have greatly diminished the correlation and nomenclature problems within the Anadarko Basin. Certain markers proved to be regionally persistent from the marine clastics into the terrigenous washes making the subdivision of thousands of feet of washes possible. Those of greatest importance were the top of the Marmaton, the Cherokee Marker, the Pink {open_quotes}Limestone{close_quotes} Interval, the top of the Atoka and the top of the Morrow. Once these and other subdivisions were made, production was allocated on a much more definitive basis. Additionally, detailed reservoir characterization of the reservoirs was conducted to include geologic and engineering data. Finally, a {open_quotes}field-specific{close_quotes} reservoir type log was chosen. A series of regional cross-sections will be presented along with the results of reservoir characterization studies conducted on reservoirs within the fields located along the cross-sections. A type log for each reservoir will also be illustrated.

Hendrickson, W.J.; Smith, P.W.; Williams, C.M. [Dwights Energydata Inc., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Superfund record of decison (EPA Region 3): Aberdeen Proving Ground (Edgewood Area), J-field soil operable unit, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, September 27, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This Operable Unit (OU) consists of two main burn pits (the Northern Main Burn Pit and Southern Main Burn Pit). It also includes the Pushout Area, which consists of the O-ethyl-S-(2-iisoprop ylaminoethyl)methyl phosphonothiolate (VX) Burn Pit, the Mustard Burn Pit, and the Liquid Smoke Disposal Pit. This decision document addresses the actions to be taken toward remediating the principal threats provided by high levels of arsenic, lead, and PCBs at the J-Field SOU: (1) the removal of isolated hot spots of contamination from the SOU followed by (2) the construction of a Protective Soil Blanket (PSB) over the J-Field SOU.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional assessment area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Occurrence, fate and ecotoxicological assessment of pharmaceutically active compounds in wastewater and sludge from wastewater treatment plants in Chongqing, the Three Gorges Reservoir Area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The occurrence, removal and ecotoxicological assessment of 21 pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) including antibiotics, analgesics, antiepileptics, antilipidemics and antihypersensitives, were studied at four municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) in Chongqing, the Three Gorges Reservoir Area. Individual treatment unit effluents, as well as primary and secondary sludge, were sampled and analyzed for the selected PhACs to evaluate their biodegradation, persistence and partitioning behaviors. PhACs were identified and quantified using high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry after solid-phase extraction. All the 21 analyzed PhACs were detected in wastewater and the target PhACs except acetaminophen, ibuprofen and gemfibrozil, were also found in sludge. The concentrations of the antibiotics and SVT were comparable to or even higher than those reported in developed countries, while the case of other target PhACs was opposite. The elimination of PhACs except acetaminophen was incomplete and a wide range of elimination efficiencies during the treatment were observed, i.e. from “negative removal” to 99.5%. The removal of PhACs was insignificant in primary and disinfection processes, and was mainly achieved during the biological treatment. Based on the mass balance analysis, biodegradation is believed to be the primary removal mechanism, whereas only about 1.5% of the total mass load of the target PhACs was removed by sorption. Experimentally estimated distribution coefficients (< 500 L/kg, with a few exceptions) also indicate that biodegradation/transformation was responsible for the removal of the target PhACs. Ecotoxicological assessment indicated that the environment concentrations of single compounds (including sulfadiazine, sulfamethoxazole, ofloxacin, azithromycin and erythromycin-H2O) in effluent and sludge, as well as the mixture of the 21 detected PhACs in effluent, sludge and receiving water had a significant ecotoxicological risk to algae. Therefore, further control of PhACs in effluent and sludge is required before their discharge and application to prevent their introduction into the environment.

Qing Yan; Xu Gao; You-Peng Chen; Xu-Ya Peng; Yi-Xin Zhang; Xiu-Mei Gan; Cheng-Fang Zi; Jin-Song Guo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region oil and gas operations. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 October--31 December 1992  

SciTech Connect

Tasks 3 (Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), Heavy Metals, and Organics) and 4 (Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas) activities have included the narrowing of the list of potential offshore platforms for study off Louisiana and Texas and a preliminary selection of three coastal sites in Louisiana. After an extensive search effort, it was concluded that no coastal sites are available in Texas. A meeting was held between the contractor, Department of Energy (DOE), and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) personnel to discuss potential sites and sampling designs. A letter was sent to the Scientific Review Committee (SRC) providing a general description of the revised site selection process and sampling designs. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Region) activities included continued evaluation of data types available for the economic analysis. Historical field basis data were acquired. The identification of permitted discharge points was also initiated. Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Seafood Consumption and Use Patterns) activities have involved the completion of the literature review. Drafts of the fisherman and wholesaler surveys were prepared. It was determined with DOE and BNL personnel that the retailer survey would be eliminated and a subsistence fisherman survey would be added. Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan) work has been delayed due to the Tasks 3 and 4 delay and cancellation of the annual US Minerals Management Service (MMS) Gulf of Mexico Region Information Transfer Meeting. Task 8 (Project Management and Deliverables) activities have involved the submission of the necessary reports and routine management.

Gettleson, D.A.

1993-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

243

A multiple-tracer approach to understanding regional groundwater flow in the Snake Valley area of the eastern Great Basin, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Groundwater in Snake Valley and surrounding basins in the eastern Great Basin province of the western United States is being targeted for large-scale groundwater extraction and export. Concern about declining groundwater levels and spring flows in western Utah as a result of the proposed groundwater withdrawals has led to efforts that have improved the understanding of this regional groundwater flow system. In this study, environmental tracers (?2H, ?18O, 3H, 14C, 3He, 4He, 20Ne, 40Ar, 84Kr, and 129Xe) and major ions from 142 sites were evaluated to investigate groundwater recharge and flow-path characteristics. With few exceptions, ?2H and ?18O show that most valley groundwater has similar ratios to mountain springs, indicating recharge is dominated by relatively high-altitude precipitation. The spatial distribution of 3H, terrigenic helium (4Heterr), and 3H/3He ages shows that modern groundwater (temperatures (NGTs) are generally 1–11 °C in Snake and southern Spring Valleys and >11 °C to the east of Snake Valley and indicate a hydraulic discontinuity between Snake and Tule Valleys across the northern Confusion Range. The combination of \\{NGTs\\} and 4Heterr shows that the majority of Snake Valley groundwater discharges as springs, evapotranspiration, and well withdrawals within Snake Valley rather than continuing northeastward to discharge at either Fish Springs or the Great Salt Lake Playa. The refined understanding of groundwater recharge and flow paths acquired from this multi-tracer investigation has broad implications for interbasin subsurface flow estimates and future groundwater development.

Philip M. Gardner; Victor M. Heilweil

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico region oil and gas operations. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1995--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

Progress is described on the determination of environmental impacts from waste discharges to the aquatic ecosystems from oil and gas operations. Task 2 (Preparation of the Sampling and Analysis Plan) activities involved revisions and additions to the Sampling and Analysis Plan. Task 3 (Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of NORM, Heavy Metals, and Organics) work included analyses of water, sediment, and tissue samples as well as data management. Task 4 (Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas) activities involved the continued analyses of samples and conducting field sampling at Bay de Chene. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Region) activities included preparing a draft final report and review by the Scientific Review Committee (SRC). Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Seafood Consumption and Use Patterns) work involved the preparation of the draft final report and review by the SRC. Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan) activities involved the presentation of four papers. Task 8 (Project Management and Deliverables) activities involved the submission of the necessary reports and routine management.

Gettleson, D.A.

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 October--31 December 1993  

SciTech Connect

Task 2 (Preparation of the Sampling and Analysis Plan) activities involved the incorporation of the offshore site selection process into the Sampling and Analysis Plan. Task 3 (Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of NORM, Heavy Metals, and Organics) work included making decisions on tissue analyses and performing analyses of water and sediment samples. Task 4 (Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas) activities involved the completion of the spring benthos samples collection on pre-termination samples at Four Isle Dome and the first post-termination samples at Delacroix Island. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gum of Mexico Region) activities included continued work on development of a base case production forecast, modeling future production, and determining economic impact of treatment technologies. Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Seafood Consumption and Use Patterns) work involved the completion of the fall survey season and the initiation of the survey data assembly. Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan) activities included presentations at the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry annual meeting and Minerals Management Service Information Transfer Meeting. Task 8 (Project Management and Deliverables) activities involved the submission of the necessary reports and routine management.

Gettleson, D.A.

1994-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

246

Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico region oil and gas operations. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 January--31 March 1993  

SciTech Connect

Task 3 (Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of NORM, Heavy Metals, and Organics) activities included the continuation of the platform selection process. A revised sampling plan and a projected cost estimate were prepared for Task 3. A letter detailing the revised plan was sent to the Scientific Review Committee (SRC). Task 4 (Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas) activities involved receiving the final approval for sampling two facilities and requesting approval for a third alternative facility. A revised Task 4 sampling plan and projected estimated costs were prepared. The sampling plan was presented to the SRC for comment. Mobilization activities for the first quarterly sampling were initiated. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impactsof Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Region) activities included refining the model for estimating the impact of increased environmental compliance costs on remaining reserves in coastal and offshore fields. Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Seafood Consumption and Use Patterns) activities involved completion and field testing of most survey forms. Retail surveys were initiated and contacts were made with the Vietnamese community. Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan) work has included scheduling the presentation of information concerning this project at the DOE Contractor Review Meeting in July in Oklahoma. Task 8 (Project Management and Deliverables) activities have involved the submission of the necessary reports and routine management.

Gettleson, D.A.

1993-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

247

Western Area Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Loveland Area Projects November 29-30, 2011 2 Agenda * Overview of Western Area Power Administration * Post-1989 Loveland Area Projects (LAP) Marketing Plan * Energy Planning and Management Program * Development of the 2025 PMI Proposal * 2025 PMI Proposal * 2025 PMI Comment Period & Proposal Information * Questions 3 Overview of Western Area Power Administration (Western) * One of four power marketing administrations within the Department of Energy * Mission: Market and deliver reliable, renewable, cost-based Federal hydroelectric power and related services within a 15-state region of the central and western U.S. * Vision: Provide premier power marketing and transmission services Rocky Mountain Region (RMR) is one of five regional offices 4 Rocky Mountain Region

248

Is pelvic bone mineral content assessed through dual energy X-ray absorptionmetry an appropriate anatomical area for bone mass estimation in women?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bibliographic references seem very controversill regarding the most appropriate anatomical area for bone mass estimation. Since some overlapping in the different bone mass measurements among normal and osteopo...

Prof. Dr. H. Rico; M. Revilla; E. R. Hernández; L. F. Villa…

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Regional Analysis Briefs  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Regional Analysis Briefs (RABs) provide an overview of specific regions that play an important role in world energy markets, either directly or indirectly. These briefs cover areas that are currently major producers (Caspian Sea), have geopolitical importance (South China Sea), or may have future potential as producers or transit areas (East Africa, Eastern Mediterranean).

2028-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

San Andreas Split Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » San Andreas Split Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home San Andreas Split Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States[1] References ↑ "Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States" Geothermal Region Data State(s) California Area 18,246 km²18,246,000,000 m² 7,042.956 mi² 196,398,119,400 ft² 21,822,216,000 yd² 4,508,677.83 acres USGS Resource Estimate for this Region

251

NSTB Summarizes Vulnerable Areas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NSTB Summarizes Vulnerable Areas NSTB Summarizes Vulnerable Areas Commonly Found in Energy Control Systems Experts at the National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) discovered some common areas of vulnerability in the energy control systems assessed between late 2004 and early 2006. These vulnerabilities ranged from conventional IT security issues to specific weaknesses in control system protocols. The paper "Lessons Learned from Cyber Security Assessments of SCADA and Energy Management Systems" describes the vulnerabilities and recommended strategies for mitigating them. It should be of use to asset owners and operators, control system vendors, system integrators, and third-party vendors interested in enhancing the security characteristics of current and future products.

252

DOE/EA-1528: Environmental Assessment for the Storage of Tritium-Producing Burnable Absorber RODs in K-Area Transfer Bay at the Savannah River Site (6/2/05)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28 28 JUNE 2005 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE STORAGE OF TRITIUM-PRODUCING BURNABLE ABSORBER RODS IN K-AREA TRANSFER BAY AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE DOE/EA-1528 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE STORAGE OF TRITIUM-PRODUCING BURNABLE ABSORBER RODS IN K-AREA TRANSFER BAY AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE June 2005 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE This page is intentionally left blank ii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1 1.1 Background 1 1.2 Purpose and Need for Action 2 2.0 PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 2 2.1 Proposed Action 2 2.2 Alternatives to the Proposed Action 3

253

Assessment of Geothermal Resource Potential at a High-Priority Area on the Utah Testing and Training Range–South (UTTR–S)  

SciTech Connect

Field investigations conducted during 2011 support and expand the conclusion of the original Preliminary Report that discovery of a viable geothermal system is possible in the northwestern part of the Utah Testing and Training Range-South (UTTR-S), referred to henceforth as Focus Area 1. The investigations defined the southward extent of the Wendover graben into and near Focus Area 1, enhanced the understanding of subsurface conditions, and focused further geothermal exploration efforts towards the northwestern-most part of Focus Area 1. Specifically, the detailed gravity survey shows that the Wendover graben, first defined by Cook et al. (1964) for areas north of Interstate Highway 80, extends and deepens southwest-ward to the northwest corner of Focus Area 1. At its deepest point, the intersection with a northwest-trending graben there is favorable for enhanced permeability associated with intersecting faults. Processing and modeling of the gravity data collected during 2011 provide a good understanding of graben depth and distribution of faults bounding the graben and has focused the interest area of the study. Down-hole logging of temperatures in wells made available near the Intrepid, Inc., evaporation ponds, just north of Focus Area 1, provide a good understanding of the variability of thermal gradients in that area and corroborate the more extensive temperature data reported by Turk (1973) for the depth range of 300-500 m. Moderate temperature gradients in the northern part of the Intrepid area increase to much higher gradients and bottom-hole temperatures southeastward, towards graben-bounding faults, suggesting upwelling geothermal waters along those faults. Water sampling, analysis, and temperature measurements of Blue Lakes and Mosquito Willey's springs, on the western boundary of Focus Area 1, also show elevated temperatures along the graben-bounding fault system. In addition, water chemistry suggests origin of those waters in limestone rocks beneath the graben in areas with temperatures as high as 140 C (284 F). In conclusion, all of the field data collected during 2011 and documented in the Appendices of this report indicate that there is reasonable potential for a viable geothermal resource along faults that bound the Wendover graben. Prospects for a system capable of binary electrical generation are especially good, and the possibility of a flash steam system is also within reason. The next steps should focus on securing the necessary funding for detailed geophysical surveys and for drilling a set of temperature gradient wells to further evaluate the resource, and to focus deep exploration efforts in the most promising areas.

Richard P. Smith, PhD., PG; Robert P. Breckenridge, PhD.; Thomas R. Wood, PhD.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Ahuachapan Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: El Salvador Exploration Region: Central American Volcanic Arc Chain GEA Development Phase: Phase...

255

Berlín Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: El Salvador Exploration Region: Central American Volcanic Arc Chain GEA Development Phase: Phase...

256

Los Humeros Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Chignautla, Puebla, Mexico Exploration Region: Transmexican Volcanic Belt GEA Development Phase: Phase IV -...

257

Fukushima Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Fukushima, Japan Exploration Region: Northeast Honshu Arc GEA Development Phase: Coordinates:...

258

Southern Rockies Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southern Rockies Geothermal Region Southern Rockies Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Southern Rockies Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States[1] References ↑ "Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States" Geothermal Region Data State(s) Colorado, New Mexico Area 128,454 km²128,454,000,000 m² 49,583.244 mi² 1,382,666,010,600 ft² 153,630,984,000 yd² 31,741,625.67 acres USGS Resource Estimate for this Region Identified Mean Potential 0 MW0 kW 0 W 0 mW 0 GW 0 TW Undiscovered Mean Potential 1,010 MW1,010,000 kW 1,010,000,000 W 1,010,000,000,000 mW 1.01 GW 0.00101 TW Planned Capacity

259

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glen Canyon to Flagstaff #2 345-kV Transmission Line Access Road Maintenance from Structure 45/4 to 46/1 Continuation Sheet Special Conditions Biological Resources 1. Project sites should be cleaned of trash and other items at the end of each day to minimize the likelihood of attracting California condors. 2. No human interaction is allowed with condor(s), especially non-permitted hazing (i.e., attempts to scare birds away). If condor(s) occur at the project site, all activity should cease until the condor(s) leaves on its own. The Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife (928-871-6450), or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (602-242-0210), should be contacted immediately. 3. Work shall be conducted between August 15 and April 15, generally outside of the breeding season for

260

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Glen Canyon to Flagstaff #2 345-kV Transmission Line Access Road Maintenance from Structure 45/4 to 46/1 Continuation Sheet Special Conditions Biological Resources 1. Project sites should be cleaned of trash and other items at the end of each day to minimize the likelihood of attracting California condors. 2. No human interaction is allowed with condor(s), especially non-permitted hazing (i.e., attempts to scare birds away). If condor(s) occur at the project site, all activity should cease until the condor(s) leaves on its own. The Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife (928-871-6450), or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (602-242-0210), should be contacted immediately. 3. Work shall be conducted between August 15 and April 15, generally outside of the breeding season for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional assessment area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Henderson-Mead 2 230-kV Transmission Line Erosion Repair, Structure 2-4 - Continuation Sheet Project Description (Continued) The scope of work includes the following: 1. Excavate...

262

EA-1177: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 7: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants, Richland, Washington EA-1177: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to salvage and demolish the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping equipment, and ancillary facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD October 21, 1996 EA-1177: Finding of No Significant Impact Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants October 21, 1996 EA-1177: Final Environmental Assessment

263

Event:Hands-on Training Workshop for the Latin America and Caribbean Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region Region on Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Hands-on Training Workshop for the Latin America and Caribbean Region on Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment: on 2012/07/09 The Consultative Group of Experts provides essential support to developing countries in the preparation of their national communications, including support for GHG inventories, mitigation assessment, among other areas. Beyond the simple act of reporting, the training and support also focuses on mainstreaming climate change and providing support for the maintenance of in-country capacity. The CGE is comprised of 26 experts nominated by their regional groups under the UNFCCC. Event Details Name Hands-on Training Workshop for the Latin America and Caribbean Region on Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment

264

DOE/EA-1697 Draft Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Assessment Draft Environmental Assessment for Right-of-Way Maintenance in the San Joaquin Valley, California June 2010 Prepared for: Western Area Power Administration, Sierra Nevada Region San Joaquin Valley ROW Maintenance EA June 2010 iii Draft EA CONTENTS 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR ACTION ...................................................................... 1-1 1.1 Introduction ............................................................................................. 1-1 1.2 Background ............................................................................................. 1-1 1.3 Purpose and Need for Action .................................................................. 1-3 1.4 Location and Project Area Description .................................................... 1-4

265

Assessment of radionuclides in the soil of residential areas of the Chittagong metropolitan city, Bangladesh and evaluation of associated radiological risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......periphery and the Bay of Bengal is on the west...situated beside the Bay of Bengal. Another site...lines). For the estimation of the activity...the assessment of radiation hazards associated...annual effective dose (H) to adults......

Quazi Muhammad Rashed-Nizam; Md. Mashiur Rahman; Masud Kamal; Mantazul Islam Chowdhury

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Geology of the McMillan Ranch in Mason, Texas: An Assessment of the Nature of Normal Faults in the Mason Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is determined based upon the orientation of the subsidiary normal faults in its hanging wall. A detailed study of the geology of the McMillan Ranch and the surrounding area, including a geologic history of the area, geologic map and cross section..., and the pasture that was chosen for this study was best represented at a scale of 1:7,000. At such a large scale, it was necessary to recognize precisely where in the stratigraphic section the mapper was located, as some subsidiary faults were recognized...

Harper, Rebecca Anne

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

267

Feasibility of Flow Cytometry for Measurements of Plasmodium falciparum Parasite Burden in Studies in Areas of Malaria Endemicity by Use of Bidimensional Assessment of YOYO-1 and Autofluorescence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the hands of trained personnel. A cost/benefit analysis...study and all additional personnel involved; the children...technique to field site personnel, and quality checked...falciparum-malaria by in vivo selection of competent strains...area under the receiver operating characteristic, 0...

Joseph J. Campo; John J. Aponte; Augusto J. Nhabomba; Jahit Sacarlal; Iñigo Angulo-Barturen; María Belén Jiménez-Díaz; Pedro L. Alonso; Carlota Dobaño

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

268

Regional Assessments of Low Clouds Against Large-Scale Stability in CAM5 and CAM-CLUBB Using MODIS and ECMWF-Interim Reanalysis Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Daily gridded cloud data from MODIS and ERA-Interim reanalysis have been assessed to examine variations of low cloud fraction (CF) and cloud top height and their dependence on large-scale dynamics and a measure of stability. In order to assess the ...

Terence L. Kubar; Graeme L. Stephens; Matthew Lebsock; Vincent E. Larson; Peter A. Bogenschutz

269

Analysis of the validity of analytical models used for assessment of forty-five waste site areas: Subsurface flow and chemical transport  

SciTech Connect

Closure actions at 45 waste sites were analyzed using an analytical model. A quality assurance program, which consisted of (1) comparison to analytical solutions with different boundary conditions, (2) comparison of model results to measured concentrations, (3) comparison with layered numerical solutions, and (4) evaluation and sensitivity analysis of input data, suggests that this type of analysis is a reasonable screening tool. Boundary conditions and controlling processes, such as chemical speciation, must be properly identified when defining input parameters; also, transient models that account for unsaturated zone processes predict higher peak concentrations than steady-state models such as the EPA VHS model. Assessment of complex systems that have multiple flow paths, or studies of remedial actions (such as ground water withdrawal and treatment) may require numerical modeling to meet the required objectives. However, the quality assurance analysis for the subject waste sites indicates that analytical approximations are sufficiently accurate to make relative environmental assessments (e.g., prioritizing sites or assessing various closure actions).

Looney, B.B.; Fjeld, R.A.; Merrell, G.B.; Duffield, G.M.; Andrews, C.B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Preliminary assessment of the geologic setting, hydrology, and geochemistry of the Hueco Tanks geothermal area, Texas and New Mexico. Geological Circular 81-1  

SciTech Connect

The Hueco Tanks geothermal area contains five known but now inactive hot wells (50/sup 0/ to 71/sup 0/C). The area trends north-south along the east side of Tularosa-Hueco Bolson astride the Texas-New Mexico border approximately 40 km northeast of El Paso. Because of its proximity to El Paso, geothermal water in the Hueco Tanks area could be a significant resource. Hueco Bolson is an asymmetric graben. Greatest displacement along boundary faults is on the west side adjacent to the Franklin Mountains. Faults, probably with less displacement, also form an irregular boundary on the east side of the bolson. Several probable faults may allow the rise of thermal waters from depth. Ground water in the central part of Hueco Bolson flows southward to the Rio Grande. However, four of the five hot wells occur in a ground-water trough along the eastern margin of the bolson. The trough may be bounded by one of the postulated faults serving as a barrier to ground-water flow. Data on permeability of potential reservoir rocks, including basin fill and fractured bedrock, suggest that they may be sufficiently permeable for development of geothermal water. The concentration of dissolved solids in the geothermal waters varies from 1100 to at least 12,500 mg/L, but most waters show high concentrations. They are Na-Cl-(SO/sub 4/) waters similar in composition to nonthermal waters in basin fill. The composition probably results from contact with evaporite deposits either in basin fill or in Paleozoic bedrock. Shallow reservoirs reach maximum temperatures of about 80/sup 0/ to 110/sup 0/C. Available data are too limited to evaluate adequately the resource potential of geothermal water in the Hueco Tanks area. A complete exploration program, including geological, hydrological, and geochemical investigation, is recommended.

Henry, C.D.; Gluck, J.K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Preliminary assessment of the geologic setting, hydrology, and geochemistry of the Hueco Tanks geothermal area, Texas and New Mexico. Geological Circular 81-1  

SciTech Connect

The Hueco Tanks geothermal area contains five known but now inactive hot wells (50/sup 0/ to 71/sup 0/C). The area trends north-south along the east side of Tularosa-Hueco Bolson astride the Texas-New Mexico border approximately 40 km northeast of El Paso. Because of its proximity to El Paso, geothermal water in the Hueco Tanks area could be a significant resource. Hueco Bolson is an asymmetric graben. Greatest displacement along boundary faults is on the west side adjacent to the Franklin Mountains. Faults, probably with less displacement, also form an irregular boundary on the east side of the bolson. Several probable faults may allow the rise of thermal waters from depth. Ground water in the central part of Hueco Bolson flows southward to the Rio Grande. However, four of the five hot wells occur in a ground-water trough along the eastern margin of the bolson. The trough may be bounded by one of the postulated faults serving as a barrier to ground-water flow. Data on permeability of potential reservoir rocks, including basin fill and fractured bedrock, suggest that they may be sufficiently permeable for development of geothermal water. The concentration of dissolved solids in the geothermal waters varies from 1100 to at least 12,500 mg/L, but most waters show high concentrations. They are Na-Cl-(SO/sub 4/) waters similar in composition to nonthermal waters in basin fill. The composition probably results from contact with evaporite deposits either in basin fill or in Paleozoic bedrock. Shallow reservoirs reach maximum temperatures of about 80/sup 0/ to 110/sup 0/C. Available data are too limited to evaluate adequately the resource potential of geothermal water in the Hueco Tanks area.

Henry, C.D.; Gluck, J.K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina. Final report on macroinvertebrate stream assessments for F/H area ETF effluent discharge, July 1987--February 1990  

SciTech Connect

In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F?H area effluent on the creek, the study includes qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. This final report presents the results of both pre-operational and post-operational qualitative and quantitative (artificial substrate) macroinvertebrate studies. Six quantitative and three qualitative studies were conducted prior to the initial release of the F/H ETF effluent and five quantitative and two qualitative studies were conducted post-operationally.

Specht, W.L.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change: the MIT IGSM-CAM (version 1.0)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a computationally efficient framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model ...

Monier, Erwan

274

Preliminary evaluation of wind energy potential: Cook Inlet area, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work on a project performed under contract to the Alaska Power Administration (APA). The objective of this research was to make a preliminary assessment of the wind energy potential for interconnection with the Cook Inlet area electric power transmission and distribution systems, to identify the most likely candidate regions (25 to 100 square miles each) for energy potential, and to recommend a monitoring program sufficient to quantify the potential.

Hiester, T.R.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

EA-1625: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment Final Environmental Assessment EA-1625: Final Environmental Assessment Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) Phase III Early Test The Department of Energy proposes to co-fund a project to inject and closely monitor the flow of approximately 1.7 million short tons (1.5 million metric tons) of supercritical carbon dioxide into the brinebearing Tuscaloosa Formation in an area within the lease boundaries of the Cranfield Unit oilfield, about 12 miles (19 kilometers (km)) east of Natchez, Mississippi Final Environmental Assessment Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) Phase III Early Test, DOE/EA-1625 (March 2009) More Documents & Publications EA-1785: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1846: Final Environmental Assessment

276

Geothermal Areas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Areas Geothermal Areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Areas Geothermal Areas are specific locations of geothermal potential (e.g., Coso Geothermal Area). The base set of geothermal areas used in this database came from the 253 geothermal areas identified by the USGS in their 2008 Resource Assessment.[1] Additional geothermal areas were added, as needed, based on a literature search and on projects listed in the GTP's 2011 database of funded projects. Add.png Add a new Geothermal Resource Area Map of Areas List of Areas Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":2500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

277

Risk assessment of soil-based exposures to plutonium at experimental sites located on the Nevada Test Site and adjoining areas  

SciTech Connect

In the late 1950s and early 1960s, a series of tests was conducted at or near the Nevada Test Site to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of {sup 239,240}Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Access to the sites is strictly controlled; therefore, it does not constitute a threat to human health at the present time. However, because the residual {sup 239} Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), the sites could indeed represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, we defined three basic exposure scenarios that could bring individuals in contact with {sup 239,240}Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision located at a test site, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility. Our screening analyses indicated that doses to organs are dominated by the intemal deposition of Pu via the inhalation pathway, and thus our risk assessment focused on those factors that affect inhalation exposures and associated doses, including inhalation rates, activity patterns, tenure at a residence or occupation, indoor/outdoor air relationships, and resuspension outdoors. Cancer risks were calculated as a function of lifetime cumulative doses to the key target organs (i.e., bone surface, liver, and lungs) and risk factors for those organs. Uncertainties in the predicted cancer risks were analyzed using Monte-Carlo simulations of the probability distributions used to represent assessment parameters. The principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung.

Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Bogen, K.T.; Straume, T.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Regional Climate Modeling: Progress, Challenges, and Prospects  

SciTech Connect

Regional climate modeling with regional climate models (RCMs) has matured over the past decade and allows for meaningful utilization in a broad spectrum of applications. In this paper, latest progresses in regional climate modeling studies are reviewed, including RCM development, applications of RCMs to dynamical downscaling for climate change assessment, seasonal climate predictions and climate process studies, and the study of regional climate predictability. Challenges and potential directions of future research in this important area are discussed, with the focus on those to which less attention has been given previously, such as the importance of ensemble simulations, further development and improvement of regional climate modeling approach, modeling extreme climate events and sub-daily variation of clouds and precipitation, model evaluation and diagnostics, applications of RCMs to climate process studies and seasonal predictions, and development of regional earth system models. It is believed that with both the demonstrated credibility of RCMs’ capability in reproducing not only monthly to seasonal mean climate and interannual variability but also the extreme climate events when driven by good quality reanalysis and the continuous improvements in the skill of global general circulation models (GCMs) in simulating large-scale atmospheric circulation, regional climate modeling will remain an important dynamical downscaling tool for providing the needed information for assessing climate change impacts and seasonal climate predictions, and a powerful tool for improving our understanding of regional climate processes. An internationally coordinated effort can be developed with different focuses by different groups to advance regional climate modeling studies. It is also recognized that since the final quality of the results from nested RCMs depends in part on the realism of the large-scale forcing provided by GCMs, the reduction of errors and improvement in physics parameterizations in both GCMs and RCMs remain a priority for climate modeling community.

Wang, Yuqing; Leung, Lai R.; McGregor, John L.; Lee, Dong-Kyou; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Ding, Yihui; Kimura, Fujio

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Germany Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Germany Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Germany Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0)...

280

Russia Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Russia Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Russia Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional assessment area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Iceland Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Planned Estimate Plants with Unknown Planned Capacity Geothermal Areas within the Iceland Geothermal Region Energy Generation Facilities within the Iceland Geothermal Region...

282

Austria Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Planned Estimate Plants with Unknown Planned Capacity Geothermal Areas within the Austria Geothermal Region Energy Generation Facilities within the Austria Geothermal Region...

283

Avian Monitoring and Risk Assessment at the Tehachapi Pass Wind Resource Area; Period of Performance: October 2, 1996--May 27, 1998  

SciTech Connect

Observations of dead raptors at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area triggered concerns on the parts of regulatory agencies, environmental/conservation groups, wildlife resource agencies, and wind and electric utility industries about possible impacts to birds from wind energy development. Bird fatality rates observed at most wind projects are not currently considered significant to individual bird species populations. Although many bird species have observed fatalities, raptors have received the most attention. The primary objective of this study was to estimate and compare bird utilization, fatality rates, and collision risk indices among factors such as bird taxonomic groups, turbine types, and turbine locations within the operating wind plant in the Tehachapi Pass WRA, in south-central California between October 1996 and May 1998.

Anderson, R.; Neumann, N.; Tom, J.; Erickson, W. P.; Strickland, M. D.; Bourassa, M.; Bay, K. J.; Sernka, K. J.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region MW K Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone Mesozoic Granitic MW K Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones major range front fault Jurassic Basalt MW K Geysers Geothermal Area Geysers Geothermal Area Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone intrusion margin and associated fractures MW K Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Displacement Transfer Zone Caldera Margin Quaternary Rhyolite MW K

285

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Construction and Operation of a Proposed Biogas Anaerobic Digestion Facility at an Ethanol Plant Western Plains Energy, LLC Grinnell Township (Oakley), Gove County, Kansas U. S. Department of Agriculture Rural Business Cooperative Service 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20250-3225 August 29, 2011 Environmental Assessment Western Plains Energy, LLC Gove County, Kansas ii TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page I. PROPOSAL DESCRIPTION AND NEED .................................................................... 1 II. PRIMARY BENEFICIARIES AND RELATED ACTIVITIES .................................. 2 III. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSAL AREA .............................................................. 2

286

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area (Redirected from Blackfoot Reservoir Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

287

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Teels Marsh Geothermal Area (Redirected from Teels Marsh Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

288

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area (Redirected from Mokapu Penninsula Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

289

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area (Redirected from Kilauea Summit Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (12) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

290

Geothermal Regions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regions Regions Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Regions RegionsMap2012.jpg Geothermal regions were outlined for the western United States (including Alaska and Hawaii) to identify geothermal areas, projects, and exploration trends for each region. These regions were developed based on the USGS physiographic regions (U.S. Geological Survey), and then adjusted to fit geothermal exploration parameters such as differences in geologic regime, structure, heat source, surface effects (weather, vegetation patterns, groundwater flow), and other relevant factors. The 21 regions can be seen outlined in red and overlain on the 2008 USGS Geothermal Favorability Map in Figure 1.[1] Add a new Geothermal Region List of Regions Area (km2) Mean MW

291

the Regional Development Corporation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carry out this work, CPO partners carry out this work, CPO partners with the Los Alamos National Laboratory Foundation for education, the Regional Development Corporation for economic development, and the regional United Way organizations for community giving. Education Los Alamos National Security (LANS) invests more than $1 million each year to enhance regional educational opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education. Education Focus Areas Our education commitments address four focus areas: * Workforce Development * Student Internships * Teacher and Faculty Professional Development * Public Understanding of Science In 2011, more than 1,100 students

292

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Areas Areas Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

293

Assessment in natural sciences.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research study focusses on assessment in the Natural Sciences learning area in grades 8 and 9. The aspect under focus is the extent to… (more)

Singh, Suresh Kamar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Evaluating sub-national building-energy efficiency policy options under uncertainty: Efficient sensitivity testing of alternative climate, technolgical, and socioeconomic futures in a regional intergrated-assessment model.  

SciTech Connect

Improving the energy efficiency of the building stock, commercial equipment and household appliances can have a major impact on energy use, carbon emissions, and building services. Subnational regions such as U.S. states wish to increase their energy efficiency, reduce carbon emissions or adapt to climate change. Evaluating subnational policies to reduce energy use and emissions is difficult because of the uncertainties in socioeconomic factors, technology performance and cost, and energy and climate policies. Climate change may undercut such policies. Assessing these uncertainties can be a significant modeling and computation burden. As part of this uncertainty assessment, this paper demonstrates how a decision-focused sensitivity analysis strategy using fractional factorial methods can be applied to reveal the important drivers for detailed uncertainty analysis.

Scott, Michael J.; Daly, Don S.; Zhou, Yuyu; Rice, Jennie S.; Patel, Pralit L.; McJeon, Haewon C.; Kyle, G. Page; Kim, Son H.; Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Property:Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region Region Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. Pages using the property "Region" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1st Light Energy, Inc. + Southern CA Area + 2 21-Century Silicon, Inc. + Texas Area + 3 3Degrees + Bay Area + 3TIER + Pacific Northwest Area + 4 4th Day Energy + Southern CA Area + 5 5 boro biofuel + Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area + @ @Ventures (California) + Bay Area + @Ventures (Massachusetts) + Greater Boston Area + A A1 Sun, Inc. + Bay Area + A10 Power + Bay Area + A123 Systems + Greater Boston Area + A2BE Carbon Capture LLC + Rockies Area + ABC Solar, Inc. + Southern CA Area + ABS Alaskan Inc + United States + AC Solar Inc + Rockies Area + AEE Solar + Bay Area + AER NY Kinetics LLC + United States +

296

Outside a Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Outside a Geothermal Region Outside a Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Outside a Geothermal Region Details Areas (1) Power Plants (1) Projects (0) Techniques (0) This is a category for geothermal areas added that do not fall within an existing geothermal region. As a number of these accumulate on OpenEI, new regions can be created and areas moved into those regions accordingly. Geothermal Regions Map[1] References ↑ "Geothermal Regions Map" Geothermal Region Data State(s) Wyoming, Colorado Area USGS Resource Estimate for this Region Identified Mean Potential Undiscovered Mean Potential Planned Capacity Planned Capacity Plants Included in Planned Estimate Plants with Unknown Planned Capacity Geothermal Areas within the Outside a Geothermal Region

297

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Print Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

298

coherence area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1....In an electromagnetic wave, such as a lightwave or a radio wave, the area of a surface (a) every point on which the surface is perpendicular to the direction of propagation, (b) over which the e...

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

National Assessment Of Us Geothermal Resources- A Perspective | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assessment Of Us Geothermal Resources- A Perspective Assessment Of Us Geothermal Resources- A Perspective Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: National Assessment Of Us Geothermal Resources- A Perspective Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The U.S. Department of Interior has assigned to the US Geological Survey ('USGS') the task of conducting an updated assessment of the geothermal resources in the United States. In that connection, we offer an objective analysis of the last such national assessment, made in 1978, and presented in USGS Circular 790, in view of the industry experience accumulated over the intervening 26 years. Based on this analysis we offer our perspective on how such assessment may be improved. Our analysis was largely based on a comparison of the results of assessment of resources in

300

Honokowai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Honokowai Geothermal Area Honokowai Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Honokowai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional assessment area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

302

Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area (Redirected from Lualualei Valley Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

303

Integrated Assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) Climate-Change Impacts on Agricultural Productivity and Irrigation Water Supply in the Conterminous United States. Part II. Regional Agricultural Production in 2030 and 2095.  

SciTech Connect

This study used scenarios of the HadCM2 GCM and the EPIC agroecosystem model to evaluate climate change impacts on crop yields and ecosystem processes. Baseline climate data were obtained from records for 1961-1990. The scenario runs for 2025-2034 and 2090-2099 were extracted from a HadCM2 run. EPIC was run on 204 representative farms under current climate and two 10-y periods centered on 2030 and 2095, each at CO2 concentrations of 365 and 560 ppm. Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and California are projected to experience significant temperature increases by 2030. Slight cooling is expected by 2030 in Alabama, Florida, Maine, Montana, Idaho, and Utah. Larger areas are projected to experience increased warming by 2095. Uniform precipitation increases are expected by 2030 in the NE. These increases are predicted to expand to the eastern half of the country by 2095. EPIC simulated yield increases for the Great Lakes, Corn Belt and Northeast regions. Simulated yields of irrigated corn yields were predicted to increase in almost all regions. Soybean yields could decrease in the Northern and Southern Plains, the Corn Belt, Delta, Appalachian, and Southeast regions and increase in the Lakes and Northeast regions. Simulated wheat yields exhibited upward yield trends under scenarios of climate change. National corn production in 2030 and 2095 could be affected by changes in three major producing regions. In 2030, corn production could increase in the Corn Belt and Lakes regions but decrease in the Northern Plains leading to an overall decrease in national production. National wheat production is expected to increase during both future periods. A proxy indicator was developed to provide a sense of where in the country, and when water would be available to satisfy change in irrigation demand for corn and alfalfa production as these are influenced by the HadCM2 scenarios and CO2-fertilization.

Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Brown, Robert A.; Thomson, Allison M.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

304

Geodetic Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region Geodetic Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Targeting of Potential Geothermal Resources in the Great Basin from Regional to Basin-Scale Relationships Between Geodetic Strain and Geological Structures, Geoffrey Blewitt. The objectives of this project are to assess the use of inter-seismic crustal strain rates derived from GPS-stations as an exploration tool for non-magmatic high-temperature geothermal systems, and to use this technique to target potential geothermal resources in the Great Basin. Two potential target areas were identified in year one (FY03) by regional-scale studies: (1) the area

305

Geodetic Survey At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Survey At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, Geodetic Survey At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Targeting of Potential Geothermal Resources in the Great Basin from Regional to Basin-Scale Relationships Between Geodetic Strain and Geological Structures, Geoffrey Blewitt. The objectives of this project are to assess the use of inter-seismic crustal strain rates derived from GPS-stations as an exploration tool for non-magmatic high-temperature geothermal systems, and to use this technique to target potential geothermal resources in the Great Basin. Two potential target areas were identified in year one (FY03) by regional-scale studies: (1) the area

306

Public health assessment for Griffiss Air Force Base, Rome, Oneida County, New York, Region 2. Cerclis No. NY4571924451. Addendum. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The public health assessment addendum addresses the two public health issues identified at Griffiss Air Force Base by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR): (1) exposures to contaminated fish from Three Mile and Six Mile Creeks, and (2) past exposures to contaminated groundwater through private wells off base. Frequent consumption of contaminated fish from Three Mile and Six Mile Creeks could pose a health problem. However, if NYSDOH fish consumption guidelines are followed, fish consumption should not present a public health hazard. ATSDR cannot evaluate exposures to contaminated groundwater through private well use prior to 1982 because there are no sampling data.

NONE

1996-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

307

Final Environmental Assessment for the Cheyenne-Miracle Mile and Ault-Cheyenne Transmission Line Rebuild Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment Assessment Cheyenne-Miracle Mile and Ault-Cheyenne Transmission Line Rebuild Project DOE/EA -1456 U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Region Loveland, Colorado October 2006 Final Environmental Assessment Cheyenne-Miracle Mile and Ault-Cheyenne Transmission Line Rebuild Project DOE/EA-1456 U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Region Loveland, Colorado October 2006 Table of Contents CH-MM & AU-CH Transmission Line Rebuild Table of Contents i Table of Contents Summary ......................................................................................................................................... 1 1.0 Introduction ..................................................................................................................

308

Geothermal Resources Assessment In Hawaii | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assessment In Hawaii Assessment In Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geothermal Resources Assessment In Hawaii Details Activities (78) Areas (14) Regions (0) Abstract: The Hawaii Geothermal Resources Assessment Program was initiated in 1978. The preliminary phase of this effort identified 20 Potential Geothermal Resource Areas (PGRAs) using available geological, geochemical and geophysical data. The second phase of the Assessment Program undertook a series of field studies, utilizing a variety of geothermal exploration techniques. A total of 15 PGRAs on four of the five major islands in the Hawaiian chain were subject to at least a preliminary field analysis. The results of these studies have allowed us to attempt an estimate of the

309

Fire Hazards Analysis for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area  

SciTech Connect

This documents the Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area. The Interim Storage Cask, Rad-Vault, and NAC-1 Cask are analyzed for fire hazards and the 200 Area Interim Storage Area is assessed according to HNF-PRO-350 and the objectives of DOE Order 5480 7A. This FHA addresses the potential fire hazards associated with the Interim Storage Area (ISA) facility in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480 7A. It is intended to assess the risk from fire to ensure there are no undue fire hazards to site personnel and the public and to ensure property damage potential from fire is within acceptable limits. This FHA will be in the form of a graded approach commensurate with the complexity of the structure or area and the associated fire hazards.

JOHNSON, D.M.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

310

It is a unique programme of its kind not only in this country but also in the whole of South East Asian region. Besides offering M.Tech and Ph.D degrees in the area of Nuclear Engineering & Technology, the programme provides research and development exper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asian region. Besides offering M.Tech and Ph.D degrees in the area of Nuclear Engineering & TechnologyDepartmentofAtomicEnergy. Contact Head Nuclear Engineering & Technology Programme Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur Kanpur - 208.iitk.ac.in/net/ Nuclear Engineering & Technology Programme IITK Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur 3D Tomographic

Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

311

Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West; Report and Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect

This study assesses the outlook for utility-scale renewable energy development in the West once states have met their renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements. In the West, the last state RPS culminates in 2025, so the analysis uses 2025 as a transition point on the timeline of RE development. Most western states appear to be on track to meet their final requirements, relying primarily on renewable resources located relatively close to the customers being served. What happens next depends on several factors including trends in the supply and price of natural gas, greenhouse gas and other environmental regulations, consumer preferences, technological breakthroughs, and future public policies and regulations. Changes in any one of these factors could make future renewable energy options more or less attractive.

Hurlbut, D. J.; McLaren, J.; Gelman, R.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Coal geology of the U.S. Gulf Coastal region  

SciTech Connect

The US Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a comprehensive assessment of the major coal regions of the country. In this program, known as the National Coal Resource Assessment, the quantity and quality of coals that are expected to be mined during the next 30 years will be characterized. For the Gulf Coast region, the evaluation will include reviews of the stratigraphic setting, resource potential, and the quality of the lignites in four coal-producing areas. These areas are: the Sabine Uplift (including parts of Texas and Louisiana), Northeast Texas, Central Texas, and South Texas. The results of these efforts will be a series of digital Geographic Information System (GIS) maps, text, and tables that will be published in a CD-ROM format. These products, along with a national summary CD-ROM, are expected to be completed in 1999. This paper is to present a review of Gulf Coast coal geology and to outline the USGS assessment efforts for the Gulf Coast region. Most coal in the Gulf Coast area is produced from the Paleocene Wilcox Group, and minor amounts of coal are produced from the Ecocene Jackson and Claiborne Groups. Initial results indicate that for coals being mined in the Sabine Uplift, Northeast, and Central Texas areas mean moisture values are about 34%, mean ash yields range from 12 to 15%, and mean calorific values range from about 5,800 to 6,900 Btu/lb (all data are on an as-received basis). Detailed bed and zone analysis in all areas indicate that resource figures will be greater than previous estimates that have usually combined multiple coal horizons to estimate cumulative coal thicknesses for a formation. Ongoing research in the Sabine Uplift and Northeast study areas suggests that coal zones in both the upper and lower Wilcox may be more laterally extensive than previous studies indicate.

Warwick, P.D.; Aubourg, C.E.; Crowley, S.S. [and others

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Design and Feasibility Assessment of a Retrospective Epidemiological Study of Coal-Fired Power Plant Emissions in the Pittsburgh Pennsylvania Region  

SciTech Connect

Eighty-nine (89) percent of the electricity supplied in the 35-county Pittsburgh region (comprising parts of the states of Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, and Maryland) is generated by coal-fired power plants making this an ideal region in which to study the effects of the fine airborne particulates designated as PM{sub 2.5} emitted by the combustion of coal. This report demonstrates that during the period from 1999-2006 (1) sufficient and extensive exposure data, in particular samples of speciated PM{sub 2.5} components from 1999 to 2003, and including gaseous co-pollutants and weather have been collected, (2) sufficient and extensive mortality, morbidity, and related health outcomes data are readily available, and (3) the relationship between health effects and fine particulates can most likely be satisfactorily characterized using a combination of sophisticated statistical methodologies including latent variable modeling (LVM) and generalized linear autoregressive moving average (GLARMA) time series analysis. This report provides detailed information on the available exposure data and the available health outcomes data for the construction of a comprehensive database suitable for analysis, illustrates the application of various statistical methods to characterize the relationship between health effects and exposure, and provides a road map for conducting the proposed study. In addition, a detailed work plan for conducting the study is provided and includes a list of tasks and an estimated budget. A substantial portion of the total study cost is attributed to the cost of analyzing a large number of archived PM{sub 2.5} filters. Analysis of a representative sample of the filters supports the reliability of this invaluable but as-yet untapped resource. These filters hold the key to having sufficient data on the components of PM{sub 2.5} but have a limited shelf life. If the archived filters are not analyzed promptly the important and costly information they contain will be lost.

Richard A. Bilonick; Daniel Connell; Evelyn Talbott; Jeanne Zborowski; Myoung Kim

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

314

Assessing the CAM5 Physics Suite in the WRF-Chem Model: Implementation, Resolution Sensitivity, and a First Evaluation for a Regional Case Study  

SciTech Connect

A suite of physical parameterizations (deep and shallow convection, turbulent boundary layer, aerosols, cloud microphysics, and cloud fraction) from the global climate model Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) has been implemented in the regional model Weather Research and Forecasting with chemistry (WRF-Chem). A downscaling modeling framework with consistent physics has also been established in which both global and regional simulations use the same emissions and surface fluxes. The WRF-Chem model with the CAM5 physics suite is run at multiple horizontal resolutions over a domain encompassing the northern Pacific Ocean, northeast Asia, and northwest North America for April 2008 when the ARCTAS, ARCPAC, and ISDAC field campaigns took place. These simulations are evaluated against field campaign measurements, satellite retrievals, and ground-based observations, and are compared with simulations that use a set of common WRF-Chem Parameterizations. This manuscript describes the implementation of the CAM5 physics suite in WRF-Chem provides an overview of the modeling framework and an initial evaluation of the simulated meteorology, clouds, and aerosols, and quantifies the resolution dependence of the cloud and aerosol parameterizations. We demonstrate that some of the CAM5 biases, such as high estimates of cloud susceptibility to aerosols and the underestimation of aerosol concentrations in the Arctic, can be reduced simply by increasing horizontal resolution. We also show that the CAM5 physics suite performs similarly to a set of parameterizations commonly used in WRF-Chem, but produces higher ice and liquid water condensate amounts and near-surface black carbon concentration. Further evaluations that use other mesoscale model parameterizations and perform other case studies are needed to infer whether one parameterization consistently produces results more consistent with observations.

Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Gustafson, William I.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Singh, Balwinder

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

315

Health assessment for Bunker Hill Mining and Metallurgical Complex, Kellogg, Shoshone County, Idaho, Region 10. CERCLIS No. IDD048340921. Addenda. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Bunker Hill site is listed, by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), on the National Priorities List (NPL). The 21 square-mile site includes the Bunker Hill mining and smelting complexes and the communities of Pinehurst, Page, Smelterville, Kellog, and Wardner, Idaho. Mining and smelting operations have occurred in the area (Silver Valley) since the 1880's. The Bunker Hill smelter discontinued operation in 1982. The former milling and smelting operation at the Bunker Hill Complex has left behind contaminated soils and deposits of slag, mine tailings, and other process residuals. Based upon the information reviewed, ATSDR has concluded that this site is of public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the probable human exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects. Human exposure to heavy metals is probably occurring via ingestion, dermal, or inhalation exposure to contaminated surface soils, mine wastes and tailings, surface waters, or contaminated foodstuffs.

Not Available

1989-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

316

EA-1617: Draft Environmental Assessment for Public Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment for Public Review Environmental Assessment for Public Review DOE/EA-1617 Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project Big Horn County, Wyoming and Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Region Loveland, Colorado Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service July 2011 Montana Department of Environmental Quality Environmental Assessment for Public Review DOE/EA-1617 Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana and Big Horn County, Wyoming U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Region Loveland, Colorado Cooperating Agencies:

317

Australia - Energy Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Australia - Energy Resource Assessment Australia - Energy Resource Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Australia - Energy Resource Assessment Agency/Company /Organization Australian Government Sector Energy Focus Area Conventional Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics Resource assessment Resource Type Publications Website https://www.ga.gov.au/image_ca Country Australia UN Region South-Eastern Asia, "Pacific" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

318

Public health assessment for petitioned public health assessment, West Pullman Iron and Metal (a/k/a West Pullman/Victory Heights), Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, Region 5: CERCLIS number ILD005428651. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The West Pullman/Victory Heights/Maple Park site consists of two abandoned industrial properties. The Navistar International Transportation Corporation (Navistar) property is commonly called International Harvester (IH) and the NL Industries, Incorporated property is commonly called Dutch Boy (DB). These industries were active from the early part of this century until the early 1980s when the factories were closed and abandoned. Currently, for people trespassing on the site, both the Dutch Boy and the International Harvester properties represent a potential public health hazard. Limited data are available to assess potential off-site exposures to site-related contaminants, and therefore, exposure to off-site contaminants from the International Harvester and Dutch Boy properties is classified as an indeterminate public health hazard.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Cathedral Rock Picnic Area Rehabilitation Environmental Assessment  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

are over 40 years old and show signs of heavy use. The sewer system consists of septic tanks and leach fields, which are about 40 years old and nearing the end of their...

320

Radiological Areas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas On July 13, 2000, the Secretary of Energy imposed an agency-wide suspension on the unrestricted release of scrap metal originating from radiological areas at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for the purpose of recycling. The suspension was imposed in response to concerns from the general public and industry groups about the potential effects of radioactivity in or on material released in accordance with requirements established in DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The suspension was to remain in force until DOE developed and implemented improvements in, and better informed the public about, its release process. In addition, in 2001 the DOE announced its intention to prepare a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional assessment area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Northeast Region Standardized Bycatch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flexibility Act Assessment, and a Regulatory Impact Review June 2007 Prepared by the New England Fishery Management Plans of the Mid-Atlantic and New England Regional Fishery Management Councils June 2007 #12;This Management Plan (FMP); Amendment 2 to the Atlantic Herring FMP; Amendment 2 to the Atlantic Salmon FMP

322

Health assessment for Cherokee County-Galena Subsite National Oriorities List (NPL) Site, Galena, Cherokee County, Kansas, Region 7. CERCLIS No. KSD980741862. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Cherokee County site is on the National Priorities List. Mine wastes resulting from the shaft excavations, ore-milling processes, and smelter operations had been disposed of on the ground near mine shafts and former mill sites. Maximum contaminant concentrations in the on-site areas consist of lead (3,880 parts per million (ppm) in surface-mine wastes, 550 ppm in surface soils, 390 parts per billion (ppb) in private drinking-water wells, 290 ppb in surface water from subsidence or open-pit mine ponds, 67 ppb in other surface waters (creeks or rivers)); cadmium (60 ppm surface-mine wastes, 12 ppm in surface soils, 180 ppb in private drinking-water wells, 200 ppb in surface water from subsidence or open-pit-mine ponds, 140 ppb in other surface water (creeks or rivers)); and, chromium (total) (120 ppb in private drinking water wells). The site is of public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the probable human exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects. Human exposure to heavy metals is probably occurring via ingestion, dermal, or inhalation exposure to contaminated surface soils, mine wastes, surface waters, or contaminated foodstuffs.

Not Available

1989-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

323

Estimates of future regional heavy oil production at three production rates--background information for assessing effects in the US refining industry  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of publications from a project considering the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil (10{degree} to 20{degree} API gravity inclusive) production being conducted for the US Department of Energy. The report includes projections of future heavy oil production at three production levels: 900,000; 500,000; and 300,000 BOPD above the current 1992 heavy oil production level of 750,000 BOPD. These free market scenario projections include time frames and locations. Production projections through a second scenario were developed to examine which heavy oil areas would be developed if significant changes in the US petroleum industry occurred. The production data helps to define the possible constraints (impact) of increased heavy oil production on the US refining industry (the subject of a future report). Constraints include a low oil price and low rate of return. Heavy oil has high production, transportation, and refining cost per barrel as compared to light oil. The resource is known, but the right mix of technology and investment is required to bring about significant expansion of heavy oil production in the US.

Olsen, D.K.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Health assessment for New Hanover County Burn Pit, Wilmington, New Hanover County, North Carolina, Region 4. CERCLIS No. NCD981021157. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The New Hanover County Burn Pit, Wilmington, New Hanover County, North Carolina, has been proposed for the National Priorities List by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The burn pit is part of an active airport and was used from 1968-1979 for fire-training exercises. Aviation fuel, waste oil, and petroleum tank bottoms were burned and extinguished with water, carbon dioxide, or dry chemicals. Samples from the pit and soil adjacent to the pit, where pit contents were drained, showed the presence of heavy metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Investigation of the site has been limited to the pit and surrounding soil. Groundwater is close to land surface in the area and may be affected. Groundwater is used for domestic purposes within a 3-mile radius of the site. Based on the available information, the site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances.

Not Available

1990-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

325

Sacramento Area Voltage Support - Environment - Sierra Nevada...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sierra Nevada Region (SNR) operates and maintains more than 1,200 miles of transmission lines. These transmission lines are interconnected to other Sacramento area...

326

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tectonic br Setting Host br Rock br Age Host br Rock br Lithology Tectonic br Setting Host br Rock br Age Host br Rock br Lithology Mean br Capacity Mean br Reservoir br Temp Amedee Geothermal Area Amedee Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics Mesozoic granite granodiorite MW K Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics MW K Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics triassic metasedimentary MW K Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics MW Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone

327

Wister Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wister Geothermal Area Wister Geothermal Area (Redirected from Wister Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Wister Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

328

Truckhaven Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truckhaven Geothermal Area Truckhaven Geothermal Area (Redirected from Truckhaven Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Truckhaven Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

329

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area (Redirected from Flint Geothermal Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

330

Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico region oil and gas operations. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect

Continental Shelf Associates, Inc. (CSA) was contracted to conduct a three-year study of the environmental and health related impacts of produced water and sand discharges from oil and gas operations. Data on naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), heavy metals, and hydrocarbons in water, sediment, and biota will be collected and evaluated. Health related impacts will be studied through field collections and analyses of commercially- and recreationally-important fish and shellfish tissues. Additionally, information on seafood catch, consumption, and use patterns for the Gulf of Mexico will be gathered and analyzed. The facilities to be studied will include both offshore and coastal facilities in the Gulf of Mexico. Coastal sites will be additionally studied to determine ecological recovery of impacted wetland and open bay areas. The economic impact of existing and proposed effluent federal and state regulations will also be evaluated. The primary objectives of the project are to increase the base of scientific knowledge concerning (1) the fate and environmental effects of organics, trace metals, and NORM in water, sediment, and biota near several offshore oil and gas facilities; (2) the characteristics of produced water and produced sand discharges as they pertain to organics, trace metals, and NORM variably found in association with the discharges; (3) the recovery of four terminated produced water discharge sites located in wetland and high-energy open bay sites of coastal Louisiana and Texas; (4) the economic and energy supply impacts of existing and anticipated federal and state offshore and coastal discharge regulations; and (5) the catch, consumption and human use patterns of seafood species collected from coastal and offshore waters. Accomplishments for this period are described.

Gettleson, D.A.

1993-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

331

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. How to report wildland fire hazard Use the following form to report any wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. Fill out this form as completely as possible so we can better assess the hazard. All submissions will be assessed as promptly as possible. For assistance with a non-emergency situation, contact the Operations Support Center at 667-6211. Name (optional): Hazard Type (check one): Wildlife Sighting (check box if animal poses serious threat) Trails (access/egress)

332

Las Tres Virgenes Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Baja California Sur, Mexico Exploration Region: Baja Peninsula GEA Development Phase: Coordinates:...

333

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 1): Fort Devens-Sudbury Training Annex (areas of contamination A4, A7, and A9), Middlesex County, MA, September 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The US Army Sudbury Annex (the Annex) is a National Priorities List (NPL) site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). This Record of Decision addresses past releases of contaminants to all media at area of contamination (AOC) A4-Waste Dump, and past releases to groundwater at AOC A7-Old Gravel Pit Landfill and AOC A9-Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricant (POL) Burn Area.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Geodetic Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Geodetic Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Targeting of Potential Geothermal Resources in the Great Basin from Regional to Basin-Scale Relationships Between Geodetic Strain and Geological Structures, Geoffrey Blewitt. The objectives of this project are to assess the use of inter-seismic crustal strain rates derived from GPS-stations as an exploration tool for non-magmatic high-temperature geothermal systems, and to use this technique to target potential geothermal resources in the Great Basin. Two potential target areas were identified in year one (FY03) by regional-scale studies: (1) the area

335

2012 Annual Planning Summary for Western Area Power Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2012 and 2013 within Western Area Power Administration.

336

2014 Annual Planning Summary for the Western Area Power Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2014 and 2015 within the Western Area Power Administration.

337

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area (Redirected from Salt Wells Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

338

Chena Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chena Geothermal Area Chena Geothermal Area (Redirected from Chena Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Chena Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Technical Problems and Solutions 8 Geology of the Area 9 Heat Source 10 Geofluid Geochemistry 11 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 12 Exploration Activities (9) 13 References Map: Chena Geothermal Area Chena Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Fairbanks, Alaska Exploration Region: Alaska Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

339

Wind energy resources atlas. Volume 1. Northwest region  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concering regional wind energy resource assessment; regional features; and state features for Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.

Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

White Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

White Mountains Geothermal Area White Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: White Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Hampshire Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional assessment area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Truckhaven Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truckhaven Geothermal Area Truckhaven Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Truckhaven Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

342

Wister Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wister Geothermal Area Wister Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Wister Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

343

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Map: Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

344

Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Map: Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

345

Chena Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chena Geothermal Area Chena Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Chena Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Technical Problems and Solutions 8 Geology of the Area 9 Heat Source 10 Geofluid Geochemistry 11 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 12 Exploration Activities (9) 13 References Map: Chena Geothermal Area Chena Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Fairbanks, Alaska Exploration Region: Alaska Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

346

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

347

Regional Purchasing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Purchasing Regional Purchasing Regional Purchasing Pursuant to Appendix M of Prime Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396 between DOE/NNSA and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), LANS is committed to building a strong supplier base with Northern New Mexico businesses and the local Native American pueblos in the purchases of goods and services. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email We seek out and utilize known Northern New Mexico business as suppliers The Northern New Mexico counties included are Los Alamos Santa Fe Rio Arriba Taos Mora San Miguel Sandoval The eight regional pueblos included are Nambe Ohkay Owingeh (formerly known as San Juan) Picuris Pojoaque San Ildefonso Santa Clara Taos Tesuque When the Laboratory cannot identify regional firms, it will expand its

348

SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

The Southwest Partnership Region includes five states (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Utah) and contiguous areas from three adjacent states (west Texas, south Wyoming, and west Kansas). This energy-rich region exhibits some of the largest growth rates in the nation, and it contains two major CO{sub 2} pipeline networks that presently tap natural subsurface CO{sub 2} reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery at a rate of 30 million tons per year. The ten largest coal-fired power plants in the region produce 50% (140 million tons CO{sub 2}/y) of the total CO{sub 2} from power-plant fossil fuel combustion, with power plant emissions close to half the total CO{sub 2} emissions. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state government agencies and universities, the five major electric utility industries, seven oil, gas and coal companies, three federal agencies, the Navajo Nation, several NGOs including the Western Governors Association, and data sharing agreements with four other surrounding states. The Partnership is developing action plans for possible Phase II carbon sequestration pilot tests in the region, as well as the non-technical aspects necessary for developing and carrying out these pilot tests. The establishment of a website network to facilitate data storage and information sharing, decision-making, and future management of carbon sequestration in the region is a priority. The Southwest Partnership's approach includes (1) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, (2) assessing and initiating public acceptance of possible sequestration approaches, and (3) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region. The Partnership will also identify potential gaps in monitoring and verification approaches needed to validate long-term storage efforts.

Brian McPherson

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Event:Hands-on Training Workshop for the Africa Region on Mitigation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Calendar.png Calendar.png Hands-on Training Workshop for the Africa Region on Mitigation Assessment: on 2012/09/10 The Consultative Group of Experts provides essential support to developing countries in the preparation of their national communications, including support for GHG inventories, mitigation assessment, among other areas. Beyond the simple act of reporting, the training and support also focuses on mainstreaming climate change and providing support for the maintenance of in-country capacity. The CGE is comprised of 26 experts nominated by their regional groups under the UNFCCC. Event Details Name Hands-on Training Workshop for the Africa Region on Mitigation Assessment Date 2012/09/10 Location Ghana Organizer UNFCCC Tags LEDS, CLEAN, Training Website Event Website

350

Additional Information for E-Area Vault Performance Assessment, Appendix I `Suspect Soil Performance` - Results of Modeling the Effects of Organic Matter on the Mobility of Radionuclides as it Relates to the Disposal of Wood Products in E-Area Slit Trenches  

SciTech Connect

Numerous laboratory and field studies have shown that the chemical form (i.e., speciation) of many metals and radionuclides is affected by the presence of naturally occurring organic matter (OM) and its degradation products. The effects of OM (e.g., wood products) on the speciation and, therefore, the mobility of Am, Bk, Cf, Cm, Cs, Ni, NpO{sub 2}, Rb, Sr. UO{sub 2}, and Zr were estimated through use of geochemical and groundwater flow modeling. Due to the complex mixture nature of naturally occurring OM, the OM system was simplified through use of surrogate compounds (citric acid and ethylenedinitrilotetraacetic acid (EDTA)) to estimate effects of OM on radionuclide mobility. Using this approach, OM was found to have no effect on the inventory limits for Cs, NpO{sub 2}, Rb and Zr. The inventory limits for the isotopes of Am, Bk, Cf, Cm, Ni, Pd, PuO{sub 2}, Sr, and UO{sub 2} calculated in the presence of OM decreased over a range of 26 percent for U-233 to 48 percent for Pu-240. The information in this report will be included in the next revision of the E-Area Vaults Performance Assessment.

Serkiz, S.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Myers, J.L.

1996-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

351

EA-1177: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment SalvageDemolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to salvage and...

352

Regional Maps  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 East Central Area Reliability Coordination Agreement (ECAR) 1 East Central Area Reliability Coordination Agreement (ECAR) 2 Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) 3 Mid-Atlantic Area Council (MAAC) 4 Mid-America Interconnected Network (MAIN) 5 Mid-Continent Area Power Pool (MAPP) 6. New York (NY) Southern Nevada (RA) 7. New England (NE) 8 Florida Reliability Coordinating Council (FL) 9 Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) 10 Southwest Power Pool (SPP) 11 Northwest Power Pool (NWP) 12. Rocky Mountain Power Area, Arizona, New Mexico, and 13 California (CA) Source: Energy Information Administration. Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting Figure 3. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts Source: Energy Information Administration. Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting AK WA NV

353

Subsurface contaminants focus area  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sierra Nevada Region Sierra Nevada Region Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power Administration-Sierra Nevada Region Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Western Area Power Administration-Sierra Nevada Region. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 3, 2013 CX-010684: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cottonwood-Roseville Optical Groundwire Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6, B4.7, B4.11, B4.13 Date: 07/03/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Sierra Nevada Region September 15, 2011 CX-006896: Categorical Exclusion Determination Maxwell - O'Banion Optical Ground Wire CX(s) Applied: B1.7, B4.6, B4.7, B4.11 Date: 09/15/2011 Location(s): Sutter County, California Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Sierra Nevada Region, National

355

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Upper Great Plains Region Upper Great Plains Region Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power Administration-Upper Great Plains Region Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Western Area Power Administration-Upper Great Plains Region. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD March 22, 2013 CX-010553: Categorical Exclusion Determination Appledorn Substation Construction CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 03/22/2010 Location(s): Minnesota Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Upper Great Plains Region December 3, 2012 CX-009534: Categorical Exclusion Determination Construct New Transmission Line and Footings, Garrison Switchyard CX(s) Applied: B4.13 Date: 12/03/2012 Location(s): North Dakota Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Upper Great Plains Region October 11, 2011

356

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Desert Southwest Region Desert Southwest Region Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 22, 2013 CX-010882: Categorical Exclusion Determination Liberty-Parker Dam #2 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line, Optical Power Ground Wire Repair CX(s) Applied: B4.7 Date: 08/22/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region August 12, 2013 CX-010883: Categorical Exclusion Determination PHX-LOB and LIB-LOB 230-Kilovolt Double-Circuit- Replace Insulators at Structure No. 28-2 With NCI Type Polymers CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/12/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

357

Model Fire Protection Assessment Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Assessment guide covers the implementation of the DOE's responsibility of assuring that DOE and the DOE Contractors have established Fire Protection Programs that are at the level required for the area being assessed.

358

Southeast Idaho Area Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Area Attractions and Events Area Geography Area History Area Links Driving Directions Idaho Falls Attractions and Events INL History INL Today Research Park Sagebrush Steppe...

359

EA-1697: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Draft Environmental Assessment 7: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1697: Draft Environmental Assessment Right-of-Way Maintenance in the San Joaquin Valley, California The Western Area Power Administration (Western) Sierra Nevada Region is a power marketing administration of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). As a Federal entity, Western is responsible for examining the potential environmental consequences of its proposed actions prior to making a decision or commitment to implement an action (see Section 1.5 for more information). This Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluates environmental impacts of the Proposed Action (San Joaquin Valley Right-of-Way Maintenance Project) and the No Action Alternative. EA-1697-DEA-2010.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1697: Final Environmental Assessment

360

Outstanding Issues For New Geothermal Resource Assessments | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Outstanding Issues For New Geothermal Resource Assessments Outstanding Issues For New Geothermal Resource Assessments Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Outstanding Issues For New Geothermal Resource Assessments Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A critical question for the future energy policy of the United States is the extent to which geothermal resources can contribute to an ever-increasing demand for electricity. Electric power production from geothermal sources exceeds that from wind and solar combined, yet the installed capacity falls far short of the geothermal resource base characterized in past assessments, even though the estimated size of the resource in six assessments completed in the past 35 years varies by thousands of Megawatts-electrical (MWe). The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional assessment area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Regional Inventories  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: This year has not started well for gasoline inventories, with inventories being low across regions of the country. The Midwest region (PADD II) had been running lower than most regions, but began to catch up during the last week in April. Gasoline inventories ran about 9% below their 5-year average for this time of year and about 4% below where they were last year. The recent refinery problems in the Midwest, though, could erase some of that recovery. The impacts of Tosco's Wood River refinery and Marathon's St Paul refinery are not fully realized. But inventories were also precariously low along the East Coast (PADD I) and are extremely low in the Rocky Mountain region (PADD IV), although the size of this market mitigates any national impact. While the

362

Regional Renewable Assessment Wind Versus Solar Energy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abstract of Thesis Presented to the Graduate School of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of… (more)

Walker, Joshua

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

ECOWAS - GBEP REGIONAL BIOMASS RESOURCE ASSESSMENT WORKSHOP ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Biomass Program Peer...

364

Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power...

365

Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

D.C. tiarravt056gilbert2010p.pdf More Documents & Publications Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project Chicago Area Alternative...

366

DOE limited standard: Operations assessments  

SciTech Connect

Purpose of this standard is to provide DOE Field Element assessors with a guide for conducting operations assessments, and provide DOE Field Element managers with the criteria of the EM Operations Assessment Program. Sections 6.1 to 6.21 provide examples of how to assess specific areas; the general techniques of operations assessments (Section 5) may be applied to other areas of health and safety (e.g. fire protection, criticality safety, quality assurance, occupational safety, etc.).

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Kawaihae Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kawaihae Geothermal Area Kawaihae Geothermal Area (Redirected from Kawaihae Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kawaihae Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

368

Maui Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maui Geothermal Area Maui Geothermal Area (Redirected from Maui Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Maui Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (13) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

369

Kauai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kauai Geothermal Area Kauai Geothermal Area (Redirected from Kauai Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kauai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

370

Development and assessment of a 250 m spatial resolution MODIS annual land cover time series (2000–2011) for the forest region of Canada derived from change-based updating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Detailed information on the spatial and temporal distribution of land cover is required to evaluate the effects of land cover change on environmental processes. The development of temporally consistent land cover time series (LCTS) from satellite-based earth observation has proven difficult because multi-year observations are acquired under different conditions resulting in high inter-annual reflectance variability. This leads to spurious differences in land cover when standard approaches for image classification are applied to generate multi-year land cover data. To reduce this effect, a common solution has been to first detect change and update a base map for only these change areas. As long as the change commission error is low, this approach will ensure high consistency between maps in the time series. Here we present an approach for change-based LCTS development following from previous research, but with significant advancements in change detection, training, classification, and evidence-based refinement. The method was applied to generate an annual LCTS covering Canada spanning 2000–2011 that is consistent between years and can be used to identify dominant change transitions. Assessment of the LCTS was challenging because multiple maps needed to be evaluated and can be prohibitive particularly for annual time series covering several years. Three approaches were undertaken involving visual examination, comparison with a reference sample derived from Landsat, and comparison with the MODIS Global LCTS V5.1. Visual assessment revealed high inter-map consistency and logical temporal change trajectories of land cover classes. Comparison with the reference sample showed an accuracy of 70% at the 19 class thematic resolution. Accounting for mixed pixels by considering the first or second reference land cover label as correct increased the accuracy to 80%. Comparison with the MODIS Global LCTS showed that the Canada LCTS achieved higher inter-map consistency and accuracy as expected with national relative to global land cover products.

Darren Pouliot; Rasim Latifovic; Natalie Zabcic; Luc Guindon; Ian Olthof

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Western Water Assessment Annual RISA Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Western Water Assessment Annual RISA Report Reporting Period: January-December 2006 #12;Western................................................20 #12;Western Water Assessment 2006 Annual Report 3 _____________________________________________________ WWA Mission: The mission of the Western Water Assessment is to identify and characterize regional

Neff, Jason

372

Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

373

The Western Water Assessment Annual RISA Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Western Water Assessment Annual RISA Report Reporting Period: January 2007-December 2007 #12;Western Water Assessment 2007 Annual Report 2 Table of Contents I. Areas of Focus-30 #12;Western Water Assessment 2007 Annual Report 3

Neff, Jason

374

Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

375

Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: REMI Agency/Company /Organization: Regional Economic Models Inc. Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline, Develop Goals Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.remi.com/ Cost: Paid References: http://www.remi.com/index.php?page=overview&hl=en_US Related Tools Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) The Integrated Environmental Strategies Handbook: A Resource Guide for Air Quality Planning

376

Regional-Scale Climate Change: Observations and Model Simulations  

SciTech Connect

This collaborative proposal addressed key issues in understanding the Earthâ??s climate system, as highlighted by the U.S. Climate Science Program. The research focused on documenting past climatic changes and on assessing future climatic changes based on suites of global and regional climate models. Geographically, our emphasis was on the mountainous regions of the world, with a particular focus on the Neotropics of Central America and the Hawaiian Islands. Mountain regions are zones where large variations in ecosystems occur due to the strong climate zonation forced by the topography. These areas are particularly susceptible to changes in critical ecological thresholds, and we conducted studies of changes in phonological indicators based on various climatic thresholds.

Raymond S. Bradley; Henry F. Diaz

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

377

Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed several more tasks during the period of April 1, 2005-September 30, 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership project is to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. While Phase 2 planning is well under way, the content of this report focuses exclusively on Phase 1 objectives completed during this reporting period. Progress during this period was focused in the three areas: geological carbon storage capacity in New Mexico, terrestrial sequestration capacity for the project area, and the Integrated Assessment Model efforts. The geologic storage capacity of New Mexico was analyzed and Blanco Mesaverde (which extends into Colorado) and Basin Dakota Pools were chosen as top two choices for the further analysis for CO{sub 2} sequestration in the system dynamics model preliminary analysis. Terrestrial sequestration capacity analysis showed that the four states analyzed thus far (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah) have relatively limited potential to sequester carbon in terrestrial systems, mainly due to the aridity of these areas, but the large land area offered could make up for the limited capacity per hectare. Best opportunities were thought to be in eastern Colorado/New Mexico. The Integrated Assessment team expanded the initial test case model to include all New Mexico sinks and sources in a new, revised prototype model in 2005. The allocation mechanism, or ''String of Pearls'' concept, utilizes potential pipeline routes as the links between all combinations of the source to various sinks. This technique lays the groundwork for future, additional ''String of Pearls'' analyses throughout the SW Partnership and other regions as well.

Brian McPherson

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Resource investigation of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal areas in San Bernardino, California. Part of the third year report, 1980-81, of the US Department of Energy-California State-Coupled Program for Reservoir Assessment and Confirmation  

SciTech Connect

Ninety-seven geothermal wells and springs were identified and plotted on a compiled geologic map of the 40-square-mile study area. These wells and springs were concentrated in three distinguishable resource areas: Arrowhead Hot Springs; South San Bernardino; and Harlem Hot Springs - in each of which detailed geophysical, geochemical, and geological surveys were conducted. The Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area lies just north of the City of San Bernardino in the San Bernardino Mountains astride a shear zone (offshoot of the San Andreas fault) in pre-Cambrian gneiss and schist. The Harlem Hot Springs geothermal area, on the east side of the City, and the south San Bernardino geothermal area, on the south side, have geothermal reservoirs in Quaternary alluvial material which overlies a moderately deep sedimentary basin bound on the southwest by the San Jacinto fault (a ground water barrier). Geothermometry calculations suggest that the Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area, with a maximum reservoir temperature of 142/sup 0/C, may have the highest maximum reservoir temperature of the three geothermal areas. The maximum temperature recorded by CDMG in the south San Bernardino geothermal area was 56/sup 0/C from an artesian well, while the maximum temperature recorded in the Harlem Hot Springs geothermal area was 49.5/sup 0/C at 174 meters (570 feet) in an abandoned water well. The geophysical and geological surveys delineated fault traces in association with all three of the designated geothermal areas.

Youngs, L.G.; Bezore, S.P.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Ground Gravity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Gravity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Area Ground Gravity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea East Rift Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes This model was later expanded through the examination of detailed and regional gravity data (Krivoy and Eaton, 1961) and regional aeromagnetic data (Malahoff and Woollard, 1966) to a three-dimensional map of the rift zone (Furumoto, 1978b). This model projected a dike complex (presumably at high temperatures) which has a width of approximately 20 km near the summit of Kilauea that narrows to approximately 12 km at the lower quarter of the subaerial portion of the rift (Fig. 52). References Donald M. Thomas (1 January 1986) Geothermal Resources Assessment In

380

Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area (Redirected from Hualalai Northwest Rift Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional assessment area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (Redirected from Under Steamboat Springs Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure

382

Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area (Redirected from Columbus Salt Marsh Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure

383

3D Mt Resistivity Imaging For Geothermal Resource Assessment And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resistivity Imaging For Geothermal Resource Assessment And Resistivity Imaging For Geothermal Resource Assessment And Environmental Mitigation At The Glass Mountain Kgra, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: 3D Mt Resistivity Imaging For Geothermal Resource Assessment And Environmental Mitigation At The Glass Mountain Kgra, California Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: MT and TDEM surveys acquired in 2005 were integrated with existing MT and TDEM data recovered from obsolete formats to characterize the geometry of the geothermal reservoir. An interpretation based on the correlation of the 3D MT resistivity with well properties indicated that most of the previous exploration wells had been tarted close to but not in the center of areas tha appeared most likely to be permeable. Such

384

Geothermal Resources Exploration And Assessment Around The Cove  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Resources Exploration And Assessment Around The Cove Geothermal Resources Exploration And Assessment Around The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Geothermal Field In Utah By Multiple Geophysical Imaging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geothermal Resources Exploration And Assessment Around The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Geothermal Field In Utah By Multiple Geophysical Imaging Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area is located in the transition zone between the Basin and Range to the west and the Colorado Plateau to the east. We have collected various geophysical data around the geothermal field, including heat flow, gravity, MT, seismic surface wave phase and group velocity maps, seismic body wave travel time data and full seismic waveforms. All of these geophysical data sets have different

385

EA-1665: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1665: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Davis-Kingman Tap 69-kV Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Mohave County, Arizona For more information, contact: Ms. Linette King Desert Southwest Region Western Area Power Administration P.O. Box 6457 Phoenix, AZ 85005-6457 Telephone: 602-605-2434 Fax: 602-605-2630 Electronic mail: lking@wapa.gov The Western Area Power Administration (Western) plans to rebuild a 26.2-mile-long portion of the existing Davis-Kingman Tap 69-kilovolt (kV) Transmission Line located in Mohave County,Arizona. The existing Davis-Kingman Tap 69-kV Transmission Line originates in Bullhead City, Arizona, at the Davis Dam Switchyard and extends northwest of Kingman, Arizona, four

386

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (12) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

387

Molokai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Molokai Geothermal Area Molokai Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Molokai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

388

Maui Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maui Geothermal Area Maui Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Maui Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (13) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

389

Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area (Redirected from Rhodes Marsh Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase:

390

Jersey Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jersey Valley Geothermal Area Jersey Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jersey Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: near Fallon, NV Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

391

Kauai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kauai Geothermal Area Kauai Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kauai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

392

Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

393

Kawaihae Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kawaihae Geothermal Area Kawaihae Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kawaihae Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

394

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

395

Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (3) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Fallon, NV Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

396

Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

397

Bristol Bay Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bristol Bay Geothermal Area Bristol Bay Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Bristol Bay Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Bristol Bay Borough, Alaska Exploration Region: Alaska Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

398

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

399

Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

400

Desert Queen Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert Queen Geothermal Area Desert Queen Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Desert Queen Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional assessment area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Oil and gas potential of the maritime boundary region in the central Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a detailed study in the first half of 1981 of the oil and gas resource potential in the Maritime Boundary region of the central Gulf of Mexico. The Maritime Boundary region encompasses a part of the Gulf where jurisdiction over natural resources by adjacent coastal countries has not yet been established. The region of investigation is divided into six assessment areas on the basis of their generally distinct geologic characteristics. Individual assessment areas comprise a total area of approximately 58,940 mi/sup 2/ (152,660 km/sup 2/) and contain a total estimated sediment volume of 188,140 mi/sup 3/ (784,170 km/sup 3/). Water depths within the overall study region range from a minimum of 98 ft (30 m) on the continental shelf off the Rio Grande to a maximum of about 12,270 ft (3,740 m) in the deep abyssal plain of the westcentral Gulf; more than 75% of the study region is in water depth exceeding 10,000 ft (3,048 m).

Foote, R.Q.; Martin, R.G.; Powers, R.B.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Regional Retail Gasoline Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Notes: Retail gasoline prices, like those for distillate fuels, have hit record prices nationally and in several regions this year. The national average regular gasoline price peaked at $1.68 per gallon in mid-June, but quickly declined, and now stands at $1.45, 17 cents higher than a year ago. Two regions, in particular, experienced sharp gasoline price runups this year. California, which often has some of the highest prices in the nation, saw prices peak near $1.85 in mid-September, while the Midwest had average prices over $1.87 in mid-June. Local prices at some stations in both areas hit levels well over $2.00 per gallon. The reasons for the regional price runups differed significantly. In the Midwest, the introduction of Phase 2 RFG was hampered by low stocks,

403

Template:GeothermalRegion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeothermalRegion GeothermalRegion Jump to: navigation, search This is the GeothermalRegion template. To define a new Geothermal Region, please use the Geothermal Region form. Parameters Map - The map of the region. State - The state in which the resource area is located. Area - The estimated size of the area in which the resource area is located, in km². IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential - The identified hydrothermal electricity generation potential in megawatts, from the USGS resource estimate. UndiscoveredHydrothermalPotential - The estimated undiscovered hydroelectric generation potential in megawatts from the USGS resource estimate. PlannedCapacity - The total planned capacity for the region in megawatts. Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate - The number of plants

404

DOEEA-1177 Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Environmental Assessment SalvageDemolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area and 300 Area Steam Plants, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Richland, Washington October 1996 DOE/EA-1177 ENVIR0NMEN"AL ASSESSMENT' FOR THE SALVAGE/DEMOLITION OF 200 WEST AREA, '200 EAST AREA, AND 300 AREA STEAM PLANTS U . S . DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RICHLAND, WASHINGTON OCTOBER 1996 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available origid document. DOE/EA- 1177 U.S. Department o f Energy Preface Appendices. Additional information necessary t o support an understanding of the proposed action, a1 ternati ves , and potenti a1 impacts i s provided. Comments resul ti.ng from review o

405

Waste area Grouping 2 Phase I remedial investigation: Sediment and Cesium-137 transport modeling report  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of five reports issued in 1996 that provide follow-up information to the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The five reports address areas of concern that may present immediate risk to public health at the Clinch River and ecological risk within WAG 2 at ORNL. A sixth report, on groundwater, in the series documenting WAG 2 RI Phase I results were part of project activities conducted in FY 1996. The five reports that complete activities conducted as part of Phase I of the Remedial Investigation (RI) for WAG 2 are as follows: (1) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Seep Data Assessment, (2) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Tributaries Data Assessment, (3) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Ecological Risk Assessment, (4) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Human Health Risk Assessment, (5) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Sediment and {sup 137}Cs Transport Modeling In December 1990, the Remedial Investigation Plan for Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was issued (ORNL 1990). The WAG 2 RI Plan was structured with a short-term component to be conducted while upgradient WAGs are investigated and remediated, and a long-term component that will complete the RI process for WAG 2 following remediation of upgradient WAGs. RI activities for the short-term component were initiated with the approval of the Environmental Protection Agency, Region IV (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). This report presents the results of an investigation of the risk associated with possible future releases of {sup 137}Cs due to an extreme flood. The results are based on field measurements made during storms and computer model simulations.

Clapp, R.B.; Bao, Y.S.; Moore, T.D.; Brenkert, A.L.; Purucker, S.T.; Reece, D.K.; Burgoa, B.B.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Site Monitoring Area Maps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring Area sampler Control measures (best management practices) installed at the Site Monitoring Area Structures such as...

407

National Climate Assessment: Production Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NCA & Development Advisory Committee NCA & Development Advisory Committee Production Team Indicators System Coastal Resilience Resources Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally National Climate Assessment: Production Team Print E-mail National Climate Assessment Staff (USGCRP National Coordination Office) Current NCA Staff Dr. Fabien Laurier, Director, Third National Climate Assessment Dr. Glynis Lough, Chief of Staff for the National Climate Assessment Emily Therese Cloyd, Engagement Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment Bryce Golden-Chen, Program Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment Alison Delgado, Scientist Dr. Ilya Fischhoffkri, Scientist Melissa Kenney, Indicators Coordinator Dr. Fred Lipschultz, Regional Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment

408

Redfield Campus Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Redfield Campus Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Redfield Campus Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate

409

Preliminary Site Assessment Of The Redfield Campus, Reno, Nevada, Usa |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Site Assessment Of The Redfield Campus, Reno, Nevada, Usa Site Assessment Of The Redfield Campus, Reno, Nevada, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Preliminary Site Assessment Of The Redfield Campus, Reno, Nevada, Usa Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: To develop a foundation to support future geothermal potential assessment on the Redfield campus property, this project compiled a GIS with the framework coming from existing geologic, hydrologic, and geoscience information. Along with the GIS, an InSAR deformation study was conducted from a suite of previously created interferograms from 1993-2005. Geochemical data were also re-evaluated in the context of fault controlled flow paths and the InSAR data results. Estimates of vertical and horizontal surface displacements associated with production of geothermal fluids were

410

Mexico-NREL Wind Resource Assessments | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Resource Assessments Wind Resource Assessments Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Mexico-NREL Initiatives Name Mexico-NREL Initiatives Agency/Company /Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector Energy Focus Area Wind Topics Background analysis Resource Type Dataset, Maps, Software/modeling tools Website http://www.nrel.gov/internatio Country Mexico Central America References NREL International Program Overview [1] Abstract Currently NREL is working with Mexico to develop wind resource assessments including wind maps for Tamuilipas and & Baja California (10/10) and to prepare wind development scenarios for these regions. Currently NREL is working with Mexico to develop wind resource assessments including wind maps for Tamuilipas and & Baja California (10/10) and to

411

Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Jump to: navigation, search Name Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Agency/Company /Organization World Agroforestry Centre Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type Publications Website http://www.worldagroforestry.o Country Philippines UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed[1] Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Screenshot This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it.

412

Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment Agency/Company /Organization Organization of American States (OAS) Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Biomass Topics Market analysis, Background analysis Website http://www.sepa-americas.net/p Program Start 2008 Program End 2009 Country Belize UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References OAS Project Database[1] "The main objective of the Project is to assess the market potential for cellulosic ethanol in Belize through sustainable implementation of cellulosic ethanol technology utilizing agricultural and forest residues as primary biomass feedstock. A supplementary objective will be to help prepare for potential future cellulosic ethanol projects in other Caribbean

413

NANA Wind Resource Assessment Program Final Report  

SciTech Connect

NANA Regional Corporation (NRC) of northwest Alaska is located in an area with abundant wind energy resources. In 2007, NRC was awarded grant DE-FG36-07GO17076 by the US Department of Energy's Tribal Energy Program for funding a Wind Resource Assessment Project (WRAP) for the NANA region. The NANA region, including Kotzebue Electric Association (KEA) and Alaska Village Electric Cooperative (AVEC) have been national leaders at developing, designing, building, and operating wind-diesel hybrid systems in Kotzebue (starting in 1996) and Selawik (2002). Promising sites for the development of new wind energy projects in the region have been identified by the WRAP, including Buckland, Deering, and the Kivalina/Red Dog Mine Port Area. Ambler, Shungnak, Kobuk, Kiana, Noorvik & Noatak were determined to have poor wind resources at sites in or very near each community. However, all five of these communities may have better wind resources atop hills or at sites with slightly higher elevations several miles away.

Jay Hermanson

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

414

Static Temperature Survey At Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Medicine Lake Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Medicine Lake Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Glass Mountain region of northern California, which is considered to be one of the sites of the greatest untapped geothermal potential in the lower 48 states, is the focus of an exploration project to identify the characteristics of the resource at the Fourmile Hill location (northwest of Medicine Lake in T44N R3E). The objective of Phase I work was to deepen a temperature gradient well to finalize the assessment of the site. The

415

Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area (Redirected from Gabbs Valley Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (11) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

416

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Marysville Mt Geothermal Area (Redirected from Marysville Mt Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Montana Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

417

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Fort Bliss Geothermal Area (Redirected from Fort Bliss Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (22) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Texas Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

418

Amedee Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Amedee Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Amedee Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Map: Amedee Geothermal Area Amedee Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

419

New River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New River Geothermal Area New River Geothermal Area (Redirected from New River Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: New River Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (13) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

420

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Glass Buttes Geothermal Area (Redirected from Glass Buttes Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (14) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Oregon Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional assessment area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area (Redirected from Obsidian Cliff Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

422

Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area (Redirected from Jemez Pueblo Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

423

Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area (Redirected from Socorro Mountain Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (10) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

424

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area (Redirected from Dixie Meadows Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

425

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area (Redirected from Jemez Mountain Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

426

Wind Resource Assessment Overview | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Resource Assessment Overview Wind Resource Assessment Overview Jump to: navigation, search Maps.jpg The first step in developing a wind project is to locate and quantify the wind resource. The magnitude of the wind and the characteristics of the resource are the largest factors in determining a potential site's economic and technical viability. There are three basic steps to identifying and characterizing the wind resource: prospecting, validating, and micrositing. The process of locating sites for wind energy development is similar to exploration for other resources, such as minerals and petroleum. Thus, the term prospecting is often used to describe the identification and preliminary evaluation of a wind resource area. Prospecting includes identifying potentially windy sites within a fairly large region - such

427

CAPITAL REGION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

t 09/20/07 15:28 FAX 301 903 4656 t 09/20/07 15:28 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION 0 j002 SDOE F 1325.8 (8-89) EFG (0790) Energy United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE. September 18, 2007 Audit Report No.: OAS-L-07-23 REPLY TO: IG-34 (A07TG036) SUBJECT: Evaluation of "The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Cyber Security Program-2007" TO: Chairman, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results o Four evaluation of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission) cyber security program. The evaluation was initiated in May 2007, and our fieldwork was conducted through September 2007. Our methodology is described in the attachment to this report. . INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Commission reports that it is constantly improving thl stability, reliability, and

428

2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Western Area Power Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2013 and 2014 within the Western Area Power Administration.

429

2011 Annual Planning Summary for Western Area Power Administration (WAPA)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA).

430

2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Southwestern Area Power Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2013 and 2014 for the Southwestern Area Power Administration.

431

Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

432

EA-1611-S1: Final Supplemental Environmental Assessment | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment EA-1611-S1: Final Supplemental Environmental Assessment Colorado Highlands Wind Project, Logan County, Colorado DOE's Western Area Power...

433

EA-1972: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Assessment EA-1972: Draft Environmental Assessment Electric District 2 to Saguaro No. 2 Transmission Line Rebuild, Pinal County, Arizona Western Area Power Administration issued...

434

Nepal-DLR Resource Assessments | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DLR Resource Assessments Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal-DLR Resource Assessments AgencyCompany Organization German Aerospace Center (DLR) Sector Energy Focus Area...

435

EA-1960: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment EA-1960: Draft Environmental Assessment Townsite Solar Project Transmission Line, Clark County, Nevada The Bureau of Land Management, with Western Area...

436

EA-1948: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment EA-1948: Final Environmental Assessment Gila-North Gila Transmission Line Rebuild and Upgrade Project, Yuma County, Arizona DOE's Western Area Power...

437

EA-1960: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment EA-1960: Final Environmental Assessment Townsite Solar Project Transmission Line, Clark County, Nevada The Bureau of Land Management, with Western Area...

438

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in

439

Isotopic Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, 2005) Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being

440

A regional comparison of postmining land use practices  

SciTech Connect

Three case studies were undertaken to investigate the role of land use potential evaluation in reclamation planning and to determine the impact of regional differences on the evaluation process. The three surface mines studied were representative of operations in the Appalachian, Interior, and Northern Great Plains provinces. The scope of the investigations included a survey of regional characteristics, a detailed investigation of the mining operations and site conditions, and an assessment of local land use planning activities in the area of the mine. Special attention was given to key factors that presently determine the use of reclaimed land. Also, for each case study, the postmining land use potential was evaluated using site planning principles.

Sweigard, R.J.; Ramani, R.V.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (5) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content