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1

Snake River Plain Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Snake River Plain Geothermal Region Snake River Plain Geothermal Region (Redirected from Snake River Plain) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Snake River Plain Geothermal Region Details Areas (8) Power Plants (1) Projects (2) Techniques (11) Map: {{{Name}}} "The Snake River Plain is a large arcuate structural trough that characterizes the topography of southern Idaho that can be divided into three sections: western, central, and eastern. The western Snake River Plain is a large tectonic graben or rift valley filled with several km of lacustrine (lake) sediments; the sediments are underlain by rhyolite and basalt, and overlain by basalt. The western plain began to form around 11-12 Ma with the eruption of rhyolite lavas and ignimbrites. The western plain is not parallel to North American Plate motion, and lies at a high

2

Flow Test At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP)...

3

Snake River Plain Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Snake River Plain Geothermal Region Details Areas (8) Power Plants (1) Projects (2) Techniques (11) Map: {{{Name}}} "The Snake River Plain is a large arcuate structural trough that characterizes the topography of southern Idaho that can be divided into three sections: western, central, and eastern. The western Snake River Plain is a large tectonic graben or rift valley filled with several km of lacustrine (lake) sediments; the sediments are underlain by rhyolite and basalt, and overlain by basalt. The western plain began to form around 11-12 Ma with the eruption of rhyolite lavas and ignimbrites. The western plain is not parallel to North American Plate motion, and lies at a high angle to the central and eastern Snake River Plains. Its morphology is

4

Well Log Techniques At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Log Techniques At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Well Log Techniques At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Well Log Techniques At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Snake River Plain Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Well Log Techniques Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Well_Log_Techniques_At_Snake_River_Plain_Region_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=600470" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

5

Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration DOE Geothermal...

6

Development of a regional groundwater flow model for the area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a study conducted to develop a regional groundwater flow model for the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer in the area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The model was developed to support Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-04 groundwater flow and transport studies. The products of this study are this report and a set of computational tools designed to numerically model the regional groundwater flow in the Eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. The objective of developing the current model was to create a tool for defining the regional groundwater flow at the INEL. The model was developed to (a) support future transport modeling for WAG 10-04 by providing the regional groundwater flow information needed for the WAG 10-04 risk assessment, (b) define the regional groundwater flow setting for modeling groundwater contaminant transport at the scale of the individual WAGs, (c) provide a tool for improving the understanding of the groundwater flow system below the INEL, and (d) consolidate the existing regional groundwater modeling information into one usable model. The current model is appropriate for defining the regional flow setting for flow submodels as well as hypothesis testing to better understand the regional groundwater flow in the area of the INEL. The scale of the submodels must be chosen based on accuracy required for the study.

McCarthy, J.M.; Arnett, R.C.; Neupauer, R.M. [and others

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Microearthquake surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin and Range  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin and Range surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin and Range geothermal areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Microearthquake surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin and Range geothermal areas Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: applications; Basin and Range Province; Black Rock Desert; Cassia County Idaho; earthquakes; economic geology; exploration; fracture zones; geophysical methods; geophysical surveys; geothermal energy; Humboldt County Nevada; Idaho; microearthquakes; Nevada; North America; passive systems; Pershing County Nevada; Raft River; reservoir rocks; seismic methods; seismicity; seismology; Snake River plain; surveys; United States; Western U.S. Author(s): Kumamoto, L.H.

8

Lower Snake River I | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lower Snake River I Lower Snake River I Jump to: navigation, search Name Lower Snake River I Facility Lower Snake River I Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Puget Sound Energy Developer Puget Sound Energy Energy Purchaser Puget Sound Energy Location South of Pomeroy and north of Pataha Creek in Garfield County Coordinates 46.375632°, -117.703257° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.375632,"lon":-117.703257,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

9

Snake and Columbia Rivers Sediment Sampling Project  

SciTech Connect

The disposal of dredged material in water is defined as a discharge under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act and must be evaluated in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency regulation 40 CFR 230. Because contaminant loads in the dredged sediment or resuspended sediment may affect water quality or contaminant loading, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Walla Walla District, has requested Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory to collect and chemically analyze sediment samples from areas that may be dredged near the Port Authority piers on the Snake and Columbia rivers. Sediment samples were also collected at River Mile (RM) stations along the Snake River that may undergo resuspension of sediment as a result of the drawdown. Chemical analysis included grain size, total organic carbon, total volatile solids, ammonia, phosphorus, sulfides, oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons, metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and 21 congeners of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans.

Pinza, M.R.; Word, J.Q; Barrows, E.S.; Mayhew, H.L.; Clark, D.R. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

OUTDOOR RECREATION DEMAND AND EXPENDITURES: LOWER SNAKE RIVER RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i OUTDOOR RECREATION DEMAND AND EXPENDITURES: LOWER SNAKE RIVER RESERVOIRS John R. Mc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v SECTION ONE - OUTDOOR RECREATION DEMAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Recreation Demand Methods

O'Laughlin, Jay

11

Mineral Chemistry of Basalts Recovered from Hotspot Snake River Scientific Drilling Project, Idaho: Source and Crystallization Characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineral Chemistry of Basalts Recovered from Hotspot Snake River Scientific Drilling Project, Idaho recovered by Hotspot: Snake River Scientific Drilling Project, Idaho establish crystallization conditions;ABSTRACT Mineral Chemistry of Basalts Recovered from Hotspot: Snake River Scientific Drilling Project

Seamons, Kent E.

12

New Hydropower Turbines to Save Snake River Steelhead | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydropower Turbines to Save Snake River Steelhead Hydropower Turbines to Save Snake River Steelhead New Hydropower Turbines to Save Snake River Steelhead May 24, 2010 - 1:23pm Addthis Voith Hydro installed machines at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River, located about 40 miles east of Portland, Ore., that are meant to save more fish. The next-generation machines at Ice Harbor will be even more advanced. | Photo Courtesy of Voith Hydro Voith Hydro installed machines at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River, located about 40 miles east of Portland, Ore., that are meant to save more fish. The next-generation machines at Ice Harbor will be even more advanced. | Photo Courtesy of Voith Hydro Joshua DeLung Hydropower harnesses water power to create reliable, clean and plentiful renewable energy, but dams can have an unintended impact on wildlife --

13

Distinctive upper mantle anisotropy beneath the High Lava Plains and Eastern Snake River Plain,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distinctive upper mantle anisotropy beneath the High Lava Plains and Eastern Snake River Plain and continuing with the still- ongoing volcanism in the High Lava Plains (HLP) and eastern Snake River Plain (SRP waves; shear wave splitting; high lava plains; Snake River Plain; Yellowstone. Index Terms: 8137

14

The Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches to Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title The Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description This project will implement and test a series of innovative geothermal exploration strategies in two phases. Phase 1 studies will comprise surface mapping, shallow seismic surveys, potential field surveys (gravity and magnetics), compilation of existing well data, and the construction of three dimension structure sections. Phase 2 will comprise two intermediate depth (1.5-1.6 km) slim-hole exploration wells with a full suite of geophysical borehole logs and a vertical seismic profile to extrapolate stratigraphy encountered in the well into the surrounding terrain. Both of the exploration wells will be fully cored to preserve a complete record of the volcanic stratigraphy that can be used in complementary science projects. This project will function in tandem with Project Hotspot, a continental scientific drilling project that focuses on the origin and evolution of the Yellowstone hotspot.

15

Geothermal alteration of basaltic core from the Snake River Plain, Idaho.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The Snake River Plain is located in the southern part of the state of Idaho. The eastern plain, on which this study focuses, is (more)

Sant, Christopher J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

OUTDOOR RECREATION USE AND VALUE: SNAKE RIVER BASIN OF CENTRAL IDAHO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OUTDOOR RECREATION USE AND VALUE: SNAKE RIVER BASIN OF CENTRAL IDAHO John R. McKean Agricultural . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Recreation Demand Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Recreation Demand Survey

O'Laughlin, Jay

17

Spawning Distribution of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River : Annual Report 1999.  

SciTech Connect

This report is separated into 2 chapters. The chapters are (1) Progress toward determining the spawning distribution of supplemented fall chinook salmon in the Snake River in 1999; and (2) Fall chinook salmon spawning ground surveys in the Snake River, 1999.

Garcia, Aaron P.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Salmonid Gamete Preservation in the Snake River Basin, Annual Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect

In spite of an intensive management effort, chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations in the Northwest have not recovered and are currently listed as threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. In addition to the loss of diversity from stocks that have already gone extinct, decreased genetic diversity resulting from genetic drift and inbreeding is a major concern. Reduced population and genetic variability diminishes the environmental adaptability of individual species and entire ecological communities. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), in cooperation with Washington State University and the University of Idaho, established a germplasm repository in 1992 in order to preserve the remaining salmonid diversity in the region. The germplasm repository provides long-term storage for cryopreserved gametes. Although only male gametes can be cryopreserved, conserving the male component of genetic diversity will maintain future management options for species recovery. NPT efforts have focused on preserving salmon and steelhead gametes from the major river subbasins in the Snake River basin. However, the repository is available for all management agencies to contribute gamete samples from other regions and species. In 2002 a total of 570 viable semen samples were added to the germplasm repository. This included the gametes of 287 chinook salmon from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, upper Grande Ronde River, Imnaha River (Lookingglass Hatchery), Lake Creek, South Fork Salmon River, Johnson Creek, Big Creek, Capehorn Creek, Marsh Creek, Pahsimeroi River (Pahsimeroi Hatchery), and upper Salmon River (Sawtooth Hatchery) and the gametes of 280 steelhead from the North Fork Clearwater River (Dworshak Hatchery), Fish Creek, Little Sheep Creek, Pahsimeroi River (Pahsimeroi Hatchery) and Snake River (Oxbow Hatchery). In addition, gametes from 60 Yakima River spring chinook and 34 Wenatchee River coho salmon were added to the repository by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and Columbia River Intertribal Fish Commission, respectively. To date, a total of 3,928 Columbia River salmon and steelhead gamete samples and three Kootenai River white sturgeon are preserved in the repository. Samples are stored in independent locations at the University of Idaho (UI) and Washington State University (WSU).

Young, William; Kucera, Paul

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Snakes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Snakes Snakes Nature Bulletin No. 36 October 13, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation SNAKES If you were a snake you would never have an earache or get dust in your eye. They have inner ears but no trace of an outside ear or eardrum, A sleeping snake will pay no attention to shouts or banging on a tin pan, but rouses immediately when a man or other animal walks near. Apparently snakes hear by feeling the vibrations of the earth, just as a person can hear a distant train by putting his ear to the track. Snakes are very short-sighted, their eyes being specially constructed for focusing on nearby small objects. That "glassy stare" is produced by a transparent cap or lid which covers the eye and cannot be moved. The eyeball inside is just as movable as yours.

20

EIS-0163-S: Supplemental EIS/1993 Interim Columbia and Snake Rivers Flow Improvement Measures for Salmon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Walla Walla District has prepared this statement to assess alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. The U.S. Department of Energys Bonneville Power Administration served as a cooperating agency in developing this supplement due to its key role in direct operation of the integrated and coordinated Columbia-Snake River System, and adopted this statement in March of 1993. This statement supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis Environmental Impact Statement, which evaluated ways to alter water management operations in 1992 on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers to enhance the survival of wild Snake River salmon.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "region snake river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Salmonid Gamete Preservation in the Snake River Basin : 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) populations in the Northwest are decreasing. Genetic diversity is being lost at an alarming rate. The Nez Perce Tribe (Tribe) strives to ensure availability of genetic samples of the existing male salmonid population by establishing and maintaining a germplasm repository. The sampling strategy, initiated in 1992, has been to collect and preserve male salmon and steelhead genetic diversity across the geographic landscape by sampling within the major river subbasins in the Snake River basin, assuming a metapopulation structure existed historically. Gamete cryopreservation conserves genetic diversity in a germplasm repository, but is not a recovery action for listed fish species. The Tribe was funded in 2000 by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) to coordinate gene banking of male gametes from Endangered Species Act listed steelhead and spring and summer chinook salmon in the Snake River basin. In 2000, a total of 349 viable chinook salmon semen samples from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, upper Grande Ronde River, Lookingglass Hatchery (Imnaha River stock), Rapid River Hatchery, Lake Creek, the South Fork Salmon River weir, Johnson Creek, Big Creek, Capehorn Creek, Marsh Creek, Pahsimeroi Hatchery, and Sawtooth Hatchery (upper Salmon River stock) were cryopreserved. Also, 283 samples of male steelhead gametes from Dworshak Hatchery, Fish Creek, Grande Ronde River, Imnaha River, Little Sheep Creek, Pahsimeroi Hatchery and Oxbow Hatchery were also cryopreserved. The Tribe acquired 5 frozen steelhead samples from the Selway River collected in 1994 and 15 from Fish Creek sampled in 1993 from the U.S. Geological Survey, for addition into the germplasm repository. Also, 590 cryopreserved samples from the Grande Ronde chinook salmon captive broodstock program are being stored at the University of Idaho as a long-term archive, half of the total samples. A total of 2,420 cryopreserved samples from Snake River basin steelhead and spring and summer chinook salmon, from 1992 through 2000, are stored in two independent locations at the University of Idaho and Washington State University. Two large freezer tanks are located at each university, each of which holds approximately 25% of the cryopreserved sperm. One tank at each university is considered long-term archival storage, while the other is short-term. Fertility trials were conducted at each university to test the viability of the cryopreserved chinook salmon sperm. The experiments on the 2000 frozen and thawed sperm at both universities found a fertility rate of 60-70%. This document also summarizes 1999-2000 steelhead genetic analysis report. The results of mitochondrial, nuclear DNA and microsatellite analysis found differences and shared haplotypes between the stocks of fish sampled for cryopreservation. Recommendations for future gene banking efforts include the need for establishment of a regional genome resource bank, a greater emphasis on cryopreserving wild fish, continued fertility trials, exploring field cryopreservation and genetic analysis on all fish represented in the germplasm repository.

Armstrong, Robyn; Kucera, Paul A. [Nez Perce Tribe. Dept. of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID (US)

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Snake River Plain Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Snake River Plain Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 43.136944444444°, -115° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.136944444444,"lon":-115,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

23

EA-0956: South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project, Bonneville County, Idaho  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic...

24

White Sturgeon Mitigation & Restoration in the Columbia & Snake River Upstream from Bonneville Dam  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Summary: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund the White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam Project. The project proposes to continue to carry out harvest monitoring and stock status updates coordinated with fisheries management planning, annual young-of-the year recruitment indexing, research, experimental artificial propagation, and transport of white sturgeon to less densely populated areas of the river(s). Additionally, release of hatchery-reared juveniles is proposed to evaluate release

25

Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Brood-Stock Program, 1981-1986 Final Report of Research.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Brood-stock Program was to hatch eggs from upriver stocks, rear the fish to spawning maturity, and use the resulting eggs for stock restoration in the Snake River. Approximately 15,000 eyed Snake River fall chinook salmon eggs were obtained each winter in 1981, 1982, 1983, and 1984 from various Columbia River hatcheries. Fish from these eggs were reared in dechlorinated City of Seattle water at the Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Center or in constant 10.5/degree/C groundwater at the University of Washington's Big Beef Creek Research Station. Seawater tolerance trials of 0+ age (3--5 months) juveniles in all four brood stocks were strongly suggestive of the 1+ age smoltification pattern of spring chinook salmon. Attempts to transfer 0+ age fish to marine net-pens at the Manchester Marine Experimental Station were unsuccessful during the four brood years. The only Snake River fall chinook salmon that demonstrated acceptable survival after 4 months residence in seawater were fish that were transferred as 1+ age smolts. After smolts were successfully transferred to seawater, losses were minimal for several months. However, in all Snake River chinook salmon stocks, mortality due to bacterial kidney disease (BKD) and a previously undescribed ''rosette disease'' resulted in very few maturing fish at 4 or 5 years of age. 5 refs., 7 figs.

Harrell, Lee W.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Enhanced Geothermal System Potential for Sites on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

The Snake River volcanic province overlies a thermal anomaly that extends deep into the mantle and represents one of the highest heat flow provinces in North America (Blackwell and Richards, 2004). This makes the Snake River Plain (SRP) one of the most under-developed and potentially highest producing geothermal districts in the United States. Elevated heat flow is typically highest along the margins of the topographic SRP and lowest along the axis of the plain, where thermal gradients are suppressed by the Snake River aquifer. Beneath this aquifer, however, thermal gradients rise again and may tap even higher heat flows associated with the intrusion of mafic magmas into the mid-crustal sill complex (e.g., Blackwell, 1989).

Robert K Podgorney; Thomas R. Wood; Travis L McLing; Gregory Mines; Mitchell A Plummer; Michael McCurry; Ahmad Ghassemi; John Welhan; Joseph Moore; Jerry Fairley; Rachel Wood

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Spawning Distribution of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River : Annual Report 2000.  

SciTech Connect

From 1997 to 2000, we collected data on the spawning distribution of fall chinook salmon above Lower Granite Dam as part of a five-year evaluation of three acclimation/release facilities: Pittsburgh Landing, Captain John, and Big Canyon Creek. The use of multiple facilities is intended to distribute spawning throughout the habitat normally used in the Snake and Clearwater rivers, and our study was designed to determine if this is achieved. In the Snake River, spawning normally occurs throughout a 100 mile reach. Pittsburgh Landing is located within the upper half of this reach, and Captain John is located within the lower half. In the Clearwater River, most spawning occurs within the lower 41 miles and the Big Canyon Creek facility is located therein. Our approach for determining spawning distribution was to first trap returning fish at Lower Granite Dam, identify their origin (all yearling fish were externally marked before they were released), and use radio tags and redd searches to determine where they spawned. Thus far we radio tagged 203 adult fish that were initially released at the acclimation sites. We confirmed the spawning location of 74 of these fish, 42 from releases at Pittsburgh Landing, seven from Captain John, and 25 from releases at the Big Canyon Creek facility. All of the fish from Pittsburgh Landing spawned in the Snake River, 86% within the upper half of the Snake River study area, and 14% in the lower half. Of the adult fish from Captain John, roughly 71% spawned in the lower half of the Snake River study area, 14% spawned in the upper half, and 14% spawned in the Clearwater River. Of the adult fish from releases at Big Canyon Creek, 80% spawned in the Clearwater River and 20% spawned in the Snake River (four in the lower half and one in the upper half). To augment the study, we determined the spawning locations of 16 adult fish that were directly released as subyearlings at or near the three acclimation sites. Ten of the fish were from Pittsburgh Landing, three from Big Canyon Creek, and three from the Captain John area. All of the fish from Pittsburgh Landing spawned in the Snake River (nine in the upper half, and one in the lower half). All of the fish from Big Canyon Creek spawned in the Clearwater River, and all of the fish from Captain John area spawned in the lower half of the Snake River study area. We also tagged and tracked six adult natural fish. These fish were initially captured and PIT-tagged in the Snake River when they were juveniles, and, based on our observations, all spawned in the Snake River and did not wander into other rivers after crossing Lower Granite Dam. Our results indicate that the supplementation program will accomplish its objective in terms of spawning distribution, although currently the sample size for some groups is too small for the results to be conclusive. To finish the study we plan to tag 340 fish in the fall-winter of 2001-2002, and complete the final report by November 2002.

Garcia, Aaron P.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Survival of Hatchery Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Free-Flowing Snake River and Lower Snake River Reservoirs, 1998-2001 Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect

We report results from four years (1998-2001) of an ongoing study of survival and travel time of subyearling fall chinook salmon in the Snake River. We report analyses of associations among river conditions and survival and travel time estimates, which include data from 1995 through 1997. At weekly intervals from early June to early July each year (mid-May to late June in 2001), hatchery-reared subyearling fall chinook salmon were PIT tagged at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, trucked upstream, acclimated, and released above Lower Granite Dam at Pittsburgh Landing and Billy Creek on the Snake River and at Big Canyon Creek on the Clearwater River. Each year, a small proportion of fish released were not detected until the following spring. However, the number that overwintered in the river and migrated seaward as yearlings the following spring was small and had minimal effect on survival estimates. Concurrent with our studies, a number of subyearling fall chinook salmon that reared naturally in the Snake River were caught by beach seine, PIT tagged, and released. We compared a number of characteristics of hatchery and wild fish. Hatchery and wild fish were similar in 2001, and from 1995 through 1997. Results for 1998 through 2000 showed some relatively large differences between hatchery and wild fish. However, recent information suggests that a considerable proportion of wild subyearling chinook salmon migrating in a given year may actually be stream-type (spring/summer), rather than ocean-type (fall) fish, which may account for some of the differences we have observed.

Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle, WA)

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Hydraulic Characteristics of the Lower Snake River During Periods of Juvenile Fall Chinook Migration  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a four-year study to assess hydraulic conditions in the lower Snake River. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Cold water released from the Dworshak Reservoir hypolimnion during mid- to late-summer months cools the Clearwater River far below equilibrium temperature. The volume of released cold water augments the Clearwater River, and the combined total discharge is on the order of the Snake River discharge when the two rivers meet at their confluence near the upstream edge of Lower Granite Reservoir. With typical temperature differences between the Clearwater and Snake rivers of 10C or more during July and August, the density difference between the two rivers during summer flow augmentation periods is sufficient to stratify Lower Granite Reservoir as well as the other three reservoirs downstream. Because cooling of the river is desirable for migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during this same time period, the amount of mixing and cold water entrained into Lower Granite Reservoirs epilimnion at the Clearwater/Snake River confluence is of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. Data collected during this project indicates the three reservoirs downstream of Lower Granite also stratify as direct result of flow augmentation from Dworshak Reservoir. These four lower Snake reservoirs are also heavily influenced by wind forcing at the waters surface, and during periods of low river discharge, often behave like a two-layer lake. During these periods of stratification, lower river discharge, and wind forcing, the water in the upper layer of the reservoir is held in place or moves slightly upstream. This upper layer is also exposed to surface heating and may warm up to temperatures close to equilibrium temperature. The depth of this upper warm layer and its direction of travel may also be of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. This report describes field data collection, modeling, and analysis of hydrodynamic and temperature conditions in the Lower Granite Reservoir during the summer flow augmentation periods of 2002, 2003, and 2004 plus a brief one-week period in 2005 of Lower Monumental, Little Goose, and Lower Granite Reservoirs. Circulation patterns in all four lower Snake River reservoirs were numerically simulated for periods of 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 using CE-QUAL-W2. Simulation results show that these models are sufficiently capable of matching diurnal and long term temperature and velocity changes in the reservoirs. In addition, the confluence zone of the Clearwater and Snake rivers was modeled using the 3-D model Flow3-D. This model was used to better understand mixing processing and entrainment. Once calibrated and validated, the reservoir models were used to investigate downstream impacts of alternative reservoir operation schemes, such as increasing or decreasing the ratio of Clearwater to Snake discharge. Simulation results were also linked with the particle tracking model FINS to better understand alterations of integrated metrics due to alternative operation schemes. These findings indicate that significant alterations in water temperature throughout the lower Snake River are possible by altering hypolimnetic discharges from Dworshak Reservoir and may have a significant impact on the behavior of migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon during periods of flow augmentation.

Cook, Chris B.; Dibrani, Berhon; Richmond, Marshall C.; Bleich, Matthew D.; Titzler, P. Scott; Fu, Tao

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

Dissolved Gas in the Snake and Columbia Rivers Modeled by CRiSP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dissolved Gas in the Snake and Columbia Rivers 1969-1984 Modeled by CRiSP Pamela Shaw Columbia Basin Research School of Fisheries, UW #12;Introduction These dissolved gas profiles for 1969-1984 were created using CRiSP and historic spill and flow data. In CRiSP the gas going into the tailwater

Washington at Seattle, University of

31

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report details the 2000 results from an ongoing project to monitor the migration behavior of wild spring/summer chinook salmon smolts in the Snake River Basin. The report also discusses trends in the cumulative data collected for this project from Oregon and Idaho streams since 1989.

Achord, Stephen (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Independent External Peer Review Report Lower Snake River 24 May 2013 ii  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Independent External Peer Review Report ­ Lower Snake River 24 May 2013 ii Table of Contents and Schedule 9 3.2 Selection of Panel 10 3.3 Preparation and Charge for Peer Review Panel 11 3 of Interest Questionnaire D-1 List of Figures Figure 1. IEPR Team 14 #12;Independent External Peer Review

US Army Corps of Engineers

33

Laboratory-Measured and Property-Transfer Modeled Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Snake River Plain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plain Aquifer Sediments at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Scientific Investigations Report 2008, Idaho: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific-Investigations Report 2008­5169, 14 p. #12;iii Contents Conductivity of Snake River Plain Aquifer Sediments at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho By Kim S. Perkins

34

Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Life History Investigations, Annual Report 2008.  

SciTech Connect

This study was initiated to provide empirical data and analyses on the dam passage timing, travel rate, survival, and life history variation of fall Chinook salmon that are produced in the Clearwater River. The area of interest for this study focuses on the lower four miles of the Clearwater River and its confluence with the Snake River because this is an area where many fish delay their seaward migration. The goal of the project is to increase our understanding of the environmental and biological factors that affect juvenile life history of fall Chinook salmon in the Clearwater River. The following summaries are provided for each of the individual chapters in this report.

Tiffan, Kenneth F. [U.S. Geological Survey; Connor, William P. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Bellgraph, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research : 2008 Annual Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

In March 1990, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes petitioned the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to list Snake River sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) as endangered. Snake River sockeye salmon were officially listed as endangered in November 1991 under the Endangered Species Act (56 FR 58619). In 1991, the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research Project was implemented. This project is part of an interagency effort to prevent the extinction of the Redfish Lake stock of Snake River sockeye salmon. The Shoshone-Bannock Tribal goal for this project is two tiered: the immediate goal is to increase the population of Snake River sockeye salmon while preserving the unique genetic characteristics of the evolutionarily significant unit (ESU). The Tribes long term goal is to maintain a viable population that warrants delisting and provides Tribal harvest opportunities. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides funding for this interagency Recovery effort. Collaborators in the recovery effort include the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), the University of Idaho (UI), and the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT). This report summarizes activities conducted by Shoshone-Bannock Tribal Fisheries Department personnel during the 2008 calendar year. Project tasks include: (1) monitor limnological parameters of the Sawtooth Valley lakes to assess lake productivity; (2) conduct lake fertilization in Pettit and Alturas lakes; (3) reduce the number of mature kokanee salmon spawning in Alturas Lake Creek; (4) monitor, enumerate, and evaluate sockeye salmon smolt migration from Pettit and Alturas lakes; (5) monitor spawning kokanee salmon escapement and estimate fry recruitment in Fishhook and Alturas Lake creeks; (6) conduct sockeye and kokanee salmon population surveys; (7) evaluate potential competition and predation between stocked juvenile sockeye salmon and a variety of fish species in Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes; and (8) assist IDFG with captive broodstock production activities.

Kohler, Andre E. [Shoshone-Bannock Tribes; Griswold, Robert G. [Biolines Environmental Consulting; Taki, Doug [Shoshone-Bannock Tribes

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Columbia-Snake River Irrigators Association Eastern Oregon Irrigators Association  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to river flows, reservoir elevations and hydroelectric power production. Its results are currently being

37

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program Hatchery Element : Project Progress Report 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Numbers of Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka have declined dramatically in recent years. In Idaho, only the lakes of the upper Salmon River (Sawtooth Valley) remain as potential sources of production (Figure 1). Historically, five Sawtooth Valley lakes (Redfish, Alturas, Pettit, Stanley, and Yellowbelly) supported sockeye salmon (Bjornn et al. 1968; Chapman et al. 1990). Currently, only Redfish Lake receives a remnant anadromous run. On April 2, 1990, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service (NOAA - formerly National Marine Fisheries Service) received a petition from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) to list Snake River sockeye salmon as endangered under the United States Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973. On November 20, 1991, NOAA declared Snake River sockeye salmon endangered. In 1991, the SBT, along with the Idaho Department of Fish & Game (IDFG), initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley Project (Sawtooth Valley Project) with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The goal of this program is to conserve genetic resources and to rebuild Snake River sockeye salmon populations in Idaho. Coordination of this effort is carried out under the guidance of the Stanley Basin Sockeye Technical Oversight Committee (SBSTOC), a team of biologists representing the agencies involved in the recovery and management of Snake River sockeye salmon. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service ESA Permit Nos. 1120, 1124, and 1481 authorize IDFG to conduct scientific research on listed Snake River sockeye salmon. Initial steps to recover the species involved the establishment of captive broodstocks at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in Idaho and at NOAA facilities in Washington State (for a review, see Flagg 1993; Johnson 1993; Flagg and McAuley 1994; Kline 1994; Johnson and Pravecek 1995; Kline and Younk 1995; Flagg et al. 1996; Johnson and Pravecek 1996; Kline and Lamansky 1997; Pravecek and Johnson 1997; Pravecek and Kline 1998; Kline and Heindel 1999; Hebdon et al. 2000; Flagg et al. 2001; Kline and Willard 2001; Frost et al. 2002; Hebdon et al. 2002; Hebdon et al. 2003; Kline et al. 2003a; Kline et al. 2003b; Willard et al. 2003a; Willard et al. 2003b; Baker et al. 2004; Baker et al. 2005; Willard et al. 2005; Baker et al. 2006; Plaster et al. 2006; Baker et al. 2007). The immediate goal of the program is to utilize captive broodstock technology to conserve the population's unique genetics. Long-term goals include increasing the number of individuals in the population to address delisting criteria and to provide sport and treaty harvest opportunity. (1) Develop captive broodstocks from Redfish Lake sockeye salmon, culture broodstocks and produce progeny for reintroduction. (2) Determine the contribution hatchery-produced sockeye salmon make toward avoiding population extinction and increasing population abundance. (3) Describe O. nerka population characteristics for Sawtooth Valley lakes in relation to carrying capacity and broodstock program reintroduction efforts. (4) Utilize genetic analysis to discern the origin of wild and broodstock sockeye salmon to provide maximum effectiveness in their utilization within the broodstock program. (5) Transfer technology through participation in the technical oversight committee process, provide written activity reports, and participate in essential program management and planning activities. Idaho Department of Fish and Game's participation in the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program includes two areas of effort: (1) sockeye salmon captive broodstock culture, and (2) sockeye salmon research and evaluations. Although objectives and tasks from both components overlap and contribute to achieving the same goals, work directly related to sockeye salmon captive broodstock research and enhancement will appear under a separate cover. Research and enhancement activities associated with Snake River sockeye salmon are permitted under NOAA permit numbers 1120, 1124, and 1481. This report details fish

Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Green, Daniel G.; Kline, Paul A.

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

38

White Sturgeon Mitigation & Restoration in the Columbia & Snake River Upstream from Bonneville Dam  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29, 2003 29, 2003 To: People Interested in the Project to Mitigate and Restore White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has prepared the Final Environmental Assessment (EA), which includes a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI), for the White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam Project. The document is enclosed for your information. Background: Since 1986, State, Federal, and Tribal fisheries agencies have been gathering data and studying habitats, movements, population dynamics, feeding, and distribution of white sturgeon in the Columbia River system. With the decline in anadromous salmonid runs there has been an increase in the importance of the white sturgeon fisheries. The Oregon Department of

39

Deep Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho using Multicomponent Geothermometry  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Geological survey has estimated that there are up to 4,900 MWe of undiscovered geothermal resources and 92,000 MWe of enhanced geothermal potential within the state of Idaho. Of particular interest are the resources of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) which was formed by volcanic activity associated with the relative movement of the Yellowstone Hot Spot across the state of Idaho. This region is characterized by a high geothermal gradient and thermal springs occurring along the margins of the ESRP. Masking much of the deep thermal potential of the ESRP is a regionally extensive and productive cold-water aquifer. We have undertaken a study to infer the temperature of the geothermal system hidden beneath the cold-water aquifer of the ESRP. Our approach is to estimate reservoir temperatures from measured water compositions using an inverse modeling technique (RTEst) that calculates the temperature at which multiple minerals are simultaneously at equilibrium while explicitly accounting for the possible loss of volatile constituents (e.g., CO2), boiling and/or water mixing. In the initial stages of this study, we apply the RTEst model to water compositions measured from a limited number of wells and thermal springs to estimate the regionally extensive geothermal system in the ESRP.

Ghanashyam Neupane; Earl D. Mattson; Travis L. McLing; Carl D. Palmer; Robert W. Smith; Thomas R. Wood

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Determining Columbia and Snake River Project Tailrace and Forebay Zones of Hydraulic Influence using MASS2 Modeling  

SciTech Connect

Although fisheries biology studies are frequently performed at US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) projects along the Columbia and Snake Rivers, there is currently no consistent definition of the ``forebay'' and ``tailrace'' regions for these studies. At this time, each study may use somewhat arbitrary lines (e.g., the Boat Restriction Zone) to define the upstream and downstream limits of the study, which may be significantly different at each project. Fisheries researchers are interested in establishing a consistent definition of project forebay and tailrace regions for the hydroelectric projects on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The Hydraulic Extent of a project was defined by USACE (Brad Eppard, USACE-CENWP) as follows: The river reach directly upstream (forebay) and downstream (tailrace) of a project that is influenced by the normal range of dam operations. Outside this reach, for a particular river discharge, changes in dam operations cannot be detected by hydraulic measurement. The purpose of this study was to, in consultation with USACE and regional representatives, develop and apply a consistent set of criteria for determining the hydraulic extent of each of the projects in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. A 2D depth-averaged river model, MASS2, was applied to the Snake and Columbia Rivers. New computational meshes were developed most reaches and the underlying bathymetric data updated to the most current survey data. The computational meshes resolved each spillway bay and turbine unit at each project and extended from project to project. MASS2 was run for a range of total river flows and each flow for a range of project operations at each project. The modeled flow was analyzed to determine the range of velocity magnitude differences and the range of flow direction differences at each location in the computational mesh for each total river flow. Maps of the differences in flow direction and velocity magnitude were created. USACE fishery biologists requested data analysis to determine the project hydraulic extent based on the following criteria: 1) For areas where the mean velocities are less than 4 ft/s, the water velocity differences between operations are not greater than 0.5 ft/sec and /or the differences in water flow direction are not greater than 10 degrees, 2) If mean water velocity is 4.0 ft/second or greater the boundary is determined using the differences in water flow direction (i.e., not greater than 10 degrees). Based on these criteria, and excluding areas with a mean velocity of less than 0.1 ft/s (within the error of the model), a final set of graphics were developed that included data from all flows and all operations. Although each hydroelectric project has a different physical setting, there were some common results. The downstream hydraulic extent tended to be greater than the hydraulic extent in the forebay. The hydraulic extent of the projects tended to be larger at the mid-range flows. At higher flows, the channel geometry tends to reduce the impact of project operations.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "region snake river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

DoE/..A South Fork Snake RiverPalisades Wildlife Mitigation Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

..A ..A -- South Fork Snake RiverPalisades Wildlife Mitigation Project Final Environmental Assessment ig of No Significant Impact and Findi RECEIVED @ S T 1 JAN 3 1 DOEIEA-0956 September 1995 SOUTH FORK SNAKE RIVER / PALISADES WILDLIFE MITIGATION PROJECT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DOE EA # 0956 DECLAIMER This report was prepared as an a m u n t of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their ' employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsi- , bility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Refer-

42

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research; 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

In March 1990, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes petitioned the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to list the Snake River sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) as endangered. As a result of that petition the Snake River sockeye salmon was officially listed as endangered in November 1991 under the Endangered Species Act (56 FR 58619). In 1991, the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research Program was implemented (Project Number 91-71, Intergovernmental Contract Number DE-BI79-91bp22548). This project is part of an interagency effort to prevent the extinction of the Redfish Lake stock of O. nerka. The Shoshone-Bannock Tribal goal for this project is two tiered: The immediate goal is to increase the population of Snake River sockeye salmon while preserving the unique genetic characteristics of the Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU). The Tribes long term goal is to maintain a viable population that warrants delisting and provides Tribal harvest opportunities. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides funding for this interagency recovery program through the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPCFWP). Collaborators in the recovery effort include the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), the University of Idaho (UI), U.S. Forest Service (USFS), and the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe (SBT). This report summarizes activities conducted by Shoshone-Bannock Tribal Fisheries Department personnel during the 2002 calendar year. Project objectives include: (1) monitor over-winter survival and emigration of juvenile anadromous O. nerka stocked from the captive rearing program; (2) fertilize Redfish Lake (3) conduct kokanee salmon (non-anadromous O. nerka) population surveys; (4) monitor spawning kokanee escapement and estimate fry recruitment on Fishhook, Alturas Lake, and Stanley Lake creeks; (5) evaluate potential competition and predation between stocked juvenile O. nerka and a variety of fish species in Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes; and (6) monitor limnological parameters of Sawtooth Valley lakes to assess lake productivity.

Kohler, Andre E.; Taki, Doug (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall, ID); Griswold, Robert G. (Biolines, Stanley, ID)

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Phase II Water Rental Pilot Project: Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented in 1991 as part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to quantify resident fish and wildlife impacts resulting from salmon flow augmentation releases made from the upper Snake River Basin. Phase I summarized existing resource information and provided management recommendations to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat resulting from storage releases for the I improvement of an adromous fish migration. Phase II includes the following: (1) a summary of recent biological, legal, and political developments within the basin as they relate to water management issues, (2) a biological appraisal of the Snake River between American Falls Reservoir and the city of Blackfoot to examine the effects of flow fluctuation on fish and wildlife habitat, and (3) a preliminary accounting of 1993--1994 flow augmentation releases out of the upper Snake, Boise, and Payette river systems. Phase III will include the development of a model in which annual flow requests and resident fish and wildlife suitability information are interfaced with habitat time series analysis to provide an estimate of resident fish and wildlife resources.

Stovall, Stacey H.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Evaluate the Restoration Potential of Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Habitat, Status Report 2006.  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Project 2003-038-00, Evaluate the restoration potential of Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, began in FY04 (15 December 2003) and continues into FY06. This status report is intended to summarize accomplishments during FY04 and FY05. Accomplishments are summarized by Work Elements, as detailed in the Statement of Work (see BPA's project management database PISCES). This project evaluates the restoration potential of mainstem habitats for fall Chinook salmon. The studies address two research questions: 'Are there sections not currently used by spawning fall Chinook salmon within the impounded lower Snake River that possess the physical characteristics for potentially suitable fall Chinook spawning habitat?' and 'Can hydrosystem operations affecting these sections be adjusted such that the sections closely resemble the physical characteristics of current fall Chinook salmon spawning areas in similar physical settings?' Efforts are focused at two study sites: (1) the Ice Harbor Dam tailrace downstream to the Columbia River confluence, and (2) the Lower Granite Dam tailrace. Our previous studies indicated that these two areas have the highest potential for restoring Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat. The study sites will be evaluated under existing structural configurations at the dams (i.e., without partial removal of a dam structure), and alternative operational scenarios (e.g., varying forebay/tailwater elevations). The areas studied represent tailwater habitat (i.e., riverine segments extending from a dam downstream to the backwater influence from the next dam downstream). We are using a reference site, indicative of current fall Chinook salmon spawning areas in tailwater habitat, against which to compare the physical characteristics of each study site. The reference site for tailwater habitats is the section extending downstream from the Wanapum Dam tailrace on the Columbia River. Escapement estimates for fall of 2000 indicate more than 9000 adult fall Chinook salmon returned to this area, accounting for more than 2100 redds within a 5 km section of river.

Hanrahan, T.P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

45

Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1997 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

During 1997 the first phase of the Nez Perce Tribe White Sturgeon Project was completed and the second phase was initiated. During Phase I the ''Upper Snake River White Sturgeon Biological Assessment'' was completed, successfully: (1) compiling regional white sturgeon management objectives, and (2) identifying potential mitigation actions needed to rebuild the white sturgeon population in the Snake River between Hells Canyon and Lower Granite dams. Risks and uncertainties associated with implementation of these potential mitigative actions could not be fully assessed because critical information concerning the status of the population and their habitat requirements were unknown. The biological risk assessment identified the fundamental information concerning the white sturgeon population that is needed to fully evaluate the effectiveness of alternative mitigative strategies. Accordingly, a multi-year research plan was developed to collect specific biological and environmental data needed to assess the health and status of the population and characterize habitat used for spawning and rearing. In addition, in 1997 Phase II of the project was initiated. White sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River. During 1997, 316 white sturgeon were captured in the Snake River. Of these, 298 were marked. Differences in the fork length frequency distributions of the white sturgeon were not affected by collection method. No significant differences in length frequency distributions of sturgeon captured in Lower Granite Reservoir and the mid- and upper free-flowing reaches of the Snake River were detected. The length frequency distribution indicated that white sturgeon between 92 and 183 cm are prevalent in the reaches of the Snake River that were sampled. However, white sturgeon >183 have not changed markedly since 1970. I would speculate that some factor other than past over-fishing practices is limiting the recruitment of white sturgeon into larger size classes (>183 cm). Habitat, food resources, and migration have been severely altered by the impoundment of the Snake River and it appears that the recruitment of young may not be severely affected as recruitment of fish into size classes > 183 cm.

Hoefs, Nancy (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

We report on our progress from April 2002 through March 2003 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam.

Ward, David L.; Kern, J. Chris; Hughes, Michele L. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Hydraulic Characteristics of the Lower Snake River during Periods of Juvenile Fall Chinook Salmon Migration, 2002-2006 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a four-year study to assess hydraulic conditions in the lower Snake River. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Cold water released from the Dworshak Reservoir hypolimnion during mid- to late-summer months cools the Clearwater River far below equilibrium temperature. The volume of released cold water augments the Clearwater River, and the combined total discharge is on the order of the Snake River discharge when the two rivers meet at their confluence near the upstream edge of Lower Granite Reservoir. With typical temperature differences between the Clearwater and Snake rivers of 10 C or more during July and August, the density difference between the two rivers during summer flow augmentation periods is sufficient to stratify Lower Granite Reservoir as well as the other three reservoirs downstream. Because cooling of the river is desirable for migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during this same time period, the amount of mixing and cold water entrained into Lower Granite Reservoir's epilimnion at the Clearwater/Snake River confluence is of key biological importance. Data collected during this project indicates the three reservoirs downstream of Lower Granite also stratify as direct result of flow augmentation from Dworshak Reservoir. These four reservoirs are also heavily influenced by wind forcing at the water's surface and during periods of low river discharge often behave like a two-layer lake. During these periods of stratification, lower river discharge, and wind forcing, the water in the upper layer of the reservoir is held in place or moves slightly upstream. This upper layer is also exposed to surface heating and may warm up to temperatures close to equilibrium temperature. The thickness (depth) of this upper warm layer and its direction of travel may be of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. This report describes field data collection, modeling, and analysis of hydrodynamic and temperature conditions in the Lower Granite Reservoir during the summer flow augmentation periods of 2002, 2003, and 2004. Although temperature, and hence density, differences during flow augmentation periods between the Clearwater and Snake rivers were approximately equal (7-12 C) for all four years, the discharge ratio varied which resulted in significant differences in entrainment of cooler Clearwater River water into the Lower Granite Reservoir epilimnion. However, as a direct result of system management, Lower Granite Dam tailrace temperatures were maintained near 20 C during all years. Primary differences in the other three lower Snake River reservoirs were therefore a result of meteorological conditions and dam operations, which produced variations in wind setup and surface heating. Circulation patterns in all four lower Snake River reservoirs were numerically simulated for periods of 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 using CE-QUAL-W2. Simulation results show that these models are capable of matching diurnal and long-term temperature and velocity changes in the reservoirs. In addition, the confluence zone of the Clearwater and Snake rivers was modeled using the three-dimensional non-hydrostatic model Flow3D. Once calibrated and validated, the reservoir models were used to investigate downstream impacts of alternative reservoir operation schemes, such as increasing or decreasing the ratio of Clearwater to Snake river discharge. Simulation results were linked with the particle tracking model FINS to develop reservoir-integrated metrics that varied due to these alternative operation schemes. Findings indicate that significant alterations in water temperature throughout the lower Snake River are possible by altering hypolimnetic discharges from Dworshak Reservoir, which may also impact the behavior of migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon during periods of flow augmentation.

Cook, C.; Dibrani, B.; Richmond, M.; Bleich, M.; Titzler, P..; Fu, T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Research and Recovery of Snake River Sockeye Salmon, 1994 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley Project to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. In 1994, the authors estimated the total September Redfish Lake O. nerka population at 51,529 fish (95% CI, {+-} 33,179). The Alturas Lake O. nerka population was estimated at 5,785 fish ({+-} 6,919). The total density and biomass of Alturas Lake was estimated at 27 fish/hectare ({+-} 33) and 0.7 kg/hectare, respectively. The total O. nerka population estimate for Pettit Lake was 14,743 fish ({+-} 3,683). Stanley Lake O. nerka total population size, density, and biomass was estimated at 2,695 fish ({+-} 963), 37 fish/hectare ({+-} 13), and 0.5 kg/hectare, respectively. Estimated numbers of O. nerka outmigrant smolts passing Redfish Lake Creek and Salmon River trapping sites increased in 1994. The authors estimated 1,820 (90% CI 1,229--2,671) and 945 (90% CI 331--13,000) smolts left Redfish and Alturas lakes, respectively. The total PIT tag detection rate at mainstem dams for Redfish Lake outmigrants was 21% in 1994. No Alturas Lake outmigrants were detected at any of the downstream facilities with detection capabilities (zero of 50 fish).

Kline, Paul A.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research; 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

In March 1990, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes petitioned the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to list the Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered. As a result of that petition the Snake River sockeye salmon was officially listed as endangered in November 1991 under the Endangered Species Act (56 FR 58619). In 1991, the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research Program was implemented (Project Number 91-71, Intergovernmental Contract Number DE-BI79-91bp22548). This project is part of an interagency effort to prevent the extinction of the Redfish Lake stock of O. nerka. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides funding for this interagency recovery program through the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program (Council). Collaborators in the recovery effort include the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), the University of Idaho (UI), U.S. Forest Service (USFS), and the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe (SBT). This report summarizes activities conducted by Shoshone-Bannock Tribal Fisheries Department personnel during the 2001 calendar year. Project objectives include: (1) monitor over-winter survival and emigration of juvenile anadromous O. nerka stocked from the captive rearing program; (2) fertilize Redfish Lake, fertilization of Pettit and Alturas lakes was suspended for this year; (3) conduct kokanee (non-anadromous O. nerka) population surveys; (4) monitor spawning kokanee escapement and estimate fry recruitment on Fishhook, Alturas Lake, and Stanley Lake creeks; (5) evaluate potential competition and predation interactions between stocked juvenile O. nerka and a variety of fish species in Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes; (6) monitor limnological parameters of Sawtooth Valley lakes to assess lake productivity.

Kohler, Andre E.; Taki, Doug (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall, ID); Griswold, Robert G. (Biolines, Stanley, ID)

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

We sampled and released 313 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) from the Tucannon River in 2004. Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags were inserted in 231 of these individuals, and we detected existing PIT tags in an additional 44 bull trout. Twenty-five of these were also surgically implanted with radio-tags, and we monitored the movements of these fish throughout the year. Ten bull trout that were radio-tagged in 2003 were known to survive and carry their tags through the spring of 2004. One of these fish outmigrated into the Snake River in the fall, and remained undetected until February, when it's tag was located near the confluence of Alkali Flat Creek and the Snake River. The remaining 9 fish spent the winter between Tucannon River miles 2.1 (Powers Road) and 36.0 (Tucannon Fish Hatchery). Seven of these fish retained their tags through the summer, and migrated to known spawning habitat prior to September 2004. During June and July, radio-tagged bull trout again exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon subbasin. As in past years, we observed some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October, suggesting post spawning outmigrations. By late November and early December, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and were distributed from river mile 42 at Camp Wooten downstream to river mile 17, near the Highway 12 bridge. As in previous years, we did not collect data associated with objectives 2, 3, or 4 of this study, because we were unable to monitor migratory movement of radio-tagged bull trout into the vicinity of the hydropower dams on the main stem Snake River. Transmission tests of submerged Lotek model NTC-6-2 nano-tags in Lower Granite Pool showed that audible detection and individual tag identification was possible at depths of 20, 30, and 40 ft. We were able to maintain tag detection and code separation at all depths from both a boat and 200 ft. above water surface in a helicopter. However, we lost detection capability from 40 ft. water depth when we passed 700 ft. above the water surface in a helicopter. Two years of high tag loss, particularly after spawning, has prevented us from documenting fall and winter movements with an adequate sample of radio tagged bull trout. The high transmitter loss after spawning may be a reflection of high natural mortality for large, older age fish that we have been radio tagging to accommodate the longer life transmitters. Therefore, we reduced the size of the radio tags that we implanted, and delayed most of our collection and tagging of bull trout until after spawning. These changes are a new approach to try to maximize the number of radio tagged bull trout available post spawning to adequately document fall and winter movements and any use of the Snake River by bull trout from the Tucannon River.

Faler, Michael P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID); Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Division, Dayton, WA)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

OVERVIEW OF THE RHIC INSERTION REGION, SEXTUPOLE, AND SNAKE POWER SUPPLY SYSTEMS.  

SciTech Connect

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was commissioned in 1999 and 2000. RHIC requires power supplies to supply currents to highly inductive superconducting magnets. The RHIC Insertion Region (IR) contains many shunt power supplies to trim the current of different magnet elements in a large superconducting magnet circuit. There are a total of 237 Insertion Region power supplies in both RHIC rings. RHIC also requires sextupole power supplies. One sextupole power supply is connected across 12 sextupole magnets. There are a total of 24 sextupole power supplies in both rings. Snake magnets are also a part of the RHIC ring, and these snake magnets also require power supplies. There shall be a total of 24 snake power supplies in both rings. Power supply technology, connections, control systems and interfacing with the Quench Protection System will be presented.

BRUNO,D.; ENG,W.; GANETIS,G.; LAMBIASE,R.F.; SANDBERG,J.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

52

Geothermal significance of magnetotelluric sounding in the eastern Snake  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

significance of magnetotelluric sounding in the eastern Snake significance of magnetotelluric sounding in the eastern Snake River Plain-Yellowstone Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geothermal significance of magnetotelluric sounding in the eastern Snake River Plain-Yellowstone Region Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Magnetotelluric soundings along a profile extending from the Raft River geothermal area in southern Idaho in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming reveal a highly anamalous crustal structure involving a conductive zone at depths that range from 18 km in the central part of the eastern Snake River Plain to 7 km beneath the Raft River thermal area and as little as 5 km in Yellowstone. Resistivities in this conductive zone are less than

53

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program : Hatchery Element : Annual Progress Report, 2000.  

SciTech Connect

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2000 are presented in this report.

Kline, Paul A.; Willard, Catherine

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Large-scale spatial variability of riverbed temperature gradients in Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning areas  

SciTech Connect

In the Snake River basin of the Pacific northwestern United States, hydroelectric dam operations are often based on the predicted emergence timing of salmon fry from the riverbed. The spatial variability and complexity of surface water and riverbed temperature gradients results in emergence timing predictions that are likely to have large errors. The objectives of this study were to quantify the thermal heterogeneity between the river and riverbed in fall Chinook salmon spawning areas and to determine the effects of thermal heterogeneity on fall Chinook salmon emergence timing. This study quantified river and riverbed temperatures at 15 fall Chinook salmon spawning sites distributed in two reaches throughout 160 km of the Snake River in Hells Canyon, Idaho, USA, during three different water years. Temperatures were measured during the fall Chinook salmon incubation period with self-contained data loggers placed in the river and at three different depths below the riverbed surface. At all sites temperature increased with depth into the riverbed, including significant differences (p<0.05) in mean water temperature of up to 3.8C between the river and the riverbed among all the sites. During each of the three water years studied, river and riverbed temperatures varied significantly among all the study sites, among the study sites within each reach, and between sites located in the two reaches. Considerable variability in riverbed temperatures among the sites resulted in fall Chinook salmon emergence timing estimates that varied by as much as 55 days, depending on the source of temperature data used for the estimate. Monitoring of riverbed temperature gradients at a range of spatial scales throughout the Snake River would provide better information for managing hydroelectric dam operations, and would aid in the design and interpretation of future empirical research into the ecological significance of physical riverine processes.

Hanrahan, Timothy P.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Analysis of steady-state flow and advective transport in the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer System, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

The regional aquifer system of the eastern Snake River Plain is an important component of the hydrologic system in eastern Idaho. The aquifer was thought to be the largest unified ground-water reservoir on the North American continent but is probably second to the Floridian aquifer in the southeastern United States. Flow in the aquifer is from major recharge areas in the northeastern part of the plain to discharge areas in the southwestern part. A comprehensive analysis of the occurrence and movement of water in the aquifer was presented by Garabedian. The analysis included a description of the recharge and discharge, the hydraulic properties, and a numerical model of the aquifer. The purposes of this report are to: (1) describe compartments in the aquifer that function as intermediate and regional flow systems, (2) describe pathlines for flow originating at or near the water table, and (3) quantify traveltimes for adjective transport originating at or near the water table. The model constructed for this study and described in this report will aid those concerned with the management and protection of the aquifer. The model will serve as a tool to further our understanding of the aquifer and will aid in assessing the needs for future flow and transport studies of the aquifer.

Ackerman, D.J.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

In 2000, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the eight year of a study to estimate survival of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A total of 20,313 hatchery steelhead were tagged with passive integrated transpoder (PIT) tags and released at Lower Granite Dam for reach survival estimation. They did not PIT tag any yearlying chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) for reach survival estimates in 2000 because sufficient numbers for these estimates were available from other studies. Primary research objectives in 2000 were (1) to estimate reach and project survival in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the yearling chinook salmon and steelhead migrations, and (2) to evaluate the survival-estimation models under prevailing conditions. In addition, they estimated survival from point of release to Lower Granite Dam and below for chinook salmon, steelhead, and sockeye salmon (O.nerka) PIT tagged and released at Snake River basin hatcheries and chinook salmon and steelhead PIT tagged and released at Snake River basin hatcheries and chinook salmon and steelhead PIT tagged and released at Snake River basin smolt traps. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2000 for PIT-tagged yearling chinook salmon and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Results are reported primarily in the form of tables and figures. Further details on methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited in the text.

Zabel, Richard; Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

We collected 279 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Tucannon River during the Spring and Fall of 2003. Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags were inserted in 191 of them, and we detected existing PIT tags in an additional 31bull trout. Thirty five of these were also surgically implanted with radio-tags, and we monitored the movements of these fish throughout the year. Fourteen radio-tags were recovered shortly after tagging, and as a result, 21 remained in the river through December 31, 2003. Four bull trout that were radio-tagged in spring 2002 were known to survive and carry their tags through the spring and/or summer of 2003. One of these fish spent the winter near river mile (RM) 13.0; the other 3 over-wintered in the vicinity of the Tucannon Hatchery between RM 34 and 36. Twenty-one radio tags from bull trout tagged in 2002 were recovered during the spring and summer, 2003. These tags became stationary the winter of 2002/2003, and were recovered between RM 11 and 55. We were unable to recover the remaining 15 tags from 2002. During the month of July, radio-tagged bull trout exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon subbasin. We observed some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October. By late November and early December, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and were distributed from the headwaters downstream to river mile 6.4, near Lower Monumental Pool. As in 2002, we did not conduct work associated with objectives 2, 3, or 4 of this study, because we were unable to monitor migratory movement of radio-tagged bull trout into the Federal hydropower system on the mainstem Snake River. Transmission tests of submerged ATS model F1830 radio-tags in Lower Granite Pool showed that audible detection and individual tag identification was possible at depths of 20 and 30 ft. Tests were conducted using an ATS R-4000 Receiver equipped with an ''H'' antenna at 200 and 700 feet above water surface from a helicopter. Audible detection and frequency separation were possible at both elevations. Two years of high tag loss, particularly after spawning, has prevented us from documenting fall and winter movements with an adequate sample of radio tagged bull trout. The high transmitter loss after spawning may be a reflection of high natural mortality for large, older age fish that we have been radio tagging to accommodate the longer life transmitters. Therefore, we are planning to reduce the size of the radio tags that we implant, and delay most of our collection and tagging of bull trout until after spawning. These changes are a new approach to try to maximize the number of radio tagged bull trout available post spawning to adequately document fall and winter movements and any use of the Snake River by bull trout from the Tucannon River.

Faler, Michael P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID); Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Division, Dayton, WA)

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, Annual Report 2003.  

SciTech Connect

Redd counts were used to document the spawning distribution of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2003; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992) and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2003 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (Projects 199801003, 199801004, 199403400, 198335003), Idaho Power Company, and Bureau of Land Management.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S.M.; Arnsberg, B.D.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2007; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches counted upstream of Lower Granite Dam into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2007 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Arnsberg, B.D. [Nez Perce Tribe; Groves, P.A. [Idaho Power Company

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

60

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2005; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2005 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S.; Arnsberg, B.D.; Rocklage, S.J.; Groves, P.A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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61

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Redd counts were used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2004; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2004 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration, Idaho Power Company, and Bureau of Land Management.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S.; Arnsberg, B.D.; Rocklage, S.J.; Groves, P.A.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, Annual Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect

Redd counts were used to document the spawning distribution of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2001; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992) and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2002 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (Projects 1998-01-003 and 1994-03-400) and the Idaho Power Company.

Garcia, Aaron P.; Bradbury, S.M.; Arnsberg, Billy D.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Research Element, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

On November 20, 1991, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and Idaho Department of Fish and Game initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley Project to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Restoration efforts are focusing on Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes within the Sawtooth Valley. The first release of hatchery-produced juvenile sockeye salmon from the captive broodstock program occurred in 1994. The first anadromous adult returns from the captive broodstock program were recorded in 1999 when six jacks and one jill were captured at IDFG's Sawtooth Fish Hatchery. In 2002, progeny from the captive broodstock program were released using four strategies: age-0 presmolts were released to Alturas, Pettit, and Redfish lakes in August and to Pettit and Redfish lakes in October, age-1 smolts were released to Redfish Lake Creek in May, eyed-eggs were planted in Pettit Lake in December, and hatchery-produced and anadromous adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for volitional spawning in September. Oncorhynchus nerka population monitoring was conducted on Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes using a midwater trawl in September 2002. Age-0, age-1, and age-2 O. nerka were captured in Redfish Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 50,204 fish. Age-0, age-1, age-2, and age-3 kokanee were captured in Alturas Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 24,374 fish. Age-2 and age-3 O. nerka were captured in Pettit Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 18,328 fish. The ultimate goal of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) captive broodstock development and evaluation efforts is to recover sockeye salmon runs in Idaho waters. Recovery is defined as reestablishing sockeye salmon runs and providing for utilization of sockeye salmon and kokanee resources by anglers. The immediate project goal is to maintain this unique sockeye salmon population through captive broodstock technology and avoid species extinction. The project objectives are: (1) Develop captive broodstocks from Redfish Lake anadromous sockeye salmon. (2) Determine the contribution hatchery-produced sockeye salmon make toward avoiding population extinction and increasing population abundance. (3) Describe O. nerka population characteristics for Sawtooth Valley lakes in relation to carrying capacity and broodstock program supplementation efforts. (4) Refine our ability to discern the origin of wild and broodstock sockeye salmon to provide maximum effectiveness in their utilization within the broodstock program. (5) Transfer technology through participation in the technical oversight committee process, providing written activity reports and participation in essential program management and planning activities.

Willard, Catherine; Hebdon, J. Lance; Castillo, Jason (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

White Sturgeon Mitgation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

We report on our progress from April 2003 through March 2004 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported.

Rein, Thomas A.; Hughes, Michele L.; Kern, J. Chris (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Effects of Marine Mammals on Columbia River Salmon Listed under the Endangered Species Act : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report 3 of 11.  

SciTech Connect

Most research on the Columbia and Snake Rivers in recent years has been directed to downstream migrant salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) losses at dams. Comparatively little attentions has been given to adult losses. Recently an estimated 378,4000 adult salmon and steelhead (O. mykiss) were unaccounted-for from Bonneville Dam to terminal areas upstream. It is now apparent that some of this loss was due to delayed mortality from wounded by marine mammals. This report reviews the recent literature to define predatory effects of marine mammals on Columbia River salmon.

Park, Donn L.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 1999 are presented in this report. In 1999, seven anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley and were captured at the adult weir located on the upper Salmon River. Four anadromous adults were incorporated in the captive broodstock program spawning design for year 1999. The remaining three adults were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. All seven adults were adipose and left ventral fin-clipped, indicating hatchery origin. One sockeye salmon female from the anadromous group and 81 females from the captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in 1999. Spawn pairings produced approximately 63,147 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed-stage of development averaging 38.97%. Eyed-eggs (20,311), presmolts (40,271), smolts (9,718), and adults (21) were planted or released into Sawtooth Valley waters in 1999. Supplementation strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek, upper Salmon River (below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir), Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, four broodstocks and three production groups were in culture at the Eagle Fish Hatchery. Two of the four broodstocks were incorporated into the 1999 spawning design and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

Baker, Dan J,; Heindel, Jeff A.; Kline, Paul A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Oxbow Fish Hatchery Snake River Sockeye Salmon Smolt Program, 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This contract proposal is in response to the Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion Implementation Plan/Update Proposed Action (UPA) associated with increasing the number of Snake River sockeye smolts by 150,000. To accomplish this proposal the cooperation and efforts of three government entities has been planned (e.g., Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)). Improvements at the IDFG Eagle Fish Hatchery and NMFS Burley Creek Hatchery will focus on increasing sockeye salmon captive broodstock and egg production. Improvements at the ODFW Oxbow Fish Hatchery will be made to accommodate the incubation, hatching and rearing of 150,000 sockeye salmon smolts for release into Idaho's Sawtooth Valley, Upper Salmon River near IDFG's Sawtooth Fish Hatchery and/or Redfish Lake Creek 1.4 km downstream of Redfish Lake. Modifications to Oxbow Fish Hatchery (ODFW) will include retro-fit existing pond drains so pond cleaning effluent water can be routed to the pollution abatement pond, and modifications to the abatement pond. Also included in this project as an added phase, was the rerouting of the hatchery building effluent water to meet state DEQ guidelines for the use of formalin to treat salmonid eggs. Some additional funding for the described Oxbow Hatchery modifications will come from Mitchell Act Funding. All personnel costs associated with this project will come from Mitchell Act funding. Due to heavy work load issues, being under staffed, and two emergency projects in the spring and summer of 2006, ODFW engineers were not able to complete all plans and get them out for bid in 2006. As a result of these circumstances retro-fitting pond drains and modifications to the abatement pond was carried over into fiscal year 2007-2008. A no cost time extension to the contract was approved by BPA. The format for this report will follow the standard format for Statement of Work Report (SOW), which includes sub-categories Work Element (WE), and within the WE the Milestone Titles.

Banks, Duane D. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

68

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program Research Elements : 2007 Annual Project Progess Report.  

SciTech Connect

On November 20, 1991, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) and Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Restoration efforts are focused on Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes within the Sawtooth Valley. The first release of hatchery-produced adults occurred in 1993. The first release of juvenile sockeye salmon from the captive broodstock program occurred in 1994. In 1999, the first anadromous adult returns from the captive broodstock program were recorded when six jacks and one jill were captured at the IDFG Sawtooth Fish Hatchery. In 2007, progeny from the captive broodstock program were released using four strategies: (1) eyed-eggs were planted in Pettit Lake in November; (2) age-0 presmolts were released to Alturas, Pettit, and Redfish lakes in October; (3) age-1 smolts were released into Redfish Lake Creek and the upper Salmon River in May; and (4) hatchery-produced adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for volitional spawning in September. Oncorhynchus nerka population monitoring was conducted on Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes using a midwater trawl in September 2007. Population abundances were estimated at 73,702 fish for Redfish Lake, 124,073 fish for Alturas Lake, and 14,746 fish for Pettit Lake. Angler surveys were conducted from May 26 through August 7, 2007 on Redfish Lake to estimate kokanee harvest. On Redfish Lake, we interviewed 102 anglers and estimated that 56 kokanee were harvested. The calculated kokanee catch rate was 0.03 fish/hour for each kokanee kept. The juvenile out-migrant trap on Redfish Lake Creek was operated from April 14 to June 13, 2007. We estimated that 5,280 natural origin and 14,256 hatchery origin sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Redfish Lake in 2007. The hatchery origin component originated from a 2006 fall presmolt direct-release. The juvenile out-migrant traps on Alturas Lake Creek and Pettit Lake Creek were operated by the SBT from April 19 to May 23, 2007 and April 18 to May 29, 2007, respectively. The SBT estimated 1,749 natural origin and 4,695 hatchery origin sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Pettit Lake and estimated 8,994 natural origin and 6,897 hatchery origin sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Alturas Lake in 2007. The hatchery origin component of sockeye salmon out-migrants originated from fall presmolt direct-releases made to Pettit and Alturas lakes in 2006. In 2007, the Stanley Basin Sockeye Technical Oversight Committee (SBSTOC) chose to have all Snake River sockeye salmon juveniles (tagged and untagged) transported due to potential enhanced survival. Therefore, mainstem survival evaluations were only conducted to Lower Granite Dam. Unique PIT tag interrogations from Sawtooth Valley juvenile out-migrant traps to Lower Granite Dam were utilized to estimate survival rates for out-migrating sockeye salmon smolts. Survival rate comparisons were made between smolts originating from Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes and the various release strategies. Alturas Lake hatchery origin smolts tagged at the out-migrant trap recorded the highest survival rate of 78.0%. In 2007, 494 hatchery origin adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. We observed 195 areas of excavation in the lake from spawning events. This was the highest number of redds observed in Redfish Lake since the program was initiated. Suspected redds were approximately 3 m x 3 m in size and were constructed by multiple pairs of adults. To monitor the predator population found within the lakes, we monitored bull trout spawning in Fishhook Creek, a tributary to Redfish Lake; and in Alpine Creek, a tributary to Alturas Lake. This represented the tenth consecutive year that the index reaches have been surveyed on these two streams. Adult counts (41 adults) and redd counts (22 redds

Peterson, Mike; Plaster, Kurtis; Redfield, Laura; Heindel, Jeff; Kline, Paul

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

69

Post-Release Performance of Natural and Hatchery Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Clearwater Rivers.  

SciTech Connect

In 2006, we continued a multi-year study to compare smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) ratios between two groups of Snake River Basin fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that reached the sea through a combination of either (1) transportation and inriver migration or (2) bypass and inriver migration. We captured natural subyearlings rearing along the Snake and Clearwater rivers and implanted them with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, but knew in advance that sample sizes of natural fish would not be large enough for precise comparisons of SAR ratios. To increase sample sizes, we also cultured Lyons Ferry Hatchery subyearlings under a surrogate rearing strategy, implanted them with PIT tags, and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers to migrate seaward. The surrogate rearing strategy involved slowing growth at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery to match natural subyearlings in size at release as closely as possible, while insuring that all of the surrogate subyearlings were large enough for tagging (i.e., 60-mm fork length). Surrogate subyearlings were released from late May to early July 2006 to coincide with the historical period of peak beach seine catch of natural parr in the Snake and Clearwater rivers. We also PIT tagged a large representative sample of hatchery subyearlings reared under a production rearing strategy and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers in 2006 as part of new research on dam passage experiences (i.e., transported from a dam, dam passage via bypass, dam passage via turbine intakes or spillways). The production rearing strategy involved accelerating growth at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, sometimes followed by a few weeks of acclimation at sites along the Snake and Clearwater rivers before release from May to June. Releasing production subyearlings has been suggested as a possible alternative for making inferences on the natural population if surrogate fish were not available. Smoltto-adult return rates are not reported here, but will be presented in future reports written after workshops and input by federal, state, and tribal researchers. In this report, we compared the postrelease performance of natural subyearlings to the postrelease performance of surrogate and production subyearlings. We made this comparison to help the fisheries community determine which of the two hatchery rearing strategies produced fish that were more similar to natural subyearlings. We compared the following attributes of postrelease performance (1) detection dates at dams, (2) detections during the implementation of summer spill, (3) travel times, (4) migrant sizes, and (5) the joint probability of migration and survival. Overall, we found that postrelease performance was more similar between natural and surrogate subyearlings than between natural and production subyearlings. Further, the similarity between natural and surrogate subyearlings was greater in 2006 than in 2005, partly as the result of changes in incubation and early rearing practices we recommended based on 2005 results.

Connor, William P.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 2000 annual report covers the fourth year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 2000 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. The Snake River was sampled between Lower Granite Dam (rkm 174) and the mouth of the Salmon River (rkm 303), and the Salmon River was sampled from its mouth upstream to Hammer Creek (rkm 84). A total of 53,277 hours of setline effort and 630 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 2000. A total of 538 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 25 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 32.8 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 48 cm to 271 cm and averaged 107 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 103 cm to 227 cm and averaged 163 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber open population estimator, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,725 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,668-5,783. A total of 10 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags. The movement of these fish ranged from 54.7 km (34 miles) downstream to 78.8 km (49 miles) upstream; however, 43.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P<0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 31 percent since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir had a higher relative weight factor than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. A von Bertalanffy growth curve was fitted to 138 aged white sturgeon. The results suggests fish are currently growing faster than fish historically inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate mats were used to document white sturgeon spawning. A total of 34 white sturgeon eggs were recovered: 27 in the Snake River, and seven in the Salmon River.

Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fishereis Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 1997 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 1997 and December 31, 1997 are presented in this report. One hundred twenty-six female sockeye salmon from one captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in 1997. Successful spawn pairings produced approximately 148,781 eyed-eggs with a cumulative mean survival to eyed-egg rate of 57.3%. Approximately 361,600 sockeye salmon were released to Sawtooth basin waters in 1997. Reintroduction strategies included eyed-eggs (brood year 1997), presmolts (brood year 1996), and prespawn adults for volitional spawning (brood year 1994). Release locations included Redfish Lake, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, four broodstocks and two unique production groups were in culture at the Eagle Fish Hatchery. Two of the four broodstocks were incorporated into the 1997 spawning design, and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

Kline, Paul A.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Willard, Catherine (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock; Research Element, 1993 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

In 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Initial steps to recover the species include the establishment of captive broodstocks at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in Eagle, Idaho. Research and recovery activities for sockeye conducted by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game during the period of April 1993 to April 1994 are covered by this report. Eight anadromous adults (two female and six male) returned to the Redfish Lake Creek trap this year and were spawned at the Sawtooth Hatchery near Stanley, Idaho. Fecundity was 3160 for each female. The mean fertilization rate was 52% for female {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} and 65% for female {open_quotes}B.{close_quotes} Captive broodstock also spawned as well as residual sockeye captured in a Merwin trap in Redfish Lake. Spawning data from 72 fish spawned during this period is included in this report. Captive broodstock also matured later than normal (winter and spring 1994). Fish were spawned and samples were taken to investigate reasons for poor fertilization rates. Twenty-four out migrants of 1991 were selected for return to Redfish Lake for volitional spawning. Releases were made in August of 1993. All fish were implanted with sonic tags and tracking of this group began soon after the release to identify spawning-related activities. A research project is being conducted on captive broodstock diets. The project will investigate the effect of diet modification on spawn timing, gamete quality, and fertilization rates. A second project used ultrasound to examine fish for sexual maturity. The goal was to obtain a group a fish to be released f or volitional spawning. A total of 44 fish were found to be mature. The performance of all captive groups held at Eagle are included in this report.

Johnson, Keith A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Research Element, 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

On November 20, 1991, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) and Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Restoration efforts are focused on Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes within the Sawtooth Valley. The first release of hatchery-produced adults occurred in 1993. The first release of juvenile sockeye salmon from the captive broodstock program occurred in 1994. In 1999, the first anadromous adult returns from the captive broodstock program were recorded when six jacks and one jill were captured at the IDFG Sawtooth Fish Hatchery. In 2003, progeny from the captive broodstock program were released using three strategies: eyed-eggs were planted in Pettit and Alturas lakes in November and December, age-0 presmolts were released to Alturas, Pettit, and Redfish lakes in October, and hatchery-produced adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for volitional spawning in September. Oncorhynchus nerka population monitoring was conducted on Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes using a midwater trawl in September 2003. Age-0 through age-4 O. nerka were captured in Redfish Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 81,727 fish. Age-0 through age-3 O. nerka were captured in Alturas Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 46,234 fish. Age-0 through age-3 O. nerka were captured in Pettit Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 11,961 fish. Angler surveys were conducted from May 25 through August 7, 2003 on Redfish Lake to estimate kokanee harvest. On Redfish Lake, we interviewed 179 anglers and estimated that 424 kokanee were harvested. The calculated kokanee catch rate was 0.09 fish/hour. The juvenile out-migrant trap on Redfish Lake Creek was operated from April 15 to May 29, 2003. We estimated that 4,637 wild/natural and 12,226 hatchery-produced sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Redfish Lake in 2003. The hatchery-produced component included an estimated 5,352 out-migrants produced from a summer direct-release made to Redfish Lake in 2002 and 6,874 out-migrants produced from a fall direct-release made in 2002. The juvenile out-migrant traps on Alturas Lake Creek and Pettit Lake Creek were operated by the SBT from April 23 to June 5, 2003 and April 25 to June 4, 2003, respectively. The SBT enumerated 28 wild/natural and 13,329 hatchery-produced sockeye salmon smolts that outmigrated from Pettit Lake and estimated 286 wild/natural and 553 hatchery-produced sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Alturas Lake in 2003. The hatchery-produced component of sockeye salmon out-migrants originated from presmolt releases made directly to Pettit and Alturas lakes in 2002. Median travel times for passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagged smolts from the Redfish Lake Creek trap site to Lower Granite Dam were estimated for wild/natural smolts and hatchery-produced smolts. Median travel times for smolts originating from the Redfish Lake Creek trap were 10.6 d for wild/natural smolts, 6.2 d for summer direct-released smolts, and 7.1 d for fall direct-released smolts. Median travel times for PIT-tagged smolts from the Pettit Lake Creek trap site to Lower Granite Dam were estimated for hatchery-produced smolts. Median travel times for smolts originating from the Pettit Lake Creek trap were 14.1 d for fall direct released smolts and 13.6 d for fall direct released smolts. Cumulative unique PIT tag interrogations from Sawtooth Valley juvenile out-migrant traps to mainstem Snake and Columbia river dams were utilized to estimate detection rates for out-migrating sockeye salmon smolts. Detection rate comparisons were made between smolts originating from Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes and the various release strategies. Pettit Lake fall direct released smolts recorded the highest detection rate of 37.14%. In 2003, 312 hatchery-produced adult socke

Willard, Catherine; Plaster, Kurtis; Castillo, Jason (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Research Element, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and Idaho Department of Fish and Game initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley Project to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Restoration efforts are focusing on Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes within the Sawtooth Valley. The first release of hatchery-produced juvenile sockeye salmon from the captive broodstock program occurred in 1994. The first anadromous adult returns from the captive broodstock program were recorded in 1999, when six jacks and one jill were captured at Idaho Department of Fish and Game's Sawtooth Fish Hatchery. In 2001, progeny from the captive broodstock program were released using four strategies: age-0 presmolts were released to all three lakes in October and to Pettit and Alturas lakes in July; age-1 smolts were released to Redfish Lake Creek, and hatchery-produced adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for volitional spawning in September along with anadromous adult sockeye salmon that returned to the Sawtooth basin and were not incorporated into the captive broodstock program. Kokanee population monitoring was conducted on Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes using a midwater trawl in September. Only age-0 and age-1 kokanee were captured on Redfish Lake, resulting in a population estimate of 12,980 kokanee. This was the second lowest kokanee abundance estimated since 1990. On Alturas Lake age-0, age-1, and age-2 kokanee were captured, and the kokanee population was estimated at 70,159. This is a mid range kokanee population estimate for Alturas Lake, which has been sampled yearly since 1990. On Pettit Lake only age-1 kokanee were captured, and the kokanee population estimate was 16,931. This estimate is in the midrange of estimates of the kokanee population in Pettit Lake, which has been sampled yearly since 1992. We continue to have difficulty capturing age-0 kokanee in the midwater trawl on Pettit Lake. Angler surveys were conducted on Redfish and Alturas lakes to estimate kokanee harvest and to estimate return to creel for hatchery rainbow trout planted in Alturas Lake. We failed to encounter any kokanee that had been harvested in 88 angler interviews conducted between May 26 and August 7, resulting in an estimated kokanee harvest of zero. On Alturas Lake, we again failed to encounter any harvested kokanee in 116 angler interviews, resulting in an estimated kokanee harvest of zero. We estimated that anglers harvested 9.5% of the 6,598 rainbow trout planted in Alturas Lake. We estimated that 110 wild/natural and 9,616 hatchery-produced sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Redfish Lake in 2001. This was the lowest estimate of unmarked smolt out-migration since monitoring began in 1991. The trap on Redfish Lake Creek was operated from April 22 to June 6, 2001 to estimate out-migration. Mean travel times for PIT-tagged smolts from Redfish Lake Creek Trap to Lower Granite Dam was 10.3 days for wild/natural smolts and 10.6 days for hatchery-produced smolts. Based on cumulative unique PIT tag interrogations from Sawtooth basin traps to mainstem Snake and Columbia river dams, the Redfish Lake wild/natural smolts, Redfish fall direct presmolts group, and Alturas Lake fall direct presmolts recorded the highest detection rates. In 2001, 65 hatchery-raised and 14 anadromous adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. We observed 12 to 15 areas of excavation in the lake that were possible redds. We monitored bull trout spawning on Fishhook Creek, a tributary to Redfish Lake, and on Alpine Creek, a tributary to Alturas Lake. This represented the fourth consecutive year that the index reaches have been surveyed on these two streams. Adult counts on Fishhook Creek were similar to previous years as were redd counts. On Alpine Creek, bull trout numbers were also similar to previous years, but the number of redds observed increased over prev

Hebdon, J. Lance; Castillo, Jason; Willard, Catherine (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 2001 annual report covers the fifth year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 2001 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. The Snake River was sampled between Lower Granite Dam (rkm 174) and the mouth of the Salmon River (rkm 303), and the Salmon River was sampled from its mouth upstream to Hammer Creek (rkm 84). A total of 45,907 hours of setline effort and 186 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 2001. A total of 390 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 12 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 36.1 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 42 cm to 307 cm and averaged 107 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 66 cm to 235 cm and averaged 160 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,483 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,208-7,477. An additional 10 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags during 2001. The locations of 17 radio-tagged white sturgeon were monitored in 2001. The movement of these fish ranged from 38.6 km (24 miles) downstream to 54.7 km (34 miles) upstream; however, 62.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P<0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 30 percent since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir had a higher relative weight factor than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. A von Bertalanffy growth curve was fitted to 309 aged white sturgeon. The results suggest fish are currently growing faster than fish historically inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate mats were used to document white sturgeon spawning. A total of 14 white sturgeon eggs were recovered in the Snake River in 2001.

Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported separately. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2001 for the hatchery element of the program are presented in this report. In 2001, 26 anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Basin. Twenty-three of these adults were captured at adult weirs located on the upper Salmon River and on Redfish Lake Creek. Three of the anadromous sockeye salmon that returned were observed below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir and allowed to migrate upstream volitionally (following the dismantling of the weir on October 12, 2001). Nine anadromous adults were incorporated into the captive broodstock program spawning design in 2001. The remaining adults were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. Based on their marks, returning adult sockeye salmon originated from a variety of release options. Two sockeye salmon females from the anadromous group and 152 females from the brood year 1998 captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Hatchery in 2001. Spawn pairings produced approximately 118,121 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed stage of development averaging 42.0%. Presmolts (106,166), smolts (13,915), and adults (79) were planted or released into Stanley Basin waters in 2001. Supplementation strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, five broodstocks and two unique production groups were in culture at Idaho Department of Fish and Game facilities (Eagle Fish Hatchery and Sawtooth Fish Hatchery). Two of the five broodstocks were incorporated into the 2001 spawning design, and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

Kline, Paul A.; Willard, Catherine; Baker, Dan J. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Long-term, One-dimensional Simulation of Lower Snake River Temperatures for Current and Unimpounded Conditions  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the study was to compare water temperatures in the Lower Snake River for current (impounded) and unimpounded conditions using a mathematical model of the river system. A long-term analysis was performed using the MASS1 one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic and water quality model. The analysis used historical flows and meteorological conditions for a 35-year period spanning between 1960 and 1995. Frequency analysis was performed on the model results to calculate river temperatures at various percent of time exceeded levels. Results were are also analyzed to compute the time when, during the year, water temperatures rose above or fell below various temperature levels. The long-term analysis showed that the primary difference between the current and unimpounded river scenarios is that the reservoirs decrease the water temperature variability. The reservoirs also create a thermal inertia effect which tends to keep water cooler later into the spring and warmer later into the fall compared to the unimpounded river condition. Given the uncertainties in the simulation model, inflow temperatures, and meteorological conditions the results show only relatively small differences between current and unimpounded absolute river temperatures.

Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Evaluation of Delisting Criteria and Rebuilding Schedules for Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook, Fall Chinook and Sockeye Salmon : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report 10 of 11.  

SciTech Connect

We develop a framework for distinguishing healthy and threatened populations, and we analyze specific criteria by which these terms can be measured for threatened populations of salmon in the Snake River. We review reports and analyze existing data on listed populations of salmon in the Snake River to establish a framework for two stages of the recovery process: (1) defining de-listing criteria, and (2) estimating the percentage increase in survival that will be necessary for recovery of the population within specified time frames, given the de-listing criteria that must be achieved. We develop and apply a simplified population model to estimate the percentage improvement in survival that will be necessary to achieve different rates of recovery. We considered five main concepts identifying de-listing criteria: (1) minimum population size, (2) rates of population change, (3) number of population subunits, (4) survival rates, and (5) driving variables. In considering minimum population size, we conclude that high variation in survival rates poses a substantially greater probability of causing extinction than does loss of genetic variation. Distinct population subunits exist and affect both the genetic variability of the population and the dynamics of population decline and growth. We distinguish between two types of population subunits, (1) genetic and (2) geographic, and we give examples of their effects on population recovery.

Cramer, Steven P.; Neeley, Doug

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported separately. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004 for the hatchery element of the program are presented in this report. In 2004, twenty-seven anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley. Traps on Redfish Lake Creek and the upper Salmon River at the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery intercepted one and four adults, respectively. Additionally, one adult sockeye salmon was collected at the East Fork Salmon River weir, 18 were seined from below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir, one adult sockeye salmon was observed below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir but not captured, and two adult sockeye salmon were observed in Little Redfish Lake but not captured. Fish were captured/collected between July 24 and September 14, 2004. The captured/collected adult sockeye salmon (12 females and 12 males) originated from a variety of release strategies and were transferred to Eagle Fish Hatchery on September 14, 2004 and later incorporated into hatchery spawn matrices. Nine anadromous females, 102 captive females from brood year 2001, and one captive female from brood year 2000 broodstock groups were spawned at the Eagle Hatchery in 2004. Spawn pairings produced approximately 140,823 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed stage of development averaging 72.8%. Eyed-eggs (49,134), presmolts (130,716), smolts (96), and adults (241) were planted or released into Sawtooth Valley waters in 2004. Reintroduction strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, five broodstocks and five unique production groups were in culture at Idaho Department of Fish and Game (Eagle Fish Hatchery and Sawtooth Fish Hatchery) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (Oxbow Fish Hatchery) facilities. Two of the five broodstocks were incorporated into the 2004 spawning design.

Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Redding, Jeremy (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Review of Monitoring Plans for Gas Bubble Disease Signs and Gas Supersaturation Levels on the Columbia and Snake Rivers.  

SciTech Connect

Montgomery Watson was retained by the Bonneville Power Administration to evaluate the monitoring program for gas bubble disease signs and dissolved gas supersaturation levels on the Columbia and Snake rivers. The results of this evaluation will provide the basis for improving protocols and procedures for future monitoring efforts. Key study team members were Dr. John Colt, Dr. Larry Fidler, and Dr. Ralph Elston. On the week of June 6 through 10, 1994 the study team visited eight monitoring sites (smolt, adult, and resident fish) on the Columbia and Snake rivers. Additional protocol evaluations were conducted at the Willard Field Station (National Biological Survey) and Pacific Northwest Laboratories at Richland (Battelle). On June 13 and 14, 1994, the study team visited the North Pacific Division office of the U.S. Corps of Engineers and the Fish Passage Center to collect additional information and data on the monitoring programs. Considering the speed at which the Gas Bubble Trauma Monitoring Program was implemented this year, the Fish Passage Center and cooperating Federal, State, and Tribal Agencies have been doing an incredible job. Thirty-one specific recommendations are presented in this report and are summarized in Section 14.

Fidler, Larry; Elston, Ralph; Colt, John

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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81

Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Life History Investigations, Annual Report 2007.  

SciTech Connect

In 2007, we used radio and acoustic telemetry to evaluate the migratory behavior, survival, mortality, and delay of subyearling fall Chinook salmon in the Clearwater River and Lower Granite Reservoir. Monthly releases of radio-tagged fish ({approx}95/month) were made from May through October and releases of 122-149/month acoustic-tagged fish per month were made from August through October. We compared the size at release of our tagged fish to that which could have been obtained at the same time from in-river, beach seine collections made by the Nez Perce Tribe. Had we relied on in-river collections to obtain our fish, we would have obtained very few in June from the free-flowing river but by late July and August over 90% of collected fish in the transition zone were large enough for tagging. Detection probabilities of radio-tagged subyearlings were generally high ranging from 0.60 (SE=0.22) to 1.0 (SE=0) in the different study reaches and months. Lower detection probabilities were observed in the confluence and upper reservoir reaches where fewer fish were detected. Detection probabilities of acoustic-tagged subyearlings were also high and ranged from 0.86 (SE=0.09) to 1.0 (SE=0) in the confluence and upper reservoir reaches during August through October. Estimates of the joint probability of migration and survival generally declined in a downstream direction for fish released from June through August. Estimates were lowest in the transition zone (the lower 7 km of the Clearwater River) for the June release and lowest in the confluence area for July and August releases. The joint probability of migration and survival in these reaches was higher for the September and October releases, and were similar to those of fish released in May. Both fish weight and length at tagging were significantly correlated with the joint probability of migrating and surviving for both radio-tagged and acoustic-tagged fish. For both tag types, fish that were heavier at tagging had a higher probability of successfully passing through the confluence (P=0.0050 for radio-tagged fish; P=0.0038 for acoustic-tagged fish). Radio-tagged fish with greater weight at tagging also had a higher probability of migrating and surviving through both the lower free-flowing reach (P=0.0497) and the transition zone (P=0.0007). Downstream movement rates of radio-tagged subyearlings were highest in free-flowing reaches in every month and decreased considerably with impoundment. Movement rates were slowest in the transition zone for the June and August release groups, and in the confluence reach for the July release group. For acoustic-tagged subyearlings, the slowest movement rates through the confluence and upper reservoir reaches were observed for the September release group. Radio-tagged fish released in August showed the greatest delay in the transition zone, while acoustic-tagged fish released in September showed the greatest delay in the transition zone and confluence reaches. Across the monthly release groups from July through September, the probability of delaying in the transition zone and surviving there declined throughout the study. All monthly release groups of radio-tagged subyearlings showed evidence of mortality within the transition zone, with final estimates (across the full 45-d detection period) ranging from 0.12 (SE not available) for the May release group to 0.58 (SE = 0.06) for the June release group. The May and September release groups tended to have lower mortality in the transition zone than the June, July, and August release groups. Live fish were primarily detected away from shore in the channel, whereas all dead fish were located along shorelines with most being located in the vicinity of the Memorial Bridge and immediately upstream. During the May detection period, before the implementation of summer flow augmentation, temperatures in the Clearwater River and Snake River arms of Lower Granite Reservoir and the downstream boundary of the confluence ranged from 8 to 17 C. During the June-August detection periods, however, temperatures in

Tiffan, Kenneth F. [U.S. Geological Survey; Connor, William P. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; McMichael, Geoffrey A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

82

Evaluate Potenial Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This report presents a summary of results from the 1997-2002 Phase II data collection and represents the end of phase II. From 1997 to 2001 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon. A total of 1,785 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 77 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 25.8 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. Relative density of white sturgeon was highest in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River, with reduced densities of fish in Lower Granite Reservoir, and low densities the Salmon River. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir, the free-flowing Snake River and the Salmon River (Chi-Square test, P<0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 30 percent since the 1970's. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,483 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,208-7,477. Total annual mortality rate was estimated to be 0.14 (95% confidence interval of 0.12 to 0.17). A total of 35 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags during 1999-2002. The movement of these fish ranged from 53 km (33 miles) downstream to 77 km (48 miles) upstream; however, 38.8 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir had a higher relative weight factor than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. The results suggest fish are currently growing faster than fish historically inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate egg mats documented white sturgeon spawning in four consecutive years. A total of 49 white sturgeon eggs were recovered in the Snake River from 1999-2002, and seven from the Salmon River during 2000.

Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A.; Hesse, Jay A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Management, Lapwai, ID)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Age at ocean entry of Snake River Basin fall Chinook salmon and its significance to adult returns prior to summer spill at Lower Granite, Little  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Snake River basin. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 134:291-304. Marsh D. M., Harmon, J. R, Douglas M. Marsh, William D. Muir, Kenneth F. Tiffan, Jay Hesse Prior to 2002, it was largely assumed entrants is an important area for future research. REFERENCES Connor, W. P., H. L. Burge, R. Waitt, and T

84

Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 1999 annual report covers the third year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 1999 white sturgeon were captured, marked and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. A total of 33,943 hours of setline effort and 2,112 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 1999. A total of 289 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 29 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 11.1 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 27 cm to 261 cm and averaged 110 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 98 cm to 244 cm and averaged 183.5 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon < 60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 1,823 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,052-4,221. A total of 15 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags. The movement of these fish ranged from 6.4 km (4 miles) downstream to 13.7 km (8.5 miles) upstream; however, 83.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 kilometers (0.5 miles). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P < 0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 29 percent since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir were slightly larger than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. A von Bertalanffy growth curve was fitted to 49 aged white sturgeon. The results suggests the fish are currently growing faster than fish historicly inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate mats were used to document white sturgeon spawning. Five white sturgeon eggs were recovered in the Snake River.

Tuell, Michael A.; Everett, Scott R. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Juveniles, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report provides information on PIT-tagging of wild Chinook salmon parr in Idaho in 2003 and the subsequent monitoring of these fish and similarly tagged fish from Oregon. We report estimated parr-to-smolt survival and arrival timing of these fish at Lower Granite Dam, as well as interrogation data collected at several other sites throughout the Snake and Columbia River system. This research continues studies that began under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funding in 1991. Results from previous study years were reported by Achord et al. (1994; 1995a,b; 1996a; 1997; 1998; 2000; 2001a,b; 2002, 2003, 2004). Goals of this ongoing study are: (1) Characterize the migration timing and estimate parr-to-smolt survival of different stocks of wild Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon smolts at Lower Granite Dam. (2) Determine whether consistent migration patterns are apparent. (3) Determine what environmental factors influence migration patterns. (4) Characterize the migration behavior and estimate survival of different wild juvenile fish stocks as they emigrate from their natal rearing areas. This study provides critical information for recovery planning, and ultimately recovery for these ESA-listed wild fish stocks. In 2003-2004, we also continued to measure water temperature, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, turbidity, water depth, and pH at five monitoring stations in the Salmon River Basin, Idaho for the Baseline Environmental Monitoring Program. These data, along with parr/smolt migration, survival, and timing data, will help to discern patterns or characteristic relationships between fish movement/survival and environmental factors.

Achord, Stephen; Hodge, Jacob M.; Sandford, Benjamin P.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report details the 2001 results from an ongoing project to monitor the migration behavior of wild spring/summer chinook salmon smolts in the Snake River Basin. The report also discusses trends in the cumulative data collected for this project from Oregon and Idaho streams since 1989. The project was initiated after detection data from passive-integrated-transponder tags (PIT tags) had shown distinct differences in migration patterns between wild and hatchery fish for three consecutive years. National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) investigators first observed these data in 1989. The data originated from tagging and interrogation operations begun in 1988 to evaluate smolt transportation for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Achord, Stephen; Axel, Gordon A.; Hockersmith, Eric E.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Juvenile Salmonids through Snake River Dams and Reservoirs, 1997 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report consists of two parts describing research activities completed during 1997 under Bonneville Power Administration Project Number 93-29. Part 1 provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 1997 for PIT-tagged hatchery steelhead and yearling chinook salmon in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. The results are reported primarily in the form of tables and figures with a minimum of text. More detailed information on methodology and the statistical models used in the analysis are provided in previous annual reports cited in the text. Analysis of the relationships among travel time, survival, and environmental factors for 1997 and previous years of the study will be reported elsewhere. Part 2 of this report describes research to determine areas of loss and delay for juvenile hatchery salmonids above Lower Granite Reservoir.

Hockersmith, Eric E.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

We report on our progress from April 2000 through March 2001 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division (USGS; Report C), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report D), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS; Report E), and Oregon State University (OSU; Report F). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported. Highlights of results of our work from April 2000 through March 2001 are listed.

Kern, J. Chris; Ward, David L.; Farr, Ruth A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Effects of Hydroelectric Dam Operations on the Restoration Potential of Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Spawning Habitat Final Report, October 2005 - September 2007.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes research conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Fish and Wildlife Program directed by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council. The study evaluated the restoration potential of Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat within the impounded lower Snake River. The objective of the research was to determine if hydroelectric dam operations could be modified, within existing system constraints (e.g., minimum to normal pool levels; without partial removal of a dam structure), to increase the amount of available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the lower Snake River. Empirical and modeled physical habitat data were used to compare potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Snake River, under current and modified dam operations, with the analogous physical characteristics of an existing fall Chinook salmon spawning area in the Columbia River. The two Snake River study areas included the Ice Harbor Dam tailrace downstream to the Highway 12 bridge and the Lower Granite Dam tailrace downstream approximately 12 river kilometers. These areas represent tailwater habitat (i.e., riverine segments extending from a dam downstream to the backwater influence from the next dam downstream). We used a reference site, indicative of current fall Chinook salmon spawning areas in tailwater habitat, against which to compare the physical characteristics of each study site. The reference site for tailwater habitats was the section extending downstream from the Wanapum Dam tailrace on the Columbia River. Fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat use data, including water depth, velocity, substrate size and channelbed slope, from the Wanapum reference area were used to define spawning habitat suitability based on these variables. Fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat suitability of the Snake River study areas was estimated by applying the Wanapum reference reach habitat suitability criteria to measured and modeled habitat data from the Snake River study areas. Channel morphology data from the Wanapum reference reach and the Snake River study areas were evaluated to identify geomorphically suitable fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat. The results of this study indicate that a majority of the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas contain suitable fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat under existing hydrosystem operations. However, a large majority of the currently available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas is of low quality. The potential for increasing, through modifications to hydrosystem operations (i.e., minimum pool elevation of the next downstream dam), the quantity or quality of fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat appears to be limited. Estimates of the amount of potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor study area decreased as the McNary Dam forebay elevation was lowered from normal to minimum pool elevation. Estimates of the amount of potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Lower Granite study area increased as the Little Goose Dam forebay elevation was lowered from normal to minimum pool elevation; however, 97% of the available habitat was categorized within the range of lowest quality. In both the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas, water velocity appears to be more of a limiting factor than water depth for fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, with both study areas dominated by low-magnitude water velocity. The geomorphic suitability of both study areas appears to be compromised for fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, with the Ice Harbor study area lacking significant bedforms along the longitudinal thalweg profile and the Lower Granite study area lacking cross-sectional topographic diversity. To increase the quantity of available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study area, modifications to hydroelectric dam operations beyond those evaluated in this study likely would be necessary. M

Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Arntzen, Evan V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

90

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Juveniles, 2007-2008  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results from an ongoing project to monitor the migration behavior and survival of wild juvenile spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Snake River Basin. Data reported is from detections of PIT tagged fish during late summer 2007 through mid-2008. Fish were tagged in summer 2007 by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in Idaho and by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) in Oregon. Our analyses include migration behavior and estimated survival of fish at instream PIT-tag monitors and arrival timing and estimated survival to Lower Granite Dam. Principal results from tagging and interrogation during 2007-2008 are: (1) In July and August 2007, we PIT tagged and released 7,390 wild Chinook salmon parr in 12 Idaho streams or sample areas. (2) Overall observed mortality from collection, handling, tagging, and after a 24-hour holding period was 1.4%. (3) Of the 2,524 Chinook salmon parr PIT tagged and released in Valley Creek in summer 2007, 218 (8.6%) were detected at two instream PIT-tag monitoring systems in lower Valley Creek from late summer 2007 to the following spring 2008. Of these, 71.6% were detected in late summer/fall, 11.9% in winter, and 16.5% in spring. Estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam was 15.5% for the late summer/fall group, 48.0% for the winter group, and 58.5% for the spring group. Based on detections at downstream dams, the overall efficiency of VC1 (upper) or VC2 (lower) Valley Creek monitors for detecting these fish was 21.1%. Using this VC1 or VC2 efficiency, an estimated 40.8% of all summer-tagged parr survived to move out of Valley Creek, and their estimated survival from that point to Lower Granite Dam was 26.5%. Overall estimated parr-to-smolt survival for all summer-tagged parr from this stream at the dam was 12.1%. Development and improvement of instream PIT-tag monitoring systems continued throughout 2007 and 2008. (4) Testing of PIT-tag antennas in lower Big Creek during 2007-2008 showed these antennas (and anchoring method) are not adequate to withstand high spring flows in this drainage. Future plans involve removing these antennas before high spring flows. (5) At Little Goose Dam in 2008, length and/or weight were taken on 505 recaptured fish from 12 Idaho stream populations. Fish had grown an average of 40.1 mm in length and 10.6 g in weight over an average of 288 d. Their mean condition factor declined from 1.25 at release (parr) to 1.05 at recapture (smolt). (6) Mean release lengths for detected fish were significantly larger than for fish not detected the following spring and summer (P < 0.0001). (7) Fish that migrated through Lower Granite Dam in April and May were significantly larger at release than fish that migrated after May (P < 0.0001) (only 12 fish migrated after May). (8) In 2008, peak detections at Lower Granite Dam of parr tagged during summer 2007 (from the 12 stream populations in Idaho and 4 streams in Oregon) occurred during moderate flows of 87.5 kcfs on 7 May and high flows of 197.3 kcfs on 20 May. The 10th, 50th, and 90th percentile passage occurred on 30 April, 11 May, and 23 May, respectively. (9) In 2007-2008, estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam for Idaho and Oregon streams (combined) averaged 19.4% (range 6.2-38.4% depending on stream of origin). In Idaho streams the estimated parr-to-smolt survival averaged 21.0%. This survival was the second highest since 1993 for Idaho streams. Relative parr densities were lower in 2007 (2.4 parr/100 m2) than in all previous years since 2000. In 2008, we observed low-to-moderate flows prior to mid-May and relatively cold weather conditions throughout the spring migration season. These conditions moved half of the fish through Lower Granite Dam prior to mid-May; then high flows moved 50 to 90% of the fish through the dam in only 12 days. Clearly, complex interrelationships of several factors drive the annual migrational timing of the stocks.

Achord, Stephen; Sandford, Benjamin P.; Hockersmith, Eric E. [Fish Ecology Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

91

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report details the 2002 results from an ongoing project to monitor the migration behavior of wild spring/summer chinook salmon smolts in the Snake River Basin. The report also discusses trends in the cumulative data collected for this project from Oregon and Idaho streams since 1989. The project was initiated after detection data from passive-integrated-transponder tags (PIT tags) had shown distinct differences in migration patterns between wild and hatchery fish for three consecutive years. National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) investigators first observed these differences in 1989. The data originated from tagging and interrogation operations begun in 1988 to evaluate smolt transportation for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. In 1991, the Bonneville Power Administration began a cooperative effort with NMFS to expand tagging and interrogation of wild fish. Project goals were to characterize the outmigration timing of these fish, to determine whether consistent migration patterns would emerge, and to investigate the influence of environmental factors on the timing and distribution of these migrations. In 1992, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) began an independent program of PIT tagging wild chinook salmon parr in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River Basins in northeast Oregon. Since then, ODFW has reported all tagging, detection, and timing information on fish from these streams. However, with ODFW concurrence, NMFS will continue to report arrival timing of these fish at Lower Granite Dam.

Achond, Stephen; Hockersmith, Eric E.; Sandford, Benjamin P. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA)

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Post-Release Attributes and Survival of Hatchery and Natural Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River : Annual Report 1999.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes results of research activities conducted in 1999 and years previous. In an effort to provide this information to a wider audience, the individual chapters in this report have been submitted as manuscripts to peer-reviewed journals. These chapters communicate significant findings that will aid in the management and recovery of fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River Basin. Abundance and timing of seaward migration of Snake River fall chinook salmon was indexed using passage data collected at Lower Granite Dam for five years. We used genetic analyses to determine the lineage of fish recaptured at Lower Granite Dam that had been previously PIT tagged. We then used discriminant analysis to determine run membership of PIT-tagged smolts that were not recaptured to enable us to calculate annual run composition and to compared early life history attributes of wild subyearling fall and spring chinook salmon. Because spring chinook salmon made up from 15.1 to 44.4% of the tagged subyearling smolts that were detected passing Lower Granite Dam, subyearling passage data at Lower Granite Dam can only be used to index fall chinook salmon smolt abundance and passage timing if genetic samples are taken to identify run membership of smolts. Otherwise, fall chinook salmon smolt abundance would be overestimated and timing of fall chinook salmon smolt passage would appear to be earlier and more protracted than is the case.

Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Rondorf, Dennis W.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Regional North American gravity and magnetic anomaly correlations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......volcanic rocks of the Snake River Plain, Idaho...A. , 1964. Developments in Solid Earth...combined with lateral temperature perturbations are...regionally higher temperatures are associated...volcanic rocks of the Snake River Plain, Idaho...A., 1964. Developments in Solid Earth......

R. R. B. von Frese; W. J. Hinze; L. W. Braile

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Factors Affecting the Survival of Upstream Migrant Adult Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report 9 of 11.  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is developing conservation planning documentation to support the National Marine Fisheries Service`s (NMFS) recovery plan for Columbia Basin salmonid stocks that are currently listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Information from the conservation planning documentation will be used as a partial scientific basis for identifying alternative conservation strategies and to make recommendations toward conserving, rebuilding, and ultimately removing these salmon stocks from the list of endangered species. This report describes the adult upstream survival study, a synthesis of biological analyses related to conditions affecting the survival of adult upstream migrant salmonids in the Columbia River system. The objective of the adult upstream survival study was to analyze existing data related to increasing the survival of adult migrant salmonids returning to the Snake River system. The fate and accountability of each stock during its upstream migration period and the uncertainties associated with measurements of escapement and survival were evaluated. Operational measures that affected the survival of adult salmon were evaluated including existing conditions, augmented flows from upstream storage release, and drawdown of mainstem reservoirs. The potential impacts and benefits of these measures to each ESA stock were, also described based on considerations of species behavior and run timing.

Dauble, Dennis D.; Mueller, Robert P.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

A comparative evaluation of conceptual models for the Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, INEL  

SciTech Connect

Geologic and hydrologic data collected by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) are used to evaluate the existing ground water monitoring well network completed in the upper portion of the Snake River Plain aquifer (SRPA) beneath the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The USGS data analyzed and compared in this study include: (a) lithologic, geophysical, and stratigraphic information, including the conceptual geologic models intrawell, ground water flow measurement (Tracejector tests) and (c) dedicated, submersible, sampling group elevations. Qualitative evaluation of these data indicate that the upper portion of the SRPA is both heterogeneous and anisotropic at the scale of the ICPP monitoring well network. Tracejector test results indicate that the hydraulic interconnection and spatial configuration of water-producing zones is extremely complex within the upper portion of the SRPA. The majority of ICPP monitoring wells currently are equipped to sample ground water only the upper lithostratigraphic intervals of the SRPA, primarily basalt flow groups E, EF, and F. Depth-specific hydrogeochemical sampling and analysis are necessary to determine if ground water quality varies significantly between the various lithostratigraphic units adjacent to individual sampling pumps.

Prahl, C.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Multiscale Genetic Structure of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout in the Upper Snake River Basin.  

SciTech Connect

Populations of Yellowstone cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvierii have declined throughout their native range as a result of habitat fragmentation, overharvest, and introductions of nonnative trout that have hybridized with or displaced native populations. The degree to which these factors have impacted the current genetic population structure of Yellowstone cutthroat trout populations is of primary interest for their conservation. In this study, we examined the genetic diversity and genetic population structure of Yellowstone cutthroat trout in Idaho and Nevada with data from six polymorphic microsatellite loci. A total of 1,392 samples were analyzed from 45 sample locations throughout 11 major river drainages. We found that levels of genetic diversity and genetic differentiation varied extensively. The Salt River drainage, which is representative of the least impacted migration corridors in Idaho, had the highest levels of genetic diversity and low levels of genetic differentiation. High levels of genetic differentiation were observed at similar or smaller geographic scales in the Portneuf River, Raft River, and Teton River drainages, which are more altered by anthropogenic disturbances. Results suggested that Yellowstone cutthroat trout are naturally structured at the major river drainage level but that habitat fragmentation has altered this structuring. Connectivity should be restored via habitat restoration whenever possible to minimize losses in genetic diversity and to preserve historical processes of gene flow, life history variation, and metapopulation dynamics. However, alternative strategies for management and conservation should also be considered in areas where there is a strong likelihood of nonnative invasions or extensive habitat fragmentation that cannot be easily ameliorated.

Cegelski, Christine C.; Campbell, Matthew R.

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; Annual Progress Report, April 2007 - March 2008.  

SciTech Connect

We report on our progress from April 2007 through March 2008 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report C), and Montana State University (MSU; Report D). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported.

Mallette, Christine [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

98

Energy - Water Nexus -- Meeting the Energy and Water Needs of the Snake/Columbia River Basin in the 21st CenturyScience and Technology SummitConference Results  

SciTech Connect

In June 2007, representatives from federal, state, and academic institutions met to discuss the role of innovative science, technology, and policy in meeting future energy and water demands in the Snake-Columbia River Basin. Conference members assessed the state-of-the-science, technology, and associated research to develop cost-effective and environmentally sound methodologies and technologies to maximize the production of energy and availability of water and to minimize the consumption of both water and energy in the Snake-Columbia River system. Information on all phases of science and technology development, theoretical analysis, laboratory experiments, pilot tests, and field applications were relevant topics for discussion. An overview of current management needs was presented the first day. On the second day, five focus groups were created: ? Energy Generation and Use ? Water Allocation and Use ? Energy/Water Storage ? Environmental Considerations ? Social, Economic, Political, and Regulatory Considerations. Each group started with a list of status items and trends, and discussed the future challenges and research needed to reach four goals: ? Balance energy production and resource consumption ? Balance water availability and competing needs ? Balance water consumption/energy production and competing needs ? Balance environmental impacts and water use/energy production ? Balance costs and benefits of water use. The resulting initiatives were further broken down into three categories of importance: critical, important, and nice to do but could be delayed. Each initiative was assigned a number of dots to show a more refined ranking. The results of each focus group are given in the pages that follow. These results are intended to help local and regional researchers 1. Develop a technical strategy for developing cost-effective science and technology to predict, measure, monitor, purify, conserve, and store water and to maximize power generation, storage, and efficiency in the region 2. Evaluate methods and technologies for reducing the impacts of energy and water development and use on the environment.

Paul L. Wichlacz; Gerald Sehlke

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Survival of Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Free-flowing Snake River and Lower Snake River Reservoirs in 2003 and from McNary Dam Tailrace to John Day Dam Tailrace in the Columbia River from 1999 to 2002, 1999-2003 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect

We report results from an ongoing study of survival and travel time of subyearling fall Chinook salmon in the Snake River during 2003 and in the Columbia River during 1999-2002. Earlier years of the study included serial releases of PIT-tagged hatchery subyearling Chinook salmon upstream from Lower Granite Dam, but these were discontinued in 2003. Instead, we estimated survival from a large number of PIT-tagged fish released upstream from Lower Granite Dam to evaluate transportation from Snake River Dams. During late May and early June 2003, 68,572 hatchery-reared subyearling fall Chinook salmon were PIT tagged at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, trucked upstream, acclimated, and released at Couse Creek and Pittsburg Landing in the free-flowing Snake River. We estimated survival for these fish from release to Lower Granite Dam tailrace. In comparison to wild subyearling fall Chinook salmon PIT tagged and released in the free-flowing Snake River, the hatchery fish we released traveled faster and had higher survival to Lower Granite Dam, likely because of their larger size at release. For fish left in the river to migrate we estimated survival from Lower Granite Dam tailrace to McNary Dam tailrace. Each year, a small proportion of fish released are not detected until the following spring. However, the number of fish released in 2003 that overwintered in the river and were detected as they migrated seaward as yearlings in 2004 was small (<1.0%) and had minimal effect on survival estimates. We evaluated a prototype floating PIT-tag detector deployed upstream from Lower Granite reservoir to collect data for use in partitioning travel time and survival between free-flowing and reservoir habitats. The floating detector performed poorly, detecting only 27 PIT tags in 340 h of operation from a targeted release of 68,572; far too few to partition travel time and survival between habitats. We collected river-run subyearling Chinook salmon (mostly wild fish from the Hanford Reach) at McNary Dam, PIT tagged them, and released them to the tailrace as part of an evaluation of transportation from McNary Dam in 2002. Estimated survival in 2002 from the tailrace of McNary Dam to the tailrace of John Day Dam was 0.746 (s.e. 0.036). For migration years 1999-2002, we found that in the reach from McNary to John Day Dam reach, travel time was shorter (migration rate was greater) and survival probabilities were greater when flow volume was greater. Survival was also correlated with water temperature: warmer water was associated with decreased survival, and there was an apparent survival threshold at about 19.3 C (above this temperature survival decreased substantially).

Muir, William D.; Axel, Gordon A.; Smith, Steven G. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

House Snakes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

House Snakes House Snakes Name: LOIS Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How do you get rid of snakes in a house? Do mothballs work? Replies: The snake is the most misunderstood and most abused of all animals. If you cannot overcome your abhorrence or fear of them, leave them alone. Do not kill them. They are valuable destroyers of mice, rats, gophers and many insects. Perhaps the following links could be of some assistance in keeping people from indiscriminately killing snakes? Snake-A-Way is the same product used by the pest control industry and currently the only registered snake repellent. Snake-A-Way links: http://www.animalrepellents.com/snakeinfo.html http://www.animalrepellents.com/ustudies/saw.html http://www.animalrepellents.com/editorials/naturel.html

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "region snake river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Survival of Seaward-Migrating PIT and Acoustic-Tagged Juvenile Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Columbia Rivers: An Evaluation of Length-Specific Tagging Effects  

SciTech Connect

Studies examining the survival of juvenile salmon as they emigrate to the ocean provide important information regarding the management of regulated river systems. Acoustic telemetry is a widely used tool for evaluating the behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids in the Columbia River basin. Thus, it is important to understand how the surgical tagging process and the presence of a transmitter affect survival so any biases can be accounted for or eliminated. This study evaluated the effects of fish length and tag type on the survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon during their seaward migrations through the Snake and Columbia rivers during 2006, 2007, and 2008. Fish were collected at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River (river kilometer 695) and implanted with either only a passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag (PIT fish) or both a PIT tag and an acoustic transmitter (AT fish). Survival was estimated from release at Lower Granite Dam to multiple downstream locations (dams) using the CormackJollySeber single release model, and analysis of variance was used to test for differences among length-classes and between tag types. No length-specific tag effect was detected between PIT and AT fish (i.e., length affected the survival of PIT fish in a manner similar to which it affected the survival of AT fish). Survival among the smallest length class (i.e., 8089 mm) of both PIT and AT subyearling Chinook salmon was markedly low (i.e., 4%). Fish length was positively correlated with the survival of both PIT and AT fish. Significant differences in survival were detected between tag types; the survival of PIT fish was generally greater than that of AT fish. However, confounding variables warrant caution in making strong inferences regarding this factor. Further, results suggest that tag effects may be due to the process of surgically implanting the transmitter rather than the presence of the transmitter.

Brown, Richard S.; Oldenburg, Eric W.; Seaburg, Adam; Cook, Katrina V.; Skalski, John R.; Eppard, M. B.; Deters, Katherine A.

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

102

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Prior to 1992, decisions on dam operations and use of stored water relied on recoveries of branded hatchery fish, index counts at traps and dams, and flow patterns at the dams. The advent of PIT-tag technology provided the opportunity to precisely track the smolt migrations of many wild stocks as they pass through the hydroelectric complex and other monitoring sites on their way to the ocean. With the availability of the PIT tag, a more complete approach to these decisions was undertaken starting in 1992 with the addition of PIT-tag detections of several wild spring and summer chinook salmon stocks at Lower Granite Dam. Using data from these detections, we initiated development of a database on wild fish, addressing several goals of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning Council and Conservation Act (NPPC 1980). Section 304(d) of the program states, ''The monitoring program will provide information on the migrational characteristics of the various stocks of salmon and steelhead within the Columbia Basin.'' Further, Section 201(b) urges conservation of genetic diversity, which will be possible only if wild stocks are preserved. Section 5.9A.1 of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program states that field monitoring of smolt movement will be used to determine the best timing for water storage releases and Section 5.8A.8 states that continued research is needed on survival of juvenile wild fish before they reach the first dam with special attention to water quantity, quality, and several other factors. The goals of this ongoing study are as follows (1) Characterize the migration timing and estimate parr-to-smolt survival of different stocks of wild Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon smolts at Lower Granite Dam. (2) Determine whether consistent migration patterns are apparent. (3) Determine what environmental factors influence these patterns. (4) Characterize the migrational behavior and estimate survival of different wild juvenile fish stocks as they emigrate from their natal rearing areas. This study provides critical information for recovery planning, and ultimately recovery for these ESA-listed wild fish stocks. This report provides information on PIT tagging of wild chinook salmon parr in 2002 and the subsequent monitoring of these fish. Fish were monitored as they migrated through two in-stream PIT-tag monitoring systems in lower Valley Creek and at juvenile migrant traps in 2002 and 2003 as well as through interrogation systems at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams during 2003. Fish were also monitored by the PIT-tag trawl in the mouth of the Columbia River in 2003. In 2002-2003, we also continued to collect environmental data for the Baseline Environmental Monitoring Program, which was developed from 1993 to 1997. The project was designed to collect data for use in conjunction with data on parr and smolt movements to discern patterns or characteristic relationships between these movements and environmental factors. Water quality data collected consist of water temperature, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, turbidity, water depth, and pH measured at five monitoring stations in the Salmon River Basin, Idaho.

Achord, Stephen; McNatt, Regan A.; Hockersmith, Eric E. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Effects of Summer Flow Augmentation on the Migratory Behavior and Survival of Juvenile Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon; 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes results of research activities conducted in 2002 and years previous to aid in the management and recovery of fall chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Columbia River basin. The report is divided into self-standing chapters. For detailed summaries, we refer the reader to the abstracts given on the second page of each chapter. The Annual Reporting section includes information provided to fishery managers in-season and post-season, and it contains a detailed summary of life history and survival statistics on wild Snake River fall chinook salmon juveniles for the years 1992-2002. Peer-review publication remains a high priority of this research project, and it insures that our work meets high scientific standards. The Bibliography of Published Journal Articles section provides citations for peer-reviewed papers coauthored by personnel of project 199102900 that were written or published from 1998 to 2003.

Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Haskell, Craig A. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA); Connor, William P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID)

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Effects of Summer Flow Augmentation on the Migratory Behavior and Survival of Juvenile Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon; 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes results of research activities conducted in 2004 and years previous to aid in the management and recovery of fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Columbia River basin. For detailed summaries, we refer the reader to the abstracts given on the second page of each chapter. The Annual Reporting section includes information provided to fishery managers in-season and post-season, and it contains a detailed summary of life history and survival statistics on wild Snake River fall Chinook salmon juveniles for the years 1992-2004. Publication is a high priority of our staff. Publication provides our results to a wide audience, and it insures that our work meets high scientific standards. The Bibliography of Published Journal Articles section provides citations for peer-reviewed papers co-authored by personnel of project 1991-02900 that were written or published from 1998 to 2005.

Tiffan, Kenneth F. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA); Connor, William P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Factors Affecting Route Selection and Survival of Steelhead Kelts at Snake River Dams in 2012 and 2013  

SciTech Connect

In 2012 and 2013, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a study that summarized the passage proportions and route-specific survival rates of steelhead kelts that passed through Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) dams. To accomplish this, a total of 811 steelhead kelts were tagged with Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) transmitters. Acoustic receivers, both autonomous and cabled, were deployed throughout the FCRPS to monitor the downstream movements of tagged-kelts. Kelts were also tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder tags to monitor passage through juvenile bypass systems and detect returning fish. The current study evaluated data collected in 2012 and 2013 to identify individual, behavioral, environmental and dam operation variables that were related to passage and survival of steelhead kelts that passed through FCRPS dams. Bayesian model averaging of multivariable logistic regression models was used to identify the environmental, temporal, operational, individual, and behavioral variables that had the highest probability of influencing the route of passage and the route-specific survival probabilities for kelts that passed Lower Granite (LGR), Little Goose (LGS), and Lower Monumental (LMN) dams in 2012 and 2013. The posterior probabilities of the best models for predicting route of passage ranged from 0.106 for traditional spill at LMN to 0.720 for turbine passage at LGS. Generally, the behavior (depth and near-dam searching activity) of kelts in the forebay appeared to have the greatest influence on their route of passage. Shallower-migrating kelts had a higher probability of passing via the weir and deeper-migrating kelts had a higher probability of passing via the JBS and turbines than other routes. Kelts that displayed a higher level of near-dam searching activity had a higher probability of passing via the spillway weir and those that did less near-dam searching had a higher probability of passing via the JBS and turbines. The side of the river in which kelts approached the dam and dam operations also affected route of passage. Dam operations and the size and condition of kelts were found to have the greatest effect on route-specific survival probabilities for fish that passed via the spillway at LGS. That is, longer kelts and those in fair condition had a lower probability of survival for fish that passed via the spillway weir. The survival of spillway weir- and deep-spill passed kelts was positively correlated with the percent of the total discharge that passed through turbine unit 4. Too few kelts passed through the traditional spill, JBS, and turbine units to evaluate survival through these routes. The information gathered in this study describes Snake River steelhead kelt passage behavior, rates, and distributions through the FCRPS as well as provide information to biologists and engineers about the dam operations and abiotic conditions that are related to passage and survival of steelhead kelts.

Harnish, Ryan A.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Li, Xinya; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Hair Snakes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hair Snakes Hair Snakes Nature Bulletin No. 101 February 1, 1947 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation HAIR SNAKES Farm boys have more fun than city boys. Every farm boy has watched the "hair snakes" sometimes found wriggling in drinking troughs for horses and cattle, or in puddles on a country road. They and their fathers will argue obstinately that these are hairs, from a horse's mane or tail, that turned into snakes. Phooie. Hair snakes are not snakes at all. They are roundworms. There are four common groups of worms here: annelids, which include earthworms and sewage-sludge worms; tapeworms; flatworms; and roundworms. The last three are called the "Lower Worms" and many of them are parasitic in other animals.

107

A multiple-tracer approach to understanding regional groundwater flow in the Snake Valley area of the eastern Great Basin, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Groundwater in Snake Valley and surrounding basins in the eastern Great Basin province of the western United States is being targeted for large-scale groundwater extraction and export. Concern about declining groundwater levels and spring flows in western Utah as a result of the proposed groundwater withdrawals has led to efforts that have improved the understanding of this regional groundwater flow system. In this study, environmental tracers (?2H, ?18O, 3H, 14C, 3He, 4He, 20Ne, 40Ar, 84Kr, and 129Xe) and major ions from 142 sites were evaluated to investigate groundwater recharge and flow-path characteristics. With few exceptions, ?2H and ?18O show that most valley groundwater has similar ratios to mountain springs, indicating recharge is dominated by relatively high-altitude precipitation. The spatial distribution of 3H, terrigenic helium (4Heterr), and 3H/3He ages shows that modern groundwater (temperatures (NGTs) are generally 111C in Snake and southern Spring Valleys and >11C to the east of Snake Valley and indicate a hydraulic discontinuity between Snake and Tule Valleys across the northern Confusion Range. The combination of \\{NGTs\\} and 4Heterr shows that the majority of Snake Valley groundwater discharges as springs, evapotranspiration, and well withdrawals within Snake Valley rather than continuing northeastward to discharge at either Fish Springs or the Great Salt Lake Playa. The refined understanding of groundwater recharge and flow paths acquired from this multi-tracer investigation has broad implications for interbasin subsurface flow estimates and future groundwater development.

Philip M. Gardner; Victor M. Heilweil

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Flow Augmentation in the Snake River, 1991-1995 : Phase I: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this evaluation was to estimate the volume and shape of flow augmentation water delivered in the Snake Basin during the years 1991 through 1995, and to assess the biological consequences to ESA-listed salmon stocks in that drainage. HDR Engineering, Inc. calculated flow augmentation estimates and compared their values to those reported by agencies in the Northwest. BioAnalysts, Inc. conducted the biological evaluation.

Giorgi, Albert E.; Schlecte, J.Warren [Bio Analysts, Inc., Redmond, WA (United States)]|[HDR Engineering, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Field container as a regional strategy for revitalizing the Los Angeles River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is the study of the Los Angeles River as a multi-layered field with urban condensers that revitalize the river, connect and revitalize the municipal districts bordering the river, and restructure the region to ...

Ghole, Saba (Saba Ashfaq)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Juveniles, 2007-2008 Report of Research.  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results from an ongoing project to monitor the migration behavior and survival of wild juvenile spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Snake River Basin. Data reported is from detections of PIT tagged fish during late summer 2007 through mid-2008. Fish were tagged in summer 2007 by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in Idaho and by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) in Oregon. Our analyses include migration behavior and estimated survival of fish at instream PIT-tag monitors and arrival timing and estimated survival to Lower Granite Dam. Principal results from tagging and interrogation during 2007-2008 are listed below: (1) In July and August 2007, we PIT tagged and released 7,390 wild Chinook salmon parr in 12 Idaho streams or sample areas. (2) Overall observed mortality from collection, handling, tagging, and after a 24-hour holding period was 1.4%. (3) Of the 2,524 Chinook salmon parr PIT tagged and released in Valley Creek in summer 2007, 218 (8.6%) were detected at two instream PIT-tag monitoring systems in lower Valley Creek from late summer 2007 to the following spring 2008. Of these, 71.6% were detected in late summer/fall, 11.9% in winter, and 16.5% in spring. Estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam was 15.5% for the late summer/fall group, 48.0% for the winter group, and 58.5% for the spring group. Based on detections at downstream dams, the overall efficiency of VC1 (upper) or VC2 (lower) Valley Creek monitors for detecting these fish was 21.1%. Using this VC1 or VC2 efficiency, an estimated 40.8% of all summer-tagged parr survived to move out of Valley Creek, and their estimated survival from that point to Lower Granite Dam was 26.5%. Overall estimated parr-to-smolt survival for all summer-tagged parr from this stream at the dam was 12.1%. Development and improvement of instream PIT-tag monitoring systems continued throughout 2007 and 2008. (4) Testing of PIT-tag antennas in lower Big Creek during 2007-2008 showed these antennas (and anchoring method) are not adequate to withstand high spring flows in this drainage. Future plans involve removing these antennas before high spring flows. (5) At Little Goose Dam in 2008, length and/or weight were taken on 505 recaptured fish from 12 Idaho stream populations. Fish had grown an average of 40.1 mm in length and 10.6 g in weight over an average of 288 d. Their mean condition factor declined from 1.25 at release (parr) to 1.05 at recapture (smolt). (6) Mean release lengths for detected fish were significantly larger than for fish not detected the following spring and summer (P < 0.0001). (7) Fish that migrated through Lower Granite Dam in April and May were significantly larger at release than fish that migrated after May (P < 0.0001) (only 12 fish migrated after May). (8) In 2008, peak detections at Lower Granite Dam of parr tagged during summer 2007 (from the 12 stream populations in Idaho and 4 streams in Oregon) occurred during moderate flows of 87.5 kcfs on 7 May and high flows of 197.3 kcfs on 20 May. The 10th, 50th, and 90th percentile passage occurred on 30 April, 11 May, and 23 May, respectively. (9) In 2007-2008, estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam for Idaho and Oregon streams (combined) averaged 19.4% (range 6.2-38.4% depending on stream of origin). In Idaho streams the estimated parr-to-smolt survival averaged 21.0%. This survival was the second highest since 1993 for Idaho streams. Relative parr densities were lower in 2007 (2.4 parr/100 m{sup 2}) than in all previous years since 2000. In 2008, we observed low-to-moderate flows prior to mid-May and relatively cold weather conditions throughout the spring migration season. These conditions moved half of the fish through Lower Granite Dam prior to mid-May; then high flows moved 50 to 90% of the fish through the dam in only 12 days. Clearly, complex interrelationships of several factors drive the annual migrational timing of the stocks.

Achord, Stephen; Sandford, Benjamin P.; Hockersmith, Eric E. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

111

Post-Release Attributes and Survival of Hatchery and Natural Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River; 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes results of research activities conducted in 2000, 2001, and years previous to aid in the management and recovery of fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River basin. The report is divided into sections and self-standing chapters. For detailed summaries, we refer the reader to the abstracts given on the second page of each chapter. The Annual Reporting section includes information provided to fishery managers in-season and post-season, and it contains a detailed summary of life history and survival statistics on wild Snake River fall chinook salmon juveniles for the years 1992-2001. The Journal Manuscripts section includes complete copies of papers submitted or published during 2000 and 2001 that were not included in previous annual reports. Publication is a high priority for this project because it provides our results to a wide audience, it ensures that our work meets high scientific standards, and we believe that it is a necessary obligation of a research project. The Bibliography of Published Journal Articles section provides citations for peer-reviewed papers co-authored by personnel of project 199102900 that were published from 1998 to 2001.

Connor, William P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID)

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Movements and Distribution of Northern Squawfish Downstream of Lower Snake River Dams Relative to the Migration of Juvenile Salmonids, 1992-1993 Completion Report.  

SciTech Connect

Northern squawfish Ptychocheilus oregonensis movements were monitored downstream of two lower Snake River dams during the juvenile salmonid migrations of 1992 and 1993. During a high flow year in 1993, the abundance of squawfish in the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam peaked in July, after the majority of juveniles had moved past Lower Granite Dam, and peak abundance was inversely related to river discharge. Few squawfish moved into the tailrace of Ice Harbor Dam in 1993 because of the extended period of spill. Distributions of squawfish in the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam varied between and within years and shifted in response to changing prey densities, flow patterns, water temperature, and diel cycles, but fish consistently used low velocity habitats. Data from Ice Harbor Dam is less extensive, but squawfish distributions there appeared to be affected by changing flow patterns and fish used low velocity habitats. The changes in distribution and abundance of squawfish in tailrace areas are evidence that predation on seaward migrating salmonids depends on the timing of migration and size and timing of runoff. Juvenile salmonids migrating in the spring and early summer will probably be less affected by squawfish predation in tailrace areas than salmon that migrate later in the summer.

Isaak, D.J.; Bjornn, T.C. (University of Idaho, Idaho Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Moscow, ID)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Population dynamics of the Concho water snake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the upper Colorado and Concho river systems of central Texas. It is 1 of 2 subspecies, the other being the Brazos water snake (Nerodia harteri harteri) which occurs in the Brazos river system of north-central Texas, Together they comprise the only species..., reproductive potential, mortality, and movements. williams predicted that habitat degradation resulting from the creation of Spence Reservoir, 2 km above his study site, would be detrimental to the Concho water snake population. Since the impoundment...

Mueller, James Michael

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Core Analysis At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

115

White Sturgeon Management Plan in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams; Nez Perce Tribe, 1997-2005 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

White sturgeon in the Hells Canyon reach (HCR) of the Snake River are of cultural importance to the Nez Perce Tribe. However, subsistence and ceremonial fishing opportunities have been severely limited as a result of low numbers of white sturgeon in the HCR. Hydrosystem development in the Columbia River Basin has depressed numbers and productivity of white sturgeon in the HCR by isolating fish in impounded reaches of the basin, restricting access to optimal rearing habitats, reducing the anadromous forage base, and modifying early life-history habitats. Consequently, a proactive management plan is needed to mitigate for the loss of white sturgeon production in the HCR, and to identify and implement feasible measures that will restore and rebuild the white sturgeon population to a level that sustains viability and can support an annual harvest. This comprehensive and adaptive management plan describes the goals, objectives, strategies, actions, and expected evaluative timeframes for restoring the white sturgeon population in the HCR. The goal of this plan, which is to maintain a viable, persistent population that can support a sustainable fishery, is supported by the following objectives: (1) a natural, stable age structure comprising both juveniles and a broad spectrum of spawning age-classes; (2) stable or increasing numbers of both juveniles and adults; (3) consistent levels of average recruitment to ensure future contribution to reproductive potential; (4) stable genetic diversity comparable to current levels; (5) a minimum level of abundance of 2,500 adults to minimize extinction risk; and (6) provision of an annual sustainable harvest of 5 kg/ha. To achieve management objectives, potential mitigative actions were developed by a Biological Risk Assessment Team (BRAT). Identified strategies and actions included enhancing growth and survival rates by restoring anadromous fish runs and increasing passage opportunities for white sturgeon, reducing mortality rates of early life stages by modifying flows in the HCR, reducing mortality imposed by the catch and release fishery, augmenting natural production through translocation or hatchery releases, and assessing detrimental effects of contaminants on reproductive potential. These proposed actions were evaluated by assessing their relative potential to affect population growth rate and by determining the feasibility of their execution, including a realistic timeframe (short-term, mid-term, long-term) for their implementation and evaluation. A multi-pronged approach for management was decided upon whereby various actions will be implemented and evaluated under different timeframes. Priority management actions include: Action I- Produce juvenile white sturgeon in a hatchery and release into the management area; Action G- Collect juvenile white sturgeon from other populations in the Snake or Columbia rivers and release them into the management area; and Action D- Restore white sturgeon passage upriver and downriver at Lower Snake and Idaho Power dams. An integral part of this approach is the continual monitoring of performance measures to assess the progressive response of the population to implemented actions, to evaluate the actions efficacy toward achieving objectives, and to refine and redirect strategies if warranted.

Nez Perce Tribe Resources Management Staff, (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Reply to Haeseker: Value of controlled scientific experiments to resolve critical uncertainties regarding Snake River salmon survival  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...River yearling Chinook smolts using a continental-scale acoustic-telemetry array, 2011. Report to the Bonneville Power Administration by Kintama Research Services Ltd., Contract No. 46389, Project No. 2003-114-00. Available at...

Erin L. Rechisky; David W. Welch; Aswea D. Porter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Department of Energy Awards $200,000 Grant to the Savannah River Regional  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

200,000 Grant to the Savannah River 200,000 Grant to the Savannah River Regional Diversification Initiative Community Reuse Organization Department of Energy Awards $200,000 Grant to the Savannah River Regional Diversification Initiative Community Reuse Organization Department of Energy Awards $200,000 Grant to the Savannah River Regional Diversification Initiative Community Reuse Organization Department of Energy Awards $200,000 Grant to the Savannah River Regional Diversification Initiative Community Reuse Organization More Documents & Publications Energy Department Awards $295,000 Grant to Savannah River Regional Diversification Initiative Department of Energy Awards $300,000 to Savannah River Regional Diversification Initiative Department of Energy Awards $485,000 Grant to the Southern Ohio

118

Geologic Controls of Hydraulic Conductivity in the Snake River Plain Aquifer At and Near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

The effective hydraulic conductivity of basalt and interbedded sediment that compose the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) ranges from about 1.0x10 -2 to 3.2x10 4 feet per day (ft/d). This six-order-of-magnitude range of hydraulic conductivity was estimated from single-well aquifer tests in 114 wells, and is attributed mainly to the physical characteristics and distribution of basalt flows and dikes. Hydraulic conductivity is greatest in thin pahoehoe flows and near-vent volcanic deposits. Hydraulic conductivity is least in flows and deposits cut by dikes. Estimates of hydraulic conductivity at and near the INEEL are similar to those measured in similar volcanic settings in Hawaii. The largest variety of rock types and the greatest range of hydraulic conductivity are in volcanic rift zones, which are characterized by numerous aligned volcanic vents and fissures related to underlying dikes. Three broad categories of hydraulic conductivity corresponding to six general types of geologic controls can be inferred from the distribution of wells and vent corridors. Hydraulic conductivity of basalt flows probably is increased by localized fissures and coarse mixtures of interbedded sediment, scoria, and basalt rubble. Hydraulic conductivity of basalt flows is decreased locally by abundant alteration minerals of probable hydrothermal origin. Hydraulic conductivity varies as much as six orders of magnitude in a single vent corridor and varies from three to five orders of magnitude within distances of 500 to 1,000 feet. Abrupt changes in hydraulic conductivity over short distances suggest the presence of preferential pathways and local barriers that may greatly affect the movement of ground water and the dispersion of radioactive and chemical wastes downgradient from points of waste disposal.

S. R. Anderson; M. A. Kuntz; L. C. Davis

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Resampling of regional climate model output for the simulation of extreme river flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the simulation of extreme river flows. This is important to assess the impact of climate change on river flooding biases in the RCM data, the simulated extreme flood quantiles correspond quite well with those obtainedResampling of regional climate model output for the simulation of extreme river flows Robert

Haak, Hein

120

THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER THE SNAKE RIVER...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the complex to be found in the aquifer are volatile organic contaminants - particularly carbon tetrachloride ("carbon tet"). The carbon tet found in the aquifer is attributed to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "region snake river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Savannah River Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Carolina Regions » Savannah River Carolina Regions » Savannah River Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov South Carolina Regions Savannah River Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Kim Mitchell Email: kimberly.mitchell@srs.gov Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, March 1, 2014

122

Snakes and Their Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many kinds of snakes live in Texas, but only a few are poisonous. This leaflet focuses on the control of poisonous snakes by altering their habitats, fencing, trapping, poisoning and shooting....

Texas Wildlife Services

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVIII: Survival and Transportation Effects of Migrating Snake River Wild Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates From 1996-2004 and Comparison to Hatchery Results. Draft.  

SciTech Connect

The combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged wild salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) were analyzed using the ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine) statistical release-recapture model. This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER, was used to estimate survival on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged wild spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam from 1996 to 2004. In addition, annual results from wild salmonids were compared with results from hatchery salmonids, which were presented in a previous report in this series (Buchanan, R. A., Skalski, J. R., Lady, J. L., Westhagen, P., Griswold, J., and Smith, S. 2007, 'Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003', Technical report, Bonneville Power Administration, Project 1991-051-00). These results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on a dam-specific basis for release years with sufficient numbers of wild PIT-tagged smolts transported. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 1,000 tagged wild smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few wild Chinook salmon and steelhead tagged upstream of Lower Granite Dam were transported before the 2003 release year, T/I and D were estimated only for the 2003 and 2004 release years. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Spring and summer Chinook salmon release groups were pooled across the entire Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam for this report. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.92% with an estimated standard error (dSE) of 0.25% for wild spring and summer Chinook salmon for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2004, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. Only for the 1999 and 2000 release years did the wild Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for wild steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.63% (dSE = 0.15%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2004. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2004), it was estimated that on average approximately 83% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged wild spring and summer Chinook, and 78% for steelhead (omitting the 2001 release year), occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Lower Granite Dam were available for the 2003 and 2004 release years for both wild Chinook salmon and wild steelhead. The estimated T/I for Lower Granite was significantly > 1.0 for Chinook in 2004 (P < 0.0001) and for steelhead in both 2003 (P < 0.0001) and 2004 (P < 0.0001), indicating that for these release years, wild fish transported at Lower Granite returned there in higher proportions than fish that were returned to the river at Lower Granite, or that passed Lower Granite without detection as juveniles. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Little Goose Dam were available for wild Chinook salmon for both 2003 and 2004. The estimated T/I for Little Goose was significantly > 1.0 for wild Chinook in 2004 (P = 0.0024), but not in 2003 (P = 0.1554). Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of pos

Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.; Broms, Kristin

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

124

Savannah River Region: Transition between the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the this conference of Coastal Plains geologists was on the Savannah River region of Georgia and South Carolina, and particularly on the geology of the US Department of Energy`s 300 square mile Savannah River Site (SRS) in western South Carolina. Current geological studies indicate that the Mesozoic-Cenozoic section in the Savannah River region is transitional between that of the Gulf Coastal Plain to the southwest and that of the Atlantic Coastal Plain to the northeast. With the transitional aspect of the region as its theme, the first session was devoted to overviews of Cretaceous and Paleogene geology in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Succeeding presentations and resulting discussions dealt with more specific problems in structural, lithostratigraphic, hydrological, biostratigraphic, and cyclostratigraphic analysis, and of correlation to standard stratigraphic frameworks. For these conference proceedings, individual papers have been processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

Zullo, V.A.; Harris, W.B.; Price, V. [eds.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Federally-Recognized Tribes of the Columbia-Snake Basin.  

SciTech Connect

This is an omnibus publication about the federally-recognized Indian tribes of the Columbia-Snake river basin, as presented by themselves. It showcases several figurative and literal snapshots of each tribe, bits and pieces of each tribe`s story. Each individual tribe or tribal confederation either submitted its own section to this publication, or developed its own section with the assistance of the writer-editor. A federally-recognized tribe is an individual Indian group, or confederation of Indian groups, officially acknowledged by the US government for purposes of legislation, consultation and benefits. This publication is designed to be used both as a resource and as an introduction to the tribes. Taken together, the sections present a rich picture of regional indian culture and history, as told by the tribes.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Snakes and Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Snakes and Plants Snakes and Plants Name: kathy Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We live in the southern most tip of Illinois,on horseshoe lake. I would like to know what time of the year do snakes come out and when do they go back in? Also is there any plants to plant to keep them away? Replies: What kind of snakes, in what kind of habitat? All snakes in Illinois hibernate in winter, but their habits differ by species. I'm not sure of the range of dates for southern Illinois, but they start to come out of hibernation in northern Illinois around the end of March or in April, depending on the weather. Advance of spring is usually about 3 weeks earlier in southern Illinois than northern, so i guess snake emergence would be about that much advanced as well. They will come out when there are warm sunny days to get them warmed up, and nights are not so cold that they will be harmed. Fall entry into hibernation is roughly parallel, snakes will often bask in the sun on sunny fall days before going into hibernation, again in no. Ill usually in October but widely varying.

127

Effects of Mitigative Measures on Productivity of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam: Determine Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from McNary Dam, 1997-1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The authors report on their progress from April 1997 through March 1998 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division (USGS; Report C), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS; Report D), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS; Report E), and Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report F). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete. Therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported. Highlights of results of the work from April 1997 through March 1998 listed.

Ward, David L. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Columbia River Plume andColumbia River Plume and California Current Ecosystem:California Current Ecosystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Understand processes and develop tools (models and ocean indices) for forecasting salmonid survival and returns #12;EggEgg--smolt Potentialsmolt Potential-- Snake RiverSnake River Spring ChinookSpring Chinook 0 Recent `good' ocean 100 yr ave ocean `Poor' ocean #12;CHART OF SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE · Note: warm water

129

Population ecology of the Concho water snake, Nerodia harteri paucimaculata, in artificial habitats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was the single most important habitat variable. Males were more vagile than gravid females, moving greater daily distances; however, the likelihood of a snake making a dispersal movement was independent of age and/or reproductive condition. Males had... to observed values from the river system for Pecan Creek, 1990-91. . 102 Table LIST OF TABLES (Continued) Page 39 Predatory success as determined by tail loss frequency in the Concho water snake, by site 103 XV LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Maximum...

Whiting, Martin John

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

SRO -NERP-1 THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND TREATMENT by Whit Gibbons Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Aiken , South Carolina A PUBLICATION OF EROA 'S SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PARK -SEPTEMBER 1977 COPIES MAY BE OBTAINEO FROM SAVANNAHSRO -NERP-1 SNAKES OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT WITH INFORMATION ABOUT SNAKEBITE PREVENTION

Georgia, University of

131

Systematic Analysis of Priority Water Resources Problems to Develop a Comprehensive Research Program for the Southern Plains River Basins Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TR- 61 1975 Systematic Analysis of Priority Water Resources Problems to Develop a Comprehensive Research Program for the Southern Plains River Basins Region R.E. Babcock J.W. Clark E.J. Dantin M.T. Edmison N.A. Evans...

Babcock, R. E.; Clark, J. W.; Dantin, E. J.; Edmison, M. T.; Evans, N. A.; Power, W. L.; Runkles, J. L.

132

The Nelson River hydroelectric development : a public utility investment affecting both regional and national development.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This is a study of the decision to develop hydroelectric power on the Nelson River. An historical account is given of the events leading to (more)

Cline, John Alexander

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Position of the Snake River watershed divide as an indicator of geodynamic processes in the greater Yellowstone region, western North America  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...indices of channel concavity, stream power distribution, and channel slope-basin...S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Geodetic Survey, http...E., 1987, Drainage history of the Bonneville Basin: In Kopp, R.S., and Cohenour...

134

A new interpretation of deformation rates in the Snake River Plain and adjacent basin and range regions based on GPS measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......from continuous sites and other campaigns...velocity field to test previous hypotheses...Oregon and northern Nevada areas beginning...structure between the Nevada Test Site and Boise, Idaho...zone in southern Nevada linking the Wasatch......

S.J. Payne; R. McCaffrey; R.W. King; S.A. Kattenhorn

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Atmospheric Rivers Induced Heavy Precipitation and Flooding in the Western U.S. Simulated by the WRF Regional Climate Model  

SciTech Connect

Twenty years of regional climate simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting model for North America has been analyzed to study the influence of the atmospheric rivers and the role of the land surface on heavy precipitation and flooding in the western U.S. Compared to observations, the simulation realistically captured the 95th percentile extreme precipitation, mean precipitation intensity, as well as the mean precipitation and temperature anomalies of all the atmospheric river events between 1980-1999. Contrasting the 1986 President Day and 1997 New Year Day atmospheric river events, differences in atmospheric stability are found to have an influence on the spatial distribution of precipitation in the Coastal Range of northern California. Although both cases yield similar amounts of heavy precipitation, the 1997 case was found to produce more runoff compared to the 1986 case. Antecedent soil moisture, the ratio of snowfall to total precipitation (which depends on temperature), and existing snowpack all seem to play a role, leading to a higher runoff to precipitation ratio simulated for the 1997 case. This study underscores the importance of characterizing or simulating atmospheric rivers and the land surface conditions for predicting floods, and for assessing the potential impacts of climate change on heavy precipitation and flooding in the western U.S.

Leung, Lai R.; Qian, Yun

2009-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

136

SURVEY OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER AND ITS TRIBUTARIES -Part VII  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SURVEY OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER AND ITS TRIBUTARIES - Part VII I ^^^^'fie^BkJioJS SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC, Director Special Scientific Report - Fisheries No. UO SURVEY OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER AND ITS TRIBUTARIES PART these have been divided for con- venience into four sub-areas. On the Idaho side of the Snake River

137

Groundwater responses to controlled water releases in the limitrophe region of the Colorado River: Implications for management and restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Flow regulation and water diversion for irrigation have considerably affected the exchange of surface water between the Colorado River and its floodplains. However, the way in which both have impacted groundwatersurface water interactions is not completely understood. The objective of this study was to conduct a hydrologic analysis of the 20092010 winter flows released into the limitrophe region of the Colorado River in order to characterize the surface flows along this dry reach and, for the first time, study the impact of winter flows on the groundwater conditions in the area. The study used existing data on groundwater levels that was collected from regional piezometers on both sides of the limitrophe every five years from 1980 to 2005. Regional flow direction from NE to SW was observed in all years. A groundwater depression cone in the southwest part of the limitrophe was identified from 1980 to 1995. A general rise of groundwater levels was observed from 2000 to 2005 on both sides of the limitrophe, but during the same time period, a depression cone formed along the border between Arizona and Sonora, in the Mesa Arenosa on the Mexican side of the border. In order to identify the water table evolution within the limitrophe riparian zone, nine sets of piezometers were constructed in an arrangement perpendicular to the main river channel. Water table levels were measured automatically every 30min and were also manually measured periodically. Nine geohydrological cross sections were constructed using the topographic relief from LIDAR elevation points and depth to groundwater measurements during water discharges in the Colorado River channel at Morelos dam. Groundwater seepage from irrigation canals, irrigation returns, and river discharge flows were identified and the depth to groundwater and its influence on riparian vegetation was analyzed. A strong correlation between flow discharge (up to 60.49hm3 from November 2009 to April 2010) and groundwater elevation (average elevation change of 1.62m on January 22, 2010) in time and space was found. The percentage of water retained in the main river channel decreased from 100% in the first discharge event (December 1213, 2009) to 36% after the last discharge event (April 917, 2010), due to remaining moisture in the unsaturated soil. The total volume of water retained, infiltrated, and evaporated, was 60% (36.6נ106m3) of the total water discharged. The delay time of the groundwater front during a discharge event was on average 6:30, 20:06, and 28:53h from section 1 to section 2, 13, and 14 respectively. This historical study provides insight into how floods affect the groundwater system, which is the foundation for aquatic and riparian biodiversity. This issue is of increasing relevance given growing international interest in rehabilitating the riparian and aquatic ecosystems of the Colorado River delta through intentional flood releases.

Jorge Ramrez-Hernndez; Osvel Hinojosa-Huerta; Mauricio Peregrina-Llanes; Alejandra Calvo-Fonseca; Edgar Carrera-Villa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Molecular evidence for a terrestrial origin of snakes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...snakes since the nineteenth century. One hypothesis suggests that...snakes since the nineteenth century. One hypothesis suggests that...snakes since the nineteenth century. One hypothesis suggests that...semi-burrowing) origin (Camp 1923; Mahendra 1938; Walls...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Quantitation of Pyrethrum Residues in Brown Tree Snakes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......captured in Guam. Snakes exposed to pyrethrum...homogenization. Control snakes were analyzed for...extract for method development and quality control. Control snakes were fortified at...further lower the temperature of the tissue, liquid......

John J. Johnston; Carol A. Furcolow; Stephanie A. Volz; Richard E. Mauldin; Thomas M. Primus; Peter J. Savarie; Joe E. Brooks

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.  

SciTech Connect

Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

Ashley, Paul

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "region snake river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Southwest region solar pond study for three sites: Tularosa Basin, Malaga Bend, and Canadian River  

SciTech Connect

In the study, the Bureau of Reclamation investigated the technical and economic feasibility of using solar salt-gradient ponds to generate power and to produce freshwater in Bureau projects at three sites--the Canadian River at Logan, New Mexico; Malaga Bend on the Pecos River near Carlsbad, New Mexico; and the Tularosa Basin in the vicinity of Alamogordo, New Mexico. The ponds would be used to generate electric power that could be integrated with the Bureau's power grid or used in combination with thermal energy from the ponds to power commercially available desalination systems to produce freshwater. Results of the economic analysis, which concentrated primarily on the Tularosa Basin site, showed that solar-pond-generated intermediate load power would cost between 62 and 90 mills/kWh and between 52 and 83 mills/kWh for baseload power. This results in benefit-cost ratios of approximately 2.0 and 1.3 for intermediate and baseload, respectively, when compared to similar facilities powered by fossil fuels. The cost savings are even more pronounced when comparing the two (solar versus fossil fuel) as a source of power for conventional distillation and membrane-type desalination systems.

Boegli, W.J.; Dahl, M.M.; Remmers, H.E.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Friction enhancement in concertina locomotion of snakes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...video S4 shows side and top views of a corn snake performing concertina in which...This behaviour is favourable if the energy required for lifting, m i gz i , is...We first discuss our measurements of corn snake frictional properties, body...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Middle Snake Draft Assessment 59 May 2004 3 Biological Characterization and Status  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural area designations, pending further local assessment and refinement (ICBEMP 1997). Thirty percentMiddle Snake Draft Assessment 59 May 2004 3 Biological Characterization and Status 3.1 Biodiversity and Endemism Regional Context Two recent regional assessment efforts have identified portions of the Middle

144

Regional hydrocarbon generation, migration, and accumulation pattern of Cretaceous strata, Powder River Basin  

SciTech Connect

A cell of abnormally high fluid pressure in the deep part of the Powder River basin is centered in an area where oil-generation-prone source rocks in the Skull Creek (oldest), Mowry, and Niobrara (youngest) formations are presently at their maximum hydrocarbon-volume generation rate. The overpressures are believed to be caused by the high conversion rate of solid kerogen in the source rocks to an increased volume of potentially expellable fluid hydrocarbons. In this area, hydrocarbons appear to be the principal mobile fluid species present in reservoirs within or proximal to the actively generating source rocks. Maximum generation pressures within the source rocks have caused vertical expulsion through a pressure-induced microfracture system and have charged the first available underlying and/or overlying sandstone carrier-reservoir bed. Hydrocarbons generated in the Skull Creek have been expelled downward into the Dakota Sandstone and upward into the Muddy Sandstone. Hydrocarbons generated in the Mowry have been expelled downward into the Muddy or upward into lower Frontier sandstones. Hydrocarbons generated in the Niobrara have been expelled downward into upper Frontier sandstones or upward into the first available overlying sandstone in the Upper Cretaceous. The first chargeable sandstone overlying the Niobrara, in ascending order, may be the (1) Shannon, (2) Sussex, (3) Parkman, (4) Teapot, or (5) Tekla, depending on the east limit of each sandstone with respect to vertical fracture migration through the Cody Shale from the underlying area of mature overpressured Niobrara source rocks.

Meissner, F.F.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Range Geothermal Region and Range Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Details Areas (34) Power Plants (3) Projects (7) Techniques (33) Map: {{{Name}}} Examination of seismicity and late Quaternary faults in Montana and Idaho north of the Snake River Plain shows a geographic correspondence between high seismicity and 24 faults that have experienced surface rupture during the late Quaternary. The Lewis and Clark Zone delineates the northern boundary of this tectonically active extensional region. Earthquakes greater than magnitude 5.5 and all identified late Quaternary faults are confined to the Montana-Idaho portion of the Basin and Range Province south of the Lewis and Clark Zone. Furthermore, all 12 Holocene faults are

146

Theory of snake states in graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the dynamics of the electrons in a nonuniform magnetic field applied perpendicular to a graphene sheet in the low-energy limit when the excitation states can be described by a Dirac-type Hamiltonian. Compared to two-dimensional electron gas systems, we show that snake states in graphene exhibit peculiar properties related to the underlying dynamics of the Dirac fermions. The current carried by snake states is locally uncompensated, leading to a current inhomogeneity in the ground state.

L. Oroszlny; P. Rakyta; A. Kormnyos; C. J. Lambert; J. Cserti

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

147

Molecular evidence for a terrestrial origin of snakes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.12.03; Published online 30.01.04 Biologists have debated the origin of snakes since the nineteenth century. One of snakes: a ter- restrial (burrowing or semi-burrowing) origin (Camp 1923; Mahendra 1938; Walls 1940

Hedges, Blair

148

Lateral undulation of a snake-like robot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Snake robots have been studied by many researchers but historically more on a theoretical basis. Recently, more and more robotic snakes have been realized in hardware. This thesis presents a design process for the electrical, ...

Gupta, Amit

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Folding in regions of extension  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......For the large crustal temperatures that are implied by the small...interesting feature is the Snake River Plain at the northern...implications for fold and rock fabric development, central Mojave metamorphic...Evans B., 1979. Stress and temperature in the bending lithosphere......

F. Lvy; C. Jaupart

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Factors influencing the road mortality of snakes on the Upper Snake River Plain, Idaho  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the Area of Concern (AOC) roads data maintained athttp://giscenter.isu.edu). The AOC refers to land areas thatin the field. I used the AOC vegetation coverage assembled

Jochimsen, Denim M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Intercellular Junctions between Visual Cells in the Snake Retina  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......cones. Key words = snake retina: intercellular...species examined. In the snake, Elaphe quadrivirgata...visual cells and the development of their intercellular...MATERIALS AND METHODS Snakes used in the present...same fixative at room temperature for 2 hr. After postfixation......

Shingo HARA; Masayuki MIYOSHI

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Snake River Geothermal Project- Innovative Approaches to Geothermal Exploration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objective: To Implement and Test Geological and Geophysical Techniques for Geothermal Exploration. Project seeks to lower the cost of geothermal energy development by identifying which surface and borehole techniques are most efficient at identifying hidden resources.

153

The Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project - Innovative Approaches...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a complete record of the volcanic stratigraphy that can be used in complementary science projects. This project will function in tandem with Project Hotspot, a continental...

154

Microearthquake surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black Rock Desert; Cassia County Idaho; earthquakes; economic geology; exploration; fracture zones; geophysical methods; geophysical surveys; geothermal energy; Humboldt County...

155

Snake River Geothermal Project - Innovative Approaches to Geothermal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

will document detailed stratigraphy of each site. 8 | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov ScientificTechnical Approach * Detailed Gravity & Magnetics: US Geological...

156

The INL and the Snake River Plain Aquifer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the complex to be found in the aquifer are volatile organic contaminants particularly carbon tetrachloride (carbon tet). The carbon tet found in the aquifer is attributed...

157

Study of spin resonances in the accelerators with snakes  

SciTech Connect

Spin resonances in the circular accelerators with snakes are studied to understand the nature of snake resonances. We analyze the effect of snake configuration, and the snake superperiod on the resonance. Defining the critical resonance strength epsilon/sub c/ as the maximum tolerable resonance strength without losing the beam polarization after passing through the resonance, we found that epsilon/sub c/ is a sensitive function of the snake configuration, the snake superperiod at the first order snake resonance, the higher order snake resonance conditions and the spin matching condition. Under properly designed snake configuration, the critical resonance strength epsilon/sub c/ is found to vary linearly with N/sub S/ as = (1/..pi..)sin/sup /minus/1/(/vert bar/cos ..pi nu../sub z//vert bar//sup /1/2//)N/sub S/, where ..nu../sub z/ and N/sub S/ are the betatron tune and the number of snakes respectively. We also study the effect of overlapping intrinsic and imperfection resonances. The imperfection resonance should be corrected to a magnitude of insignificance (e.g., epsilonless than or equal to0.1 for two snakes case) to maintain proper polarization. 23 refs., 25 figs.

Lee, S.Y.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Controls on Eurasian coastal sea ice formation, melt onset and decay from ERS scatterometry: regional contrasts and effects of river  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

first-year sea ice (FYI) are observed in the Eurasian Arctic using the C-band (5.3 GHz) European RemoteControls on Eurasian coastal sea ice formation, melt onset and decay from ERS scatterometry and Kolyma rivers. Melt onset of the sea ice surface is associated with abrupt changes in s0 40, with values

Smith, Laurence C.

159

Hydrodynamic and water quality river basin modeling using CE-QUAL-W2 version 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-dimensional (longitudinal-vertical) water quality and hydrodynamic computer simulation model that was originally developed of the Lower Snake River in the Northwestern USA; the Bull Run River basin composed of 3 water supply and computes water levels, horizontal and vertical velocities, temperature, and 21 other water quality

Wells, Scott A.

160

1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS.  

SciTech Connect

This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FSWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "region snake river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Interactions and Implications of a Collector Well with a River in an Unconfined Aquifer with Regional Background Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Steward, 1999; Zhan, 1999; Zhan and Cao, 2000]. These wells are often placed near or under rivers, where they collect water from both the surface and aquifer that is naturally filtered through low permeability riverbank sediments. Seines et al. [1994... various conditions [Schafer, 1996; Zhan, 1999; Steward, 1999; Zhan and Cao, 2000; Stewart and Jin, 2001]. Radial collector wells are complex fluid collection systems that induce intricate flow dynamics as a result of their pumping because...

Dugat, William D., IV

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

162

RETURN TO THE RIVER -2000 Literature Cited Literature Cited468  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Snake River spring and summer chinook salmon smolts, 1993. Bonneville Power Administration. DOE/BP-18800 Administration. DOE/BP-18800-1. Portland, Oregon. Ad Hoc Transportation Review Group. 1992. Review of salmon-49 in V. T. Chow, ed. Handbook of Applied Hydrology. McGraw Hill Book Co., New York. Allen, R. L., and T

163

E-Print Network 3.0 - african snake fish Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

snake fish Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: african snake fish Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Sustained by Snakes? Seasonal Livelihood...

164

E-Print Network 3.0 - asian snake rhabdophis Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

than 85% of extant snakes and is characterized by increased mobility of the jaws... the food habits of a basal clade of macrostomatan snakes the erycine boas (Erycinae) ...

165

DESTRUCTION OF LIFE IN INDIA BY POISONOUS SNAKES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... made out that the human deaths from snake-bite were as follows in-Bengal, including Assain and Orissa 6645

J. FAYRER

1882-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

166

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1992.  

SciTech Connect

This document is the 1992 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the National Biological Survey (NBS) and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon cannot be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

ENGINEERING OF THE AGS SNAKE COIL ASSEMBLY.  

SciTech Connect

A 30% Snake superconducting magnet is proposed to maintain polarization in the AGS proton beam, the magnetic design of which is described elsewhere. The required helical coils for this magnet push the limits of the technology developed for the RHIC Snake coils. First, fields must be provided with differing pitch along the length of the magnet. To accomplish this, a new 3-D CAD system (''Pro/Engineer'' from PTC), which uses parametric techniques to enable fast iterations, has been employed. Revised magnetic field calculations are then based on the output of the mechanical model. Changes are made in turn to the model on the basis of those field calculations. To ensure that accuracy is maintained, the final solid model is imported directly into the CNC machine programming software, rather than by the use of graphics translating software. Next, due to the large coil size and magnetic field, there was concern whether the structure could contain the coil forces. A finite element analysis was performed, using the 3-D model, to ensure that the stresses and deflections were acceptable. Finally, a method was developed using ultrasonic energy to improve conductor placement during coil winding, in an effort to minimize electrical shorts due to conductor misplacement, a problem that occurred in the RHIC helical coil program. Each of these activities represents a significant improvement in technology over that which was used previously for the RHIC snake coils.

ANERELLA,M.GUPTA,R.KOVACH,P.MARONE,A.PLATE,S.POWER,K.SCHMALZLE,J.WILLEN,E.

2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

168

Study on consumption efficiency of soil water resources in the Yellow River Basin based on regional ET structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on the regional water resources character, the concept of soil water resources is first redefined, and then associated...ET)-based consumption structure and consumption efficiency of soil water resources ar...

Hao Wang; GuiYu Yang; YangWen Jia; DaYong Qin

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

River Thames River Thames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

West Kent House Penge East Lower Sydenham Forest Hill Honor Oak Park Crofton Park Nunhead New CrossC BD A River Thames River Thames Waterloo & City Southwark Northwood Northwood Hills North Harrow Harrow- on-the-Hill Northwick Park Harrow & Wealdstone Headstone Lane Pinner Kenton Stanmore Canons Park

Delmotte, Nausicaa

170

River Thames River Thames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

River Thames River Thames Du Cane Road Wood Lane Wood Lane North Pole Road Barlby Road Highlever Street Acton Market Place Acton Horn Lane Wood Lane Du Cane Road Wood Lane South Africa Road White City for BBC Television Centre Wood Lane Ariel Way Wood Lane Shepherd's Bush Green Shepherd's Bush Green

171

EIS-0163: 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Walla Walla District prepared this statement to analyze four general alternatives to modify the flow of water in the lower Columbia-Snake River in order to help anadromous fish migrate past eight multipurpose Federal dams. The U.S. Department of Energys Bonneville Power Administration served as a cooperating agency due to its key role in direct operation of the integrated and coordinated Columbia-Snake River System, and adopted this statement on February 10, 1992.

172

Snake modulates constriction in response to prey's heartbeat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...heartbeat. When the heart was stopped midway through the constriction, snakes abandoned...and pressures (70 378 12 580 s mmHg) midway between our continuous and no heart treatments...heartbeat. When the heart was stopped midway through the constriction, snakes abandoned...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION  

SciTech Connect

Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by U.S. EPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

Kevin Crist

2005-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

174

EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION  

SciTech Connect

Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley Region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by U.S. EPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley Region.

Kevin Crist

2003-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

175

Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury, Fine Particulate Matter, and Arsenic from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region  

SciTech Connect

As stated in the proposal: Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg0 and RGM. Approximately 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by the USEPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

Kevin Crist

2006-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

176

EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION  

SciTech Connect

Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by U.S. EPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

Kevin Crist

2004-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

177

Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury, Fine Particulate Matter, and Arsenic from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region  

SciTech Connect

Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg0, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by U.S. EPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

Kevin Crist

2005-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

178

EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION  

SciTech Connect

Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal-fired power plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley Region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by U.S. EPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

Kevin Crist

2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

179

Regional groundwater flow model for C, K. L. and P reactor areas, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC  

SciTech Connect

A regional groundwater flow model encompassing approximately 100 mi2 surrounding the C, K, L, and P reactor areas has been developed. The reactor flow model is designed to meet the planning objectives outlined in the General Groundwater Strategy for Reactor Area Projects by providing a common framework for analyzing groundwater flow, contaminant migration and remedial alternatives within the Reactor Projects team of the Environmental Restoration Department. The model provides a quantitative understanding of groundwater flow on a regional scale within the near surface aquifers and deeper semi-confined to confined aquifers. The model incorporates historical and current field characterization data up through Spring 1999. Model preprocessing is automated so that future updates and modifications can be performed quickly and efficiently. The CKLP regional reactor model can be used to guide characterization, perform scoping analyses of contaminant transport, and serve as a common base for subsequent finer-scale transport and remedial/feasibility models for each reactor area.

Flach, G.P.

2000-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

180

Snakes of the Lake ErieSnakes of the Lake Erie IslandsIslands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and were modified by human activities suchand were modified by human activities such as quarrying and farmingas quarrying and farming #12;Attempts were made to eradicate snakes from the islands #12;#12;...and;· Found throughout Ohio · Locally found in the quarries of Kelleys island and on the shoreline of Johnson

King, Richard B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "region snake river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Groundwater and surface water supplies in the Williston and Powder River structural basins are necessary for future development in these regions. To help determine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;i Abstract Groundwater and surface water supplies in the Williston and Powder River structural of streams, and quantify reservoir interaction in the Williston and Powder River structural basins the loss to underlying aquifers was 7790 ft3 /s. Both the Powder River and Williston basins contain gaining

Torgersen, Christian

182

Annual Report - Remotely Operated NDE System for Inspection of Hanford's Waste Tank Knuckle Regions and Development of a Small Roving Annulus Inspection Vehicle T-SAFT Scanning Bridge for Savannah River Site Applications  

SciTech Connect

The design, development, and performance testing of a prototype system known as the Remotely Operated Nondestructive Examination (RONDE)system to examine the knuckle region of a Hanford DST have been completed. The design and fabrication of a scanning bridge to support the Savannah River Site utilizing similar technology was also completed.

Pardini, Allan F.; Crawford, Susan L.; Harris, Robert V.; Samuel, Todd J.; Roberts, Ron A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Gervais, Kevin L.; Maynard, Melody A.; Tucker, Joseph C.

2002-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

183

Magnetotellurics At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotellurics At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Magnetotellurics At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date 1977 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Magnetotelluric soundings along a profile extending from the Raft River geothermal area in southern Idaho in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming reveal a highly anomalous crustal structure involving a conductive zone at depths that range from 18 km in the central part of the eastern Snake River Plain to 7 km beneath the Raft River thermal area and as little as 5 km in Yellowstone. Resistivities in this conductive zone are less than 10 ohm-m and at some sites than 1 ohm-m. References Stanley, W.D.; Boehl, J.E.; Bostick, F.X.; Smith, H.W. (10 June

184

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, 1991 Annual Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

This document is the 1991 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. In April 1992, Snake River fall chinook salmon were listed as ``threatened`` under the Endangered Species Act. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon can not be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Formation and Stability of Impurity "snakes" in Tokamak Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

New observations of the formation and dynamics of long-lived impurity-induced helical "snake" modes in tokamak plasmas have recently been carried-out on Alcator C-Mod. The snakes form as an asymmetry in the impurity ion density that undergoes a seamless transition from a small helically displaced density to a large crescent-shaped helical structure inside q < 1, with a regularly sawtoothing core. The observations show that the conditions for the formation and persistence of a snake cannot be explained by plasma pressure alone. Instead, many features arise naturally from nonlinear interactions in a 3D MHD model that separately evolves the plasma density and temperature

L. Delgado-Aparicio, et. al.

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

186

Morphological and ecological convergence in two natricine snakes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-dwelling natricine snakes, Thamnophis rufipunctatus and Nerodia harteri. Both species live in shallow riffles in streams and forage visually for fish. Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA sequences for the ND4 gene from these species and four other natricines...

Hibbitts, Toby Jarrell

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

CE-QUAL-W2 Version 3: Hydrodynamic and Water Quality River Basin Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-dimensional (longitudinal-vertical) water quality and hy- drodynamic computer simulation model that was originally developed segments. Test cases for this new code include a 244 km section of the Lower Snake River in Idaho and ver- tical velocities, temperature, and 21 other wa- ter quality parameters (such as dissolved oxy

Wells, Scott A.

188

Development of a Performance and Processing Property Acceptance Region for Cementitious Low-Level Waste Forms at Savannah River Site - 13174  

SciTech Connect

The Saltstone Production and Disposal Facilities (SPF and SDF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have been treating decontaminated salt solution, a low-level aqueous waste stream (LLW) since facility commissioning in 1990. In 2012, the Saltstone Facilities implemented a new Performance Assessment (PA) that incorporates an alternate design for the disposal facility to ensure that the performance objectives of DOE Order 435.1 and the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) of Fiscal Year 2005 Section 3116 are met. The PA performs long term modeling of the waste form, disposal facility, and disposal site hydrogeology to determine the transport history of radionuclides disposed in the LLW. Saltstone has been successfully used to dispose of LLW in a grout waste form for 15 years. Numerous waste form property assumptions directly impact the fate and transport modeling performed in the PA. The extent of process variability and consequence on performance properties are critical to meeting the assumptions of the PA. The SPF has ensured performance property acceptability by way of implementing control strategies that ensure the process operates within the analyzed limits of variability, but efforts continue to improve the understanding of facility performance in relation to the PA analysis. A similar understanding of the impact of variability on processing parameters is important from the standpoint of the operability of the production facility. The fresh grout slurry properties (particularly slurry rheology and the rate of hydration and structure formation) of the waste form directly impact the pressure and flow rates that can be reliably processed. It is thus equally important to quantify the impact of variability on processing parameters to ensure that the design basis assumptions for the production facility are maintained. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has been pursuing a process that will ultimately establish a property acceptance region (PAR) to incorporate elements important to both processability and long-term performance properties. This process involves characterization of both emplaced product samples from the disposal facility and laboratory-simulated samples to demonstrate the effectiveness of the lab simulation. With that basis confirmed, a comprehensive variability study using non-radioactive simulants will define the acceptable PAR, or 'operating window' for Saltstone production and disposal. This same process will be used in the future to evaluate new waste streams for disposal or changes to the existing process flowsheet. (authors)

Staub, Aaron V. [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Reigel, Marissa M. [Savannah River National Lab, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Lab, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1993.  

SciTech Connect

Recovery efforts for the endangered fall chinook salmon necessitates knowledge of the factors limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which affect spawning of the fish in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing seward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs. The spawning was generally a November event in 1993, with some activity in late Oct. and early Dec. Spawning habitat availability was assessed by applying hydraulic and habitat models to known fall chinook salmon spawning sites. Juveniles were seined and PIT tagged in the free-flowing Snake River, and in the Columbia River in he Hanford Reach and in McNary Reservoir. Subyearling fish were marked at McNary Dam to relate river flow and migration patterns of juveniles to adult returns. Hydroacoustic surveys were conducted on McNary and John Day reservoirs and in net pens.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Zgoubi-ing AGS : spin motion with snakes and jump-quads,G? = 43.5 through G? = 46.5 and beyond  

SciTech Connect

This Note reports on the first, and successful, simulations of particle and spin dynamics in the AGS in presence of the two helical snakes and of the tune-jump quadrupoles, using the ray-tracing code Zgoubi. It includes DA tracking in the absence or in the presence of the two helical snakes, simulation of particle and spin motion in the snakes using their magnetic field maps, spin flipping at integer resonances in the 36+Qy depolarizing resonance region, with and without tune-jump quadrupole gymnastics. It also includes details on the setting-up of Zgoubi input data files and on the various numerical methods of concern in and available from Zgoubi.

Meot F.; Ahrens& #44; L.; Glenn& #44; J.; Huang& #44; H.; Luccio& #44; A.; MacKay& #44; W.W.; Roser& #44; T.; Tsoupas& #44; N.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

About Rocky Mountain Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rates About the Rocky Mountain Region RM Office The Platte River Power Authority in Colorado, Nebraska Public Power District, Kansas Electric Power Cooperative and Wyoming...

192

SNAKE SPECIES RICHNESS IN RELATION TO HABITAT IN THE POST OAK SAVANNAH OF EAST CENTRAL TEXAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project examined snake species richness and relative abundances in a heterogeneous landscape within the post oak savannah of East Central Texas. Snakes were sampled using funnel traps (with drift fences for terrestrial species) and hand capture...

Putegnat, John

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

193

Ultrastructure of the Reproductive System of the Black Swamp Snake (Seminatrix pygaea). IV. Occurrence of an  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultrastructure of the Reproductive System of the Black Swamp Snake (Seminatrix pygaea). IV gefu¨llt sein." In the next paragraph, van den Broek turns his atten- tion to snakes and reported, "Auf

Sever, David M.

194

Tucannon River Temperature Study, Prepared for : Watershed Resource Inventory Area (WRIA) 35.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a temperature analysis of the Tucannon River completed for the WRIA 35 Planning Unit. The Tucannon River is located in southeastern Washington and flows approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles) from the Blue Mountains to the Snake River. High water temperature in the Tucannon River has been identified as a limiting factor for salmonid fish habitat (Columbia Conservation District, 2004). Several segments of the Tucannon River are included on Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) 303(d) list of impaired waterbodies due to temperature. Ecology is currently conducting scoping for a temperature Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) study of the Tucannon River. The WRIA 35 Planning Unit retained HDR Engineering to evaluate water temperature in the Tucannon River. The project objectives are: (1) Review recent and historic data and studies to characterize temperature conditions in the river; (2) Perform field studies and analyses to identify and quantify heating and cooling processes in the river; (3) Develop and calibrate a computer temperature model to determine the sources of heat to the Tucannon River and to predict the temperature of the river that would occur with increased natural riparian shading assuming the current river morphology; (4) Evaluate differences in river temperatures between current and improved riparian shading during the 'critical' period - low river flows and high temperatures; and (5) Determine the potential benefits of riparian shading as a mechanism to decrease river temperature.

HDR Engineering.

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

195

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Cassia County Idaho; data; geophysical surveys; Idaho; Raft River geothermal area; surveys; United States; USGS; Well No. 3; well-logging Author(s): Covington, H.R. Published: Open-File Report - U. S. Geological Survey, 1/1/1978 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Deep_drilling_data,_Raft_River_geothermal_area,_Idaho-Raft_River_geothermal_exploration_well_sidetrack-C&oldid=473365"

196

Ultrastructure of the Reproductive System of the Black Swamp Snake (Seminatrix pygaea). III. Sexual Segment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultrastructure of the Reproductive System of the Black Swamp Snake (Seminatrix pygaea). III. Sexual, Indiana ABSTRACT In mature male snakes and lizards, a distal portion of the nephron is hypertrophied segment of the kidney of a squa- mate, the natricine snake Seminatrix pygaea. Previous workers have

Sever, David M.

197

Ultrastructure of the Reproductive System of the Black Swamp Snake (Seminatrix pygaea)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultrastructure of the Reproductive System of the Black Swamp Snake (Seminatrix pygaea): Part I (lecithotrophic) colu- brid snake Seminatrix pygaea was studied by light and electron microscopy. Out of 17 adult snakes examined from May­October, sperm were found in the oviducts of only two specimens

Sever, David M.

198

Ultrastructure of the Reproductive System of the Black Swamp Snake (Seminatrix pygaea). VI. Anterior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultrastructure of the Reproductive System of the Black Swamp Snake (Seminatrix pygaea). VI of the North American natricine snake Seminatrix pygaea are described using light and electron micros- copy is a glycoprotein. Overall, the characteristics of the ante- rior testicular ducts of this snake are concordant

Sever, David M.

199

Systematic analysis of snake neurotoxins' functional classification using a data warehousing approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......bungarotoxin at room temperature for1hinthepresence of...AND DISCUSSIONS 3.1 Snake venom neurotoxin database...tool. 4 CONCLUSION Snake venoms are important...rapid data analysis and development of a prediction module...Systematic analysis of snake neurotoxins' functional......

Joyce Phui Yee Siew; Asif M. Khan; Paul T. J. Tan; Judice L. Y. Koh; Seng Hong Seah; Chuay Yeng Koo; Siaw Ching Chai; Arunmozhiarasi Armugam; Vladimir Brusic; Kandiah Jeyaseelan

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Statistical pressure snakes based on color images.  

SciTech Connect

The traditional mono-color statistical pressure snake was modified to function on a color image with target errors defined in HSV color space. Large variations in target lighting and shading are permitted if the target color is only specified in terms of hue. This method works well with custom targets where the target is surrounded by a color of a very different hue. A significant robustness increase is achieved in the computer vision capability to track a specific target in an unstructured, outdoor environment. By specifying the target color to contain hue, saturation and intensity values, it is possible to establish a reasonably robust method to track general image features of a single color. This method is convenient to allow the operator to select arbitrary targets, or sections of a target, which have a common color. Further, a modification to the standard pixel averaging routine is introduced which allows the target to be specified not only in terms of a single color, but also using a list of colors. These algorithms were tested and verified by using a web camera attached to a personal computer.

Schaub, Hanspeter [ORION International Technologies, Albuquerque, NM

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "region snake river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

MAGNETIC DESIGN OF A SUPERCONDUCTING AGS SNAKE.  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory plans to build a partial helical snake for polarized proton acceleration in the AGS. It will be a 3 Tesla superconducting magnet having a magnetic length of 1.9 meter. AGS needs only one magnet and currently there is no plan to build a prototype. Therefore, the first magnet itself must function at the design operating field and provide the required field quality, spin rotation and deflections on the particle beam. New software have been developed that exchanges input/output between the OPERA3d field design program, the Pro-Engineering CAD model and the software that drives the machine to make slots in aluminum cylinders where blocks of 6-around-I NbTi wires are placed. This new software have been used to carry out a number of iterations to satisfy various design requirements and to assure that the profile that is used in making field computations is the same that is used in cutting metal. The optimized coil cross-section is based on a two layer design with both inner and outer layers having five current blocks per quadrant. The ends are based on a design concept that will be used for the first time in accelerator magnets.

GUPTA,R.; LUCCIO,A.; MORGAN,G.; MACKAY,W.; POWER,K.; ROSER,T.; WILLEN,E.; OKAMURA,M.

2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

202

Spectroscopy of snake states using a graphene Hall bar  

SciTech Connect

An approach to observe snake states in a graphene Hall bar containing a pn-junction is proposed. The magnetic field dependence of the bend resistance in a ballistic graphene Hall bar structure containing a tilted pn-junction oscillates as a function of applied magnetic field. We show that each oscillation is due to a specific snake state that moves along the pn-interface. Furthermore, depending on the value of the magnetic field and applied potential, we can control the lead in which the electrons will end up and hence control the response of the system.

Milovanovi?, S. P., E-mail: slavisa.milovanovic@gmail.com; Ramezani Masir, M., E-mail: mrmphys@gmail.com; Peeters, F. M., E-mail: francois.peeters@ua.ac.be [Departement Fysica, Universiteit Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

203

Columbia River System Operation Review on Selecting an Operating Strategy for the Federal Columbia River Power System; 21Feb1997  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Bonneville Power Administration Columbia River System Operation Review on Selecting an Operating Strategy for the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) AGENCY: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Record of Decision (ROD) SUMMARY: The Columbia River System Operation Review (SOR) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assessed operations at the 14 Federal dams and reservoirs on the Columbia and lower Snake Rivers that have a major influence on the multiple purpose system operation, and for which power production is coordinated under the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement. Lead agencies for this six-year process were the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

204

Snakes mimic earthworms: propulsion using rectilinear travelling waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Rectilinear locomotion may also be implemented in the control of medical snake-robots used to reach parts of the human body that physicians...body is pressed against the ground, which prevents the side lighting from reaching the camera. At t = 0 s, the front of the body...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

The Columbia River System Inside Story  

SciTech Connect

The Columbia River is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Pacific Northwestfrom fostering world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying clean natural fuel for 50 to 65 percent of the regions electrical generation. Since early in the 20th century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system.

none,

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey made seventy Schlumberger resistivity soundings in the Upper Raft River Valley and in parts of the Raft River Valley. These soundings complement the seventy-nine soundings made previously in the Raft River Valley (Zohdy and others, 1975) and bring the total number of soundings to 149. This work was done as part of a hydrogeologic study of the area. The location, number, and azimuth of all 149 Schlumberger sounding stations are presented. The location of the new

207

Our River  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River River Nature Bulletin No. 22 July 7, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation OUR RIVER The people of Cook County are missing a bet. They are not using their DesPlaines River. The other day we took a boat trip down that river from Lake County to Lawndale Avenue in Summit. It being a week day, we saw few people other than an occasional fisherman or pairs of strolling boys. Except for a bridge now and then, there were no signs or sounds of civilization. Chicago might have been a thousand miles away. We rested. There was isolation. There was peace. Once in a while a heron flew ahead of us; or a squirrel scampered up a tree; once we saw a family of young muskrats playing around the entrance to their den in the bank; twice we saw and heard a wood duck; again and again big fish plowed ripples surging ahead of us. It was shady and cool and still beneath the arching trees. We thought of the centuries this river had traveled. We were babes nuzzling again at the breast of Mother Nature.

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced snakes superfamily Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

snakes model for image segmentation and object representation. The model ... Source: Gout, Christian - Laboratoire de Mathmatiques et leurs Applications, Universit de...

209

920 Articles | JNCI Vol. 99, Issue 12 | June 20, 2007 Drinking water in region II of Chile is supplied mainly by rivers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

920 Articles | JNCI Vol. 99, Issue 12 | June 20, 2007 Drinking water in region II of Chile in the main city of region II, Antofagasta, was approximately 90 µg/L (1), nearly twice the drinking water.permissions@oxfordjournals.org. Fifty-Year Study of Lung and Bladder Cancer Mortality in Chile Related to Arsenic in Drinking Water

California at Berkeley, University of

210

DATABASE Open Access Regional distribution of mercury in sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DATABASE Open Access Regional distribution of mercury in sediments of the main rivers of French led to locally high concentrations in soils and sediments. The present study maps the levels of Hg concentrations in river sediments from five main rivers of French Guiana (Approuague River, Comté River, Mana

Boyer, Edmond

211

River Steamboats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River Steamboats River Steamboats Nature Bulletin No. 628-A February 12, 1977 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation RIVER STEAMBOATS The westward migration of the pioneer settlers and the rapid growth of agriculture, commerce and industry in the Middle West is in large part the story of water transportation on our inland waterways. The two main water routes were the chain of Great Lakes on the north and the Ohio River on the south. Sailing vessels carrying hundreds of tons were able to navigate on the Great Lakes almost as freely as on the ocean. Also, on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers heavy loads could be floated downstream from Pittsburgh to New Orleans -- almost 2000 miles. But boats had to be hauled back upstream by manpower -- grueling labor, stretching over weeks or months to move a few tons a few hundred miles. The coming of the steamboat a century and a half ago changed all this.

212

The Columbia River System : the Inside Story.  

SciTech Connect

The Columbia Ricer is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Northwest-from providing the world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying the clean natural fuel for over 75 percent of the region's electrical generation. Since early in the century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system. And through cooperative efforts, the floods that periodically threaten developments near the river can be controlled. This publication presents a detailed explanation of the planning and operation of the multiple-use dams and reservoirs of the Columbia River system. It describes the river system, those who operate and use it, the agreements and policies that guide system operation, and annual planning for multiple-use operation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

The use of snakes as symbols has been popular throughout the ages. Egyptian Pharaohs wore the likeness of a poisonous  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the likeness of a poisonous asp on their headdresses in the belief that this protected them from harm and gave- tions of such superstitions can be destroyed. Food All snakes eat other animals. Some small snakes feed various ways of catching their food. One of them, the worm snake, burrows through the ground to eat

214

Speed and Endurance of Gravid and Nongravid Green Snakes, Opheodrys aestivus Author(s): Michael V. Plummer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Speed and Endurance of Gravid and Nongravid Green Snakes, Opheodrys aestivus Author(s): Michael V-194 Speed and Endurance of Gravid and Nongravid Green Snakes, Opheodrys aestivus MICHAELV. PLUMMER depends on a snake's speed or endurance, then reduced locomotor performance of females car- rying eggs

Plummer, Michael V.

215

The influence of circadian rhythms on pre-and post-prandial metabolism in the snake Lamprophis fuliginosus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The influence of circadian rhythms on pre- and post-prandial metabolism in the snake Lamprophis expenditure in snakes, but less emphasis has been placed on identifying metabolic variation and associated with circadian cycles in nocturnally active African house snakes (Lamprophis fuliginosus), we measured oxygen

Hopkins, William A.

216

An ecological study of the amphibians and reptiles of the Navasota River, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Navasota River (Fig. 2 and Table 1, pp. 11 and 12). A study plot was established within a wooded section but cleared areas occur throughout the area. The dominant vegetation consists of post oak, blackjack oak, and black hickory. The understory is dense... to occur in other areas along the river. Site 7UL contained the greatest number of species of lisards (8) and snakes (18). Community Comparisons Community coefficients were calculated for every two site combinations for 11 sites (1-ILL and 1-7UL...

Calvin, Terry Lynne

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

A Scaleless Snake: Tests of the Role of Reptilian Scales in Water Loss and Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Scaleless Snake: Tests of the Role of Reptilian Scales in Water Loss and Heat Transfer Reprinted: Tests of the Role of Reptilian Scales in Water Loss and Heat Transfer A unique specimen of gopher snake of pulmocutaneous water loss and heat transfer, no difference was observed between the scale- less animal

Bennett, Albert F.

218

Nest-site selection in Eastern hognose snakes (Heterodon platirhinos) Casey Peet-Par  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nest-site selection in Eastern hognose snakes (Heterodon platirhinos) by Casey Peet-Paré Thesis...........................................................................................19 #12;3 Abstract Nest-site selection is considered to be the only form of parental care in most by selecting nest-sites which have optimal conditions. I examined nest-site selection in Eastern hognose snakes

Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

219

Smooth transition for CPG-based body shape control of a snake-like robot  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a locomotion control based on central pattern generator (CPG) of a snake-like robot. The main point addressed in this paper is a method that produces a smooth transition of the body shape of a snake-like robot. Body shape transition is important for snake-like robot locomotion to adapt to different space widths and also for obstacle avoidance. By manipulating the phase difference of the CPG outputs instantly, it will results in a sharp point or discontinuity which lead to an unstable movement of the snake-like robot. To tackle the problem, we propose a way of controlling the body shape: by incorporating activation function in the phase oscillator CPG model. The simplicity of the method promises an easy implementation and simple control. Simulation results and torque analysis confirm the effectiveness of the proposed control method and thus, can be used as a locomotion control in various potential applications of a snake-like robot.

Norzalilah Mohamad Nor; Shugen Ma

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Regional Inventories  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: This year has not started well for gasoline inventories, with inventories being low across regions of the country. The Midwest region (PADD II) had been running lower than most regions, but began to catch up during the last week in April. Gasoline inventories ran about 9% below their 5-year average for this time of year and about 4% below where they were last year. The recent refinery problems in the Midwest, though, could erase some of that recovery. The impacts of Tosco's Wood River refinery and Marathon's St Paul refinery are not fully realized. But inventories were also precariously low along the East Coast (PADD I) and are extremely low in the Rocky Mountain region (PADD IV), although the size of this market mitigates any national impact. While the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "region snake river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Research and Recovery of Snake River Sockeye Salmon, 1993 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Significant changes were made in the fitah rearing facilities at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game's (IDFG) Eagle Hatchery during the contract period. An outside rearing area was enclosed with fence and chicken wire and covered with 70% shade cloth. Seven circular tanks were installed to hold the outmigrante in separate groups while the inside of the hatchery building was modified. The concrete vats were removed and a concrete floor with drains was poured. Twenty 2-m and eight l-m semisquare fiberglass tanks were installed. The original water supply and degassing tower were left intact since they have functioned well. The pump and back-up generator were serviced. Water level sensors were installed for the alarm system, which was linked to the local ADT Security Systems operator to call both staff telephone numbers and pagers. This system has worked well. No photoperiod control has been used to date. At this phase of the project, no attempt to control water temperature was installed. The other option was to move any maturing fish to Sawtooth Fish Hatchery to complete maturation. This was not necessary for the first year of the project. Project security has been increased at Eagle by having the fish culturist and one temporary employee live on-site. This also decreases response time in emergencies. The second requirement for rearing juveniles was to design a rearing protocol and develop sampling protocols for genetics and pathology. The rearing protocol was derived with assistance of the Technical Oversight Committee (TOC), the scientific advisory group, and several fish culturists and nutritionists who were consulted informally. The standards were incorporated into the Research and Propagation Permit from National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), which was applied for during this project period (Appendix A). Pathology and genetics samples have been taken and processed from each fish which died during the rearing phase. These have been distributed in a timely manner to the appropriate laboratories at NMFS, University of Idaho, and IDFG.

Kline, Paul A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Update Idaho Department of Fish and Game  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strategy recommends a phased approach that includes: a. Increased smolt production b. Increased use of F1 the use of "wild" and F1 anadromous adults in the hatchery and in the habitat 3 PDF created with pdf;16 ·The recovery strategy has been defined (IDFG NOAA) · more smolts out · more F1 adults in hatchery

223

The costs of breaching the four lower Snake River dams - BPA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ratepayers 373 million and generate 106 million annually in benefi ts and avoided costs (1998 dollars) over a 100-year period. With the exception of power prices, which...

224

Spawning Distribution of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River : Annual Report 1998.  

SciTech Connect

In 1998 data was collected on the spawning distribution of the first adult fall chinook salmon to return from releases of yearling hatchery fish upriver of Lower Granite Dam. Yearling fish were released at three locations with the intent of distributing spawning throughout the existing habitat. The project was designed to use radio-telemetry to determine if the use of multiple release sites resulted in widespread spawning.

Garcia, Aaron P.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin The Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin's (ICPRB) mission is to enhance, protect, and conserve the water and associated land resources of the Potomac River and its tributaries through regional and interstate

226

Final Environmental Assessment - Idaho Department of Fish and Game Captive Rearing Initiative for Salmon River Chinook Salmon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Fish and Game Department of Fish and Game Captive Rearing Initiative for Salmon River Chinook Salmon Finding of No Significant Impact October 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Bonneville Power Administration Idaho Department of Fish and Game Captive Rearing Initiative for Salmon River Chinook Salmon Finding of No Significant Impact Summary: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Department of Energy (DOE), is proposing to fund the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) Captive Rearing Initiative for Salmon River Chinook Salmon Program (IDFG Program). The IDFG Program is a small-scale research and production initiative designed to increase numbers of three weak but recoverable populations of spring/summer chinook salmon in the Salmon River drainage. This would increase numbers of spring/summer chinook salmon within the Snake River

227

DOE/EA-1374-SA-01: Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids In the Lower Columbia River Research Project Supplement Analysis (March 2002)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bonneville Power Administration DATE: March 21, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Avian Predation On Juvenile Salmonids In The Lower Columbia River Research Project Supplement Analysis (DOE/EA-1374-SA-01) Bill Maslen Project Manager - KEWR-4 Proposed Action: Avian Predation On Juvenile Salmonids In The Lower Columbia River Research Project-Modifications to originial proposal. Project No.: 199702400 Location: Columbia and Snake Rivers Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and USGS-Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Oregon State University. Introduction: The Bonneville Power Administration prepared a multi-year Environmental Assessment (EA) and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) on this project in April of

228

Red River Compact (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Red River Compact Commission administers the Red River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Red River and its tributaries as apportioned by the...

229

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1994.  

SciTech Connect

Spawning ground surveys were conducted in 1994 as part of a five year study of Snake River chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawyacha begun in 1991. Observations of fall chinook salmon spawning in the Snake River were limited to infrequent aerial red counts in the years prior to 1987. From 1987-1990, red counts were made on a limited basis by an interagency team and reported by the Washington Department of Fisheries. Starting in 1991, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and other cooperating agencies and organizations, expanded the scope of spawning ground surveys to include: (1) additional aerial surveys to improve red counts and provide data on the timing of spawning; (2) the validation (ground truthing) of red counts from aerial surveys to improve count accuracy; (3) underwater searches to locate reds in water too deep to allow detection from the air; and (4) bathymetric mapping of spawning sites for characterizing spawning habitat. This document is the 1994 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook salmon. The studies were undertaken because of the growing concern about the declining salmon population in the Snake River basin.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS : Appendices.  

SciTech Connect

This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described. The document concludes with an evaluation of the potential effects that could result from implementing proposed actions. The conclusions are based on evaluation of existing data, utilization of numerical models, and application of logical inference. This volume contains the appendices.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Scenic Rivers Act (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Virginia Scenic Rivers Programs intent is to identify, designate and help protect rivers and streams that possess outstanding scenic, recreational, historic and natural characteristics of...

232

Platte River Cooperative Agreement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Platte River Cooperative Agreement Skip Navigation Links Transmission Functions Infrastructure projects Interconnection OASIS OATT Platte River Cooperative Agreement PEIS, NE, WY,...

233

River Basin Commissions (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

234

Maine Rivers Policy (Maine)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Maine Rivers Policy accompanies the Maine Waterway Development and Conservation Act and provides additional protection for some river and stream segments, which are designated as outstanding...

235

PHYSICAL REVIEW E 85, 026211 (2012) Weakly subcritical stationary patterns: Eckhaus instability and homoclinic snaking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHYSICAL REVIEW E 85, 026211 (2012) Weakly subcritical stationary patterns: Eckhaus instability from subcritical to supercritical stationary periodic patterns is described by the one of localized structures in systems exhibiting homoclinic snaking during the transition from subcriticality

Knobloch, Edgar

236

Project #31: Connecticut River  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

GEOMORPHIC SETTING: At the project location, the Connecticut River has an annual average discharge of...

Wendi Goldsmith; Donald Gray; John McCullah

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Petrography of late cenozoic sediments, Raft River geothermal field, Idaho  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of late cenozoic sediments, Raft River geothermal field, Idaho of late cenozoic sediments, Raft River geothermal field, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Petrography of late cenozoic sediments, Raft River geothermal field, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; PETROGRAPHY; BIOTITE; CALCITE; CLAYS; LIMESTONE; PYRITE; SANDSTONES; SEDIMENTS; SHALES; VOLCANIC ROCKS; ZEOLITES; ALKALINE EARTH METAL COMPOUNDS; CALCIUM CARBONATES; CALCIUM COMPOUNDS; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBONATE ROCKS; CARBONATES; CHALCOGENIDES; IDAHO; IGNEOUS ROCKS; INORGANIC ION EXCHANGERS; ION EXCHANGE MATERIALS; IRON COMPOUNDS; IRON SULFIDES; MICA; MINERALS; NORTH AMERICA; ORES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; PYRITES; ROCKS; SEDIMENTARY ROCKS; SULFIDES; SULFUR COMPOUNDS;

238

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; BOREHOLES; EVALUATION; HOT-WATER SYSTEMS; IDAHO; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; WELL LOGGING; CAVITIES; EXPLORATION; GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS; HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Author(s): Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace, T.L. Published: Geophysics, 2/1/1977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area

239

Emigration of Natural and Hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon; Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Heeyey (Steelhead; Oncorhynchus mykiss) Smolts from the Imnaha River, Oregon from 5 October 2006 to 21 June 2007, Annual Report 2007.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) Department of Fisheries Resources Management (DFRM) results for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) Hatchery Evaluation studies and the Imnaha River Smolt Monitoring Program (SMP) for the 2007 smolt migration from the Imnaha River, Oregon. These studies are closely coordinated and provide information about juvenile natural and hatchery spring/summer Naco x (Chinook Salmon; Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Heeyey (steelhead; O. mykiss) biological characteristics, emigrant timing, survival, arrival timing and travel time to the Snake River dams and McNary Dam (MCD) on the Columbia River. These studies provide information on listed Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) for the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (NMFS 2000). The Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program's goal is to maintain a hatchery production program of 490,000 Naco x (Chinook salmon) and 330,000 Heeyey (steelhead) for annual release in the Imnaha River (Carmichael et al. 1998, Whitesel et al. 1998). These hatchery releases occur to compensate for fish losses due to the construction and operation of the four lower Snake River hydroelectric facilities. One of the aspects of the LSRCP hatchery evaluation studies in the Imnaha River is to determine natural and hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) smolt performance, emigration characteristics and survival (Kucera and Blenden 1998). A long term monitoring effort was established to document smolt emigrant timing and post release survival within the Imnaha River, estimate smolt survival downstream to McNary Dam, compare natural and hatchery smolt performance, and collect smolt-to-adult return information. This project collects information for, and is part of, a larger effort entitled Smolt Monitoring by Federal and Non-Federal Agencies (BPA Project No. 198712700). This larger project provides data on movement of smolts out of major drainages and past dams on the Snake River and Columbia River. In season indices of migration strength and migration timing are provided for the run-at large at key monitoring sites. Marked smolts are utilized to measure travel time and estimate survival through key index reaches. Fish quality and descaling measures are recorded at each monitoring site and provide indicators of the health of the run. Co-managers in the Imnaha River subbasin (Ecovista 2004) have identified the need to collect information on life history, migration patterns, juvenile emigrant abundance, reach specific smolt survivals, and Smolt-to-Adult Return rates (SAR's) for both Heeyey (steelhead) and Naco x (Chinook salmon) smolts. The current study provides information related to the majority of the high priority data needs. Current funding does not allow for determination of a total (annual) juvenile emigrant abundance and lack of adult passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag detectors at the mouth of the Imnaha River results in the inability to calculate tributary specific SAR's. Information is shared with the Fish Passage Center (FPC) on a real time basis during the spring emigration period. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted the NPT to monitor emigration timing and tag up to 19,000 emigrating natural and hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) smolts from the Imnaha River with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. The completion of trapping in the spring of 2007 marked the 16th year of emigration studies on the Imnaha River, and the 14th year of participating in the FPC smolt monitoring program. Monitoring and evaluation objectives were to: (1) Evaluate effects of flow, temperature and other environmental factors on juvenile migration timing. (2) Determine emigration timing, travel time, and in-river survival of PIT tagged hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) smolts released at the Imnaha River acclimation facility to the Imnaha River juvenile migration trap. (3) Monitor the daily catch and biological cha

Michaels, Brian; Espinosa, Neal (Nez Perce Tribe)

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

240

SNAKE Sodium S-CO2 Interactions Experiment - Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SNAKE Sodium S-CO2 Interactions Experiment SNAKE Sodium S-CO2 Interactions Experiment Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Testing and Analysis Overview Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments MAX NSTF SNAKE Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr SNAKE Sodium S-CO2 Interactions Experiment 1 2 The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO2) Brayton cycle, coupled with a Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR), has been identified as a new and innovative energy conversion technology that could contribute to improving the economics of advanced nuclear energy. For these reactors, a new generation of compact, highly-efficient heat exchangers (HXs) will be employed that show great promise in improving the safety and cost of SFRs; however, small HX leaks could still occur. SNAKE is designed to study S-CO2 leakage into sodium.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "region snake river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Inhibitory effect of snake venom toxin from Vipera lebetina turanica on hormone-refractory human prostate cancer cell growth: induction of apoptosis through inactivation of nuclear factor ?B  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2):675-83] snake venom toxin|Vipera...implicated in tumor development and resistance to...cancer cell death. Snake venom toxins (SVT...in PBS) at room temperature for 2 h. The cells...during mammary gland development. Cell 2001;107...Chung KH, Kim DS. Snake venom disintegrin...

Dong Ju Son; Mi Hee Park; Sang Jin Chae; Soon Ok Moon; Jae Woong Lee; Ho Sueb Song; Dong Cheul Moon; Sang Sun Kang; Young Ee Kwon; and Jin Tae Hong

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Deep drilling data Raft River geothermal area, Idaho | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

drilling data Raft River geothermal area, Idaho drilling data Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Deep drilling data Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Stratigraphy and geophysical logs of three petroleum test boreholes in the Raft River Valley are presented. The geophysical logs include: temperature, resistivity, spontaneous potential, gamma, caliper, and acoustic logs. Author(s): Oriel, S. S.; Williams, P. L.; Covington, H. R.; Keys, W. S.; Shaver, K. C. Published: DOE Information Bridge, 1/1/1978 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/6272996 Source: View Original Report Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1976) Raft River Geothermal Area

243

Contortrostatin, a Snake Venom Disintegrin, Inhibits ?1 Integrin-mediated Human Metastatic Melanoma Cell Adhesion and Blocks Experimental Metastasis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to be involved in the development of the metastatic phenotype...Crotalidae and Viperidae snake species (9 "18...Contortrostatin, a Snake Venom Disintegrin...was incubated at room temperature overnight. Absorbance...for 5 "6mm at room temperature. Excess iodine was...

Mohit Trikha; Yves A. De Clerck; and Francis S. Markland

1994-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Habitat restoration and sediment transport in rivers Streams and rivers or any bodies of flowing water are dynamic by nature. Through erosion and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water are dynamic by nature. Through erosion and deposition, streams and rivers transport and transform itself or was not considered important or scarce enough to conserve. Now the river region is increasingly heterogeneity of the river has reduced its ability to sustain a diverse ecology. Salmonids need pool and riffle

Barthelat, Francois

245

Pecos River Compact (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Pecos River Compact, a joint agreement between the states of New Mexico and Texas. The compact is administered by the Pecos River Compact...

246

Turbulent Rivers Bjorn Birnir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) function gives rise to Hack's law [16]; stating that the length of the main river, in mature river basins, scales with the area of the basin l Ah, h = 0.568 being Hack's exponent. 1 Introduction The flow]. One of the best known scaling laws of river basins is Hack's law [16] that states that the area

Birnir, Björn

247

Passage Distribution and Federal Columbia River Power System Survival for Steelhead Kelts Tagged Above and at Lower Granite Dam, Year 2  

SciTech Connect

Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations have declined throughout their range in the last century and many populations, including those of the Snake River Basin are listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. The reasons for their decline are many and complex, but include habitat loss and degradation, overharvesting, and dam construction. The 2008 Biological Opinion calls for an increase in the abundance of female steelhead through an increase in iteroparity (i.e., repeat spawning) and this can be realized through a combination of reconditioning and in-river survival of migrating kelts. The goal of this study is to provide the data necessary to inform fisheries managers and dam operators of Snake River kelt migration patterns, survival, and routes of dam passage. Steelhead kelts (n = 487) were captured and implanted with acoustic transmitters and passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tags at the Lower Granite Dam (LGR) Juvenile Fish Facility and at weirs located in tributaries of the Snake and Clearwater rivers upstream of LGR. Kelts were monitored as they moved downstream through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) by 15 autonomous and 3 cabled acoustic receiver arrays. Cabled receiver arrays deployed on the dam faces allowed for three-dimensional tracking of fish as they approached the dam face and were used to determine the route of dam passage. Overall, 27.3% of the kelts tagged in this study successfully migrated to Martin Bluff (rkm 126, as measured from the mouth of the Columbia River), which is located downstream of all FCRPS dams. Within individual river reaches, survival per kilometer estimates ranged from 0.958 to 0.999; the lowest estimates were observed in the immediate forebay of FCRPS dams. Steelhead kelts tagged in this study passed over the spillway routes (spillway weirs, traditional spill bays) in greater proportions and survived at higher rates compared to the few fish passed through powerhouse routes (turbines and juvenile bypass systems). The results of this study provide information about the route of passage and subsequent survival of steelhead kelts that migrated through the Snake and Columbia rivers from LGR to Bonneville Dam in 2013. These data may be used by fisheries managers and dam operators to identify potential ways to increase the survival of kelts during their seaward migrations.

Colotelo, Alison HA; Harnish, Ryan A.; Jones, Bryan W.; Hanson, Amanda C.; Trott, Donna M.; Greiner, Michael J.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Brown, Richard S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Li, X.; Fu, Tao

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

248

OVERCOMING DEPOLARIZING RESONANCES IN THE AGS WITH TWO HELICAL PARTIAL SNAKES  

SciTech Connect

Dual partial snake scheme has provided polarized proton beams with 1.5 x 10{sup 11} intensity and 65% polarization for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) spin program. To overcome the residual polarization loss due to horizontal resonances in the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), a new string of quadrupoles have been added. The horizontal tune can then be set in the spin tune gap generated by the two partial snakes, such that horizontal resonances can also be avoided. This paper presents the accelerator setup and preliminary results.

HUANG,H.; AHRENS, L.; BAI, M.; BROWN, K.A.; GARDNER, C.J.; ET AL.

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

249

New River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New River Geothermal Area New River Geothermal Area (Redirected from New River Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: New River Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (13) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

250

SNAKES manipulator and ARD sluicer testing -- April 1997  

SciTech Connect

Long reach arms represent one of the options available for deployment of end effectors which can be used in the retrieval of radioactive waste, from the Hanford single shell tanks. The versatility of an arm based deployment system is such that it has the potential to improve the performance of a wide range of end effectors compared with stand-alone or other deployment methods. The long term reliability and availability of the deployment system is central to the timely completion of a waste retrieval program. However, concerns have been expressed over the dynamic performance of long reach arms and it is essential that an arm based system can cope with operational dynamic loads generated by end effectors. The test program conducted set out to measure static and dynamic loads and responses from a representative arm and sluicer, with the objective of extrapolating the data to a long reach arm system, that can be used for in-tank waste retrieval. As an arm with an appropriate reach was not available, the test program was undertaken to measure dynamic characteristics of a Magnox Electric 18 ft multi-link, hydraulically actuated SNAKES manipulator. This is the longest reach unit in service, albeit only one third of the 50 ft length required for in-tank waste retrieval. In addition operational performance and loading measurements were obtained from a low pressure confined system sluicer under development by ARD Environmental, to add to the end effector data base. When subject to impulse loading, the arm was found to behave in a repeatable manner having fundamental natural frequencies in the vertical and transverse directions of 1 Hz. There were also a large number of higher natural frequencies measured up to 100 Hz.

Berglin, E.J.

1997-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

251

The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River valley,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River valley, investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River valley, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Cassia County Idaho; clastic sediments; economic geology; exploration; geophysical methods; geophysical surveys; geothermal energy; gravel; ground methods; Idaho; isothermal remanent magnetization; magnetic anomalies; magnetic methods; magnetic properties; magnetic susceptibility; magnetization; paleomagnetism; Raft River basin; remanent magnetization; sediments; surveys; United States Author(s): Anderson, L.A.; Mabey, D.R. Published: Abstracts - Society of Exploration Geophysicists International

252

New estimates of global emissions of N2O from rivers and estuaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from rivers and estuaries. We present total global emissions, as well as regional shares. 2New estimates of global emissions of N2O from rivers and estuaries CAROLIEN KROEZE1 , EGON DUMONT1 rivers and estuaries, using the NEWS-DIN model. NEWS-DIN is a model of the global transport of dissolved

Seitzinger, Sybil

253

Sources of Atmospheric Moisture for the La Plata River Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The La Plata River basin (LPRB) is the second largest basin of South America and extends over a highly populated and socioeconomically active region. In this study, the spatiotemporal variability of sources of moisture for the LPRB are quantified ...

J. Alejandro Martinez; Francina Dominguez

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Mass energy storage using off-river pumped hydro  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Energy storage assists very high penetration of variable renewable energy sources such as wind and solar. In many regions short-term off-river pumped hydro energy storage can...

Blakers, Andrew

255

Multiple colonization of Madagascar and Socotra by colubrid snakes: evidence from nuclear and mitochondrial gene phylogenies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...analysis of 2176 bp of the nuclear c-mos and the mitochondrial...Jemen-Studien mono- graph series, vol. 14. Wiesbaden...phylogeny: evidence from nuclear and mitochondrial genes...snakes inferred from four nuclear and mito- chondrial...contribute to production costs. Visit http://www...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

A Study of Snake-like Locomotion Through the Analysis of a Flexible Robot Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the problem of snake-like locomotion by studying a system consisting of a planar inextensible elastic rod that is able to control its spontaneous curvature. Using a Cosserat model we derive, through variational principles, the equations of motion for two special cases: one in which the system is confined inside a frictionless channel, and one in which it is placed in an anisotropic frictional environment, modeling the dynamical setting of the slithering of snakes on flat surfaces. The presence of constraints in both cases leads to non-standard boundary conditions, that allow us to close the equations of motion reducing them to a differential and an integro-differential equation, respectively, for one end point (the tail) of the active rod. For the snake-like case we also provide analytic solutions for a special class of motions. We highlight the role of the spontaneous curvature in the pushing (and the steering, in the snake-like setting) needed to power locomotion. Comparisons with available experiments confirm that the model is able to capture many of the essential findings in the zoological literature. The complete solvability and the existence of analytic solutions offers a tool that may prove valuable for the design of bio-inspired soft robots.

Giancarlo Cicconofri; Antonio DeSimone

2014-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

257

The Benefits of a Hot Meal: Identifying the Advantages of Postprandial Thermophily in Snakes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many reptiles rely on external sources of heat energy (e.g., solar radiation and sun-warmed rocksThe Benefits of a Hot Meal: Identifying the Advantages of Postprandial Thermophily in Snakes MS to increase nutrient and energy assimilation and reduce meal retention time. Yet if PPT is beneficial

Espinoza, Robert E.

258

Intravenous liposomal delivery of the snake venom disintegrin contortrostatin limits breast cancer progression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...incubate 2 h at room temperature. The samples were...incubate for 1 h at room temperature. The samples were...evaluated for color development using a Dynex MRX microplate...angiogenesis. The development of the liposomal delivery...immunogenicity of the snake venom protein. Inhibition...

Stephen Swenson; Fritz Costa; Radu Minea; Russell P. Sherwin; William Ernst; Gary Fujii; Dongyun Yang; and Francis S. Markland, Jr.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Level 2 Diagnosis and Project Inventory, Lower Snake Tributaries Prepared by: Mobrand Biometrics, Inc.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Level 2 Diagnosis and Project Inventory, Lower Snake Tributaries Prepared by: Mobrand Biometrics considerations to the contrary, a fish habitat manager developing a restoration plan based solely by EDT output turbidity, maximum temperature, woody debris and riparian function are the dominant limiting factors

260

Developmental effects of incubation temperature on hatchling pine snakes Pituophis melanoleucus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1. 1. In this study pine snake eggs were incubated at different temperatures (2132C) to examine effects on physiological and morphological development. 2. 2. Snakes from eggs incubated at low temperatures (2123C) had significantly more morphological abnormalities, were shorter in body length, and had proportionally larger heads than those from eggs incubated at higher temperatures. 3. 3. At low temperatures most embryonic mortality occurred before two weeks and after 50 days of development. In the low temperature group most eggs that developed beyond 50 days but failed to hatch, had fully-formed snakes. 4. 4. The amount of yolk remaining unabsorbed was negatively correlated with total length. 5. 5. Incubation temperature affected the age at which shedding occurred in hatchlings maintained at the same temperatures. 6. 6. Snakes maintained at a temperature below their incubation temperature took longer to shed, while maintenance at a temperature greater than incubation temperature accelerated shedding. 7. 7. The results are consistent with a physiologic set point determined by incubation temperature, which then influences rates for at least some physiologic phenomena.

Joanna Burger; Robert T Zappalorti; Michael Gochfeld

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "region snake river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Incorporates the results of flow tests for geothermal production and injection wells in the Raft River geothermal field in southern Idaho. Interference testing was also accomplished across the wellfield. Author(s): Glaspey, Douglas J. Published: DOE Information Bridge, 1/30/2008 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/922630 Source: View Original Report Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2008) Raft River Geothermal Area Retrieved from

262

Trough to trough The Colorado River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trough to trough The Colorado River and the Salton Sea Robert E. Reynolds, editor Trough to trough....................................................................................5 Robert E. Reynolds The vegetation of the Mojave and Colorado deserts geological excursions and observations of the Colorado Desert region by William Phipps Blake, 1853 and 1906

de Lijser, Peter

263

Savannah River Site - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Savannah River Site Review Reports 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Field Office Tritium Facilities Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation, November 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development, August 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the Savannah River Operations Office, July 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project, January 2013 Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design, January 2013 Activity Reports 2013 Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design, May 2013

264

Raft River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Raft River Geothermal Area Raft River Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Raft River Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 DOE Involvement 4 Timeline 5 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 6 Future Plans 7 Raft River Unit II (26 MW) and Raft River Unit III (32 MW) 8 Enhanced Geothermal System Demonstration 9 Exploration History 10 Well Field Description 11 Technical Problems and Solutions 12 Geology of the Area 12.1 Regional Setting 12.2 Structure 12.3 Stratigraphy 12.3.1 Raft River Formation 12.3.2 Salt Lake Formation 12.3.3 Precambrian Rocks 13 Hydrothermal System 14 Heat Source 15 Geofluid Geochemistry 16 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 17 Exploration Activities (77) 18 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.10166667,"lon":-113.38,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

265

Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project The Mission of the Office of River Protection is to safely retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River. Office of River Protection (ORP) and Washingotn River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) Partnering Agreement for the DOE-EM Tank Operations Project More Documents & Publications 2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Office of River Protection Consent Order, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC - NCO-2011-01

266

Columbia River Treaty  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

an understanding of the implications for post-2024 Treaty planning and Columbia River operations. The joint effort by the Entities to conduct initial post-2024 modeling and...

267

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of lab building SREL Home Faculty and Scientists Research Technical Reports Assessment of Radionuclide Monitoring in the CSRA Savannah River NERP Research Opportunities Field Sites...

268

Reconnaissance geothermal exploration at Raft River, Idaho from thermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Reconnaissance geothermal exploration at Raft River, Idaho from thermal infrared scanning Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Reconnaissance geothermal exploration at Raft River, Idaho from thermal infrared scanning Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; INFRARED SURVEYS; IDAHO; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION; EXPLORATION; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Author(s): Watson, K. Published: Geophysics, 4/1/1976

269

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Abstract In 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey made seventy Schlumberger resistivity...

270

Savannah River | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River River Savannah River Following are compliance agreements for the Savannah River Site. Also included are short summaries of the agreements. Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Summary

271

Savannah River | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Savannah River Savannah River Following are compliance agreements for the Savannah River Site. Also included are short summaries of the agreements. Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Natural Resources Defense Council Consent Decree, May 26, 1988 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-155-W, October 11, 1999 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Savannah River Site Consent Order 85-70-SW, November 7, 1985 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Savannah River Site Consent Order 95-22-HW, September 29, 1995 Summary Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-21-HW, July 13, 1999 Summary

272

Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Malheur River is a 306-kilometer tributary to the Snake River, which drains 12,950 square kilometers. The Malheur River originates in the Blue Mountains and flows into the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C, and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 30 centimeters in the lower reaches. Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2002. Bull trout Salvelinus confluentus are considered to be cold water species and are temperature-dependant. Due to the interest of bull trout from various state and Federal agencies, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. Table 1 lists individuals that participated in the 2002 work group. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power Administration contract period starting April 1, 2002, and ending March 31, 2003. All tasks were conducted within this timeframe, and a more detailed timeframe may be referred to in each individual report.

Miller, Alan; Soupir, Jim (US Forest Service, Prairie City Ranger District, Prairie City, OR); Schwabe, Lawrence (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

River Edge Redevelopment Zone (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of the River Edge Redevelopment Program is to revive and redevelop environmentally challenged properties adjacent to rivers in Illinois.

274

Microsoft Word - SavannahRiverAward20030701.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2003 , 2003 Energy Department Awards $295,000 Grant to Savannah River Regional Diversification Initiative WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that it will award $295,000 to the Savannah River Regional Diversification Initiative (SRRDI), to establish a positive economic development environment that includes job creation, job retention, and entrepreneurial development in high-tech and manufacturing businesses. SRRDI is the community reuse organization (CRO) for the department's Savannah River Site. "The Energy Department is a good neighbor to the communities surrounding our sites," Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham said. "We will continue to work with the Savannah River Regional Diversification Initiative and other community reuse organizations around the country,

275

Geothermal Modeling of the Raft River Geothermal Field | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Modeling of the Raft River Geothermal Field Geothermal Modeling of the Raft River Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal Modeling of the Raft River Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This interim report presents the results to date of chemical modeling of the Raft River KGRA. Earlier work indicated a northwest-southeast anomaly in the contours. Modeling techniques applied to more complete data allowed further definition of the anomaly. Models described in this report show the source of various minerals in the geothermal water. There appears to be a regional heat source that gives rise to uniform conductive heat flow in the region, but convective flow is concentrated near the upwelling in the Crook well vicinity. Recommendations

276

The Nation's Rivers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...task of water quality assessment." Such interpretation...environment demands continuing assessment and interpretation...pro-cesses active in river systems and hence such measures...character of many river systems. To date, observations...money, observational tools must be designed to...

M. Gordon Wolman

1971-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

277

New River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New River Geothermal Area New River Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: New River Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (13) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

278

Predicting the rivers blue line for fish conservation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Basin (VRB), a tributary to the lower Colorado River that has been the poster child...rivers like the San Pedro River (also a Colorado River tributary in Arizona), citizen...reaches with zero flows (i.e., during floods) and hence colonize parts of the distant...

John L. Sabo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

ORNL DAAC GLOBAL RIVER DISCHARGE, 1807-1991, V. 1.1 (RIVDIS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data > Regional/Global > River Discharge (RIVDIS) > Guide Data > Regional/Global > River Discharge (RIVDIS) > Guide Document GLOBAL RIVER DISCHARGE, 1807-1991, V. 1.1 (RIVDIS) Get Data Global River Discharge, 1807-1991, V. 1.1 (RivDIS) Summary: The Global Monthly River Discharge Data Set contains monthly averaged discharge measurements for 1018 stations located throughout the world. The period of record varies widely from station to station with a mean of 21.5 years. The data are derived from the published UNESCO archives for river discharge and checked against information obtained from the Global Runoff Center in Koblenz, Germany, through the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center in Boulder, Colorado. Citation: Cite this data set as follows (citation revised on September 20, 2002): Vorosmarty, C. J., B. M. Fekete, and B. A. Tucker. 1998. Global River

280

BNL-71449-2003-CP ENGINEERING OF THE AGS SNAKE COIL ASSEMBLY*  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

submitted to The Particle Accelerator Conference, Portland, OR, May 12-16, 2003 submitted to The Particle Accelerator Conference, Portland, OR, May 12-16, 2003 BNL-71449-2003-CP ENGINEERING OF THE AGS SNAKE COIL ASSEMBLY* M. Anerella # , R. Gupta, P. Kovach, A. Marone, S. Plate, K. Power, J. Schmalzle, E. Willen, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 USA Abstract Foundation module, the complex helical cuts are produced in a more efficient manner. Also, since Pro/E can easily construct variable pitch helixes (see Figure 1) the process of creating the helical paths was greatly simplified. The paths produced in this manner were parametric, meaning they could easily be changed without the need to reconstruct them as the design evolved. A 30% Snake superconducting magnet is proposed to maintain polarization in the AGS proton beam, the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "region snake river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Watch Out for the Snakes! 21 Biologists and one Physicist in a Rain Forest  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Watch Out for the Snakes! 21 Biologists and one Physicist in a Rain Forest Watch Out for the Snakes! 21 Biologists and one Physicist in a Rain Forest in Nicaragua Speaker(s): Donald Grether Date: June 29, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Don, his wife Becky, and their granddaughter Briana recently returned from spending almost three weeks at a field station in a rain forest in Nicaragua, along with UCLA faculty members, graduate students, and undergraduates. Our location was way off the beaten track, even for "eco-tourists", and could only be reached by a three-hour boat trip on Rio San Juan. No hot water or space heating or cooling, running water most but not all of the time, no electricity in our rooms, no windows, and no Internet. Sort of like a near-zero energy building. Don's presentation will include photos that give some sense of why we went, what it took to

282

Sidewinding with minimal slip: Snake and robot ascent of sandy slopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Limbless organisms such as snakes can navigate nearly all terrain. In particular, desert-dwelling sidewinder rattlesnakes (Crotalus cerastes) operate effectively on inclined granular media (such as sand dunes) that induce failure in field-tested limbless robots through slipping and pitching. Our laboratory experiments reveal that as granular incline angle increases, sidewinder rattlesnakes increase the length of their body in contact with the sand. Implementing this strategy in a physical robot model of the snake enables the device to ascend sandy slopes close to the angle of maximum slope stability. Plate drag experiments demonstrate that granular yield stresses decrease with increasing incline angle. Together, these three approaches demonstrate how sidewinding with contact-length control mitigates failure on granular media.

Marvi, Hamidreza; Gravish, Nick; Astley, Henry; Travers, Matthew; Hatton, Ross L; Mendelson, Joseph R; Choset, Howie; Hu, David L; Goldman, Daniel I

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Water Power Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: maps.nrel.gov/river_atlas Country: United States Web Application Link: maps.nrel.gov/river_atlas Cost: Free UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 39.7412019515°, -105.172290802° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7412019515,"lon":-105.172290802,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

284

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River geothermal system is located in southern Idaho, near the Utah-Idaho state boarder in the Raft River Valley. The field, which is owned and operated by U.S. Geothermal, has been selected as an EGS demonstration site by the U. S. Department of Energy. This paper summarizes ongoing geologic and petrologic investigations being conducted in support of this project. The reservoir is developed in fractured Proterozoic schist and quartzite, and Archean quartz monzonite cut by younger diabase

285

Hydrochemistry of selected parameters at the Raft River KGRA, Cassia  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrochemistry of selected parameters at the Raft River KGRA, Cassia Hydrochemistry of selected parameters at the Raft River KGRA, Cassia County, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Hydrochemistry of selected parameters at the Raft River KGRA, Cassia County, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Low to moderate temperature (< 150 0C) geothermal fluids are being developed in the southern Raft River Valley of Idaho. Five deep geothermal wells ranging in depth from 4911 feet to 6543 feet (1490 to 1980 meters) and two intermediate depth (3858 feet or 1170 meters) injection wells have been drilled within the Raft River KGRA. Several shallower (1423-500 feet or 430-150 meters) wells have also been constructed to monitor the environmental effects of geothermal development of the

286

Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area, Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area, Idaho-Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area, Idaho-Utah Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This study covers about 1000 mi2 (2600 km2) of the southern Raft River drainage basin in south-central Idaho and northwest Utah. The main area of interest, approximately 200 mi2 (520 km2) of semiarid agricultural and rangeland in the southern Raft River Valley that includes the known Geothermal Resource Area near Bridge, Idaho, was modelled numerically to evaluate the hydrodynamics of the unconfined aquifer. Computed and estimated transmissivity values range from 1200 feet squared per day (110

287

Raft River geoscience case study- appendixes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geoscience case study- appendixes geoscience case study- appendixes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Raft River geoscience case study- appendixes Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The following are included in these appendices: lithology, x-ray analysis, and cores; well construction data; borehole geophysical logs; chemical analyses from wells at the Raft River geothermal site; and bibliography. Author(s): Dolenc, M. R.; Hull, L. C.; Mizell, S. A.; Russell, B. F.; Skiba, P. A.; Strawn, J. A.; Tullis, J. A. Published: DOE Information Bridge, 11/1/1981 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/5988071 Source: View Original Report Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Raft River Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Raft_River_geoscience_case_study-_appendixes&oldid=473481

288

Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1980 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Delineate the subsurface geology Notes The Raft River Valley occupies an upper Cenozoic structural basin filled with nearly 1600 m of fluvial silt, sand, and gravel. Rapid facies and thickness changes, steep initial dips (30 0C), and alteration make correlation of basin-fill depositional units very difficult. The Raft River geothermal system is a hot water convective system relying on deep circulation of meteoric water in a region of high geothermal gradients and open fractures near the base of the Tertiary basin fill. References Covington, H. R. (1 September 1980) Subsurface geology of the

289

A tale of two rivers: Pathways for improving water management in the Jordan and Colorado River basins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper considers two river systems that have been subject to significant development during the last 60 years: the Jordan River in the Middle East and the Colorado River in the western United States. Both play major roles in serving the demands of growing populations, and climate change models predict both semi-arid to arid regions to become hotter and/or drier in the future. The Jordan River basin, shared by five nations, is already experiencing a critical level of environmental damage. Its lower stretch is practically a sewage canal with less than 10% of its natural base-flow. Due to its unique historical, religious and environmental role, restoration efforts have gained momentum and wide public support. In the Colorado River Basin, water law is characterized by the Law of the River and water use is managed through regional allocation constraints. The Colorado River, shared by seven U.S. states and Mexico, is highly managed and over-allocated. Shortage declarations have serious implications for low priority users, with the Central Arizona Project being among the lowest. This makes large population centers and agricultural users vulnerable to curtailment of deliveries. We argue that there are common factors with respect to the policy and management options of these two basins that may provide insights into the similarities and divergences of their respective future pathways. These factors are: regional water supply and demand pressures, water governance, transboundary issues and demand for environmental flows. With a particular focus on the Israel and Arizona portions of these respective river basins, we address synergies and tradeoffs between groundwater and surface water usage, sectoral allocation strategies, public vs. private water ownership and legality, transboundary sharing, technical options for addressing growing regional water scarcity, and economic considerations. Difficult and bold decisions are required in both regions.

Assaf Chen; Adam Abramson; Nir Becker; Sharon B. Megdal

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Regional and Global Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products > Regional/Global Products > Regional/Global Regional and Global Data Biogeochemical Dynamics Data Regional and global biogeochemical dynamics data can be used to improve our understanding of the structure and function of various ecosystems; to enable prediction across spatial and temporal scales; and to parameterize and validate terrestrial ecosystem models. The ORNL DAAC compiles, archives, and distributes more than 150 products from the following projects: Climate Collections Hydroclimatology Collections ISLSCP II Project Net Primary Productivity (NPP) River Discharge (RIVDIS) Russian Land Cover (RLC) Soil Collections Vegetation Collections Vegetation-Ecosystem Modeling (VEMAP) Climate Collections Climate collections include measured and modeled values for variables such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, radiation, wind velocity, and

291

DOE/EA-1374-SA-05: Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project Supplement Analysis (03/20/06)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2006 0, 2006 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project Supplement Analysis (DOE/EA-1374-SA-05) Dorie Welch - KEWU-4 Project Manager Proposed Action: Avian Predation On Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project - Modifications to Original Proposal Project No: 1997-02-400 Location: Columbia and Snake Rivers Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), USGS-Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Oregon State University, and U. S. Army Corps of Engineers. Introduction: The Bonneville Power Administration prepared a multi-year Environmental Assessment (EA) and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) on this project in April of 2001

292

Savannah River National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River National Laboratory srnl.doe.gov SRNL is a DOE National Laboratory operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. At a glance Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing): Selectively Printed Conductive Pathways Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have developed a rapid prototype conductive material that can be used for electrical shielding or circuit fabrication. Background Several rapid prototype technologies currently exist. A few of the technologies produce metallic parts, but the majority produce nonconductive parts made from various grades of plastic. In all of these technologies however, only conductive material or nonconductive material can be used within one part created. There is no known option for 3D printing conductive material for

293

Microsoft Word - SavannahRiverRegDivers20020717.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Regional Diversification Initiative Savannah River Regional Diversification Initiative WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that it will award $300,000 to the Savannah River Regional Diversification Initiative (SRRDI). This block grant will fund SRRDI's administrative expenses as it continues working with other economic development organizations to diversify the economic base within the region. "The Energy Department is a good neighbor to the communities surrounding our sites," Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham said. "Working with SRRDI and other community reuse organizations around the country, the Department has retained, expanded or created over 25,000 jobs for workers affected by restructuring efforts at DOE sites." SRRDI was established in 1993 to mitigate the adverse effects of the downsizing of the

294

Microsoft Word - GrantSavannahRiver20020828.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

200,000 Grant to the Savannah River 200,000 Grant to the Savannah River Regional Diversification Initiative Community Reuse Organization WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Department of Energy has awarded $200,000 in the form of a competitive grant to the Savannah River Regional Diversification Initiative (SRRDI). SRRDI is the community reuse organization (CRO) for the Department's Savannah River Site. The SRRDI applied for funding from the Department's Office of Worker and Community Transition in the form of a competitive grant. Each CRO can apply for funds under the Small Capital Program (small cap) up to $200,000 and/or the Large Capital Program (large cap) up to one million dollars. "The Energy Department is a good neighbor to the communities surrounding our sites," Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham said. "We will continue to work with SRDDI and other

295

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter GQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

296

Regional water planning Milind Sohoni  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of energy, capital and O&M ­ surface water: generally large investments, canals, pipelines ­ ground water demand for resources water, energy, firewood etc. · Need to meet demand with supply ­ Logistics efficiency, equity, sustainability #12;Regional View LOCATE: Farmland Villages Road/highways River/stream Dam

Sohoni, Milind

297

Sioux River Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sioux River Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sioux River Ethanol LLC Place: Hudson, South Dakota Zip: 57034 Product: Farmer owned ethanol producer, Sioux River Ethanol...

298

Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Savannah River Company - April...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Company - July 21, 1998 Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Savannah River Company - March 29, 2000 Enforcement Letter, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, 2000...

299

Recommendations for Amendments--Mainstem Columbia/Snake Rivers Elements of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Service under the ESA have been superceded by one year of drought conditions and Bonneville Power Administration's declaration of a "revenue emergency." #12;2 The Council acts as if it and the Northwest Power to operate the FCRPS to maximize energy revenue so Bonneville can pay its nuclear power plant gambling debts

300

Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Minnesota) Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "region snake river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Distribution patterns of \\{PAHs\\} in different tissues of annulated sea snake (Hydrophis cyanocinctus) and short sea snake (Lapemis curtus) from the Hara Protected Area on the North Coast of the Persian Gulf, Iran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The levels of 22 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined in the skin, liver, kidney and muscle tissues of annulated sea snake (Hydrophis cyanocinctus), and short sea snake (Lapemis curtus) collected from the Hara Protected Area, Persian Gulf during October 2010. Low molecular weight (?3-rings) had the highest levels in skin, while high molecular weight (?4-rings) was highest in the kidney. The lowest levels of analyzed \\{PAHs\\} were found in muscle in the both species. H. cyanocinctus (59.37ngg?1 dw) revealed to be significantly more contaminated than L. curtus (50.51ngg?1 dw). Naphtalene was the PAH most frequently detected and at the highest level in the different tissues both species. Di- and tri-cyclic \\{PAHs\\} were predominant in both species suggesting petrogenic origin rather than pyrogenic sources of PAHs. The present study represents the first data of contamination by \\{PAHs\\} in sea snake from the Persian Gulf.

Zahra Heydari Sereshk; Alireza Riyahi Bakhtiari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Metal concentrations in selected tissues and main prey species of the annulated sea snake (Hydrophis cyanocinctus) in the Hara Protected Area, northeastern coast of the Persian Gulf, Iran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study is the first detailed ecotoxicological study of the annulated sea snake, Hydrophis cyanocinctus. Concentrations of lead, cadmium, nickel and vanadium were evaluated in muscle, liver, kidney, skin and blood of the annulated sea snake (H. cyanocinctus) and in the whole bodies of its main prey species (Periophthalmus waltoni and Boleophthalmus dussumieri) in the Hara Protected Area, the Persian Gulf. The mean concentrations of lead and vanadium were highest in the kidney, which identified the kidney as a target organ for metals in sea snakes as it is in other reptilian groups. Mean concentrations of cadmium and nickel were highest in the liver and skin, respectively. Mean cadmium concentrations were significantly higher in the liver compared to prey species, which indicated that prey items may be a source of cadmium for the annulated sea snake in the study area. Data presented here may be considered as a baseline for further ecotoxicological studies in sea snakes.

Mohsen Rezaie-Atagholipour; Alireza Riyahi-Bakhtiari; Mirmasoud Sajjadi; Chee Kong Yap; Sanaz Ghaffari; Zohreh Ebrahimi-Sirizi; Parviz Ghezellou

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Total field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource Area, Idaho by the US Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Total field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource Area, Idaho by the US Geological Survey Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; MAGNETIC SURVEYS; MAPS; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; AERIAL SURVEYING; GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES; IDAHO; KGRA; FEDERAL REGION X; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; NORTH AMERICA; RESOURCES; SURVEYS; USA Author(s): Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA) Published: DOE Information Bridge, 1/1/1981 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/5456508 Source: View Original Report Aeromagnetic Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Raft River Geothermal Area

304

River Protection.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

cc: cc: DOE/IG-0506 I N S P E C T I O N R E P O R T U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF INSPECTIONS I N S P E C T I O N O F SELECTED ASPECTS OF THE OFFICE OF RIVER PROTECTION PERFORMANCE-BASED INCENTIVE PROGRAM JUNE 2001 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, DC 20585 June 14, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman /s/ Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Report on "Inspection of Selected Aspects of the Office of River Protection Performance-Based Incentive Program" BACKGROUND The Office of River Protection (ORP), which reports to the Office of Environmental Management, is responsible for remediation of the radioactive waste stored in tanks at the Hanford Site in the State of Washington. For Fiscal Year (FY) 2000, ORP established 26 performance-based contract

305

Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The results to date of chemical modeling of the Raft River KGRA are presented. Earlier work indicated a northwest-southeast anomaly in the contours. Modeling techniques applied to more complete data allowed further definition of the anomaly. Models described in this report show the source of various minerals in the geothermal water. There appears to be a regional heat source that gives rise to uniform conductive heat flow in the region, but convective flow is concentrated near the upwelling in the Crook well

306

Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

307

Ecotoxicology | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River NERP Research Opportunities Field Sites Data Research Facilities Low Dose Irradiation Facility Tritium Irrigation Facility Microsatellite Development Education...

308

Brief Report: Salmonella Sepsis Caused by a Platelet Transfusion from a Donor with a Pet Snake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...nausea, vomiting, chills, and fever (temperature of up to 40C) developed. Blood was drawn for culture, and the patient was immediately treated with ceftazidime and vancomycin. Six hours later, lethargy, hypotension, anuria, and respiratory distress developed. The clinical diagnosis was bacterial sepsis... Two patients had salmonella sepsis after receiving platelet transfusions, and the source of the infection was traced to the pet snake of the platelet donor. The donor was asymptomatic, but Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis was cultured from his pet boa constrictor. The isolate was identical to the isolates from the two patients with sepsis.

Jafari M.; Forsberg J.; Gilcher R.O.

2002-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

309

River restoration Ellen Wohl,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, massive expenditures, and the burgeoning industry of aquatic and riparian restoration, river ecosystems. Introduction: Problem Statement [2] Continuing degradation of river ecosystems and loss of aquatic biodiversityRiver restoration Ellen Wohl,1 Paul L. Angermeier,2 Brian Bledsoe,3 G. Mathias Kondolf,4 Larry Mac

Poff, N. LeRoy

310

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2007 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the eleventh season (1997-2007) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the ninth season (1999-2007) of acclimation of resulting Lostine River progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies In 2007, acclimation of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts occurred from 3/5/07 through to 4/17/07 and a total of 230,010 smolts were acclimated and released. These smolts were produced from the brood year (BY) 2005 egg source and included captive brood (24,604) and conventional (205,406) origin smolts that were all progeny of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon. Operation of the Lostine River adult monitoring and collection facility in 2007 began May 14th. The first Chinook was captured on June 2, 2007 and the last Chinook was captured on September 25, 2007. The weir and trap were removed on October 1, 2007. A total of 637 adult Chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. The composition of the run included 240 natural origin fish and 397 hatchery supplementation fish. There were no identified 'stray' hatchery fish from other programs trapped. Of the fish captured, 41 natural and 81 hatchery supplementation adults were retained for broodstock and transported to LGH for holding and spawning, 403 adult Chinook were passed or transported above the weir to spawn naturally, and only hatchery origin jack Chinook were transported and outplanted in the Wallowa River and Bear Creek in underseeded habitat. Of the 122 adult fish retained for broodstock, 20 natural females and 40 supplementation females were represented in spawning. The eggs from these females produced a total of 267,350 eggs at fertilization. Eye-up was 86.73% which yielded a total of 231,882 conventional program eyed eggs. The fecundity averaged 4,456 eggs per female. These eggs will be incubated and reared at Lookingglass Hatchery until they are smolts in the spring of 2009. Captive brood program eggs/fish will be added to the conventional program eggs to make up the entire juvenile release for the Lostine River program in 2009. Due to the success of the 2007 egg collection, the number of fish produced exceeded program needs and facility capabilities. As a result, there are plans to outplant fry in 2008 and parr in early 2009 to underseeded habitat in the Wallowa River.

Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

Chao Phraya River  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

the river flow during low flow in January and 4% during high flow conditions in July 2004. The unit shoreline ...... since the water first became enriched in radium isotopes assuming no ... uranium-series isotopes (223Ra and 226Ra), estimating radium ages .... inventory into concentration by dividing by the water depth, which

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

312

Condamine River Meteor Zamia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONNORS Cape Townshend Townshend Island Island Long Broad Sound Condamine River Maran oa Comet Isaac Daws Roper Nogoa Ca llide Bungeworgorai North Balmy L ogan Denison L o t us Buck land Con ciliation Humb oldt Elphinstone Dam Eungella Dam R Ck Nebo RomaAmby Wowan Warra Miles Moura Dingo Comet Alpha Banana Rannes Marmor

Greenslade, Diana

313

Savannah River Site Robotics  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

None

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

314

The Nation's Rivers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...soil erosion and the need for soil conserva-tion were first clearly...residuals accumu-lated in soils, vegetation, and other organisms...from the Potomac River near Washing-ton, D.C., and doubtless...Ruhe and R. B. Daniels, J. Soil Water Conserv. 20, 52 (1965...

M. Gordon Wolman

1971-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

315

River meandering dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Ikeda, Parker, and Sawai river meandering model is reexamined using a physical approach employing an explicit equation of motion. For periodic river shapes as seen from above, a cross-stream surface elevation gradient creates a velocity shear that is responsible for the decay of small-wavelength meander bends, whereas secondary currents in the plane perpendicular to the downstream direction are responsible for the growth of large-wavelength bends. A decay length D=H/2Cf involving the river depth H and the friction coefficient Cf sets the scale for meandering, giving the downstream distance required for the fluid velocity profile to recover from changes in the channel curvature. Using this length scale and a time scale T, we explicitly trace the observed length scale invariance to the equations of motion, and predict similar time and velocity scale invariances. A general time-dependent nonlinear modal analysis for periodic rivers reveals that modes higher than the third mode are needed to describe upstream migration of bend apexes just before oxbow cutoff, and are important to accurate calculations of the time and sinuosity at cutoff.

Boyd F. Edwards and Duane H. Smith

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

316

Controls on morphological variability and role of stream power distribution pattern, Yamuna River, western India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Understanding the controls on the morphological variability of river systems constitutes one of the fundamental questions in geomorphic investigation. Channel morphology is an important indicator of river processes and is of significance for mapping the hydrology-ecologic connectivity in a river system and for predicting the future trajectory of river health in response to external forcings. This paper documents the spatial morphological variability and its natural and anthropogenic controls for the Yamuna River, a major tributary of the Ganga River, India. The Yamuna River runs through a major urban centre i.e. Delhi National Capital Region. The Yamuna River was divided into eight geomorphically distinct reaches on the basis of the assemblages of geomorphic units and the association of landscape, valley and floodplain settings. The morphological variability was analysed through stream power distribution and sediment load data at various stations. Stream power distribution of the Yamuna River basin is characterised by a non-linear pattern that was used to distinguish (a) high energy natural upstream reaches, (b) anthropogenically altered, low energy middle stream reaches, and (c) rejuvenated downstream reaches again with higher stream power. The relationship between stream power and channel morphology in these reaches was integrated with sediment load data to define the maximum flow efficiency (MFE) as the threshold for geomorphic transition. This analysis supports the continuity of river processes and the significance of a holistic, basin-scale approach rather than isolated local scale analysis in river studies.

Nupur Bawa; Vikrant Jain; Shashank Shekhar; Niraj Kumar; Vikas Jyani

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Geoscience interpretations of the Raft River Resource | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geoscience interpretations of the Raft River Resource Geoscience interpretations of the Raft River Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geoscience interpretations of the Raft River Resource Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A discussion of the geology and the wellfield development at Raft River is presented. The geothermal resource is located in a downdropped and downwarped basin bordered on east, west, and south by mountain ranges that vary in both stratigraphy and structure. It is inferred that the geothermal resource occurs where hydrothermal water rises at the intersection of and along the Narrows Zone and the Bridge Fault. Three exploration wells, two development wells, and two injection wells were drilled. The basic strategy of field development was to drill deep production wells on the faulted

318

Northland Power Mississippi River LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northland Power Mississippi River LLC Northland Power Mississippi River LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Northland Power Mississippi River LLC Address 30 St Clair Avenue West 17th Floor Place Toronto Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number (416) 820-9521 Website http://http://www.northlandpow Region Canada LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: NPI 01 NPI 013 NPI 014 NPI 015 NPI 016A NPI 016B NPI 017 NPI 018 NPI 019 NPI 020 NPI 021 NPI 022 NPI 023 NPI 024 NPI 025 NPI 027 NPI 055 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Northland_Power_Mississippi_River_LLC&oldid=678391

319

FLOWMETER ANALYSIS AT RAFT RIVER, IDAHO | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLOWMETER ANALYSIS AT RAFT RIVER, IDAHO FLOWMETER ANALYSIS AT RAFT RIVER, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: FLOWMETER ANALYSIS AT RAFT RIVER, IDAHO Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A quantitative evaluation of borehole-impeller flowmeter data leads to estimated field hydraulic conductivity. Data were obtained during an injection test of a geothermal well at the Raft River geothermal test site in Idaho. Both stationary and trolling calibrations of the flowmeter were made in the well. Methods were developed to adjust for variations in hole diameter, impeller speed, and trolling speed. These methods were applied to evaluate water losses into the formation as a function of depth. Application of the techniques is restricted to aquifers below the water

320

Interpretation of electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interpretation of electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River geothermal Interpretation of electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Interpretation of electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: An electromagnetic (EM) controlled source survey was conducted in the Raft River Valley, near Malta, Idaho. The purpose of the survey was: to field test U.S. Geological Survey extra-low-frequency (ELF) equipment using a grounded wire source and receiver loop configuration (which is designed to measure the vertical magnetic field (Hz) at the loop center for various frequencies); to present an example of the EM sounding data and interpretations using a previously developed inversion program; and (3) to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "region snake river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Phosphorus limitation in the Mississippi River Plume (MRP) and Louisiana shelf (LS) during May 1992  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the dissolved N/P are, nevertheless, the most frequently cited evidence for N-limitation in the MRP and LS region. Large rivers can significantly affect to biological processes in the coastal zone and some polluted rivers now carry dissolved phosphorus loads...

Kim, Jin-Seok

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

1. Puget Sound Rivers and Salmon Recovery David R. Montgomery, Derek B. Booth, and Susan Bolton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and streams and therefore aquatic ecosystems. Factors influencing salmon abundance are often general- ized A symposium on Restoration of Puget Sound Rivers at the spring 2000 meeting of the Society for Ecological Restoration's Northwest chapter pre- sented an opportunity to synthesize regional expertise on river

Montgomery, David R.

323

XXI Century Climatology of Snow Cover for the Western River Basins of the Indus River System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under changing climate, freshwater resources of Hindu Kush-Karakoram-Himalaya (HKH) region can be affected by changes in temperature and in amount, type and distribution of precipitation. This can have serious implications for the water supply and in turn threaten the food security and economic wellbeing of Indus basin. Using MODIS daily snow products (Terra & Aqua), this study focuses on the assessment of the 2000-2010 snow cover dynamics on seasonal/annual basis against geophysical parameters (aspect, elevation and slope) for the so called western river basins of Indus River System (IRS), namely Indus, Kabul, Jhelum, Astore, Gilgit, Hunza, Swat, Shigar and Shyok basins. Results show that inputs from MODIS instrument provide unprecedented better opportunity to study by using GIS techniques the snow cover dynamics in the remote areas like HKH region at such hyper-temporal and finer planar resolution. Adapted non-spectral cloud filtering techniques have significantly reduced cloud coverage and improved sno...

Hasson, Shabeh ul; Lucarini, Valerio

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 17, 2009 December 17, 2009 CX-000810: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ceramic Synthesis and Gas Permeation Measurements in 735-11A CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/17/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office December 17, 2009 CX-000809: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cut, Remove and Replace Off-Gas Exhaust Fan #2 and #3 foundation and Replace Air Monitor Fan #1 and #2 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 12/17/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office December 17, 2009 CX-000808: Categorical Exclusion Determination Howard T. Ricketts Regional Biocontainment Laboratory 134 CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/17/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina

325

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Upper Ohio River Valley Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Upper Ohio River Valley Project Upper Ohio River Valley Project In cooperation with key stakeholders including EPA, local and state environmental agencies, industry, and academia, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), a network for monitoring and characterizing PM2.5 in the Upper Ohio River Valley. This region was chosen because it has a high density of coal-fired electric utilities, heavy industries (e.g. coke and steel making), light industry, and transportation emission sources. It is also ideally situated to serve as a platform for the study of interstate pollution transport issues. This region, with its unique topography (hills and river valleys) as well as a good mix of urban and rural areas, has a high population of elderly who are susceptible to health impacts of fine particulate as well as other related environmental issues (e.g., acid rain, Hg deposition, ozone). A world-class medical research/university system is also located in the region, which will facilitate the subsequent use of the air quality data in studies of PM2.5 health effects.

326

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2004 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the eighth season (1997-2004) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the sixth season (1999-2004) of acclimation of resulting Lostine River progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progency for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies. In 2004, acclimation of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts occurred from March 1, 2004 through to April 14, 2004 and a total of 250,249 smolts were acclimated and released. These smolts were produced from the brood year (BY) 2002 egg source and included captive brood (133,781) and conventional (116,468) origin smolts that were all progeny of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon. Operation of the Lostine River adult monitoring and collection facility in 2004 began May 10, the first Chinook was captured on May 19, 2004 and the last Chinook was captured on September 16, 2004. The weir and trap were removed on October 1, 2004. A total of 1,091 adult Chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. The composition of the run included 299 natural origin fish and 792 hatchery supplementation fish. There were no identified 'stray' hatchery fish from other programs trapped. Of the fish captured, 46 natural and 69 hatchery supplementation adults were retained for broodstock and transported to Lookingglass Hatchery for holding and spawning, 537 adult Chinook were passed or transported above the weir to spawn naturally, and 447 hatchery origin adult Chinook were transported and outplanted in the Wallowa River and Bear Creek to spawn in underseeded habitat. Of the 107 adults retained (eight additional hatchery females were collected and then later returned to the Lostine River to spawn naturally) for broodstock at Lookingglass Hatchery, 22 natural females and 30 supplementation females were represented in spawning. These females produced a total of 221,889 eggs at fertilization. Eye-up was 94.9% which yielded a total of 210,661 conventional program eyed eggs. The fecundity averaged 4,267 eggs per female. These eggs were incubated and at Lookingglass Hatchery until eyed stage and then transferred to Oxbow Hatchery where they will be reared to the fingerling stage. They will then be transported back to LGH and reared to the smolt stage and then transported to the Lostine acclimation facility for release in the spring of 2006. Captive brood program eggs/fish will be added to

Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2006 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the tenth season (1997-2006) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the eighth season (1999-2006) of acclimation of resulting Lostine River progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies In 2006, acclimation of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts occurred from February 27, 2006 through to April 10, 2006 and a total of 240,568 smolts were acclimated and released. These smolts were produced from the brood year (BY) 2004 egg source and included captive brood (40,982) and conventional (199,586) origin smolts that were all progeny of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon. Operation of the Lostine River adult monitoring and collection facility in 2006 began May 15th, the first Chinook was captured on June 14, 2006 and the last Chinook was captured on September 27, 2006. The weir and trap were removed on October 1, 2006. A total of 534 adult Chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. The composition of the run included 205 natural origin fish and 329 hatchery supplementation fish. There were no identified 'stray' hatchery fish from other programs trapped. Of the fish captured, 33 natural and 120 hatchery supplementation adults were retained for broodstock and transported to LGH for holding and spawning and 397 adult Chinook were passed or transported above the weir to spawn naturally. In 2006, no hatchery origin adult Chinook were transported and out planted in the Wallowa River and Bear Creek to spawn in under seeded habitat. In order to meet egg take goals for the conventional portion of the program, a determination was made that approximately 147 adults were needed for broodstock. As a result 16 (8 males and 8 females) of the 153 fish collected for broodstock were returned to the Lostine River to spawn naturally. Females that were spawned and provided the brood source were made up of 12 natural females and 45 supplementation females. One of these females tested positive for high levels of Bacterial Kidney Disease and consequently this females eggs were destroyed. The remaining females produced a total of 241,372 eggs at fertilization. Eye-up was 85.47% which yielded a total of 206,309 conventional program eyed eggs. The fecundity averaged 4,162 eggs per female. The brood year 2006 eggs will be incubated and reared at Lookingglass Hatchery until

Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

A Dexterous System for Laryngeal Surgery Multi-Backbone Bending Snake-like Slaves for Teleoperated Dexterous Surgical Tool Manipulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Current manual instrumentation is awkward, hard to manipulate precisely, and lacks sufficient dexterity four degrees-of-freedom (DoF) are required in manipulating a surgical instrument, then some form reported. Many systems (e.g., [7] [2]) used wire actuated articulated wrists. Other systems used snake

Simaan, Nabil

329

Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This document is the first annual report for the study titled 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River'. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of the 2007-2009 Tidal Freshwater Monitoring Study is to answer the following questions: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; Figure 1) are yearling and subyearling salmonids found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions?1 And, what is the ecological importance2 of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of Upper Columbia River spring Chinook salmon and steelhead and Snake River fall Chinook salmon? Research in 2007 focused mainly on the first question, with fish stock identification data providing some indication of Chinook salmon presence at the variety of habitat types sampled. The objectives and sub-objectives for the 2007 study were as follows: (1) Habitat and Fish Community Characteristics-Provide basic data on habitat and fish community characteristics for yearling and subyearling salmonids at selected sites in the tidal freshwater reach in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (1a) Characterize vegetation assemblage percent cover, conventional water quality, substrate composition, and beach slope at each of six sampling sites in various tidal freshwater habitat types. (1b) Determine fish community characteristics, including species composition, abundance, and temporal and spatial distributions. (1c) Estimate the stock of origin for the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon captured at the sampling sites using genetic analysis. (1d) Statistically assess the relationship between salmonid abundance and habitat parameters, including ancillary variables such as temperature and river stage. (2) Acoustic Telemetry Monitoring-Assess feasibility of applying Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) technology to determine migration characteristics from upriver of Bonneville Dam through the study area (vicinity of the Sandy River delta/Washougal River confluence). (2a) Determine species composition, release locations, and distributions of JSATS-tagged fish. (2b) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for these fish. Additionally, both objectives serve the purpose of baseline research for a potential tidal rechannelization project on the Sandy River. The U.S. Forest Service, in partnership with the Bonneville Power Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is currently pursuing reconnection of the east (relict) Sandy River channel with the current channel to improve fish and wildlife habitat in the Sandy River delta. Our study design and the location of sampling sites in this reach provide baseline data to evaluate the potential restoration.

Sobocinski, Kathryn; Johnson, Gary; Sather, Nichole [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

330

Use of Dual Frequency Identification Sonar to Determine Adult Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Escapement in the Secesh River, Idaho ; Annual Report, January 2008 December 2008.  

SciTech Connect

Chinook salmon in the Snake River basin were listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 1992 (NMFS 1992). The Secesh River represents the only stream in the Snake River basin where natural origin (wild) salmon escapement monitoring occurs at the population level, absent a supplementation program. As such the Secesh River has been identified as a long term salmon escapement and productivity monitoring site by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management. Salmon managers will use this data for effective population management and evaluation of the effect of conservation actions on a natural origin salmon population. The Secesh River also acts as a reference stream for supplementation program comparison. Dual frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) was used to determine adult spring and summer Chinook salmon escapement in the Secesh River in 2008. DIDSON technology was selected because it provided a non-invasive method for escapement monitoring that avoided listed species trapping and handling incidental mortality, and fish impedance related concerns. The DIDSON monitoring site was operated continuously from June 13 to September 14. The first salmon passage was observed on July 3. DIDSON site total estimated salmon escapement, natural and hatchery fish, was 888 fish {+-} 65 fish (95% confidence interval). Coefficient of variation associated with the escapement estimate was 3.7%. The DIDSON unit was operational 98.1% of the salmon migration period. Adult salmon migration timing in the Secesh River occurred over 74 days from July 3 to September 14, with 5,262 total fish passages observed. The spawning migration had 10%, median, and 90% passage dates of July 8, July 16, and August 12, respectively. The maximum number of net upstream migrating salmon was above the DIDSON monitoring site on August 27. Validation monitoring of DIDSON target counts with underwater optical cameras occurred for species identification. A total of 860 optical camera identified salmon passage observations were identical to DIDSON target counts. However, optical cameras identified eight jack salmon (3 upstream, 5 downstream) less than 55 cm in length that DIDSON did not count as salmon because of the length criteria employed ({ge} 55 cm). Precision of the DIDSON technology was evaluated by comparing estimated net upstream salmon escapement and associated 95% confidence intervals between two DIDSON sonar units operated over a five day period. The DIDSON 1 salmon escapement was 145.7 fish ({+-} 2.3), and the DIDSON 2 escapement estimate was 150.5 fish ({+-} 5). The overlap in the 95% confidence intervals suggested that the two escapement estimates were not significantly different from each other. Known length salmon carcass trials were conducted in 2008 to examine the accuracy of manually measured lengths, obtained using DIDSON software, on high frequency files at a 5 m window length. Linear regression demonstrated a highly significant relationship between known lengths and manually measured salmon carcass lengths (p < 0.0001). A positive bias in manual length measurement of 6.8% to 8% existed among the two observers in the analysis. Total Secesh River salmon escapement (natural origin and hatchery) in 2008 was 912 fish. Natural origin salmon escapement in the entire Secesh River drainage was 847 fish. The estimated natural origin spawner abundance was 836 fish. Salmon spawner abundance in 2008 increased by three fold compared to 2007 abundance levels. The 10 year geometric mean natural origin spawner abundance was 538 salmon and was below the recommended viable population threshold level established by the ICTRT (2007). One additional Snake River basin salmon population was assessed for comparison of natural origin salmon spawner abundance. The Johnson Creek/EFSF Salmon River population had a 10 year geometric mean natural origin spawner abundance of 254 salmon. Salmon spawner abundance levels in both streams were below viable population thresholds. DIDSON technology has been used in the Secesh River to determine salmo

Kucera, Paul A. [Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management

2009-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

331

Geology and alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geology and alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: analcime; Cassia County Idaho; Cenozoic; chlorite; chlorite group; clay minerals; economic geology; exploration; framework silicates; geothermal energy; Idaho; illite; kaolinite; laumontite; montmorillonite; Neogene; Precambrian; Raft Formation; Raft River KGRA; Salt Lake Formation; sheet silicates; silicates; Tertiary; United States; wairakite; wells; zeolite group Author(s): Blackett, R.E.; Kolesar, P.T. Published: Geothermal Resource Council Transactions 1983, 1/1/1983 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable

332

Evaluating greenhouse gas emissions from hydropower complexes on large rivers in Eastern Washington  

SciTech Connect

Water bodies, such as freshwater lakes, are known to be net emitters of carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4). In recent years, significant greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from tropical, boreal, and mid-latitude reservoirs have been reported. At a time when hydropower is increasing worldwide, better understanding of seasonal and regional variation in GHG emissions is needed in order to develop a predictive understanding of such fluxes within man-made impoundments. We examined power-producing dam complexes within xeric temperate locations in the northwestern United States. Sampling environments on the Snake (Lower Monumental Dam Complex) and Columbia Rivers (Priest Rapids Dam Complex) included tributary, mainstem, embayment, forebay, and tailrace areas during winter and summer 2012. At each sampling location, GHG measurement pathways included surface gas flux, degassing as water passed through dams during power generation, ebullition within littoral embayments, and direct sampling of hyporheic pore-water. Measurements were also carried out in a free-flowing reach of the Columbia River to estimate unaltered conditions. Surface flux resulted in very low emissions, with reservoirs acting as a sink for CO2 (up to 262 mg m-2 d-1, which is within the range previously reported for similarly located reservoirs). Surface flux of methane remained below 1 mg CH4 m-2d-1, a value well below fluxes reported previously for temperate reservoirs. Water passing through hydroelectric projects acted as a sink for CO2 during winter and a small source during summer, with mean degassing fluxes of 117 and 4.5 t CO2 d-1, respectively. Degassing of CH4 was minimal, with mean fluxes of 3.1 10-6 and 5.6 10-4 t CH4 d-1 during winter and summer, respectively. Gas flux due to ebullition was greater in coves located within reservoirs than in coves within the free flowing Hanford Reachand CH4 flux exceeded that of CO2. Methane emissions varied widely across sampling locations, ranging from 10.5 to 1039 mg CH4 m-2 d-1, with mean fluxes of 324 mg CH4 m-2 d-1in Lower Monumental Dam reservoir and 482 mg CH4 m-2d-1 in the Priest Rapids Dam reservoir. The magnitude of methane flux due to ebullition was unexpectedly high, and falls within the range recently reported for other temperate reservoirs around the world, further suggesting that this methane source should be considered in estimates of global greenhouse gas emissions. Methane flux from sediment pore-water within littoral embayments averaged 4.2 mg m-2 d-1 during winter and 8.1 mg m-2 d-1 during summer, with a peak flux of 19.8 mg m-2d-1 (at the same location where CH4 ebullition was also the greatest). Carbon dioxide flux from sediment pore-water averaged approximately 80 mg m-2d-1 with little difference between winter and summer. Similar to emissions from ebullition, flux from sediment pore-water was higher in reservoirs than in the free flowing reach.

Arntzen, Evan V.; Miller, Benjamin L.; O'Toole, Amanda C.; Niehus, Sara E.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Regional Public Coordination Transportation Plan Texoma Region #22  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Goodwill Industries J.D. Hall Fannin County Judge Bob Rhoden Texoma Workforce Kathy Roberts Texas Department of Health and Human Services James Powell NCTCOG Michelle Bloomer NCTCOG Tim McGraw Grayson County Judge Tom Parker Red River Regional...: Transportation Research Board, National Research Council Federal Highway Administration and Federal Transit Administration. Statewide metropolitan transportation planning. Federal Register 65:02, pp. 33922-33958 21 Appendix D ? Survey Form...

Texoma Council of Governments

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2003 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the seventh season (1997-2003) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the fifth season (1999-2003) of acclimating the resultant progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies. In 2003, acclimation of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts occurred from March 3, 2003 through to April 14, 2003 and a total of 242,776 smolts were acclimated and released. These smolts were produced from the brood year (BY) 2001 egg source and included captive broodstock (141,860) and conventional broodstock (100,916) origin smolts that were all progeny of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon. Operation of the Lostine River adult monitoring and collection facility in 2003 began April 30th, the first Chinook was captured on May 16, 2003 and the last Chinook was captured on September 21, 2003. The weir and trap were removed on October 1, 2003. A total of 464 adult Chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. The composition of the run included 239 natural origin fish and 225 hatchery supplementation fish. There were no identified 'stray' hatchery fish from other programs trapped. Of the fish captured, 45 natural and 4 hatchery supplementation adults were retained for broodstock and transported to LGH for holding and spawning, 366 adult Chinook were passed or transported above the weir to spawn naturally, and 49 hatchery origin adult jack Chinook were transported and outplanted in the Wallowa River and Bear Creek to spawn in underseeded habitat. Of the 49 adults retained for broodstock at Lookingglass Hatchery, 21 natural females and no hatchery origin females were represented in spawning. These females produced a total of 106,609 eggs at fertilization. Eye-up was 95.50% which yielded a total of 101,811 conventional program eyed eggs. The fecundity averaged 5,077 eggs per female. These eggs were incubated and at Lookingglass Hatchery until eyed stage. At eye they were transferred to Oxbow Hatchery where they were reared to the fingerling state at which time they were transported back to LGH until they were smolts in the spring of 2005. Captive brood program eggs/fish will be added to the conventional program eggs to make up the entire juvenile release for the Lostine River program in 2005.

Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Savannah River Site - Enforcement Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enforcement Documents Enforcement Documents Savannah River Site Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC related to a Puncture Wound Injury resulting in a Radiological Uptake at the Savannah River Site, July 22, 2011 (NEA-2011-02) Consent Order issued to Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., related to Nuclear Facility Construction Deficiencies and Subcontractor Oversight at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site, April 13, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Amer Industrial Technologies, Inc. related to Weld Deficiencies at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site, April 13, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Parsons Technology Development & Fabrication Complex related to Deficiencies in the Fabrication of Safety Significant Embed Plates at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site, April 13, 2010

336

CARBON FLOW AND ECOSYSTEM DYNAMICS IN THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER PLUME DESCRIBED BY INVERSE ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into four subregions connected by water flow to discretize the gradient of ecosystem properties as river with mid-salinity waters (15-29 psu), surrounded by a larger region of net heterotrophic waters where- salinity regions of the plume, with strongest sedimentation from the productive mid- salinity regions

Breed, Greg A.

337

Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Malheur basin lies within southeastern Oregon. The Malheur River is a tributary to the Snake River, entering at about River Kilometer (RK) 595. The hydrological drainage area of the Malheur River is approximately 12,950 km{sup 2} and is roughly 306 km in length. The headwaters of the Malheur River originate in the Blue Mountains at elevations of 6,500 to 7,500 feet, and drops to an elevation of 2000 feet at the confluence with the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the Malheur basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 300 centimeters and ranges from 100 centimeters in the upper mountains to less than 25 centimeters in the lower reaches (Gonzalez 1999). Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2000. The Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT), United States Forest Service (USFS), and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), have been working cooperatively to achieve this common goal. Bull trout ''Salvenlinus confluentus'' have specific environmental requirements and complex life histories making them especially susceptible to human activities that alter their habitat (Howell and Buchanan 1992). Bull trout are considered to be a cold-water species and are temperature dependent. This presents a challenge for managers, biologists, and private landowners in the Malheur basin. Because of the listing of bull trout under the Endangered Species Act as threatened and the current health of the landscape, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power contract period starting 1 April 2000 and ending 31 March 2001. The study area will include the North Fork Malheur River and the Upper Malheur River from Warm Springs Reservoir upstream to the headwaters.

Gonzales, Dan; Schwabe, Lawrence; Wenick, Jess (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

339

Florida Nuclear Profile - Crystal River  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crystal River1" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

340

Food production and consumption near the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiological doses to the off-site maximum individual and the 80-km population are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are generated using dose models prescribed in the NRC Reg. Guide 1.109 for the commercial nuclear power industry. A study of land and water usage characteristics in the region of the Savannah River Site has been conducted to determine site-specific values of the NRC dose model parameters. The study's scope included local characteristics of meat, milk, vegetable production; Savannah River recreational activities and fish harvests; meat, milk, vegetable, and seafood consumption rates; and Savannah River drinking-water populations. Average and maximum consumption rates of beef, milk, vegetables, and fish have been determined for individuals residing in the southern United States. The study suggest that many of the consumption rates provided by the NRC may not be appropriate for residents of the South. Average consumption rates are slightly higher than the defaults provided by the NRC. Maximum consumption rates, however, are typically lower than NRC values. Agricultural productivity in the SRS region was found to be quite different than NRC recommendations. Off-site doses have been predicted using both NRC and SRS parameter values to demonstrate the significance of site-specific data.

Hamby, D.M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "region snake river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Food production and consumption near the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiological doses to the off-site maximum individual and the 80-km population are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are generated using dose models prescribed in the NRC Reg. Guide 1.109 for the commercial nuclear power industry. A study of land and water usage characteristics in the region of the Savannah River Site has been conducted to determine site-specific values of the NRC dose model parameters. The study`s scope included local characteristics of meat, milk, vegetable production; Savannah River recreational activities and fish harvests; meat, milk, vegetable, and seafood consumption rates; and Savannah River drinking-water populations. Average and maximum consumption rates of beef, milk, vegetables, and fish have been determined for individuals residing in the southern United States. The study suggest that many of the consumption rates provided by the NRC may not be appropriate for residents of the South. Average consumption rates are slightly higher than the defaults provided by the NRC. Maximum consumption rates, however, are typically lower than NRC values. Agricultural productivity in the SRS region was found to be quite different than NRC recommendations. Off-site doses have been predicted using both NRC and SRS parameter values to demonstrate the significance of site-specific data.

Hamby, D.M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Relationships between detoxifying enzymes in several snake species and the occurrence of these species in clean and pesticide-contaminated ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the accumulation of residues of environmental contaminants were measured in snakes from highly contaminated and lightly contaminated eco-systems near College Station, Texas. The objectives of this study were to determine differences in detoxifying enzyme... fold and used without additional purification. Homogenates were usually used within an hour of preparation, but tests repeated after a weelc of storage in a freezer indicated that little activity was lost. The enzyme systems I measured in snake...

Stafford, Duane Paul

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

RIVER RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS River Res. Applic. 21: 849864 (2005)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to assimilate wastewater treatment plant effluent. Our study illustrates the types of changes that river of future climate scenarios on flow regimes and how predicted changes might affect river ecosystems. We under future climate scenarios to describe the extent and type of changes predicted to occur. Daily

Poff, N. LeRoy

344

Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Savannah River Company- November 14, 2003  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company related to Criticality Safety Violations at the Savannah River Site

345

Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Savannah River Company- April 19, 2004  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company related to Employee Reprisal at the Savannah River Site

346

Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Rivers included in the Scenic Rivers System will be classified, designated and administered as Wild, Scenic, Pastoral, Recreational and Modified Recreational Rivers (Sections 4; (a) (1) of the Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Act). Low dams are permitted on Modified Recreational Rivers, but are not

347

NERPs Definition | Savannah River National Environmental Park  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERPS: Idaho, Hanford, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, Fermilab, Nevada, and Savannah River. The Savannah River Site became the first NERP in 1972. Unlike National Parks, NERPs provide a...

348

Overview | Savannah River National Environmental Park  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ecology Laboratory (SREL), USDA Forest Service - Savannah River (USFS-SR), and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). As a research unit of UGA, SREL's primary function is...

349

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 July 2013 Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the...

350

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operation - June 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June 2010 June 2010 Savannah River Operations Office Self-Assessment of the Technical Qualification...

351

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - September...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

September 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - September 2010 Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Effectiveness Review The U.S. Department of...

352

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediation - July 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July 2010 July 2010 Savannah River Operations Office Integrated Safety Management System Phase II...

353

Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site, Summary...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site, Summary Report - February 2004 February 2004 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management and Emergency Management at the Savannah River Site...

354

Savannah River Site hosts regional Lean Alliance event | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA's Nevada Field Office Transfers Two Armored Vehicles to FBI SRS employees raise funds for American Heart Association SRS 'teach-ins' show why math and science are cool...

355

Redd Site Selection and Spawning Habitat Use by Fall Chinook Salmon, Hanford Reach, Columbia River : Final Report 1995 - 1998.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes results of research activities conducted from 1995 through 1998 on identifying the spawning habitat requirements of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The project investigated whether traditional spawning habitat models could be improved in order to make better predictions of available habitat for fall chinook salmon in the Snake River. Results suggest models could be improved if they used spawning area-specific, rather than river-specific, spawning characteristics; incorporated hyporheic discharge measurements; and gave further consideration to the geomorphic features that are present in the unconstrained segments of large alluvial rivers. Ultimately the recovery of endangered fall chinook salmon will depend on how well we are able to recreate the characteristics once common in alluvial floodplains of large rivers. The results from this research can be used to better define the relationship between these physical habitat characteristics and fall chinook salmon spawning site selection, and provide more efficient use of limited recovery resources. This report is divided into four chapters which were presented in the author's doctoral dissertation which he completed through the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University. Each of the chapters has been published in peer reviewed journals or is currently under review. Chapter one is a conceptual spawning habitat model that describes how geomorphic features of river channels create hydraulic processes, including hyporheic flows, that influence where salmon spawn in unconstrained reaches of large mainstem alluvial rivers. Chapter two describes the comparison of the physical factors associated with fall chinook salmon redd clusters located at two sites within the Reach. Spatial point pattern analysis of redds showed that redd clusters averaged approximately 10 hectares in area and their locations were consistent from year to year. The tendency to spawn in clusters suggests fall chinook salmon's use of spawning habitat is highly selective. Hydraulic characteristics of the redd clusters were significantly different than the habitat surrounding them. Velocity and lateral slope of the river bottom were the most important habitat variables in predicting redd site selection. While these variables explained a large proportion of the variance in redd site selection (86 to 96%), some unmeasured factors still accounted for a small percentage of actual spawning site selection. Chapter three describes the results from an investigation into the hyporheic characteristics of the two spawning areas studied in chapter two. This investigation showed that the magnitude and chemical characteristics of hyporheic discharge were different between and within two spawning areas. Apparently, fall chinook salmon used chemical and physical cues from the discharge to locate spawning areas. Finally, chapter four describes a unique method that was developed to install piezometers into the cobble bed of the Columbia River.

Geist, David R.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Update on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Update on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Since the last conference, a fourth well has been drilled to an intermediate depth and tested as a production well, with plans to use this well in the long term for injection of fluids into the strata above the production strata. The third, triple legged well has been fully pump tested, and the recovery of the second well from an injection well back to production status has revealed very interesting data on the reservoir conditions around that well. Both interference testing and geochemistry analysis shows that the third well is producing from a different aquifer

357

Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1993) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1993) Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1993 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine the importance of Early to Middle Miocene period in the northern Basin and Range region. Notes New apatite fission track cooling age and track length data, supplemented by other information, point to the Early to Middle Miocene as an additional time of very significant extension-induced uplift and range formation. Many ranges in a 700-km-long north-south corridor from the Utah-Nevada-Idaho border to southernmost Nevada experience extension and major exhumation in Early to Middle Miocene time. Reconnaissance apatite ages from the Toiyabe

358

Raft River geoscience case study | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

study study Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Raft River geoscience case study Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River Geothermal Site has been evaluated over the past eight years by the United States Geological Survey and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory as a moderate-temperature geothermal resource. The geoscience data gathered in the drilling and testing of seven geothermal wells suggest that the Raft River thermal reservoir is: (a) produced from fractures found at the contact metamorphic zone, apparently the base of detached normal faulting from the Bridge and Horse Well Fault zones of the Jim Sage Mountains; (b) anisotropic, with the major axis of hydraulic conductivity coincident to the Bridge Fault Zone; (c) hydraulically

359

Savannah River Site Homepage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7/2014 7/2014 SEARCH GO News Releases Video Releases Upcoming Events 12.31.13 Dr. Sam Fink Earns Donald Orth Lifetime Achievement Award 12.31.13 Savannah River Remediation Issues Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Report 12.18.13 Prototype System Brings Advantages of Wireless Technology to Secure Environment CLICK HERE FOR ADDITIONAL NEWS RELEASES CLICK HERE for our email news service, govDELIVERY 2013 PMI Project of the Year Award - Click to play on YouTube 2013 PMI Project of the Year Award Finalist: SRS Recovery Act Project PLAY VIDEO CLICK HERE FOR ADDITIONAL VIDEO RELEASES Enterprise.SRS - Safety and Security begin with me! SRS Status & Emergency Information * Cold War Patriot's Resource Fair - Aiken, SC (04.25.13) * 3rd Annual Small Modular Reactor Conference - Columbia, SC (04.16-17.13)

360

Prediction of ungauged river basin for hydropower potential and flood risk mitigation: a case study at Gin River, Sri Lanka  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A hydrologic study was performed for ungauged river basin of Sri Lanka to examine synthetic discharge relations. Rainfall-runoff relationships were used for identifying hydrological conditions of the Gin River basin. The peak discharge achieves within 4.74 hours from the onset of the rainstorm and 11.95 hours take to reach its normal discharge conditions. Stream frequency of the Gin River is 4.56 junctions/km while the channel slope gradient is 7.90 m/km. The regional coefficient of the catchment is 0.00296. Higher stream frequency and gentle channel slope were identified as flood triggering factors of the basin. Mini-hydropower systems were recognised as the most applicable and economical flood controlling hydraulic structures. Also, it can be utilised as a reliable energy source (8,630.0 kW).

A.S. Ratnayake; A. Pitawala

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "region snake river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Sediment chemistries and chironomid deformities in the Buffalo River (NY)  

SciTech Connect

The authors examined the surficial sediment chemistry (heavy metals) and the frequency of chironomid (Diptera) larvae mouthpart deformities from multiple PONAR grabs samples at each of 20 sites along the Buffalo River (NY) area of concern (AOC). Because of the potential for patchy invertebrate distribution and high variance in sediment chemistry, repeated spatial and temporal sampling is important to obtain a better integrated picture of contamination in rivers. The findings suggest that the Buffalo River has one of the highest percentages of deformed chironomids in AOC`s of the Great Lakes basin. One river site that was traditionally thought to be a chemical hot spot was less contaminated than another downstream section. At another site, sediment concentrations for V., Mn and AS appeared to be strongly associated with the proximity of combined sewer overflows from a region which is primarily residential. Interestingly, a demonstration project of the US Army Corps of Engineers, during which three types of dredges were used to carefully remove upper sediments from two different short reaches along the river, seemed to have no significant impact on proximate sediment chemistries or biota.

Stewart, K.M.; Diggins, T.P. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States). Dept. of Biological Science

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

Wood River Levee Reconstruction, Madison County, IL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wood River Levee Reconstruction, Madison County, IL 25 October 2006 Abstract: The recommended plan provides for flood damage reduction and restores the original degree of protection of the Wood River Levee-federal sponsor is the Wood River Drainage and Levee District. The Wood River Levee System was authorized

US Army Corps of Engineers

363

The Columbia River Estuary the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" fish and wildlife in the Columbia River as affected by development and operation of the hydroelectric modified in terms of physical and biological processes. The development and operation of the hydroelectric

364

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE A PUIIUCATION OF THE SAVANNAII RIVER ECOI"OGY LAIIORATORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE A PUIIUCATION OF THE SAVANNAII RIVER ECOI"OGY LAIIORATORY NATIONAL of the Savannah River Site National Environmental Research Park Program Publication number: SRO-NERP-2S Printed OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BY CHARLES E. DAVIS AND LAURA L. JANECEK A PUBLICATION OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

Georgia, University of

365

Regional Purchasing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Purchasing Regional Purchasing Regional Purchasing Pursuant to Appendix M of Prime Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396 between DOE/NNSA and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), LANS is committed to building a strong supplier base with Northern New Mexico businesses and the local Native American pueblos in the purchases of goods and services. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email We seek out and utilize known Northern New Mexico business as suppliers The Northern New Mexico counties included are Los Alamos Santa Fe Rio Arriba Taos Mora San Miguel Sandoval The eight regional pueblos included are Nambe Ohkay Owingeh (formerly known as San Juan) Picuris Pojoaque San Ildefonso Santa Clara Taos Tesuque When the Laboratory cannot identify regional firms, it will expand its

366

Two-dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and wells. (SINDA-3G program) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Two-dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and wells. (SINDA-3G program) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Computer models describing both the transient reservoir pressure behavior and the time dependent temperature response of the wells at the Raft River, Idaho, Geothermal Resource were developed. A horizontal, two-dimensional, finite-difference model for calculating pressure effects was constructed to simulate reservoir performance. Vertical, two-dimensional, finite-difference, axisymmetric models for each of the three existing wells at Raft River were also constructed to describe the

367

Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This report covers the drilling and testing of the slim well 56-4 at the Reese River Geothermal Project in Lander County, Nevada. This well was partially funded through a GRED III Cooperative Funding Agreement # DE-FC36-04GO14344, from USDOE. Author(s): William R. Henkle, Joel Ronne Published: Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection, 2008 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Report Compound and Elemental Analysis At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008)

368

Rheological control on the initial geometry of the Raft River detachment  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rheological control on the initial geometry of the Raft River detachment Rheological control on the initial geometry of the Raft River detachment fault and shear zone, western United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Rheological control on the initial geometry of the Raft River detachment fault and shear zone, western United States Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The strain, exhumation history, and field orientation of a well-exposed shear zone and detachment fault in the Raft River Mountains of northwestern Utah, a Cordilleran metamorphic core complex, have been studied to determine the kinematics of ductile shearing and initial orientations of the shear zone and detachment fault. Mapping and strain and kinematic analysis indicate that the top-to-the-east Raft River shear zone

369

Caney River | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River River Jump to: navigation, search Name Caney River Facility Caney River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Enel Green Power North America Inc. Developer Tradewind Energy LLC Energy Purchaser Tennessee Valley Authority Location Elk County KS Coordinates 37.448424°, -96.425027° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.448424,"lon":-96.425027,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

370

Marble River | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River River Jump to: navigation, search Name Marble River Facility Marble River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner EDP Renewables North America LLC Developer EDP Renewables North America LLC Energy Purchaser Merchant Location Churubusco NY Coordinates 44.9406848°, -73.9303307° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.9406848,"lon":-73.9303307,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

371

Missouri River Institute Research Symposium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Army Corps of Engineers) Corps of Engineers Outreach and Education Programs 11:00 Dan Catlin (Virginia and Pesticides on Amphibians Along the 59-Mile Reach of the Missouri River Posters from various individuals

Sweeney, Mark R.

372

Two-dimensional river modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flow conditions. This thesis investigates the application of a recently developed two- dimensional river model system. The microcomputer version of FESWMS-2DH was developed for the Federal Highway Administration by the U. S. Geological Survey. Four... simulations are used to examine the performance of the two- dimensional river modeling system: flow in a simple channel, flow in a strongly curved channel bend, flow in a meandering creek, and flow in Buckhorn Creek, a single opening bridge crossing of a...

Thompson, James Cameron

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

373

Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc resistivity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc resistivity Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc resistivity method (Abstract) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc resistivity method (Abstract) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; ELECTRICAL SURVEYS; IDAHO; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; GEOTHERMAL WELLS; KGRA; TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT; ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES; EXPLORATION; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; USA; WELLS Author(s): Zohdy, A.A.R.; Jackson, D.B.; Bisdorf, R.J. Published: Geophysics, 10/12/1975 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article

374

Geology of the central part of the James River Valley, Mason County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(19/1) descr1bed certain features of the weathering found on the Precambrian gran1te of ths Llano region. PRTSI00RAPRT 0LINATE The central pert of the James River valley is located 1n a sem1-arid region of Texas, The annual precipitation...

Dannemiller, George David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

375

Development of a HEC-HMS model to inform river gauge placement for a flood early warning system in Uganda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Communities in the downstream region of the Manafwa River Basin in eastern Uganda experience floods caused by heavy precipitation upstream. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has partnered with the Red Cross ...

Kaatz, Joel Alan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Comments of the Lower Colorado River Authority | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Lower Colorado River Authority Comments of the Lower Colorado River Authority Comments of the Lower Colorado River Authority on Implementing the National Broadband Plan by...

377

Flambeau River Papers Makes a Comeback with a Revised Energy...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

ITP LEADER Case Study: Flambeau River Papers Makes a Comeback With a Revised Energy Strategy Flambeau River Biofuels Demonstration-Scale Biorefinery FlambeauRiverBiofuels.pdf...

378

ITP LEADER Case Study: Flambeau River Papers Makes a Comeback...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Documents & Publications Flambeau River Papers Makes a Comeback with a Revised Energy Strategy Flambeau River Biofuels Demonstration-Scale Biorefinery FlambeauRiverBiofuels.pdf...

379

EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing Facility, Red River Parish, LA EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing...

380

Enforcement Documents - Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Savannah River Site (EA-2000-08) June 7, 2000 Enforcement Letter, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, 2000 Issued to Savannah River Ecology Laboratory related to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "region snake river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

79) 79) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Conceptual Model Activity Date 1979 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Recommendations are made concerning field expansion and additional work needed to refine the overall reservoir model. Notes Models described in this report show the source of various minerals in the geothermal water. There appears to be a regional heat source that gives rise to uniform conductive heat flow in the region, but convective flow is concentrated near the upwelling in the Crook well vicinity. References Overton, H. L.; Chaney, R. E.; Mcatee, R. E.; Graham, D. L. (1 November 1979) Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field Overton, H. L.; Chaney, R. E.; Mcatee, D. L.; Graham, D. L. (1

382

River Protection Project (RPP) Project Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Office of River Protection (ORP) Project Management Plan (PMP) for the River Protection Project (RPP) describes the process for developing and operating a Waste Treatment Complex (WTC) to clean up Hanford Site tank waste. The Plan describes the scope of the project, the institutional setting within which the project must be completed, and the management processes and structure planned for implementation. The Plan is written from the perspective of the ORP as the taxpayers' representative. The Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State, has one of the largest concentrations of radioactive waste in the world, as a result of producing plutonium for national defense for more than 40 years. Approximately 53 million gallons of waste stored in 177 aging underground tanks represent major environmental, social, and political challenges for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These challenges require numerous interfaces with state and federal environmental officials, Tribal Nations, stakeholders, Congress, and the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ). The cleanup of the Site's tank waste is a national issue with the potential for environmental and economic impacts to the region and the nation.

NAVARRO, J.E.

2001-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

383

Microbial ammonium cycling in the Mississippi River plume during  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ammonium (NH4 + ) were studied along a salinity gradient (salinities 0.2­34.4) in the Mississippi River in the low- and mid-salinity regions (salinities 8.5­28.2) and comparable to records of other years not reflect phytoplankton and bacterial spatial distribution but peaked at 9.2 g C L?1 at salinity 8

Jochem, Frank J.

384

Canadian River Compact (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Canadian River Compact (Texas) Canadian River Compact (Texas) Canadian River Compact (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Texas Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Canadian River Compact Commission The Canadian River Commission administers the Canadian River Compact which includes the states of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Signed in 1950 by

385

Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Savannah River Site | June 2011 Aerial View Savannah River Site | June 2011 Aerial View Savannah River Site (SRS) has mission responsibilities in nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship by ensuring the safe and reliable management of tritium resources; by contributing to the stockpile surveillance program; and by assisting in the development of alternatives for large-scale pit disassembly/conversion capability. SRS also manages excess nuclear materials and supports nuclear nonproliferation initiatives. Environmental stewardship activities include the management, treatment, and disposal of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes. Enforcement April 13, 2010 Consent Order, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc. -

386

Regional East Tennessee Information | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scenic Trail Cumberland Plateau Nature Trail Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area Obed Wild and Scenic River Tennessee State Parks Cherohala Skyway Gatlinburg,...

387

Spin tracking simulations in AGS based on ray-tracing methods - bare lattice, no snakes -  

SciTech Connect

This Note reports on the first simulations of and spin dynamics in the AGS using the ray-tracing code Zgoubi. It includes lattice analysis, comparisons with MAD, DA tracking, numerical calculation of depolarizing resonance strengths and comparisons with analytical models, etc. It also includes details on the setting-up of Zgoubi input data files and on the various numerical methods of concern in and available from Zgoubi. Simulations of crossing and neighboring of spin resonances in AGS ring, bare lattice, without snake, have been performed, in order to assess the capabilities of Zgoubi in that matter, and are reported here. This yields a rather long document. The two main reasons for that are, on the one hand the desire of an extended investigation of the energy span, and on the other hand a thorough comparison of Zgoubi results with analytical models as the 'thin lens' approximation, the weak resonance approximation, and the static case. Section 2 details the working hypothesis : AGS lattice data, formulae used for deriving various resonance related quantities from the ray-tracing based 'numerical experiments', etc. Section 3 gives inventories of the intrinsic and imperfection resonances together with, in a number of cases, the strengths derived from the ray-tracing. Section 4 gives the details of the numerical simulations of resonance crossing, including behavior of various quantities (closed orbit, synchrotron motion, etc.) aimed at controlling that the conditions of particle and spin motions are correct. In a similar manner Section 5 gives the details of the numerical simulations of spin motion in the static case: fixed energy in the neighboring of the resonance. In Section 6, weak resonances are explored, Zgoubi results are compared with the Fresnel integrals model. Section 7 shows the computation of the {rvec n} vector in the AGS lattice and tuning considered. Many details on the numerical conditions as data files etc. are given in the Appendix Section, pages A and sqs.

Meot F.; Ahrens& #44; L.; Glenn& #44; J.; Huang& #44; H.; Luccio& #44; A.; MacKay& #44; W.W.; Roser& #44; T.; Tsoupas& #44; N.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Report on the Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Program Evaluation for the Columbia River Basin Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results for year seventeen in the basin-wide Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991 - a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system-wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale. In 1994, we investigated the use of trap nets and gillnets at specific locations where concentrations of northern pikeminnow were known or suspected to occur during the spring season (i.e., March through early June). In addition, we initiated a concerted effort to increase public participation in the sport-reward fishery through a series of promotional and incentive activities. In 1995, 1996, and 1997, promotional activities and incentives were further improved based on the favorable response in 1994. Results of these efforts are subjects of this annual report. Evaluation of the success of test fisheries in achieving our target goal of a 10-20% annual exploitation rate on northern pikeminnow is presented in Report C of this report. Overall program success in terms of altering the size and age composition of the northern pikeminnow population and in terms of potential reductions in loss of juvenile salmonids to northern pikeminnow predation is also discussed in Report C. Program cooperators include the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal Damage Unit as a contractor to test Dam Angling. The PSMFC was responsible for coordination and administration of the program; PSMFC subcontracted various tasks and activities to ODFW and WDFW based on the expertise each brought to the tasks involved in implementing the program and dam angling to the USDA.

Porter, Russell [Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission].

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

389

Last Interglacial marine environments in the White Sea region, northwestern Russia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Last Interglacial marine environments in the White Sea region, northwestern Russia KARI GR?SFJELD, northwestern Russia. Boreas, Vol. 35, pp. 493Á520. Oslo. ISSN 0300-9483. Marine sediments from river sections in the Mezen River drainage, northwest Russia, have been analysed for dinoflagellate cysts, foraminifers

Ingólfsson, ?lafur

390

Savannah River National Laboratory - Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

SRNL Logo SRNL and DOE logo art SRNL Logo SRNL and DOE logo art Top Menu Bar SRNL Update: Embassy Fellows Report A report co-authored by Savannah River National Laboratory Senior Advisory Engineer, Dr. Robert Sindelar, has been released. The report to the Government of Japan - Ministry of the Environment provides observations and recommendations on decontamination work and progress... >>MORE Portable Power Research at SRNL Hadron Technologies, Inc., a microwave technology and systems development and manufacturing company with offices in Tennessee and Colorado, has signed a license for a Hybrid Microwave and Off-Gas Treatment System developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory, the Department of Energy's applied science laboratory located at the Savannah River Site. >>MORE

391

Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah Savannah River Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 1 November 6, 2008 Presentation By Sherri R. Ross Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office The Issue * How clean is clean? * Ultimate Challenge - Justify highly radioactive radionuclides have been removed to the maximum extent practical? 2 removed to the maximum extent practical? - Building compelling regulatory documentation that will withstand intense scrutiny §3116 Requirements 1. Does not require disposal in deep geological repository 2. Highly radioactive radionuclides removed to the maximum extent practical 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 3 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 61, Subpart C 4. Waste disposed pursuant to a State-approved closure plan or permit Note: If it is anticipated that Class C disposal limits will be exceeded, additional

392

Enforcement Letter, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory- June 7, 2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Issued to Savannah River Ecology Laboratory related to Radioactive Material Control Deficiencies at the Savannah River Site

393

Flambeau River Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flambeau River Biofuels Flambeau River Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Flambeau River Biofuels Place Park Falls, Wisconsin Sector Biomass Product A subsidiary of Flambeau River Papers LLC that plans to develop a Fischer Tropsch diesel project in Park Falls, Wisconsin that will process residual wood biomass from forest and agricultural sources. References Flambeau River Biofuels[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Flambeau River Biofuels is a company located in Park Falls, Wisconsin . References ↑ "Flambeau River Biofuels" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Flambeau_River_Biofuels&oldid=345407" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

394

Youghiogheny Wild and Scenic River (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Portions of the Youghiogheny River are protected under the Scenic and Wild Rivers Act, and development on or near these areas is restricted. COMAR section 08.15.02 addresses permitted uses and...

395

Salinity Gradient Energy at River Mouths  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Salinity Gradient Energy at River Mouths ... River mouths are potentially abundant locations for the exploitation of the clean and renewable salinity gradient energy (SGE) as here perpetually fresh water mixes with saline seawater. ...

Oscar Alvarez-Silva; Christian Winter; Andres F. Osorio

2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

396

Critical wavelength for river meandering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fully nonlinear modal analysis identifies a critical centerline wave number qc for river meandering that separates long-wavelength bends, which grow to cutoff, from short-wavelength bends, which decay. Exact, numerical, and approximate analytical results for qc rely on the Ikeda, Parker, and Sawai [J. Fluid Mech. 112, 363 (1981)] model, supplemented by dynamical equations that govern the river migration and length. Predictions also include upvalley bend migration at long times and a peak in lateral migration rates at intermediate times. Experimental tests are suggested.

Boyd F. Edwards and Duane H. Smith

2001-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

397

Wild and Scenic Rivers | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWildandScenicRivers&oldid612228" Category: NEPA Resources...

398

Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

C.S. Cearlock

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

399

Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System)- River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System) - River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)

400

Atlas of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Atlas of the Columbia River Basin Oregon State University Computer-Assisted Cartography Course & GEOVISUALIZATION GROUP UNIVERSITY #12;2013 Oregon State University Atlas of the Columbia River Basin FOREWORDAtlas, Montana, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah. 2013 Oregon State University Atlas of the Columbia River Basin

Jenny, Bernhard

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401

Petrologic constraints on the development of a large-volume, high temperature, silicic magma system: The Twin Falls eruptive centre, central Snake River Plain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Explosive volcanism associated with the Yellowstone hotspot spanning ~11.3 to 9Ma, thought to have erupted from the Twin Falls eruptive centre, is recorded in the Cassia Mountains of southern Idaho and northern Nevada. The stratigraphy contains intensely welded, rhyolitic (SiO2 6976wt.%) ignimbrites with an anhydrous mineralogy: plagioclase, sanidine, quartz, pigeonite, augite, ilmenite, titanomagnetite, accessory zircon and apatite. Several different thermometers indicate high temperature rhyolitic magmas (>900C). All Cassia Mountain ignimbrites show a significant depletion in ?18OVSMOW with magmatic feldspar values between 1.7 and 3.0, reflecting incorporation of a hydrothermally altered protolith. Multiple compositions of both pigeonite (Mg# 3046) and augite (Mg# 1753) may occur within an individual ignimbrite while crystal aggregates contain only a single composition of each. The compositional heterogeneity within the ignimbrites reflects a complex magmatic system whereby magma was segregated into multiple smaller chambers prior to eruption.

Ben S. Ellis; Tiffany Barry; Michael J. Branney; John A. Wolff; Ilya Bindeman; Rob Wilson; Bill Bonnichsen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Resilience of river flow regimes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Junk WJ Bayley PB Sparks RE ( 1989 ) The flood pulse concept in river-floodplain systems...F Ward JV ( 2000 ) An extension of the flood pulse concept...ZZQQhy2011 Bisbee (AZ) Bisbee (AZ) Summer Boulder Creek Arizona (United States) 98 1984...

Gianluca Botter; Stefano Basso; Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe; Andrea Rinaldo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Resilience of river flow regimes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Junk WJ Bayley PB Sparks RE ( 1989 ) The flood pulse concept in river-floodplain systems...F Ward JV ( 2000 ) An extension of the flood pulse concept...summer, autumn, winter Vallecito Creek Colorado (United States) 188 1963 ZZQQhy1997...

Gianluca Botter; Stefano Basso; Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe; Andrea Rinaldo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

From waterfront to watershed : mapping a big idea in the Greater Toronto Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today, Toronto is revered among Great Lakes' and waterfront cities for its environmental planning: its massive re-investment in water and stormwater infrastructure; protected headwaters of the region's rivers; realized ...

Ciesielski, Linda C. (Linda Claire)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

ASSESSING REGIONAL CLIMATE AND LOCAL LANDCOVER IMPACTS ON VEGETATION WITH REMOTE SENSING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landcover change alters not only the surface landscape but also regional carbon and water cycling. The objective of this study was to assess the potential impacts of landcover change across the Kansas River Basin (KRB) by ...

Lin, Pei-Ling

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

Synopsis of Mackenzie GEWEX Studies on the Atmospheric-Hydrologic System of a Cold Region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The atmospheric-hydrologic system of the Mackenzie River Basin (MRB) shares many traits special to the world cold regions. MAGS investigators used a variety of research methods (field investigations, remote se...

Ming-ko Woo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Preservation of an extreme transient geotherm in the Raft River detachment  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Preservation of an extreme transient geotherm in the Raft River detachment Preservation of an extreme transient geotherm in the Raft River detachment shear zone Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Preservation of an extreme transient geotherm in the Raft River detachment shear zone Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Extensional detachment systems separate hot footwalls from cool hanging walls, but the degree to which this thermal gradient is the product of ductile or brittle deformation or a preserved original transient geotherm is unclear. Oxygen isotope thermometry using recrystallized quartz-muscovite pairs indicates a smooth thermal gradient (140 °C/100 m) across the gently dipping, quartzite-dominated detachment zone that bounds the Raft River core complex in northwest Utah (United States). Hydrogen

408

Reservoir evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal Project, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Reservoir evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal Project, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Results of the production and interference tests conducted on the geothermal wells RRGE 1 and RRGE 2 in Raft River Valley, Idaho during September--November, 1975 are presented. In all, three tests were conducted, two of them being short-duration production tests and one, a long duration interference test. In addition to providing estimates on the permeability and storage parameters of the geothermal reservoir, the tests also indicated the possible existence of barrier boundaries. The data

409

Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River area, Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River area, Cassia County, Idaho (1974-1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River area, Cassia County, Idaho (1974-1976) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Basin and Range Province; Cassia County Idaho; economic geology; exploration; geophysical surveys; geothermal energy; heat flow; heat flux; Idaho; North America; Raft River basin; south-central Idaho; surveys; temperature; thermal conductivity; United States; USGS Author(s): Urban, T.C.; Diment, W.H.; Nathenson, M.; Smith, E.P.; Ziagos, J.P.; Shaeffer, M.H. Published: Open-File Report - U. S. Geological Survey, 1/1/1986 Document Number: Unavailable

410

An early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river metamorphic core complex- black pine mountains, southern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river metamorphic core complex- black pine mountains, southern Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Although commonly obscured by simple shear, pure shear fabrics occur locally within many metamorphic core complexes. The cover rocks to the Raft River metamorphic core complex exposed within the Black Pine Mountains display an early coaxial strain history which developed prior to the formation of low-angle fault-bounded allochthons. At higher structural levels this is documented by pressure shadows with straight sutures, and

411

Resistivity measurements before and after injection Test 5 at Raft River  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

measurements before and after injection Test 5 at Raft River measurements before and after injection Test 5 at Raft River KGRA, Idaho. Final report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Resistivity measurements before and after injection Test 5 at Raft River KGRA, Idaho. Final report Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Resistivity measurements were made prior to, and after an injection test at Raft River KGRA, Idaho. The objectives of the resistivity measurements were to determine if measureable changes could be observed and whether they could be used to infer the direction of fluid flow. Most of the apparent resistivity changes observed after the injection phase of Test 5 are smaller than the estimated standard deviation of the measurements. However, the contour map of the changes suggest an anomalous trend to the

412

Geophysical logging case history of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical logging case history of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Geophysical logging case history of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geophysical logging case history of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Drilling to evaluate the geothermal resource in the Raft River Valley began in 1974 and resulted in the discovery of a geothermal reservoir at a depth of approximately 1523 m (500 ft). Several organizations and companies have been involved in the geophysical logging program. There is no comprehensive report on the geophysical logging, nor has there been a complete interpretation. The objectives of this study are to make an integrated interpretation of the available data and compile a case history. Emphasis has been on developing a simple interpretation

413

Helium isotopes in geothermal systems- Iceland, The Geysers, Raft River and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helium isotopes in geothermal systems- Iceland, The Geysers, Raft River and Helium isotopes in geothermal systems- Iceland, The Geysers, Raft River and Steamboat Springs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Helium isotopes in geothermal systems- Iceland, The Geysers, Raft River and Steamboat Springs Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Helium isotope ratios have been measured in geothermal fluids from Iceland, The Geysers, Raft River, Steamboat Springs and Hawaii. These ratios have been interpreted in terms of the processes which supply He in distinct isotopic ratios (i.e. magmatic He, ~10 Ra; atmospheric He, R,sub>a; and crustal He, ~0.1 Ra) and in terms of the processes which can alter the isotopic ratio (hydrologic mixing, U-Th series alpha production and weathering release of crustal He, magma aging and

414

Fault and joint geometry at Raft River geothermal area, Idaho | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and joint geometry at Raft River geothermal area, Idaho and joint geometry at Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Fault and joint geometry at Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Raft River geothermal reservoir is formed by fractures in sedimentary strata of the Miocene and Pliocene Salt Lake Formation. The fracturing is most intense at the base of the Salt Lake Formation, along a decollement that dips eastward at less than 5 0 on top of metamorphosed Precambrian and Lower Paleozoic rocks. Core taken from less than 200 m above the decollement contains two sets of normal faults. The major set of faults dips between 50 0 and 70 0. These faults occur as conjugate pairs that are bisected by vertical extension fractures. The second set of faults

415

Subsurface geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Subsurface geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River Valley occupies an upper Cenozoic structural basin filled with nearly 1600 m of fluvial silt, sand, and gravel. Rapid facies and thickness changes, steep initial dips (30 0C), and alteration make correlation of basin-fill depositional units very difficult. Hydrothermal alteration products in the form of clays and zeolites, and deposition of secondary calcite and silica increase with depth. The abundance of near-vertical open fractures also increases with depth, allowing greater movement of hydrothermal fluids near the base of the Cenozoic basin fill.

416

FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND HYDROGEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND HYDROGEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Following a period of exploration and development in the mid-late 1970's, there was little activity at the Raft River geothermal field for the next ~20 years. US Geothermal Inc. acquired the project in 2002, and began commercial power generation in January 2008. From mid-2004 to present, US Geothermal Inc. has collected geochemical data from geothermal and monitoring wells in the field, as well as other shallow wells in the

417

Seismic refraction study of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

refraction study of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho refraction study of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismic refraction study of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River geothermal system in southeastern Idaho is a convective hot water system, presently being developed to demonstrate the production of electricity from low-temperature (approx. 150 0C) water. Interpretation of seismic refraction recordings in the area yielded compressional velocities from near the surface to the crystalline basement at a maximum depth of approximately 1600 m. The results show a complex sequence of sediments and volcanic flows overlying basement. Velocities in the sedimentary section vary laterally. Correlation with well data suggests

418

Ground Gravity Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1957-1961) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Gravity Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1957-1961) Ground Gravity Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1957-1961) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1957-1961) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date 1957 - 1961 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes From 1957 to 1961 a regional gravity survey was made over the northern part of the Great Salt Lake Desert and adjacent areas in Utah, eastern Nevada, and southeastern Idaho. A total of 1040 stations were taken over an area of about 7000 square miles. The results were compiled as a Bouguer gravity anomaly map with a contour interval of 2 mgal. The Bouguer values ranged

419

Independent Activity Report, Washington River Protection Solutions -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington River Protection Solutions Washington River Protection Solutions - September 2010 Independent Activity Report, Washington River Protection Solutions - September 2010 September 2010 Participation in the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Integrated Safety Management System Annual Review The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), participated in the review of the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Integrated Safety Management System Annual Review for 2010. The review was conducted during the period of August 23 to September 2, 2010, and focused on six functional areas: corrective action management, work planning and control, radiological protection, environmental protection, emergency preparedness, and

420