Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional activities state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

State and Regional Policy Assistance - Program Activities | Department of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State and Regional Policy Assistance - State and Regional Policy Assistance - Program Activities State and Regional Policy Assistance - Program Activities Providing Technical Assistance to States and Regions The Electric Markets Technical Assistance Program responds to both immediate and long-terms needs of states, regions, and other organizations to implement policy and market solutions that bring about improved demand response, energy efficiency, renewable energy, and transmission utilization. Examples include: Supporting efforts by the Western Governors' Association (WGA), its subsidiary Western Interstate Energy Board (WIEB), and related ad-hoc subregional groups in the West as they work toward greater regional coordination and planning of regional electric infrastructure. (see Sample Products and Related Links or FY2003 Grants for details.)

2

New England Wind Forum: New England Regional and State Activities  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Connecticut Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island Vermont Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share New England Activities Although much of the wind-power-related activity in the New England region occurs at the state level, regional activities and organizations are also prevalent. For state-specific wind power activities and information, follow the links to specific states on the left-hand menu. Operating and Planned Wind Projects A clickable regional map provides information on operating and planned wind projects in New England. Regional Resource Agencies Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management New England Governors Conference

3

State and Regional Policy Assistance - Program Activities | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and long-terms needs of states, regions, and other organizations to implement policy and market solutions that bring about improved demand response, energy efficiency, renewable...

4

Free Magnetic Energy in Solar Active Regions above the Minimum-Energy Relaxed State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To understand the physics of solar flares, including the local reorganisation of the magnetic field and the acceleration of energetic particles, we have first to estimate the free magnetic energy available for such phenomena, which can be converted into kinetic and thermal energy. The free magnetic energy is the excess energy of a magnetic configuration compared to the minimum-energy state, which is a linear force-free field if the magnetic helicity of the configuration is conserved. We investigate the values of the free magnetic energy estimated from either the excess energy in extrapolated fields or the magnetic virial theorem. For four different active regions, we have reconstructed the nonlinear force-free field and the linear force-free field corresponding to the minimum-energy state. The free magnetic energies are then computed. From the energy budget and the observed magnetic activity in the active region, we conclude that the free energy above the minimum-energy state gives a better estimate and more insights into the flare process than the free energy above the potential field state.

S. Regnier; E. R. Priest

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

5

Free Magnetic Energy in Solar Active Regions above the Minimum-Energy Relaxed State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To understand the physics of solar flares, including the local reorganisation of the magnetic field and the acceleration of energetic particles, we have first to estimate the free magnetic energy available for such phenomena, which can be converted into kinetic and thermal energy. The free magnetic energy is the excess energy of a magnetic configuration compared to the minimum-energy state, which is a linear force-free field if the magnetic helicity of the configuration is conserved. We investigate the values of the free magnetic energy estimated from either the excess energy in extrapolated fields or the magnetic virial theorem. For four different active regions, we have reconstructed the nonlinear force-free field and the linear force-free field corresponding to the minimum-energy state. The free magnetic energies are then computed. From the energy budget and the observed magnetic activity in the active region, we conclude that the free energy above the minimum-energy state gives a better estimate and more ...

Régnier, S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

State and Regional Biomass Partnerships  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Northeast Regional Biomass Program successfully employed a three pronged approach to build the regional capacity, networks, and reliable information needed to advance biomass and bioenergy technologies and markets. The approach included support for state-based, multi-agency biomass working groups; direct technical assistance to states and private developers; and extensive networking and partnership-building activities to share objective information and best practices.

Handley, Rick; Stubbs, Anne D.

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

7

State and Regional Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Center. -, Economic Developer's Assn. South Dakota, -, Small Business Development Center. -, Dakota State SBIR. Tennessee, ...

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

8

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Regional Wind Activities  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Regional Activities Regional Activities State Activities State Lands Siting Regional Wind Activities Learn more about regional activities in New England. New England Wind Forum The New England Wind Forum has its own website with information particular to the region and its own unique circumstances. Find regional events, news, projects, and information about wind technology, economics, markets for wind energy, siting considerations, policies and public acceptance issues as they all pertain to the New England region. The site was launched in 2005 to provide a single comprehensive source of up-to-date, Web-based information on a broad array of wind-energy-related issues pertaining to New England. Contacts | Website Policies | U.S. Department of Energy | USA.gov Content Last Updated: 9/2

9

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION REGION I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

REGION I REGION I 475 ALLENDALE ROAD KING OF PRUSSIA, PENNSYLVANIA 194061415 Docket No. 040-07123 JUL. 19 '996 License No. SUB-748 (Retired) United States -Department of Energy O ffice of EnvironmentalRestoration ATTN: W. Alexander Williams, Ph.D. EM-241 Cloverleaf Building 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, Maryland 20874-1290 SUBJECT: NL INDUSTRIES, ALBANY, NEW YORK Dear Dr. Williams: We are aware that DOE is responsible for the former National Lead Company (NL Industries) facility near Albany, New York. During a recent review of retired AEC License No. SUB-748, we found records which provide additional information concerning the use of source material at the facility. Copies of AEC documents which describe activities at that facility are enclosed. License No. SUB-00748 authorized possession of 38,000 pounds of uranium during

10

Lake Region State College | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

College College Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Region State College Facility Lake Region State College Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Lake Region State College Developer Lake Region State College Energy Purchaser Lake Region State College Location Devils Lake ND Coordinates 48.166071°, -98.864529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.166071,"lon":-98.864529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

11

Optimal error regions for quantum state estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rather than point estimators, states of a quantum system that represent one's best guess for the given data, we consider optimal regions of estimators. As the natural counterpart of the popular maximum-likelihood point estimator, we introduce the maximum-likelihood region---the region of largest likelihood among all regions of the same size. Here, the size of a region is its prior probability. Another concept is the smallest credible region---the smallest region with pre-chosen posterior probability. For both optimization problems, the optimal region has constant likelihood on its boundary. We discuss criteria for assigning prior probabilities to regions, and illustrate the concepts and methods with several examples.

Jiangwei Shang; Hui Khoon Ng; Arun Sehrawat; Xikun Li; Berthold-Georg Englert

2013-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

12

Final Scientific and Technical Report State and Regional Biomass Partnerships  

SciTech Connect

The Northeast Regional Biomass Program successfully employed a three pronged approach to build the regional capacity, networks, and reliable information needed to advance biomass and bioenergy technologies and markets. The approach included support for state-based, multi-agency biomass working groups; direct technical assistance to states and private developers; and extensive networking and partnership-building activities to share objective information and best practices.

Handley, Rick; Stubbs, Anne D.

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

13

State and Regional Policy Assistance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assistance State and Regional Policy Assistance Mission The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE)'s mission with State and Regional Policy Assistance is to...

14

Active-region designs in quantum cascade lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyses the development of active-region designs in quantum cascade lasers. Active-region designs have been demonstrated to date that employ various radiative transitions (vertical, diagonal, interminiband and interband). The lower laser level is depopulated through nonradiative transitions, such as one- or two-phonon (and even three-phonon) relaxation or bound state {yields} continuum transitions. Advances in active-region designs and energy diagram optimisation in the past few years have led to significant improvements in important characteristics of quantum cascade lasers, such as their output power, emission bandwidth, characteristic temperature and efficiency. (invited paper)

Zasavitskii, I I [P N Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Solid-State Lighting: 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Municipal Consortium 0 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials on AddThis.com... Conferences & Meetings Presentations Publications

16

Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Municipal Consortium 1 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials on AddThis.com... Conferences & Meetings Presentations Publications

17

OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE)'s mission with regard to State and Regional Policy Assistance is to provide, on an as-requested basis, unbiased policy assistance and analysis to States and regions on State electricity policies, programs, laws, and regulations that facilitate electricity Infrastructure investment needed to deliver clean, affordable, and reliable electricity to customers. OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program More Documents & Publications U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability: Electric Markets Technical Assistance Program

18

Great Lakes Biomass State and Regional Partnership (GLBSRP)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Council of Great Lakes Governors administered the Great Lakes Biomass State and Regional Partnership (GLBSRP) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). This Partnership grew out of the existing Regional Biomass Energy Program which the Council had administered since 1983. The GLBSRP includes the States of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin. The GLBSRPÃ?Â?s overall goal is to facilitate the increased production and use of bioenergy and biobased products throughout the region. The GLBSRP has traditionally addressed its goals and objectives through a three-pronged approach: providing grants to the States; undertaking region-wide education, outreach and technology transfer projects; and, providing in-house management, support and information dissemination. At the direction of US Department of Energy, the primary emphasis of the GLBSRP in recent years has been education and outreach. Therefore, most activities have centered on developing educational materials, hosting workshops and conferences, and providing technical assistance. This report summarizes a selection of activities that were accomplished under this cooperative agreement.

Frederic Kuzel

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

IS ACTIVE REGION CORE VARIABILITY AGE DEPENDENT?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of both steady and transient loops in active region cores has been reported from soft X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of the solar corona. The relationship between the different loop populations, however, remains an open question. We present an investigation of the short-term variability of loops in the core of two active regions in the context of their long-term evolution. We take advantage of the nearly full Sun observations of STEREO and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft to track these active regions as they rotate around the Sun multiple times. We then diagnose the variability of the active region cores at several instances of their lifetime using EIS/Hinode spectral capabilities. We inspect a broad range of temperatures, including for the first time spatially and temporally resolved images of Ca XIV and Ca XV lines. We find that the active region cores become fainter and steadier with time. The significant emission measure at high temperatures that is not correlated with a comparable increase at low temperatures suggests that high-frequency heating is viable. The presence, however, during the early stages, of an enhanced emission measure in the ''hot'' (3.0-4.5 MK) and ''cool'' (0.6-0.9 MK) components suggests that low-frequency heating also plays a significant role. Our results explain why there have been recent studies supporting both heating scenarios.

Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

20

Determining the H+ Region/PDR Equation of State in Star Forming Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emission line regions of starburst galaxies and active nuclei reveal a wealth of spectroscopic information. A unified picture of the relationship between ionized, atomic, and molecular gas makes it possible to better understand these observations. We performed a series of calculations designed to determine the equation of state, the relationship between density, temperature, and pressure, through emission-line diagnostic ratios that form in the H+ region and PDR. We consider a wide range of physical conditions in the H+ region. We connect the H+ region to the PDR by considering two constant pressure cases, one with no magnetic field and one where the magnetic field overwhelms the thermal pressure. We show that diagnostic ratios can yield the equation of state for single H+ regions adjacent to single PDRs, with the results being more ambiguous when considering observations of entire galaxies. As a test, we apply our calculations to the Orion H+/PDR region behind the Trapezium. We find the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure in the PDR to be \\~1.2. If magnetic and turbulent energy are in equipartition, our results mean the magnetic field is not the cause of the unexplained broadening in M 42, but may significantly affect line broadening in the PDR. Since Orion is often used to understand physical processes in extragalactic environments, our calculations suggest magnetic pressure should be considered in modeling such regions.

N. P. Abel; G. J. Ferland

2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional activities state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Wealth, consumption, and regional economic development in the United States.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Consumption has become increasingly important to regional economies, yet the focus upon production activities as the basis for regional economic development has limited our understanding… (more)

Wenzl, Andrew J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Determining the H+ Region/PDR Equation of State in Star Forming Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emission line regions of starburst galaxies and active nuclei reveal a wealth of spectroscopic information. A unified picture of the relationship between ionized, atomic, and molecular gas makes it possible to better understand these observations. We performed a series of calculations designed to determine the equation of state, the relationship between density, temperature, and pressure, through emission-line diagnostic ratios that form in the H+ region and PDR. We consider a wide range of physical conditions in the H+ region. We connect the H+ region to the PDR by considering two constant pressure cases, one with no magnetic field and one where the magnetic field overwhelms the thermal pressure. We show that diagnostic ratios can yield the equation of state for single H+ regions adjacent to single PDRs, with the results being more ambiguous when considering observations of entire galaxies. As a test, we apply our calculations to the Orion H+/PDR region behind the Trapezium. We find the ratio of thermal ...

Ferland, N P A G J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Northeast Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Northeast Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts CALiPER Program Standards Development Technical Information Network

24

Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Northwest Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Northwest Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts CALiPER Program Standards Development Technical Information Network

25

Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Consortium North Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts CALiPER Program

26

Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2011 Municipal Consortium North 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on AddThis.com... Conferences & Meetings

27

Advanced Manufacturing Office: State and Regional Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on State Policies that Impact Industrial Energy Efficiency In order to reduce industrial energy intensity and use, the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) is forming partnerships...

28

State and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities State and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to section 139 of the energy policy act of 2005. March 2007 State and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities More Documents & Publications State and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006)

29

State and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities State and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to section 139 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. March 2007 State and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities More Documents & Publications State and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006)

30

Regional Energy Activity | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in every region of the world. Important issue areas include regional and country-specific energy policies and practices, technology developments, market conditions, and trade and...

31

Regional Simulation of Summertime Precipitation over the Southwestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using results taken from a finescale (25 km), regional modeling simulation for the summer of 1999, along with contemporaneous daily surface observations, synoptic variations in summertime precipitation over the southwestern United States are ...

Bruce T. Anderson; John O. Roads

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Classification of Regional Climate Variability in the State of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel approach is presented to objectively identify regional patterns of climate variability within the state of California using principal component analysis on monthly precipitation and temperature data from a network of 195 climate stations ...

John T. Abatzoglou; Kelly T. Redmond; Laura M. Edwards

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

State and Regional Policy Assistance | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assistance Assistance State and Regional Policy Assistance Mission The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE)'s mission with State and Regional Policy Assistance is to provide, on an as-requested basis, unbiased policy assistance and analysis to States and regions on State electricity policies, programs, laws, and regulations that facilitate electricity infrastructure investment needed to deliver clean, affordable, and reliable electricity to customers. The program was transferred from the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, with a history going back to the early 1990's, as part of OE's 2003 creation. Efforts in the 1990's included the topics of integrated resource planning, plus seminal work on best practices for electricity information disclosure and consumer protection practices, state renewable

34

MAGNETIC ENERGY SPECTRA IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS  

SciTech Connect

Line-of-sight magnetograms for 217 active regions (ARs) with different flare rates observed at the solar disk center from 1997 January until 2006 December are utilized to study the turbulence regime and its relationship to flare productivity. Data from the SOHO/MDI instrument recorded in the high-resolution mode and data from the BBSO magnetograph were used. The turbulence regime was probed via magnetic energy spectra and magnetic dissipation spectra. We found steeper energy spectra for ARs with higher flare productivity. We also report that both the power index, {alpha}, of the energy spectrum, E(k) {approx} k{sup -}{alpha}, and the total spectral energy, W = {integral}E(k)dk, are comparably correlated with the flare index, A, of an AR. The correlations are found to be stronger than those found between the flare index and the total unsigned flux. The flare index for an AR can be estimated based on measurements of {alpha} and W as A = 10{sup b}({alpha}W){sup c}, with b = -7.92 {+-} 0.58 and c = 1.85 {+-} 0.13. We found that the regime of the fully developed turbulence occurs in decaying ARs and in emerging ARs (at the very early stage of emergence). Well-developed ARs display underdeveloped turbulence with strong magnetic dissipation at all scales.

Abramenko, Valentyna; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl [Big Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 N. Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Probing the softest region of the nuclear equation of state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An attractive, energy-dependent mean-field potential for baryons is introduced in order to generate a soft region in the nuclear equation of state, as suggested by recent lattice QCD calculations of baryon-free matter at finite temperature. Based on a hadronic transport model, we find that although this equation of state has negligible effects on the inclusive hadronic spectra, it leads to a minimum in the energy dependence of the transverse collective flow and a delayed expansion of the compressed matter. In particular, the transverse flow changes its direction as the colliding system passes through the softest region in the equation of state.

Li, Ba; Ko, Che Ming.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Wind Powering America's Regional Stakeholder Meetings and Priority State Reports: FY11 Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Beginning in 2010, DOE conducted an assessment of Wind Powering America (WPA) activities to determine whether the methods the department had used to help grow the wind industry to provide 2% of the nation's electrical energy should be the same methods used to achieve 20% of the nation's energy from wind (as described in the report 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply). After the assessment, it was determined that the initiative's state-based activities should be phased out as part of a shift to regional-based approaches. To assist with this transition, WPA hosted a series of 1-day regional meetings at six strategic locations around the country and a single teleconference for island states, U.S. territories, and remote communities. This report summarizes the results of the inaugural regional meetings and the state reports with a focus on ongoing wind deployment barriers in each region.

Not Available

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

Between 2001 and 2005, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) created a set of eight Regional Application Centers (RACs) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies. By utilizing the thermal energy that is normally wasted when electricity is produced at central generating stations, Combined Heat and Power installations can save substantial amounts of energy compared to more traditional technologies. In addition, the location of CHP facilities at or near the point of consumption greatly reduces or eliminates electric transmission and distribution losses. The regional nature of the RACs allows each one to design and provide services that are most relevant to the specific economic and market conditions in its particular geographic area. Between them, the eight RACs provide services to all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Through the end of the federal 2009 fiscal year (FY 2009), the primary focus of the RACs was on providing CHP-related information to targeted markets, encouraging the creation and adoption of public policies and incentives favorable to CHP, and providing CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. Beginning with the 2010 fiscal year, the focus of the regional centers broadened to include district energy and waste heat recovery and these entities became formally known as Clean Energy Application Centers, as required by the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort to establish metrics to quantify the RACs accomplishments. That effort began with the development of a detailed logic model describing RAC operations and outcomes, which provided a basis for identifying important activities and accomplishments to track. A data collection spreadsheet soliciting information on those activities for FY 2008 and all previous years of RAC operations was developed and sent to the RACs in the summer of 2008. This represents the first systematic attempt at RAC program measurement in a manner consistent with approaches used for other efforts funded by DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP). In addition, data on CHP installations and associated effects were collected for the same years from a state-by-state database maintained for DOE by ICF international. A report documenting the findings of that study was produced in September, 2009. The purpose of the current report is to present the findings from a new study of RAC activities and accomplishments which examined what the Centers did in FY 2009, the last year in which they concentrated exclusively on CHP technologies. This study focused on identifying and describing RAC activities and was not designed to measure how those efforts influenced CHP installations or other outcomes.

Schweitzer, Martin [ORNL

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Technique for inferring sizes of stellar-active regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inspection of spectroheliograms showing large, well-developed active regions generally show the sunspots to lead the associated plage, in the sense of the solar rotation. Measurements have been made from spectroheliograms of spot-plage offsets and compared with nearly contemporaneous integrated disk observations. Larger active regions generally show larger spot leads; however, information regarding active-region sizes and spot-plage offsets is not readily obtainable form stellar-type observations of the Sun.

Dobson-Hockey, A.K.; Radick, R.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Table C5. Residential Propane Prices by Region and State ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table C5. Residential Propane Prices by Region and State (Cents per Gallon) ... New York 141.9 145.6 146.4 150.4 153.7 162.1 164.5 168.1 169.0 190.2 ...

40

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: State Wind Activities  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Federal, Federal, State, & Local Printable Version Bookmark and Share Economic Development Policy Public Lands Public Power Regional Activities State Activities State Lands Siting State Wind Activities The U.S. map below summarizes Wind Powering America's state activities as of February 2010, which include Wind Working Groups, validated wind maps, anemometer loan programs, small wind guides, Wind for Schools Wind Applications Centers, exhibits, and workshops or webcasts. To read more state-specific news, click on a state. You can also view an enlarged map or print the state wind activities map. U.S. map showing Wind Powering America's activities in each state. Washington has an inactive/evolved wind working group, validated wind map, and a small wind guide. Exhibits have been displayed. Oregon has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. California has an inactive/evolved wind working group and valided wind map. Exhibits have been displayed. Idaho has an inactive/evolved wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Nevada has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts and exhibits. Montana has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Wyoming has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts and exhibits. Utah has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Arizona has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, and exhibits have been displayed. Colorado has a wind working group, a validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. New Mexico has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, and exhibits have been displayed. North Dakota has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts and exhibits. South Dakota has a wind working group, a validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Nebraska has a wind working group, a validated wind map, a small wind guide, has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Kansas has a wind working group, a validated wind map, a small wind guide, has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Oklahoma has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Texas currently does not have any Wind Powering America activities. Minnesota has a small wind guide. Iowa has a small wind guide and has had exhibits. Missouri has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Arkansas has a wind working group, validated wind map, and workshops or Webcasts. Lousiana currently does not have any Wind Powering America activities. Mississippi currently does not have any Wind Powering America activities. Alabama currently does not have any Wind Powering America activities. Georgia has a wind working group, a validated wind map, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Florida currently does not have any Wind Powering America activities. South Carolina has a wind working group. Alaska has a wind working group, validated wind map, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Hawaii has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, and has had exhibits. Puerto Rico has a validated wind map and a planned wind working group. Wisconsin has a wind working group, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Illinois has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Michigan has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts and exhibits. Indiana has a wind working group, a validated wind map, a small wind guide, and has had workshops or Webcasts and exhibits. Kentucky has a wind working group and a validated wind map. Tennessee has a wind working group, a validated wind map, small wind guide, anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. North Carolina has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Virginia has a wind working group, a validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. West Virginia has a wind working group, a validated wind map, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Ohio has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Maryland has a wind working group, a validated wind map, a small wind guide, and an anemometer loan program. Pennsylvania has a wind working group, a validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Delaware has a validated wind map and a small wind guide. New Jersey has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Connecticut has a wind working group and a validated wind map. New York has a small wind guide. Vermont has a validated wind map and a small wind guide. Massachusetts has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had exhibits. New Hampshire has a validated wind map and small wind guide. Maine has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Rhode Island has a validated wind map and small wind guide. The U.S. Virgin Islands have a validated wind map.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional activities state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

NREL: Technology Deployment - State and Local Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deployment Deployment Search More Search Options Site Map NREL helps states and local communities throughout the United States achieve their clean energy goals by supporting renewable energy and energy-saving projects through a variety of technical assistance and technology deployment programs. Analyze Energy Policy Impacts Analyze Energy Policy Impacts Find data to help your state, locality, or region establish beneficial clean energy policies. Learn more. Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player. Technical Assistance Webcast Experts present information on state and local energy projects, financing, policy and more... Renewable Energy Data Book NREL's Cean Energy Policy Analyses Project State of the States 2010 The role of policy in clean energy market transformation

42

OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS  

SciTech Connect

The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial ({approx}0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to {approx}15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 A channel, and by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 10{sup 23} erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).

Testa, Paola; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Title, Alan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, Org. A021S, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Hansteen, Viggo [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Kuzin, Sergey [P. N. Lebedev Physical institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospekt, 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Walsh, Robert [University of Central Lancashire, Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); DeForest, Craig, E-mail: ptesta@cfa.harvard.edu [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

43

Regional Per Capita Solar Electric Footprint for the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report, we quantify the state-by-state per-capita 'solar electric footprint' for the United States. We use state-level data on population, electricity consumption, economic activity and solar insolation, along with solar photovoltaic (PV) array packing density data to develop a range of estimates of the solar electric footprint. We find that the solar electric footprint, defined as the land area required to supply all end-use electricity from solar photovoltaics, is about 181 m2 per person in the United States. Two key factors that influence the magnitude of the state-level solar electric footprint include how industrial energy is allocated (based on location of use vs. where goods are consumed) and the assumed distribution of PV configurations (flat rooftop vs. fixed tilt vs. tracking). The solar electric footprint is about 0.6% of the total land area of the United States with state-level estimates ranging from less than 0.1% for Wyoming to about 9% for New Jersey. We also compare the solar electric footprint to a number of other land uses. For example, we find that the solar electric footprint is equal to less than 2% of the land dedicated to cropland and grazing in the United States.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Regional Per Capita Solar Electric Footprint for the United States  

SciTech Connect

In this report, we quantify the state-by-state per-capita 'solar electric footprint' for the United States. We use state-level data on population, electricity consumption, economic activity and solar insolation, along with solar photovoltaic (PV) array packing density data to develop a range of estimates of the solar electric footprint. We find that the solar electric footprint, defined as the land area required to supply all end-use electricity from solar photovoltaics, is about 181 m2 per person in the United States. Two key factors that influence the magnitude of the state-level solar electric footprint include how industrial energy is allocated (based on location of use vs. where goods are consumed) and the assumed distribution of PV configurations (flat rooftop vs. fixed tilt vs. tracking). The solar electric footprint is about 0.6% of the total land area of the United States with state-level estimates ranging from less than 0.1% for Wyoming to about 9% for New Jersey. We also compare the solar electric footprint to a number of other land uses. For example, we find that the solar electric footprint is equal to less than 2% of the land dedicated to cropland and grazing in the United States.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

THE MAGNETIC ENERGY-HELICITY DIAGRAM OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a recently proposed nonlinear force-free method designed for single-vector magnetograms of solar active regions, we calculate the instantaneous free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity budgets in 162 vector magnetograms corresponding to 42 different active regions. We find a statistically robust, monotonic correlation between the free magnetic energy and the relative magnetic helicity in the studied regions. This correlation implies that magnetic helicity, in addition to free magnetic energy, may be an essential ingredient for major solar eruptions. Eruptive active regions appear well segregated from non-eruptive ones in both free energy and relative helicity with major (at least M-class) flares occurring in active regions with free energy and relative helicity exceeding 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 31} erg and 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} Mx{sup 2}, respectively. The helicity threshold agrees well with estimates of the helicity contents of typical coronal mass ejections.

Tziotziou, Kostas; Georgoulis, Manolis K. [Research Center for Astronomy and Applied Mathematics (RCAAM), Academy of Athens, 4 Soranou Efesiou Street, Athens, GR-11527 (Greece); Raouafi, Nour-Eddine [Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL), 11100 Johns Hopkins Rd. Laurel, MD 20723-6099 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

The Magnetic Energy - Helicity Diagram of Solar Active Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a recently proposed nonlinear force-free method designed for single vector magnetograms of solar active regions we calculate the instantaneous free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity budgets in 162 vector magnetograms corresponding to 42 different active regions. We find a statistically robust, monotonic correlation between the free magnetic energy and the relative magnetic helicity in the studied regions. This correlation implies that magnetic helicity, besides free magnetic energy, may be an essential ingredient for major solar eruptions. Eruptive active regions appear well segregated from non-eruptive ones in both free energy and relative helicity with major (at least M-class) flares occurring in active regions with free energy and relative helicity exceeding 4x10^{31} erg and 2x10^{42} Mx^2, respectively. The helicity threshold agrees well with estimates of helicity contents of typical coronal mass ejections.

Tziotziou, Kostas; Raouafi, Nour-Eddine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

NREL: State and Local Activities - Related Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Related Links Related Links Find information about U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other state and local clean energy technical assistance and deployment programs and activities. State and Local Technical Assistance Programs NREL provides technical assistance to state and local energy projects through the following initiatives and programs. DOE Green Power Network DOE Weatherization & Intergovernmental Program U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Energy for America Program For more information about NREL's role, contact Dave Peterson. State and Local Deployment Programs NREL strives to increase the scale of clean energy technology deployment in U.S. states and localities by supporting these technology deployment projects and initiatives. DOE Biomass Program DOE Builders Challenge

48

Regional State Committees Can Help Provide a Regional Perspective to Planning and Siting Decisions, Reducing the Need for Federal Preemption  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy Act of 2005 gave FERC the authority to preempt state and local transmission siting authorities under certain conditions, creating the potential for federal/state disputes. Such disputes are less likely to occur where there are open, regional planning processes. Multi-state advisory bodies known as regional state committees, working with RTOs, can provide a forum to evaluate transmission needs from a regional perspective, reducing the need for FERC involvement. (author)

Basheda, Gregory

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Issue 1: Residents Split on the State of the Region's Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

related to the state of the economy. The sampling error mayState of the Region’s Economy I NTRODUCTION Public opinionstate of the regional economy. This is not sur- prising

Ong, Paul M.; Haselhoff, Kim

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

NREL: State and Local Activities - Clean Energy Policy Analyses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Energy Policy Analyses Clean Energy Policy Analyses Want notifications of new reports and data? Subscribe to E-mail Updates NREL's Clean Energy Policy Analyses (CEPA) project seeks to quantify the connection between state and local policies and clean energy market development, and analyze the impacts of state policy on decision makers. The project brings together U.S. state and local policy stakeholders to consider all of the factors that make up effective state and local energy policies and to identify barriers that impede them. Learn more about clean energy policy basics and CEPA's activities to analyze: State policies Region-specific policies Local policies Innovative policies. This NREL-managed project is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program. A voluntary technical

51

Regional Climate Model Projections for the State of Washington  

SciTech Connect

Global climate models do not have sufficient spatial resolution to represent the atmospheric and land surface processes that determine the unique regional heterogeneity of the climate of the State of Washington. If future large-scale weather patterns interact differently with the local terrain and coastlines than current weather patterns, local changes in temperature and precipitation could be quite different from the coarse-scale changes projected by global models. Regional climate models explicitly simulate the interactions between the large-scale weather patterns simulated by a global model and the local terrain. We have performed two 100-year climate simulations using the Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). One simulation is forced by the NCAR Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) and the second is forced by a simulation of the Max Plank Institute, Hamburg, global model (ECHAM5). The mesoscale simulations produce regional changes in snow cover, cloudiness, and circulation patterns associated with interactions between the large-scale climate change and the regional topography and land-water contrasts. These changes substantially alter the temperature and precipitation trends over the region relative to the global model result or statistical downscaling. To illustrate this effect, we analyze the changes from the current climate (1970-1999) to the mid 21st century (2030-2059). Changes in seasonal-mean temperature, precipitation, and snowpack are presented. Several climatological indices of extreme daily weather are also presented: precipitation intensity, fraction of precipitation occurring in extreme daily events, heat wave frequency, growing season length, and frequency of warm nights. Despite somewhat different changes in seasonal precipitation and temperature from the two regional simulations, consistent results for changes in snowpack and extreme precipitation are found in both simulations.

Salathe, E.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun; Zhang, Yongxin

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

52

Regional climate change scenarios over the United States produced with a nested regional climate model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two continuous 31/2-year-long climate simulation over the continental United States are discussed, one of present-day conditions and one for conditions under double carbon dioxide concentration, conducted with a limited area model (LAM) nested in a general circulation model (GCM). The models used are a version of the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM) at rhomboidal 15 spectral resolution and the climate version of the NCAR/Penn State mesoscale model (MM4) at 60-km gridpoint spacing. For present-day conditions the model temperatures are within 1[degrees]-2[degrees]C of observations except over the Great Lakes region, where temperature is overpredicted. The CCM overpredicts precipitation throughout the continental United States (overall by about 60%) and especially over the West (by up to 300%). The nested MM4 overpredicts precipitation over the West but underpredicts it over the eastern United States. In addition, it produces a large amount of topographically and lake-induced sub-GCM grid-scale detail that compares well with available high-resolution climate data. Overall, the nested MM4 reproduces observed spatial and seasonal precipitation patterns better than the driving CCM. Doubled carbon dioxide-induced temperature change scenarios produced by the two models generally differ by less than several tenths of a degree except over the Great Lakes region where, because of the presence of the lakes in the nested model, the two model scenarios differ by more than one degree. Conversely, precipitation change scenarios from the two model simulations can locally differ in magnitude, sign, spatial, and seasonal detail. These differences are associated with topographical features in the MM4, such as the presence of steep coastal ranges in the western United States. This work illustrates the feasibility of the use of the nested modeling technique for long-term regional climate simulation. 43 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

Giorgi, F.; Brodeur, C.S.; Bates, G.T. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

I UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGU.LATORYCOMMISS& REGION I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' \*-'- ' \*-'- I UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGU.LATORYCOMMISS& REGION I 63, PARK AVENUE KING OF PRUSSIA. PENNSY LVANIA 19406 I..*. :+ 2 6 JUN 1979 2.lr.b The Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Public Health Division of Health Care Standards 8 Regulation ATTN: Mr. Gerald S. Parker, Director Radiation Control Programs 80 Boylston Street, Room 835 Boston, Massachusetts 02116 Dear Mr. Parker: Enclosed for your information and retention is a copy of the NRC, Region I Investigation Report No. 078-154-A which documents our investigation into.the source of the radioactive material found at the privately owned landfill in Norton, Massachusetts. The report has been prepared in two parts. Confidential - Restricted data has been intentionally omitted.

54

QUANTIFYING THE EVOLVING MAGNETIC STRUCTURE OF ACTIVE REGIONS  

SciTech Connect

The topical and controversial issue of parameterizing the magnetic structure of solar active regions has vital implications in the understanding of how these structures form, evolve, produce solar flares, and decay. This interdisciplinary and ill-constrained problem of quantifying complexity is addressed by using a two-dimensional wavelet transform modulus maxima (WTMM) method to study the multifractal properties of active region photospheric magnetic fields. The WTMM method provides an adaptive space-scale partition of a fractal distribution, from which one can extract the multifractal spectra. The use of a novel segmentation procedure allows us to remove the quiet Sun component and reliably study the evolution of active region multifractal parameters. It is shown that prior to the onset of solar flares, the magnetic field undergoes restructuring as Dirac-like features (with a Hoelder exponent, h = -1) coalesce to form step functions (where h = 0). The resulting configuration has a higher concentration of gradients along neutral line features. We propose that when sufficient flux is present in an active region for a period of time, it must be structured with a fractal dimension greater than 1.2, and a Hoelder exponent greater than -0.7, in order to produce M- and X-class flares. This result has immediate applications in the study of the underlying physics of active region evolution and space weather forecasting.

Conlon, Paul A.; McAteer, R.T. James; Gallagher, Peter T.; Fennell, Linda, E-mail: mcateer@nmsu.ed [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

2010-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

55

On active region loops: Hinode/EIS observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coronal loops are fundamental building blocks of the solar active regions and the corona. Therefore, a clear understanding of the physics of coronal loops will help us understand the physics of active region heating in particular and coronal heating in general. This requires a precise measurement of physical quantities such as electron densities and filling factors, temperatures, and flows in coronal loops. In this paper we have carried out an investigation of a spatially well resolved coronal loop using the EIS onboard Hinode to measure the above mentioned physical quantities. Based on this study we find that a nano-flare model could explain most of the observed characteristics of this loop.

Tripathi, D; Dwivedi, B N; Del Zanna, G; Young, P R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Power systems simulations of the western United States region.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents a part of a broad assessment of energy-water-related issues in the western United States. The full analysis involved three Department of Energy national laboratories: Argonne National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. Argonne's objective in the overall project was to develop a regional power sector expansion forecast and a detailed unit-level operational (dispatch) analysis. With these two major analysis components, Argonne estimated current and future freshwater withdrawals and consumption related to the operation of U.S. thermal-electric power plants in the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) region for the period 2005-2025. Water is withdrawn and used primarily for cooling but also for environmental control, such as sulfur scrubbers. The current scope of the analysis included three scenarios: (1) Baseline scenario as a benchmark for assessing the adequacy and cost-effectiveness of water conservation options and strategies, (2) High nuclear scenario, and (3) High renewables scenario. Baseline projections are consistent with forecasts made by the WECC and the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in its Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) (EIA 2006a). Water conservation scenarios are currently limited to two development alternatives that focus heavily on constructing new generating facilities with zero water consumption. These technologies include wind farms and nuclear power plants with dry cooling. Additional water conservation scenarios and estimates of water use associated with fuel or resource extraction and processing will be developed in follow-on analyses.

Conzelmann, G.; Koritarov, V.; Poch, L.; Thimmapuram, P.; Veselka, T.; Decision and Information Sciences

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Moving Beyond Paralysis: How States and Regions Are Creating Innovative Transmission Projects; May 2009 - May 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report profiles certain state and regional transmission policy initiatives aimed at promoting transmission development, mainly to access renewable resources.

Schumacher, A.; Fink, S.; Porter, K.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Petrovay: Solar physics The solar cycle ACTIVE REGIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petrovay: Solar physics The solar cycle ACTIVE REGIONS Large scale (up to 100 Mm) anomalies in the structure and radiation of the solar atmosphere. Photosphere : AR = cluster of strong magnetic flux tubes of facular points. Filamentary structure due to supergranulation. #12;Petrovay: Solar physics The solar cycle

Petrovay, Kristóf

59

Optical Activity as a Two?State Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phenomenon of optical activity is analyzed as a quantum two?state process with transitions between photon states of perpendicular plane polarizations

E. A. Power; T. Thirunamachandran

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

NREL: State and Local Activities - Case Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Case Studies Case Studies These case studies highlight NREL's state and local technical assistance activities. Kaupuni Village: A Closer Look at the First Affordable Net-Zero Energy Village in Hawai'i Each net-zero energy house in Kaupuni Village located in Oahu, Hawaii, is designed to use 40% less energy than a standard home. As part of the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative's goal to achieve 70% clean energy by 2030, NREL helped design the model sustainable homes and educated homeowners on how to practice energy efficiency. Science Museum Receives NREL Expert Input on Clean Energy Exhibits NREL staff contributed their technical expertise to the Connecticut Science Center's Energy City-the first science museum exhibit gallery to educate visitors about both renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional activities state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Compliance Methods for State  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compliance Methods for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Compliance Methods for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Compliance Methods for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Compliance Methods for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Compliance Methods for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Compliance Methods for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory

62

PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF COOLING PLASMA IN QUIESCENT ACTIVE REGION LOOPS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present work, we use SOHO/SUMER, SOHO/UVCS, SOHO/EIT, SOHO/LASCO, STEREO/EUVI, and Hinode/EIS coordinated observations of an active region (AR 10989) at the west limb taken on 2008 April 8 to study the cooling of coronal loops. The cooling plasma is identified using the intensities of SUMER spectral lines emitted at temperatures in the 4.15 {EIS and SUMER spectral observations are used to measure the physical properties of the loops. We found that before cooling took place these loops were filled with coronal hole-like plasma, with temperatures in the 5.6 {<=} log T {<=} 5.9 range. SUMER spectra also allowed us to determine the plasma temperature, density, emission measure, element abundances, and dynamic status during the cooling process. The ability of EUVI to observe the emitting region from a different direction allowed us to measure the volume of the emitting region and estimate its emission measure. Comparison with values measured from line intensities provided us with an estimate of the filling factor. UVCS observations of the coronal emission above the active region showed no streamer structure associated with AR 10989 at position angles between 242{sup 0}and 253.{sup 0} EIT, LASCO, and EUVI-A narrowband images and UVCS spectral observations were used to discriminate between different scenarios and monitor the behavior of the active region in time. The present study provides the first detailed measurements of the physical properties of cooling loops, a very important benchmark for theoretical models of loop cooling and condensation.

Landi, E. [Artep, Inc. at Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. S.W., 20375-5320, Washington DC (United States); Miralles, M. P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., MS-50, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Curdt, W. [Max Planck Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max Planck Strasse 2, Katlenburg-Lindau 37191 (Germany); Hara, H. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

63

Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Activities in the United States Electricity Grid Electricity Advisory Committee Energy Storage Technologies Subcommittee Members Ralph Masiello, Subcommittee Chair Senior...

64

Ne IX emission-line ratios in solar active regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emission-line ratios for Ne IX are derived and compared with observational data for solar active regions obtained with the SOLEX B spectrometer on the P78-1 satellite. Excellent agreement is obtained, providing support for the atomic data adopted in the calculations and resolving discrepancies between existing theoretical calculations and solar data. The calculated R-ratio for the low-density limit agrees well with the SOLEX observations. 47 references.

Keenan, F.P.; Mccann, S.M.; Kingston, A.E.; Mckenzie, D.L.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Regional Cloud Cover Change Associated with Global Climate Change: Case Studies for Three Regions of the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-based observations of cloud cover, for the period 1900–87 and averaged over three geographical regions of the United States (coastal southwest, coastal northeast, and southern plains), show strong positive correlations with one estimate of ...

Meredith S. Croke; Robert D. Cess; Sultan Hameed

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Financing geothermal resource development in the Pacific Region states  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

State and federal tax treatment as an incentive to development and non-tax financial incentives such as: the federal geothermal loan guarantee program, the federal geothermal reservoir insurance, and state financial incentives are discussed. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

State and Regional Hydrogen Initiatives Meeting March 19, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be public-private entity and at the moment that are only public. The state is so enthusiastic about

68

Status of State Electric Industry Restructuring Activity  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents an overview of the status of electric industry restructuring in each state.. Restructuring means that a monopoly system of electric utilities has been replaced with competing sellers.

Channele Wirman

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Hawaii Renewable Hydrogen Program State & Regional Initiatives Webinar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum dependence for electricity ­ top six states #12;Highest Electricity Prices in U.S. Hawaii and US in park Reduce visitor car volume Reduce size of buses in the park Reduce emissions pollution Reduce noise pollution Reduce traffic congestion Evaluate performance of fleet of plug-in hybrid electric

70

Illinois State Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Illinois State Regional Illinois State Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Illinois Regions Illinois State Regional Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Ken Wester Email: kwester@ilstu.edu Regional Event Information Date: February 8, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 24 Maximum Number of Teams per School: 3

71

Evaluation of the Surface Climatology over the Conterminous United States in the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program Hindcast Experiment Using a Regional Climate Model Evaluation System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface air temperature, precipitation, and insolation over the conterminous United States region from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) regional climate model (RCM) hindcast study are evaluated using the Jet ...

Jinwon Kim; Duane E. Waliser; Chris A. Mattmann; Linda O. Mearns; Cameron E. Goodale; Andrew F. Hart; Dan J. Crichton; Seth McGinnis; Huikyo Lee; Paul C. Loikith; Maziyar Boustani

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Regional Climate Change Scenarios over the United States Produced with a Nested Regional Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper two continuous 3½-year-long climate simulations over the continental United States are discussed, one for present-day conditions and one for conditions under double carbon dioxide concentration, conducted with a limited area model (...

Filippo Giorgi; Christine Shields Brodeur; Gary T. Bates

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

NREL: State and Local Activities - Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications For state and local communities, NREL has publications about: Clean energy policy analyses Project financing Technology deployment. Clean Energy Policy Analyses Community Energy Profiler The Community Energy Profiler is a basic spreadsheet tool that will help states, communities, and Indian tribes summarize overall energy consumption and establish and visualize a preliminary baseline for energy reduction calculations. The inputs to the spreadsheet include energy use by sector, and the outputs include a graphic of gross energy use by sector and fuel type in common units and a printable pie chart for easy information sharing. The following NREL publications evolved as part of the Clean Energy Policy Analyses project. 2011 State and Local Clean Energy Policy Primer: Getting from Here to Clean

74

Modeling Seasonal Tropical Cyclone Activity in the Fiji Region as a Binary Classification Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents a binary classification model for the prediction of tropical cyclone (TC) activity in the Fiji, Samoa, and Tonga regions (the FST region) using the accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) as a proxy of TC activity. A probit regression ...

Savin S. Chand; Kevin J. E. Walsh

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Thermally Activated Cooling: A Regional Approach for Estimating Building Adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity consumption and highest growth rate of any sector in the state,state that falls in Southern California Edison service territory, where average and marginal electricity rates

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Regional  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Analysis Regional Analysis Rocky Mountain States and California Rocky Mountain States and California The Rocky Mountain States, which include all of the States west of the Great Plains and Texas and those east of California, have seen significant natural gas production increases over the last decade. With the development of new production basins, including the San Juan Basin, Powder River Basin, and Green River Basin, natural gas processing capacity in this region has expanded significantly. In 2009, California and Rocky Mountain States accounted for a total of 16.9 Bcf per day or about 22 percent of total U.S. capacity. Since 2004, only California and New Mexico noted a decrease in overall processing capacity, falling by 17 and 12 percent, respectively. Processing capacity in all of the remaining States (Colorado, Montana, New

77

Magnetic helicity and energy spectra of a solar active region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute magnetic helicity and energy spectra of the solar active region NOAA 11158 during 11-15 February 2011 at 20 degr southern heliographic latitude using observational photospheric vector magnetograms. We adopt the isotropic representation of the Fourier-transformed two-point correlation tensor of the magnetic field. The sign of magnetic helicity turns out to be predominantly positive at all wavenumbers. This sign is consistent with what is theoretically expected for the southern hemisphere. The relative magnetic helicity is around 8% and strongest at intermediate wavenumbers of k ~ 0.4 Mm^{-1}, corresponding to a scale of 2 pi/k ~ 16 Mm. The same sign and a somewhat smaller value is also found for the relative current helicity evaluated in real space based on the vertical components of magnetic field and current density. The current helicity spectrum is estimated from the magnetic helicity spectrum and its modulus shows a k^{-5/3} spectrum at large wavenumbers. A similar power law is also obtained for...

Zhang, Hongqi; Sokoloff, D D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

SIMULATION OF THE FORMATION OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION  

SciTech Connect

We present a radiative magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the formation of an active region (AR) on the solar surface. The simulation models the rise of a buoyant magnetic flux bundle from a depth of 7.5 Mm in the convection zone up into the solar photosphere. The rise of the magnetic plasma in the convection zone is accompanied by predominantly horizontal expansion. Such an expansion leads to a scaling relation between the plasma density and the magnetic field strength such that B {proportional_to} rhov{sup 1/2}. The emergence of magnetic flux into the photosphere appears as a complex magnetic pattern, which results from the interaction of the rising magnetic field with the turbulent convective flows. Small-scale magnetic elements at the surface first appear, followed by their gradual coalescence into larger magnetic concentrations, which eventually results in the formation of a pair of opposite polarity spots. Although the mean flow pattern in the vicinity of the developing spots is directed radially outward, correlations between the magnetic field and velocity field fluctuations allow the spots to accumulate flux. Such correlations result from the Lorentz-force-driven, counterstreaming motion of opposite polarity fragments. The formation of the simulated AR is accompanied by transient light bridges between umbrae and umbral dots. Together with recent sunspot modeling, this work highlights the common magnetoconvective origin of umbral dots, light bridges, and penumbral filaments.

Cheung, M. C. M.; Title, A. M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Rempel, M. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Schuessler, M. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Katlenburg-Lindau, 37191 (Germany)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Regional/State Underground Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Regional/State Underground Natural Gas Storage Table Regional/State Underground Natural Gas Storage Table About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Regional Underground Natural Gas Storage, Close of 2007 Depleted-Reservoir Storage Aquifer Storage Salt-Cavern Storage Total Region/ State # of Sites Working Gas Capacity (Bcf) Daily Withdrawal Capability (MMcf) # of Sites Working Gas Capacity (Bcf) Daily Withdrawal Capability (MMcf) # of Sites Working Gas Capacity (Bcf) Daily Withdrawal Capability (MMcf) # of Sites Working Gas Capacity (Bcf) Daily Withdrawal Capability (MMcf) Central Region Colorado 8 42 1,088 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 42 1,088 Iowa 0 0 0 4 77 1,060 0 0 0 4 77 1,060

80

Atmospheric Moisture Transport over the United States and Mexico as Evaluated in the NCEP Regional Reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The large-scale atmospheric hydrologic cycle over the United States and Mexico derived from the 23-yr NCEP regional reanalysis (RR) was evaluated by comparing the RR products with satellite estimates, independent sounding data, and the ...

Kingtse C. Mo; Muthuvel Chelliah; Marco L. Carrera; R. Wayne Higgins; Wesley Ebisuzaki

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional activities state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Regional Simulation of Intraseasonal Variations in the Summertime Hydrologic Cycle over the Southwestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using results taken from a finescale (25 km) regional modeling simulation for the summer of 1999, intraseasonal variations in the climatological summertime hydrologic cycle over the southwestern United States are described for two previously ...

Bruce T. Anderson

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Understanding the Characteristics of Daily Precipitation over the United States Using the North American Regional Reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the seasonal characteristics of daily precipitation over the United States using the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR). To help understand the physical mechanisms that contribute to changes in the characteristics of ...

Emily J. Becker; Ernesto Hugo Berbery; R. Wayne Higgins

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Influence of Daily Rainfall Characteristics on Regional Summertime Precipitation over the Southwestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The regional variability in the summertime precipitation over the southwestern United States is studied using stochastic chain-dependent models generated from 70 yr of station-based daily precipitation observations. To begin, the spatiotemporal ...

Bruce T. Anderson; Jingyun Wang; Suchi Gopal; Guido Salvucci

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Regional Precipitation Quantile Values for the Continental United States Computed from L-Moments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation quantile values have been computed for 9 probabilities, 8 durations, 12 starting months, and 1 1 1 regions across the United States. L-moment methodology has been used for the calculations. Discussed are the rationale for selecting ...

Nathaniel B. Guttman; J. R. M. Hosking; James R. Wallis

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

CONTRACTING AND ERUPTING COMPONENTS OF SIGMOIDAL ACTIVE REGIONS  

SciTech Connect

It has recently been noted that solar eruptions can be associated with the contraction of coronal loops that are not involved in magnetic reconnection processes. In this paper, we investigate five coronal eruptions originating from four sigmoidal active regions, using high-cadence, high-resolution narrowband EUV images obtained by the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). The magnitudes of the flares associated with the eruptions range from GOES class B to class X. Owing to the high-sensitivity and broad temperature coverage of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board SDO, we are able to identify both the contracting and erupting components of the eruptions: the former is observed in cold AIA channels as the contracting coronal loops overlying the elbows of the sigmoid, and the latter is preferentially observed in warm/hot AIA channels as an expanding bubble originating from the center of the sigmoid. The initiation of eruption always precedes the contraction, and in the energetically mild events (B- and C-flares), it also precedes the increase in GOES soft X-ray fluxes. In the more energetic events, the eruption is simultaneous with the impulsive phase of the nonthermal hard X-ray emission. These observations confirm that loop contraction is an integrated process in eruptions with partially opened arcades. The consequence of contraction is a new equilibrium with reduced magnetic energy, as the contracting loops never regain their original positions. The contracting process is a direct consequence of flare energy release, as evidenced by the strong correlation of the maximal contracting speed, and strong anti-correlation of the time delay of contraction relative to expansion, with the peak soft X-ray flux. This is also implied by the relationship between contraction and expansion, i.e., their timing and speed.

Liu Rui; Wang Yuming [CAS Key Lab of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Liu Chang; Wang Haimin [Space Weather Research Laboratory, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, NJIT, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Toeroek, Tibor, E-mail: rliu@ustc.edu.cn [Predictive Science Inc., 9990 Mesa Rim Road, Suite 170, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

ABRUPT LONGITUDINAL MAGNETIC FIELD CHANGES IN FLARING ACTIVE REGIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We characterize the changes in the longitudinal photospheric magnetic field during 38 X-class and 39 M-class flares within 65{sup 0} of disk center using 1 minute GONG magnetograms. In all 77 cases, we identify at least one site in the flaring active region where clear, permanent, stepwise field changes occurred. The median duration of the field changes was about 15 minutes and was approximately equal for X-class and for M-class flares. The absolute values of the field changes ranged from the detection limit of {approx}10 G to as high as {approx}450 G in two exceptional cases. The median value was 69 G. Field changes were significantly stronger for X-class than for M-class flares and for limb flares than for disk-center flares. Longitudinal field changes less than 100 G tended to decrease longitudinal field strengths, both close to disk center and close to the limb, while field changes greater than 100 G showed no such pattern. Likewise, longitudinal flux strengths tended to decrease during flares. Flux changes, particularly net flux changes near disk center, correlated better than local field changes with GOES peak X-ray flux. The strongest longitudinal field and flux changes occurred in flares observed close to the limb. We estimate the change of Lorentz force associated with each flare and find that this is large enough in some cases to power seismic waves. We find that longitudinal field decreases would likely outnumber increases at all parts of the solar disk within 65{sup 0} of disk center, as in our observations, if photospheric field tilts increase during flares as predicted by Hudson et al.

Petrie, G. J. D. [National Solar Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Sudol, J. J. [West Chester University, West Chester, PA 19383 (United States)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

A Filter Active-Set Trust-Region Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 10, 2007... Computing Research, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy, .... additional ellipsoidal trust-region constraint d + dc G ? ?2 (for G ...

88

Fusion 2.0 the next generation of fusion in California : aligning state and regional fusion centers .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A growing number of states have created multiple fusion centers, including California. In addition to having a state fusion center, California has four regional centers… (more)

MacGregor, David S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

NREL: State and Local Activities - State of the States 2010 - The Role of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State of the States 2010 - The Role of Policy in Clean Energy Market State of the States 2010 - The Role of Policy in Clean Energy Market Transformation NREL's State of the States 2010 analysis provides further understanding about how policy interacts with the development of the clean energy market. It quantifies the connection between a broad array of energy efficiency and renewable energy policies and actual energy savings and increases in renewable resource development. NREL produced the State of the States 2010 analysis under its Clean Energy Policy Analyses project. Key Findings The State of the States 2010 analysis draws broad conclusions about how to establish state policies that positively impact the development of clean energy markets. Policy alone does not explain variability in state clean energy growth. When other variables-population, electricity price, and number of

90

THE LIMIT OF MAGNETIC-SHEAR ENERGY IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS  

SciTech Connect

It has been found previously, by measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region's magnetic field, (1) that there is a sharp upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region's magnetic flux content, and (2) that most active regions are near this limit when their field explodes in a coronal mass ejection/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy-limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, we present evidence that specifies the underlying magnetic condition that gives rise to the free-energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free-energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find evidence that (1) in active regions at and near their free-energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non-free magnetic energy the potential field would have is of the order of one in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free-energy limit. Evidently, most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than one cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches one, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is one, most active regions are compelled to explode.

Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Sterling, Alphonse C., E-mail: ron.moore@nasa.gov [Heliophysics and Planetary Science Office, ZP13, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Regional  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Midwestern and Eastern States Midwestern and Eastern States Midwestern and Eastern States Midwestern and Eastern States combined accounted for about 13 percent of total U.S. processing capacity in 2009, accounting for the smallest portion of any region in the lower 48 States. The combined processing capacity in these States more than doubled, although a few of the States saw decreased capacity compared with 2004. Processing capacity in Illinois, Kansas, North Dakota, and Pennsylvania fell since 2004, with the highest decrease occurring in Kansas, which saw a 65 percent drop in processing capacity. At the same time, the number of plants in Kansas decreased by four. The decrease was likely the result of falling natural gas proved reserves, which decreased in this State between 1995 and 2005. While the proved reserves have

92

State Opportunities for Action: Review of States' Combined Heat and Power Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) has been the focus of federal attention since the mid-1990s. However, many of the market barriers to CHP are at the state level. As a sign of the maturing CHP market, a number of states are now undertaking activities to addre

Brown, E.; Elliott, N.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Regional  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Analysis Regional Analysis Alaska Alaska The State of Alaska had the third-largest processing capacity, trailing only Texas and Louisiana. While much of the natural gas processed in Alaska does not enter any transmission system and is instead re-injected into reservoirs, its processing capability is nonetheless significant. At 9.5 Bcf per day of processing capacity, the State of Alaska accounted for about 12 percent of total U.S. capacity. As of 2009, there were a total of 4 plants in the State, with the largest one reporting a capacity of 8.5 Bcf per day. Average plant size of 2.4 Bcf per day far exceeded any other State, with Illinois noting the next largest average plant size of 1.1 Bcf per day. In addition to the significant processing total capacity, plants in

94

State Opportunities for Action: Review of States' Combined Heat and Power Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) has been the focus of federal attention since the mid-1990s. However, many of the market barriers to CHP are at the state level. As a sign of the maturing of the CHP market, a number of states are now undertaking activities to address barriers to CHP, and some states have begun to provide incentives to encourage the development of systems in their states. This report outlines current state-level activities regarding CHP in the areas of interconnection, emissions standards, and financial incentives offered for CHP. Moreover, because this report intends to educate the public about the difficulties of installing CHP, specifically not covered in this report are utility-owned CHP facilities and large investor-owned utilities (IOUs).

Brown, E.; Scott, K.; Elliott, R. N.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Table C6. Wholesale Propane Prices by Region and State (Cents ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wholesale Propane Prices by Region and State (Cents per Gallon) P=Preliminary data. ... New York 67.5 68.3 67.2 72.0 74.4 86.0 89.2 82.8 86.6 131.8 94.3 80.2

96

A Multiyear Regional Climate Hindcast for the Western United States Using the Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In preparation for studying the effects of increased CO2 on the hydrologic cycle in the western United States, an 8-yr hindcast was performed using a regional climate model (RCM) driven by the large-scale forcing from the NCEP–NCAR reanalysis. ...

Jinwon Kim; Jung-Eun Lee

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Moving beyond paralysis: how states and regions are creating innovative transmission policies for renewable energy projects  

SciTech Connect

Experience from state and regional transmission siting initiatives aimed at expanding renewable energy development might offer lessons on how to circumvent traditional barriers to new transmission. Absent a national approach or federal transmission plan, these early models will provide a framework for increasing interstate cooperation. (author)

Schumacher, Allison; Fink, Sari; Porter, Kevin

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Electric household equipment and electric fuel usage in the Tri-State Region and the United States: 1960-70. Working paper  

SciTech Connect

The possible impact of areawide residential location policy on future residential electricity usage in the Tri-State Metropolitan Region centering on New York City is investigated. This report is concerned with selected residential electric appliance usage in the Tri-State Region as compared with usage of these appliances across the United States between 1960 and 1970. Included are tabular representations of comparisons between residential air conditioner usage in the Tri-State Region and the United States. Tabular comparisons also are made with respect to residential appliance usage and electric fuel usage.

Hillman, B.

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Short-term relationship of total electron content with geomagnetic activity in equatorial regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-term relationship of total electron content with geomagnetic activity in equatorial regions X equatorial ionosphere and geomagnetic activity is examined. Hourly averages of the total electron content for equatorial geomagnetic activity, at three local times (0700­0800, 1200­1300, and 1600­1700 LT) from March

Qiyu, Sun

100

EFFECT OF ION-NEUTRAL COLLISIONS IN SIMULATIONS OF EMERGING ACTIVE REGIONS  

SciTech Connect

We present results of 2.5D numerical simulations of the emergence of sub-surface magnetic flux into the solar atmosphere, with emerging flux regions ranging from 10{sup 18} to 10{sup 21} Mx, representing both ephemeral and active regions. We include the presence of neutral hydrogen in the governing equations, improve upon previous models by including the ionization in the equation of state, and use a more realistic convection zone model. We find that ionization and recombination of plasma during the rise of a convection zone flux tube reduces the rise speed of the tube's axis. The presence of neutral hydrogen allows the effective flow of mass across field lines, by the addition of a Pedersen resistivity to the generalized Ohm's law, which dissipates current perpendicular to the magnetic field. This causes an increase of up to 10% in the amount of magnetic in-plane flux supplied to the corona and a reduction of up to 89% in the amount of sub-surface plasma brought up into the corona. However, it also reduces the amount of free magnetic energy supplied to the corona, and thus does not positively affect the likelihood of creating unstable coronal structures.

Leake, James E. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)] [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Linton, Mark G., E-mail: jleake@gmu.edu [U.S. Naval Research Lab, 4555 Overlook Avenue, Southwest Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional activities state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

MODELING SUPER-FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES OBSERVED BY SDO IN ACTIVE REGION FUNNELS  

SciTech Connect

Recently, quasi-periodic, rapidly propagating waves have been observed in extreme ultraviolet by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument in about 10 flare/coronal mass ejection (CME) events thus far. A typical example is the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/CME event that exhibited arc-shaped wave trains propagating in an active region (AR) magnetic funnel with {approx}5% intensity variations at speeds in the range of 1000-2000 km s{sup -1}. The fast temporal cadence and high sensitivity of AIA enabled the detection of these waves. We identify them as fast magnetosonic waves driven quasi-periodically at the base of the flaring region and develop a three-dimensional MHD model of the event. For the initial state we utilize the dipole magnetic field to model the AR and include gravitationally stratified density at coronal temperature. At the coronal base of the AR, we excite the fast magnetosonic wave by periodic velocity pulsations in the photospheric plane confined to a funnel of magnetic field lines. The excited fast magnetosonic waves have similar amplitude, wavelength, and propagation speeds as the observed wave trains. Based on the simulation results, we discuss the possible excitation mechanism of the waves, their dynamical properties, and the use of the observations for coronal MHD seismology.

Ofman, L. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Liu, W.; Title, A.; Aschwanden, M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

102

Regional growth management policies: Toward reducing global warming at state and local levels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State and local governments in the United States are accepting mandates to coordinate legislated land use and growth management planning with vigorous environmental protection and resource conservation. These mandates, implemented or planned in states with populations totaling over 100 million, will directly impact growth patterns and ultimately affect the level of atmospheric gases and particulates generated within their borders. This paper addresses the issues of growth management and land use planning at the local, state and regional levels and identifies areas impacting global warming. A review of existing systems will be presented, and recommendations will be made to improve monitoring of growth management mechanisms and organizational structures with the goal of global atmospheric improvement. The issues discussed include urban sprawl, transportation, and growth patterns as managed by policies also designed to protect environments and provide for sustainable growth. Areas for improved coordination between jurisdictions to ease global warming will also be examined.

Purdie, J. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Washington Center for Real Estate Research

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - United States | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 95, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - United States- Reference Case (xls, 260.9 KiB) Quality Metrics

104

Time-Distance Imaging of Solar Far-Side Active Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is of great importance to monitor large solar active regions in the far-side of the Sun for space weather forecast, in particular, to predict their appearance before they rotate into our view from the solar east limb. Local helioseismology techniques, including helioseismic holography and time-distance, have successfully imaged solar far-side active regions. In this Letter, we further explore the possibility of imaging and improving the image quality of solar far-side active regions by use of time-distance helioseismology. In addition to the previously used scheme with four acoustic signal skips, a five-skip scheme is also included in this newly developed technique. The combination of both four- and five-skip far-side images significantly enhances the signal-to-noise ratio in the far-side images, and reduces spurious signals. The accuracy of the far-side active region imaging is also assessed using one whole year solar observation.

Junwei Zhao

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

105

Time-Distance Imaging of Solar Far-Side Active Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is of great importance to monitor large solar active regions in the far-side of the Sun for space weather forecast, in particular, to predict their appearance before they rotate into our view from the solar east limb. Local helioseismology techniques, including helioseismic holography and time-distance, have successfully imaged solar far-side active regions. In this Letter, we further explore the possibility of imaging and improving the image quality of solar far-side active regions by use of time-distance helioseismology. In addition to the previously used scheme with four acoustic signal skips, a five-skip scheme is also included in this newly developed technique. The combination of both four- and five-skip far-side images significantly enhances the signal-to-noise ratio in the far-side images, and reduces spurious signals. The accuracy of the far-side active region imaging is also assessed using one whole year solar observation.

Zhao, Junwei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Magnetic Complexity in Eruptive Solar Active Regions and Associated Eruption Parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using an efficient magnetic complexity index in the active-region solar photosphere, we quantify the preflare strength of the photospheric magnetic polarity inversion lines in 23 eruptive active regions with flare/CME/ICME events tracked all the way from the Sun to the Earth. We find that active regions with more intense polarity inversion lines host statistically stronger flares and faster, more impulsively accelerated, CMEs. No significant correlation is found between the strength of the inversion lines and the flare soft X-ray rise times, the ICME transit times, and the peak $Dst indices of the induced geomagnetic storms. Corroborating these and previous results, we speculate on a possible interpretation for the connection between source active regions, flares, and CMEs. Further work is needed to validate this concept and uncover its physical details.

Georgoulis, M K

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Magnetic Complexity in Eruptive Solar Active Regions and Associated Eruption Parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using an efficient magnetic complexity index in the active-region solar photosphere, we quantify the preflare strength of the photospheric magnetic polarity inversion lines in 23 eruptive active regions with flare/CME/ICME events tracked all the way from the Sun to the Earth. We find that active regions with more intense polarity inversion lines host statistically stronger flares and faster, more impulsively accelerated, CMEs. No significant correlation is found between the strength of the inversion lines and the flare soft X-ray rise times, the ICME transit times, and the peak $Dst indices of the induced geomagnetic storms. Corroborating these and previous results, we speculate on a possible interpretation for the connection between source active regions, flares, and CMEs. Further work is needed to validate this concept and uncover its physical details.

M. K. Georgoulis

2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

108

Synoptic and Regional Circulation Parameters Associated with the Degree of Convective Shower Activity in South Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radar and synoptic data obtained during the Florida Area Cumulus Experiment have been used in an exploratory study to investigate the effects of synoptic and regional circulations on the development of convective activity in south Florida. The ...

Raúl E. López; Patrick T. Gannon Sr.; David O. Blanchard; Christopher C. Balch

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

United States country report for IEA integrated bioenergy systems activity  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes efforts to model hybrid poplar and switchgrass production costs and supply curves. Estimates of the full economic cost of producing switchgrass bales and hybrid poplar chips in six US regions are presented. Average production costs vary by region and yield, ranging from $US 25 to $62/dry ton for switchgrass bales and $US 30 to $86/dry ton for poplar chips. Biomass prices are generally lower for switchgrass than for hybrid poplar, and are higher in the Lake States and Corn Belt than for other regions. Estimated national biomass supply curves are also presented. Assuming average US yields of 5 dry ton/acre/year, approximately 300 million dry tons of switchgrass could be supplied nationally at farm-gate prices of less than $30/dry ton. Approximately 250 million dry tons of woody crops can be potentially supplied nationally at farm-gate prices of less than $40/dry ton. This is enough biomass to produce 24 to 33 billion gallons of ethanol at a feedstock price of $0.36 to $0.63/gal (depending on conversion efficiency), or 600 billion kWh at a price of $0.04 to $0.05/kWh.

Walsh, M.E.

1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

110

CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: A PRELIMINARY INVENTORY OF ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eight Regional CHP Application Centers (RACs) are funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies in all 50 states. The RACs build end-user awareness by providing CHP-related information to targeted markets through education and outreach; they work with the states and regulators to encourage the creation and adoption of favorable public policies; and they provide CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. The RACs were started by DOE as a pilot program in 2001 to support the National CHP Roadmap developed by industry to accelerate deployment of energy efficient CHP technologies (U.S. Combined Heat and Power Association 2001). The intent was to foster a regional presence to build market awareness, address policy issues, and facilitate project development. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has supported DOE with the RAC program since its inception. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort involving DOE and some CHP industry stakeholders to establish quantitative metrics for measuring the RACs accomplishments. This effort incorporated the use of logic models to define and describe key RAC activities, outputs, and outcomes. Based on this detailed examination of RAC operations, potential metrics were identified associated with the various key sectors addressed by the RACs: policy makers; regulatory agencies; investor owned utilities; municipal and cooperative utilities; financiers; developers; and end users. The final product was reviewed by a panel of representatives from DOE, ORNL, RACs, and the private sector. The metrics developed through this effort focus on major RAC activities as well as on CHP installations and related outcomes. All eight RACs were contacted in August 2008 and asked to provide data for every year of Center operations for those metrics on which they kept records. In addition, data on CHP installations and related outcomes were obtained from an existing DOE-supported data base. The information provided on the individual RACs was summed to yield totals for all the Centers combined for each relevant item.

Schweitzer, Martin [ORNL

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Time-Distance analysis of the Emerging Active Region NOAA 10790  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the emergence of Active Region NOAA 10790 by means of time--distance helioseismology. Shallow regions of increased sound speed at the location of increased magnetic activity are observed, with regions becoming deeper at the locations of sunspot pores. We also see a long-lasting region of decreased sound speed located underneath the region of the flux emergence, possibly relating to a temperature perturbation due to magnetic quenching of eddy diffusivity, or to a dense flux tube. We detect and track an object in the subsurface layers of the Sun characterised by increased sound speed which could be related to emerging magnetic flux and thus obtain a provisional estimate of the speed of emergence of around $1 {\\rm km s^{-1}}$.

S. Zharkov; M. J. Thompson

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

112

MAGNETIC FIELD TOPOLOGY AND THE THERMAL STRUCTURE OF THE CORONA OVER SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS  

SciTech Connect

Solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images of quiescent active-region coronae are characterized by ensembles of bright 1-2 MK loops that fan out from select locations. We investigate the conditions associated with the formation of these persistent, relatively cool, loop fans within and surrounding the otherwise 3-5 MK coronal environment by combining EUV observations of active regions made with TRACE with global source-surface potential-field models based on the full-sphere photospheric field from the assimilation of magnetograms that are obtained by the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on SOHO. We find that in the selected active regions with largely potential-field configurations these fans are associated with (quasi-)separatrix layers (QSLs) within the strong-field regions of magnetic plage. Based on the empirical evidence, we argue that persistent active-region cool-loop fans are primarily related to the pronounced change in connectivity across a QSL to widely separated clusters of magnetic flux, and confirm earlier work that suggested that neither a change in loop length nor in base field strengths across such topological features are of prime importance to the formation of the cool-loop fans. We discuss the hypothesis that a change in the distribution of coronal heating with height may be involved in the phenomenon of relatively cool coronal loop fans in quiescent active regions.

Schrijver, Carolus J.; DeRosa, Marc L.; Title, Alan M., E-mail: schryver@lmsal.co [Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

113

Utah Southwest Regional Geothermal Development Operations Research Project. Appendix 10 of regional operations research program for development of geothermal energy in the Southeast United States. Final technical report, June 1977--August 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Southwest Regional Geothermal Operations/Research project was initiated to investigate geothermal development in the five states within the region: Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. Although the region changed during the first year to include Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming, the project objectives and procedures remained unchanged. The project was funded by the DOE/DGE and the Four Corners Regional Commission with participation by the New Mexico Energy Resources Board. The study was coordinated by the New Mexico Energy Institute at New Mexico State University, acting through a 'Core Team'. A 'state' team, assigned by the states, conducted the project within each state. This report details most of the findings of the first year's efforts by the Utah Operations/Research team. It is a conscientious effort to report the findings and activities of the Utah team, either explicitly or by reference. The results are neither comprehensive nor final, and should be regarded as preliminary efforts to much of what the Operations/Research project was envisioned to accomplish. In some cases the report is probably too detailed, in other cases too vague; hopefully, however, the material in the report, combined with the Appendices, will be able to serve as source material for others interested in geothermal development in Utah.

Green, Stanley; Wagstaff, Lyle W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Utah Southwest Regional Geothermal Development Operations Research Project. Appendix 10 of regional operations research program for development of geothermal energy in the Southeast United States. Final technical report, June 1977--August 1978  

SciTech Connect

The Southwest Regional Geothermal Operations/Research project was initiated to investigate geothermal development in the five states within the region: Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. Although the region changed during the first year to include Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming, the project objectives and procedures remained unchanged. The project was funded by the DOE/DGE and the Four Corners Regional Commission with participation by the New Mexico Energy Resources Board. The study was coordinated by the New Mexico Energy Institute at New Mexico State University, acting through a 'Core Team'. A 'state' team, assigned by the states, conducted the project within each state. This report details most of the findings of the first year's efforts by the Utah Operations/Research team. It is a conscientious effort to report the findings and activities of the Utah team, either explicitly or by reference. The results are neither comprehensive nor final, and should be regarded as preliminary efforts to much of what the Operations/Research project was envisioned to accomplish. In some cases the report is probably too detailed, in other cases too vague; hopefully, however, the material in the report, combined with the Appendices, will be able to serve as source material for others interested in geothermal development in Utah.

Green, Stanley; Wagstaff, Lyle W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Climatic Role of North American Low-Level Jets on U.S. Regional Tornado Activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variability of springtime tornadic activity over the United States is assessed through the connectivity of preferred modes of North American low-level jet (NALLJ) variability to the local thermodynamic environment and remote SST variations. The ...

Scott J. Weaver; Stephen Baxter; Arun Kumar

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

EVOLUTION OF CURRENTS OF OPPOSITE SIGNS IN THE FLARE-PRODUCTIVE SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 10930  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of a time series of high spatial resolution vector magnetograms of the active region NOAA 10930 available from the Solar Optical Telescope SpectroPolarimeter on board Hinode revealed that there is a mixture of upward and downward currents in the two footpoints of an emerging flux rope. The flux emergence rate is almost the same in both the polarities. We observe that along with an increase in magnetic flux, the net current in each polarity increases initially for about three days after which it decreases. This net current is characterized by having exactly opposite signs in each polarity while its magnitude remains almost the same most of the time. The decrease of the net current in both the polarities is due to the increase of current having a sign opposite to that of the net current. The dominant current, with the same sign as the net current, is seen to increase first and then decreases during the major X-class flares. Evolution of non-dominant current appears to be a necessary condition for flare initiation. The above observations can be plausibly explained in terms of the superposition of two different force-free states resulting in a non-zero Lorentz force in the corona. This Lorentz force then pushes the coronal plasma and might facilitate the magnetic reconnection required for flares. Also, the evolution of the net current is found to follow the evolution of magnetic shear at the polarity inversion line.

Ravindra, B. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Venkatakrishnan, P.; Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Bhattacharyya, R., E-mail: ravindra@iiap.res.in, E-mail: pvk@prl.res.in, E-mail: tiwari@mps.mpg.de, E-mail: ramit@prl.res.in [Udaipur Solar Observatory, Physical Research Laboratory, Dewali, Bari Road, Udaipur 313 001 (India)

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

117

Ethanol Demand in United States Regional Production of Oxygenate-limited Gasoline  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Ethanol Demand in United States Regional Production of Oxygenate-limited Gasoline G. R. Hadder Center for Transportation Analysis Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee August 2000 Prepared for Office of Fuels Development Office of Transportation Technologies U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 managed by UT-BATTELLE, LLC for the U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 iii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v LIST OF TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii ABSTRACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

118

Lyme Disease In New York State: Spatial Pattern At A Regional Scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lyme disease occurs commonly in New York State, but its geographic distribution is heterogeneous. For each of nine consecutive years, incidence rates from 57 New York State counties were subjected to spatial autocorrelation analysis. Although the epidemic advanced during the study period, the analyses reveal a consistent pattern of spatial dependence. The correlation distance, the distance over which incidence rates covary positively, remained near 120 km over the nine years. A local spatial analysis around Westchester County, a major disease focus, indicated that the global correlation distance matched the extent of the most intense local clustering; statistically weaker clustering extended to 200 km from Westchester. Analyzing the spatial character of the epidemic may reveal the epizootic processes underlying patterns in human infection, and may help identify a spatial scale for regional control of disease. Lyme disease remains the most frequently reported vector-borne disease in the Northern Hemisphere, and the world's most common tick-borne infection.

Stephan Glavanakov; Dennis J. White; Thomas Caraco; Andrei Lapenis; George Robinson; Boleslaw K. Szymanski; William; A. Maniatty

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Argonne TDC: Regional Economic Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Economic Development Argonne participates in economic development activities with State of Illinois agencies and programs, business and industrial organizations, and...

120

Annual housing survey: 1979. United States and regions. part f: energy-related housing characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents statistics on energy - related housing characteristics from the 1979 Annual Housing Survey for the United States by inside and outside standard metropolitan statistical areas (SMSA's) and each of the four geographic regions. The statistics are based on information from a sample of housing units. The information was collected by personal interview from September 1979 to December 1979. For the United States as a whole and for the separate regions (North Central, Northeast, South, and West), data are presented on fuel, fuel cost, heating, air conditioning, insulation, and transportation characteristics in relation to the following information: income of families and primary individuals, value of owner - occupied housing units, gross rent of renter - occupied housing units, housing units in structure, number of rooms per housing unit, year structure built, monthly cost paid for electricity, and others. Also shown are the yearly cost paid for fuel oil, coal, etc. and household head's principal means of transportation to work, by distance and travel time to work in 1979. Data are classified according to all races, black - housing units with black household head, and Spanish - housing units with household head of Spanish origin. Maps and a table - finding guide are provided. Appendices describe the geographic area classifications; define subjects covered in the report; and present information on sample design, estimation, and data accuracy.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional activities state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Representation of Terrestrial Hydrology and Large-Scale Drought of the Continental United States from the North American Regional Reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) is a state-of-the-art land–atmosphere reanalysis product that provides improved representation of the terrestrial hydrologic cycle compared to previous global reanalyses, having the potential to ...

Justin Sheffield; Ben Livneh; Eric F. Wood

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Attribution of the Seasonality and Regionality in Climate Trends over the United States during 1950–2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The observed climate trends over the United States during 1950–2000 exhibit distinct seasonality and regionality. The surface air temperature exhibits a warming trend during winter, spring, and early summer and a modest countrywide cooling trend ...

Hailan Wang; Siegfried Schubert; Max Suarez; Junye Chen; Martin Hoerling; Arun Kumar; Philip Pegion

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Statistical Analysis of Precipitation Chemistry Measurements over the Eastern United States. Part II: Kriging Analysis of Regional Patterns and Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The regional patterns and time trends of free acidity and inorganic chemical constituents in precipitation were investigated using a new archive of daily precipitation chemistry measurements for the eastern United States. This archive contains ...

Barrett P. Eynon

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Simulations of Present and Future Climates in the Western United States with Four Nested Regional Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the authors analyze simulations of present and future climates in the western United States performed with four regional climate models (RCMs) nested within two global ocean–atmosphere climate models. The primary goal here is to ...

P. B. Duffy; R. W. Arritt; J. Coquard; W. Gutowski; J. Han; J. Iorio; J. Kim; L.-R. Leung; J. Roads; E. Zeledon

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

ANALYSIS ON CORRELATIONS BETWEEN SUBSURFACE KINETIC HELICITY AND PHOTOSPHERIC CURRENT HELICITY IN ACTIVE REGIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation on correlations between photospheric current helicity and subsurface kinetic helicity is carried out by analyzing vector magnetograms and subsurface velocities for two rapidly developing active regions. The vector magnetograms are from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (SDO/HMI) observed Stokes parameters, and the subsurface velocity is from time-distance data-analysis pipeline using HMI Dopplergrams. Over a span of several days, the evolution of the weighted current helicity shows a tendency similar to that of the weighted subsurface kinetic helicity, attaining a correlation coefficient above 0.60 for both active regions. Additionally, there seems to be a phase lag between the evolutions of the unweighted current and subsurface kinetic helicities for one of the active regions. The good correlation between these two helicities indicates that there is some intrinsic connection between the interior dynamics and photospheric magnetic twistedness inside active regions, which may help to interpret the well-known hemispheric preponderance of current-helicity distribution.

Gao Yu; Zhang Hongqi [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Zhao Junwei [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

FLOWS AT THE EDGE OF AN ACTIVE REGION: OBSERVATION AND INTERPRETATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upflows observed at the edges of active regions have been proposed as the source of the slow solar wind. In the particular case of Active Region (AR) 10942, where such an upflow has been already observed, we want to evaluate the part of this upflow that actually remains confined in the magnetic loops that connect AR 10942 to AR 10943. Both active regions were visible simultaneously on the solar disk and were observed by STEREO/SECCHI EUVI. Using Hinode/EIS spectra, we determine the Doppler shifts and densities in AR 10943 and AR 10942 in order to evaluate the mass flows. We also perform magnetic field extrapolations to assess the connectivity between AR 10942 and AR 10943. AR 10943 displays a persistent downflow in Fe XII. Magnetic extrapolations including both ARs show that this downflow can be connected to the upflow in AR 10942. We estimate that the mass flow received by AR 10943 areas connected to AR 10942 represents about 18% of the mass flow from AR 10942. We conclude that the upflows observed on the edge of active regions represent either large-scale loops with mass flowing along them (accounting for about one-fifth of the total mass flow in this example) or open magnetic field structures where the slow solar wind originates.

Boutry, C.; Buchlin, E.; Vial, J.-C. [Universite Paris Sud, Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, UMR8617, 91405 Orsay (France); Regnier, S., E-mail: eric.buchlin@ias.u-psud.fr [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

127

Active constraint regions for a natural gas liquefaction process Magnus G. Jacobsena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active constraint regions for a natural gas liquefaction process Magnus G. Jacobsena , Sigurd little attention. this paper addresses optimal operation of a simple natural gas liquefaction process at all times. Keywords: Self-optimizing control, liquefied natural gas, LNG, PRICO, disturbances, optimal

Skogestad, Sigurd

128

Topological changes of the photospheric magnetic field inside active regions: a prelude to flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The observations of magnetic field variations as a signature of flaring activity is one of the main goal in solar physics. Some efforts in the past give apparently no unambiguous observations of changes. We observed that the scaling laws of the current helicity inside a given flaring active region change clearly and abruptly in correspondence with the eruption of big flares at the top of that active region. Comparison with numerical simulations of MHD equations, indicates that the change of scaling behavior in the current helicity, seems to be associated to a topological reorganization of the footpoint of the magnetic field loop, namely to dissipation of small scales structures in turbulence. It is evident that the possibility of forecasting in real time high energy flares, even if partially, has a wide practical interest to prevent the effects of big flares on Earth and its environment.

L. Sorriso-Valvo; V. Carbone; V. Abramenko; V. Yurchyshyn; A. Noullez; H. Politano; A. Pouquet; P. Veltri

2002-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

129

CALCULATING ENERGY STORAGE DUE TO TOPOLOGICAL CHANGES IN EMERGING ACTIVE REGION NOAA AR 11112  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The minimum current corona model provides a way to estimate stored coronal energy using the number of field lines connecting regions of positive and negative photospheric flux. This information is quantified by the net flux connecting pairs of opposing regions in a connectivity matrix. Changes in the coronal magnetic field, due to processes such as magnetic reconnection, manifest themselves as changes in the connectivity matrix. However, the connectivity matrix will also change when flux sources emerge or submerge through the photosphere, as often happens in active regions. We have developed an algorithm to estimate the changes in flux due to emergence and submergence of magnetic flux sources. These estimated changes must be accounted for in order to quantify storage and release of magnetic energy in the corona. To perform this calculation over extended periods of time, we must additionally have a consistently labeled connectivity matrix over the entire observational time span. We have therefore developed an automated tracking algorithm to generate a consistent connectivity matrix as the photospheric source regions evolve over time. We have applied this method to NOAA Active Region 11112, which underwent a GOES M2.9 class flare around 19:00 on 2010 October 16th, and calculated a lower bound on the free magnetic energy buildup of {approx}8.25 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg over 3 days.

Tarr, Lucas; Longcope, Dana [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

130

ACTIVE REGION MOSS: DOPPLER SHIFTS FROM HINODE/EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER OBSERVATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studying the Doppler shifts and the temperature dependence of Doppler shifts in moss regions can help us understand the heating processes in the core of the active regions. In this paper, we have used an active region observation recorded by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode on 2007 December 12 to measure the Doppler shifts in the moss regions. We have distinguished the moss regions from the rest of the active region by defining a low-density cutoff as derived by Tripathi et al. in 2010. We have carried out a very careful analysis of the EIS wavelength calibration based on the method described by Young et al. in 2012. For spectral lines having maximum sensitivity between log T = 5.85 and log T = 6.25 K, we find that the velocity distribution peaks at around 0 km s{sup -1} with an estimated error of 4-5 km s{sup -1}. The width of the distribution decreases with temperature. The mean of the distribution shows a blueshift which increases with increasing temperature and the distribution also shows asymmetries toward blueshift. Comparing these results with observables predicted from different coronal heating models, we find that these results are consistent with both steady and impulsive heating scenarios. However, the fact that there are a significant number of pixels showing velocity amplitudes that exceed the uncertainty of 5 km s{sup -1} is suggestive of impulsive heating. Clearly, further observational constraints are needed to distinguish between these two heating scenarios.

Tripathi, Durgesh [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune University Campus, Pune 411007 (India); Mason, Helen E. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Klimchuk, James A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

OUTFLOWS AND DARK BANDS AT ARCADE-LIKE ACTIVE REGION CORE BOUNDARIES  

SciTech Connect

Observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode have revealed outflows and non-thermal line broadening in low intensity regions at the edges of active regions (ARs). We use data from Hinode's EIS, Solar Dynamic Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer instrument to investigate the boundaries of arcade-like AR cores for NOAA ARs 11112, 10978, and 9077. A narrow, low intensity region that is observed at the core's periphery as a dark band shows outflows and increased spectral line broadening. This dark band is found to exist for days and appears between the bright coronal loop structures of different coronal topologies. We find a case where the dark band region is formed between the magnetic field from emerging flux and the field of the pre-existing flux. A magnetic field extrapolation indicates that this dark band is coincident with the spine lines or magnetic separatrices in the extrapolated field. This occurs over unipolar regions where the brightened coronal field is separated in connectivity and topology. This separation does not appear to be infinitesimal and an initial estimate of the minimum distance of separation is found to be Almost-Equal-To 1.5-3.5 Mm.

Scott, J. T.; Martens, P. C. H.; Tarr, L. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

132

Can a Long Nanoflare Storm Explain the Observed Emission Measure Distributions in Active Region Cores?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All theories that attempt to explain the heating of the high temperature plasma observed in the solar corona are based on short bursts of energy. The intensities and velocities measured in the cores of quiescent active regions, however, can be steady over many hours of observation. One heating scenario that has been proposed to reconcile such observations with impulsive heating models is the "long nanoflare storm," where short duration heating events occur infrequently on many sub-resolutions strands; the emission of the strands is then averaged together to explain the observed steady structures. In this Letter, we examine the emission measure distribution predicted for such a long nanoflare storm by modeling an arcade of strands in an active region core. Comparisons of the computed emission measure distributions with recent observations indicate that that the long nanoflare storm scenario implies greater than 5 times more 1 MK emission than is actually observed for all plausible combinations of loop lengths,...

Mulu-Moore, Fana M; Warren, Harry P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Summary report. Low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts. Volume 4, No. 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

`Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Activities in the States and Compacts` is a supplement to `LLW Notes` and is distributed periodically by Afton Associates, Inc. to state, compact and federal officials that receive `LLW Notes`. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Summary report, low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts. Vol. 4. No. 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

`Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Activities in the States and Compacts` is a supplement to `LLW Notes` and is distributed periodically by Afton Associates, Inc. to state, compact and federal officials that receive `LLW Notes`. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

MAGNETIC ENERGY AND HELICITY IN TWO EMERGING ACTIVE REGIONS IN THE SUN  

SciTech Connect

The magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity in two emerging solar active regions, AR 11072 and AR 11158, are studied. They are computed by integrating over time the energy and relative helicity fluxes across the photosphere. The fluxes consist of two components: one from photospheric tangential flows that shear and braid field lines (shear term), the other from normal flows that advect magnetic flux into the corona (emergence term). For these active regions: (1) relative magnetic helicity in the active-region corona is mainly contributed by the shear term, (2) helicity fluxes from the emergence and the shear terms have the same sign, (3) magnetic energy in the corona (including both potential energy and free energy) is mainly contributed by the emergence term, and (4) energy fluxes from the emergence term and the shear term evolved consistently in phase during the entire flux emergence course. We also examine the apparent tangential velocity derived by tracking field-line footpoints using a simple tracking method. It is found that this velocity is more consistent with tangential plasma velocity than with the flux transport velocity, which agrees with the conclusion by Schuck.

Liu, Y. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Schuck, P. W. [Space Weather Laboratory, Code 674, Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

136

Economic impacts of wood energy in the Northeast, 1985: State report: Northeast Regional Biomass Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the economic impacts of wood energy for the 11 Northeastern states. The report begins with a brief description of the types of economic impacts estimated in the study. The direct economic impacts are the jobs and income directly attributable to wood energy activities. They are referred to as first round impacts since they reflect the economic activity generated by the first spending of the fuelwood dollar, from the consumer to the supplier. Direct impacts include employment in logging, transport, and end-use operations such as chimney sweeping and boiler operating. Direct impacts also include personal income to employees, payments of stumpage fees to landowners, and profits earned by fuelwood enterprises. Indirect employment and income result from purchases made by fuelwood supply businesses, purpose made by the employees of fuelwood supply businesses, and purchases made by wood burning households or companies for wood combustion system installation, construction, and maintenance. They include purchases of equipment, spare parts, supplies, and services, including financial services.

Chamberlin, R.; High, C.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

NREL: State and Local Activities - Clean Energy Data Book  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Data Book The following publications contain state-level statistics of renewable energy production and other data. Renewable Energy Data Book These publications provide...

138

Barely Alive Memory Servers: Keeping Data Active in a Low-Power State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is not operational. PowerNap requires server software to avoid unwanted transitions to active state (e.g., due low power states with different levels of energy savings; (2) transition overheads are not significant others can be transitioned to a low-power state (barely-alive, Somniloquy, or off state). The behavior

Bianchini, Ricardo

139

Transient Future Climate over the Western United States Using a Regional Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional climate models (RCMs) have improved our understanding of the effects of global climate change on specific regions. The need for realistic forcing has led to the use of fully coupled global climate models (GCMs) to produce boundary ...

Mark A. Snyder; Lisa C. Sloan

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Thermally Activated Cooling: A Regional Approach for EstimatingBuilding Adoption  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the economic potential for thermally-activated cooling (TAC) technologies as a component of distributed energy resource (DER) systems in California. A geographic information system (GIS) is used to assess the regional variation of TAC potential and to visualize the geographic pattern of potential adoption. The economic potential and feasibility of DER systems in general, and especially TAC, is highly dependent on regional factors such as retail electricity rates, building cooling loads, and building heating loads. Each of these factors varies with location, and their geographic overlap at different sites is an important determinant in a market assessment of DER and TAC. This analysis uses system payback period as the metric to show the regional variation of TAC potential in California office buildings. The DER system payback with and without TAC is calculated for different regions in California using localized values of retail electricity rates and the weather-dependent variation in building cooling and heating loads. This GIS-based method has numerous applications in building efficiency studies where geographically dependent variables, such as space cooling and heating energy use, play an important role.

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional activities state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Persistent Patterns of Thunderstorm Activity in the Central United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of thunderstorm events by mouth for the period 1948–77 at 106 stations in the central United States are used to examine persistent spatial patterns in thunderstorm occurrence. A principal components analysis reveals that nearly 55% ...

David R. Easterling

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Illinois State Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

teams taking precedence over third teams, with the goal of having as many different schools participating as possible. Eligible first teams will be approved by the regional...

143

New York State Capital District Regional Science Bowl | U.S....  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Dr Burnt Hills, NY 12027 Regional Event information: Competition Location: General Electric Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Address: General Electric Global Research Center;...

144

NREL: State and Local Activities - Renewable Portfolio Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Portfolio Standards Renewable Portfolio Standards A renewable portfolio standard (RPS) is a regulatory mandate to increase production of energy from renewable sources such as wind, solar, biomass and other alternatives to fossil and nuclear electric generation. It's also known as a renewable electricity standard. Background An RPS is most successful in driving renewable energy projects when combined with the federal production tax credit. States often design them to drive a particular technology by providing "carve out" provisions that mandate a certain percentage of electricity generated comes from a particular technology (e.g. solar or biomass). States can choose to apply the RPS requirement to all its utilities or only the investor owned utilities. States can also define what technologies are eligible to count

145

Regional uptake and release of crop carbon in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon fixed by agricultural crops in the US creates regional CO(2) sinks where it is harvested and regional CO(2) sources where it is released back to the atmosphere. The quantity and location of these fluxes differ depending on the annual supply and demand of crop commodities. Data on the harvest of crop biomass, storage, import and export, and on the use of biomass for food, feed, fiber, and fuel were compiled to estimate an annual crop carbon budget for 2000 to 2008. With respect to US Farm Resource Regions, net sources of CO(2) associated with the consumption of crop commodities occurred in the Eastern Uplands, Southern Seaboard, and Fruitful Rim regions. Net sinks associated with the production of crop commodities occurred in the Heartland, Northern Great Plains, and Mississippi Portal regions. The national crop carbon budget was balanced to within 0.3 to 6.1% yr(-1) during the period of this analysis.

West, Tristram O. [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL; Branstetter, Marcia L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Schuh, Andrew [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Ogle, Stephan [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

A Statistical Study on Solar Active Regions Producing Extremely Fast Coronal Mass Ejections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a statistical result on the properties of solar source regions that have produced 57 fastest front-side coronal mass ejections (CMEs) (speed 1500 km/s) occurred from 1996 June to 2007 January. The properties of these fast-CME-producing regions, 35 in total, are compared with those of all 1143 active regions (ARs) in the period studied. An automated method, based on SOHO/MDI magnetic synoptic charts, is used to select and characterize the ARs. For each AR, a set of parameters are derived including the areas (positive, negative and total, denoted by A_P, A_N and A_T respectively), the magnetic fluxes (positive, negative and total, F_P, F_N and F_T respectively), the average magnetic field strength (B_avg), quasi-elongation (e) characterizing the overall shape of the AR, the number and length of polarity inversion lines (PILs, or neutral lines, N_PIL and L_PIL respectively), and the average and maximum of magnetic gradient on the PILs (GOP_avg and GOP_max respectively). Our statistical analysis shows ...

Wang, Yuming

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Consilience: Radiocarbon, Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis, and Litigation in the Ancestral Caddo Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through the creation and analysis of databases for radiocarbon, instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), and law, macro-level trends are exposed that form the framework of a broader research program aimed at advancing ideas of craft specialization and archaeological theory in the ancestral Caddo region of Southwest Arkansas, Northwest Louisiana, Northeast Texas, and Southeast Oklahoma. The findings of this investigation illustrate the research potential that remains buried within the context of cultural resource management (CRM) reports and legal databases (Westlaw and LexisNexis) that is awaiting consumption within regional research designs aimed at exploring the nuances and trends that appear through synthetic research. While more can—and should—be done to exploit these resources, this endeavor represents the first logical step toward a more general comprehension of Woodland and Caddo occupations in the region. As a testament to those projects that generated these data, the findings herein are representative of decades of work by numerous academic institutions, archaeological firms, undergraduate as well as graduate students, and avocational archaeologists alike; all of which have and continue to contribute to a more synthetic and dynamic understanding of the things, peoples, and cultures that lie underfoot.

Selden, Robert Zachary

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

A METHOD FOR DATA-DRIVEN SIMULATIONS OF EVOLVING SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS  

SciTech Connect

We present a method for performing data-driven simulations of solar active region formation and evolution. The approach is based on magnetofriction, which evolves the induction equation assuming that the plasma velocity is proportional to the Lorentz force. The simulations of active region (AR) coronal field are driven by temporal sequences of photospheric magnetograms from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Under certain conditions, the data-driven simulations produce flux ropes that are ejected from the modeled AR due to loss of equilibrium. Following the ejection of flux ropes, we find an enhancement of the photospheric horizontal field near the polarity inversion line. We also present a method for the synthesis of mock coronal images based on a proxy emissivity calculated from the current density distribution in the model. This method yields mock coronal images that are somewhat reminiscent of images of ARs taken by instruments such as SDO's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths.

Cheung, Mark C. M.; DeRosa, Marc L. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Building/252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

CAN A LONG NANOFLARE STORM EXPLAIN THE OBSERVED EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ACTIVE REGION CORES?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All theories that attempt to explain the heating of the high-temperature plasma observed in the solar corona are based on short bursts of energy. The intensities and velocities measured in the cores of quiescent active regions, however, can be steady over many hours of observation. One heating scenario that has been proposed to reconcile such observations with impulsive heating models is the 'long nanoflare storm', where short-duration heating events occur infrequently on many sub-resolution strands; the emission of the strands is then averaged together to explain the observed steady structures. In this Letter, we examine the emission measure distribution predicted for such a long nanoflare storm by modeling an arcade of strands in an active region core. Comparisons of the computed emission measure distributions with recent observations indicate that the long nanoflare storm scenario implies greater than five times more 1 MK emission than is actually observed for all plausible combinations of loop lengths, heating rates, and abundances. We conjecture that if the plasma had 'super coronal' abundances, the model may be able to match the observations at low temperatures.

Mulu-Moore, Fana M.; Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Warren, Harry P., E-mail: fanamariam.mulumoore@nasa.gov [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

150

Status of State Electric Industry Restructuring Activity --as of February 2003 --  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Status of State Electric Industry Restructuring Activity -- as of February 2003 -- (February 2003 Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming New Jersey #12;This site provides an overview of the status of electric industry restructuring in each state. Twenty-four states

Laughlin, Robert B.

151

CALCULATING SEPARATE MAGNETIC FREE ENERGY ESTIMATES FOR ACTIVE REGIONS PRODUCING MULTIPLE FLARES: NOAA AR11158  

SciTech Connect

It is well known that photospheric flux emergence is an important process for stressing coronal fields and storing magnetic free energy, which may then be released during a flare. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) captured the entire emergence of NOAA AR 11158. This region emerged as two distinct bipoles, possibly connected underneath the photosphere, yet characterized by different photospheric field evolutions and fluxes. The combined active region complex produced 15 GOES C-class, two M-class, and the X2.2 Valentine's Day Flare during the four days after initial emergence on 2011 February 12. The M and X class flares are of particular interest because they are nonhomologous, involving different subregions of the active region. We use a Magnetic Charge Topology together with the Minimum Current Corona model of the coronal field to model field evolution of the complex. Combining this with observations of flare ribbons in the 1600 A channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board SDO, we propose a minimization algorithm for estimating the amount of reconnected flux and resulting drop in magnetic free energy during a flare. For the M6.6, M2.2, and X2.2 flares, we find a flux exchange of 4.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx, 2.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx, and 21.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx, respectively, resulting in free energy drops of 3.89 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg, 2.62 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg, and 1.68 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 32} erg.

Tarr, Lucas; Longcope, Dana; Millhouse, Margaret [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

152

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / Regional  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico States Gulf of Mexico States Gulf of Mexico States The Gulf of Mexico area, which includes the States of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, has in the past accounted for the majority of natural gas production. Processing plants are especially important in this part of the country because of the amount of NGLs in the natural gas produced and existence of numerous petro-chemical plants seeking that feedstock in this area. Consequently, the States along the Gulf of Mexico are home to the largest number of plants and the most processing capacity in the United States. Natural gas produced in this area of the country is typically rich in NGLs and requires processing before it is pipeline-quality dry natural gas. Offshore natural gas production can contain more than 4 gallons of

153

Investigation of the Summer Climate of the Contiguous United States and Mexico Using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Part I: Model Climatology (1950–2002)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fifty-three years of the NCEP–NCAR Reanalysis I are dynamically downscaled using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to generate a regional climate model (RCM) climatology of the contiguous United States and Mexico. Data from the RAMS ...

Christopher L. Castro; Roger A. Pielke Sr.; Jimmy O. Adegoke

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

United States Department of Energy Thermally Activated Heat Pump Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is working with partners from the gas heating and cooling industry to improve energy efficiency using advance absorption technologies, to eliminate chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), to reduce global warming through more efficient combustion of natural gas, and to impact electric peak demand of air conditioning. To assist industry in developing these gas heating and cooling absorption technologies, the US DOE sponsors the Thermally Activated Heat Pump Program. It is divided into five key activities, addressing residential gas absorption heat pumps, large commercial chillers, advanced absorption fluids, computer-aided design, and advanced ``Hi-Cool`` heat pumps.

Fiskum, R.J. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Adcock, P.W.; DeVault, R.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Equatorial Energy Accumulation and Emanation Regions: Impacts of a Zonally Varying Basic State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies have suggested that the regions of mean anomalous perturbation kinetic energy which exist in the vicinity of the equatorial upper-tropospheric westerlies are the result of the propagation of extratropical synoptic and low ...

Peter J. Webster; Hai-Ru Chang

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Regional Uptake and Release of Crop Carbon in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon fixed by agricultural crops in the US creates regional CO2 sinks where it is harvested and regional CO2 sources where it is released back to the atmosphere. The quantity and location of these fluxes differ depending on the annual supply and demand of crop commodities. Data on the harvest of crop biomass, storage, import and export, and on the use of biomass for food, feed, fiber, and fuel were compiled to estimate an annual crop carbon budget for 2000 to 2008. Net sources of CO2 associated with the consumption of crop commodities occurred in the Eastern Uplands, Southern Seaboard, and Fruitful Rim regions. Net sinks associated with the production of crop commodities occurred in the Heartland, Northern Crescent, Northern Great Plains, and Mississippi Portal regions. The national crop carbon budget was balanced to within 0.7 to 6.6% yr-1 during the period of this analysis.

West, Tristram O.; Bandaru, Varaprasad; Brandt, Craig C.; Schuh, A.E.; Ogle, S.M.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

157

Simulation of the Recent Multidecadal Increase of Atlantic Hurricane Activity Using an 18-km-Grid Regional Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a new modeling framework for simulating Atlantic hurricane activity is introduced. The model is an 18-km-grid nonhydrostatic regional model, run over observed specified SSTs and nudged toward observed time-varying large-scale ...

Thomas R. Knutson; Joseph J. Sirutis; Stephen T. Garner; Isaac M. Held; Robert E. Tuleya

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

United States-Russia: Environmental management activities, Summer 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Joint Coordinating Committee for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (JCCEM) was formed between the US and Russia. This report describes the areas of research being studied under JCCEM, namely: Efficient separations; Contaminant transport and site characterization; Mixed wastes; High level waste tank remediation; Transuranic stabilization; Decontamination and decommissioning; and Emergency response. Other sections describe: Administrative framework for cooperation; Scientist exchange; Future actions; Non-JCCEM DOE-Russian activities; and JCCEM publications.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Electrical Energy Storage Activities in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spurred by increased public and private sector investment as well as policy initiatives, electrical energy storage project activities are on the upswing worldwide. The growing number of operating and planned initiatives demands that they be rigorously documented and evaluated to promote information sharing and collective learning. This report provides descriptive case studies on ten U.S.-based energy storage projects offering insight into their background, status, successes, shortcomings, and lessons lea...

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Summary of three regional assessment studies of solar electric generation opportunities in the Southwest, Southeast, and Northeast United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Market opportunities for solar generation of electricity for utility and for residential/commercial/industrial applications in the Northeast, Southeast, and Southwest regions of the United States were evaluated in three studies (JBF 1979, Stone and Webster 1979a, 1979b) and are summarized. The evaluations were based on both economic analyses and user perception of what they would require to select or approve the use of solar electric generation for themselves or for their employers. Over 30 utilities and several industrial and commercial firms and homeowners were involved. Solar electric technologies considered included biomass, hybrid retrofit, OTEC, photovoltaic, solar thermal, and wind. The studies projected that solar electric technologies could account for several percent of the forecast generation in year 2000 in the Southeast and Southwest regions,and up to 10 to 20% in the Northeast region. No single solar electric technology or application (for utility or industrial/commercial/residential use) arrived earlier at economic breakeven than other technologies in the Southeast region, but wind generation for both utility and industrial applications predominated in the Northeast region. The Southwest region, in which only utility applications were considered, showed wind energy and retrofit hybrid (a solar adjunct to an existing fossil-fueled plant) to be the most likely early applications.

Watts, R.L.; Harty, H.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional activities state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Communal spaces: aggregation and integration in the Mogollon Region of the United States Southwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aggregation and integration are processes that occur in human societies throughout the globe. An informative example of population aggregation and social integration can be observed in the North American desert borderlands from A.D. 250 to 1450 in the area known as the Mogollon region. In fact, Mogollon communities oscillated from smaller social groups into larger ones and dispersed into smaller groups only to form larger ones again. For this reason, examining the groups of people living in the Mogollon region provides a magnified view of social change over a substantial period. Understanding patterns of aggregation and integration provides researchers with the promise for research into the nature of these phenomena. In general, the Mogollon region is characterized by limited water supplies and low average annual precipitation. However, pockets of the Mogollon area, including the Mimbres valley and the Gila River valley, represent oases, where permanent rivers and their associated tributaries allowed for the pursuit of agricultural endeavors and access to a wide variety of wild plant and animal resources. The areas with these kinds of potential became population centers for previously dispersed groups of people living in the region. These people exploited natural resources and practiced agriculture in areas surrounding their communities. Over time, more organized aggregated and socially integrated communities were established throughout the region. Using ancient Mogollon communal architecture, commonly called kivas, this study examines issues of, and evidence for, population aggregation and social integration.

Nisengard, Jennifer E.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Energy storage technologies offer cost-effective flexibility and ancillary services needed by the U.S power grid. As policy reforms and decreasing technology costs facilitate market penetration, energy storage technologies offer increasingly competitive alternative means for utilities to engage these ancillary services. This report prepared by the Electricity Advisory Committee summarizes energy storage technology activities and projects in the U.S. electric power grid as of May 2011. Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 More Documents & Publications Fact Sheet: Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage Project (October 2012)

163

Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Energy storage technologies offer cost-effective flexibility and ancillary services needed by the U.S power grid. As policy reforms and decreasing technology costs facilitate market penetration, energy storage technologies offer increasingly competitive alternative means for utilities to engage these ancillary services. This report prepared by the Electricity Advisory Committee summarizes energy storage technology activities and projects in the U.S. electric power grid as of May 2011. Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 More Documents & Publications Fact Sheet: Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage Project (October 2012)

164

Transient induced MHD oscillations : A tool to probe the solar active regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar transients and eruptive phenomena which are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere, can shed new light to the understanding of the outstanding problems like coronal heating and the solar wind acceleration. Observations in the entire electromagnetic spectrum of such dynamical processes of large and small-scale transient/eruptive events, with highly dynamic magnetic field configuration, and energetic particles, provide crucial information about the plasma processes at mega-Kelvin temperature embedded in a complex magnetic field, and also energy build-up/energy-release processes, taking place in such events. One of the most important phenomenological aspects of solar eruptive phenomena is the induced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves generated during these energetic processes, which carry a potential signature to probing the solar active regions. In this paper, we briefly review the recent trends of the transient (e.g., flares) induced quasi-periodic oscillations in the solar atmosphere and discuss their implica...

Srivastava, Abhishek K; Dwivedi, B N; Kumar, Pankaj

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Nanoflare statistics in an active region 3D MHD coronal model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context. We investigate the statistics of the spatial and temporal distribution of the coronal heating in a three-dimensional magneto- hydrodynamical (3D MHD) model. The model describes the temporal evolution of the corona above an observed active region. The model is driven by photospheric granular motions which braid the magnetic field lines. This induces currents and their dissipation heats the plasma. We evaluate the transient heating as subsequent heating events and analyze their statistics. The results are then interpreted in the context of observed flare statistics and coronal heating mechanisms. Methods. To conduct the numerical experiment we use a high order finite difference code which solves the partial differential equations for the conservation of mass, the momentum and energy balance, and the induction equation. The energy balance includes the Spitzer heat conduction and the optical thin radiative loss in the corona. Results. The temporal and spatial distribution of the Ohmic heating in the 3D M...

Bingert, Sven

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

A Conterminous United States Multilayer Soil Characteristics Dataset for Regional Climate and Hydrology Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil information is now widely required by many climate and hydrology models and soil–vegetation–atmosphere transfer schemes. This paper describes the development of a multilayer soil characteristics dataset for the conterminous United States (...

Douglas A. Miller; Richard A. White

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Determining the Sources of Regional Haze in the Southeastern United States Using the CMAQ Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed sensitivity analysis was conducted to help to quantify the impacts of various emission control options in terms of potential visibility improvements at class I national parks and wilderness areas in the southeastern United States. ...

M. Talat Odman; Yongtao Hu; Alper Unal; Armistead G. Russell; James W. Boylan

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Patterns of Nanoflare Storm Heating Exhibited by an Active Region Observed with SDO/AIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is largely agreed that many coronal loops---those observed at a temperature of about 1 MK--- are bundles of unresolved strands that are heated by storms of impulsive nanoflares. The nature of coronal heating in hotter loops and in the very important but largely ignored diffuse component of active regions is much less clear. Are these regions also heated impulsively, or is the heating quasi steady? The spectacular new data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) telescopes on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) offer an excellent opportunity to address this question. We analyze the light curves of coronal loops and the diffuse corona in 6 different AIA channels and compare them with the predicted light curves from theoretical models. Light curves in the different AIA channels reach their peak intensities with predictable orderings as a function the nanoflare storm properties. We show that while some sets of light curves exhibit clear evidence of cooling after nanoflare storms, other cases are less stra...

Viall, Nicholeen M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

EVOLUTION OF RELATIVE MAGNETIC HELICITY AND CURRENT HELICITY IN NOAA ACTIVE REGION 11158  

SciTech Connect

Both magnetic and current helicities are crucial ingredients for describing the complexity of active-region magnetic structure. In this Letter, we present the temporal evolution of these helicities contained in NOAA active region 11158 during five days from 2011 February 12 to 16. The photospheric vector magnetograms of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory were used as the boundary conditions for the coronal field extrapolation under the assumption of nonlinear force-free field, from which we calculated both relative magnetic helicity and current helicity. We construct a time-altitude diagram in which altitude distribution of the magnitude of current helicity density is displayed as a function of time. This diagram clearly shows a pattern of upwardly propagating current helicity density over two days prior to the X2.2 flare on February 15 with an average propagation speed of {approx}36 m s{sup -1}. The propagation is synchronous with the emergence of magnetic flux into the photosphere, and indicative of a gradual energy buildup for the X2.2 flare. The time profile of the relative magnetic helicity shows a monotonically increasing trend most of the time, but a pattern of increasing and decreasing magnetic helicity above the monotonic variation appears prior to each of two major flares, M6.6 and X2.2, respectively. The physics underlying this bump pattern is not fully understood. However, the fact that this pattern is apparent in the magnetic helicity evolution but not in the magnetic flux evolution makes it a useful indicator in forecasting major flares.

Jing, Ju; Liu, Chang; Lee, Jeongwoo; Xu, Yan; Deng, Na; Wang, Haimin [Space Weather Research Laboratory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Park, Sung-Hong [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon, 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Wiegelmann, Thomas, E-mail: ju.jing@njit.edu, E-mail: chang.liu@njit.edu, E-mail: yx2@njit.edu, E-mail: na.deng@njit.edu, E-mail: haimin@flare.njit.edu, E-mail: freemler@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: leej@njit.edu, E-mail: wiegelmann@linmpi.mpg.de [Max Planck Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung (MPS), Max-Planck-Strasse 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

170

The Columbia Regional Geospatial Service Center System: A Proven Model for the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past 20 years, the role of geospatial technology in society has increased dramatically. However, the impact of these technologies in rural areas remains minimal. In Texas, a federally funded project called the Columbia Regional Geospatial ... Keywords: Distributed, Emergency, Geospatial, Response, Technology

P. R. Blackwell; Darrel McDonald

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The State of the Region Chapter 2 University of Pittsburgh July 1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Despite the region's loss of employment in the metals complex, the steel industry remains the most average employment growth rate (N), how much growth is attributable to an industry's growth rate minus of the steel and metals complex -- losses occurred across many two digit industries. Despite this, six

Sibille, Etienne

172

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGUtiTORY COMMISSION REGION I C31 PARK...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

REGUtiTORY COMMISSION REGION I C31 PARK AVENUE KlNt OF PRUSSIC. PENNSYLVANIA 1P4D6 z,: P -. : &J L . . : ; .; 3 Do:ket No. 40-2286 Westinqhouse Electric Company Lamp D1vis-i ons...

173

Microbial biomass and activity in high elevation (>5100 meters) soils from the Annapurna and Sagarmatha regions of the Nepalese Himalayas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbial biomass and activity in high elevation (>5100 meters) soils from the AnnapurnaOnlinePublication #12;HIMALAYAN JOURNAL OF SCIENCES VOL 6 ISSUE 8 2010 27XX Research paper Microbial biomass and Sagarmatha regions of the Nepalese Himalayas. We examined microbial biomass and activity as well as key

Hammerton, James

174

Catalysis and activation of magic states in fault-tolerant architectures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many architectures for fault-tolerant quantum computing universality is achieved by a combination of Clifford group unitary operators and preparation of suitable nonstabilizer states, the so-called magic states. Universality is possible even for some fairly noisy nonstabilizer states, as distillation can convert many noisy copies into fewer purer magic states. Here we propose protocols that exploit multiple species of magic states in surprising ways. These protocols provide examples of previously unobserved phenomena that are analogous to catalysis and activation well known in entanglement theory.

Campbell, Earl T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom) and Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Kinetic Energy Budget during Strong Jet Stream Activity over the Eastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kinetic energy budgets are computed during a cold air outbreak in association with strong jet stream activity over the eastern United States. The period is characterized by large generation of kinetic energy due to cross-contour flow. Horizontal ...

Henry E. Fuelberg; James R. Scoggins

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

A semi-continuous state-transition probability HMM-based voice activity detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce an efficient hidden Markov model-based voice activity detection (VAD) algorithm with time-variant state-transition probabilities in the underlying Markov chain. The transition probabilities vary in an exponential charge/discharge scheme ...

H. Othman; T. Aboulnasr

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Regional power systems planning: a state of the art assessment. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report was to define regional power systems planning problems, the tools available and their shortcomings, and to document all of the above in a concise readable form. The approach consisted of a survey and literature search. The survey determined the tools being used by utilities, the tools they had rejected, and the tools they planned to try out. The literature search was conducted for the purpose of documenting the tools available, and performing a comparative analysis of these tools. The project included a mix of utility, university, and consulting organizations. Several organizations were consulted in the selection of the participants. A non-profit organization, The University of Oklahoma, was selected to manage the project. The results were reviewed in a series of four one day meetings by known authorities in each field. This report consists of the results of this project. Perhaps its major finding is that several aspects of the regional planning problem are not well defined, the roles of the various participants in regional planning is not clear, and certainly research is needed for the development of new methodology.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

State and Regional Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Initiative Sacramento Conference Center, Sacramento, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a level where such equipment provides a hedge against future electricity rate increases. Funding caps: $4 (developmental). Erie Canal to stem cells. States: historical locus for technology innovation. Clean energy resurgence consistent with American historical trends. 3 #12;NYSERDA--Subsidy Model RPS behind-the-meter fuel

179

EMERGING DIMMINGS OF ACTIVE REGIONS OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we statistically investigate the emerging dimmings (EDs) of 24 isolated active regions (IARs) from 2010 June to 2011 May. All the IARs show EDs in lower-temperature lines (e.g., 171 A) at their early emerging stages. Meanwhile, in higher temperature lines (e.g., 211 A), the ED regions brighten continuously. There are two types of EDs: fan-shaped and halo-shaped. There are 19 fan-shaped EDs and 5 halo-shaped ones. The EDs appear to be delayed by several to more than ten hours relative to the first emergence of the IARs. The shortest delay is 3.6 hr and the longest is 19.0 hr. The EDs last from 3.3 hr to 14.2 hr, with a mean duration of 8.3 hr. Before the appearance of the EDs, the emergence rate of the magnetic flux of the IARs is between 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} Mx hr{sup -1} to 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx hr{sup -1}. The larger the emergence rate is, the shorter the delay time is. While the dimmings appear, the magnetic flux of the IARs ranges from 8.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} Mx to 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} Mx. These observations imply that the reconfiguration of the coronal magnetic fields due to reconnection between the newly emerging flux and the surrounding existing fields results in a new thermal distribution which leads to a dimming for the cooler channel (171 A) and brightening in the warmer channels.

Zhang Jun; Yang Shuhong [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Liu Yang; Sun Xudong, E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: shuhongyang@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: yliu@sun.stanford.edu, E-mail: xudong@sun.stanford.edu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Evidence for departure from a power-law flare size distribution for a small solar active region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active region 11029 was a small, highly flare-productive solar active region observed at a time of extremely low solar activity. The region produced only small flares: the largest of the $>70$ Geostationary Observational Environmental Satellite (GOES) events for the region has a peak 1--$8{\\AA}$ flux of $2.2\\times 10^{-6} {\\rm W} {\\rm m}^{-2}$ (GOES C2.2). The background-subtracted GOES peak-flux distribution suggests departure from power-law behavior above $10^{-6} {\\rm W} {\\rm m}^{-2}$, and a Bayesian model comparison strongly favors a power-law plus rollover model for the distribution over a simple power-law model. The departure from the power law is attributed to this small active region having a finite amount of energy. The rate of flaring in the region varies with time, becoming very high for two days coinciding with the onset of an increase in complexity of the photospheric magnetic field. The observed waiting-time distribution for events is consistent with a piecewise-constant Poisson model. These res...

Wheatland, M S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional activities state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Operator Certification Standards for Fossil Fuel Fired Plants: Survey of State and Regional Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency has only started addressing the issue of certification for fossil fuel power plant operators within the last two years. This report, which includes data collected from research of state and local authorities that currently require power plant operators to be certified or licensed, is the first phase of a certification program for Fossil Fuel Fired Power Plants. The report also addresses the possible future shortage of skilled workers needed by the power plants and the ...

1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

182

3-D nonlinear force-free field reconstruction of solar active region 11158 by direct boundary integral equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 3-D coronal magnetic field is reconstructed for NOAA 11158 on Feb 14, 2011. A GPU-accelerated direct boundary integral equation (DBIE) method is implemented. This is about 1000 times faster than the original DBIE used on solar NLFFF modeling. Using the SDO/HMI vector magnetogram as the bottom boundary condition, the reconstructed magnetic field lines are compared with the projected EUV loop structures from different views three-dimensionally by SDO/AIA and STEREO A/B spacecraft simultaneously for the first time. They show very good agreement so that the topological configurations of the magnetic fields can be analyzed, thus its role in the flare process of the active region can be better understood. A quantitative comparison with some stereoscopically reconstructed coronal loops shows that the present averaged misalignment angles are at the same order as the state-of-the-art results obtained with reconstructed coronal loops as prescribed conditions and better than other NLFFF methods. It is found that the o...

Wang, Rui; Tan, Baolin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

ENSO anomalies over the Western United States: present and future patterns in regional climate simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface temperature, precipitation, specific humidity and wind anomalies associated with the warm and cold phases of ENSO simulated by WRF and HadRM are examined for the present and future decades. WRF is driven by ECHAM5 and CCSM3, respectively, and HadRM is driven by HadCM3. For the current decades, all simulations show some capability in resolving the observed warm-dry and coolwet teleconnection patterns over the PNW and the Southwest U.S. for warm and cold ENSO. Differences in the regional simulations originate primarily from the respective driving fields. For the future decades, the warm-dry and cool-wet teleconnection patterns in association with ENSO are still represented in ECHAM5-WRF and HadRM. However, there are indications of changes in the ENSO teleconnection patterns for CCSM3-WRF in the future, with wet anomalies dominating in the PNW and the Southwest U.S. for both warm and cold ENSO, in contrast to the canonical patterns of precipitation anomalies. Interaction of anomalous wind flow with local terrain plays a critical role in the generation of anomalous precipitation over the western U.S. Anomalous dry conditions are always associated with anomalous airflow that runs parallel to local mountains and wet conditions with airflow that runs perpendicular to local mountains. Future changes in temperature and precipitation associated with the ENSO events in the regional simulations indicate varying responses depending on the variables examined as well as depending on the phase of ENSO.

Zhang, Yongxin; Qian, Yun; Duliere, Valerie; Salathe, E.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

184

INTERMITTENCY AND MULTIFRACTALITY SPECTRA OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of a study of intermittency and multifractality of magnetic structures in solar active regions (ARs). Line-of-sight magnetograms for 214 ARs of different flare productivity observed at the center of the solar disk from 1997 January until 2006 December are utilized. Data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory operating in the high resolution mode, the Big Bear Solar Observatory digital magnetograph, and the Hinode SOT/SP instrument were used. Intermittency spectra were derived from high-order structure functions and flatness functions. The flatness function exponent is a measure of the degree of intermittency. We found that the flatness function exponent at scales below approximately 10 Mm is correlated with flare productivity (the correlation coefficient is -0.63). The Hinode data show that the intermittency regime is extended toward small scales (below 2 Mm) as compared to the MDI data. The spectra of multifractality, derived from the structure functions and flatness functions, are found to be broader for ARs of higher flare productivity as compared to those of low flare productivity. The magnetic structure of high-flaring ARs consists of a voluminous set of monofractals, and this set is much richer than that for low-flaring ARs. The results indicate the relevance of the multifractal organization of the photospheric magnetic fields to the flaring activity. The strong intermittency observed in complex and high-flaring ARs is a hint that we observe a photospheric imprint of enhanced sub-photospheric dynamics.

Abramenko, Valentyna; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl [Big Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States)

2010-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

185

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM AUGUST 30 SEPTEMBER 12, 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM AUGUST 30 ­ SEPTEMBER 12 This forecast as well as past forecasts and verifications are available online at http://hurricane.atmos.colostate.edu/Forecasts This is the fifth year that we have issued shorter-term forecasts of tropical cyclone activity starting in early

186

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM AUGUST 4 AUGUST 17, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM AUGUST 4 ­ AUGUST 17, 2010) of activity relative to climatology. These new two-week forecasts have replaced the monthly forecasts that we This forecast as well as past forecasts and verifications are available online at http://hurricane.atmos.colostate.edu/Forecasts

Gray, William

187

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM SEPTEMBER 28 OCTOBER 11, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM SEPTEMBER 28 ­ OCTOBER 11 percent) of hurricane activity relative to climatology. These new two-week forecasts have replaced the monthly forecasts that we have been issuing in recent years. (as of 28 September 2011) By Philip J

Gray, William

188

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM SEPTEMBER 28 OCTOBER 11, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM SEPTEMBER 28 ­ OCTOBER 11) of hurricane activity relative to climatology. These new two-week forecasts have replaced the monthly forecasts. Gray2 This forecast as well as past forecasts and verifications are available online at http://hurricane.atmos.colostate.edu/Forecasts

Gray, William

189

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM AUGUST 31 SEPTEMBER 13, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM AUGUST 31 ­ SEPTEMBER 13) of activity relative to climatology. These new two-week forecasts have replaced the monthly forecasts that we This forecast as well as past forecasts and verifications are available online at http://hurricane.atmos.colostate.edu/Forecasts

190

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM SEPTEMBER 13 SEPTEMBER 26, 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM SEPTEMBER 13 ­ SEPTEMBER 26) of hurricane activity relative to climatology. These new two-week forecasts have replaced the monthly forecasts. Gray2 This forecast as well as past forecasts and verifications are available online at http://hurricane.atmos.colostate.edu/Forecasts

Gray, William

191

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM AUGUST 18 AUGUST 31, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM AUGUST 18 ­ AUGUST 31, 2010) of activity relative to climatology. These new two-week forecasts have replaced the monthly forecasts that we This forecast as well as past forecasts and verifications are available online at http://hurricane.atmos.colostate.edu/Forecasts

Gray, William

192

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM SEPTEMBER 14 SEPTEMBER 27, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM SEPTEMBER 14 ­ SEPTEMBER 27 percent) of hurricane activity relative to climatology. These new two-week forecasts have replaced the monthly forecasts that we have been issuing in recent years. (as of 14 September 2011) By Philip J

193

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM AUGUST 17 AUGUST 30, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM AUGUST 17 ­ AUGUST 30, 2012 percent) of activity relative to climatology. These new two-week forecasts have replaced the monthly forecasts that we have been issuing in recent years. (as of 17 August 2012) By Philip J. Klotzbach1

Gray, William

194

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM AUGUST 31 SEPTEMBER 13, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM AUGUST 31 ­ SEPTEMBER 13 percent) of activity relative to climatology. These new two-week forecasts have replaced the monthly forecasts that we have been issuing in recent years. (as of 31 August 2011) By Philip J. Klotzbach1

Birner, Thomas

195

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM OCTOBER 12 OCTOBER 25, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM OCTOBER 12 ­ OCTOBER 25%) of hurricane activity relative to climatology. These new two-week forecasts have replaced the monthly forecasts. Gray2 This forecast as well as past forecasts and verifications are available online at http://hurricane.atmos.colostate.edu/Forecasts

Gray, William

196

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM SEPTEMBER 14 SEPTEMBER 27, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM SEPTEMBER 14 ­ SEPTEMBER 27 percent) of hurricane activity relative to climatology. These new two-week forecasts have replaced the monthly forecasts that we have been issuing in recent years. (as of 14 September 2012) By Philip J

Gray, William

197

Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments National Capital Region Transportation Planning Board Summary of the State of the Practice and State of the Art of Modeling Peak Spreading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traffic congestion in large metropolitan areas has become so acute that many commuters are adjusting their departure and/or arrival times for work and other destinations to avoid the worst of what is now called the “peak period”. The adjustments in departure times combined with travel times that can last beyond the peak hour have led to the phenomena of peak spreading, where the peak hour demand on a particular roadway exceeds the peak hour capacity and causes demand to shift to the “shoulders ” of the peak hour, or the hours adjacent to the peak hour. This situation is so pronounced in the TPB region, that most of the major freeways in the areas have peak periods that last from roughly 6 AM to 10 AM in the morning and 3 PM to 7 PM in the evening where stop and go traffic is common throughout. The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, National Capital Region Transportation Planning Board (TPB) engaged Vanasse Hangen Brustlin (VHB) to review and summarize the state of the practice and the state of the art with regards to modeling peak spreading at the MPO level. VHB began this effort by reviewing the recent MPO survey and following up with staff at large MPOs with characteristics similar

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

WAITING TIMES OF QUASI-HOMOLOGOUS CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS FROM SUPER ACTIVE REGIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Why and how do some active regions (ARs) frequently produce coronal mass ejections (CMEs)? These are key questions for deepening our understanding of the mechanisms and processes of energy accumulation and sudden release in ARs and for improving our space weather prediction capability. Although some case studies have been performed, these questions are still far from fully answered. These issues are now being addressed statistically through an investigation of the waiting times of quasi-homologous CMEs from super ARs in solar cycle 23. It is found that the waiting times of quasi-homologous CMEs have a two-component distribution with a separation at about 18 hr. The first component is a Gaussian-like distribution with a peak at about 7 hr, which indicates a tight physical connection between these quasi-homologous CMEs. The likelihood of two or more occurrences of CMEs faster than 1200 km s{sup -1} from the same AR within 18 hr is about 20%. Furthermore, the correlation analysis among CME waiting times, CME speeds, and CME occurrence rates reveals that these quantities are independent of each other, suggesting that the perturbation by preceding CMEs rather than free energy input is the direct cause of quasi-homologous CMEs. The peak waiting time of 7 hr probably characterizes the timescale of the growth of the instabilities triggered by preceding CMEs. This study uncovers some clues from a statistical perspective for us to understand quasi-homologous CMEs as well as CME-rich ARs.

Wang Yuming; Liu Lijuan; Shen Chenglong; Liu Rui; Ye Pinzhong; Wang, S., E-mail: ymwang@ustc.edu.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

NUMERICAL MODELING OF THE INITIATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS IN ACTIVE REGION NOAA 9415  

SciTech Connect

Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares are the main drivers of weather in space. Understanding how these events occur and what conditions might lead to eruptive events is of crucial importance for up to date and reliable space weather forecasting. The aim of this paper is to present a numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) data-inspired model suitable for the simulation of the CME initiation and their early evolution. Starting from a potential magnetic field extrapolation of the active region (AR) NOAA 9415, we solve the full set of ideal MHD equations in a non-zero plasma-{beta} environment. As a consequence of the applied twisting motions, a force-free-magnetic field configuration is obtained, which has the same chirality as the investigated AR. We investigate the response of the solar corona when photospheric motions resembling the ones observed for AR 9415 are applied at the inner boundary. As a response to the converging shearing motions, a flux rope is formed that quickly propagates outward, carrying away the plasma confined inside the flux rope against the gravitational attraction by the Sun. Moreover, a compressed leading edge propagating at a speed of about 550 km s{sup -1} and preceding the CME is formed. The presented simulation shows that both the initial magnetic field configuration and the plasma-magnetic-field interaction are relevant for a more comprehensive understanding of the CME initiation and early evolution phenomenon.

Zuccarello, F. P.; Poedts, S. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma-Astrophysics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Meliani, Z., E-mail: Francesco.Zuccarello@wis.kuleuven.be, E-mail: Stefaan.Poedts@wis.kuleuven.be, E-mail: zakaria.meliani@obspm.fr [Observatoire de Paris, LUTh, F-92190 Meudon (France)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

200

Major electron events and coronal magnetic configurations of the related solar active regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A statistical survey of 26 major electron events during the period 2002 February through the end of solar cycle 23 is presented. We have obtained electron solar onset times and the peak flux spectra for each event by fitting to a powerlaw spectrum truncated by an exponential high-energy tail. We also derived the coronal magnetic configurations of the related solar active regions (ARs) from the potential-field source-surface model. It is found that (1) 10 of the 11 well-connected open field-line events are prompt events whose solar onset times coincide with the maxima of flare emission and 13 of the 14 closed field-line events are delayed events. (2) A not-wellconnected open field-line event and one of the closed field-line events are prompt events, they are both associated with large-scale coronal disturbances or dimming. (3)An averaged harder spectrum is found in open field-line events compared with the closed ones. Specifically, the averaged spectral index is of 1.6 +/- 0.3 in open field-line events and of ...

Li, C; Matthews, S A; Dai, Y; Tang, Y H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional activities state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the US Jeff Maguire 4/30/13 Outline * Why HPWHs? * US Water Heating Market * Overview of HPWHs * Model Description * Results o HPWH Performance o Energy Savings Potential o Breakeven Cost 2 Heat Pump Water Heaters Save $300 a year over standard electric? Save $100 a year over standard gas? Heat Pump Electric Gas 3 Questions about HPWHs * Are HPWHs a good replacement for typical gas and electric storage water heaters? o In different locations across the country? o In conditioned/unconditioned space? o Source energy savings?

202

State of the Art of Air-source Heat Pump for Cold Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, research on air source heat pump systems for cold regions in recent years is first summarized and compared. These systems can be divided into three kinds: a single-stage compression heat pump, liquid/vapor injection heat pump, and a two-stage heat pump. Finally, our research with a two-stage compression variable frequency air source heat pump is presented. A two-control-model with the priority target as COP or heating capacity is advanced. The experimental results show that the COP of this heat pump system is over 2, the compressor discharge temperature under 120, and the heating capacity can meet the heating load needed when the condensing temperature is 50 and outdoor air temperature is over -18.

Tian, C.; Liang, N.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment of 14 Regions Outside the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Background The use of horizontal drilling in conjunction with hydraulic fracturing has greatly expanded the ability of producers to profitably produce natural gas from low permeability geologic formations, particularly shale formations. Application of fracturing techniques to stimulate oil and gas production began to grow rapidly in the 1950s, although experimentation dates back to the 19 th century. Starting in the mid-1970s, a partnership of private operators, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) endeavored to develop technologies for the commercial production of natural gas from the relatively shallow Devonian (Huron) shale in the Eastern United States. This partnership helped foster technologies that eventually became crucial to producing natural gas from shale rock, including horizontal wells, multi-stage fracturing, and slick-water fracturing. 1 Practical application of horizontal drilling to oil production began in the early 1980s, by which time the advent of improved downhole drilling motors and the invention of other necessary supporting equipment, materials, and technologies, particularly downhole telemetry equipment, had brought some applications within the realm of

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

High-frequency absorption of the dynamic mixed state in the surface superconductivity region  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the absorption of a high-frequency electromagnetic field in the type II superconductor Pb{sub 0.8}In{sub 0.2} in magnetic fields H{sub c2} < H < H{sub c3}. The absorption component proportional to the rate of variation of the external magnetic field is detected. We assume that this absorption component is associated with the dynamic mixed state of the superconducting shell containing 2D magnetic flux vortices (Kulik vortices). The motion of these vortices under the action of the critical current ensures the required difference between the external and internal magnetic inductions of the superconducting shell upon a change in the external magnetic field. This model correctly describes the observed behavior of absorption of rf electromagnetic radiation.

Berezin, V. A., E-mail: berezin@iptm.ru; Tulin, V. A., E-mail: tulin@iptm.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Microelectronics Technology and High-Purity Materials (Russian Federation)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

The impact of regional energy-price differentials on manufacturing employment in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study is an econometric analysis of the role of industrial energy prices in the location of manufacturing employment in the United States. Historical electricity and natural gas prices are analyzed for the nine US Census divisions. Econometric regression equations are used to show the role of electricity and natural gas prices in the location of output and in labor demand for SIC sectors 22 (textiles), 28 (chemicals), and 35 (nonelectrical machinery) in each Census division. A structural econometric model is built showing the three-fold impact of energy prices on textile employment in the Middle Atlantic division. Energy prices are linked to investment, output, and the demand for labor. Energy prices are shown to have a significant but secondary role in determining the location of manufacturing employment.

Dye, R.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Annual housing survey: 1978. United States and regions. Part F. Energy-related housing characteristics  

SciTech Connect

This report presents statistics on energy - related housing characteristics from the 1978 Annual Housing Survey for the United States by inside and outside standard metropolitan statistical areas. Tables provide data on fuel, fuel cost, heating, air conditioning, insulation, and transportation characteristics. In addition, they present figures on the income of families and individuals by energy - related housing characteristics; the value of owner - occupied housing units and the gross rent of renter - occupied housing units by energy - related housing characteristics; the monthly and yearly costs paid for utilities; and the number of rooms per housing unit by energy - related housing characteristics. Data on energy - related housing characteristics are also given for Black and Spanish heads of households. Appendices describe the geographic area classifications; provide definitions and explanations of the subjects covered in the report; and present information on sample design, estimation, and accuracy of the data. Area maps are included.

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

VELOCITY MEASUREMENTS FOR A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION FAN LOOP FROM HINODE/EIS OBSERVATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The velocity pattern of a fan loop structure within a solar active region over the temperature range 0.15-1.5 MK is derived using data from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode satellite. The loop is aligned toward the observer's line of sight and shows downflows (redshifts) of around 15 km s{sup -1} up to a temperature of 0.8 MK, but for temperatures of 1.0 MK and above the measured velocity shifts are consistent with no net flow. This velocity result applies over a projected spatial distance of 9 Mm and demonstrates that the cooler, redshifted plasma is physically disconnected from the hotter, stationary plasma. A scenario in which the fan loops consist of at least two groups of 'strands'-one cooler and downflowing, the other hotter and stationary-is suggested. The cooler strands may represent a later evolutionary stage of the hotter strands. A density diagnostic of Mg VII was used to show that the electron density at around 0.8 MK falls from 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3} at the loop base, to 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} cm{sup -3} at a projected height of 15 Mm. A filling factor of 0.2 is found at temperatures close to the formation temperature of Mg VII (0.8 MK), confirming that the cooler, downflowing plasma occupies only a fraction of the apparent loop volume. The fan loop is rooted within a so-called outflow region that displays low intensity and blueshifts of up to 25 km s{sup -1} in Fe XII {lambda}195.12 (formed at 1.5 MK), in contrast to the loop's redshifts of 15 km s{sup -1} at 0.8 MK. A new technique for obtaining an absolute wavelength calibration for the EIS instrument is presented and an instrumental effect, possibly related to a distorted point-spread function, that affects velocity measurements is identified.

Young, P. R. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); O'Dwyer, B.; Mason, H. E. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

DIAGNOSING THE TIME-DEPENDENCE OF ACTIVE REGION CORE HEATING FROM THE EMISSION MEASURE. I. LOW-FREQUENCY NANOFLARES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observational measurements of active region emission measures contain clues to the time dependence of the underlying heating mechanism. A strongly nonlinear scaling of the emission measure with temperature indicates a large amount of hot plasma relative to warm plasma. A weakly nonlinear (or linear) scaling of the emission measure indicates a relatively large amount of warm plasma, suggesting that the hot active region plasma is allowed to cool and so the heating is impulsive with a long repeat time. This case is called low-frequency nanoflare heating, and we investigate its feasibility as an active region heating scenario here. We explore a parameter space of heating and coronal loop properties with a hydrodynamic model. For each model run, we calculate the slope {alpha} of the emission measure distribution EM(T){proportional_to}T {sup {alpha}}. Our conclusions are: (1) low-frequency nanoflare heating is consistent with about 36% of observed active region cores when uncertainties in the atomic data are not accounted for; (2) proper consideration of uncertainties yields a range in which as many as 77% of observed active regions are consistent with low-frequency nanoflare heating and as few as zero; (3) low-frequency nanoflare heating cannot explain observed slopes greater than 3; (4) the upper limit to the volumetric energy release is in the region of 50 erg cm{sup -3} to avoid unphysical magnetic field strengths; (5) the heating timescale may be short for loops of total length less than 40 Mm to be consistent with the observed range of slopes; (6) predicted slopes are consistently steeper for longer loops.

Bradshaw, S. J.; Reep, J. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Klimchuk, J. A., E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu, E-mail: jeffrey.reep@rice.edu, E-mail: james.a.klimchuk@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Lab., Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

209

EMERGENCE OF HELICAL FLUX AND THE FORMATION OF AN ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT CHANNEL  

SciTech Connect

We present comprehensive observations of the formation and evolution of a filament channel within NOAA Active Region (AR) 10978 from Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope and TRACE. We employ sequences of Hinode spectro-polarimeter maps of the AR, accompanying Hinode Narrowband Filter Instrument magnetograms in the Na I D1 line, Hinode Broadband Filter Instrument filtergrams in the Ca II H line and G-band, Hinode X-ray telescope X-ray images, and TRACE Fe IX 171 A image sequences. The development of the channel resembles qualitatively that presented by Okamoto et al. in that many indicators point to the emergence of a pre-existing sub-surface magnetic flux rope. The consolidation of the filament channel into a coherent structure takes place rapidly during the course of a few hours, and the filament form then gradually shrinks in width over the following two days. Particular to this filament channel is the observation of a segment along its length of horizontal, weak (500 G) flux that, unlike the rest of the filament channel, is not immediately flanked by strong vertical plage fields of opposite polarity on each side of the filament. Because this isolated horizontal field is observed in photospheric lines, we infer that it is unlikely that the channel formed as a result of reconnection in the corona, but the low values of inferred magnetic fill fraction along the entire length of the filament channel suggest that the bulk of the field resides somewhat above the low photosphere. Correlation tracking of granulation in the G band presents no evidence for either systematic flows toward the channel or systematic shear flows along it. The absence of these flows, along with other indications of these data from multiple sources, reinforces (but does not conclusively demonstrate) the picture of an emerging flux rope as the origin of this AR filament channel.

Lites, B. W.; Kubo, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Berger, T.; Frank, Z.; Shine, R.; Tarbell, T.; Title, A. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, 3251 Hanover Street, Organization ADBS, Building 252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Okamoto, T. J. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Otsuji, K., E-mail: lites@ucar.ed [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

210

EVIDENCE FOR WIDESPREAD COOLING IN AN ACTIVE REGION OBSERVED WITH THE SDO ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY  

SciTech Connect

A well-known behavior of EUV light curves of discrete coronal loops is that the peak intensities of cooler channels or spectral lines are reached at progressively later times than hotter channels. This time lag is understood to be the result of hot coronal loop plasma cooling through these lower respective temperatures. However, loops typically comprise only a minority of the total emission in active regions (ARs). Is this cooling pattern a common property of AR coronal plasma, or does it only occur in unique circumstances, locations, and times? The new Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) data provide a wonderful opportunity to answer this question systematically for an entire AR. We measure the time lag between pairs of SDO/AIA EUV channels using 24 hr of images of AR 11082 observed on 2010 June 19. We find that there is a time-lag signal consistent with cooling plasma, just as is usually found for loops, throughout the AR including the diffuse emission between loops for the entire 24 hr duration. The pattern persists consistently for all channel pairs and choice of window length within the 24 hr time period, giving us confidence that the plasma is cooling from temperatures of greater than 3 MK, and sometimes exceeding 7 MK, down to temperatures lower than {approx}0.8 MK. This suggests that the bulk of the emitting coronal plasma in this AR is not steady; rather, it is dynamic and constantly evolving. These measurements provide crucial constraints on any model which seeks to describe coronal heating.

Viall, Nicholeen M.; Klimchuk, James A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Laboratory, Greenbelt, MD 20706 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

PRODUCTIVITY OF SOLAR FLARES AND MAGNETIC HELICITY INJECTION IN ACTIVE REGIONS  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this study is to better understand how magnetic helicity injection in an active region (AR) is related to the occurrence and intensity of solar flares. We therefore investigate the magnetic helicity injection rate and unsigned magnetic flux, as a reference. In total, 378 ARs are analyzed using SOHO/MDI magnetograms. The 24 hr averaged helicity injection rate and unsigned magnetic flux are compared with the flare index and the flare-productive probability in the next 24 hr following a measurement. In addition, we study the variation of helicity over a span of several days around the times of the 19 flares above M5.0 which occurred in selected strong flare-productive ARs. The major findings of this study are as follows: (1) for a sub-sample of 91 large ARs with unsigned magnetic fluxes in the range from (3-5) x 10{sup 22} Mx, there is a difference in the magnetic helicity injection rate between flaring ARs and non-flaring ARs by a factor of 2; (2) the GOES C-flare-productive probability as a function of helicity injection displays a sharp boundary between flare-productive ARs and flare-quiet ones; (3) the history of helicity injection before all the 19 major flares displayed a common characteristic: a significant helicity accumulation of (3-45) x 10{sup 42} Mx{sup 2} during a phase of monotonically increasing helicity over 0.5-2 days. Our results support the notion that helicity injection is important in flares, but it is not effective to use it alone for the purpose of flare forecast. It is necessary to find a way to better characterize the time history of helicity injection as well as its spatial distribution inside ARs.

Park, Sung-hong; Wang Haimin [Space Weather Research Laboratory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, 101 Tiernan Hall, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Chae, Jongchul, E-mail: sp295@njit.ed [Astronomy Program and FPRD, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

212

Regional Sources of Nitrous Oxide over the United States: Seasonal Variation and Spatial Distribution  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents top-down constraints on the magnitude, spatial distribution, and seasonality of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions over the central United States. We analyze data from tall towers in 2004 and 2008 using a high resolution Lagrangian particle dispersion model paired with both geostatistical and Bayesian inversions. Our results indicate peak N{sub 2}O emissions in June with a strong seasonal cycle. The spatial distribution of sources closely mirrors data on fertilizer application with particularly large N{sub 2}O sources over the US Cornbelt. Existing inventories for N{sub 2}O predict emissions that differ substantially from the inverse model results in both seasonal cycle and magnitude. We estimate a total annual N{sub 2}O budget over the central US of 0.9-1.2 TgN/yr and an extrapolated budget for the entire US and Canada of 2.1-2.6 TgN/yr. By this estimate, the US and Canada account for 12-15% of the total global N{sub 2}O source or 32-39% of the global anthropogenic source as reported by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in 2007.

Miller, S. M.; Kort, E. A.; Hirsch, A. I.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Andrews, A. E.; Xu, X.; Tian, H.; Nehrkorn, T.; Eluszkiewicz, J.; Michalak, A. M.; Wofsy, S. C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Report to the Department of Energy on the DOE/EPSCoR planning activities for the state of South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

An extensive review of the current status of energy-related research and educational activities within the state of South Dakota was carried out. Information exchange meetings were conducted at the major research institutions as well as with many representatives of state government. Visits were also made to professional educators who are deeply involved with the state`s principal minority group, the American Indian. Several activities in the human resource development area that will be carried out in the five-year implementation project were identified. Many of these will be closely coordinated with other efforts currently in progress under the auspices of the NSF SSI (Statewide Systemic Initiatives in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education) office. The authors will also work closely with AWU and other regional consortia to foster a higher level of participation in existing DOE programs and to develop adaptations and {open_quotes}follow-ons{close_quotes} that are tailored to the specific needs of South Dakota. Many of these programs will involve extensive interaction with DOE laboratories. Special programs will be carried out that are designed to keep a larger number of the Native American population in the science and engineering pipeline. An assessment of the research strengths of this state was made. With the assistance of external consultants, the authors identified two principal areas in which they have the potential to develop nationally competitive research programs that fall within DOE objectives. One is a comprehensive biomass systems study, and the other a water quality study as it relates to energy production.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid Electricity Advisory Committee Energy Storage Technologies Subcommittee Members Ralph Masiello, Subcommittee Chair Senior Vice President, Transmission KEMA Honorable Lauren Azar Commissioner Wisconsin Public Utilities Commission Frederick Butler President & Chief Executive Officer Butler Advisory Services Richard Cowart Principal Regulatory Assistance Project and Chair, Electricity Advisory Committee Roger Duncan General Manager (Ret.) Austin Energy Robert Gramlich Senior Vice President, Public Policy American Wind Energy Association Brad Roberts Chairman Electricity Storage Association Honorable Tom Sloan Representative Kansas House of Representatives Wanda Reder Vice President

215

Hydroclimate of the Western United States Based on Observations and Regional Climate Simulation of 1981–2000. Part I: Seasonal Statistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The regional climate of the western United States shows clear footprints of interaction between atmospheric circulation and orography. The unique features of this diverse climate regime challenges climate modeling. This paper provides detailed ...

L. Ruby Leung; Yun Qian; Xindi Bian

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Changes in 20th century extreme temperature and precipitation over the western United States based on observations and regional climate model simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trends in extreme temperature and precipitation in two regional climate model simulations forced by two global climate models are compared with observed trends over the western United States. The observed temperature extremes show substantial and ...

Valérie Dulière; Yongxin Zhang; Eric P. Salathé Jr.

217

Regional Maps  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

United States Census Divisions Figure 2.Electricity Market Module (EMM)Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting Figure...

218

NON-THERMAL RESPONSE OF THE CORONA TO THE MAGNETIC FLUX DISPERSAL IN THE PHOTOSPHERE OF A DECAYING ACTIVE REGION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyzed Solar Dynamics Observatory line-of-sight magnetograms for a decaying NOAA active region (AR) 11451 along with co-temporal Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) data from the Hinode spacecraft. The photosphere was studied via time variations of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity coefficient, {eta}(t), and the magnetic power spectrum index, {alpha}, through analysis of magnetogram data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). These measure the intensity of the random motions of magnetic elements and the state of turbulence of the magnetic field, respectively. The time changes of the non-thermal energy release in the corona was explored via histogram analysis of the non-thermal velocity, v {sub nt}, in order to highlight the largest values at each time, which may indicate an increase in energy release in the corona. We used the 10% upper range of the histogram of v {sub nt} (which we called V {sup upp} {sub nt}) of the coronal spectral line of Fe XII 195 A. A 2 day time interval was analyzed from HMI data, along with the EIS data for the same field of view. Our main findings are the following. (1) The magnetic turbulent diffusion coefficient, {eta}(t), precedes the upper range of the v {sub nt} with the time lag of approximately 2 hr and the cross-correlation coefficient of 0.76. (2) The power-law index, {alpha}, of the magnetic power spectrum precedes V {sup upp} {sub nt} with a time lag of approximately 3 hr and the cross-correlation coefficient of 0.5. The data show that the magnetic flux dispersal in the photosphere is relevant to non-thermal energy release dynamics in the above corona. The results are consistent with the nanoflare mechanism of the coronal heating, due to the time lags being consistent with the process of heating and cooling the loops heated by nanoflares.

Harra, L. K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Abramenko, V. I. [Big Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 N. Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

219

SIMULATION FRAMEWORK FOR REGIONAL GEOLOGIC CO{sub 2} STORAGE ALONG ARCHES PROVINCE OF MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents final technical results for the project Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of the Midwest United States. The Arches Simulation project was a three year effort designed to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage infrastructure along the Arches Province through development of a geologic model and advanced reservoir simulations of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage. The project included five major technical tasks: (1) compilation of geologic, hydraulic and injection data on Mount Simon, (2) development of model framework and parameters, (3) preliminary variable density flow simulations, (4) multi-phase model runs of regional storage scenarios, and (5) implications for regional storage feasibility. The Arches Province is an informal region in northeastern Indiana, northern Kentucky, western Ohio, and southern Michigan where sedimentary rock formations form broad arch and platform structures. In the province, the Mount Simon sandstone is an appealing deep saline formation for CO{sub 2} storage because of the intersection of reservoir thickness and permeability. Many CO{sub 2} sources are located in proximity to the Arches Province, and the area is adjacent to coal fired power plants along the Ohio River Valley corridor. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, and geotechnical tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. Hydraulic parameters and historical operational information was also compiled from Mount Simon wastewater injection wells in the region. This information was integrated into a geocellular model that depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mount Simon injection wells. The geocellular model was used to develop a series of numerical simulations designed to support CO2 storage applications in the Arches Province. Variable density fluid flow simulations were initially run to evaluate model sensitivity to input parameters. Two dimensional, multiple-phase simulations were completed to evaluate issues related to arranging injection fields in the study area. A basin-scale, multiple-phase model was developed to evaluate large scale injection effects across the region. Finally, local scale simulations were also completed with more detailed depiction of the Eau Claire formation to investigate to the potential for upward migration of CO2. Overall, the technical work on the project concluded that injection large-scale injection may be achieved with proper field design, operation, siting, and monitoring. Records from Mount Simon injection wells were compiled, documenting more than 20 billion gallons of injection into the Mount Simon formation in the Arches Province over the past 40 years, equivalent to approximately 60 million metric tons CO2. The multi-state team effort was useful in delineating the geographic variability in the Mount Simon reservoir properties. Simulations better defined potential well fields, well field arrangement, CO2 pipeline distribution system, and operational parameters for large-scale injection in the Arches Province. Multiphase scoping level simulations suggest that injection fields with arrays of 9 to 50+ wells may be used to accommodate large injection volumes. Individual wells may need to be separated by 3 to 10 km. Injection fields may require spacing of 25 to 40 km to limit pressure and saturation front interference. Basin-scale multiple-phase simulations in STOMP reflect variability in the Mount Simon. While simulations suggest a total injection rate of 100 million metric tons per year (approximately to a 40% reduction of CO2 emissions from large point sources across the Arches Province) may be feasible,

Sminchak, Joel

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

220

SIMULATION FRAMEWORK FOR REGIONAL GEOLOGIC CO{sub 2} STORAGE ALONG ARCHES PROVINCE OF MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents final technical results for the project Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of the Midwest United States. The Arches Simulation project was a three year effort designed to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage infrastructure along the Arches Province through development of a geologic model and advanced reservoir simulations of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage. The project included five major technical tasks: (1) compilation of geologic, hydraulic and injection data on Mount Simon, (2) development of model framework and parameters, (3) preliminary variable density flow simulations, (4) multi-phase model runs of regional storage scenarios, and (5) implications for regional storage feasibility. The Arches Province is an informal region in northeastern Indiana, northern Kentucky, western Ohio, and southern Michigan where sedimentary rock formations form broad arch and platform structures. In the province, the Mount Simon sandstone is an appealing deep saline formation for CO{sub 2} storage because of the intersection of reservoir thickness and permeability. Many CO{sub 2} sources are located in proximity to the Arches Province, and the area is adjacent to coal fired power plants along the Ohio River Valley corridor. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, and geotechnical tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. Hydraulic parameters and historical operational information was also compiled from Mount Simon wastewater injection wells in the region. This information was integrated into a geocellular model that depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mount Simon injection wells. The geocellular model was used to develop a series of numerical simulations designed to support CO{sub 2} storage applications in the Arches Province. Variable density fluid flow simulations were initially run to evaluate model sensitivity to input parameters. Two dimensional, multiple-phase simulations were completed to evaluate issues related to arranging injection fields in the study area. A basin-scale, multiple-phase model was developed to evaluate large scale injection effects across the region. Finally, local scale simulations were also completed with more detailed depiction of the Eau Claire formation to investigate to the potential for upward migration of CO{sub 2}. Overall, the technical work on the project concluded that injection large-scale injection may be achieved with proper field design, operation, siting, and monitoring. Records from Mount Simon injection wells were compiled, documenting more than 20 billion gallons of injection into the Mount Simon formation in the Arches Province over the past 40 years, equivalent to approximately 60 million metric tons CO2. The multi-state team effort was useful in delineating the geographic variability in the Mount Simon reservoir properties. Simulations better defined potential well fields, well field arrangement, CO{sub 2} pipeline distribution system, and operational parameters for large-scale injection in the Arches Province. Multiphase scoping level simulations suggest that injection fields with arrays of 9 to 50+ wells may be used to accommodate large injection volumes. Individual wells may need to be separated by 3 to 10 km. Injection fields may require spacing of 25 to 40 km to limit pressure and saturation front interference. Basin-scale multiple-phase simulations in STOMP reflect variability in the Mount Simon. While simulations suggest a total injection rate of 100 million metric tons per year (approximately to a 40% reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions from large point sources across the Arches Pr

Sminchak, Joel

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional activities state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Global and regional aspects of tropical cyclone activity in the CMIP5 models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropical cyclone (TC) activity is analyzed in 14 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) models. The global TC activity in the historical runs is compared with observations. The simulation of TC activity in the CMIP5 models is not as ...

Suzana J. Camargo

222

Transcription Factors Bind Thousands of Active and InactiveRegions in the Drosophila Blastoderm  

SciTech Connect

Identifying the genomic regions bound by sequence-specific regulatory factors is central both to deciphering the complex DNA cis-regulatory code that controls transcription in metazoans and to determining the range of genes that shape animal morphogenesis. Here, we use whole-genome tiling arrays to map sequences bound in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by the six maternal and gap transcription factors that initiate anterior-posterior patterning. We find that these sequence-specific DNA binding proteins bind with quantitatively different specificities to highly overlapping sets of several thousand genomic regions in blastoderm embryos. Specific high- and moderate-affinity in vitro recognition sequences for each factor are enriched in bound regions. This enrichment, however, is not sufficient to explain the pattern of binding in vivo and varies in a context-dependent manner, demonstrating that higher-order rules must govern targeting of transcription factors. The more highly bound regions include all of the over forty well-characterized enhancers known to respond to these factors as well as several hundred putative new cis-regulatory modules clustered near developmental regulators and other genes with patterned expression at this stage of embryogenesis. The new targets include most of the microRNAs (miRNAs) transcribed in the blastoderm, as well as all major zygotically transcribed dorsal-ventral patterning genes, whose expression we show to be quantitatively modulated by anterior-posterior factors. In addition to these highly bound regions, there are several thousand regions that are reproducibly bound at lower levels. However, these poorly bound regions are, collectively, far more distant from genes transcribed in the blastoderm than highly bound regions; are preferentially found in protein-coding sequences; and are less conserved than highly bound regions. Together these observations suggest that many of these poorly-bound regions are not involved in early-embryonic transcriptional regulation, and a significant proportion may be nonfunctional. Surprisingly, for five of the six factors, their recognition sites are not unambiguously more constrained evolutionarily than the immediate flanking DNA, even in more highly bound and presumably functional regions, indicating that comparative DNA sequence analysis is limited in its ability to identify functional transcription factor targets.

Li, Xiao-Yong; MacArthur, Stewart; Bourgon, Richard; Nix, David; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, Venky N.; Hechmer, Aaron; Simirenko, Lisa; Stapleton, Mark; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.; Chu, Hou Cheng; Ogawa, Nobuo; Inwood, William; Sementchenko, Victor; Beaton, Amy; Weiszmann, Richard; Celniker, Susan E.; Knowles, David W.; Gingeras, Tom; Speed, Terence P.; Eisen, Michael B.; Biggin, Mark D.

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

223

Moisture Flux Convergence in Regional and Global Climate Models: Implications for Droughts in the Southwestern United States Under Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

The water cycle of the southwestern United States (SW) is dominated by winter storms that maintain a positive annual net precipitation. Analysis of the control and future climate from four pairs of regional and global climate models (RCMs and GCMs) shows that the RCMs simulate a higher fraction of transient eddy moisture fluxes because the hydrodynamic instabilities associated with flow over complex terrain are better resolved. Under global warming, this enables the RCMs to capture the response of transient eddies to increased atmospheric stability that allows more moisture to converge on the windward side of the mountains by blocking. As a result, RCMs simulate enhanced transient eddy moisture convergence in the SW compared to GCMs, although both robustly simulate drying due to enhanced moisture divergence by the divergent mean flow in a warmer climate. This enhanced convergence leads to reduced susceptibility to hydrological change in the RCMs compared to GCMs.

Gao, Yanhong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Salathe, E.; Dominguez, Francina; Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, D. P.

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

224

Determinants of residential electrical appliance usage in the Tri-State Region, 1960-1970: a regression study. Working paper  

SciTech Connect

The possible impact of areawide residential location policy on future residential electricity usage in the Tri-State Metropolitan Region centering on New York City is investigated. This study was undertaken to assess residential electricity usage, particularly electrical appliance use, in the residential sector of the New York Metropolitan area from 1960 to 1970. The attempts to choose and quantify the contribution of various determinants of electrical appliance usage using multiple regression analyses has been relatively successful. In addition, these results were compared with 1960 and 1970 data in an effort to establish a degree of consistency over time. The implications of the findings here point toward two complementary institutions for change: urban planning and public administration. The relationship between single family structures and high energy usage argue strongly for more dense communities, while price elasticities can be used by regulators to control electrical usage.

Stone, B.

1974-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM SEPTEMBER 29 OCTOBER 12, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM SEPTEMBER 29 ­ OCTOBER 12 (greater than 130 percent of climatology.) These new two-week forecasts have replaced the monthly forecasts. Gray2 This forecast as well as past forecasts and verifications are available online at http://hurricane.atmos.colostate.edu/Forecasts

Gray, William

226

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM SEPTEMBER 1 SEPTEMBER 14, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM SEPTEMBER 1 ­ SEPTEMBER 14 percent of) climatology. These new two-week forecasts have replaced the monthly forecasts that we have This forecast as well as past forecasts and verifications are available online at http://hurricane.atmos.colostate.edu/Forecasts

Gray, William

227

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM AUGUST 3 AUGUST 16, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM AUGUST 3 ­ AUGUST 16, 2012 relative to climatology. (as of 3 August 2012) By Philip J. Klotzbach1 and William M. Gray2 This forecast as well as past forecasts and verifications are available online at http://hurricane.atmos.colostate.edu/Forecasts

Gray, William

228

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM SEPTEMBER 15 SEPTEMBER 28, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM SEPTEMBER 15 ­ SEPTEMBER 28 (greater than 130 percent of climatology.) These new two-week forecasts have replaced the monthly forecasts. Gray2 This forecast as well as past forecasts and verifications are available online at http://hurricane.atmos.colostate.edu/Forecasts

Gray, William

229

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM OCTOBER 13 OCTOBER 26, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY FORECAST OF ATLANTIC HURRICANE ACTIVITY FROM OCTOBER 13 ­ OCTOBER 26 percent of climatology.) These new two-week forecasts have replaced the monthly forecasts that we have This forecast as well as past forecasts and verifications are available online at http://hurricane.atmos.colostate.edu/Forecasts

Gray, William

230

Summary of geothermal exploration activity in the State of Washington from 1978 to 1983. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project activity is summarized with references to the publications produced. Project findings are reported as they relate to specific geothermal resource target areas. Some major projects of the goethermal exploration program are: thermal and mineral spring chemistry, heat flow drilling, temperature gradient measurements, Cascade Range regional gravity, geohydrology study of the Yakima area, low temperature geothermal resources, geology, geochemistry of Cascade Mountains volcanic rocks, and soil mercury studies. (MHR)

Korosec, M.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Biodiesel Producers and Production Capacity by State, September 2013 Biodiesel Producers and Production Capacity by State, September 2013 State Number of Producers Annual Production Capacity (million gallons per year) Alabama 3 47 Alaska - - Arizona 1 2 Arkansas 3 85 California

232

STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN THE GALACTIC H II REGION Sh2-297  

SciTech Connect

We present a multiwavelength study of the Galactic H II region Sh2-297, located in the Canis Major OB1 complex. Optical spectroscopic observations are used to constrain the spectral type of ionizing star HD 53623 as B0V. The classical nature of this H II region is affirmed by the low values of electron density and emission measure, which are calculated to be 756 cm{sup -3} and 9.15 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} cm{sup -6} pc using the radio continuum observations at 610 and 1280 MHz, and Very Large Array archival data at 1420 MHz. To understand local star formation, we identified the young stellar object (YSO) candidates in a region of area {approx}7.'5 Multiplication-Sign 7.'5 centered on Sh2-297 using grism slitless spectroscopy (to identify the H{alpha} emission line stars), and near infrared (NIR) observations. NIR YSO candidates are further classified into various evolutionary stages using color-color and color-magnitude (CM) diagrams, giving 50 red sources (H - K > 0.6) and 26 Class II-like sources. The mass and age range of the YSOs are estimated to be {approx}0.1-2 M {sub Sun} and 0.5-2 Myr using optical (V/V-I) and NIR (J/J-H) CM diagrams. The mean age of the YSOs is found to be {approx}1 Myr, which is of the order of dynamical age of 1.07 Myr of the H II region. Using the estimated range of visual extinction (1.1-25 mag) from literature and NIR data for the region, spectral energy distribution models have been implemented for selected YSOs which show masses and ages to be consistent with estimated values. The spatial distribution of YSOs shows an evolutionary sequence, suggesting triggered star formation in the region. The star formation seems to have propagated from the ionizing star toward the cold dark cloud LDN1657A located west of Sh2-297.

Mallick, K. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Dewangan, L. K. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai (Bombay) 400005 (India); Samal, M. R. [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille (UMR 6110 CNRS and Universite de Provence), 38 rue F. Joliot-Curie, F-13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Pandey, A. K. [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences, Manora Peak, Nainital 263129 (India); Bhatt, B. C. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560034 (India); Ghosh, S. K. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune 411007 (India); Tamura, M., E-mail: kshitiz@tifr.res.in [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

state  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST. state. (definition). Definition: The condition of a finite state machine or Turing machine at a certain time. Informally, the content of memory. ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

234

WATER AND METHANOL MASER ACTIVITIES IN THE NGC 2024 FIR 6 REGION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NGC 2024 FIR 6 region was observed in the water maser line at 22 GHz and the methanol class I maser lines at 44, 95, and 133 GHz. The water maser spectra displayed several velocity components and month-scale time variabilities. Most of the velocity components may be associated with FIR 6n, while one component was associated with FIR 4. A typical lifetime of the water maser velocity components is about eight months. The components showed velocity fluctuations with a typical drift rate of about 0.01 km s{sup -1} day{sup -1}. The methanol class I masers were detected toward FIR 6. The methanol emission is confined within a narrow range around the systemic velocity of the FIR 6 cloud core. The methanol masers suggest the existence of shocks driven by either the expanding H II region of FIR 6c or the outflow of FIR 6n.

Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju; Byun, Do-Young [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Eun, E-mail: minho@kasi.re.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

235

Magnetic Energy and Helicity Budgets in the Active-Region Solar Corona. I. Linear Force-Free Approximation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We self-consistently derive the magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity budgets of a three-dimensional linear force-free magnetic structure rooted in a lower boundary plane. For the potential magnetic energy we derive a general expression that gives results practically equivalent to those of the magnetic Virial theorem. All magnetic energy and helicity budgets are formulated in terms of surface integrals applied to the lower boundary, thus avoiding computationally intensive three-dimensional magnetic field extrapolations. We analytically and numerically connect our derivations with classical expressions for the magnetic energy and helicity, thus presenting a so-far lacking unified treatment of the energy/helicity budgets in the constant-alpha approximation. Applying our derivations to photospheric vector magnetograms of an eruptive and a noneruptive solar active regions, we find that the most profound quantitative difference between these regions lies in the estimated free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity budgets. If this result is verified with a large number of active regions, it will advance our understanding of solar eruptive phenomena. We also find that the constant-alpha approximation gives rise to large uncertainties in the calculation of the free magnetic energy and the relative magnetic helicity. Therefore, care must be exercised when this approximation is applied to photospheric magnetic field observations. Despite its shortcomings, the constant-alpha approximation is adopted here because this study will form the basis of a comprehensive nonlinear force-free description of the energetics and helicity in the active-region solar corona, which is our ultimate objective.

M. K. Georgoulis; Barry J. LaBonte

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

236

Magnetic Energy and Helicity Budgets in the Active-Region Solar Corona. I. Linear Force-Free Approximation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We self-consistently derive the magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity budgets of a three-dimensional linear force-free magnetic structure rooted in a lower boundary plane. For the potential magnetic energy we derive a general expression that gives results practically equivalent to those of the magnetic Virial theorem. All magnetic energy and helicity budgets are formulated in terms of surface integrals applied to the lower boundary, thus avoiding computationally intensive three-dimensional magnetic field extrapolations. We analytically and numerically connect our derivations with classical expressions for the magnetic energy and helicity, thus presenting a so-far lacking unified treatment of the energy/helicity budgets in the constant-alpha approximation. Applying our derivations to photospheric vector magnetograms of an eruptive and a noneruptive solar active regions, we find that the most profound quantitative difference between these regions lies in the estimated free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity budgets. If this result is verified with a large number of active regions, it will advance our understanding of solar eruptive phenomena. We also find that the constant-alpha approximation gives rise to large uncertainties in the calculation of the free magnetic energy and the relative magnetic helicity. Therefore, care must be exercised when this approximation is applied to photospheric magnetic field observations. Despite its shortcomings, the constant-alpha approximation is adopted here because this study will form the basis of a comprehensive nonlinear force-free description of the energetics and helicity in the active-region solar corona, which is our ultimate objective.

Manolis K. Georgoulis; Barry J. Labonte

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State NIST. Weights and Measures. Laboratories. Program Handbook. NIST Handbook 143. March 2003. Preface. The National ...

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

MAGNETIC NON-POTENTIALITY OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS AND PEAK X-RAY FLUX OF THE ASSOCIATED FLARES  

SciTech Connect

Predicting the severity of solar eruptive phenomena such as flares and coronal mass ejections remains a great challenge despite concerted efforts to do so over the past several decades. However, the advent of high-quality vector magnetograms obtained from Hinode (SOT/SP) has increased the possibility of meeting this challenge. In particular, the spatially averaged signed shear angle (SASSA) seems to be a unique parameter for quantifying the non-potentiality of active regions. We demonstrate the usefulness of the SASSA for predicting flare severity. For this purpose, we present case studies of the evolution of magnetic non-potentiality using 115 vector magnetograms of four active regions, namely, ARs NOAA 10930, 10960, 10961, and 10963 during 2006 December 8-15, 2007 June 3-10, 2007 June 28-July 5, and 2007 July 10-17, respectively. The NOAA ARs 10930 and 10960 were very active and produced X and M class flares, respectively, along with many smaller X-ray flares. On the other hand, the NOAA ARs 10961 and 10963 were relatively less active and produced only very small (mostly A- and B-class) flares. For this study, we have used a large number of high-resolution vector magnetograms obtained from Hinode (SOT/SP). Our analysis shows that the peak X-ray flux of the most intense solar flare emanating from the active regions depends on the magnitude of the SASSA at the time of the flare. This finding of the existence of a lower limit of the SASSA for a given class of X-ray flares will be very useful for space weather forecasting. We have also studied another non-potentiality parameter called the mean weighted shear angle (MWSA) of the vector magnetograms along with the SASSA. We find that the MWSA does not show such distinction as the SASSA for upper limits of the GOES X-ray flux of solar flares; however, both the quantities show similar trends during the evolution of all active regions studied.

Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Gosain, Sanjay, E-mail: pvk@prl.res.i, E-mail: sgosain@prl.res.i [Udaipur Solar Observatory, Physical Research Laboratory, Dewali, Bari Road, Udaipur 313 001 (India)

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

239

Technology and the Competitive Advantage of Regions: A Study of the Biotechnology Industry in the New York State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1987- 88. 14th ed. , Albany: New York State Division of thefrom ES-202 Series. Albany, New York: New York StateAnnual Report 1987- 88. Albany: New York State Health

Willoughby, Kelvin W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

State Agencies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agencies Beatrice State Developmental Center, Nebraska Black Hills State University, SD, South Dakota Fergus Falls State Hospital, Minnesota Hastings Regional Center, Nebraska...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional activities state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A Synoptic Analysis of the Interannual Variability of Winter Cyclone Activity in the Aleutian Low Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of cyclone activity in winter associated with years of strong and weak Aleutian low in the North Pacific is presented. From 1958 to 2004, 10 winters with a strong Aleutian low are defined as the strong years, while 8 winters with a ...

Xiaojie Zhu; Jilin Sun; Zhengyu Liu; Qinyu Liu; Jonathan E. Martin

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

The Steady-State Barotropic Response of the Gulf of Maine and Adjacent Regions to Surface Wind Stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of the Gulf of Maine region to steady, spatially uniform wind stress is examined using a linearized numerical model, with the influence of the strong tidal currents in the region included in the bottom stress formulation. The ...

Daniel G. Wright; David A. Greenberg; John W. Loder; Peter C. Smith

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

States fund an expanded range of activities under low-income home energy assistance block grant  

SciTech Connect

The low-income home energy assistance (LIHEA) block grant expanded states' flexibility and authority and permitted funds to be used for a broader range of activities not previously permitted. Unlike other block grants created under the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1981, LIHEA received increased appropriations over the level established for the prior program to assist eligible households in meeting the costs of home energy. While heating assistance continued to account for the bulk of expenditures in most states, the majority of the 13 states GAO visited used their new authority to provide weatherization, transfer energy assistance funds to other block grants, and carry over funds to the following year. In addition, states gave increased emphasis to energy crisis assistance. Few changes were made to program management procedures. Overall, state executive and legislative branch officials found the block grant less burdensome and more desirable than the prior program. However, about half the interest groups viewed the block grant as a less desirable method of funding energy assistance programs.

Not Available

1984-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

244

Impact of solar activity on climate changes in Athens region, Greece  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The scope of this work is to study the role that the solar weather plays in terrestrial weather. For this reason we study the effect of the solar activity on the climate changes in Greece. In the current work we look for possible correlation between the solar activity data spanning the years from 1975 to 2000 and the meteorological data from two weather stations based inside the city of Athens, Greece (New Philadelphia) and in greater Athens in the north of Attica (Tatoi area). We examine the annual variations of the average values of six meteorological parameters: temperature, atmospheric pressure, direction and intensity of wind, rainfall and relative air humidity. The solar data include decade variations, within the above period, of the solar irradiance, mean sunspot number between two solar cycles, magnetic cycle influence, and solar UV driving of climate (radio flux).

Gizani, Nectaria A B; Vatikiotis, Leonidas; Zervas, Efthimios

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The coronal source of extreme-ultraviolet line profile asymmetries in solar active region outflows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High resolution spectra from the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) have revealed that coronal spectral line profiles are sometimes asymmetric, with a faint enhancement in the blue wing on the order of 100 km/s. These asymmetries could be important since they may be subtle, yet diagnostically useful signatures of coronal heating or solar wind acceleration processes. It has also been suggested that they are signatures of chromospheric jets supplying mass and energy to the corona. Until now, however, there have been no studies of the physical properties of the plasma producing the asymmetries. Here we identify regions of asymmetric profiles in the outflows of AR 10978 using an asymmetric Gaussian function and extract the intensities of the faint component using multiple Gaussian fits. We then derive the temperature structure and chemical composition of the plasma producing the asymmetries. We find that the asymmetries are dependent on temperature, and are clearer and stronger in coronal lines. The temperatur...

Brooks, David H

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Leveraging Regional Exploration to Develop Geologic Framework for CO2 Storage in Deep Formations in Midwestern United States  

SciTech Connect

Obtaining subsurface data for developing a regional framework for geologic storage of CO{sub 2} can require drilling and characterization in a large number of deep wells, especially in areas with limited pre-existing data. One approach for achieving this objective, without the prohibitive costs of drilling costly standalone test wells, is to collaborate with the oil and gas drilling efforts in a piggyback approach that can provide substantial cost savings and help fill data gaps in areas that may not otherwise get characterized. This leveraging with oil/gas drilling also mitigates some of the risk involved in standalone wells. This collaborative approach has been used for characterizing in a number of locations in the midwestern USA between 2005 and 2009 with funding from U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE award: DE-FC26-05NT42434) and in-kind contributions from a number of oil and gas operators. The results are presented in this final technical report. In addition to data collected under current award, selected data from related projects such as the Midwestern Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} storage project at and near the Mountaineer Plant, and the drilling of the Ohio Stratigraphic well in Eastern Ohio are discussed and used in the report. Data from this effort are also being incorporated into the MRCSP geologic mapping. The project activities were organized into tracking and evaluation of characterization opportunities; participation in the incremental drilling, basic and advanced logging in selected wells; and data analysis and reporting. Although a large number of opportunities were identified and evaluated, only a small subset was carried into the field stage. Typical selection factors included reaching an acceptable agreement with the operator, drilling and logging risks, and extent of pre-existing data near the candidate wells. The region of study is primarily along the Ohio River Valley corridor in the Appalachian Basin, which underlies large concentrations of CO{sub 2} emission sources. In addition, some wells in the Michigan basin are included. Assessment of the geologic and petrophysical properties of zones of interest has been conducted. Although a large number of formations have been evaluated across the geologic column, the primary focus has been on evaluating the Cambrian sandstones (Mt. Simon, Rose Run, Kerbel) and carbonates layers (Knox Dolomite) as well as on the Silurian-Devonian carbonates (Bass Island, Salina) and sandstones (Clinton, Oriskany, Berea). Factors controlling the development of porosity and permeability, such as the depositional setting have been explored. In northern Michigan the Bass Islands Dolomite appears to have favorable reservoir development. In west central Michigan the St. Peter sandstone exhibits excellent porosity in the Hart and Feuring well and looks promising. In Southeastern Kentucky in the Appalachian Basin, the Batten and Baird well provided valuable data on sequestration potential in organic shales through adsorption. In central and eastern Ohio and western West Virginia, the majority of the wells provided an insight to the complex geologic framework of the relatively little known Precambrian through Silurian potential injection targets. Although valuable data was acquired and a number of critical data gaps were filled through this effort, there are still many challenges ahead and questions that need answered. The lateral extent to which favorable potential injection conditions exist in most reservoirs is still generally uncertain. The prolongation of the characterization of regional geologic framework through partnership would continue to build confidence and greatly benefit the overall CO{sub 2} sequestration effort.

Neeraj Gupta

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

247

A CRITICAL ASSESSMENT OF NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD MODELING OF THE SOLAR CORONA FOR ACTIVE REGION 10953  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) models are thought to be viable tools for investigating the structure, dynamics, and evolution of the coronae of solar active regions. In a series of NLFFF modeling studies, we have found that NLFFF models are successful in application to analytic test cases, and relatively successful when applied to numerically constructed Sun-like test cases, but they are less successful in application to real solar data. Different NLFFF models have been found to have markedly different field line configurations and to provide widely varying estimates of the magnetic free energy in the coronal volume, when applied to solar data. NLFFF models require consistent, force-free vector magnetic boundary data. However, vector magnetogram observations sampling the photosphere, which is dynamic and contains significant Lorentz and buoyancy forces, do not satisfy this requirement, thus creating several major problems for force-free coronal modeling efforts. In this paper, we discuss NLFFF modeling of NOAA Active Region 10953 using Hinode/SOT-SP, Hinode/XRT, STEREO/SECCHI-EUVI, and SOHO/MDI observations, and in the process illustrate three such issues we judge to be critical to the success of NLFFF modeling: (1) vector magnetic field data covering larger areas are needed so that more electric currents associated with the full active regions of interest are measured, (2) the modeling algorithms need a way to accommodate the various uncertainties in the boundary data, and (3) a more realistic physical model is needed to approximate the photosphere-to-corona interface in order to better transform the forced photospheric magnetograms into adequate approximations of nearly force-free fields at the base of the corona. We make recommendations for future modeling efforts to overcome these as yet unsolved problems.

DeRosa, Marc L.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Cheung, Mark C. M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover St. B/252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Barnes, Graham; Leka, K. D. [North West Research Associates, Colorado Research Associates Division, 3380 Mitchell Ln., Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Lites, Bruce W. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research , P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Amari, Tahar; Canou, Aurelien [CNRS, Centre de Physique Theorique de l'Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); McTiernan, James M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Regnier, Stephane [Mathematics Institute, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Thalmann, Julia K.; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd; Tadesse, Tilaye [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Strasse 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Valori, Gherardo [Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, 14482 Potsdam (Germany); Wheatland, Michael S. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Conlon, Paul A. [Astrophysics Research Group, School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Fuhrmann, Marcel [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Potsdam, Am Neuen Palais 10, 14469 Potsdam (Germany)

2009-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

248

Terahertz quantum cascade lasers with thin resonant-phonon depopulation active regions and surface-plasmon waveguides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report three-well, resonant-phonon depopulation terahertz quantum cascade lasers with semi-insulating surface-plasmon waveguides and reduced active region (AR) thicknesses. Devices with thicknesses of 10, 7.5, 6, and 5 {\\mu}m are compared in terms of threshold current density, maximum operating temperature, output power and AR temperature. Thinner ARs are technologically less demanding for epitaxial growth and result in reduced electrical heating of devices. However, it is found that 7.5-{\\mu}m-thick devices give the lowest electrical power densities at threshold, as they represent the optimal trade-off between low electrical resistance and low threshold gain.

M. Salih; P. Dean; A. Valavanis; S. P. Khanna; L. H. Li; J. E. Cunningham; A. G. Davies; E. H. Linfield

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

249

Terahertz quantum cascade lasers with thin resonant-phonon depopulation active regions and surface-plasmon waveguides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report three-well, resonant-phonon depopulation terahertz quantum cascade lasers with semi-insulating surface-plasmon waveguides and reduced active region (AR) thicknesses. Devices with thicknesses of 10, 7.5, 6, and 5 {\\mu}m are compared in terms of threshold current density, maximum operating temperature, output power and AR temperature. Thinner ARs are technologically less demanding for epitaxial growth and result in reduced electrical heating of devices. However, it is found that 7.5-{\\mu}m-thick devices give the lowest electrical power densities at threshold, as they represent the optimal trade-off between low electrical resistance and low threshold gain.

Salih, M; Valavanis, A; Khanna, S P; Li, L H; Cunningham, J E; Davies, A G; Linfield, E H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

New Mexico Southwest Regional Geothermal Development Operations Research Project. Appendix 9 of regional operations research program for development of geothermal energy in the Southwest United States. Final technical report, June 1977--August 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes the findings and conclusions of the New Mexico Team during the first project year of the Southwest Regional Geothermal Development Operations Research Project. The purpose of this project is to help realize a goal of the USDOE , Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), to accelerate the actual commercial utilization of geothermal energy. This was done by: (1) identifying the potential for development of geothermal energy in the five-state regions of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada and Utah; and (2) identifying the actions needed to accomplish that development.

Ortiz, Thomas A.; Fedor, Dennis

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

THE CORONAL SOURCE OF EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET LINE PROFILE ASYMMETRIES IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGION OUTFLOWS  

SciTech Connect

High-resolution spectra from the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer have revealed that coronal spectral line profiles are sometimes asymmetric, with a faint enhancement in the blue wing on the order of 100 km s{sup -1}. These asymmetries could be important since they may be subtle yet diagnostically useful signatures of coronal heating or solar wind acceleration processes. It has also been suggested that they are signatures of chromospheric jets supplying mass and energy to the corona. Until now, however, there have been no studies of the physical properties of the plasma producing the asymmetries. Here we identify regions of asymmetric profiles in the outflows of AR 10978 using an asymmetric Gaussian function and extract the intensities of the faint component using multiple Gaussian fits. We then derive the temperature structure and chemical composition of the plasma producing the asymmetries. We find that the asymmetries are dependent on temperature, and are clearer and stronger in coronal lines. The temperature distribution peaks around 1.4-1.8 MK with an emission measure at least an order of magnitude larger than that at 0.6 MK. The first ionization potential bias is found to be 3-5, implying that the high-speed component of the outflows may also contribute to the slow-speed wind. Observations and models indicate that it takes time for plasma to evolve to a coronal composition, suggesting that the material is trapped on closed loops before escaping, perhaps by interchange reconnection. The results, therefore, identify the plasma producing the asymmetries as having a coronal origin.

Brooks, David H. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P., E-mail: dhbrooks@ssd5.nrl.navy.mil [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

252

Examination of the Regional Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity in the United States through 2015: Projecting from 2009 through 2015 (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the balance between the demand and supply of new renewable electricity in the United States on a regional basis through 2015. It expands on a 2007 NREL study that assessed the supply and demand balance on a national basis. As with the earlier study, this analysis relies on estimates of renewable energy supplies compared to demand for renewable energy generation needed to meet existing state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies in 28 states, as well as demand by consumers who voluntarily purchase renewable energy. However, it does not address demand by utilities that may procure cost-effective renewables through an integrated resource planning process or otherwise.

Bird, L.; Hurlbut, D.; Donohoo, P.; Cory, K.; Kreycik, C.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Summer Land–Atmosphere Coupling Strength over the United States: Results from the Regional Climate Model RegCM4–CLM3.5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the land–atmosphere coupling strength during summer over the United States using the Regional Climate Model version 4 (RegCM4)–Community Land Model version 3.5 (CLM3.5). First, a 10-yr simulation driven with reanalysis ...

Rui Mei; Guiling Wang; Huanghe Gu

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Recent Progress in the Joint Agreements on "Global and Regional Climate Change" Studies between the United States and the People's Republic of China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress since 1991 of two agreements on "global and regional climate change" studies between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and two state agencies of the People's Republic of China. The first agreement is the DOE—...

Michael R. Riches; Wei-Chyung Wang; Panqin Chen; Shiyan Tao; Shuguang Zhou; Yihui Ding

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Solar Desalination in the Southwest United States: A Thermoeconomic Analysis Utilizing the Sun to Desalt Water in High Irradiance Regions .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water scarcity and high irradiance overlap in the southwestern United States. This thesis explores solar energy as a method to power desalination in the Southwest.… (more)

Stroud, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Solar desalination in the southwest United States| A thermoeconomic analysis utilizing the sun to desalt water in high irradiance regions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Water scarcity and high irradiance overlap in the southwestern United States. This thesis explores solar energy as a method to power desalination in the… (more)

Stroud, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Statistical Analysis of Precipitation Chemistry Measurements over the Eastern United States. Part I: Seasonal and Regional Patterns and Correlations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the behavior of the chemical constituents in precipitation, including their typical concentrations and ranges, regional patterns, and seasonal changes. Daily precipitation measurements for the period 1978 through 1983 over ...

R. M. Endlich; B. P. Eymon; R. J. Ferek; A. D. Valdes; C. Maxwell

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Performance of NCEP Regional Wave Models in Predicting Peak Sea States during the 2005 North Atlantic Hurricane Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unprecedented numbers of tropical cyclones occurred in the North Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico in 2005. This provides a unique opportunity to evaluate the performance of two operational regional wave forecasting models at the National ...

Yung Y. Chao; Hendrik L. Tolman

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Benefit of Regional Energy Balancing Service on Wind Integration in the Western Interconnection of the United States: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This analysis indicates the extent to which pooled regional dispatch for matching generation to load mitigates the costs and improves associated reliability, particularly in scenarios with high penetration of variable output resources, such as wind

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.; Beuning, S.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Hydrological Processes in Regional Climate Model Simulations of the Central United States Flood of June–July 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirteen regional climate model (RCM) simulations of June–July 1993 were compared with each other and observations. Water vapor conservation and precipitation characteristics in each RCM were examined for a 10° × 10° subregion of the upper ...

Christopher J. Anderson; Raymond W. Arritt; Zaitao Pan; Eugene S. Takle; William J. Gutowski Jr.; Francis O. Otieno; Renato da Silva; Daniel Caya; Jens H. Christensen; Daniel Lüthi; Miguel A. Gaertner; Clemente Gallardo; Filippo Giorgi; René Laprise; Song-You Hong; Colin Jones; H-M. H. Juang; J. J. Katzfey; John L. McGregor; William M. Lapenta; Jay W. Larson; John A. Taylor; Glen E. Liston; Roger A. Pielke Sr.; John O. Roads

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional activities state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

ABRUPT CHANGES OF THE PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELD IN ACTIVE REGIONS AND THE IMPULSIVE PHASE OF SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect

We compared time profiles of changes of the unsigned photospheric magnetic flux in active regions with those of their associated soft X-ray (SXR) bursts for a sample of 75 {>=} M5 flares well observed by Global Oscillation Network Group longitudinal magnetographs. Sixty-six of these events had stepwise changes in the spatially integrated unsigned flux during the SXR flares. In superposed epoch plots for these 66 events, there is a sharp increase in the unsigned magnetic flux coincident with the onset of the flare impulsive phase while the end of the stepwise change corresponds to the time of peak SXR emission. We substantiated this result with a histogram-based comparison of the timing of flux steps (onset, midpoint of step, and end) for representative points in the flaring regions with their associated SXR event time markers (flare onset, onset of impulsive phase, time of peak logarithmic derivative, maximum). On an individual event basis, the principal part of the stepwise magnetic flux change occurred during the main rise phase of the SXR burst (impulsive phase onset to SXR peak) for {approx}60% of the 66 cases. We find a close timing agreement between magnetic flux steps and >100 keV emission for the three largest hard X-ray (>100 keV) bursts in our sample. These results identify the abrupt changes in photospheric magnetic fields as an impulsive phase phenomenon and indicate that the coronal magnetic field changes that drive flares are rapidly transmitted to the photosphere.

Cliver, E. W. [Space Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Petrie, G. J. D. [National Solar Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Ling, A. G. [Atmospheric Environmental Research, Lexington, MA 02421 (United States)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

262

PATTERNS OF NANOFLARE STORM HEATING EXHIBITED BY AN ACTIVE REGION OBSERVED WITH SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY/ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is largely agreed that many coronal loops-those observed at a temperature of about 1 MK-are bundles of unresolved strands that are heated by storms of impulsive nanoflares. The nature of coronal heating in hotter loops and in the very important but largely ignored diffuse component of active regions is much less clear. Are these regions also heated impulsively, or is the heating quasi-steady? The spectacular new data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) telescopes on the Solar Dynamics Observatory offer an excellent opportunity to address this question. We analyze the light curves of coronal loops and the diffuse corona in six different AIA channels and compare them with the predicted light curves from theoretical models. Light curves in the different AIA channels reach their peak intensities with predictable orderings as a function the nanoflare storm properties. We show that while some sets of light curves exhibit clear evidence of cooling after nanoflare storms, other cases are less straightforward to interpret. Complications arise because of line-of-sight integration through many different structures, the broadband nature of the AIA channels, and because physical properties can change substantially depending on the magnitude of the energy release. Nevertheless, the light curves exhibit predictable and understandable patterns consistent with impulsive nanoflare heating.

Viall, Nicholeen M.; Klimchuk, James A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Application for State Land Use Lease: Miscellaneous Easement...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for State Land Use Lease: Miscellaneous EasementROW Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions...

264

Application for State Land Use Lease: Commercial/Multi-Family...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for State Land Use Lease: CommercialMulti-Family Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0)...

265

Assessment of Regional Climate Change and Development of Climate Adaptation Decision Aids in the Southwestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the next 10–50 years, policy makers in the southwestern United States are faced with complex planning and policy issues associated with increasing water and energy demand as a result of warmer temperatures and reduced availability of water, ...

Kremena Darmenova; Duane Apling; Glenn Higgins; Philip Hayes; Heather Kiley

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Regional operations research program for development of geothermal energy in the Southwest United States. Second quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Continuation of efforts by the Core and State Teams in data acquisition, electric and non-electric economic studies, and development of computer support functions and operations is described.

Marlin, J.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Intercomparison of Global Reanalyses and Regional Simulations of Cold Season Water Budgets in the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimating water budgets of river basins in the western United States is a challenge because of the effects of complex terrain and lack of comprehensive observational datasets. This study aims at comparing different estimates of cold season water ...

L. Ruby Leung; Yun Qian; Jongil Han; John O. Roads

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Northeast Regional Biomass Energy Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is entering its ninth year of operation. The management and the objectives have virtually remained unchanged and are stated as follows. The program conducted by NRBP has three basic features: (1) a state grant component that provides funds (with a 50 percent matching requirement) to each of the states in the region to strengthen and integrate the work of state agencies involved in biomass energy; (2) a series of technical reports and studies in areas that have been identified as being of critical importance to the development of biomass energy in the region; and (3) a continuous long range planning component with heavy private sector involvement that helps to identify activities necessary to spur greater development and use of biomass energy in the Northeast.

O'Connell, R.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Northeast Regional Biomass Energy Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is entering its ninth year of operation. The management and the objectives have virtually remained unchanged and are stated as follows. The program conducted by NRBP has three basic features: (1) a state grant component that provides funds (with a 50 percent matching requirement) to each of the states in the region to strengthen and integrate the work of state agencies involved in biomass energy; (2) a series of technical reports and studies in areas that have been identified as being of critical importance to the development of biomass energy in the region; and (3) a continuous long range planning component with heavy private sector involvement that helps to identify activities necessary to spur greater development and use of biomass energy in the Northeast.

O'Connell, R.A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Pausing and activating thread state upon pin assertion by external logic monitoring polling loop exit time condition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for enhancing performance of a computer which includes a computer system including a data storage device. The computer system includes a program stored in the data storage device and steps of the program are executed by a processer. The processor processes instructions from the program. A wait state in the processor waits for receiving specified data. A thread in the processor has a pause state wherein the processor waits for specified data. A pin in the processor initiates a return to an active state from the pause state for the thread. A logic circuit is external to the processor, and the logic circuit is configured to detect a specified condition. The pin initiates a return to the active state of the thread when the specified condition is detected using the logic circuit.

Chen, Dong; Giampapa, Mark; Heidelberger, Philip; Ohmacht, Martin; Satterfield, David L; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Sugavanam, Krishnan

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

271

Oil and gas technology transfer activities and potential in eight major producing states. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1990, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (the Compact) performed a study that identified the structure and deficiencies of the system by which oil and gas producers receive information about the potential of new technologies and communicate their problems and technology needs back to the research community. The conclusions of that work were that major integrated companies have significantly more and better sources of technology information than independent producers. The majors also have significantly better mechanisms for communicating problems to the research and development (R&D) community. As a consequence, the Compact recommended analyzing potential mechanisms to improve technology transfer channels for independents and to accelerate independents acceptance and use of existing and emerging technologies. Building on this work, the Compact, with a grant from the US Department Energy, has reviewed specific technology transfer organizations in each of eight major oil producing states to identify specific R&D and technology transfer organizations, characterize their existing activities, and identify potential future activities that could be performed to enhance technology transfer to oil and gas producers. The profiles were developed based on information received from organizations,follow-up interviews, site visit and conversations, and participation in their sponsored technology transfer activities. The results of this effort are reported in this volume. In addition, the Compact has also developed a framework for the development of evaluation methodologies to determine the effectiveness of technology transfer programs in performing their intended functions and in achieving desired impacts impacts in the producing community. The results of that work are provided in a separate volume.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Nevada Southwest Regional Geothermal Development Operations Research Project. Appendix 8 of regional operations research program for development of geothermal energy in the Southwest United States. Final technical report, June 1977--August 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By the end of the first year of the Southwest Regional Geothermal Project, the Nevada State Team has defined over 300 geothermal sites. Because of the multitude of sites and data, scenarios for this first project-year have been completed for the twenty-six Nevada Geothermal Areas, which include all the specific sites. It is not improbable that fully one-third of the sites will eventually prove to be of high to intermediate temperature (i.e. > 150 C and 90-150 C) resources. Low temperature sites are also prominent, not only in number, but also in their distribution--each of Nevada's 17 counties has several such sites.

Clark, Noel A.; Booth, G. Martin, III; Weber, Dorismae; Helseth, Barbara K.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Disbursement of $65 million to the State of Texas for construction of a Regional Medical Technology Center at the former Superconducting Super Collider Site, Waxahachie, Texas  

SciTech Connect

As part of a settlement agreement between the US DOE and the State of Texas, DOE proposes to transfer $65 million of federal funds to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNLRC) for construction of the Regional Medical Technology Center (RMTC) to be located in Ellis County, Texas. The RMTC would be a state-of-the-art medical facility for proton cancer therapy, operated by the State of Texas in conjunction with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. The RMTC would use the linear accelerator assets of the recently terminated DOE Superconducting Super Collider Project to accelerate protons to high energies for the treatment of cancer patients. The current design provides for treatment areas, examination rooms, support laboratories, diagnostic imaging equipment, and office space as well as the accelerators (linac and synchrotron) and beam steering and shaping components. The potential environmental consequences of the proposed action are expected to be minor.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD MODELING OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION USING SDO/HMI AND SOLIS/VSM DATA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use SDO/HMI and SOLIS/VSM photospheric magnetic field measurements to model the force-free coronal field above a solar active region, assuming magnetic forces dominate. We take measurement uncertainties caused by, e.g., noise and the particular inversion technique, into account. After searching for the optimum modeling parameters for the particular data sets, we compare the resulting nonlinear force-free model fields. We show the degree of agreement of the coronal field reconstructions from the different data sources by comparing the relative free energy content, the vertical distribution of the magnetic pressure, and the vertically integrated current density. Though the longitudinal and transverse magnetic flux measured by the VSM and HMI is clearly different, we find considerable similarities in the modeled fields. This indicates the robustness of the algorithm we use to calculate the nonlinear force-free fields against differences and deficiencies of the photospheric vector maps used as an input. We also depict how much the absolute values of the total force-free, virial, and the free magnetic energy differ and how the orientation of the longitudinal and transverse components of the HMI- and VSM-based model volumes compare to each other.

Thalmann, J. K.; Wiegelmann, T. [Max-Plank-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Pietarila, A. [National Solar Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Sun, X., E-mail: thalmann@mps.mpg.de [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Path integral approach to the photoionization of one active electron atom by a pulsed Fock state: Fluctuations contribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We model in a fully quantum mechanical way the dynamics of an atom of one optically active electron interacting with a pulsed Fock state which is linearly polarized. We use path integral methods. We derive the system's sign solved propagator which gives full information on its dynamics. We apply our method to the ionization of atomic hydrogen by a one-photon pulsed Fock state and study the contribution of the electromagnetic fluctuations.

Thrapsaniotis, E. G. [52 Vianou street, 13671 Athens, Aharnes (Greece)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

State and Local Baldrige Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State, local, and regional Baldrige-based award programs use the ... organizational excellence and competitiveness in their states and regions. ...

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Active region based on graded-gap InGaN/GaN superlattices for high-power 440- to 470-nm light-emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect

The structural and optical properties of light-emitting diode structures with an active region based on ultrathin InGaN quantum wells limited by short-period InGaN/GaN superlattices from both sides have been investigated. The dependences of the external quantum efficiency on the active region design are analyzed. It is shown that the use of InGaN/GaN structures as limiting graded-gap short-period superlattices may significantly increase the quantum efficiency.

Tsatsulnikov, A. F., E-mail: Andrew@beam.ioffe.ru; Lundin, W. V.; Sakharov, A. V.; Zavarin, E. E.; Usov, S. O.; Nikolaev, A. E.; Cherkashin, N. A.; Ber, B. Ya.; Kazantsev, D. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Mizerov, M. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Center for Microelectronics, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation); Park, Hee Seok [Samsung Electro-Mechanics Co. Ltd. (Korea, Republic of); Hytch, M.; Hue, F. [National Center for Scientific Research, Center for Material Elaboration and Structural Studies (France)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

CHARACTERISTICS AND EVOLUTION OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD AND CHROMOSPHERIC EMISSION IN AN ACTIVE REGION CORE OBSERVED BY HINODE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the characteristics and evolution of the magnetic field and chromospheric emission in an active region core observed by the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on Hinode. Consistent with previous studies, we find that the moss is unipolar, the spatial distribution of magnetic flux evolves slowly, and that the magnetic field is only moderately inclined. We also show that the field-line inclination and horizontal component are coherent, and that the magnetic field is mostly sheared in the inter-moss regions where the highest magnetic flux variability is seen. Using extrapolations from spectropolarimeter magnetograms, we show that the magnetic connectivity in the moss is different from that in the quiet Sun because most of the magnetic field extends to significant coronal heights. The magnetic flux, field vector, and chromospheric emission in the moss also appear highly dynamic but actually show only small-scale variations in magnitude on timescales longer than the cooling times for hydrodynamic loops computed from our extrapolations, suggesting high-frequency (continuous) heating events. Some evidence is found for flux (Ca II intensity) changes on the order of 100-200 G (DN) on timescales of 20-30 minutes that could be taken as indicative of low-frequency heating. We find, however, that only a small fraction (10%) of our simulated loops would be expected to cool on these timescales, and we do not find clear evidence that the flux changes consistently produce intensity changes in the chromosphere. Using observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS), we also determine that the filling factor in the moss is {approx}16%, consistent with previous studies and larger than the size of an SOT pixel. The magnetic flux and chromospheric intensity in most individual SOT pixels in the moss vary by less than {approx}20% and {approx}10%, respectively, on loop cooling timescales. In view of the high energy requirements of the chromosphere, we suggest that these variations could be sufficient for the heating of 'warm' EUV loops, but that the high basal levels may be more important for powering the hot core loops rooted in the moss. The magnetic field and chromospheric emission appear to evolve gradually on spatial scales comparable to the cross-field scale of the fundamental coronal structures inferred from EIS measurements.

Brooks, David H.; Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Code 7673, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R., E-mail: dhbrooks@ssd5.nrl.navy.mi [Department of Physics, Alabama A and M, 4900 Meridian Street, Normal, AL 35762 (United States)

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

279

Effects of soot-induced snow albedo change on snowpack and hydrological cycle in western United States based on Weather Research and Forecasting chemistry and regional climate simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative forcing induced by soot on snow is a major anthropogenic forcing affecting the global climate. However, it is uncertain how the soot-induced snow albedo perturbation affects regional snowpack and the hydrological cycle. In this study we simulated the deposition of soot aerosol on snow and investigated the resulting impact on snowpack and the surface water budget in the western United States. A yearlong simulation was performed using the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) to determine an annual budget of soot deposition, followed by two regional climate simulations using WRF in meteorology-only mode, with and without the soot-induced snow albedo perturbations. The chemistry simulation shows large spatial variability in soot deposition that reflects the localized emissions and the influence of the complex terrain. The soot-induced snow albedo perturbations increase the net solar radiation flux at the surface during late winter to early spring, increase the surface air temperature, reduce snow water equivalent amount, and lead to reduced snow accumulation and less spring snowmelt. These effects are stronger over the central Rockies and southern Alberta, where soot deposition and snowpack overlap the most. The indirect forcing of soot accelerates snowmelt and alters stream flows, including a trend toward earlier melt dates in the western United States. The soot-induced albedo reduction initiates a positive feedback process whereby dirty snow absorbs more solar radiation, heating the surface and warming the air. This warming causes reduced snow depth and fraction, which further reduces the regional surface albedo for the snow covered regions. Our simulations indicate that the change of maximum snow albedo induced by soot on snow contributes to 60% of the net albedo reduction over the central Rockies. Snowpack reduction accounts for the additional 40%.

Qian, Yun; Gustafson, William I.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ghan, Steven J.

2009-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

280

Atmospheric Sciences at the Illinois State Water Survey: Five Decades of Diverse Activities and Achievements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During a 50-yr history of diverse scientific endeavors, the Illinois State Water Survey's weather group has constantly shifted to meet new challenges as the nation's only sizable atmospheric research and services group housed in a state agency. ...

Stanley A. Changnon; Floyd A. Huff

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional activities state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Vocalization characteristics of North Atlantic right whale surface active groups in the calving habitat, southeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive acoustic surveys were conducted to assess the vocal behavior of North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) in the designated critical calving habitat along the shallow coastal waters of southeastern United States. Underwater vocalizations were recorded using autonomous buoys deployed in close proximity to surface active groups (SAGs). Nine main vocalization types were identified with manual inspection of spectrograms

Vasilis Trygonis; Edmund Gerstein; Stephen McCulloch

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Benefit of Regional Energy Balancing Service on Wind Integration in the Western Interconnection of the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interest in various wide-area balancing schemes to help integrate wind have generated significant interest. As we have shown in past work, large balancing areas not only help with wind integration, but can also increase the efficiency of operations in systems without wind. Recent work on the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) has found that combining balancing over the WestConnect footprint will increase the efficiency of commitment and dispatch at wind penetrations ranging from 10-20% of annual electricity demand, and will be essential for high penetrations and small balancing areas. In addition the Northwest Wind Integration Action Plan recommended balancing area cooperation as a method to help integrate the large potential wind development. In this paper we investigate the potential impact of a proposed Energy Imbalance Service on the ability of the non-market portions of Western Electricity Coordinating Councils (WECC) United States footprint to integrate wind energy. We will utilize data adapted from the WWSIS for the Western Interconnection. The analysis uses time-synchronized wind and load data to evaluate the potential for ramp requirement reduction that could be achieved with combined operation. Chronological analysis and ramp duration analysis quantify the benefit in terms of not only the ramp sizes, but the frequency of the potentially avoided ramps that must be managed by the non-wind generation fleet. Multiple approaches that can be used to achieve these benefits will also be suggested in the paper. We also suggest other approaches that can help achieve much of the benefit of full consolidation without requiring the physical consolidation of balancing areas.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.; Beuning, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Western Regional Partnership Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regional Partnership Overview Regional Partnership Overview June 2013 Briefing Overview  WRP Background  Importance of Region  WRP Tribal Relations Committee  WRP Energy Committee WRP Region's Uniqueness  5 states stretching from the Great Plains to the Pacific Ocean  Diverse terrain ranging from desert valleys to forested mountains  Significant State Trust Landholdings  Approximately 188 Federally recognized Tribes  Significant amounts of Federally managed land  According to GSA 2004 study, WRP states range from 41.8% - 84.5% of total state land WRP Region's Importance to DoD  Extensive Training Ranges  Interconnected ground/air ranges provide unmatched warfighter training opportunities

284

Detecting Source Regions of Wave Activities in the Tropical Atmosphere by Applying Beamforming to Interpolated Data Grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wave activities are primary sources of weather disturbances and cyclones in the tropical atmosphere. One such activity is the intraseasonal variations in wind, convection, and precipitation in the tropical Indian and western tropical Pacific ...

Qi Hu; Zhaoning Liang; Michael W. Hoffman

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

A Large-Droplet Mode and Prognostic Number Concentration of Cloud Droplets in the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Part I: Module Descriptions and Supercell Test Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The microphysics module of the version of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) maintained at Colorado State University has undergone a series of improvements, including the addition of a large-cloud-droplet mode from 40 to 80 ?m in ...

Stephen M. Saleeby; William R. Cotton

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Drought Planning and State Government: Current Status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent droughts, calls for action by regional, national, and international organizations, and the availability of model plans have stimulated considerable activity in the development of drought contingency plans by state government in the United ...

Donald A. Wilhite

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Activity in the Contiguous United States from 1995 to 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatial and temporal distributions of cloud-to-ground lightning are examined over the contiguous United States from 1995 to 1999 using data from the National Lightning Detection Network. Annual flash density, annual lightning days, cumulative ...

Bard A. Zajac; Steven A. Rutledge

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Regional 166 Direct Loan (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regional 166 Direct Loan (Ohio) Regional 166 Direct Loan (Ohio) Regional 166 Direct Loan (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Systems Integrator Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Maximum Rebate $350,000 Program Info State Ohio Program Type Loan Program Provider Ohio Department of Development The Ohio Development Services Agency's (ODSA) Regional 166 Direct Loan provides low-interest loans to businesses creating new jobs or preserving existing employment opportunities in the State of Ohio. Eligible projects include those related to industry, commerce, distribution or research activities. Retail projects are ineligible for the Regional 166

289

Regional hydrothermal commercialization plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan for the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range Region articulates the complete range of initiatives (federal, state, local, and industrial) required for the early commercialization of the regions geothermal resources. (MHR)

1978-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

290

The eect of the high-speed stream following the corotating interaction region on the geomagnetic activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The eect of the high-speed stream following the corotating interaction region on the geomagnetic that the geomagnetic ®eld is continuously disturbed in the high-speed stream in question. The geomagnetic disturbances, the observed intensities of the geomagnetic disturbances were dierent for each recur- rent period

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

291

Regional operations research program for development of geothermal energy in the Southwest United States. Appendix 5 of final technical report, June 1977--August 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This appendix is a collection of site specific scenarios compiled on state by state basis. These scenarios are extracted from the state team final reports.

None

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

HINODE/EIS SPECTROSCOPIC VALIDATION OF VERY HOT PLASMA IMAGED WITH THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY IN NON-FLARING ACTIVE REGION CORES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use coronal imaging observations with the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), and Hinode/Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) spectral data to explore the potential of narrowband EUV imaging data for diagnosing the presence of hot (T {approx}> 5 MK) coronal plasma in active regions. We analyze observations of two active regions (AR 11281, AR 11289) with simultaneous AIA imaging and EIS spectral data, including the Ca XVII line (at 192.8 A), which is one of the few lines in the EIS spectral bands sensitive to hot coronal plasma even outside flares. After careful co-alignment of the imaging and spectral data, we compare the morphology in a three-color image combining the 171, 335, and 94 A AIA spectral bands, with the image obtained for Ca XVII emission from the analysis of EIS spectra. We find that in the selected active regions the Ca XVII emission is strong only in very limited areas, showing striking similarities with the features bright in the 94 A (and 335 A) AIA channels and weak in the 171 A band. We conclude that AIA imaging observations of the solar corona can be used to track hot plasma (6-8 MK), and so to study its spatial variability and temporal evolution at high spatial and temporal resolution.

Testa, Paola [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Reale, Fabio, E-mail: ptesta@cfa.harvard.edu [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, 90134 Palermo (Italy)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Plan, U.S. Department of Energy Region 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) Region 6 Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Plan (TEPP Plan) operates within the framework of the DOE emergency management system for developing, coordinating, and directing emergency planning, preparedness, and readiness assurance activities for radiological transportation incidents. The DOE Region 6 TEPP Plan is a narrative description of the DOE Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program activities, training and technical assistance provided to states and tribes along DOE's transportation corridors in DOE Region 6.

Marsha Keister

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Scaling up of Carbon Exchange Dynamics from AmeriFlux Sites to a Super-Region in the Eastern United States  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this project was to evaluate carbon exchange dynamics across a region of North America between the Great Plains and the East Coast. This region contains about 40 active carbon cycle research (AmeriFlux) sites in a variety of climatic and landuse settings, from upland forest to urban development. The core research involved a scaling strategy that uses measured fluxes of CO{sub 2}, energy, water, and other biophysical and biometric parameters to train and calibrate surface-vegetation-atmosphere models, in conjunction with satellite (MODIS) derived drivers. To achieve matching of measured and modeled fluxes, the ecosystem parameters of the models will be adjusted to the dynamically variable flux-tower footprints following Schmid (1997). High-resolution vegetation index variations around the flux sites have been derived from Landsat data for this purpose. The calibrated models are being used in conjunction with MODIS data, atmospheric re-analysis data, and digital land-cover databases to derive ecosystem exchange fluxes over the study domain.

Hans Peter Schmid; Craig Wayson

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

295

Occultation measurement of the size of the X-ray emitting region in the Active Galactic Nucleus of NGC 1365  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an occultation of the central X-ray emitting region in the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 1365. This extreme spectral variation (from Compton-thin to reflection-dominated and back to Compton-thin in four days) has been caught in a ten days Chandra monitoring campaign consisting of six short (15 ks) observations performed every two days. We discuss the implications of this occultation within the scenario of a Compton-thick cloud crossing the line of sight of the X-ray source. We estimate a source size R<10^14 cm and a distance of the cloud from the source D<10^16 cm. This direct measurement confirms the theoretical expectations of an extremely compact X-ray source, and shows that the Compton-thick circumnuclear gas is located at a distance from the center on the scale of the Broad Line Region.

G. Risaliti; M. Elvis; G. Fabbiano; A. Baldi; A. Zezas; M. Salvati

2007-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

296

Comparison of physical properties of quiet and active regions through the analysis of MHD simulations of the solar photosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent observations have shown that the photometric and dynamic properties of granulation and of small-scale magnetic features depend on the amount of magnetic flux of the region they are embedded in. We analyze results from numerical Hydro and Magneto Hydrodynamic simulations characterized by different amount of average magnetic flux and find qualitatively the same differences as those reported from observations. We show that these different physical properties result from the inhibition of convection induced by the presence of the magnetic field, which changes the temperature stratification of both quiet and magnetic regions. Our results are relevant for solar irradiance variations studies, as such differences are still not properly taken into account in irradiance reconstruction models.

Criscuoli, Serena

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Residential market transformation: National and regional indicators  

SciTech Connect

A variety of programs are underway to address market barriers to the adoption of energy-efficient residential technologies and practices. Most are administered by utilities, states, or regions that rely on the Energy Star as a consistent platform for program marketing and messaging. This paper reviews regional and national market transformation activities for three key residential end-uses -- air conditioning, clothes washing, and lighting -- characterizing current and ongoing programs; reporting on progress; identifying market indicators; and discussing implications.

Van Wie McGrory, Laura L.; McNamara, Maureen; Suozzo, Margaret

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Variable Density Flow Modeling for Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Along Arches Province of Midwestern United States  

SciTech Connect

The Arches Province in the Midwestern U.S. has been identified as a major area for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage applications because of the intersection of Mt. Simon sandstone reservoir thickness and permeability. To better understand large-scale CO{sub 2} storage infrastructure requirements in the Arches Province, variable density scoping level modeling was completed. Three main tasks were completed for the variable density modeling: Single-phase, variable density groundwater flow modeling; Scoping level multi-phase simulations; and Preliminary basin-scale multi-phase simulations. The variable density modeling task was successful in evaluating appropriate input data for the Arches Province numerical simulations. Data from the geocellular model developed earlier in the project were translated into preliminary numerical models. These models were calibrated to observed conditions in the Mt. Simon, suggesting a suitable geologic depiction of the system. The initial models were used to assess boundary conditions, calibrate to reservoir conditions, examine grid dimensions, evaluate upscaling items, and develop regional storage field scenarios. The task also provided practical information on items related to CO{sub 2} storage applications in the Arches Province such as pressure buildup estimates, well spacing limitations, and injection field arrangements. The Arches Simulation project is a three-year effort and part of the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE)/National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) program on innovative and advanced technologies and protocols for monitoring/verification/accounting (MVA), simulation, and risk assessment of CO{sub 2} sequestration in geologic formations. The overall objective of the project is to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic CO{sub 2} storage infrastructure along the Arches Province of the Midwestern U.S.

Joel Sminchak

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Intensive culture of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings on poorly drained sites in the Western Gulf region of the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant acreage of poorly drained sites occurs in the Western Gulf region of the United States. These sites experience standing water through much of the winter and spring, resulting in poor seedling survival. In addition, the sites occasionally experience a summer drought that affects tree growth. This study was designed to determine the effects of intensive forest management on seedling growth and physiology, and to enhance seedling performance under these harsh conditions. Fertilization, chemical vegetation control and mechanical site preparation were used in different combinations to test the effects of these intensive forest management tools on seedling above- and below-ground growth, survival, water status, gas exchange attributes, and nutrient concentrations in the foliage and soil solution. Ten sites were established in southern Arkansas in 1998 and 1999 to monitor loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedling performance in three consecutive growing seasons between 1998 and 2000. Fertilization, chemical vegetation control and mechanical site preparation increased above-ground growth. Growth increment from mechanical site preparation was comparable to that from fertilization. Survival was not affected by any treatment. Fertilization enhanced root growth, more so in the shallow soil layers. Subsoil bulk density greatly restricted root growth, resulting in decreased above-ground growth. Chemical vegetation control made more soil water available to the seedlings during drought, resulting in increased seedling water potential. The effect of chemical vegetation control on seedling water potential was absent in the early growing season when soil moisture was abundant. Seedlings on plots treated with bedding-plus-fertilizer or bedding alone experienced stomatal closure at times of severe water stress while those treated with chemical vegetation control were able to continue net carbon dioxide assimilation. Fertilization did not increase needle nutrient concentrations, but increased needle weight, thereby increasing total nutrient content. Fertilization increased base cation concentrations in the soil solution, but had no effect on nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations. Intensive forest management was found to be a viable tool for optimum loblolly pine seedling growth and survival on poorly drained sites in the Western Gulf region of the United States.

Rahman, Mohd Shafiqur

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Directory of Solar Energy Research Activities in the United States: First Edition, May 1980. [1220 projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information covering 1220, FY 1978 and FY 1979 solar energy research projects is included. In addition to the title and text of project summaries, the directory contains the following indexes: subject index, investigator index, performing organization index, and supporting organization index. This information was registered with the Smithsonian Science Information Exchange by Federal, State, and other supporting organizations. The project summaries are categorized in the following areas: biomass, ocean energy, wind energy,photovoltaics, photochemical energy conversion, photobiological energy conversion, solar heating and cooling, solar process heat, solar collectors and concentrators, solar thermal electric generation, and other solar energy conversion. (WHK)

None

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional activities state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Some activities in the United States concerning the physics aspects of actinide waste recycling  

SciTech Connect

Reactor types being considered in the United States for the purpose of actinide waste recycling are discussed briefly. The reactor types include thermal reactors operating on the 3.3 percent $sup 235$U--$sup 238$U and the $sup 233$U--$sup 232$Th fuel cycles, liquid metal fast breeder reactors, reactors fueled entirely by actinide wastes, gaseous fuel reactors, and fusion reactors. Cross section measurements in progress or planned toward providing basic data for testing the recycle concept are also discussed. (auth)

Raman, S.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

State-of-Knowledge on Deposition, Part 2: Assessment of Deposition Activity in Fossil Plant Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last 20 years, substantial advances have been made in the understanding and control of fossil plant cycle chemistry. In spite of these advances, deposition activity, most notably in boilers and steam turbines, remains an issue of concern to many organizations that operate fossil units. The underlying science of deposition in fossil unit components has not, with the exception of steam turbines, been studied extensively under the EPRI Boiler and Turbine Steam and Cycle Chemistry Program. This repo...

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

303

Survey of state regulatory activities on least cost planning for gas utilities  

SciTech Connect

Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. Incorporating the concept of meeting customer energy service needs entails a recognition that customers' costs must be considered along with the utility's costs in the economic analysis of energy options. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. All state commissions were surveyed to assess the current status of gas planning and demand-side management and to identify significant regulatory issues faced by commissions during the next several years. The survey was to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least-cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: (1) status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; (2) type and scope ofnatural gas DSM programs in effect, includeing fuel substitution; (3) economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; (4) relationship between prudence reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; and (5) key regulatory issues facing gas utilities during the next five years. 34 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

Goldman, C.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, Washington, DC (United States)); Hopkins, M.E. (Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Oil atlas: National Petroleum Technology Office activities across the United States  

SciTech Connect

Petroleum imports account for the largest share of the US trade deficit. Over one-third of the 1996 merchandise trade deficit is attributed to imported oil. The good news is that substantial domestic oil resources, both existing and yet-to-be-discovered, can be recovered using advanced petroleum technologies. The Energy Information Agency estimates that advanced technologies can yield 10 billion additional barrels, equal to $240 billion in import offsets. The US Department of Energy`s National Petroleum Technology Office works with industry to develop advanced petroleum technologies and to transfer successful technologies to domestic oil producers. This publication shows the locations of these important technology development efforts and lists DOE`s partners in this critical venture. The National Petroleum Technology Office has 369 active technology development projects grouped into six product lines: Advanced Diagnostics and Imaging Systems; Advanced Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation; Reservoir Life Extension and Management; Emerging Processing Technology Applications; Effective Environmental Protection; and Crosscutting Program Areas.

Tiedemann, H.A.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Comment on Particle acceleration by stimulated emission of radiation near a solid-state active medium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a recent Letter, V. Berezovsky, H. Alam, and L. Schaechter have reported 'acceleration of electrons moving in free space near an active Nd:YAG slab'. The reported mechanism is particle acceleration by stimulated emission of radiation (PASER). The energy of electrons was not measured directly, but instead inferred from measurements of the electron beam current, after it 'interacted' with the Nd:YAG slab. In this Comment I suggest that the authors proposition that the increase in beam current being due to the increase in beam energy is incorrect. Let us examine the simplified model of the experiment. The cathode emits about 5 mA of a dc electron beam. The beam is collimated by several apertures to about 100 nA before it reaches the collector, where the absorbed beam current is measured. Between the cathode and the collector this beam is 'continuously illuminated' by photons from the actively pumped optical medium. After the electrons 'absorb' the photons the beam current increases by 30%, to about 130 nA. Firstly, if it were true and if there were no beam collimation, this would have been the violation of charge conservation. Ignoring that fact, the authors suggest that: 'Since the charge density is not expected to vary, the change in the current is due to the increase in the velocity of the electrons.' This statement in itself is incorrect, as it violates the continuity of electron flux: when the beam velocity increases, its density decreases such that the beam current remains constant and the charge is conserved. Indeed, in a dc case (as described in the Letter) the continuity equation reads: d(nv)/dz = 0, where v is the beam velocity, n is the linear charge density and z is the coordinate along the beam axis. Since the dc beam current, I = nv and nv = const from Eq. (1), the dc beam current is not expected to vary with the change in velocity. Since the beam current in the experiment did change, it is obvious that the portion of the beam current, removed by the apertures, cannot be ignored in the analysis as it is the most likely source of the beam current increase. Moreover, there is no evidence whatsoever of the proposed PASER effect in this Letter.

Nagaitsev, Sergei; /Fermilab

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Regional Planning | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Planning Regional Planning Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Regional Planning Efforts Alias (field_alias) Apply California, Oregon, Washington Regional Ocean Partnership West Coast Governors' Alliance Regional Data Portal In Development U.S. Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico Regional Ocean Partnership U.S. Caribbean Regional Ocean Partnership-currently being formally established Regional Data Portal To be developed Georgia, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina Regional Ocean Partnership Governors' South Atlantic Alliance Regional Data Portal Currently in development American Samoa, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Marshall Islands, Palau

307

Interannual Variability of the Cyclonic Activity along the U.S. Pacific Coast: Influences on the Characteristics of Winter Precipitation in the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the observed interannual variability of the cyclonic activity along the U.S. Pacific coast and quantifies its impact on the characteristics of both the winter total and extreme precipitation in the western United States. A ...

Boksoon Myoung; Yi Deng

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

A Large-Droplet Mode and Prognostic Number Concentration of Cloud Droplets in the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Part II: Sensitivity to a Colorado Winter Snowfall Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is the second in a two-part series describing recent additions to the microphysics module of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) at Colorado State University. These changes include the addition of a large-cloud-droplet mode ...

Stephen M. Saleeby; William R. Cotton

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

A Study to Assess Needed Improvements and Barriers in Planning and Delivering Agricultural Extension Activities in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to assess planning and delivering agricultural extension activities in the Kurdistan region of Iraq for future program implementation. The study was a descriptive research and used a modified Delphi technique to identify needed improvements and highlight barriers in planning and delivering extension activities by the willingness of extension workers. The population of the study was 50 MOAWR purposely selected government employees consisted of 10 extension experts, 15 extension administrators, and 25 extension agents. The study used three rounds web-based survey questionnaires. In Round I, the panelists were responded to two open ended questions to identify needed improvements and barriers in planning and delivering extension activities. The gathered information from Round I was examined, organized, and combined to create the second questionnaire for Round II. In Round II, the panelists were indicated their levels of agreement or disagreement about each needed improvement and barrier. The study employed a six-Likert scale with 1=”Strongly Agree”, 2=”Agree”, 3=”Somewhat Agree”, 4=”Somewhat Disagree”, 5=”Disagree”, and 6=”Strongly Disagree”. The needed improvements and barriers that received two-thirds of agreement (numbers 1 and 2 in the six-point Likert scale) were used to create the third questionnaire for Round III. In Round III, panelists were developed consensus by rating the statements that received two-third agreement in Round II. Equally, the same Round II six-point Likert scale was used in Round III. The result findings of the study were revealed to the demands of extension policy implementation in the region. The results of the study were summarized in three overall implementation theme areas: community based program development, building capacity program, and institutional structuring and three distinct research areas: leadership in extension, personal traits of extension agents, and external communication. Furthermore, the results of the study provided key points and details for each implementation theme and distinct research area.

Khoshnaw, Yousif Khalid

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Regional operations research program for development of geothermal energy in the southwest United States. Final technical report, June 1977-August 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The efforts by the Core and State Teams in data acquisition, electric and non-electric economic studies, development of computer support functions and operations, and preparation of geothermal development scenarios are described. Team reports for the states of Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah are included in the appendices along with a summary of the state scenarios. (MHR)

Marlin, J.M.; Christ, R.; McDevitt, P.; Nowotny, K.; O'Dea, P.; Rao, C.R.; Swanberg, C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

CAPITAL REGION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

t 09/20/07 15:28 FAX 301 903 4656 t 09/20/07 15:28 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION 0 j002 SDOE F 1325.8 (8-89) EFG (0790) Energy United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE. September 18, 2007 Audit Report No.: OAS-L-07-23 REPLY TO: IG-34 (A07TG036) SUBJECT: Evaluation of "The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Cyber Security Program-2007" TO: Chairman, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results o Four evaluation of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission) cyber security program. The evaluation was initiated in May 2007, and our fieldwork was conducted through September 2007. Our methodology is described in the attachment to this report. . INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Commission reports that it is constantly improving thl stability, reliability, and

312

Northeast Regional Biomass Program ninth year, third quarter report, April--June 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) operates using a state grant component that provides funds (with a 50 percent matching requirement) to each of the states in the region to strengthen and integrate the work of state agencies involved in biomass energy; a series of technical reports and studies in areas that have been identified as being of critical importance to the development of biomass energy in the region; and a continuous long range planning component with heavy private sector involvement that helps to identify activities necessary to spur greater development and use of biomass energy in the Northeast. This report describes the activities of NRBP between April and June, 1992.

Lusk, P.D.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

State & Local | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

State & Local State & Local State & Local Links to Intergovernmental Organizations Council of State Governments Established in 1933, the Council of State Governments is the only multi-branch state association in the nation. It offers leadership training, provides research and information products, and focuses on regional problem-solving in an effort to increase states' efficiency and productivity. It keeps offices across the United States that staff regional associations of legislative and executive officials. Energy Communities Alliance Energy Communities Alliance is an organization of local governments that are impacted by Department of Energy (DOE) activities. Its mission is to have local government officials in Department of Energy-impacted communities share information, establish policy positions, and advocate

314

Allosteric Activation of E2-RING Finger-Mediated Ubiquitylation by a Structurally Defined Specific E2-Binding Region of gp78  

SciTech Connect

The activity of RING finger ubiquitin ligases (E3) is dependent on their ability to facilitate transfer of ubiquitin from ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2) to substrates. The G2BR domain within the E3 gp78 binds selectively and with high affinity to the E2 Ube2g2. Through structural and functional analyses, we determine that this occurs on a region of Ube2g2 distinct from binding sites for ubiquitin-activating enzyme (E1) and RING fingers. Binding to the G2BR results in conformational changes in Ube2g2 that affect ubiquitin loading. The Ube2g2:G2BR interaction also causes an 50-fold increase in affinity between the E2 and RING finger. This results in markedly increased ubiquitylation by Ube2g2 and the gp78 RING finger. The significance of this G2BR effect is underscored by enhanced ubiquitylation observed when Ube2g2 is paired with other RING finger E3s. These findings uncover a mechanism whereby allosteric effects on an E2 enhance E2-RING finger interactions and, consequently, ubiquitylation.

Das, Ranabir; Mariano, Jennifer; Tsai, Yien Che; Kalathur, Ravi C.; Kostova, Zlatka; Li, Jess; Tarasov, Sergey G.; McFeeters, Robert L.; Altieri, Amanda S.; Ji, Xinhua; Byrd, R. Andrew; Weissman, Allan M.; (NCI)

2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

315

Temperature activated absorption during laser-induced damage: The evolution of laser-supported solid-state absorption fronts  

SciTech Connect

Previously we have shown that the size of laser induced damage sites in both KDP and SiO{sub 2} is largely governed by the duration of the laser pulse which creates them. Here we present a model based on experiment and simulation that accounts for this behavior. Specifically, we show that solid-state laser-supported absorption fronts are generated during a damage event and that these fronts propagate at constant velocities for laser intensities up to 4 GW/cm{sup 2}. It is the constant absorption front velocity that leads to the dependence of laser damage site size on pulse duration. We show that these absorption fronts are driven principally by the temperature-activated deep sub band-gap optical absorptivity, free electron transport, and thermal diffusion in defect-free silica for temperatures up to 15,000K and pressures < 15GPa. In addition to the practical application of selecting an optimal laser for pre-initiation of large aperture optics, this work serves as a platform for understanding general laser-matter interactions in dielectrics under a variety of conditions.

Carr, C W; Bude, J D; Shen, N; Demange, P

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

316

SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP ON CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Southwest Partnership Region includes six whole states, including Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Utah, roughly one-third of Texas, and significant portions of adjacent states. The Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership project is to achieve an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. The Partnership made great progress in this first year. Action plans for possible Phase II carbon sequestration pilot tests in the region are almost finished, including both technical and non-technical aspects necessary for developing and carrying out these pilot tests. All partners in the Partnership are taking an active role in evaluating and ranking optimum sites and technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region. We are identifying potential gaps in all aspects of potential sequestration deployment issues.

Brian McPherson; Rick Allis; Barry Biediger; Joel Brown; Jim Cappa; George Guthrie; Richard Hughes; Eugene Kim; Robert Lee; Dennis Leppin; Charles Mankin; Orman Paananen; Rajesh Pawar; Tarla Peterson; Steve Rauzi; Jerry Stuth; Genevieve Young

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Hydroclimate of the Western United States Based on Observations and Regional Climate Simulation of 1981–2000. Part II: Mesoscale ENSO Anomalies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydroclimate of the western United States is influenced by strong interannual variability of atmospheric circulation, much of which is associated with the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Precipitation anomalies during ENSO often show ...

L. Ruby Leung; Yun Qian; Xindi Bian; Allen Hunt

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis This report covers the states that largely fall into the Southeastern Reliability...

319

Trends in Wind Speed at Wind Turbine Height of 80 m over the Contiguous United States Using the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The trends in wind speed at a typical wind turbine hub height (80 m) are analyzed using the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) dataset for 1979–2009. A method, assuming the wind profile in the lower boundary layer as power-law functions of ...

Eric Holt; Jun Wang

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

The Effects of the Gulf of California SSTs on Warm-Season Rainfall in the Southwestern United States and Northwestern Mexico: A Regional Model Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of the sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the northern Gulf of California (GC) on warm-season rainfall in the Arizona–New Mexico (AZNM) and the northwestern Mexico (NWM) regions associated with the North American monsoon (NAM) are ...

Jinwon Kim; Jongyoun Kim; John D. Farrara; John O. Roads

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional activities state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Summary report: Low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts, Volume 5, Number 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information is given on the ten compacts and their host state, describing the governing body, member states, date established, current waste management, and siting, licensing, and projected date of a disposal facility. Reports are also given on the eight states that remain unaffiliated with a compact commission.

Norris, C. [ed.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Summary report: Low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts, Volume 5, Number 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information is given on the ten compacts and their host state, describing the governing body, member states, date established, current waste management, and siting, licensing, and projected date of a disposal facility. Reports are also given on the eight states that remain unaffiliated with a compact commission.

Norris, C. [ed.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

State geothermal commercialization programs in ten Rocky Mountain states. Semi-annual progress report, July-December 1979  

SciTech Connect

The activities and findings of the ten state teams participating in the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range Regional Hydrothermal Commercialization Program for the period are described. A summary of the state projects, compilation of project accomplishments, summary of findings, and a description of the major conclusions and recommendations are presented. Also included are chapters on the commercialization activities carried out by individual teams in each state: Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New-Mexico, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming. (MHR)

Griffith, J.L. (comp.)

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Recovery Act: 'Carbonsheds' as a Framework for Optimizing United States Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Pipeline Transport on a Regional to National Scale  

SciTech Connect

Carbonsheds are regions in which the estimated cost of transporting CO{sub 2} from any (plant) location in the region to the storage site it encompasses is cheaper than piping the CO{sub 2} to a storage site outside the region. We use carbonsheds to analyze the cost of transport and storage of CO{sub 2} in deploying CCS on land and offshore of the continental U.S. We find that onshore the average cost of transport and storage within carbonsheds is roughly $10/t when sources cooperate to reduce transport costs, with the costs increasing as storage options are depleted over time. Offshore transport and storage costs by comparison are found to be roughly twice as expensive but t may still be attractive because of easier access to property rights for sub-seafloor storage as well as a simpler regulatory system, and possibly lower MMV requirements, at least in the deep-ocean where pressures and temperatures would keep the CO{sub 2} negatively buoyant. Agent-based modeling of CCS deployment within carbonsheds under various policy scenarios suggests that the most cost-effective strategy at this point in time is to focus detailed geology characterization of storage potential on only the largest onshore reservoirs where the potential for mitigating emissions is greatest and the cost of storage appears that it will be among the cheapest.

Pratson, Lincoln

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

325

Regional operation research program for development of geothermal energy in the southwest United States. Final technical report, June 1977--August 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the work accomplished from June 1977 to August 1978. The efforts by the Core and State Teams in data acquisition, electric and non-electric economic studies, development of computer support functions and operations, and preparation of geothermal development scenarios are described.

Marlin, J.M; Christ, R.; McDevitt, P.; Nowotny, K.; O'Dea, P.; Rao, C.R.; Swanberg, C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Climatic Pattern Analysis of Three- and Seven-Day Summer Rainfall in the Central United States: Some Methodological Considerations and a Regionalization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of climatic pattern analyses of three- and seven-day summer (May–August) rainfall totals for the central United States. A range of eigenvectorial methods is applied to 1949–80 data for a regularly spaced network of ...

Michael B. Richman; Peter J. Lamb

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Geographic Information System At U.S. West Region (Williams & Deangelo,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Williams & Deangelo, Williams & Deangelo, 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At U.S. West Region (Williams & Deangelo, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Colin F. Williams, Jacob DeAngelo (2008) Mapping Geothermal Potential In The Western United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geographic_Information_System_At_U.S._West_Region_(Williams_%26_Deangelo,_2008)&oldid=390068" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load)

328

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At U.S. West Region (Williams & Deangelo,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Williams & Deangelo, Williams & Deangelo, 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At U.S. West Region (Williams & Deangelo, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Colin F. Williams, Jacob DeAngelo (2008) Mapping Geothermal Potential In The Western United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Data_Acquisition-Manipulation_At_U.S._West_Region_(Williams_%26_Deangelo,_2008)&oldid=387276" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers

329

Summary of ICTP activities in support of science in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of External Activities 10 Scientific Meetings #12; Delegation from Tbilisi State University Visited ICTP Weather and Climate Events in the Southern Caucasus - Black Sea Region, Tbilisi, 2013 #12; The amounts

330

Development of White-Light Emitting Active Layers in Nitride Based Heterostructures for Phosphorless Solid State Lighting  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a summary of research activities carried out at the University of California, San Diego and Central Research of OSRAM SYLVANIA in Beverly, MA partially supported by a research contract from US Department of Energy, DE-FC26-04NT422274. The main objective of this project was to develop III-V nitrides activated by rare earth ions, RE{sup 3+}, which could eliminate the need for phosphors in nitride-based solid state light sources. The main idea was to convert electron-hole pairs injected into the active layer in a LED die to white light directly through transitions within the energy levels of the 4f{sup n}-manifold of RE{sup 3+}. We focused on the following materials: Eu{sup 3+}(red), Tb{sup 3+}(green), Er{sup 3+}(green), Dy{sup 3+}(yellow) and Tm{sup 3+}(blue) in AlN, GaN and alloys of AlN and GaN. Our strategy was to explore candidate materials in powder form first, and then study their behavior in thin films. Thin films of these materials were to be deposited on sapphire substrates using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The photo- and cathode-luminescence measurements of these materials were used to investigate their suitability for white light generation. The project proceeded along this route with minor modifications needed to produce better materials and to expedite our progress towards the final goal. The project made the following accomplishments: (1) red emission from Eu{sup 3+}, green from Tb{sup 3+}, yellow from Dy{sup 3+} and blue from Tm{sup 3+} in AlN powders; (2) red emission from Eu{sup 3+} and green emission from Tb{sup 3+} in GaN powder; (3) red emission from Eu{sup 3+} in alloys of GaN and AlN; (4) green emission from Tb{sup 3+} in GaN thin films by PLD; (5) red emission from Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} in GaN thin films deposited by MOVPE; (6) energy transfer from host to RE{sup 3+}; (7) energy transfer from Tb{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 3+} in AlN powders; (8) emission from AlN powder samples codoped with (Eu{sup 3+} ,Tb{sup 3+} ) and (Dy{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+}); and (9) white emission from AlN codoped with Dy{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+}. We also extensively studied the stabilities of rare earth ions in GaN, and the nature of oxygen defects in GaN and its impact on the optical properties of the host material, using first principles method. Results from these theoretical calculations together with fluorescence measurements from the materials essentially proved the underlying concepts for generating white light using RE{sup 3+}-activated nitrides. For this project, we successfully built a horizontal MOVPE reactor and used it to deposit thin films of undoped and doped nitrides of GaN and InGaN, which is a very significant achievement. Since this reactor was designed and built by in-house experts, it could be easily modified and reassembled for specific research purposes. During this study, it was successfully modified for homogeneous distribution of rare earth ions in a deposited film. It will be an ideal tool for future research involving novel thin film material concepts. We examined carefully the suitability of various metal organic precursors for incorporating RE{sup 3+}. In order to avoid oxygen contamination, several oxygen-free RE{sup 3+} precursors were identified. Both oxygen-free and oxygen- containing metal organic precursors were used for certain rare earth ions (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3+}). However, the suitability of any particular type of precursor for MOVPE deposition was not established during this study, and further study is needed. More intensive research in the future is needed to improve the film quality, and eliminate the separation of rare earth oxide phases during the deposition of thin films by MOVPE. The literature in the area of the chemistry of rare earth ions in nitrides is almost nonexistent, in spite of the significant research on luminescence of RE{sup 3+} in nitrides. Consequently, MOVPE as a method of deposition of RE{sup 3+}-activated nitrides is relatively unexplored. In the following sections of this report, the ou

Jan Talbot; Kailash Mishra

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB)  

SciTech Connect

The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is a diverse partnership covering eleven states involving the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) an interstate compact; regulatory agencies and/or geological surveys from member states; the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); academic institutions; a Native American enterprise; and multiple entities from the private sector. Figure 1 shows the team structure for the partnership. In addition to the Technical Team, the Technology Coalition, an alliance of auxiliary participants, in the project lends yet more strength and support to the project. The Technology Coalition, with its diverse representation of various sectors, is integral to the technical information transfer, outreach, and public perception activities of the partnership. The Technology Coalition members, shown in Figure 2, also provide a breadth of knowledge and capabilities in the multiplicity of technologies needed to assure a successful outcome to the project and serve as an extremely important asset to the partnership. The eleven states comprising the multi-state region are: Alabama; Arkansas; Florida; Georgia; Louisiana; Mississippi; North Carolina; South Carolina; Tennessee; Texas; and Virginia. The states making up the SECARB area are illustrated in Figure 3. The primary objectives of the SECARB project include: (1) Supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carbon Sequestration Program by promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. This requires the development of relevant data to reduce the uncertainties and risks that are barriers to sequestration, especially for geologic storage in the SECARB region. Information and knowledge are the keys to establishing a regional carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage industry with public acceptance. (2) Supporting the President's Global Climate Change Initiative with the goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by 2012. A corollary to the first objective, this objective requires the development of a broad awareness across government, industry, and the general public of sequestration issues and establishment of the technological and legal frameworks necessary to achieve the President's goal. The information developed by the SECARB team will play a vital role in achieving the President's goal for the southeastern region of the United States. (3) Evaluating options and potential opportunities for regional CO{sub 2} sequestration. This requires characterization of the region regarding the presence and location of sources of greenhouse gases (GHGs), primarily CO{sub 2}, the presence and location of potential carbon sinks and geological parameters, geographical features and environmental concerns, demographics, state and interstate regulations, and existing infrastructure.

Kenneth J. Nemeth

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

332

Field Mapping At Cascades Region (Ingebritsen & Mariner, 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Field Mapping At Cascades Region (Ingebritsen & Mariner, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Cascades Region (Ingebritsen & Mariner, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Cascades Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References S. E. Ingebritsen, R. H. Mariner (2010) Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Field_Mapping_At_Cascades_Region_(Ingebritsen_%26_Mariner,_2010)&oldid=510730"

333

Geographic Information System At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dixie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard

334

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dixie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of

335

Geothermal Literature Review At General Us Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2000)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

General Us Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2000) General Us Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2000) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At General US Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2000) Exploration Activity Details Location General US Region Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M.C . Richards, J. L. Steele (2000) Geothermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Gradient Data For The United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_General_Us_Region_(Blackwell,_Et_Al.,_2000)&oldid=601622" Categories: Exploration Activities

336

activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detecting Things We Cannot See: Learning the Concepts of Control and Detecting Things We Cannot See: Learning the Concepts of Control and Variable in an Experiment Submitted by Anita Brook-Dupree, 1996 TRAC teacher at Fermilab, Teacher, Alternative Middle Years School, Philadelphia, PA. Particle physicists at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois are faced with the problem of detecting the presence of sub-atomic particles they cannot see. During my summer as a TRAC teacher at Fermilab, I tried to think of ways to teach middle school students about things we cannot see. I want to thank my nine-year-old daughter Gia for the idea for the following activity. I was lamenting that I could not come up with ideas of how to relate the work of Fermilab scientists to anything that my students would understand. Then I was reminded by my daughter, that when I brought her to school on the

337

Geothermal Regions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regions Regions Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Regions RegionsMap2012.jpg Geothermal regions were outlined for the western United States (including Alaska and Hawaii) to identify geothermal areas, projects, and exploration trends for each region. These regions were developed based on the USGS physiographic regions (U.S. Geological Survey), and then adjusted to fit geothermal exploration parameters such as differences in geologic regime, structure, heat source, surface effects (weather, vegetation patterns, groundwater flow), and other relevant factors. The 21 regions can be seen outlined in red and overlain on the 2008 USGS Geothermal Favorability Map in Figure 1.[1] Add a new Geothermal Region List of Regions Area (km2) Mean MW

338

Electric power supply and demand 1979 to 1988 for the contiguous United States as projected by the Regional Electric Reliability Councils in their April 1, 1979 long-range coordinated planning reports to the Department of Energy  

SciTech Connect

Information concerning bulk electric power supply and demand is summarized and reviewed. Electric-utility power-supply systems are composed of power sources, transmission and distribution facilities, and users of electricity. In the United States there are three such systems of large geographic extent that together cover the entire country. Subjects covered are: energy forecasts, peak demand forecasts, generating-capacity forecasts, purchases and sales of capacity, and transmission. Extensive data are compiled in 17 tables. Information in two appendices includes a general description of the Regional Electric Reliability Councils and US generating capacity as of June 30, 1979. 3 figures, 17 tables.

Savage, N.; Graban, W.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Geothermal energy and the eastern US (ERDA/DGE Region 5). Second progress report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains state-by-state fact sheets; selected scenarios for Arkansas, South Dakota, and the Coastal Plain; ERDA/DOD interfacing at selected bases in Region 5, other activities of interest; and a summary of action items/future plans. (MHR)

1977-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

340

Regional Residential  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

upward pressure from crude oil markets, magnified by a regional shortfall of heating oil supplies, residential prices rose rapidly to peak February 7. The problem was...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional activities state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Carbon Supply for the Pilot Region: Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Project "Quantifying Carbon Market Opportunities in the United States" began in 2001. The first major task was the design of a methodology for estimating the quantity and cost of carbon storage opportunities in the United States and a test of this methodology in a pilot region. The primary outputs from this task are carbon supply curves for the most important classes of carbon sequestration activities in land-use change and forestry projects. This report presents the results for the pilot region...

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

342

Conceptual Model Summary Report Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Along Arches Province of Midwestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual model was developed for the Arches Province that integrates geologic and hydrologic information on the Eau Claire and Mt. Simon formations into a geocellular model. The conceptual model describes the geologic setting, stratigraphy, geologic structures, hydrologic features, and distribution of key hydraulic parameters. The conceptual model is focused on the Mt. Simon sandstone and Eau Claire formations. The geocellular model depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array that may be imported into the numerical simulations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, geotechnical test results, and reservoir tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional (3D) grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mt. Simon injection wells. The final geocellular model covers an area of 600 km by 600 km centered on the Arches Province. The geocellular model includes a total of 24,500,000 cells representing estimated porosity and permeability distribution. CO{sub 2} injection scenarios were developed for on-site and regional injection fields at rates of 70 to 140 million metric tons per year.

None

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

343

Regional Purchasing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Purchasing Regional Purchasing Regional Purchasing Pursuant to Appendix M of Prime Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396 between DOE/NNSA and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), LANS is committed to building a strong supplier base with Northern New Mexico businesses and the local Native American pueblos in the purchases of goods and services. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email We seek out and utilize known Northern New Mexico business as suppliers The Northern New Mexico counties included are Los Alamos Santa Fe Rio Arriba Taos Mora San Miguel Sandoval The eight regional pueblos included are Nambe Ohkay Owingeh (formerly known as San Juan) Picuris Pojoaque San Ildefonso Santa Clara Taos Tesuque When the Laboratory cannot identify regional firms, it will expand its

344

Study of the possibility of developing a multichannel-diode-pumped multikilowatt solid-state laser based on optically dense active media  

SciTech Connect

Optimal conditions are determined for the development of efficient diode-pumped 1-{mu}m solid-state lasers with output powers up to a few tens of kilowatts. The thermal operating conditions are analysed for various Yb{sup 3+}- or Nd{sup 3+}-doped active media used in high-power laser systems. The advantages and disadvantages of these active ions and various crystal matrices are discussed. The theoretical analysis and experimental simulations allow one to determine the application fields of various laser crystals. A new concept of a multibeam (multipoint) pumping of active media is proposed. (special issue devoted to the 25th anniversary of the a.m. prokhorov general physics institute)

Garnov, S V; Mikhailov, V A; Serov, R V; Smirnov, V A; Tsvetkov, V B; Shcherbakov, I A [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

345

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Federal, State, and Local  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Federal, Federal, State, & Local Printable Version Bookmark and Share Economic Development Policy Public Lands Public Power Regional Activities State Activities State Lands Siting Federal, State, and Local Wind energy and government intersect at many levels, including regulations, policy, and developable public lands. Wind Powering America provides information about job creation and economic development which can inform policy decisions and incentive conversations. Similarly, Wind Powering America maintains links and summaries of activities at the local, state, and regional levels, as well as other objective information regarding the impacts of wind energy development. Economic Development Achieving the goals of the Wind Powering America initiative during the next 20 years will create $60 billion in capital investment, provide $1.2

346

Regional Inventories  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: This year has not started well for gasoline inventories, with inventories being low across regions of the country. The Midwest region (PADD II) had been running lower than most regions, but began to catch up during the last week in April. Gasoline inventories ran about 9% below their 5-year average for this time of year and about 4% below where they were last year. The recent refinery problems in the Midwest, though, could erase some of that recovery. The impacts of Tosco's Wood River refinery and Marathon's St Paul refinery are not fully realized. But inventories were also precariously low along the East Coast (PADD I) and are extremely low in the Rocky Mountain region (PADD IV), although the size of this market mitigates any national impact. While the

347

PNW Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Area Map EV Micro-Climate Plan for the State of Tennessee June 2011 4 3 Electric Vehicle Charging Station Technology 3.1 Standard Level 2 EVSE Connector For wide spread EV...

348

Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash & Johnson, 2003) Exploration Activity...

349

Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Nash & Johnson, 2003) Exploration Activity...

350

Third Northeast Regional Operational Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Third Northeast Regional Operational Workshop, focusing on hydrometeorology in the northeastern United States, was held 6-7 November 2001 in Albany, New York. Sessions covered cold season events, warm season events, modeling,and operational ...

Eugene P. Auciello

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program : Five Year Report, 1985-1990.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This five-year report describes activities of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program between 1985 and 1990. Begun in 1979, this Regional Bioenergy Program became the model for the nation's four other regional bioenergy programs in 1983. Within the time span of this report, the Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program has undertaken a number of applied research and technology projects, and supported and guided the work of its five participating state energy programs. During this period, the Regional Bioenergy Program has brought together public- and private-sector organizations to promote the use of local biomass and municipal-waste energy resources and technologies. This report claims information on the mission, goals and accomplishments of the Regional Bioenergy Program. It describes the biomass projects conducted by the individual states of the region, and summarizes the results of the programs technical studies. Publications from both the state and regional projects are listed. The report goes on to consider future efforts of the Regional Bioenergy Program under its challenging assignment. Research activities include: forest residue estimates; Landsat biomass mapping; woody biomass plantations; industrial wood-fuel market; residential space heating with wood; materials recovery of residues; co-firing wood chips with coal; biomass fuel characterization; wood-boosted geothermal power plants; wood gasification; municipal solid wastes to energy; woodstove study; slash burning; forest depletion; and technology transfer. 9 figs., 6 tabs.

Pacific Northwest and Alaska Bioenergy Program (U.S.)

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program : Five Year Report, 1985-1990.  

SciTech Connect

This five-year report describes activities of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program between 1985 and 1990. Begun in 1979, this Regional Bioenergy Program became the model for the nation's four other regional bioenergy programs in 1983. Within the time span of this report, the Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Bioenergy Program has undertaken a number of applied research and technology projects, and supported and guided the work of its five participating state energy programs. During this period, the Regional Bioenergy Program has brought together public- and private-sector organizations to promote the use of local biomass and municipal-waste energy resources and technologies. This report claims information on the mission, goals and accomplishments of the Regional Bioenergy Program. It describes the biomass projects conducted by the individual states of the region, and summarizes the results of the programs technical studies. Publications from both the state and regional projects are listed. The report goes on to consider future efforts of the Regional Bioenergy Program under its challenging assignment. Research activities include: forest residue estimates; Landsat biomass mapping; woody biomass plantations; industrial wood-fuel market; residential space heating with wood; materials recovery of residues; co-firing wood chips with coal; biomass fuel characterization; wood-boosted geothermal power plants; wood gasification; municipal solid wastes to energy; woodstove study; slash burning; forest depletion; and technology transfer. 9 figs., 6 tabs.

Pacific Northwest and Alaska Bioenergy Program (U.S.)

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Advanced Manufacturing Office: State and Regional Partnerships  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Since 2002: EIA April 10, 2013 23.5 Million Investment in Innovative Manufacturing Projects Supports the New Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative March 26, 2013 More News...

354

Final Report: Multi-State Sharing Initiative  

SciTech Connect

In 2003 a joint effort between the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the U.S. Department of Justice created state and metropolitan intelligence fusion centers. These fusion centers were an effort to share law enforcement, disaster, and terrorism related information and intelligence between state and local jurisdictions and to share terrorism related intelligence between state and local law enforcement agencies and various federal entities. In 2006, DHS commissioned the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to establish and manage a groundbreaking program to assist local, state, and tribal leaders in developing the tools and methods required to anticipate and forestall terrorist events and to enhance disaster response. This program, called the Southeast Region Research Initiative (SERRI), combines science and technology with validated operational approaches to address regionally unique requirements and suggest regional solutions with the potential for national application. In 2009, SERRI sponsored the Multistate Sharing Initiative (MSSI) to assist state and metropolitan intelligence fusion centers with sharing information related to a wider variety of state interests than just terrorism. While these fusion centers have been effective at sharing data across organizations within their respective jurisdictions, their organizational structure makes bilateral communication with federal entities convenient and also allows information to be further disbursed to other local entities when appropriate. The MSSI-developed Suspicious Activity Report (SAR) sharing system allows state-to-state sharing of non-terrorism-related law enforcement and disaster information. Currently, the MSSI SAR system is deployed in Alabama, Kentucky, Tennessee, and South Carolina. About 1 year after implementation, cognizant fusion center personnel from each state were contacted to ascertain the status of their MSSI SAR systems. The overwhelming response from these individuals was that the MSSI SAR system was an outstanding success and contributed greatly to the security and resiliency of their states. At least one state commented that SERRI's implementation of the MSSI SAR actually 'jump started' and accelerated deployment and acceptance of the Nationwide Suspicious Activity Reporting Initiative (NSI). While all states were enthusiastic about their systems, South Carolina and Tennessee appeared to be the heaviest users of their respective systems. With NSI taking the load of sharing SARs with other states, Tennessee has redeployed the MSSI SAR system within Tennessee to allow SAR sharing between state and local organizations including Tennessee's three Homeland Security Regions, eleven Homeland Security Districts, and more than 500 police and sheriff offices, as well as with other states. In one success story from South Carolina, the Economy SAR System was used to compile similar SARs from throughout the state which were then forwarded to field liaison officers, emergency management personnel, and law enforcement officers for action.

Begoli, Edmon [ORNL; Boehmann, Brant [ORNL; DeNap, Frank A [ORNL

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

LAPA: a composite indicator for prioritization of geothermal-leasing activities on federal lands in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three factors, incorporating seven quantitative indicators, have been selected to represent criteria for prioritization of geothermal areas. These indicators reflect important dimensions for monitoring and estimating the contributions of particular areas to energy production goals on federal lands. Using computerized graphics and data analysis software, weighting of these indicators by experts is integrated to produce a composite indicator for evaluation of leasing activities. The selection of specific indicators for areas which have a high unleased energy potential, where the response of the private sector is positive, and where the potential delay from environmental factors is minimal is described. The development of the composite LAPA indicator and the application of fuzzy set operations for incorporation of expert judgments about the leasing process are also discussed.

Yen, W.W.S.; Carbonaro, G.A.; Benson, W.H.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Isotopic Analysis At U.S. West Region (Welhan, Et Al., 1988) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. West Region (Welhan, Et Al., 1988) U.S. West Region (Welhan, Et Al., 1988) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At U.S. West Region (Welhan, Et Al., 1988) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Helium isotope ratios are not correlated with regional heat flow in the western United States. High helium isotope ratios (R/RA > 2) occur only in magma-based geothermal systems. A direct correlation exists between geothermal reservoir temperature and helium isotope ratio of the fluids, suggesting that both heat and helium in a geothermal reservoir are derived from a shallow magmatic source. The rapid lateral decrease in 3He away from

357

Geothermal Literature Review At General Us Region (Goff & Decker, 1983) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review At General Us Region (Goff & Decker, 1983) Geothermal Literature Review At General Us Region (Goff & Decker, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At General Us Region (Goff & Decker, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location General Us Region Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Review and identification of 24 potential sites for EGS development across the U.S., as well as modeling of the representative geologic systems in which promising EGS sites occur. References Fraser Goff, Edward R. Decker (1983) Candidate Sites For Future Hot Dry Rock Development In The United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_General_Us_Region_(Goff_%26_Decker,_1983)&oldid=510806"

358

Modeling-Computer Simulations At General Us Region (Goff & Decker, 1983) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Us Region (Goff & Decker, 1983) Us Region (Goff & Decker, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At General Us Region (Goff & Decker, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location General Us Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Review and identification of 24 potential sites for EGS development across the U.S., as well as modeling of the representative geologic systems in which promising EGS sites occur. References Fraser Goff, Edward R. Decker (1983) Candidate Sites For Future Hot Dry Rock Development In The United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Modeling-Computer_Simulations_At_General_Us_Region_(Goff_%26_Decker,_1983)&oldid=38761

359

Static Temperature Survey At San Andreas Region (Williams, Et Al., 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Andreas Region (Williams, Et Al., 2004) San Andreas Region (Williams, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At San Andreas Region (Williams, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Andreas Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes As part of an ongoing effort to investigate the thermal regime of California basins, the USGS has measured heat flow in idle oil and gas wells throughout the state. (Details and references on the published data presented in this paper can be found in the USGS heat flow database for California online at http://quake.wr.usgs.gov/heatflow/. Major references are Sass et al., 1971, Lachenbruch and Sass, 1980, DeRito et al., 1988, and

360

ARAACtional exuberance : lessons and prospects for age-restricted active adult housing development in Massachusetts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last fifteen years, Massachusetts and neighboring states have experienced explosive growth in a hitherto alien form of residential development to the region: the age-restricted active adult retirement community ...

Dawson, Sloan William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional activities state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Regional University Alliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alliance Alliance Developed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory in collaboration with NETL-Regional University Alliance WVU National Research Center for Coal and Energy Fossil Consulting Services, Inc. The AVESTAR(tm) Center provides a state-of- the-art, highly realistic, dynamic simulator for a coal-fired power plant using Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology with CO 2 capture. The system is based on Invensys' DYNSIM ® software

362

Regional Revolving Loan Trust Fund (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Regional Revolving Loan Trust Fund Program, coordinated by the Empire State Development program, is operated in six regions by nonprofit organizations and provides working capital loans (up to ...

363

Outside a Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Outside a Geothermal Region Outside a Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Outside a Geothermal Region Details Areas (1) Power Plants (1) Projects (0) Techniques (0) This is a category for geothermal areas added that do not fall within an existing geothermal region. As a number of these accumulate on OpenEI, new regions can be created and areas moved into those regions accordingly. Geothermal Regions Map[1] References ↑ "Geothermal Regions Map" Geothermal Region Data State(s) Wyoming, Colorado Area USGS Resource Estimate for this Region Identified Mean Potential Undiscovered Mean Potential Planned Capacity Planned Capacity Plants Included in Planned Estimate Plants with Unknown Planned Capacity Geothermal Areas within the Outside a Geothermal Region

364

Wind Farm Power Fluctuations, Ancillary Services, and System Operating Impact Analysis Activities in the United States: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

With ever increasing penetration of wind capacity and growing interest in wind power by electric utilities and other power providers, questions about the impacts and costs associated with maintaining a stable grid is receiving lots of attention. These issues are important, both in competitive and regulated monopoly markets.To evaluate the range of ancillary service impact of wind power plants, wind power plant output fluctuations on the order of seconds to minutes must be known. However, the data required for a credible analysis has not been widely available. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), through its own efforts, and in conjunction with a wide group of stakeholders including other national labs, consultants, developers, utilities, and the non-profit Utility Wind Interest Group, has initiated measurement and analysis activities. The efforts are ongoing. While final system-cost results are not available, this paper will describe the progress to date and present typical results and statistical analysis. In addition, methods will be explained with the aim of soliciting feedback from others looking at similar issues worldwide.

Parsons, B. K. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Wan, Y. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Kirby, B. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Radioactive and other environmental threats to the United States and the Arctic resulting from past Soviet activities  

SciTech Connect

Earlier this year the Senate Intelligence Committee began to receive reports from environmental and nuclear scientists in Russia detailing the reckless nuclear waste disposal practices, nuclear accidents and the use of nuclear detonations. We found that information disturbing to say the least. Also troubling is the fact that 15 Chernobyl style RBMK nuclear power reactors continue to operate in the former Soviet Union today. These reactors lack a containment structure and they`re designed in such a way that nuclear reaction can actually increase when the reactor overheats. As scientists here at the University of Alaska have documented, polar air masses and prevailing weather patterns provide a pathway for radioactive contaminants from Eastern Europe and Western Russia, where many of these reactors are located. The threats presented by those potential radioactive risks are just a part of a larger Arctic pollution problem. Every day, industrial activities of the former Soviet Union continue to create pollutants. I think we should face up to the reality that in a country struggling for economic survival, environment protection isn`t necessarily the high priority. And that could be very troubling news for the Arctic in the future.

NONE

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Clean Coal Technology: Region 4 Market Description, South Atlantic. Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Region 4 Market Description Summary provides information that can be used in developing an understanding of the potential markets for clean coal technologies (CCTs) in the South Atlantic Region. This region (which geographically is Federal Region 4) consists of the following eight states: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. In order to understand the potential market. A description is provided of the region`s energy use, power generation capacity, and potential growth. Highlights of state government activities that could have a bearing on commercial deployment of CCTs are also presented. The potential markets characterized in this summary center on electric power generation by investor-owned, cooperative, and municipal electric utilities and involve planned new capacity additions and actions taken by utilities to comply with Phases I and II of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. Regulations, policies, utility business strategies, and organizational changes that could impact the role of CCTs as a utility option are identified and discussed. The information used to develop the Region 4 Market Description is based mainly on an extensive review of plans and annual reports of 29 investor-owned, cooperative, and municipal coal-using electric utilities and public information on strategies and actions for complying with the CAAA of 1990.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

1980 Active-Solar Installations Survey  

SciTech Connect

The survey covers active solar installations made during and prior to calendar year 1980. As the first survey of active solar installations in the United States, the objective was to establish a national baseline information system that could provide current data on residential and commercial active solar installations as well as a listing of firms involved in the active solar industry, including installers. Potential respondents were identified from regional lists of solar equipment dealers and installers compiled by each Regional Solar Energy Center (RSEC). The RSEC lists were computerized and combined into a mailing list of 5466 company names and addresses. An additional 1619 referrals, were provided by survey respondents from the RSEC list. However, because of resource constraints, 981 of these referrals were not included in the survey. To substantiate that the results of this survey represent accurate statistics on the number of active solar installations in the United States, a comparison was made to the Solar Collector Manufacturing Survey installations. (PSB)

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

NETL: ARRA Regional Carbon Sequestration Training Centers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARRA Regional Carbon Sequestration Training Centers ARRA Regional Carbon Sequestration Training Centers ARRA Logo Projects in this area are funded, in whole or in part, with funds appropriated by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) and will train personnel in the implementation of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology. While CCS technologies offer great potential for reducing CO2 emissions and mitigating potential climate change, deploying these technologies will require a significantly expanded workforce trained in the various specialties that are currently underrepresented in the United States. Education and training activities undertaken in this area are developing a future generation of geologists, scientists, and engineers that will provide the human capital and skills required for implementing CCS technologies.

369

Application of an all-solid-state diode-laser-based sensor for carbon monoxide detection by optical absorption in the 4.4 ? 4.8 µm spectral region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An all-solid-state continuous-wave (cw) laser system for mid-infrared absorption measurements of the carbon monoxide (CO) molecule has been developed and demonstrated. The single-mode, tunable output of an external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) is difference-frequency mixed (DFM) with the output of a 550-mW diode-pumped cw Nd:YAG laser in a periodically-poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal to produce tunable cw radiation in the mid-infrared. The wavelength of the 860-nm ECDL can be coarse tuned between 860.78 to 872.82 nm allowing the sensor to be operated in the 4.4 ? 4.8 µm region. Results from single-pass mid-IR direct absorption experiments for CO concentration measurements are discussed. CO measurements were performed in CO/CO2/N2 mixtures in a room temperature gas cell that allowed the evaluation of the sensor operation and data reduction procedures. Field testing was performed at two locations: in the exhaust of a well-stirred reactor (WSR) at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and the exhaust of a gas turbine at Honeywell Engines and Systems. Field tests demonstrated the feasibility of the sensor for operation in harsh combustion environments but much improvement in the sensor design and operation was required. Experiments in near-adiabatic hydrogen/air CO2-doped flames were performed featuring two-line thermometry in the 4.8 µm spectral region. The sensor concentration measurement uncertainty was estimated at 2% for gas cell testing. CO concentration measurements agreed within 15% of conventional extractive sampling at WSR, and for the flame experiments the repeatability of the peak absorption gives a system uncertainty of 10%. The noise equivalent CO detection limit for these experiments was estimated at 2 ppm per meter, for combustion gas at 1000 K assuming a SNR ratio of 1.

Rodolfo, Barron Jimenez

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

NETL: News Release - Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 10, 2004 Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership Program Adds Partners Seven States, Thirteen Organizations Added; Will Help Develop Sequestration Options WASHINGTON, DC -...

371

Turbine Tip Clearance Region De-Sensitization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TURBINE TIP CLEARANCE REGION DE-SENSITIZATION Penn State & U. of Minnesota Lakshminarayana, Camci & Goldstein 079 * Experimental aerodynamic studies leading to the weakening...

372

Browse By Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Categories Countries (211) States (51) Congressional Districts (437) Counties (3142) Cities (27937) Clean Energy Economy Regions (7) Programs (656) Tools (1483) Retrieved from...

373

Regional Districts (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Districts (Texas) Regional Districts (Texas) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility StateProvincial Govt Industrial Construction...

374

Electric Restructuring Outreach Activities and Information Disseminati...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Outreach Activities and Information Dissemination to State Public Utility Regulators Electric Restructuring Outreach Activities and Information Dissemination to State Public...

375

Structural studies of conformational changes of proteins upon phosphorylation: Structures of activated CheY, CheY-N16-FliM complex, and AAA {sup +} ATPase domain of NtrC1 in both inactive and active states  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Protein phosphorylation is a general mechanism for signal transduction as well as regulation of cellular function. Unlike phosphorylation in eukaryotic systems that uses Ser/Thr for the sites of modification, two-component signal transduction systems, which are prevalent in bacteria, archea, and lower eukaryotes, use an aspartate as the site of phosphorylation. Two-component systems comprise a histidine kinase and a receiver domain. The conformational change of the receiver domain upon phosphorylation leads to signal transfer to the downstream target, a process that had not been understood well at the molecular level. The transient nature of the phospho-Asp bond had made structural studies difficult. The discovery of an excellent analogue for acylphosphate, BeF{sub 3}{sup -}, enabled structural study of activated receiver domains. The structure of activated Chemotaxis protein Y (CheY) was determined both by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. These structures revealed the molecular basis of the conformational change that is coupled to phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of the conserved Asp residue in the active site allows hydrogen bonding of the T87 O{gamma} to phospho-aspartate, which in turn leads to the rotation of Y106 into the ''in'' position (termed Y-T coupling). The structure of activated CheY complexed with the 16 N-terminal residues of FliM (N16-FliM), its target, was also determined by X-ray crystallography and confirmed the proposed mechanism of activation (Y-T coupling). First, N16-FliM binds to the region on CheY that undergoes a significant conformational change. Second, the ''in'' position of Y106 presents a better binding surface for FliM because the sidechain of Y106 in the inactive form of CheY (''out'' position) sterically interferes with binding of N16-FliM. In addition to confirmation of Y-T coupling, the structure of the activated CheY-N16-FliM complex suggested that the N16-FliM might be sandwiched between CheY and the remainder of FliM to change the direction of flagellar rotation.

Lee, Seok-Yong

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

376

Wind Powering America FY06 Activities Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wind Powering America FY06 Activities Summary reflects the accomplishments of our state wind working groups, our programs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and our partner organizations. The national WPA team remains a leading force for moving wind energy forward in the United States. WPA continues to work with its national, regional, and state partners to communicate the opportunities and benefits of wind energy to a diverse set of stakeholders. WPA now has 29 state wind working groups (welcoming New Jersey, Indiana, Illinois, and Missouri in 2006) that form strategic alliances to communicate wind's benefits to the state stakeholders. More than 120 members of national and state public and private sector organizations from 34 states attended the 5th Annual WPA All-States Summit in Pittsburgh in June.

Not Available

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

CDKN-CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional Climate Change Resilience Framework Jump to: navigation, search Name CDKN-CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional Climate Change Resilience Framework Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development Partner Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC), Caribbean Community Heads of State (CARICOM) Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Market analysis, Pathways analysis Website http://cdkn.org/project/planni Program Start 2010 Country Antigua and Barbuda, The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Montserrat, Saint Lucia, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago

378

Building Stronger State Energy Partnerships with the U.S. Department of Energy  

SciTech Connect

This final technical report details the results of total work efforts and progress made from October 2007 – September 2011 under the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) cooperative agreement DE-FC26-07NT43264, Building Stronger State Energy Partnerships with the U.S. Department of Energy. Major topical project areas in this final report include work efforts in the following areas: Energy Assurance and Critical Infrastructure, State and Regional Technical Assistance, Regional Initiative, Regional Coordination and Technical Assistance, and International Activities in China. All required deliverables have been provided to the National Energy Technology Laboratory and DOE program officials.

Marks, Kate

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

379

Alaska Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Region Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Alaska Geothermal Region Details Areas (54) Power Plants (1) Projects (2) Techniques (0) Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States[1] Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States[2] References ↑ "Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States" ↑ "Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States" Geothermal Region Data State(s) Alaska Area 1,717,854 km²1,717,854,000,000 m² 663,091.644 mi² 18,490,808,670,600 ft² 2,054,553,384,000 yd² 424,490,312.67 acres USGS Resource Estimate for this Region Identified Mean Potential 677 MW677,000 kW

380

Northeast Regional Biomass Energy Program. Progress report, 9th year, October--December 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is entering its ninth year of operation. The management and the objectives have virtually remained unchanged and are stated as follows. The program conducted by NRBP has three basic features: (1) a state grant component that provides funds (with a 50 percent matching requirement) to each of the states in the region to strengthen and integrate the work of state agencies involved in biomass energy; (2) a series of technical reports and studies in areas that have been identified as being of critical importance to the development of biomass energy in the region; and (3) a continuous long range planning component with heavy private sector involvement that helps to identify activities necessary to spur greater development and use of biomass energy in the Northeast.

O`Connell, R.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional activities state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Northeast Regional Biomass Energy Program. Quarterly report, 9th year, January--March 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) is entering its ninth year of operation. The management and the objectives have virtually remained unchanged and are stated as follows. The program conducted by NRBP has three basic features: (1) a state grant component that provides funds (with a 50 percent matching requirement) to each of the states in the region to strengthen and integrate the work of state agencies involved in biomass energy; (2) a series of technical reports and studies in areas that have been identified as being of critical importance to the development of biomass energy in the region; and (3) a continuous long range planning component with heavy private sector involvement that helps to identify activities necessary to spur greater development and use of biomass energy in the Northeast.

O`Connell, R.A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological Survey Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Many Geological Survey Organisations (GSOs) are using 3D modelling software technology for a vast variety of applications. Initially many 3D tools were designed for the exploitation of digital seismic mass data existing in hydrocarbon exploration industry. Accordingly, GSOs have to adapt available software and to modify it to their special requirements, defining their own best practice. The Geological Survey of the Bavarian Environment Agency has developed procedures and workflows for a variety of

383

EIA'S Natural Gas Residential Programs by State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Marketer List: Marketer Summary Table: ... State Public Utility Commission Web Sites. Status of State Electric Industry Restructuring Activity.

384

Static Temperature Survey At U.S. South Region (Smith & Dees, 1982) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Static Temperature Survey At U.S. South Region (Smith & Dees, 1982) Static Temperature Survey At U.S. South Region (Smith & Dees, 1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At U.S. South Region (Smith & Dees, 1982) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. South Region Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes (Louisiana & Mississippi): "cased, non-flowing boreholes at least 150 m deep were sought on an opportunistic basis through state geological surveys and U.S. Geological Survey offices. Representative samples of drill cuttings were used for laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity. A total of 38 new heat flow values, ranging from less than 1 heat flow unit (hfu) (41.8 mW/m 2) to more than 2 hfu, were determined (Smith and Dees, in

385

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Characterization and Conceptual Modeling of Magmatically-Heated and Deep-Circulation, High-Temperature Hydrothermal Systems in the Basin and Range and Cordilleran United States, Moore, Nash, Nemcok, Lutz, Norton, Kaspereit, Berard, van de Putte, Johnson and Deymonaz. Utilizing a wealth of formerly proprietary subsurface samples and datasets for exemplary high-temperature western U.S. geothermal systems, develop and publish detailed and refined new conceptual and numerical hydrothermal-history

386

Geothermal Literature Review At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal Literature Review At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Characterization and Conceptual Modeling of Magmatically-Heated and Deep-Circulation, High-Temperature Hydrothermal Systems in the Basin and Range and Cordilleran United States, Moore, Nash, Nemcok, Lutz, Norton,

387

Final Scientific Report - Wind Powering America State Outreach Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Wind Powering America State Outreach Project was to facilitate the adoption of effective state legislation, policy, finance programs, and siting best practices to accelerate public acceptance and development of wind energy. This was accomplished by Clean Energy States Alliance (CESA) through provision of informational tools including reports and webinars as well as the provision of technical assistance to state leaders on wind siting, policy, and finance best practices, identification of strategic federal-state partnership activities for both onshore and offshore wind, and participation in regional wind development collaboratives. The Final Scientific Report - Wind Powering America State Outreach Project provides a summary of the objectives, activities, and outcomes of this project as accomplished by CESA over the period 12/1/2009 - 11/30/2011.

Sinclair, Mark; Margolis, Anne

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Toward Regional Climate Services: The Role of NOAA's Regional Climate Centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For 25 yr, the Regional Climate Center (RCC) program has provided climate services to six regions encompassing the United States. The service provided by the RCCs has evolved through this time to become an efficient, user-driven program that ...

Arthur T. DeGaetano; Timothy J. Brown; Steven D. Hilberg; Kelly Redmond; Kevin Robbins; Peter Robinson; Martha Shulski; Marjorie McGuirk

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

NETL: Carbon Storage - Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership MORE INFO Additional information related to ongoing SECARB efforts can be found on their website. The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB), managed by the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB), represents a 13-State region, including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia, and portions of Kentucky and West Virginia. SECARB is comprised of over 100 participants representing Federal and State governments, industry, academia, and non-profit organizations. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region The primary goal of SECARB is to develop the necessary framework and

390

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP THE UNITED  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 ATLAS CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB), managed by the Southern States Energy Board, represents a 13-state region, including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, eastern Texas, and Virginia and portions of Kentucky and West Virginia. SECARB comprises more than 100 participants representing Federal and state governments, industry, academia, and nonprofit organizations. The primary goal of SECARB is to develop the necessary framework and infrastructure to conduct field tests of carbon storage technologies and to

391

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Regional Definitions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Definitions Map Definitions Map About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Regional Definitions The regions defined in the above map are based upon the 10 Federal Regions of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The State groupings are as follows: Northeast Region - Federal Region 1: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Federal Region 2: New Jersey, and New York. Federal Region 3:Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. Southeast Region - Federal Region 4: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. Midwest Region - Federal Region 5: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and

392

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Estimated truck transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 8. Estimated truck transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama W W W W W Alabama Georgia - - W - - Alabama Indiana W W - - - Colorado Colorado W W W W W Colorado Michigan - - W - - Illinois Florida W - - - - Illinois Illinois $7.51 $4.74 $3.37 -33.0 -28.8 Illinois Indiana W W - - - Illinois Minnesota W W - - - Illinois Missouri $21.73 $20.23 $13.30 -21.8 -34.3 Indiana Alabama - W - - -

393

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data 5. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama Alabama W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Georgia W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Illinois - - - - - W W W W - W Colorado Alabama - W W W W W W W W - W Colorado Arizona W W W W W W W W W W W Colorado Arkansas - - - - W W W W - - -

394

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data 4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama Alabama W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Georgia W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Illinois - - - - - W W W W - W Colorado Alabama - W W W W W W W W - W Colorado Arizona W W W W W W W W W W W Colorado Arkansas - - - - W W W W - - -

395

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data 6. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama Alabama W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Georgia W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Illinois - - - - - W W W W - W Colorado Alabama - W W W W W W W W - W Colorado Arizona W W W W W W W W W W W Colorado Arkansas - - - - W W W W - - -

396

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 5. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama $4.31 $4.36 $5.01 7.9 15.0 Alabama Ohio W - - - - Colorado Alabama W - - - - Colorado Florida $11.08 $12.65 $13.27 9.4 4.9 Colorado Indiana $6.29 W - - - Colorado Iowa W - - - - Colorado Kentucky W - - - - Colorado Mississippi - - W - - Colorado Ohio - W - - - Colorado Tennessee W - - - - Illinois Alabama W $13.15 $14.28 W 8.6

397

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 6. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama $3.97 $3.97 $4.52 6.7 13.7 Alabama Ohio W - - - - Colorado Alabama W - - - - Colorado Florida $10.21 $11.53 $11.95 8.2 3.7 Colorado Indiana $5.79 W - - - Colorado Iowa W - - - - Colorado Kentucky W - - - - Colorado Mississippi - - W - - Colorado Ohio - W - - - Colorado Tennessee W - - - - Illinois Alabama W $11.99 $12.87 W 7.3

398

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Estimated truck transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 7. Estimated truck transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama W W W W W Alabama Georgia - - W - - Alabama Indiana W W - - - Colorado Colorado W W W W W Colorado Michigan - - W - - Illinois Florida W - - - - Illinois Illinois $8.16 $5.20 $3.75 -32.2 -27.9 Illinois Indiana W W - - - Illinois Minnesota W W - - - Illinois Missouri $23.60 $22.20 $14.77 -20.9 -33.5 Indiana Alabama - W - - -

399

Ground Gravity Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP)...

400

Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional activities state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Florida State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to conserve the state's oil and gas resources and minimize environmental impacts from exploration and production operations through regulation and inspection activities. The...

402

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnership Presented to: Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Annual Review Meeting Development Phase Field Tests Pittsburgh, PA October 5, 2010 Presented by: Gerald R. Hill, Ph.D. Senior Technical Advisor Southern States Energy Board Acknowledgements  This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory.  Cost share and research support provided by SECARB/SSEB Carbon Management Partners Through innovations in energy and environmental policies, programs and technologies, the Southern States Energy Board enhances economic development and the quality of life in the South. - SSEB Mission Statement SSEB Carbon Management Program  Established 2003  Characterizing Southeast Region

403

Particle-resolved simulation of aerosol size, composition, mixing state, and the associated optical and cloud condensation nuclei activation properties in an evolving urban plume  

SciTech Connect

The recently developed particle-resolved aerosol box model PartMC-MOSAIC was used to simulate the evolution of aerosol mixing state and the associated optical and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation properties in an idealized urban plume. The model explicitly resolved the size and composition of individual particles from a number of sources and tracked their evolution due to condensation/evaporation, coagulation, emission, and dilution. The ensemble black carbon (BC) specific absorption cross section increased by 40% over the course of two days as a result of BC aging by condensation and coagulation. Three- and four-fold enhancements in CCN/CN ratios were predicted to occur within 6 hours for 0.2% and 0.5% supersaturations (S), respectively. The particle-resolved results were used to evaluate the errors in the optical and CCN activation properties that would be predicted by a conventional sectional framework that assumes monodisperse, internally-mixed particles within each bin. This assumption artificially increased the ensemble BC specific absorption by 14-30% and decreased the single scattering albedo by 0.03-0.07 while the bin resolution had a negligible effect. In contrast, the errors in CCN/CN ratios were sensitive to the bin resolution, and they depended on the chosen supersaturation. For S = 0.2%, the CCN/CN ratio predicted using 100 internally-mixed bins was up to 25% higher than the particle-resolved results, while it was up to 125% higher using 10 internally-mixed bins. Errors introduced in the predicted optical and CCN properties by neglecting coagulation were also quantified.

Zaveri, Rahul A.; Barnard, James C.; Easter, Richard C.; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew

2010-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

404

Region 9: Pacific Rim Region, Regional Sustainability Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REGION 9: PACIFIC RIM REGION REGION 9: PACIFIC RIM REGION Regional Sustainability Plan Presented by Ruth Cox Region 9 Regional Administrator Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) May 22 nd , 2013 REGION 9 INFORMATION MANAGE Federal space  36 million RSF in Region Nine * 173 owned buildings, 955 leased buildings * 100,000 Federal workers housed DESIGN & CONSTRUCT new Federal buildings $1.4 billion in FY12 capital construction projects $318 million in FY13 - Los Angeles Courthouse project PROVIDE PROCUREMENT LEADERSHIP across the Federal government  $1.24 billion in total GSA Schedule sales in FY12  $468 million to small businesses  34,000 fleet vehicles, 53% of which are Alternative Fuel Vehicles Pacific Rim Profile - CA, AZ, NV, HI

405

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP (SECARB)  

SciTech Connect

The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is on schedule and within budget projections for the work completed during the first year of its two year program. Work during the semiannual period (third and fourth quarter) of the project (April 1--September 30, 2004) was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix.'' Under Task 1.0 Define Geographic Boundaries of the Region, Texas and Virginia were added during the second quarter of the project and no geographical changes occurred during the third or fourth quarter of the project. Under Task 2.0 Characterize the Region, general mapping and screening of sources and sinks has been completed, with integration and Geographical Information System (GIS) mapping ongoing. The first step focused on the macro level characterization of the region. Subsequent characterization will focus on smaller areas having high sequestration potential. Under Task 3.0 Identify and Address Issues for Technology Deployment, SECARB has completed a preliminary assessment of safety, regulatory, permitting, and accounting frameworks within the region to allow for wide-scale deployment of promising terrestrial and geologic sequestration approaches. Under Task 4.0 Develop Public Involvement and Education Mechanisms, SECARB has conducted a survey and focus group meeting to gain insight into approaches that will be taken to educate and involve the public. Task 5.0 and 6.0 will be implemented beginning October 1, 2004. Under Task 5.0 Identify the Most Promising Capture, Sequestration, and Transport Options, SECARB will evaluate findings from work performed during the first year and shift the focus of the project team from region-wide mapping and characterization to a more detailed screening approach designed to identify the most promising opportunities. Under Task 6.0 Prepare Action Plans for Implementation and Technology Validation Activity, the SECARB team will develop an integrated approach to implementing and setting up measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) programs for the most promising opportunities. During this semiannual period special attention was provided to Texas and Virginia, which were added to the SECARB region, to ensure a smooth integration of activities with the other 9 states. Milestones completed and submitted during the third and fourth quarter included: Q3-FY04--Complete initial development of plans for GIS; and Q4-FYO4--Complete preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues.

Kenneth J. Nemeth

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Fine-grained clay fraction (,0.2 {mu}m): An interesting tool to approach the present thermal and permeability state in active geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have investigated by X-ray diffraction the very fine grained secondary minerals (< 0.2 {micro}m) developed in geothermal systems, in relation with their present thermal and permeability state. Because the smallest particles are the most reactive part of a rock, they are the youngest mineral phases of the geothermal fields. This study has been performed on two active geothermal fields: Milos field, Greece (130 < T < 320 C) and Chipilapa field, Salvador (90 < T < 215 C). In the Milos field, the mineralogical composition of the < 0.2 {micro}m clay fraction observed in the reservoir strongly differs from the overlying altered metamorphic schists in the presence of abundant quantities of saponite and talc/saponite interstratified minerals at unusually high temperature. These phases are considered to be kinetically control-led ''metastable'' minerals which rapidly evolve towards actinolite and talc for present temperatures higher than 300 C. Their occurrence is a good indicator of discharge in highly permeable zones. In the geothermal field of Chipilapa, the mineralogical composition of the < 0.2 {micro}m clay fractions fairly agrees with the temperatures presently measured in the wells, whereas several discrepancies may be pointed out from the compositions of coarser clay fractions (< 5 {micro}m) which contain minerals inherited from higher temperature stages. Permeable zones may be evidenced from an increase of expandable components in the interstratified minerals and a decrease of the coherent domain of the unexpandable clay particles (chlorite).

Patrier, P.; Papapanagiotou, P.; Beaufort, D.; Traineau, H.; Bril, H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Western Region  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Region Western Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Western Region Overview | Transportation South | Transportation North | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links Overview Ten interstate and nine intrastate natural gas pipeline companies provide transportation services to and within the Western Region (Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington), the fewest number serving any region (see Table below). Slightly more than half the capacity entering the region is on natural gas pipeline systems that carry natural gas from the Rocky Mountain area and the Permian and San Juan basins. These latter systems enter the region at the New Mexico-Arizona and Nevada-Utah State lines. The rest of the capacity arrives on natural gas pipelines that access Canadian natural gas at the Idaho and Washington State border crossings with British Columbia, Canada.

408

Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii). Task 3: water resources evaluation. Topical report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii). Task 3: water resources evaluation. Topical report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The fundamental objective of the water resources analysis was to assess the availability of surface and ground water for potential use as power plant make-up water in the major geothermal areas of California. The analysis was concentrated on identifying the major sources of surface and ground water, potential limitations on the usage of this water, and the

409

Alaska Region Offshore GIS Data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region Offshore GIS Data Region Offshore GIS Data Dataset Summary Description The US Department of Interior's (DOI) Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) published GIS data of offshore information for the Alaska Region. The data are available as GIS shapefiles. The types of data include: active leases, boundary of US jurisdiction for mineral development, and fed/state boundaries. All .zip files included here contain shapefiles, and most also contain supplemental metadata. Note: metadata appears to be available for all shapefiles from BOEMRE, but not all of the links on the BOEMRE website (http://www.boemre.gov/offshore/mapping/alaska.htm#OPD) work. Source US Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) Date Released July 01st, 2002 (12 years ago)

410

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Search the State Incentives and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EERE Advanced Manufacturing Office State & Regional Partnerships State Incentives & Resource Database Site Map Printable Version Bookmark and Share Home About State &...

411

Investment in Lake States Timberland June 24, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Lake States Region Scott Henker, Senior Resource Manager Pete Coutu, Marketing Manager Our foresters

412

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 8. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama $13.29 $12.39 $13.93 2.4 12.5 Alabama Georgia $17.62 $17.84 $20.09 6.8 12.6 Alabama Kentucky - W - - - Alabama New Jersey W - - - - Alabama Pennsylvania - W - - - Arizona Arizona W W W W W Colorado Alabama $31.79 $27.66 $24.93 -11.5 -9.9 Colorado Arizona $25.97 W - - - Colorado Arkansas W - - - - Colorado California - $34.20 $46.22 - 35.1 Colorado Colorado $13.04 $7.72 $8.13 -21.1 5.3

413

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama $14.43 $13.59 $15.46 3.5 13.8 Alabama Georgia $19.13 $19.58 $22.30 8.0 13.9 Alabama Kentucky - W - - - Alabama New Jersey W - - - - Alabama Pennsylvania - W - - - Arizona Arizona W W W W W Colorado Alabama $34.52 $30.35 $27.67 -10.5 -8.8 Colorado Arizona $28.20 W - - - Colorado Arkansas W - - - - Colorado California - $37.53 $51.30 - 36.7 Colorado Colorado $14.16 $8.47 $9.02 -20.2 6.6

414

Ocean - Regional Planning Efforts | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Planning Efforts Regional Planning Efforts Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Regional Planning Efforts Marine planning is a science-based process that provides transparent information about ocean use and guarantees the public and stakeholders a voice early on in decisions affecting the uses of the marine environment. It is an inclusive, bottom-up approach that gives the Federal Government, States, and Tribes, with input from local communities, stakeholders, and the public, the ability to make informed decisions on how best to optimize the use of and protect the ocean, coasts, and Great Lakes. Under the National Ocean Policy, the United States is subdivided into nine regional planning areas. Within each region, Federal, State, and Tribal

415

Flow Test At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Snake River Plain Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness...

416

Geothermal Literature Review At U.S. West Region (Skokan, 1993...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At U.S. West Region (Skokan, 1993) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region...

417

Geothermal Literature Review At U.S. West Region (Blackwell,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At U.S. West Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West...

418

Micro-Earthquake At Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Micro-Earthquake At Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region (1976) Exploration Activity Details...

419

Geographic Information System At U.S. West Region (Williams ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At U.S. West Region (Williams & Deangelo, 2008) Exploration Activity Details...

420

Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blewitt...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "regional activities state" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Modeling-Computer Simulations At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At U.S. West Region Modeling-Computer Simulations At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Characterization and Conceptual Modeling of Magmatically-Heated and Deep-Circulation, High-Temperature Hydrothermal Systems in the Basin and Range and Cordilleran United States, Moore, Nash, Nemcok, Lutz, Norton, Kaspereit, Berard, van de Putte, Johnson and Deymonaz. Utilizing a wealth of formerly proprietary subsurface samples and datasets for exemplary high-temperature western U.S. geothermal systems, develop and publish detailed and refined new conceptual and numerical hydrothermal-history models of fundamental scientific import but, more importantly, of use to

422

Georgia/Alabama regional seismographic network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to contribute data and analyses conducive to the development of criteria for establishing earthquake hazard potential in the southeastern United States. The first task is to install and maintain the Georgia/Alabama seismic network. The seismic network consists of about 21 stations in Alabama, Georgia, and adjoining regions of southeastern Tennessee and South Carolina. The seismic net includes three three-component short period stations and operates completely on solar power. The second task is to monitor the seismic activity in southeastern Tennessee, northern Alabama, and Georgia. The data are to be used in appropriate topical studies. Five topical studies achieved notable conclusions or were completed during the reporting period of July 1986 to June 1987. The principal conclusions are summarized and presented in this paper. 11 refs., 26 figs., 3 tabs.

Long, L.T. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (USA). School of Geophysical Sciences)

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Studying Transition Region Phenomena with Solar-B/EIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transition region lines in active regions can become strongly enhanced in coronal footpoints and active region blinkers. The weak transition region lines found in the Solar-B/EIS wavebands will thus become useful for diagnostic studies of these events. EIS count rates predicted from SOHO/CDS spectra are presented, and a Mg VII density diagnostic is highlighted.

P. R. Young

2007-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

424

Template:GeothermalRegion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeothermalRegion GeothermalRegion Jump to: navigation, search This is the GeothermalRegion template. To define a new Geothermal Region, please use the Geothermal Region form. Parameters Map - The map of the region. State - The state in which the resource area is located. Area - The estimated size of the area in which the resource area is located, in km². IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential - The identified hydrothermal electricity generation potential in megawatts, from the USGS resource estimate. UndiscoveredHydrothermalPotential - The estimated undiscovered hydroelectric generation potential in megawatts from the USGS resource estimate. PlannedCapacity - The total planned capacity for the region in megawatts. Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate - The number of plants

425

Regional Districts, Commissions, and Authorities (South Carolina) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regional Districts, Commissions, and Authorities (South Carolina) Regional Districts, Commissions, and Authorities (South Carolina) Regional Districts, Commissions, and Authorities (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Regional Districts, Commissions, and Authorities

426

Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration...

427

RTG resource book for western states and provinces: Final proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The Western Interstate Energy Board held a workshop and liaison activities among western states, provinces, and utilities on the formation of Regional Transmission Groups (RTGs). Purpose of the activities was to examine the policy implications for western states and provinces in the formation of RTGs in the West, the implications for western ratepayers and utilities of the RTG formation and potential impacts of RTGs on the western electricity system. The workshop contributed to fulfilling the transmission access and competition objectives of Title VII of the Energy Policy Act of 1992.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

LLW Forum summary report: Volume 2, Number 1.1, February 1994: Low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information presented for compacts and their home states includes: regulatory and program responsibility; siting responsibility, other involvement; siting; licensing; development costs; and disposal facility operation.

Norris, C. [ed.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Independent Oversight Activity Report for Catholic University of America Vitreous State Laboratory Tour and Discussion of Experiments Conducted in Support of Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Select Systems Design, November 18, 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Number: HIAR-VSL-2013-11-18 Site: Catholic University of America - Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Catholic University of America Vitreous State Laboratory Tour and Discussion of Experiments Conducted in Support of Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Select Systems Design Date of Activity : 11/18/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) is the contractor responsible for the design and construction of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection. BNI is

430

Spectral Analysis of Station Pressure as an Indicator of Climatological Variations in Synoptic-Scale Activity in the Eastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A substantial decline in North American cyclone and anticyclone activity has been documented by several recent studies based on counts of disturbance tracks. An independent method of assessing long-term trends in synoptic-scale activity based on ...

David A. Barber; Jerry M. Davis; Allen J. Riordan

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Cuttings Analysis At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Cuttings Analysis At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region Exploration Technique Cuttings Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Characterization and Conceptual Modeling of Magmatically-Heated and Deep-Circulation, High-Temperature Hydrothermal Systems in the Basin and Range and Cordilleran United States, Moore, Nash, Nemcok, Lutz, Norton, Kaspereit, Berard, van de Putte, Johnson and Deymonaz. Utilizing a wealth

432

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, 2005) Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Characterization and Conceptual Modeling of Magmatically-Heated and Deep-Circulation, High-Temperature Hydrothermal Systems in the Basin and Range and Cordilleran United States, Moore, Nash, Nemcok, Lutz, Norton, Kaspereit, Berard, van de Putte, Johnson and Deymonaz. Utilizing a wealth of formerly proprietary subsurface samples and datasets for exemplary high-temperature western U.S. geothermal systems, develop and publish

433

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dixie Valley data that help to

434

Appendix K: Regional Definitions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

K K Regional Definitions The six basic country groupings used in this report (Figure K1) are defined as follows: *OECD (18 percent of the 2008 world population): North America-United States, Canada, and Mexico; OECD Europe-Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxem- bourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. OECD Asia-Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand. *Non-OECD (82 percent of the 2008 world popula- tion): - Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia (5 percent of the 2008 world population)-Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Malta, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovenia,

435

U.S. Department of Energy Region 6 Radiological Assistance Program response plan. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upon request, the DOE, through the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP), makes available and will provide radiological advice, monitoring, and assessment activities during radiological incidents where the release of radioactive materials is suspected or has occurred. Assistance will end when the need for such assistance is over, or if there are other resources available to adequately address the incident. The implementation of the RAP is usually accomplished through the recommendation of the DOE Regional Coordinating Office`s (RCO) on duty Regional Response Coordinator (RRC) with the approval of the Regional Coordinating Office Director (RCOD). The DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is the designated RCO for DOE Region 6 RAP. The purpose of this document is: to describe the mechanism for responding to any organization or private citizen requesting assistance to radiological incidents; to coordinate radiological assistance among participating federal agencies, states, and tribes in DOE Region 6; and to describe the RAP Scaled Response concept of operations.

Jakubowski, F.M.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Influences of the Kuroshio/Oyashio Extensions on Air–Sea Heat Exchanges and Storm-Track Activity as Revealed in Regional Atmospheric Model Simulations for the 2003/04 Cold Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Influences of oceanic fronts in the Kuroshio and Oyashio Extension (KOE) region on the overlying atmosphere are investigated by comparing a pair of atmospheric regional model hindcast experiments for the 2003/04 cold season, one with the observed ...

Bunmei Taguchi; Hisashi Nakamura; Masami Nonaka; Shang-Ping Xie

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z