Sample records for region greater boston

  1. The impact of multifamily development on single family home prices in the Greater Boston Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuur, Arah (Arah Louise Adele)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of large, multifamily developments on nearby single-family home prices was tested in five towns in the Greater Boston Area. Case studies that had recent multifamily developments built near transit nodes or town ...

  2. The seismic monitoring of buildings is particularly important in high-population urban areas like Greater Boston. While

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    PROBLEM The seismic monitoring of buildings is particularly important in high-population urban areas like Greater Boston. While Massachusetts' seismic building codes are adapted from Cali- fornia to damage from earthquakes of small magnitude, particularly if the fundamen- tal frequency of the seismic

  3. South Asians in Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masurkar, Alpita

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Boston has a rich and diverse history of immigrants. Right from the arrival of the Puritans in 1628-30 who established the earliest immigrant settlements in Boston, this region has attracted immigrants from different parts ...

  4. Climatological simulations of ozone and atmospheric aerosols in the Greater Cairo region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steiner, A. L.; Tawfik, A. B.; Shalaby, A.; Zakey, A. S.; Abdel Wahab, M. M.; Salah, Z.; Solmon, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated chemistry-climate model (RegCM4-CHEM) simulates present-day climate, ozone and tropospheric aerosols over Egypt with a focus on Greater Cairo (GC) region. The densley populated GC region is known for its severe air quality issues driven by high levels of anthropogenic pollution in conjuction with natural sources such as dust and agricultural burning events. We find that current global emission inventories underestimate key pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and anthropogenic aerosol species. In the GC region, average-ground-based NO2 observations of 40-60 ppb are substantially higher than modeled estimates (5-10 ppb), likely due to model grid resolution, improper boundary layer representation, and poor emissions inventories. Observed ozone concentrations range from 35 ppb (winter) to 80 ppb (summer). The model reproduces the seasonal cycle fairly well, but modeled summer ozone is understimated by approximately 15 ppb and exhibits little interannual variability. For aerosols, springtime dust events dominate the seasonal aerosol cycle. The chemistry-climate model captures the springtime peak aerosol optical depth (AOD) of 0.7-1 but is slightly greater than satellite-derived AOD. Observed AOD decreases in the summer and increases again in the fall due to agricultural burning events in the Nile Delta, yet the model underestimates this fall observed AOD peak, as standard emissions inventories underestimate this burning and the resulting aerosol emissions. Our comparison of modeled gas and particulate phase atmospheric chemistry in the GC region indicates that improved emissions inventories of mobile sources and other anthropogenic activities are needed to improve air quality simulations in this region.

  5. Boston, Massachusetts Location: Boston, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    -recovery ventilation and water-source heat pumps Each unit has fresh air ducted independently. Each residence is warmed by a heat pump that taps the Trigen Energy Corporation steam lines that run underneath the street. #12;WallsBoston, Massachusetts #12;Location: Boston, MA Building type(s): Multi-unit residential, Retail 350

  6. Greater Boston Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to: navigation,II Wind FarmGratiotLakesWind

  7. From waterfront to watershed : mapping a big idea in the Greater Toronto Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciesielski, Linda C. (Linda Claire)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, Toronto is revered among Great Lakes' and waterfront cities for its environmental planning: its massive re-investment in water and stormwater infrastructure; protected headwaters of the region's rivers; realized ...

  8. Boston, Massachusetts: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Boston, MA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given. The City of Boston and its Solar America Cities program, Solar Boston, are helping to debunk the myth that solar energy is only feasible in the southern latitudes. Boston has some of the highest energy prices in the country and will likely be one of the first locations where solar power achieves grid parity with conventional energy technologies. Solar Boston is facilitating the rapid development of solar energy projects and infrastructure in the short-term, and is preparing for the rapid market growth that is expected with the imminent arrival of grid parity over the long-term. Solar Boston developed the strategy for achieving Mayor Menino's goal of installing 25 MW of solar energy throughout Boston by 2015. Through Solar Boston, the city has developed a strategy for the installation of solar technology throughout Boston, including mapping feasible locations, preparing a permitting guide, and planning the citywide bulk purchase, financing, and installation of solar technology. The city has also worked with local organizations to maximize Boston's participation in state incentive programs and innovative financing initiatives. The resulting accomplishments include the following: (1) Created an online map of current local renewable energy projects with a tool to allow building owners to calculate their rooftop solar potential. The map is currently live at http://gis.cityofboston.gov/solarboston/. (2) Supported the city's Green Affordable Housing Program (GAHP), in partnership with the Department of Neighborhood Development (DND). Under GAHP, the city is installing more than 150 kW of PV on 200 units of affordable housing. DND requires that all new city-funded affordable housing be LEED silver certified and built solar-ready. (3) Defined solar's role in emergency preparedness with the Boston Mayor's Office of Emergency Preparedness. (4) Worked with local organizations to maximize Boston's participation in state incentive programs and innovative financing mechanisms. Solar Boston partners include DOE, MTC, local utilities and unions, an anonymous foundation, and a broad range of local, regional, and national clean-energy stakeholders. Solar Boston kicked off its partner program on January 10, 2008, sponsoring a workshop on 'Thinking BIG about Boston's Solar Energy Future,' to discuss how state, utility, and municipal programs can work together. Presentations were given by Solar Boston, Keyspan/National Grid, NSTAR, and MTC.

  9. BOSTON UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbordt, Martin

    BOSTON UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Dissertation ACCELERATING MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS WITH HIGH PERFORMANCE RECONFIGURABLE SYSTEMS (Order No. ) SHIHCHIN CHIU Boston..................................................................... 12 1.5.1 Acceleration of Molecular Dynamics Simulations............................ 12 1.5.2 General

  10. HOUSING RESOURCES Description of Boston Neighborhoods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HOUSING RESOURCES Boston Description of Boston Neighborhoods http://www.bu.edu/offcampus/tips-resources/bostons-neighborhoods/ Summer Housing Boston http://www.urbaninterns.com/journal/jobseekers/summer-housing-for-boston-interns/ https://www.northeastern.edu/conferences/intern/index.html http://housing.mit.edu/summer_guest/non_mit_summer_internship_housing

  11. Boston Massachusetts: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boston, Massachusetts Includes case studies on: * Incorporating Solar into Emergency Preparedness Planning * Developing the Boston Solar Map October 2011 Solar in Action Boston was...

  12. Downtown Boston : a public place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meiklejohn, Robert

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the physical and experiential qualities of public space in downtown Boston. Streets are the dominant element of urban public space; other elements include plazas , squares, promenades, alleys and parks. ...

  13. Boston Urban Farm : mending the Southwest Corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Timothy Eric

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work studies Boston's segregated nature in terms of race and class especially as this coincides with the physical form of the city. Known for its strong neighborhoods, Boston cannot escape definite boundaries between ...

  14. Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (G.E.E.R.) Science Conference 'HILQLQJ6XFFHVV Naples Beach a Committee of the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force and Working Group #12;Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (G.E.E.R.) Science Conference Page ii #12;December 11-15, 2000 z Naples, Florida Page

  15. BOSTON COLLEGE WOMEN'S RESOURCE CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    and time to be agreed upon by staff). Coordinate campus-wide projects and programs on a variety of women, filing, operating phones) Demonstrate some computer skills (specifically MS Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Publisher; preferred Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, and web design) #12;BOSTON COLLEGE WOMEN'S RESOURCE CENTER

  16. Beyond Poverty: Race and Concentrated-Poverty Neighborhoods in Metro Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McArdle, Nancy

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1999 Boston Metro Area Attleboro Boston Brockton Cambridgemile. Satellite cities include: Attleboro Brockton Cambridge

  17. Paleoecology of Calf Island in Boston's Outer Harbor WILLIAM A. PATTERSON III1,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    -marsh peat to understand the landscape processes (both natural and anthropogenic) that have influenced greater detail over a longer period of nearly 1200 years. 1 Department of Natural Resources Conservation- responding author - wap@forwild.umass.edu. Boston Harbor Islands National Park Area: Natural Resources

  18. Michael Langley GREATER MSP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    prosper here. People prosper here. OUR REGION'S STORY #12;RAPID URBANIZATION & GROWING MIDDLE CLASS Mumbai and Insurance Reports (examples) · Met Council: NARC Study · MGI: Game Changers Data Analysis · Sectors (Mc · Nutrition · Water filtration · Water purification Food & Water Solutions #12;BUSINESS AND PEOPLE PROSPER

  19. BOSTON UNIVERSITY HISTORY OF ART & ARCHITECTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    BOSTON UNIVERSITY HISTORY OF ART & ARCHITECTURE GRADUATE PROGRAM 2012-2013 Information & Architecture College of Arts & Sciences 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Room 302 Boston, MA 02215 Tel: (617) 353 ..................................................................... 5 THE MA DEGREE IN HISTORY OF ART AND ARCHITECTURE ........................ 5 History of Art

  20. Fermilab Today | Boston University Profile

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. CategoryFebruaryFebruaryInThe, 2015 spacer7,,Upcoming4Boston

  1. Boston College | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in CarbonofBiotinsBoston College Jump to: navigation, search Logo:

  2. Greater West Texas State Employee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    together we change lives Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign 2013 Annual Report of Transportation-Odessa Vickie Wilhite, Health and Human Services Commission Greater West Texas Local Campaign.ttuhsc.edu/relations/secc www.facebook.com/gwtsecc #12;2013 Top Greater West Texas State Agencies In Employee Participation 2013

  3. Water rites : a city stage for Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mansfield, Timothy Denton

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the design of a public theatre for the entire city of Boston, a "city stage." The intention is to explore through design the boundaries of an architectural setting for large scale performance art; ...

  4. Urban solarium : thermal performance in Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Juliet Chia-Wen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis addresses the issue of energy efficiency through the lens of thermal performance in the context of urban housing in the city of Boston. Located in the historic brick row house neighborhood of the South End, the ...

  5. BOSTON UNIVERSITY Policy BU-100-001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Frank

    to extreme heat or cold or other potentially harmful environmental conditions. Protect the equipment from theft. 2.5.3. For policies regarding remote access to Boston University's information resources, see Remote Access Policy [BU 100-001A]. #12;

  6. Projective preservation : reframing Rudolph's Tower for Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Jessica K

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By 2012, the fate of Paul Rudolph's tower in downtown Boston has been in question for years while a vision of a denser city calls for its demolition. Projected development on the site currently argues that to move forward, ...

  7. Boston University College of Arts & Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Chemical Methodology and Library Development at Boston University (CMLD- BU) along) activation. HSF1 inhibitors have received significant attention for their potential role of a three-year research grant from the National Institutes of Health awarded to Porco

  8. boston

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 |0/%2A en Smallawards

  9. Boston Edison ventures into unregulated subsidiaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, B.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Last June 18, Boston Edison won Massachusetts regulatory approval to take advantage to internal expertise, proven business successes, and external opportunities with an unregulated subsidiary, Boston Energy Technology Group Inc. (BETG). The group is in place to help assure the financial strength and competitiveness of Boston Edison for its customers, shareholders, and employees. Just as important will be BETG's role in promoting economic development in the state. Boston Energy Technology will function as the tap root for branch companies that will develop services related to the electric utility business - demand-side management (DSM), electric transportation, and generation services. Two other subsidiary companies under the BETG umbrella already have been established. One, TravElectric Services Corp., will explore opportunities in the electric transportation field. The other, ENER-G-VISION Inc., will be devoted to DSM activities. These efforts have been endorsed by the company's partnership constituencies. In 1992, for example, the state's Department of Public Utilities allowed Boston Edison to recover a good portion of its DSM expenses and even granted the company a bonus for its program performance. Boston Edison will dedicate about 5 percent of its business efforts to subsidiary operations, up to a $45-million commitment over the next three years.

  10. Boston University College of Arts & Sciences Information Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    Boston University College of Arts & Sciences Information Technology 685 Commonwealth Avenue Boston, College of Arts and Sciences Information Technology #12; to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences here at Boston University. I would like to introduce you to the CAS

  11. Boston University College of Arts and Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    congestion, magnetic media failures, electronic component failures, or malicious subversion 7]. Additionally-353-8919 ; Fax: 617-353-6457 Computer Science Department Boston, Massachusetts 02215 Reliability, Availability Reliability and availability have long been considered twin system properties that could be en- hanced

  12. Boston University College of Arts and Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the continuous improve­ ments in the reliability and overall quality of hardware components [11, 16]. A very overload, severe congestion, magnetic media failures, electronic component failures, or malicious­353­8919 ; Fax: 617­353­6457 Computer Science Department Boston, Massachusetts 02215 Reliability, Availability

  13. Boston University Seminar Series on Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchant, David R.

    Boston University Seminar Series on Climate Change Free and open to the public Thursdays, September for Societal Change Matthew Nisbet, Associate Professor of Communication Studies, Public Policy and Urban National Assessments of Climate Change Tony Janetos, Professor of Earth and Environment and Director

  14. Distinguishing Between Greater and Lesser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    .e. knee high), minimal cover at ground level, and an abundance of flowering plants that harbor insects, see Ecology and Management of the Greater Prairie-Chicken E-969 at nrem.okstate.edu/extension. Threats power devel- opment. GPCs can tolerate some minimal levels of fragmentation, but at higher levels

  15. asymptomatic greater kudus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Land Cover Change (1975-2000) in the Greater Border Lakes Region Research Map NRS-3 United land cover classifications and change detection for a 13.8 million ha landscape...

  16. Boston Architectural College Urban Sustainability Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byers, Arthur C.

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Boston Architectural College's Urban Sustainability initiative is a demonstration project as defined by the National Energy Technology Laboratory. BAC's proposed project with the U.S. Department of Energy - NETL, is a large part of that overall initiative. The BAC's Urban Sustainability Initiative is a multi-part project with several important goals and objectives that will have a significant impact on the surrounding neighborhood including: energy conservation, reduction of storm water runoff, generation of power through alternative energy sources, elimination/reduction of BAC carbon footprint, and to create a vehicle for ongoing public outreach and education. Education and outreach opportunities will serve to add to the already comprehensive Sustainability Design courses offered at BAC relative to energy savings, performance and conservation in building design. At the finish of these essential capital projects there will be technical materials created for the education of the design, sustainability, engineering, community development and historic preservation communities, to inform a new generation of environmentally-minded designers and practitioners, the city of Boston and the general public. The purpose of the initiative, through our green renovations program, is to develop our green alley projects and energy saving renovations to the BAC physical plant, to serve as a working model for energy efficient design in enclosed 19th century and 20th century urban sites and as an educational laboratory for teaching ecological and sustainable technologies to students and the public while creating jobs. The scope of our project as it relates to the BAC and the U.S. Department of Energy- NETL combined efforts includes: Task I of the project is Phase II (Green Alley). Task I encompasses various renovation activities that will demonstrate the effectiveness of permeable paving and ground water recharge systems. It will aid in the reduction of storm water runoff into the Charles River Basin in one of its most significantly polluted sections and, will provide a green renovation mechanism for the redirected storm water of a public alley way. This activity is designed to improve the quality of water recharging the ground water and protecting the vulnerable wood pilings under many of the historic masonry buildings in Boston's Back Bay. Sustainable design research and system monitoring opportunities will also be incorporated, providing ongoing tools for public outreach and education through innovative signage and "virtual tour" technology. The monitoring will include a "building performance dash board" that reflects real time operating conditions and improvements in environmental and economic performance to be prominently displayed on the face of our 320 Newbury Street building (approximately 1.5 million people walk by annually). The project site and demonstration area is located at the rear of 951 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02115 and the parking area adjacent to Public Alley #444 in Boston's historic Back Bay. Task II of the project is Geothermal Solution. This task involves the installation of approximately seven Geothermal wells which will tap into the earth's constant underground temperatures to provide air-conditioning and heating for BAC facilities. The environmentally friendly geothermal system uses no fossil fuel, produces no emissions and runs silently, providing a sustainable model for commercial and residential buildings throughout Boston. Ultimately the combination of this project and other projects will assist in making the BAC "carbon-neutral", and could generate enough additional energy to provide free power to the Engine 33 and Ladder 15 Firehouse located at 941 Boylston Street. The project is located at the rear of 951 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02115 and the parking area adjacent to Public Alley #444 in Boston's historic Back Bay. Task III of the project is the Sustainability Design Curriculum at the BAC. The BAC is the nation’s largest independent, multi-disciplinary college of spatial design, and a leader in

  17. Boston University's Department of Chemistry Selection of Dissertation Advisory Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boston University's Department of Chemistry Selection of Dissertation Advisory Committee, will select the members of a Dissertation Advisory Committee and submit the list of names to the chair

  18. BOSTON UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutyra, Lucy R.

    Boston, MA 02215 Phone: (617) 353-3318 Email: mco@bu.edu Web: www.bu.edu/applied-linguistics Program

  19. Boston University Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boston University Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering ENG EC 517 Introduction's; Block source coding with outage: weak law of large numbers, entropically typical sequences and typical

  20. A Bold Goal: Boston Manufacturing R&D Workshop Video

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View the video from Jim Brodrick's opening presentation at the April 2011 DOE SSL Manufacturing R&D Workshop in Boston, Massachusetts.

  1. Racial Segregation and Educational Outcomes in Metropolitan Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Chungmei

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Worcester, Leominster, Attleboro, Fall Comfort ex rel.Asian Satellite Cities Attleboro Brockton Cambridge ChelseaM C A S Rates Boston Attleboro Brockton Cambridge Chelsea

  2. Lung Extraction, Lobe Segmentation and Hierarchical Region Assessment for Quantitative Analysis on High

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lung Extraction, Lobe Segmentation and Hierarchical Region Assessment for Quantitative Analysis Care Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA Abstract. Regional assessment of lung disease specific to different lung regions on high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) datasets. We present

  3. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA August 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA August 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston this maintenance. Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month

  4. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA July 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA the next service visit. Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island

  5. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA March 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA speed at Thompson Island for the month of March 2007, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m. #12;

  6. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA May 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA, at 42° 18 below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of May 2008, at the highest anemometer

  7. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA May 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA the next site visit. · Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island

  8. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA March 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA the spring of 2006. · Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island

  9. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA April 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA to this report if and when this happens. Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson

  10. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA July 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA speed at Thompson Island for the month of July 2007, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m. #12;

  11. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA June 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA to the sensor cables. Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island

  12. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA April 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA speed at Thompson Island for the month of April 2007, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m. #12;

  13. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA June 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA the next service visit. · Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island

  14. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA April 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA the next service visit. · Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island

  15. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA June 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA speed at Thompson Island for the month of June 2007, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m. #12;

  16. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA August 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA August 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of August 2007

  17. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA March 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of March 2008, at the highest anemometer height

  18. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA June 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA at Thompson Island for the month of June 2005, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m. Thompson Island Wind

  19. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA July 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA to the sensor cables. Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island

  20. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA May 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA, at 42° 18 speed at Thompson Island for the month of May 2007, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m. #12;

  1. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA July 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA Series #12;Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of July 2005

  2. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

  3. Boston, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,BelcherBlundell 1FortInformationJV JumpBoston,

  4. Boston Carbon Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthby 2022Illinois:InformationInformationBosBoston

  5. Boston Technology Venture Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthbyBoston Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to:Technology

  6. Boston, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in CarbonofBiotinsBoston College Jump to: navigation, searchJump

  7. PLANNING FOR WATER CONSERVATION Greater Vancouver Regional District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the public and private sectors in providing a supply of high quality urban water? Best management practices in urban areas around the globe, yet per capita water consumption continues to increase. Faced with increasing populations and costs associated with urban growth--related to infrastructure, energy, operation

  8. Clean Cities: Greater Washington Region Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro

  9. EA-1885: Boston Architectural College's Urban Sustainability Initiative Renovation of Green Alley #444, Boston, Massachusetts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide a grant to Boston Architectural College (BAC) to design, construct and implement the renovation of Public Alley #444 in Boston's Historic Back Bay District. The project would include the installation of 7 to 10 open loop geothermal wells to provide heating and cooling energy to BAC's facilities; the installation of a green screen trellis system, planting soils, concrete pavement, pavers, and landscaping; and mechanical upgrades (plumbing and electrical) to accommodate the geothermal solution into the benefiting facilities. Comment Period Ends: 01/13/2012 Comments should be marked "BAC Public Alley #444 Draft EA Comments" and sent to: Mr. Fred Pozzuto U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880, MS B07 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 Email: fred.pozzuto@netl.doe.gov Facsimile: 1-304-285-4403

  10. The Boston College Alumni Connections Application for Facebook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    1 The Boston College Alumni Connections Application for Facebook® How to add the BC Alumni Connections application to your Facebook profile.......................................................... 2 How to bookmark the BC Alumni Connections application in Facebook so it shows on your profile

  11. An urban infill : a residual site in Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savvides, Andreas L. (Andreas Loucas)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is concerned with the treatment of residual sites in the context of the urban environment and in particular with the wounds inflicted by the passage of the Massachusetts Turnpike through the city of Boston. The ...

  12. Improving public transportation to Boston Logan International Airport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Siyuan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Boston Logan International Airport is the largest airport in New England and the 1 9 th busiest airport in the United States, serving 29.3 million passengers (arrivals and departures) in 2012. There are approximately 36,900 ...

  13. Boston University Physics Colloquium Microscale propulsion in biological and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Raj

    Boston University Physics Colloquium Microscale propulsion in biological and engineered systems biological locomotion and engineered propulsion. In the first example, we examine swimming microorganisms the microstructure. In the second example, we examine engineered magnetic artificial microswimmers which can

  14. Groundwater decline and the preservation of property in Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoham, Tamar

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a slow-motion disaster underway below the city of Boston. The levels of groundwater have been steadily decreasing over the past eighty years and the structural integrity of the city's older buildings is in jeopardy. ...

  15. CAN INTEGRATED WATERSHED MANAGEMENT BRING GREATER FOOD SECURITY IN ETHIOPIA?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    CAN INTEGRATED WATERSHED MANAGEMENT BRING GREATER FOOD SECURITY IN ETHIOPIA? Oloro V. McHugh, Amy S, Ethiopia Gete Zeleke ARARI, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia Abstract: In the food insecure regions, short annual. Ethiopia's agricultural sector is driven by the subsistence strategies of smallholder farmers

  16. Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    together we changed lives Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign 2011 Annual Report of Transportation Vickie Wilhite, Health and Human Services Commission Greater West Texas Campaign Manager Nicole campaign information 2011 Local Employee Committee Darcy Pollock (chair), Texas Tech University Health

  17. 2010 Annual Report Greater West Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    2010 Annual Report Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign You will find, as you look,717 and West Central Texas SECC raised $131,797 for a combined total of $957,514! · 4,608 state employees gave a fan! www.facebook.com/pages/Greater-West-Texas-State- Employee-Charitable-Campaign/103542263037744

  18. The moment of William Ralph Emerson's Art Club in Boston's art culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoeffler, Michelle Leah

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis will analyze the architect William Ralph Emerson's (1833-1917) Boston Art Club building (1881-82) and its station within Boston and New York's art culture. Even though there has been considerable research on ...

  19. Boston University College of Engineering Division of Materials Science and Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xi

    Boston University College of Engineering Division of Materials Science and Engineering Annual | Division of Materials Science and Engineering | Highlights | 1 Message from the Division Head Boston University has many interdisciplinary research activities in materials science and engineering, spanning

  20. Ground penetrating radar characterization of wood piles and the water table in Back Bay, Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LeFrançois, Suzanne O'Neil, 1980-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys are performed to determine the depth to the water table and the tops of wood piles beneath a residential structure at 122 Beacon Street in Back Bay, Boston. The area of Boston known ...

  1. From Gondwanaland, with love : the tale of how Boston got its rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cull, Selby (Selby C.)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rocks on which the city of Boston was built did not form as part of North America. They formed about 600 million years ago, at the South Pole, as the northern coast of a supercontinent called Gondwanaland. Boston's ...

  2. Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    together we changed lives Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign 2012 Annual Report campaign information 2012 Local Employee Committee Darcy Pollock (Chair), Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center David Abercia, Texas Tech University Dianah Ascencio, Texas Department of Transportation

  3. Boston University 2012 Graduate Student Library Survey Report Supplementary Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    Manuscripts Print journals Print books E-Books Databases E-Journals Importance of Types of Library Resources 5 the importance of various types of library resources. #12;9% 11% 11% 14% 14% 16% 29% 29% 13% 17% 19% 23% 23% 27Boston University 2012 Graduate Student Library Survey Report Supplementary Data Library Assessment

  4. The Boston College Law School Alumni Connections Application for Facebook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    1 The Boston College Law School Alumni Connections Application for Facebook® How to add the BC Law Alumni Connections application to your Facebook profile............................................................. 2 How to bookmark the BC Law Alumni Connections application in Facebook so it shows on your profile

  5. Periodicals postage paid at Boston, MA, and at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the world, over the next 25 years the College produced 98 graduates, among whom was the first African-American in 1873. The School-- integrated since 1864 and coeducational since 1873--was recognized in the Flexner in the South End, the School's Geriatrics and Home Care program has provided home visits for Boston citizens

  6. BOSTON UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, J. Douglas

    the residual for the water wave problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 3.4.1 Important lemmas TO THE KDV APPROXIMATION FOR WATER WAVES by J. DOUGLAS WRIGHT B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1997 CORRECTIONS TO THE KDV APPROXIMATION FOR WATER WAVES (Order No. ) J. DOUGLAS WRIGHT Boston University Graduate

  7. Boston University Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    , and solar cell material science. Design and installation of solar panels for residential and industrial manufacturing processes for the production of solar panels, environmental impacts, and the related systemBoston University Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering EC/MS 573 Solar Energy Systems

  8. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA January 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA January 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts for January 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of January 2008, at the highest anemometer height

  9. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA February 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA February 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts for February 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site speed at Thompson Island for the month of February 2007, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m. #12;

  10. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA October 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA October 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts for October 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site speed at Thompson Island for the month of October 2007, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m. #12;

  11. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA November 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA November 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts for November 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of November 2008, at the highest anemometer height

  12. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA November 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA November 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts for November 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site speed at Thompson Island for the month of November 2006, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m

  13. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA November 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA November 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts for November 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of November 2007

  14. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA September 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA September 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts for September 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site no maintenance issues to report. Monthly Data Time Series #12;Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson

  15. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA December 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA December 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts for December 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site. Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of December

  16. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA January 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA January 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts for January 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site speed at Thompson Island for the month of January 2007, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m. #12;

  17. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA December 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA December 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts for December 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of December 2008, at the highest anemometer height

  18. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA November 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA November 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts for November 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site during the spring of 2006. Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson

  19. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA October 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA October 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts for October 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site speed at Thompson Island for the month of October 2006, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m

  20. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA September 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA September 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts for September 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site speed at Thompson Island for the month of September 2006, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m

  1. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA August 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA August 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts for August 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of August 2006, at the highest

  2. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA September 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA September 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts for September 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site speed at Thompson Island for the month of September 2007, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m. #12;

  3. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA February 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA February 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts for February 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site of 2006. · Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month

  4. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA October 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA October 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts for October 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site issues arose this month. Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island

  5. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA September 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA September 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts for September 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site issues arose this month. Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island

  6. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA December 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA December 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts for December 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site speed at Thompson Island for the month of December 2006, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m

  7. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA August 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA August 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts for August 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site no maintenance issues to report. Monthly Data Time Series #12;Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson

  8. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA January 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA January 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts for January 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site. · Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of January

  9. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA December 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA December 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts for December 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site during the spring of 2006. Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson

  10. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA October 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA October 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts for October 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site no maintenance issues to report. #12;Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson

  11. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA February 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA February 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts for February 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of February 2008, at the highest anemometer height

  12. Boston University Libraries Strategic Plan: 2010-2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    be viewed as a sustainability document. In our context, the Libraries recognize that we think of sustainability both #12;Boston University Libraries Strategic Plan: 2010-2015 Page 2 8/11/10 environmentally and economically. The Libraries are committed to practices that are environmentally sustainable and that utilize

  13. EK424 THERMODYNAMICS AND STATISTICAL MECHANICS Boston University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EK424 THERMODYNAMICS AND STATISTICAL MECHANICS Boston University Fall 2012 Thermodynamics of energy. A thermodynamic system is a collection of matter, defined by some macroscopic variables in a piston. Thermodynamics is the study of processes done on the system, and explains how the macroscopic

  14. Boston University College of Engineering Division of Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xi

    Boston University College of Engineering Division of Materials Science & Engineering MEng Program and Statistical Materials AND MS 577 Electronic Optical and Magnetic Properties of Materials OR CAS PY 543 structured Engineering Management Course (4 cr); 3 other courses (12 credits) can be engineering, science

  15. Boston University College of Engineering Division of Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xi

    Theory of Elasticity MS 784 Topics in Materials Science ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT (4 cr) CourseBoston University College of Engineering Division of Materials Science & Engineering MEng Program and Statistical Materials AND MS 577 Electronic Optical and Magnetic Properties of Materials OR CAS PY 543

  16. Distribution of Permo-Carboniferous clastics of Greater Arabian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Laboun, A.A.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strikingly correlative sequences of sediments composed of sandstones, siltstones, shales, and thin argillaceous carbonate beds are present, practically everywhere, underlying the Late Permian carbonates in the Greater Arabian basin. The Greater Arabian basin as defined here occupies the broad Arabian Shelf that borders the Arabian shield. This basin is composed of several smaller basins. These clastics are exposed as thin bands and scattered small exposures in several localities around the margins of the basin. The Permo-Carboniferous clastics are represented by the Unayzah Formation of Arabia, the Doubayat Group of Syria, the Hazro Formation of southeast Turkey, the Ga'arah Formation of Iraq, the Faraghan Formation of southwest Iran, and the Haushi Group of Oman. A Late Carboniferous-Early Permian age is assigned to these clastics because they contain fossil plants and palynomorphs. These sediments represent time-transgressive fluctuating sea deposits following a phase of regional emergence, erosion, and structural disturbance which preceded the Permian transgression. The basal contact of these clastics is marked by a well-pronounced angular unconformity with various older units, ranging in age from early Carboniferous to late Precambrian. This regional unconformity is probably related to the Hercynian movements. The upper contact is conformable with the Permian carbonates. The porous sandstones of the Permo-Carboniferous sediments are important hydrocarbon exploration targets. These reservoir rocks sometimes overlie mature source rocks and are capped by shales, marls, and tight carbonates. Significant quantities of hydrocarbons are contained in these reservoirs in different parts of the Greater Arabian basin.

  17. The Boston Indicators Project : the role of indicators in supporting environmental efforts in the Boston metropolitan region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Anna K. (Anna Katherine)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Community indicators projects are an increasingly popular way to measure, track, and, advocates claim, make progress. The commonly held belief is that indicators provide residents, governments, private entities, and community ...

  18. Text-Alternative Version: Boston Manufacturing R&D Workshop Video

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Following is a text version of Jim Brodrick's welcome presentation video from the April 2011 DOE SSL Manufacturing R&D Workshop in Boston, Massachusetts.

  19. Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials—Boston, MA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Workshop held in Boston August 2–3, 2012.

  20. More than Money: The Spatial Mismatch Between Where Homeowners of Color in Metro Boston Can Afford to Live and Where They Actually Reside Part I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, David J.; McArdle, Nancy

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    times Bridgewater Norton Attleboro Seekonk Less than half3% Bridgewater Norton Attleboro Seekonk Less than 1% Boston3% Bridgewater Norton Attleboro Seekonk Less than 1% Boston

  1. Greater Green River basin well-site selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frohne, K.H. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Boswell, R. [EG and G Washington Analytical Services Center, Inc., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent estimates of the natural gas resources of Cretaceous low-permeability reservoirs of the Greater Green River basin indicate that as much as 5000 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas may be in place (Law and others 1989). Of this total, Law and others (1989) attributed approximately 80 percent to the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group and Lewis Shale. Unfortunately, present economic conditions render the drilling of many vertical wells unprofitable. Consequently, a three-well demonstration program, jointly sponsored by the US DOE/METC and the Gas Research Institute, was designed to test the profitability of this resource using state-of-the-art directional drilling and completion techniques. DOE/METC studied the geologic and engineering characteristics of ``tight`` gas reservoirs in the eastern portion of the Greater Green River basin in order to identify specific locations that displayed the greatest potential for a successful field demonstration. This area encompasses the Rocks Springs Uplift, Wamsutter Arch, and the Washakie and Red Desert (or Great Divide) basins of southwestern Wyoming. The work was divided into three phases. Phase 1 consisted of a regional geologic reconnaissance of 14 gas-producing areas encompassing 98 separate gas fields. In Phase 2, the top four areas were analyzed in greater detail, and the area containing the most favorable conditions was selected for the identification of specific test sites. In Phase 3, target horizons were selected for each project area, and specific placement locations were selected and prioritized.

  2. Enhancing pedestrian access and neighborhood integrity in Boston's North End : a mixed use approach utilizing the existing highway structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sih, Shuh-Hwa

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I set out to explore for this thesis the development of the Central Artery Project and the future planning of downtown Boston. After investigating the history of the artery, visions for Boston's redevelopment and different ...

  3. The Graduate Student Anchored Project : a new approach to incentivizing multifamily development in the City of Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Stephen Thayer

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite a significant addition of new multifamily housing stock into Boston's residential rental market, Boston in 2014 faces a considerable shortage of middle income housing supply relative to demand. Both the supply ...

  4. Greater Green River Basin Production Improvement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnett, B.B.; Lim, F.H.; Calogero, D.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) of Wyoming has produced abundant oil and gas out of multiple reservoirs for over 60 years, and large quantities of gas remain untapped in tight gas sandstone reservoirs. Even though GGRB production has been established in formations from the Paleozoic to the Tertiary, recent activity has focused on several Cretaceous reservoirs. Two of these formations, the Ahnond and the Frontier Formations, have been classified as tight sands and are prolific producers in the GGRB. The formations typically naturally fractured and have been exploited using conventional well technology. In most cases, hydraulic fracture treatments must be performed when completing these wells to to increase gas production rates to economic levels. The objectives of the GGRB production improvement project were to apply the concept of horizontal and directional drilling to the Second Frontier Formation on the western flank of the Rock Springs Uplift and to compare production improvements by drilling, completing, and testing vertical, horizontal and directionally-drilled wellbores at a common site.

  5. Company Name: Boston Partners Financial Group, LLC Web Site: bostonpartnersfinancialgroup.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    .com Industry: Financial Planning Brief Company Overview: Boston Partners Financial Group is a great placeCompany Name: Boston Partners Financial Group, LLC Web Site: bostonpartnersfinancialgroup to ensure that they and those they care about are protected now, and in the future. Majors they typically

  6. In-vivo operation of the Boston 15-channel wireless subretinal visual prosthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Shawn K.

    In-vivo operation of the Boston 15-channel wireless subretinal visual prosthesis Douglas B. Shire the engineering development of the Boston visual prosthesis for restoring useful vision to patients blind. The prosthesis conforms to the eye and drives a microfabricated polyimide stimulating electrode array having

  7. Clean Cities: Greater Indiana Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro CleanGenesee RegionIndiana

  8. Boston, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthbyBoston Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump

  9. Solar Boston Program Press Event | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of Energy Ready,Smart GridAboutWindowsBoston Program Press

  10. New Boston, New Hampshire: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: EnergyEnergyPPCR)Nevis Engine Company JumpWisconsin:Boston, New

  11. Boston Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthbyBoston Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to:

  12. Boston Power GP Batteries JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in CarbonofBiotinsBoston College Jump to: navigation, search

  13. Boston solar retrofits: studies of solar access and economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro, M.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of solar access and solar retrofit economics are described for residential applications in the City of Boston. The study of solar access was based upon a random sample of 94 buildings; the sample was stratified to ensure a broad geographic representation from the city's various sections. Using available data on the heights and orientations of the sampled structures and surrounding buildings, each building's hourly access to sunlight was computed separately for the roof and south facing walls. These data were then aggregated by broad structural classifications in order to provide general measures of solar access. The second study was a comparative analysis of the economics of several solar heating and hot water systems. An active hot water system, installed using pre-assembled, commercially purchased equipment, was selected as a reference technology. A variety of measures of economic performance were computed for this system, with and without existing tax credits and under various financing arrangements. Next, a number of alternative approaches for solar space and water heating were identified from interviews with individuals and groups involved in solar retrofit projects in the Boston area. The objective was to identify approaches that many of those interviewed believe to be low-cost means of applying solar energy in residential settings. The approaches selected include thermal window covers, wall collectors, bread box water heaters, and sun spaces. Preliminary estimates of the performance of several representative designs were developed and the economics of these designs evaluated.

  14. A comparison of the behavior of intact and Resedimented Boston Blue Clay (BBC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    House, Robert Donald

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resedimented Boston Blue Clay (RBBC) has been used as an analog test material for research at MIT for decades, due to local variability and the high cost of sampling. However, a comprehensive study of the differences in ...

  15. Jonathan Rosen, PhD Visiting Scholar, Wyss Institute and Adjunct Professor, Boston University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    is developing new models for translational research in micro-robotics, computer- assisted surgical, and currently serves as Special Assistant to the Provost for Entrepreneurial Studies at Boston University. He

  16. Inventing the Charles River Basin : urban images and civic discourse in Boston, 1844-1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haglund, Karl T

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Charles River Basin, extending from the foot of Beacon Hill upstream past Harvard's Soldiers Field, has been called Boston's "Central Park." The river looks to all appearances tranquil and unchanging, one of the most ...

  17. In vivo operation of the Boston 15-channel wireless subretinal visual prosthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyatt, John L.

    This presentation concerns the engineering development of the Boston visual prosthesis for restoring useful vision to patients blind with degenerative retinal disease. A miniaturized, hermetically-encased, 15-channel ...

  18. Schedule and cost estimate for an innovative Boston Harbor concert hall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coste, Amelie, 1982-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis formulates a cost estimate and schedule for constructing the Boston Concert Hall, an innovative hypothetical building composed of two concert halls and a restaurant. Concert Halls are complex and expensive ...

  19. Economic impact of M.I.T. on Cambridge and Metropolitan Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finberg, Irving William

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigated the economic impact of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology on its host city, Cambridge, and upon the Boston Metropolitan Area. The primary purpose was to develop sufficient information about ...

  20. Reassembling the rolling bridge : an art gallery at Fort Point Channel, Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Winston E

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spanning the Fort Point Channel for nearly a century, Boston's Rolling Bridge is a familiar landmark to many railway commuters and residents of the city. Its robust steel assembly, characterized by three anthropomorphic ...

  1. Research in particle physics. [Dept. of Physics, Boston Univ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitaker, Scott J.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research accomplishments and current activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics are presented. Principal areas of activity include the following: detectors for studies of electron[endash]positron annihilation in colliding beams; advanced accelerator component design, including the superconducting beam inflector, electrostatic quadrupoles, and the electrostatic muon kicker''; the detector for the MACRO (Monopole, Astrophysics, and Cosmic Ray Observatory) experiment; neutrino astrophysics and the search for proton decay; theoretical particle physics (electroweak and flavor symmetry breaking, hadron collider phenomenology, cosmology and astrophysics, new field-theoretic models, nonperturbative investigations of quantum field theories, electroweak interactions); measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon; calorimetry for the GEM experiment; and muon detectors for the GEM experiment at the Superconducting Super Collider.

  2. Primer Festival de Teatro Latinoamericano en Boston (marzo 2-5): Comienza una tradición

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Ur, Lorraine Elena

    1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPRING 1977 73 Primer Festival de Teatro Latinoamericano en Boston (marzo 2-5): Comienza una tradición LORRAINE ELENA BEN-UR Fue éste un acontecimiento de envergadura cultural y artística para Boston, ciudad multicultural cuya comunidad hispana... cuenta menos de quince años de existencia. Su importancia reside 1) en el hecho de que el público asistente se componía tanto de hispanos de la ciudad como norteamericanos de todo el área metropolitana, 2) en la calidad de los elencos teatrales que...

  3. Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide for State Government Officials Prepared by The National Council on Electricity Policy November 2009 NATIONAL COUNCIL...

  4. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Rebate Program (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides rebate incentives for homeowners in Hamilton, Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties. To qualify for rebates, homeowners must receive a [http://www...

  5. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Rebate Program (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides rebate incentives for homeowners in Hamilton, Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties. To qualify for rebates, homeowners must receive a [http://www...

  6. Molluscan Mariculture in the Greater Caribbean: An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molluscan Mariculture in the Greater Caribbean: An Overview DARRYL E. JORY and EDWIN S. IVERSEN mariculture in the greater Caribbean area (Fig. 1). Sea- food is and has been a staple for Carib- bean people since pre-Columbian times. ABSIRACF-Marine mollusks suitable for mariculture in the Caribbean area have

  7. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Mapping Contest at Boston College Students are invited to present their GIS Mapping work as part of a campus-wide celebration of geospatial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    to present their GIS Mapping work as part of a campus-wide celebration of geospatial research at Boston

  8. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Loan Program (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides loans for single family residencies and owner occupied duplexes in Hamilton county in Ohio and Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties in Kentucky. To...

  9. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Loan Program (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides loans for single family residencies and owner occupied duplexes in Hamilton county in Ohio and Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties in Kentucky. To...

  10. Captive propagation and brood behavior of greater prairie chickens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drake, David

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAPTIVE PROPAGATION AND BROOD BEHAVIOR OF GREATER PRAIRIE CHICKENS A Thesis by DAVID DRAKE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May 1994 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences CAPTIVE PROPAGATION AND BROOD BEHAVIOR OF GREATER PRAIRIE CHICKENS A Thesis by DAVID DRAKE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  11. Greater Cincinnati Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl U.S. Department of Energy SC-27 Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P:...

  12. Many voices, one wilderness : collaborative conservation in the greater Chicago region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, Justin (Justin Timothy)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been a growing recognition in the conservation community that landscape-scale networks of preserves and habitat corridors are needed to adequately protect native biodiversity. While most of the efforts to protect ...

  13. From The Boston Globe, February 22, 2008 Dance troupe is game for some heavy lifting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    From The Boston Globe, February 22, 2008 Dance troupe is game for some heavy lifting From left and uses heavy steel pieces as props? A game-show story? Who are these people? "Ideally, we're a mix beyond the industry, but steel is part of the soul of the town. . . . When the metal is molten and hot

  14. A review of the book "Optimal control" by Richard Vinter, Modern Birkhaeuser Classics, Boston, MA, 2010.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henrion, Didier

    A review of the book "Optimal control" by Richard Vinter, Modern Birkhaeuser Classics, Boston, MA in optimal control, a mathematically-oriented branch of systems control engineering whose roots can be found be considered as a major con- tribution to the modern optimal control literature. Together with the more

  15. Boston University Computer Science Technical Report No. 2005027 Computing a Uniform Scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parameter for 3D Registration of Lung Surfaces Vladimir Rodeski 1 , William Mullally 1 , Carissa Bellardine of Biomedical Engineering Boston University Abstract. A di#culty in lung image registration is accounting for chang­ es in the size of the lungs due to inspiration. We propose two methods for computing a uniform

  16. Boston University Computer Science Technical Report No. 2005-027 Computing a Uniform Scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parameter for 3D Registration of Lung Surfaces Vladimir Rodeski1 , William Mullally1 , Carissa Bellardine2 Engineering Boston University Abstract. A difficulty in lung image registration is accounting for chang- es in the size of the lungs due to inspiration. We propose two methods for computing a uniform scale parameter

  17. Boston University User Fee Structure for ICP-ES, ICP-MS and Laser Labs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutyra, Lucy R.

    Cost per sample by laser ablation includes three spots on a sample plus an additional three spotsBoston University User Fee Structure for ICP-ES, ICP-MS and Laser Labs The Department of Earth come to BU and digest their samples in our labs with sufficient training. Laser-ICP-MS cost per sample

  18. The Boston Retinal Prosthesis A 15-Channel Hermetic Wireless Neural Stimulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Shawn K.

    The Boston Retinal Prosthesis A 15-Channel Hermetic Wireless Neural Stimulator Shawn K. Kelly-- A miniaturized, hermetically-encased, wirelessly- operated retinal prosthesis has been developed for pre-clinical studies in Yucatan minipig animal models. The prosthesis attaches conformally to the outside of the eye

  19. Tackling Dyslexia at an Early Age esearchers at HMS and Boston Children's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corey, David P.

    Tackling Dyslexia at an Early Age R esearchers at HMS and Boston Children's Hospital who have been studying dyslexia in children have identified differences in the brain activity of at-risk children that very young children at risk for dyslexia could take part in early intervention programs that may help

  20. The BosTon College Chroniclefebruary 14, 2008-vol. 16 no. 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    , who commutes from his home in Wakefield each day to an extended on-ice session at the Boston Skating accompany his older sister to a lo- cal rink. His skill on the blades was quickly recognized and his parents en- rolled him in a US Figure Skating Ba- sic Skills Program at the Stoneham Rink, the skating home

  1. Boston Massachusetts: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Boston, MA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  2. Greater Acceleration through Sparsity-Promoting GRAPPA Kernel Calibration Daniel S Weller1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Vivek K

    , Boston, MA, United States, 4 Dept. of Image Analytics and Informatics, Siemens Corporate Research,2, where N is the total number of fits, is a tuning parameter, is the DWT sparsifying transform, F-1 resolution), requiring 8 minutes in a Siemens Trio 3 T scanner with a vendor-supplied 32-channel head array

  3. Paleoecology of the Greater Phyllopod Bed community, Burgess Shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Don

    Paleoecology of the Greater Phyllopod Bed community, Burgess Shale Jean-Bernard Caron , Donald A and composition, ecological attributes, and environmental influences for the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale ecosystems further suggest the Burgess Shale community was probably highly dependent on immigration from

  4. Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface in Forested Landscapes Andrew A- tems. In 1998, a severe ice storm damaged over ten million hectares of forest across northern New York investigated the spatial arrangement of forest damage at the terrestrial-aquatic interface, an ecological edge

  5. Title: Boundary File: GTA (Greater Toronto Area) Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Municipal Boundary shapefiles: Municipal Boundary ­ Upper Tier and District, and Municipal Boundary ­ Lower Municipality of Durham, Regional Municipality of York Data Type: Digital Vector Data Format: Shapefile Datum

  6. Community in the garden in the community : the development of an open space resource in Boston's South End

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meehan, Angela Elizabeth

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Now a permanently protected type of open space, the community gardens in Boston's South End began in the early 1970's as an effort to utilize vacant land in what was a predominantly low-income neighborhood. Since then, the ...

  7. By Community or Design? Age-restricted Neighbourhoods, Physical Design and Baby Boomers' Local Travel Behaviour in Suburban Boston, US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zegras, P. Christopher

    This article analyses the travel behaviour, residential choices and related preferences of 55+ baby boomers in suburban Boston, USA, looking specifically at age-restricted neighbourhoods. For this highly auto-dependent ...

  8. Politics, jobs and workforce development : the role of workforce intermediaries in building career pathways within Boston's health care industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutson, Malo

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research study examines the role that workforce intermediaries within Boston play in creating career pathways for economically disadvantaged, under-skilled residents in the local health care industry. Using a case ...

  9. Clean Cities: Greater Long Island Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro CleanGeneseeGreater Long

  10. Clean Cities: Greater New Haven Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro CleanGeneseeGreater

  11. A bottom up approach to on-road CO2 emissions estimates: improved spatial accuracy and applications for regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wing, Ian Sue

    's Global Warming Solutions Act.3 Both policies set emissions reduction targets for power plants and other Type: Article Date Submitted by the Author: 11-Jan-2013 Complete List of Authors: Gately, Conor; Boston their own abatement initiatives such as the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) and California

  12. Boston.com / News / Local / New fuel cell uses germs to generate electricity Page 1 THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Boston.com / News / Local / New fuel cell uses germs to generate electricity Page 1 THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING New fuel cell uses germs to generate electricity By Gareth Cook, Globe://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2003/09/08/new_fuel_cell_uses_germs_to_generate_electricity?mode=9:15:28 AM 9/8/2003 #12;Boston

  13. nature biotechnology advance online publication 1 1Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. 2Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University, Cambridge,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    nature biotechnology advance online publication 1 1Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. 3Biological and Biomedical Sciences Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston

  14. Boston University College of Engineering Division of Systems Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Process Modeling and Control ENG ME 560 Precision Machine Design and Instrumentation ENG ME 570 Robot and Environmental Systems CAS EC 513 Game Theory ENG SE/EC/ME 543 Sustainable Power Systems ENG ME/MS 545 Control of Business ENG EC/MS 573 Solar Energy Systems GRS GE 712 Regional Energy Modeling GRS EC 716 Game

  15. Boston University College of Engineering Division of Systems Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Control ME/MS 507 Process Modeling and Control ME 570 Robot Motion Planning EC 702 Recursive Estimation/Semester/Grade ______________________________ Energy and Environmental Systems CAS EC 513 Game Theory SE/EC/ME 543 Sustainable Power Systems ME/MS 545 Control of Business EC/MS 573 Solar Energy Systems GRS GE 712 Regional Energy Modeling GRS EC 716 Game

  16. Co-sponsored in part by the Department of Mechanical Engineering, the Department of Physics, and the Division of Materials Science & Engineering at Boston University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and the Division of Materials Science & Engineering at Boston University Boston University welcomes the 57th New Supramolecular Assemblies: From Design to Applications Dr. Brian Prevo (Cabot Corporation) Understanding particle/polymer interactions and how they in turn influence final composite material properties

  17. Greater sage-grouse winter habitat selection and energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doherty, K.E.; Naugle, D.E.; Walker, B.L.; Graham, J.M. [University of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent energy development has resulted in rapid and large-scale changes to western shrub-steppe ecosystems without a complete understanding of its potential impacts on wildlife populations. We modeled winter habitat use by female greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana, USA, to 1) identify landscape features that influenced sage-grouse habitat selection, 2) assess the scale at which selection occurred, 3) spatially depict winter habitat quality in a Geographic Information System, and 4) assess the effect of coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) development on winter habitat selection. We developed a model of winter habitat selection based on 435 aerial relocations of 200 radiomarked female sage-grouse obtained during the winters of 2005 and 2006. Percent sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) cover on the landscape was an important predictor of use by sage-grouse in winter. Sage-grouse were 1.3 times more likely to occupy sagebrush habitats that lacked CBNG wells within a 4-km{sup 2} area, compared to those that had the maximum density of 12.3 wells per 4 km{sup 2} allowed on federal lands. We validated the model with 74 locations from 74 radiomarked individuals obtained during the winters of 2004 and 2007. This winter habitat model based on vegetation, topography, and CBNG avoidance was highly predictive (validation R{sup 2} = 0.984). Our spatially explicit model can be used to identify areas that provide the best remaining habitat for wintering sage-grouse in the PRB to mitigate impacts of energy development.

  18. Reserves in western basins: Part 1, Greater Green River basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, overpressured sandstone reservoirs located below 8,000 feet drill depth in the Greater Green River basin, Wyoming. Total in place resource is estimated at 1,968 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 33 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Five plays (formations) were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its overpressured, tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources: in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. Total recoverable reserves estimates of 33 Tcf do not include the existing production from overpressured tight reservoirs in the basin. These have estimated ultimate recovery of approximately 1.6 Tcf, or a per well average recovery of 2.3 Bcf. Due to the fact that considerable pay thicknesses can be present, wells can be economic despite limited drainage areas. It is typical for significant bypassed gas to be present at inter-well locations because drainage areas are commonly less than regulatory well spacing requirements.

  19. Do Regions Matter? Evidence on Capabilities and Coalitions from Defense-Dependent Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Catherine; Markusen, Ann

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    San Francisco, California­ Hunters Point Naval Shipyard,in Boston and the Hunters Point Shipyard in San Francisco--Boston Naval Complex, the Hunters Point Shipyard closed in 1

  20. DOE and Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships Host Two-Day Market Introduction Workshop in Boston

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Over 100 attendees gathered in Boston, MA to participate in the "Voices for SSL Efficiency" Solid-State Lighting Workshop on July 16-17, 2007. The workshop, hosted by DOE and Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships (NEEP), was the second DOE meeting to explore how Federal, State, and private-sector organizations can work together to guide market introduction of high-performance SSL products. The first workshop, hosted by DOE and Southern California Edison, was held in Pasadena in April 2007. In both workshops, a diverse gathering of participants – energy efficiency organizations, utilities, government, and industry – shared insights, ideas, and updates on the rapidly evolving SSL market.

  1. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NEWLY CONSTRUCTED BUILDINGS AND ADDITIONS GREATER THAN 1,000 FT2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA NEWLY CONSTRUCTED BUILDINGS AND ADDITIONS GREATER THAN 1,000 FT2 CEC- CF-1R Newly Constructed Buildings and Additions Greater Than 1,000 ft2 (Page 1 of 5) Project Name: Climate________ Project Type: New Building Construction New Addition1 greater than 1,000 ft2 1. Additions greater than 1

  2. Outages of electric power supply resulting from cable failures Boston Edison Company system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Factual data are provided regarding 5 electric power supply interruptions that occurred in the Boston Metropolitan area during April to June, 1979. Common to all of these outages was the failure of an underground cable as the initiating event, followed by multiple equipment failures. There was significant variation in the voltage ratings and types of cables which failed. The investigation was unable to delineate a single specific Boston Edison design operating or maintenance practice that could be cited as the cause of the outages. After reviewing the investigative report the following actions were recommended: the development and implementation of a plan to eliminate the direct current cable network; develop a network outage restoration plan; regroup primary feeder cables wherever possible to minimize the number of circuits in manholes, and to separate feeders to high load density areas; develop a program to detect incipient cable faults; evaluate the separation of the north and south sections of Back Bay network into separate networks; and, as a minimum, install the necessary facilities to make it possible to re-energize one section without interfering with the other; and re-evaluate the cathodic protection scheme where necessary. (LCL)

  3. Find may yield flu early warning -The Boston Globe THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasisekharan, Ram

    underway before they realize it, unless they can develop an early warning system to detect when the germFind may yield flu early warning - The Boston Globe THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING Find may yield flu early warning By Stephen Smith, Globe Staff | January 7, 2008 For a decade, disease

  4. Faculty Position in Health Science The Department of Health Sciences at Boston University's College of Health and Rehabilitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Frank

    an inter-disciplinary framework to its students. Applicants should have a PhD, ScD or MD, a strong record experience and research plans and three letters of recommendation to: Eileen O'Keefe MD Health Science Search information, about BU Sargent College and our programs, visit our website at www.bu.edu/sargent. Boston

  5. "ECS Transactions -Boston, MA" Volume 16, "Photovoltaics for the 21st Century 7" to be published in September, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dagenais, Mario

    "ECS Transactions - Boston, MA" Volume 16, "Photovoltaics for the 21st Century 7" to be published Ã?/600 Ã? /200 Ã?. The CIGS film with homogeneous and dense surface morphology with large grain size temperature from 99.99% pure source. Figure 1(a) shows the schematic of the E-beam evaporation system used

  6. Browse by region (RaphaelSVGMap) | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in CarbonofBiotinsBostonBridger Valley05411°,Browse by region

  7. Seeking Greater Influence in the World of Low-Energy Buildings...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seeking Greater Influence in the World of Low-Energy Buildings Seeking Greater Influence in the World of Low-Energy Buildings July 23, 2010 - 4:03pm Addthis Cindy Regnier,...

  8. The art of cross-writing in Grove Hall : two centuries of form and place-making in a Boston neighborhood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenzweig, Gilad J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Boston neighborhood of Grove Hall is presently engaged in a period of urban revival. New civic, commercial and residential projects are starting to fill in empty lots and rejuvenate historic yet dilapidated structures. ...

  9. Terry Boston

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from wind resources, at night. Through grid interactivity, the large volume electric water heaters can heat energy during off-peak hours when wind energy is abundant and...

  10. Terry Boston

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy Solar Decathlon DOE-HDBK-1046-2008 AugustTerms April 7,

  11. Terry Boston

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy Solar Decathlon DOE-HDBK-1046-2008 AugustTerms April 7,

  12. Appendix to the final environmental impact report supplement. Northeast Corridor Improvement Project electrification, New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is an appendix to the final Environmental Impact Report Supplement, published on February 15, 1995, addressing the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. The purpose of this document is to discuss the selection of the Boston area electrical substation site and the relocation of a paralleling station in East Foxboro.

  13. EnergyWorks Final Report: A Better Buildings Neighborhood Program in the Five-County Greater Philadelphia Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gajewski, Katherine [City of Philadelphia] [City of Philadelphia

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the grant performance period of July 1, 2010-September 30, 2013 and discusses of the program design, outcomes and best practices as they relate to the following six areas: 1. Institutional Design and Business Model; 2. Program Design and Customer Experience; 3. Driving Demand; 4. Workforce Development; 5. Financing and Incentives; 6. Data and Evaluation.

  14. Eocene climates, depositional environments, and geography, greater Green River basin, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roehler, H.W.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The climates, depositional environments, and geography of Eocene rocks in the greater Green River basin are investigated to determine the origin, mode of deposition, and areal distribution of the Wasatch, Green River, Bridger, and Washakie Formations. The data indicate that Eocene climates ranged from cool temperature to tropical and were affected by both terrestrial and astronomical factors. The terrestrial factors were mainly latitude, altitude, regional geography, tectonism, and volcanism. The astronomical factors are interpreted from reptitious rock sequences in the Wilkins Peak Member of the Green River Formation that record seasonal changes, 21,000 year precession of the equinox cycles, 100,000 year eccentricity cycles, and an undetermined cycle of 727,000 years. Eight depositional environments are identified, discussed, and illustrated by diagrams, columnar sections, and photographs. They are: (1) fluvial, (2) paludal, (3) freshwater lacustrine, (4) saltwater lacustrine, (5) pond and playa lake, (6) evaporite (salt pan), (7) mudflat, and (8) volcanic and fluviovolcanic. The areal distribution of the eight depositional environments in the Wasatch, Green River, Bridger, and Washakie Formations is illustrated by photographs and 13 paleogeographic maps. 76 refs., 90 figs.

  15. State of Indiana/Greater IN Clean Cities Alternative Fuels Implementat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications State of IndianaGreater IN Clean Cities Alternative Fuels Implementation Plan State of IndianaGICC Alternative Fuels Implementation...

  16. Prioritizing winter habitat quality for greater sage-grouse in a landscape influenced by energy development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Jeffrey L.

    Prioritizing winter habitat quality for greater sage-grouse in a landscape influenced by energy, and F. C. Blomquist. 2014. Prioritizing winter habitat quality for Greater Sage-Grouse in a landscape influenced by energy development. Ecosphere 5(2):15. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ES13-00238. 1 Abstract

  17. 0040: 1-24 2008 The bees of Greater Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franz, Nico M.

    1 0040: 1-24 2008 The bees of Greater Puerto Rico (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Anthophila) Julio A-mail:polimita@hotmail.com Nico M. Franz Department of Biology, University of Puerto Rico PO Box 9012, Mayagüez, PR 00681, U.S.A. E-mail:franz@uprm.edu Abstract. The bee fauna of the Greater Puerto Rico area was studied. A review

  18. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix H: Packaging factors for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, G.; Grant, P.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report develops and presents estimates for a set of three values that represent a reasonable range for the packaging factors for several waste streams that are potential greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste. The packaging factor is defined as the volume of a greater-than-Class C low-level waste disposal container divided by the original, as-generated or ``unpackaged,`` volume of the wastes loaded into the disposal container. Packaging factors take into account any processes that reduce or increase an original unpackaged volume of a greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste, the volume inside a waste container not occupied by the waste, and the volume of the waste container itself. The three values developed represent (a) the base case or most likely value for a packaging factor, (b) a high case packaging factor that corresponds to the largest anticipated volume of waste for disposal, and (c) a low case packaging factor for the smallest volume expected. Three categories of greater-than-Class C low-level waste are evaluated in this report: activated metals, sealed sources, and all other wastes. Estimates of reasonable packaging factors for the low, base, and high cases for the specific waste streams in each category are shown in Table H-1.

  19. Article published in BARCEL M. et SIGAUT F., (eds.), The Making of Feudal Agricultures ?, Boston-Leiden, Brill editor, coll. The transformation of the Roman World, vol. 14, 2004, p. 177-253.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Article published in BARCELÓ M. et SIGAUT F., (eds.), The Making of Feudal Agricultures ?, Boston SIGAUT F., (eds.), The Making of Feudal Agricultures ?, Boston-Leiden, Brill editor, coll results in the birth of two new feudal principalities: the county of Provence torn between its allegiance

  20. Landscape-scale patterns of forest pest and pathogen damage in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    rust by examining changes in the spatial scale of significant stress and mortality clusters computedLandscape-scale patterns of forest pest and pathogen damage in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

  1. You are on a path to greater prosperity and knowledge of nature, science, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    You are on a path to greater prosperity and knowledge of nature, science, and engineering. Our'Texas Aggie football team is nationally acclaimed, and every game brings a festive atmosphere

  2. An extinct monkey from Haiti and the origins of the Greater Antillean primates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberger, Alfred H.

    An extinct monkey from Haiti and the origins of the Greater Antillean primates Siobhán B. Cookea from Haiti, Insulacebus toussaintiana, is described here from the most complete Caribbean subfossil

  3. Rutgers Regional Report # Regional Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    , population, income, and building permits over a 32-year period from 1969 to 2001 for the 31-county Tri counties of the Tri-State (Connecticut, New Jersey, and New York) Region have been divided for analytical the nation and the Tri-State Region. What has not been fully documented, however, is the apparent shift

  4. Final environment impact report supplement: Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a supplement to the final environmental impact report (FEIR) published in October 1994 on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electrification from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. The purpose of this supplement is to provide additional information relative to: the Roxbury Substation Alternative Analysis; an expanded discussion on mitigation of potential adverse impacts; draft Section 61 findings; the Memorandum of Understanding between Amtrak and the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) for Route 128 Station; Amtrak`s draft outreach program; and to address other Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act concerns.

  5. Are We Heading Towards a Reversal of the Trend for Ever-Greater...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Region(s): Europe, Latin America & Caribbean, Global This paper shows that a decline in car ownership in cities in developed nations can be attributed primarily to people living...

  6. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-4: Packaging factors for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, G.; Grant, P.; Winberg, M.; Williams, K.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report estimates packaging factors for several waste types that are potential greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste (LLW). The packaging factor is defined as the volume of a GTCC LLW disposal container divided by the as-generated or ``unpackaged`` volume of the waste loaded into the disposal container. Packaging factors reflect any processes that reduce or increase an original unpackaged volume of GTCC LLW, the volume inside a waste container not occupied by the waste, and the volume of the waste container itself. Three values are developed that represent (a) the base case or most likely value for a packaging factor, (b) a high case packaging factor that corresponds to the largest anticipated disposal volume of waste, and (c) a low case packaging factor for the smallest volume expected. GTCC LLW is placed in three categories for evaluation in this report: activated metals, sealed sources, and all other waste.

  7. Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 4. Comment letters and public hearing transcripts. Northeast corridor improvement project electrication: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume IV) reprints the comments received on the DEIS/R.

  8. Space use by female Greater Prairie-Chickens in response to wind energy development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    Space use by female Greater Prairie-Chickens in response to wind energy development V. L. WINDER,1-Chickens in response to wind energy development. Ecosphere 5(1):3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ ES13-00206.1 Abstract. Wind energy development is targeted to meet 20% of U.S. energy demand by 2030. In Kansas, optimal sites

  9. FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GS FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

  10. Effects of wind energy development on survival of female greater prairie-chickens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    community, grouse, hazard function, mortality, preda- tion, wind turbine *Correspondence author. EEffects of wind energy development on survival of female greater prairie-chickens Virginia L of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA Summary 1. The potential effects of wind energy development

  11. Impact of folivory on photosynthesis is greater than the sum of its holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Impact of folivory on photosynthesis is greater than the sum of its holes A. R. Zangerl*, J. G), pp. 135­151.]. An impediment to understanding the effects of leaf damage on photosynthesis has been chlorophyll fluo- rescence and used it to map the effects of caterpillar feeding on whole-leaf photosynthesis

  12. Citizen Science System Assemblages: Toward Greater Understanding of Technologies to Support Crowdsourced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Citizen Science System Assemblages: Toward Greater Understanding of Technologies to Support crowston@syr.edu ABSTRACT We explore the nature of technologies to support citizen science, a method different citizen science platforms may be comprised of widely varying functionalities, yet still support

  13. Asthenospheric upwelling, oceanic slab retreat, and exhumation of UHP mantle rocks: Insights from Greater Antilles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Greater Antilles in Hispaniola. We use numerical models of intra-oceanic subduction to explain exhumation Antilles in Hispaniola [Abbott et al., 2006; Abbott et al., 2005]. Field observations show that the garnet and Hispaniola islands [e.g., Lewis et al., 2006]. It was formed during subduction of the Proto-Caribbean oceanic

  14. The Potential of Distributed Cogeneration in Commercial Sites in the Greater Vancouver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (production of electricity at the point of use) may reduce CO2 emissions relative to the most likely of electricity and CO2 emissions. The results showed that while greater energy efficiency is achieved: December 10, 1999 #12;iii ABSTRACT The Canadian government is evaluating options to reduce CO2 emissions

  15. Novel Battery Thermal Management System for Greater Lifetime Ratifying Current Quality and Safety Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    acceptance; o power and energy capability; o reliability; o lifetime and life cycle cost. ThereofNovel Battery Thermal Management System for Greater Lifetime Ratifying Current Quality and Safety,Denmark. Temperature excursions and non-uniformity of the temperature inside the battery systems are the main concern

  16. The potential for coalbed gas exploration and production in the Greater Green River Basin, southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Scott, A.R.; Hamilton, D.S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed gas is an important source of natural gas in the United States. In 1993, approximately 740 BCF of coalbed gas was produced in the United States, or about 4.2% of the nation`s total gas production. Nearly 96% of this coalbed gas is produced from just two basins, the San Juan (615.7 BCF; gas in place 84 TCF) and Black Warrior (105 BCF; gas in place 20 TCF), and current production represents only a fraction of the nation`s estimated 675 TCF of in-place coalbed gas. Coal beds in the Greater Green River Basin in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado hold almost half of the gas in place (314 TCF) and are an important source of gas for low-permeability Almond sandstones. Because total gas in place in the Greater Green River Basin is reported to exceed 3,000 TCF (Law et al., 1989), the basin may substantially increase the domestic gas resource base. Therefore, through integrated geologic and hydrologic studies, the coalbed gas potential of the basin was assessed where tectonic, structural, and depositional setting, coal distribution and rank, gas content, coal permeability, and ground-water flow are critical controls on coalbed gas producibility. Synergism between these geologic and hydrologic controls determines gas productivity. High productivity is governed by (1) thick, laterally continuous coals of high thermal maturity, (2) basinward flow of ground water through fractured and permeable coals, down the coal rank gradient toward no-flow boundaries oriented perpendicular to the regional flow direction, and (3) conventional trapping of gas along those boundaries to provide additional sources of gas beyond that sorbed on the coal surface.

  17. Greater Biopsy Core Number Is Associated With Improved Biochemical Control in Patients Treated With Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bittner, Nathan [Tacoma/Valley Radiation Oncology Centers, Tacoma, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.or [Schiffler Cancer Center/Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M. [Schiffler Cancer Center/Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Adamovich, Edward [Department of Pathology, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Standard prostate biopsy schemes underestimate Gleason score in a significant percentage of cases. Extended biopsy improves diagnostic accuracy and provides more reliable prognostic information. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that greater biopsy core number should result in improved treatment outcome through better tailoring of therapy. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to May 2006, 1,613 prostate cancer patients were treated with permanent brachytherapy. Patients were divided into five groups stratified by the number of prostate biopsy cores ({<=}6, 7-9, 10-12, 13-20, and >20 cores). Biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were evaluated as a function of core number. Results: The median patient age was 66 years, and the median preimplant prostate-specific antigen was 6.5 ng/mL. The overall 10-year bPFS, CSS, and OS were 95.6%, 98.3%, and 78.6%, respectively. When bPFS was analyzed as a function of core number, the 10-year bPFS for patients with >20, 13-20, 10-12, 7-9 and {<=}6 cores was 100%, 100%, 98.3%, 95.8%, and 93.0% (p < 0.001), respectively. When evaluated by treatment era (1995-2000 vs. 2001-2006), the number of biopsy cores remained a statistically significant predictor of bPFS. On multivariate analysis, the number of biopsy cores was predictive of bPFS but did not predict for CSS or OS. Conclusion: Greater biopsy core number was associated with a statistically significant improvement in bPFS. Comprehensive regional sampling of the prostate may enhance diagnostic accuracy compared to a standard biopsy scheme, resulting in better tailoring of therapy.

  18. Solid waste workers and livelihood strategies in Greater Port-au-Prince, Haiti

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel, Claudel, E-mail: claudelnoel@gmail.co [University of the West Indies, Institute for Sustainable Development, Environmental Management Unit, 13 Gibraltar Camp Way, Mona Campus, Kingston (Jamaica)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The solid waste management industry in Haiti is comprised of a formal and an informal sector. Many basic activities in the solid waste management sector are being carried out within the context of profound poverty, which exposes the failure of the socioeconomic and political system to provide sufficient job opportunities for the urban population. This paper examines the involvement of workers in the solid waste management industry in Greater Port-au-Prince and the implications for livelihood strategies. The findings revealed that the Greater Port-au-Prince solid waste management system is very inclusive with respect to age, while highly segregated with regard to gender. In terms of earning capacity, the results showed that workers hired by the State agencies were the most economically vulnerable group as more than 50% of them fell below the official nominal minimum wage. This paper calls for better salary scales and work compensation for the solid waste workers.

  19. Drilling Off-Shore (Mademoiselle From Armentiers) Pedrolina "Paige" Delaparrucca and the Greater Westerly Grannies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nightingale, Peter

    Drilling Off-Shore (Mademoiselle From Armentiers) Pedrolina "Paige" Delaparrucca and the Greater- George ofU Old Drill- Litt- heat lost had need had get E his no more his more belch, ba- Bush, A, Rea Car- Ba- Litt- U Old Drill- B 7 5 bon rack le S Ron- ing more oil, D o we his no more his in ma who we

  20. Beyond the Inventory: An Interagency Collaboration to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Greater Yellowstone Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Fiebig, M.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As one of the largest, intact ecosystems in the continental United States, land managers within the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) have recognized the importance of compiling and understanding agency greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The 10 Federal units within the GYA have taken an active role in compiling GHG inventories on a unit- and ecosystem-wide level, setting goals for GHG mitigation, and identifying mitigation strategies for achieving those goals. This paper details the processes, methodologies, challenges, solutions, and lessons learned by the 10 Federal units within the GYA throughout this ongoing effort.

  1. Method to produce alumina aerogels having porosities greater than 80 percent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-step method for producing monolithic alumina aerogels having porosities of greater than 80 percent. Very strong, very low density alumina aerogel monoliths are prepared using the two-step sol-gel process. The method of preparing pure alumina aerogel modifies the prior known sol method by combining the use of substoichiometric water for hydrolysis, the use of acetic acid to control hydrolysis/condensation, and high temperature supercritical drying, all of which contribute to the formation of a polycrystalline aerogel microstructure. This structure provides exceptional mechanical properties of the alumina aerogel, as well as enhanced thermal resistance and high temperature stability.

  2. Activities of ?-ray emitting isotopes in rainwater from Greater Sudbury, Canada following the Fukushima incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. T. Cleveland; F. A. Duncan; I. T. Lawson; N. J. T. Smith; E. Vazquez-Jauregui

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the activity measured in rainwater samples collected in the Greater Sudbury area of eastern Canada on 3, 16, 20, and 26 April 2011. The samples were gamma-ray counted in a germanium detector and the isotopes 131I and 137Cs, produced by the fission of 235U, and 134Cs, produced by neutron capture on 133Cs, were observed at elevated levels compared to a reference sample of ice-water. These elevated activities are ascribed to the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex in Japan that followed the 11 March earthquake and tsunami. The activity levels observed at no time presented health concerns.

  3. Enabling Greater Penetration of Solar Power via the Use of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At high penetration of solar generation there are a number of challenges to economically integrating this variable and uncertain resource. These include the limited coincidence between the solar resource and normal demand patterns and limited flexibility of conventional generators to accommodate variable generation resources. Of the large number of technologies that can be used to enable greater penetration of variable generators, concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) presents a number of advantages. The use of storage enables this technology to shift energy production to periods of high demand or reduced solar output. In addition, CSP can provide substantial grid flexibility by rapidly changing output in response to the highly variable net load created by high penetration of solar (and wind) generation. In this work we examine the degree to which CSP may be complementary to PV by performing a set of simulations in the U.S. Southwest to demonstrate the general potential of CSP with TES to enable greater use of solar generation, including additional PV.

  4. Greater-Than-Class C low-level radioactive waste treatment technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, T W; Fischer, D K

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was developed to provide the Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program with criteria and a methodology to select candidate treatment technologies for Greater-Than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) destined for dedicated storage and ultimately disposal. The technology selection criteria are provided in a Lotus spreadsheet format to allow the methodology to evolve as the GTCC LLW Program evolves. It is recognized that the final disposal facility is not yet defined; thus, the waste acceptance criteria and other facility-specific features are subject to change. The spreadsheet format will allow for these changes a they occur. As additional treatment information becomes available, it can be factored into the analysis. The technology selection criteria were established from program goals, draft waste acceptance criteria for dedicated storage (including applicable regulations), and accepted remedial investigation methods utilized under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Kepner-Tregoe decisionmaking techniques are used to compare and rank technologies against the criteria.

  5. Final environmental impact statement/report and 4(f) statement. Volume 1. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume I) is the main body of the FEIS/R and includes a 4(f) Statement on the proposed location of an electrification facility in the Great Swamp Wildlife Management Area.

  6. Record of decision: Final environmental impact statement/report and 4(f) statement. Northeast Corridor Improvement Project electrification, New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This record of decision (ROD) completes the environmental review by the Federal Administration (FRA) of the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to extend electric train operation from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. In this ROD, FRA approves Amtrak`s proposal subject to the inclusion into the project of a number of measures to eliminate or minimize potential adverse environmental impacts.

  7. Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 2. Technical studies. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume II) presents additional technical studies to supplement Volume III of the DEIS/R issued in October 1993 (PB94-111838).

  8. Department of Energy treatment capabilities for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrell, D.K.; Fischer, D.K.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides brief profiles for 26 low-level and high-level waste treatment capabilities available at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), Savannah River Site (SRS), and West Valley Demonstration Plant (WVDP). Six of the treatments have potential use for greater-than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW). They include: (a) the glass ceramic process and (b) the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility incinerator at INEL; (c) the Super Compaction and Repackaging Facility and (d) microwave melting solidification at RFP; (e) the vitrification plant at SRS; and (f) the vitrification plant at WVDP. No individual treatment has the capability to treat all GTCC LLW streams. It is recommended that complete physical and chemical characterizations be performed for each GTCC waste stream, to permit using multiple treatments for GTCC LLW.

  9. Mitogenomic sequences better resolve stock structure of southern Greater Caribbean green turtle rookeries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    confounds assessment of the scale of natal homing and population structure among regional rookeries. We, Venezuela; Galibi, Suriname; and Tortuguero, Costa Rica. Five single- nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were differentiation supports demographic indepen- dence of Aves Island and Suriname, emphasizing the need to recognize

  10. Regional Summary Pacific Region Management Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , for the Eastern Pacific Ocean, and the Western and Central Pacific Fishery Commission, for the Western PacificRegional Summary Pacific Region Management Context The Pacific Region includes California, Oregon, and Washington. Federal fisheries in this region are managed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC

  11. HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM date ­ November 23, 2004 · Contract end date ­ March 31, 2006 #12;Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania · Objectives ­ Capture

  12. CityLab, a biotechnology learning laboratory for high school teachers and students at the Boston University School of Medicine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franblau, C.; Phillips, C.; Zook, D. [and others

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    CityLab is a fully equipped biotechnology learning laboratory for high school students and teachers funded by the National Institutes of Health and located at the Boston University School of Medicine. The aim of CityLab is to provide access to state-of-the-art laboratory facilities and curriculum in biotechnology otherwise unavailable to most school systems. Teachers bring their classes to CityLab where they are challenged to solve problems by applying the same techniques and concepts of genetics and molecular biology. Each topic is presented in a mystery format. Some popular investigations include The Mystery of the Crooked Cell (sickle cell anemia), The Case of the Crown Jewels (DNA restrictions analysis), and Entangled in the Web (transformation). In addition to regular class visits, CityLab offers two after school enrichment activities, the Biotechnology Club and BioCity. The club provides eighty young people with the opportunity to work more extensively in the laboratory investigating topics such as genetic engineering, gene cloning, and AIDS. BioCity is a mock biotechnology company run by and for students. Since 1992, more than 2,000 high school students and 300 teachers have used CityLab.

  13. Engineering, analytical, and program management assistance to the US Department of Energy Boston Support Office. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, W.; Azad, B.; Poston, P.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of the monitoring effort included a total of 132 grants awarded to schools, hospitals, and other eligible institutions throughout the six New England States. The monitoring was conducted during a six-month period at the rate of approximately 22 grantees per month. Table 1 presents a summary of grantees assigned for monitoring for the period December 1981 - May 1982. The nature of the monitoring involved a significant level of communication and coordination with State Program Coordinators at the Boston Support Office and Program Managers at the State Energy Offices. The monitoring required the cooperation and active participation of the grantees' energy conservation grant project managers and building operators. The effort also required a high level of internal coordination due to the geographic dispersion of the grantees being monitored and the need to maintain regular communication with federal- and state-level officials during the course of the project. To address the requirements of all parties involved in the monitoring, it was necessary to organize and conduct the work in a systematic fashion. As a result, the approach to the monitoring program consisted of five distinct steps which were replicated on a monthly basis for each group of grants assigned for monitoring. These steps included: scheduling of site visits; review of working files prior to each visit; site visitation and meeting with grantee officials; notification of BSO regarding critical problems; and preparation of site visit and monthly reports.

  14. Greater sage-grouse population response to energy development and habitat loss

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, B.L.; Naugle, D.E.; Doherty, K.E. [University of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Modification of landscapes due to energy development may alter both habitat use and vital rates of sensitive wildlife species. Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana, USA, have experienced rapid, widespread changes to their habitat due to recent coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) development. We analyzed lek-count, habitat, and infrastructure data to assess how CBNG development and other landscape features influenced trends in the numbers of male sage-grouse observed and persistence of leks in the PRB. From 2001 to 2005, the number of males observed on leks in CBNG fields declined more rapidly than leks outside of CBNG. Of leks active in 1997 or later, only 38% of 26 leks in CBNG fields remained active by 2004-2005, compared to 84% of 250 leks outside CBNG fields. By 2005, leks in CBNG fields had 46% fewer males per active lek than leks outside of CBNG. Persistence of 110 leks was positively influenced by the proportion of sagebrush habitat within 6.4 km of the lek. After controlling for habitat, we found support for negative effects of CBNG development within 0.8 km and 3.2 km of the lek and for a time lag between CBNG development and lek disappearance. Current lease stipulations that prohibit development within 0.4 km of sage-grouse leks on federal lands are inadequate to ensure lek persistence and may result in impacts to breeding populations over larger areas. Seasonal restrictions on drilling and construction do not address impacts caused by loss of sagebrush and incursion of infrastructure that can affect populations over long periods of time. Regulatory agencies may need to increase spatial restrictions on development, industry may need to rapidly implement more effective mitigation measures, or both, to reduce impacts of CBNG development on sage-grouse populations in the PRB.

  15. Greater Green River Basin production improvement project, Phase 1: Site characterization report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnett, B.B.; Krystinik, L.F.; Mead, R.H.; Poe, S.C.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several tight, naturally-fractured, gas-productive formations in the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) in Wyoming have been exploited using conventional vertical well technology. Typically, hydraulic fracture treatments must be performed in completing these wells to increase gas production rates to economic levels. However, with the maturation of horizontal drilling technology hydraulic fracture treatments may not be the most effective method for improving gas production from these tight reservoirs. Two of the most prolific tight gas reservoirs in the Green River Basin, the Frontier and the Mesaverde, are candidates for the application of horizontal well completion technology. The objective of the proposed project is to apply the DOE`s technical concept to the Second Frontier Formation on the western flank of the Rock Springs Uplift. Previous industry attempts to produce in commercial quantities from the Second Frontier Formation have been hampered by lack of understanding of both the in-situ natural fracture system and lack of adequate stimulation treatments. The proposed technical approach involves drilling a vertical characterization well to the Second Frontier Formation at a depth of approximately 16,000 ft. from a site located about 18 miles northwest of Rock Springs, Wyoming. Logging, coring, and well testing information from the vertical well will be used to design a hydraulic fracturing treatment and to assess the resulting production performance. Data from the vertical drilling phase will be used to design a 2,500 to 3,000-ft lateral wellbore which will be kicked off from the vertical hole and extend into the blanket marine sandstone bench of the Second Frontier Formation. The trajectory of this wellbore will be designed to intersect the maximum number of natural fractures to maximize production rates. Production testing of the resulting completion will provide an assessment of reserve potential related to horizontal lateral completions.

  16. Northeast Corridor improvement project draft environmental impact statement/report for electrification of Northwest Corridor, New Haven, CT. to Boston, MA. Volume 3. Technical appendices. Final report, September 1992-September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impacts of extending electrification on the National Railroad Passenger Corporation's (Amtrak) Northeast Corridor (NEC) from New Haven, Connecticut to Boston, Massachusetts are of direct concern to the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). To improve rail service and increase ridership between New York and Boston, Amtrak proposes the electrification of the NEC main line between New Haven, CT and Boston, MA using an overhead 2 x 25,000 volt - 60 hertz power system. The volume Number III contains the detailed technical studies that were performed in order to identify and evaluate the environmental impacts of the proposed project. Some of these studies have been included entirely in the Draft Environmental Impact Statements-draft (DEIS/R) (Volume 1). The technical evaluations performed were based upon regulatory requirements as well as substantive issues raised by individuals and public agencies as part of the public participation program.

  17. Northwest Regional Technology Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Regional Technology Center for Homeland Security The Northwest Regional Technology Center and deployment of technologies that are effective homeland security solutions for the region, and accelerate technology transfer to the national user community. Foster a collaborative spirit across agencies

  18. Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Use and Population Demographics at the Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area, Carbon County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory D. Johnson; Chad W. LeBeau; Ryan Nielsen; Troy Rintz; Jamey Eddy; Matt Holloran

    2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was conducted to obtain baseline data on use of the proposed Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area (SRWRA) in Carbon County, Wyoming by greater sage-grouse. The first two study years were designed to determine pre-construction seasonally selected habitats and population-level vital rates (productivity and survival). The presence of an existing wind energy facility in the project area, the PacifiCorp Seven Mile Hill (SMH) project, allowed us to obtain some information on initial sage-grouse response to wind turbines the first two years following construction. To our knowledge these are the first quantitative data on sage-grouse response to an existing wind energy development. This report presents results of the first two study years (April 1, 2009 through March 30, 2011). This study was selected for continued funding by the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative Sage-Grouse Collaborative (NWCC-SGC) and has been ongoing since March 30, 2011. Future reports summarizing results of this research will be distributed through the NWCC-SGC. To investigate population trends through time, we determined the distribution and numbers of males using leks throughout the study area, which included a 4-mile radius buffer around the SRWRA. Over the 2-year study, 116 female greater sage-grouse were captured by spotlighting and use of hoop nets on roosts surrounding leks during the breeding period. Radio marked birds were located anywhere from twice a week to once a month, depending on season. All radio-locations were classified to season. We developed predictor variables used to predict success of fitness parameters and relative probability of habitat selection within the SRWRA and SMH study areas. Anthropogenic features included paved highways, overhead transmission lines, wind turbines and turbine access roads. Environmental variables included vegetation and topography features. Home ranges were estimated using a kernel density estimator. We developed resource selection functions (RSF) to estimate probability of selection within the SRWRA and SMH. Fourteen active greater sage-grouse leks were documented during lek surveys Mean lek size decreased from 37 in 2008 to 22 in 2010. Four leks located 0.61, 1.3, 1.4 and 2.5 km from the nearest wind turbine remained active throughout the study, but the total number of males counted on these four leks decreased from 162 the first year prior to construction (2008), to 97 in 2010. Similar lek declines were noted in regional leks not associated with wind energy development throughout Carbon County. We obtained 2,659 sage-grouse locations from radio-equipped females, which were used to map use of each project area by season. The sage-grouse populations within both study areas are relatively non-migratory, as radio-marked sage-grouse used similar areas during all annual life cycles. Potential impacts to sage-grouse from wind energy infrastructure are not well understood. The data rom this study provide insight into the early interactions of wind energy infrastructure and sage-grouse. Nest success and brood-rearing success were not statistically different between areas with and without wind energy development in the short-term. Nest success also was not influenced by anthropogenic features such as turbines in the short-term. Additionally, female survival was similar among both study areas, suggesting wind energy infrastructure was not impacting female survival in the short-term; however, further analysis is needed to identify habitats with different levels of risk to better understand the impact of wind enregy development on survival. Nest and brood-rearing habitat selection were not influenced by turbines in the short-term; however, summer habitat selection occurred within habitats closer to wind turbines. Major roads were avoided in both study areas and during most of the seasons. The impact of transmission lines varied among study areas, suggesting other landscape features may be influencing selection. The data provided in this report are preliminary and are not meant to provide a basis for fo

  19. Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandercock, Brett K. [Kansas State University

    2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary 1. We investigated the impacts of wind power development on the demography, movements, and population genetics of Greater Prairie-Chickens (Tympanuchus cupido) at three sites in northcentral and eastern Kansas for a 7-year period. Only 1 of 3 sites was developed for wind power, the 201MW Meridan Way Wind Power Facility at the Smoky Hills site in northcentral Kansas. Our project report is based on population data for prairie chickens collected during a 2-year preconstruction period (2007-2008), a 3-year postconstruction period (2009-2011) and one final year of lek surveys (2012). Where relevant, we present preconstruction data from our field studies at reference sites in the northern Flint Hills (2007-2009) and southern Flint Hills (2006-2008). 2. We addressed seven potential impacts of wind power development on prairie chickens: lek attendance, mating behavior, use of breeding habitat, fecundity rates, natal dispersal, survival rates, and population numbers. Our analyses of pre- and postconstruction impacts are based on an analysis of covariance design where we modeled population performance as a function of treatment period, distance to eventual or actual site of the nearest wind turbine, and the interaction of these factors. Our demographic and movement data from the 6-year study period at the Smoky Hills site included 23 lek sites, 251 radio-marked females monitored for 287 bird-years, and 264 nesting attempts. Our genetic data were based on genotypes of 1,760 females, males and chicks that were screened with a set of 27 microsatellite markers that were optimized in the lab. 3. In our analyses of lek attendance, the annual probability of lek persistence during the preconstruction period was ~0.9. During the postconstruction period, distance to nearest turbine did not have a significant effect on the probability of lek persistence. However, the probability of lek persistence increased from 0.69 at 0 m to 0.89 at 30 km from turbines, and most abandoned lek sites were located <5 km from turbines. Probability of lek persistence was significantly related to habitat and number of males. Leks had a higher probability of persistence in grasslands than agricultural fields, and increased from ~0.2 for leks of 5 males, to >0.9 for leks of 10 or more males. Large leks in grasslands should be a higher priority for conservation. Overall, wind power development had a weak effect on the annual probability of lek persistence. 3. We used molecular methods to investigate the mating behavior of prairie chickens. The prevailing view for lek-mating grouse is that females mate once to fertilize the clutch and that conspecific nest parasitism is rare. We found evidence that females mate multiple times to fertilize the clutch (8-18% of broods, 4-38% of chicks) and will parasitize nests of other females during egg-laying (~17% of nests). Variable rates of parentage were highest in the fragmented landscapes at the Smoky Hills field site, and were lower at the Flint Hills field site. Comparisons of the pre- and postconstruction periods showed that wind energy development did not affect the mating behaviors of prairie chickens. 4. We examined use of breeding habitats by radio-marked females and conducted separate analyses for nest site selection, and movements of females not attending nests or broods. The landscape was a mix of native prairie and agricultural habitats, and nest site selection was not random because females preferred to nest in grasslands. Nests tended to be closer to turbines during the postconstruction period and there was no evidence of behavioral avoidance of turbines by females during nest site selection. Movements of females not attending nests or broods showed that females crossed the site of the wind power development at higher rates during the preconstruction period (20%) than the postconstruction period (11%), and that movements away from turbines were more frequent during the postconstruction period. Thus, wind power development appears to affect movements in breeding habitats but not nest site s

  20. American Nuclear Society 2013 Student Conference Massachusetts Institute of Technology Boston, Massachusetts, USA, April 4-6, 2013, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL (2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    American Nuclear Society 2013 Student Conference ­ Massachusetts Institute of Technology Boston, Massachusetts, USA, April 4-6, 2013, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL (2013) A DETECTOR. Troy, NY 12180 mcderb@rpi.edu 1. INTRODUCTION Reactor design and criticality safety calculations

  1. Meteorological and air quality impacts of increased urban albedo and vegetative cover in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, Haider; Hammer, Hillel; Akbari, Hashem

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The study described in this report is part of a project sponsored by the Toronto Atmospheric Fund, performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, to assess the potential role of surface property modifications on energy, meteorology, and air quality in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), Canada. Numerical models were used to establish the possible meteorological and ozone air-quality impacts of increased urban albedo and vegetative fraction, i.e., ''cool-city'' strategies that can mitigate the urban heat island (UHI), significantly reduce urban energy consumption, and improve thermal comfort, particularly during periods of hot weather in summer. Mitigation is even more important during critical heat wave periods with possible increased heat-related hospitalization and mortality. The evidence suggests that on an annual basis cool-city strategies are beneficial, and the implementation of such measures is currently being investigated in the U.S. and Canada. We simulated possible scenari os for urban heat-island mitigation in the GTA and investigated consequent meteorological changes, and also performed limited air-quality analysis to assess related impacts. The study was based on a combination of mesoscale meteorological modeling, Lagrangian (trajectory), and photochemical trajectory modeling to assess the potential meteorological and ozone air-quality impacts of cool-city strategies. As available air-quality and emissions data are incompatible with models currently in use at LBNL, our air-quality analysis was based on photochemical trajectory modeling. Because of questions as to the accuracy and appropriateness of this approach, in our opinion this aspect of the study can be improved in the future, and the air-quality results discussed in this report should be viewed as relatively qualitative. The MM5 meteorological model predicts a UHI in the order of 2 to 3 degrees C in locations of maxima, and about 1 degree C as a typical value over most of the urban area. Our si mulations suggest that cool-city strategies can typically reduce local urban air temperature by 0.5-1 degrees C; as more sporadic events, larger decreases (1.5 degrees C, 2.5-2.7 degrees C and 4-6 degrees C) were also simulated. With regard to ozone mixing ratios along the simulated trajectories, the effects of cool-city strategies appear to be on the order of 2 ppb, a typical decrease. The photochemical trajectory model (CIT) also simulates larger decreases (e.g., 4 to 8 ppb), but these are not taken as representative of the potential impacts in this report. A comparison with other simulations suggest very crudely that a decrease of this magnitude corresponds to significant ''equivalent'' decreases in both NOx and VOCs emissions in the region. Our preliminary results suggest that significant UHI control can be achieved with cool-cities strategies in the GTA and is therefore worth further study. We recommend that better input data and more accurate modeling schemes be used to carry out f uture studies in the same direction.

  2. Does `Facebooking' lead to greater student engagement? Junco, R. (2012). The relationship between frequency of Facebook use, participation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Does `Facebooking' lead to greater student engagement? Junco, R. (2012). The relationship between frequency of Facebook use, participation in Facebook activities, and student engagement. Computers, such as Facebook (FB) is also a somewhat prickly topic in higher education as the stakeholders listed above attempt

  3. Summary We tested the hypothesis that greater cavitation resistance correlates with less total inter-vessel pit area per ves-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacke, Uwe

    Summary We tested the hypothesis that greater cavitation resistance correlates with less total cavitation safety and transport efficiency. Fourteen species of diverse growth form (vine, ring- and diffuse species total). Two types of vulnerability-to-cavitation curves were found. Ring-porous trees and vines

  4. Method of making selective crystalline silicon regions containing entrapped hydrogen by laser treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pankove, Jacques I. (Princeton, NJ); Wu, Chung P. (Trenton, NJ)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel hydrogen rich single crystalline silicon material having a band gap energy greater than 1.1 eV can be fabricated by forming an amorphous region of graded crystallinity in a body of single crystalline silicon and thereafter contacting the region with atomic hydrogen followed by pulsed laser annealing at a sufficient power and for a sufficient duration to recrystallize the region into single crystalline silicon without out-gasing the hydrogen. The new material can be used to fabricate semi-conductor devices such as single crystalline silicon solar cells with surface window regions having a greater band gap energy than that of single crystalline silicon without hydrogen.

  5. SITN Regional Outreach Map

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Region States in Region Awardee(s) Location of Awardee(s) Contact(s) Northeast (Photovoltaics) CT * ME * MA * NH NY * RI * VT Hudson Valley Community College Troy, NY Richard...

  6. Ultracompact HII Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stan Kurtz; Jose Franco

    2001-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We review some recent observational results on the properties of ultracompact HII regions, in particular the presence of extended continuum emission surrounding ultracompact sources and the discovery of a new class of so-called ``Hypercompact'' HII regions. In addition, we discuss recent attempts to probe the density structure within UC HII regions using the technique of spectral index analysis.

  7. Bark beetle and wood borer infestation in the greater Yellowstone area during four postfire years. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, L.A.; Amman, G.D.; Vandygriff, J.C.; Oakes, R.D.; Munson, A.S.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surveys of bark beetle and wood borer infestation in the Greater Yellowstone Area were conducted from 1991 through 1993 to determine the effect of delayed tree mortality on mosaics of fire-killed and green tree stands, the relationship between fire injury and infestation, but both types of mortality greatly altered the mosaics immediately apparent after the 1988 fires. The high level of infestation suggests that insects built up in fire-injured trees and then caused increased infestation of uninjured trees.

  8. Randolph : Boston's gateway suburb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madden, James, Jr. (James Michael)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last two decades, certain American suburbs have begun to struggle with issues traditionally thought of as urban problems and dealt with in city settings, such as failing schools, fragmented community, affordable ...

  9. Boston University Dresden Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits, Prentice Hall Neudorfer and Hassul, Introduction to Circuit And Design Of Linear Circuits, 7th edition, Jon Wiley & Sons Inc., 2012 References: Recommended Analysis, Allyn and Bacon Hayt and Kemmerly, Engineering Circuit Analysis, McGraw Hill Simpson, Student

  10. Bioinformatics at Boston University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in computational genomics, bioinformatics, computational biology, functional genomics, and comparative genomics. We of biological systems using computational ideas, methods, and tools combined with experimental investigations-protein interaction proteomics gene regulation pathways genetic switches cancer computational biology and biocomputing

  11. Multilateral, regional and bilateral energy trade governance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leal-Arcas, Rafael; Grasso, Costantino; Rios, Juan Alemany (Queen Mary Univ. of London (United Kingdom))

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current international energy trade governance system is fragmented and multi-layered. Streamlining it for greater legal cohesiveness and international political and economic cooperation would promote global energy security. The current article explores three levels of energy trade governance: multilateral, regional and bilateral. Most energy-rich countries are part of the multilateral trading system, which is institutionalized by the World Trade Organization (WTO). The article analyzes the multilateral energy trade governance system by focusing on the WTO and energy transportation issues. Regionally, the article focuses on five major regional agreements and their energy-related aspects and examines the various causes that explain the proliferation of regional trade agreements, their compatibility with WTO law, and then provides several examples of regional energy trade governance throughout the world. When it comes to bilateral energy trade governance, this article only addresses the European Union’s (EU) bilateral energy trade relations. The article explores ways in which gaps could be filled and overlaps eliminated whilst remaining true to the high-level normative framework, concentrating on those measures that would enhance EU energy security.

  12. Aerosols in the Caribbean MidAtlantic Region as Observed with the EOS Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Aerosols in the Caribbean MidAtlantic Region as Observed with the EOS Moderate Resolution Imaging the year, changes in precipitation patterns and greater health risks for the Caribbean region during the spring months. Keywords: MODIS, MODIS Conversion Toolkit, aerosols, Caribbean region INTRODUCTION

  13. CDKN-CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional Climate Change Resilience Framework Jump to: navigation, search Name CDKN-CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for...

  14. CEMI Western Regional Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please Join Assistant Secretary of Energy Dr. David Danielson for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative's Western Regional Summit. Register now for this free event.

  15. SciTech Connect:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (BAPL), West Mifflin, PA (United States) Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Portland, OR (United States) Boston Regional Office, Boston, MA...

  16. Activities of \\gamma-ray emitting isotopes in rainwater from Greater Sudbury, Canada following the Fukushima incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cleveland, B T; Lawson, I T; Smith, N J T; Vazquez-Jauregui, E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the activity measured in rainwater samples collected in the Greater Sudbury area of eastern Canada on 3, 16, 20, and 26 April 2011. The samples were gamma-ray counted in a germanium detector and the isotopes 131I and 137Cs, produced by the fission of 235U, and 134Cs, produced by neutron capture on 133Cs, were observed at elevated levels compared to a reference sample of ice-water. These elevated activities are ascribed to the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex in Japan that followed the 11 March earthquake and tsunami. The activity levels observed at no time presented health concerns.

  17. Regional Analysis Briefs

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2028-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional Analysis Briefs (RABs) provide an overview of specific regions that play an important role in world energy markets, either directly or indirectly. These briefs cover areas that are currently major producers (Caspian Sea), have geopolitical importance (South China Sea), or may have future potential as producers or transit areas (East Africa, Eastern Mediterranean).

  18. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 4. The Northeast region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickering, K.E.; Vilardo, J.M.; Schakenbach, J.T.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each state of the region. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled in this chapter into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. An introduction and outline are provided for in the descriptions of the wind resource given for each state. Assessments for individual states are presented. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the state chapters.

  19. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 5: the East Central Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brode, R.; Stoner, R.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each state of the region. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. Assessments for individual states are presented as separate chapters. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the state chapters. States include Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia.

  20. Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 3. Response to comments on draft environmental impact statement/report. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven CT to Boston, MA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume III) of the FEIS/R presents summaries of comments received on the DEIS/R and responses to these comments.

  1. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix D-3: Characterization of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste from other generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fish, L.W.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Other Generators category includes all greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) that is not generated or held by nuclear utilities or sealed sources licensees or that is not stored at Department of Energy facilities. To determine the amount of waste within this category, 90 LLW generators were contacted; 13 fit the Other Generators category. Based on information received from the 13 identified Other Generators, the GTCC LLW Management Program was able to (a) characterize the nature of industries in this category, (b) estimate the 1993 inventory of Other Generator waste for high, base, and low cases, and (c) project inventories to the year 2035 for high, base, and low cases. Assumptions were applied to each of the case estimates to account for generators who may not have been identified in this study.

  2. Northeast corridor improvement project draft environmental impact statement/report for electrification of Northwest Corridor, New Haven, CT. To Boston, MA. Volume 1. Final report, September 1992-September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impacts of extending electrification on the National Railroad Passenger Corporation's (Amtrak) Northeast Corridor (NEC) from New Haven, Connecticut to Boston, Massachusetts are of direct concern to the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). To improve rail service and increase ridership between New York and Boston, Amtrak proposes the electrification of the NEC main line between New Haven, CT and Boston, MA using an overhead 2 X 25,000 volt - 60 hertz power system. This volume considers impacts on the Human and Natural Environment utilizing guidance as outlined in CFR Part 1500, Council on Environmental Quality, Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Requirements of NEPA as amended and the Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) regulations (301 CMR 11:00). Impacts analyzed include changes in the natural environment (air quality, noise and vibration, energy, electromagnetic fields, natural resources, hazardous materials and visual/aesthetics), changes in the social environment (land use and recreation, transportation and traffic), impacts on historic and archaeological sites, changes in transit service and patronage, associated changes in highway and airport congestion, capital costs, operating and maintenance costs, and financial implications. Impacts are identified both for the proposed construction period and for the long-term operation of the alternatives.

  3. ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANT (EECBG) - BETTER BUILDINGS NEIGHBORHOOD PROGRAM AT GREATER CINCINNATI ENERGY ALLIANCE Project Title: Home Performance with Energy Star® and Better Buildings Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holzhauser, Andy; Jones, Chris; Faust, Jeremy; Meyer, Chris; Van Divender, Lisa

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (Energy Alliance) is a nonprofit economic development agency dedicated to helping Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky communities reduce energy consumption. The Energy Alliance has launched programs to educate homeowners, commercial property owners, and nonprofit organizations about energy efficiency opportunities they can use to drive energy use reductions and financial savings, while extending significant focus to creating/retaining jobs through these programs. The mission of the Energy Alliance is based on the premise that investment in energy efficiency can lead to transformative economic development in a region. With support from seven municipalities, the Energy Alliance began operation in early 2010 and has been among the fastest growing nonprofit organizations in the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky area. The Energy Alliance offers two programs endorsed by the Department of Energy: the Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® Program for homeowners and the Better Buildings Performance Program for commercial entities. Both programs couple expert guidance, project management, and education in energy efficiency best practices with incentives and innovative energy efficiency financing to help building owners effectively invest in the energy efficiency, comfort, health, longevity, and environmental impact of their residential or commercial buildings. The Energy Alliance has raised over $23 million of public and private capital to build a robust market for energy efficiency investment. Of the $23 million, $17 million was a direct grant from the Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP). The organization’s investments in energy efficiency projects in the residential and commercial sector have led to well over $50 million in direct economic activity and created over 375,000 hours of labor created or retained. In addition, over 250 workers have been trained through the Building Performance Training Center, a program that was developed and funded by the Energy Alliance and housed at Cincinnati State Technical and Community College. Nearly 100 residential and commercial contractors currently participate in the Energy Alliance’s two major programs, which have together served over 2,800 residential and 100 commercial customers. Additionally, the Energy Alliance established loan programs for homeowners, nonprofits and commercial businesses. The GC-HELP program was established to provide up to ten year low interest, unsecured loans to homeowners to cover the energy efficiency products they purchased through the Energy Alliance approved contractor base. To date the Energy Alliance has financed over $1 million in energy efficiency loans for homeowners, without any loans written off. The nonprofit business community is offered five year, fixed-interest rate loans through the Building Communities Loan Fund of $250,000. Additionally, the Energy Alliance has developed GC-PACE, a commercial financing tool that enables buildings owners to finance their energy upgrades through voluntary property assessments deploying low-interest extended-term capital from the bond market. The Energy Alliance and its partners are actively evaluating additional market-based financing solutions.

  4. Catalog of documents produced by the Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winberg, M.R.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This catalog provides a ready reference for documents prepared by the Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Waste (GTCC LLW) Management Program. The GTCC LLW Management Program is part of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP). The NLLWMP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and is responsible for assisting the DOE in meeting its obligations under Public Law 99-240, The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985. This law assigns DOE the responsibility of ensuring the safe disposal of GTCC LLW in a facility licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The NLLWMP is managed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL).

  5. Evaluation of Department of Energy-Held Potential Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of commercial facilities have generated potential greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW), and, through contractual arrangements with the US Department of Energy (DOE) or for health and safety reasons, DOE is storing the waste. This report presents the results of an assessment conducted by the GTCC LLW Management Program to consider specific circumstances under which DOE accepted the waste, and to determine whether disposal in a facility licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, or by DOE in a nonlicensed facility, is appropriate. Input from EG&G Idaho, Inc., and DOE Idaho Operations Office legal departments concerning the disposal requirements of this waste were the basis for the decision process used in this report.

  6. Greater Caribbean Energy and Environment Future. Ad hoc working group report, Key Biscayne, Florida, October 26-28, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorhaug, A. (ed.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report of Workshop I (presented in outline form) by the Greater Caribbean Energy and Environment Foundation begin an intensive focus on the energy problems of the Caribbean. The process by which environmental assessments by tropical experts can be successfully integrated into energy decisions is by: (1) international loan institutions requiring or strongly recommending excellent assessments; (2) engineering awareness of total effects of energy projects; (3) governmental environmental consciousness-raising with regard to natural resource value and potential inadvertent and unnecessary resource losses during energy development; and (4) media participation. Section headings in the outline are: preamble; introduction; research tasks: today and twenty years hence; needed research, demonstration and information dissemination projects to get knowledge about Caribbean energy-environment used; summary; recommendations; generalized conclusions; and background literature. (JGB)

  7. Regional Districts (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Adjacent Water Control and Improvement Districts and Municipal Utility Districts can opt to form a Regional District to oversee water issues. Such districts may be created:(1) to purchase, own,...

  8. Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also...

  9. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-2: Mixed GTCC LLW assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirner, N.P. [Ebasco Environmental, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (mixed GTCC LLW) is waste that combines two characteristics: it is radioactive, and it is hazardous. This report uses information compiled from Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Characterization: Estimated Volumes, Radionuclide Activities, and Other Characteristics (DOE/LLW 1 14, Revision 1), and applies it to the question of how much and what types of mixed GTCC LLW are generated and are likely to require disposal in facilities jointly regulated by the DOE and the NRC. The report describes how to classify a RCRA hazardous waste, and then applies that classification process to the 41 GTCC LLW waste types identified in the DOE/LLW-114 (Revision 1). Of the 41 GTCC LLW categories identified, only six were identified in this study as potentially requiring regulation as hazardous waste under RCRA. These wastes can be combined into the following three groups: fuel-in decontamination resins, organic liquids, and process waste consisting of lead scrap/shielding from a sealed source manufacturer. For the base case, no mixed GTCC LLW is expected from nuclear utilities or sealed source licensees, whereas only 177 ml of mixed GTCC LLW are expected to be produced by other generators through the year 2035. This relatively small volume represents approximately 40% of the base case estimate for GTCC wastes from other generators. For these other generators, volume estimates for mixed GTCC LLW ranged from less than 1 m{sup 3} to 187 m{sup 3}, depending on assumptions and treatments applied to the wastes.

  10. 407 Design and operation of HVAC systems THE IMPACT OF VENTILATION ON AIR QUALITY IN INDOOR ICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Demokritou; Qingyan Chen; Chunxin Yang; John Spengler

    risk to both athletes and spectators. A field survey in ten ice rink arenas in the Greater Boston and

  11. 80 BOSTONIA Summer 2014 As a student in the School of Law in the 1980s, Michael A. Gollin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) and Matthew Horowitz (LAW'14). Among the agencies where PIP grantees have worked are Greater Boston Legal

  12. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-5: Impact of the 1993 NRC draft Branch Technical Position on concentration averaging of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuite, P.; Tuite, K.; Harris, G. [Waste Management Group, Inc., Peekskill, NY (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates the effects of concentration averaging practices on the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) generated by the nuclear utility industry and sealed sources. Using estimates of the number of waste components that individually exceed Class C limits, this report calculates the proportion that would be classified as GTCC LLW after applying concentration averaging; this proportion is called the concentration averaging factor. The report uses the guidance outlined in the 1993 Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) draft Branch Technical Position on concentration averaging, as well as waste disposal experience at nuclear utilities, to calculate the concentration averaging factors for nuclear utility wastes. The report uses the 1993 NRC draft Branch Technical Position and the criteria from the Barnwell, South Carolina, LLW disposal site to calculate concentration averaging factors for sealed sources. The report addresses three waste groups: activated metals from light water reactors, process wastes from light-water reactors, and sealed sources. For each waste group, three concentration averaging cases are considered: high, base, and low. The base case, which is the most likely case to occur, assumes using the specific guidance given in the 1993 NRC draft Branch Technical Position on concentration averaging. To project future GTCC LLW generation, each waste category is assigned a concentration averaging factor for the high, base, and low cases.

  13. Northeast Regional Biomass Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lusk, P.D.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program has been in operation for a period of nine years. During this time, state managed programs and technical programs have been conducted covering a wide range of activities primarily aim at the use and applications of wood as a fuel. These activities include: assessments of available biomass resources; surveys to determine what industries, businesses, institutions, and utility companies use wood and wood waste for fuel; and workshops, seminars, and demonstrations to provide technical assistance. In the Northeast, an estimated 6.2 million tons of wood are used in the commercial and industrial sector, where 12.5 million cords are used for residential heating annually. Of this useage, 1504.7 mw of power has been generated from biomass. The use of wood energy products has had substantial employment and income benefits in the region. Although wood and woodwaste have received primary emphasis in the regional program, the use of municipal solid waste has received increased emphasis as an energy source. The energy contribution of biomass will increase as potentia users become more familiar with existing feedstocks, technologies, and applications. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program is designed to support region-specific to overcome near-term barriers to biomass energy use.

  14. QUANTIFYING THE EVOLVING MAGNETIC STRUCTURE OF ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conlon, Paul A.; McAteer, R.T. James; Gallagher, Peter T.; Fennell, Linda, E-mail: mcateer@nmsu.ed [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The topical and controversial issue of parameterizing the magnetic structure of solar active regions has vital implications in the understanding of how these structures form, evolve, produce solar flares, and decay. This interdisciplinary and ill-constrained problem of quantifying complexity is addressed by using a two-dimensional wavelet transform modulus maxima (WTMM) method to study the multifractal properties of active region photospheric magnetic fields. The WTMM method provides an adaptive space-scale partition of a fractal distribution, from which one can extract the multifractal spectra. The use of a novel segmentation procedure allows us to remove the quiet Sun component and reliably study the evolution of active region multifractal parameters. It is shown that prior to the onset of solar flares, the magnetic field undergoes restructuring as Dirac-like features (with a Hoelder exponent, h = -1) coalesce to form step functions (where h = 0). The resulting configuration has a higher concentration of gradients along neutral line features. We propose that when sufficient flux is present in an active region for a period of time, it must be structured with a fractal dimension greater than 1.2, and a Hoelder exponent greater than -0.7, in order to produce M- and X-class flares. This result has immediate applications in the study of the underlying physics of active region evolution and space weather forecasting.

  15. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 3. Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paton, D.L.; Bass, A.; Smith, D.G.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great Lakes Region atlas assimilates six collections of wind resource data, one for the region and one for each of the five states that compose the Great Lakes region: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin. At the state level, features of the climate, topography, and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than in the regional discussion and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations over several time scales in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and of hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction, and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

  16. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 9. The Southwest Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, R.L.; Norman, G.T.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in Nevada and California. Background on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted is presented. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. An introduction and outline to the descriptions of the wind resource given for each state are given. Assessments for individual states are presented as separate chapters. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed.

  17. Characterization of Greater-Than-Class C sealed sources. Volume 3, Sealed sources held by general licensees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, G.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third volume in a series of three volumes characterizing the population of sealed sources that may become greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW). In this volume, those sources possessed by general licensees are discussed. General-licensed devices may contain sealed sources with significant amounts of radioactive material. However, the devices are designed to be safe to use without special knowledge of radiological safety practices. Devices containing Am-241 or Cm-244 sources are most likely to become GTCC LLW after concentration averaging. This study estimates that there are about 16,000 GTCC devices held by general licensees; 15,000 of these contain Am-241 sources and 1,000 contain Cm-244 sources. Additionally, this study estimates that there are 1,600 GTCC devices sold to general licensees each year. However, due to a lack of available information on general licensees in Agreement States, these estimates are uncertain. This uncertainty is quantified in the low and high case estimates given in this report, which span approximately an order of magnitude.

  18. Characterization of Greater-Than-Class C sealed sources. Volume 1, Sealed sources held by specific licensees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, G.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sealed sources are small, relatively high-activity radioactive sources typically encapsulated in a metallic container. The activities can range from less than 1 mCi to over 1,000 Ci. They are used in a variety of industries and are commonly available. Many of the sources will be classified as Greater-Than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) for the purpose of waste disposal. The US Department of Energy is responsible for disposing of this class of low-level radioactive waste. To better understand the scope of the GTCC LLW situation regarding sealed sources and to provide data to a model that projects future quantities of GTCC material, data from a comprehensive 1991 US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) survey and a related 1992 survey of Agreement States were analyzed to estimate the number, volume, and activity of Potential GTCC sealed sources currently available from specific licensees. Potential GTCC sealed sources are sources that exceed the limits stated in 10 CFR 61 when isotope concentrations are averaged over the volume of the capsule. Based on the surveys, the estimated number of existing Potential GTCC sealed sources held by specific licensees is 89,000, with an unpackaged volume of 0.93 m{sup 3} and an activity of 2,300,000 Ci. However, current disposal practices allow concentration averaging over the disposal container, substantially reducing the number of sealed sources which will actually be classified as GTCC LLW.

  19. Vitrification treatment options for disposal of greater-than-Class-C low-level waste in a deep geologic repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullmer, K.S.; Fish, L.W.; Fischer, D.K.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE), in keeping with their responsibility under Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, is investigating several disposal options for greater-than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW), including emplacement in a deep geologic repository. At the present time vitrification, namely borosilicate glass, is the standard waste form assumed for high-level waste accepted into the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System. This report supports DOE`s investigation of the deep geologic disposal option by comparing the vitrification treatments that are able to convert those GTCC LLWs that are inherently migratory into stable waste forms acceptable for disposal in a deep geologic repository. Eight vitrification treatments that utilize glass, glass ceramic, or basalt waste form matrices are identified. Six of these are discussed in detail, stating the advantages and limitations of each relative to their ability to immobilize GTCC LLW. The report concludes that the waste form most likely to provide the best composite of performance characteristics for GTCC process waste is Iron Enriched Basalt 4 (IEB4).

  20. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulse, R.A.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning for storage or disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of that waste to estimate volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms. Data from existing literature, disposal records, and original research were used to estimate the characteristics and project volumes and radionuclide activities to the year 2035. GTCC LLW is categorized as: nuclear utilities waste, sealed sources waste, DOE-held potential GTCC LLW; and, other generator waste. It has been determined that the largest volume of those wastes, approximately 57%, is generated by nuclear power plants. The Other Generator waste category contributes approximately 10% of the total GTCC LLW volume projected to the year 2035. Waste held by the Department of Energy, which is potential GTCC LLW, accounts for nearly 33% of all waste projected to the year 2035; however, no disposal determination has been made for that waste. Sealed sources are less than 0.2% of the total projected volume of GTCC LLW.

  1. Regional Report Issue Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regional Report Introduction The economy of the United States is more than three and one-half years accounting for both increasing shares of the economy and of recessionary employment losses. Manufacturing, driven by globalization and advancing information technology. Recoveries now produce jobs new

  2. LAMPF transition-region mechanical fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, E.D. Jr.; Gallegos, J.D.F.; Harrison, R.; Hart, V.E.; Hunter, W.T.; Rislove, S.E.; Sims, J.R.; Van Dyke, W.J.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of the new Transition Region (TR-II) is to optimize the phase matching of the H/sup +/ and H/sup -/ beams during simultaneous transport. TR-II incorporates several design improvements that include larger aperture, a straight beam track, greater beam-path length adjustments, and utility lines integrated with the support system. The close pack density of magnets and beam-line hardware required innovative solutions to magnet design and mounting, vacuum manifolding, and utility routing. Critical magnet placement was accomplished using a new three-dimensional alignment system that does real-time vector calculations on a computer with input from two digital theodolites. All assembly and a large fraction of the mechanical fabrication were done by LAMPF personnel. The TR-II has been operational since September 1983 and routinely transports production beams up to 900-..mu..A current with no major problems.

  3. LEADERSHIP HANDBOOK FOR REGIONAL COMMUNITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

    LEADERSHIP HANDBOOK FOR REGIONAL COMMUNITIES JOHNS HOPKINS ALUMNI ASSOCIATION & THE OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS #12;Leadership Handbook for Regional Chapters 2 CONTENTS Contents .......................................................................................................................9 Chapter Leadership

  4. Regional Competitions - EERE Commercialization Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Runner-up Teams The Six Regional Competitions The Massachusetts Institute of Technology logo. Northeast Region Lead: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, MA) This...

  5. Browse By Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in CarbonofBiotinsBostonBridger Valley05411°,

  6. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) planning for the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of the waste. This report estimates volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms of GTCC LLW to the year 2035. It groups the waste into four categories, representative of the type of generator or holder of the waste: Nuclear Utilities, Sealed Sources, DOE-Held, and Other Generator. GTCC LLW includes activated metals (activation hardware from reactor operation and decommissioning), process wastes (i.e., resins, filters, etc.), sealed sources, and other wastes routinely generated by users of radioactive material. Estimates reflect the possible effect that packaging and concentration averaging may have on the total volume of GTCC LLW. Possible GTCC mixed LLW is also addressed. Nuclear utilities will probably generate the largest future volume of GTCC LLW with 65--83% of the total volume. The other generators will generate 17--23% of the waste volume, while GTCC sealed sources are expected to contribute 1--12%. A legal review of DOE`s obligations indicates that the current DOE-Held wastes described in this report will not require management as GTCC LLW because of the contractual circumstances under which they were accepted for storage. This report concludes that the volume of GTCC LLW should not pose a significant management problem from a scientific or technical standpoint. The projected volume is small enough to indicate that a dedicated GTCC LLW disposal facility may not be justified. Instead, co-disposal with other waste types is being considered as an option.

  7. Natural Recharge to the Unconfined Aquifer System on the Hanford Site from the Greater Cold Creek Watershed: Progress Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waichler, Scott R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Movement of contaminants in groundwater at the Hanford Site is heavily dependent on recharge to the unconfined aquifer. As the effects of past artificial discharges dissipate, the water table is expected to return to more natural conditions, and natural recharge will become the driving force when evaluating future groundwater flow conditions and related contaminant transport. Previous work on the relationship of natural recharge to groundwater movement at the Hanford Site has focused on direct recharge from infiltrating rainfall and snowmelt within the area represented by the Sitewide Groundwater Model (SGM) domain. However, part of the groundwater recharge at Hanford is provided by flow from Greater Cold Creek watershed (GCC), a large drainage area on the western boundary of the Hanford Site that includes Cold Creek Valley, Dry Creek Valley, and the Hanford side of Rattlesnake Mountain. This study was undertaken to estimate the recharge from GCC, which is believed to enter the unconfined aquifer as both infiltrating streamflow and shallow subsurface flow. To estimate recharge, the Distributed Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model (DHSVM) was used to simulate a detailed water balance of GCC from 1956 to 2001 at a spatial resolution of 200~m and a temporal resolution of one hour. For estimating natural recharge to Hanford from watersheds along its western and southwestern boundaries, the most important aspects that need to be considered are 1)~distribution and relative magnitude of precipitation and evapotranspiration over the watershed, 2)~streamflow generation at upper elevations and infiltration at lower elevations during rare runoff events, and 3)~permeability of the basalt bedrock surface underlying the soil mantle.

  8. Regional Transportation Coordination Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden Crescent Regional Planning Commission

    Committee for this study. ? Develop a coordination public transportation plan ? Identify resources required to develop the plan ? Provide policy guidance to lead the planning and coordination effort Golden Crescent Regional Transit 1... of Texas. This resource will be relied upon for further development of the Intermodal Transportation Terminal. ? FTA Section 5309 (Bus) Discretionary Support ? To assist in meeting the GCRPC?s capital replacement needs. This resource...

  9. Natural Gas Resources of the Greater Green River and Wind River Basins of Wyoming (Assessing the Technology Needs of Sub-economic Resources, Phase I: Greater Green River and Wind river Basins, Fall 2002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boswell, Ray; Douds, Ashley; Pratt, Skip; Rose, Kelly; Pancake, Jim; Bruner, Kathy (EG& G Services) [EG& G Services; Kuuskraa, Vello; Billingsley, Randy (Advanced Resources International) [Advanced Resources International

    2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2000, NETL conducted a review of the adequacy of the resource characterization databases used in its Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM). This review indicated that the most striking deficiency in GSAM’s databases was the poor representation of the vast resource believed to exist in low-permeability sandstone accumulations in western U.S. basins. The model’s databases, which are built primarily around the United States Geological Survey (USGS) 1995 National Assessment (for undiscovered resources), reflected an estimate of the original-gas-inplace (OGIP) only in accumulations designated “technically-recoverable” by the USGS –roughly 3% to 4% of the total estimated OGIP of the region. As these vast remaining resources are a prime target of NETL programs, NETL immediately launched an effort to upgrade its resource characterizations. Upon review of existing data, NETL concluded that no existing data were appropriate sources for its modeling needs, and a decision was made to conduct new, detailed log-based, gas-in-place assessments.

  10. Projections, politics, and practice in regional planning : a case study of MetroFuture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, Evan Thomas

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the comprehensive planning effort undertaken by the Metropolitan Area Planning Council in the Boston area. This effort engaged over 4,000 of the area's residents between 2002 and 2009 and produced a ...

  11. Method of making selective crystalline silicon regions containing entrapped hydrogen by laser treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pankove, J.I.; Wu, C.P.

    1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel hydrogen rich single crystalline silicon material having a band gap energy greater than 1.1 eV can be fabricated by forming an amorphous region of graded crystallinity in a body of single crystalline silicon and thereafter contacting the region with atomic hydrogen followed by pulsed laser annealing at a sufficient power and for a sufficient duration to recrystallize the region into single crystalline silicon without out-gassing the hydrogen. The new material can be used to fabricate semi-conductor devices such as single crystalline silicon solar cells with surface window regions having a greater band gap energy than that of single crystalline silicon without hydrogen. 2 figs.

  12. Wind energy resource atlas: Volume 6. The Southeast region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zabransky, J.; Vilardo, J.M.; Schakenbach, J.T.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southeast atlas assimilates six collections of wind resource data: one for the region and one for each of the five states that compose the Southeast region (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina). At the state level, features of the climate, topography and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than is provided in the regional discussion, and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

  13. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 2. The North Central Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, D.L.; Hadley, D.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The North Central atlas assimilates six collections of wind resource data: one for the region and one for each of the five states that compose the North Central region (Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota). At the state level, features of the climate, topography and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than is provided in the regional discussion, and that data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and international wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed direction and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

  14. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 7. The south central region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, R.L.; Graves, L.F.; Sprankle, A.C.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This atlas of the south central region combines seven collections of wind resource data: one for the region, and one for each of the six states (Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas). At the state level, features of the climate, topography, and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than that provided in the regional discussion, and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction, and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

  15. Regional Energy Baseline 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ESL-TR-11-09-02 REGIONAL ENERGY BASELINE (1960 ~ 2009) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 To tal En erg y U se pe r C ap ita (M MB tu) Year Total Energy... Use per Capita (1960-2009) US SEEC 12-States TX Hyojin Kim Juan-Carlos Baltazar, Ph.D. Jeff S. Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. September 2011 ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University...

  16. Regional Energy Baseline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

    ESL-TR-11-09-02 REGIONAL ENERGY BASELINE (1960 ~ 2009) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 To tal En erg y U se pe r C ap ita (M MB tu) Year Total Energy... Use per Capita (1960-2009) US SEEC 12-States TX Hyojin Kim Juan-Carlos Baltazar, Ph.D. Jeff S. Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. September 2011 ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University...

  17. Regional companies eye growth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently Approved JustificationBio-Inspired PowerRegional companies eye

  18. Regional discrimination studies. Scientific report No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayward, C.; Herrin, E.; Sorrell, G.G.; Tibuleac, I.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part (1) describes TXAR in detail. The first Alpha-type station proposed by the GSE in 1993 is the Texas Experimental Seismic System (TEXESS), now designated TXAR, located at Lajitas, Texas, and operated by SMU during GSETT-1 and GSETT-2. Part (2) describes the results of the study of 144 events recorded at TXAR. The correlation method used allows the analysis of weak regional to teleseismic events and the identification of successive phases for each event. Corrected phase velocities show Pn first arrivals come to TXAR from as far as 2000 km. Events at greater distances have mantle P waves as first arrivals. Part (3) describes construction of a new Ground Truth Data Base using regional events from a variety of sources. Known sources include mine explosions, normal earthquakes, earthquake swarms, and very shallow earthquakes induced by hydrocarbon production. These induced earthquakes are only 1 to 4 km deep and have been observed with magnitudes ranging from 1.0 to 4.6. We believe all events in the Permian Basin of Texas to the northeast of TXAR are induced and are associated with oil and gas fields Part (4) are the Acknowledgements required by the contract.

  19. Regional trends in the take-up of clean coal technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wootten, J.M. [Peabody Holding Co., Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Using surveys of the electricity industry taken in major OECD coal producing/coal consuming regions of North America, Europe, Southern Africa, and Asia/Pacific, this paper reports on the attitudes of power plant operators and developers toward clean coal technologies, the barriers to their use and the policies and measures that might be implemented, if a country or region desired to encourage greater use of clean coal technologies.

  20. Colorado Regional Faults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Regional Faults Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the regional faults of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4543192.100000 m Left: 144385.020000 m Right: 754585.020000 m Bottom: 4094592.100000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  1. Innovative . Flexible . RegionalInnovative . Flexible . Regional Health Care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    Executive Master in Innovative . Flexible . RegionalInnovative . Flexible . Regional Health Care Learning Outcomes Health Systems, Policy and Reform - Communicating with Policy Makers - Evidence - Human Resources Management - Data and Decision Making Executive Master in Health Care Leadership (EMHCL

  2. Southern Region Watershed Management Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coordinators and the organization, management and activities of the Southern Region Water Quality Planning1 Southern Region Watershed Management Project September 15, 2000 to September 14, 2005 Terminal responding to water quality and conservation issues with educational assistance, technology development

  3. Regional Summary Pacific Management Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Bocaccio, Pacific ocean perch, cowcod, and darkblotched and widow rockfish are currently in rebuildingRegional Summary Pacific Management Context The Pacific Region includes California, Oregon, and Washington. Federal fisheries in this region are managed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC

  4. 6, 1332313366, 2006 Regional pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 13323­13366, 2006 Regional pollution potentials of major population centers M. G. Lawrence a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Regional pollution potentials. Lawrence (lawrence@mpch-mainz.mpg.de) 13323 #12;ACPD 6, 13323­13366, 2006 Regional pollution potentials

  5. EIS-0375: Disposal of Greater-than-Class-C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Department of Energy GTCC-like Waste

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the reasonably foreseeable environmental impacts associated with the proposed development, operation, and long-term management of a disposal facility or facilities for Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste and GTCC-like waste. The Environmental Protection Agency is a cooperating agency in the preparation of this EIS.

  6. Frothy Bloat Mitigation in Grazing Cattle Frothy bloat impacts on cattle production in the United States in 1999 were estimated to be greater than $300 million dollars.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frothy Bloat Mitigation in Grazing Cattle Frothy bloat impacts on cattle production in the United States in 1999 were estimated to be greater than $300 million dollars. Frothy bloat is the major nonpathogenic cause of death loss and depressed weight gains in stocker cattle grazing winter wheat

  7. What is the Eelgrass Stressor Response Project? The Eelgrass Stressor Response Project was established in 2005 to identify causes of eelgrass decline in greater Puget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrington, Emily

    was established in 2005 to identify causes of eelgrass decline in greater Puget Sound. It is closely connected to DNR's long term eelgrass monitoring program. Both projects are part of the Puget Sound Assessment and Monitoring Program (PSAMP), a multi-agency monitoring effort that is coordinated by the Puget Sound

  8. Brandon Heller A number of recent advances in the physical layer are enabling wireless communications devices to reach ever-greater speeds. These

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Raj

    -Division Multiplexing (OFDM) 3. Multi-Antenna Techniques 3.1 Multiple Input Single Output (MISO) 3.2 Multiple Input range, better bit rates, greater battery life, and increased reliability. Upcoming standards bit-error rates. Section 4 describes options for more reliably encoding data. Section five discusses

  9. Geohydrologic feasibility study of the greater Green River Basin for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, P.D.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc, of Midland, Texas conducted geologic and hydrologic feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented tool for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed/sand formations in the Greater Green River Basin through literature surveys.

  10. Understanding Regional Economic Growth in IndiaUnderstanding Regional Economic Growth in India Understanding Regional Economic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Understanding Regional Economic Growth in IndiaUnderstanding Regional Economic Growth in India Understanding Regional Economic Growth in India* Jeffrey D. Sachs Director The Earth Institute at Columbia_ramiah@yahoo.co.uk Asian Economic Papers 1:3 © 2002 The Earth Institute at Columbia University and the Massachusetts

  11. Discovery of Localized Regions of Excess 10-TeV Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdo, A A; Aune, T; Berley, D; Blaufuss, E; Casanova, S; Chen, C; Dingus, B L; Ellsworth, R W; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gonzales, M M; Goodman, J A; Hoffman, C M; Hüntemeyer, P H; Kolterman, B E; Lansdell, C P; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Mincer, A I; Némethy, P; Noyes, D; Pretz, J; Ryan, J M; Parkinson, P M Saz; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Vasileiou, V; Walker, G P; Williams, D A; Yodh, G B

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of 7 years of Milagro data performed on a 10-degree angular scale has found two localized regions of excess of unknown origin with greater than 12 sigma significance. Both regions are inconsistent with gamma-ray emission at a level of 11 sigma. One of the regions has a different energy spectrum than the isotropic cosmic-ray flux at a level of 4.6 sigma, and it is consistent with hard spectrum protons with an exponential cutoff, with the most significant excess at ~10 TeV. Potential causes of these excesses are explored, but no compelling explanations are found.

  12. Discovery of Localized Regions of Excess 10-TeV Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Abdo; B. Allen; T. Aune; D. Berley; E. Blaufuss; S. Casanova; C. Chen; B. L. Dingus; R. W. Ellsworth; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; M. M. Gonzales; J. A. Goodman; C. M. Hoffman; P. H. Hüntemeyer; B. E. Kolterman; C. P. Lansdell; J. T. Linnemann; J. E. McEnery; A. I. Mincer; P. Nemethy; D. Noyes; J. Pretz; J. M. Ryan; P. M. Saz Parkinson; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; V. Vasileiou; G. P. Walker; D. A. Williams; G. B. Yodh

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of 7 years of Milagro data performed on a 10-degree angular scale has found two localized regions of excess of unknown origin with greater than 12 sigma significance. Both regions are inconsistent with gamma-ray emission with high confidence. One of the regions has a different energy spectrum than the isotropic cosmic-ray flux at a level of 4.6 sigma, and it is consistent with hard spectrum protons with an exponential cutoff, with the most significant excess at ~10 TeV. Potential causes of these excesses are explored, but no compelling explanations are found.

  13. Boston College Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan January 2014 BOSTON COLLEGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    . Preparedness is operationally focused on establishing guidelines, plans, procedures, protocols, and standards Operations Center 27 Appendix G ­ Acronyms 28 Campus Map 29 Addendum ­ Detailed Operation Procedures (under 9 Meetings 10 Plans Development and Maintenance 10 Plan Review, Testing, and Exercises 11 Training

  14. Coordinated Regional Public Transportation Plan: Heart of Texas Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heart of Texas Council of Governments

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coordinated Regional Public Transportation Plan Heart of Texas Region Bosque, Falls, Freestone, Hill, Limestone & McLennan Counties December 1, 2006 TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgements... of Texas Council of Governments (HOTCOG) and the McLennan County Youth Collaboration (MCYC) ---21 Central Texas Senior Ministries (CTSM), Hill County Transit (HCT) and Scott and White (S&W) Medical Facilities...

  15. Greater-than-Class C low-level waste characterization. Appendix I: Impact of concentration averaging low-level radioactive waste volume projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuite, P.; Tuite, K.; O`Kelley, M.; Ely, P.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides a quantitative framework for bounding unpackaged greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste types as a function of concentration averaging. The study defines the three concentration averaging scenarios that lead to base, high, and low volumetric projections; identifies those waste types that could be greater-than-Class C under the high volume, or worst case, concentration averaging scenario; and quantifies the impact of these scenarios on identified waste types relative to the base case scenario. The base volume scenario was assumed to reflect current requirements at the disposal sites as well as the regulatory views. The high volume scenario was assumed to reflect the most conservative criteria as incorporated in some compact host state requirements. The low volume scenario was assumed to reflect the 10 CFR Part 61 criteria as applicable to both shallow land burial facilities and to practices that could be employed to reduce the generation of Class C waste types.

  16. Detrital U-Pb geochronology provenance analyses: case studies in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, and the Book Cliffs, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lippert, Peter Gregory

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ! ! Detrital U-Pb geochronology provenance analyses: case studies in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, and the Book Cliffs, Utah By Peter Gregory Lippert Submitted to the graduate degree program in Geology and the Graduate Faculty... i Acceptance Page ii Abstract iii-iv Table of contents v-viii List of figures and tables ix-x Chapter 1. Introduction 11-16 Chapter 2. Geologic History...

  17. Energy Emergency Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Preparedness...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Washington, DC; the FEMA Region I Regional Response Coordination Center (RRCC) in Boston, Massachusetts; the Region II RRCC in Colts Neck, New Jersey; the Region III RRCC in...

  18. Regional Energy Efficiency Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Programs Regional Energy Efficiency Programs This presentation covers regional industrial energy efficiency programs in the Midwest, Southeast, and Southwest. Regional Energy...

  19. PITTSBURGH REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL THREATS ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    AND COMMUNITIES PITTSBURGH, PA. | AUGUST 2013 #12;PRETA AIR: HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS 32 PITTSBURGH REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL THREATS ANALYSIS REPORT PRETA AIR: HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS (HAPs)/AIR TOXICS PREPARED BY AUTHORSPITTSBURGH REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL THREATS ANALYSIS (PRETA) REPORT PRETA AIR: HAZARDOUS AIR

  20. 1, 497531, 2004 Regional hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    BGD 1, 497­531, 2004 Regional hydrology controls stream microbial biofilms T. J. Battin et al hydrology controls stream microbial biofilms: evidence from a glacial catchment T. J. Battin1, , A. Wille2@pflaphy.pph.univie.ac.at) 497 #12;BGD 1, 497­531, 2004 Regional hydrology controls stream microbial biofilms T. J. Battin et al

  1. REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY PLANNING AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mays, Larry W.

    CHAPTER 3 REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY PLANNING AND CAPACITY EXPANSION MODELS Messele Z. Ejeta California Department of Water Resources Sacramento, California Larry W. Mays Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona 3.1 INTRODUCTION Water supply planning on a regional scale

  2. Presentation of Regional SDSN Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garulli, Andrea

    ;Conference topics: Pollution in the Mediterranean sea Climate change Improving the management Energy#12;Presentation of UN SDSN and MED SDSN Regional SDSN Center for the Mediterranean Region #12;UN for the Mediterranean Basin Why a Mediterranean Network? Shared history Shared environment Shared future MED

  3. BOSTON UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbordt, Martin

    D, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering ABSTRACT While Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDBOSTON UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Dissertation SCALABLE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION USING #12;SCALABLE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION USING FPGAS AND MULTICORE PROCESSORS (Order No. ) MD

  4. MERIT Collaboration Meeting MIT, Boston,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Instrumentation ? · Why may we need it ? · What to do ? · Lessons from LHC machine and detector cryogenics · Other components required to measure and control the process parameters. Effects of radiation: Aging of material on a chip. Single events are proportional to particle flux #12;Cryogenic Instrumentation exposed

  5. BOSTON COLLEGE ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    /Mechanical Rooms 8 3.4 Asbestos Free Labels 8 4.0 Lockout Areas 8 5.0 Training 9 5.1 Overview 9 5.2 Asbestos Signage 3. Asbestos Warning labels 4. Asbestos Free Labels D. Lockout Area Report E. Training Outline F

  6. Boston University College of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    include additional BE coursework (8 credits): 1) 4 2) 4 Choice of Two Courses from the following: Check, and Commercialization ENG ME 525 Technology Ventures ENG ME 550 Product Supply Chain Design ENG ME 584 Manufacturing

  7. Boston University College of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    ; may include additional BE coursework (8 credits): 1) 4 2) 4 Choice of Two Technology Leadership Manufacturing Strategy ENG ME 703 Managerial Cost Accounting ENG EC 518 Project Management for Software

  8. Boston University College of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    include additional BE coursework (8 credits): 1) 4 2) 4 Choice of Two Courses from the following: Check Manufacturing Strategy · ENG ME 703 Managerial Cost Accounting · ENG EC 518 Project Management for Software

  9. GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK Boston University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Frank

    *648 Beacon St. David Barlow (C) CARD 9610 Deborah Belle (DS) 115 5455 Peter Blake (DS) 137 3 School/Psychiatry) 232-9500x4689 Domenic Ciraulo (Medical School/Psychiatry) 638-8141 Gary Kaplan

  10. Boston University College of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @bu.edu Address: Department of Manufacturing Engineering Rm. 135, 15 Saint Mary's Street Telephone: (617) 353 and Thursday 9:30-11:30am in room 135, at 15 Saint Mary's (very close to the ECL lab, where Matlab was once of Semiconductor Devices," by Betty Anderson and Richard Anderson. · "Fundamentals of Modern VLSI Devices," by Yuan

  11. Boston Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,BelcherBlundell 1FortInformationJV Jump

  12. boston | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14Russian NuclearNational NuclearSecurityacademic|aviationboston |

  13. The Project The Southern Region Water Quality Regional Coordination Project is designed to promote regional collaboration,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Project The Southern Region Water Quality Regional Coordination Project is designed to promote to protect and restore water resources. Effective approaches for watershed management, pollution prevention to the research, extension and education resources available through the Land Grant University System

  14. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit: Lightweighting Breakout Session Summary Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit: Lightweighting...

  15. Regional Public Coordination Transportation Plan Texoma Region #22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texoma Council of Governments

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in conjunction with TxDOT to increase public awareness of the project. As an integral part of this project, each of the 24 regions studying public transportation in their area was charged with assessing Barriers, Constraints and Best Practices in public... Sherman TAPS TAPS TAPS operates in seven (7) counties, with three (3) of the counties in the Texoma Region. TAPS services include demand response, commuter bus services and special services. Square Miles Population ?00 Rider Trips ?05 Clay 1...

  16. U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a multi-sector, integrated model of the U.S. energy system put out by the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. NEMS is used to produce the annual 20-year forecast of U.S. energy use aggregated to the nine-region census division level. The research objective was to disaggregate this regional energy forecast to the county level for select forecast years, for use in a more detailed and accurate regional analysis of energy usage across the U.S. The process of disaggregation using a geographic information system (GIS) was researched and a model was created utilizing available population forecasts and climate zone data. The model's primary purpose was to generate an energy demand forecast with greater spatial resolution than what is currently produced by NEMS, and to produce a flexible model that can be used repeatedly as an add-on to NEMS in which detailed analysis can be executed exogenously with results fed back into the NEMS data flow. The methods developed were then applied to the study data to obtain residential and commercial electricity demand forecasts. The model was subjected to comparative and statistical testing to assess predictive accuracy. Forecasts using this model were robust and accurate in slow-growing, temperate regions such as the Midwest and Mountain regions. Interestingly, however, the model performed with less accuracy in the Pacific and Northwest regions of the country where population growth was more active. In the future more refined methods will be necessary to improve the accuracy of these forecasts. The disaggregation method was written into a flexible tool within the ArcGIS environment which enables the user to output the results in five year intervals over the period 2000-2025. In addition, the outputs of this tool were used to develop a time-series simulation showing the temporal changes in electricity forecasts in terms of absolute, per capita, and density of demand.

  17. Pacific Islands Region News Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacific Islands Region News Release Contact: Wende Goo FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 808-721-4098 May 27 of these unique twins by contributing more than 100 hours of work to construct a holding pen for the young seal

  18. Council's Regional Hydropower Potential Scoping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Council's Regional Hydropower Potential Scoping Study Generating Resources Advisory Committee 11 to determine potential, and draw conclusions Determine if realistic, reasonable assumption for hydropower at existing non-powered dams, and upgrades at existing hydropower facilities #12;Questions Asked Can

  19. Anomalous Emission from HII regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Dickinson

    2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Spinning dust appears to be the best explanation for the anomalous emission that has been observed at $\\sim 10-60$ GHz. One of the best examples of spinning dust comes from a HII region in the Perseus molecular cloud. Observations of other HII regions also show tentative evidence for excess emission at frequencies $\\sim 30$ GHz, although at lower emissivity levels. A new detection of excess emission at 31 GHz in the HII region RCW175 has been made. The most plausible explanation again comes from spinning dust. HII regions are a good place to look for spinning dust as long as accurate radio data spanning the $\\sim 5-100$ GHz range is available.

  20. RAFT Regional Algal Feedstock Testbed

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3B—Integration of Supply Chains III: Algal Biofuels Strategy RAFT Regional Algal Feedstock Testbed Kimberly Ogden, Professor, University of Arizona, Engineering Technical Lead, National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts

  1. Regional 166 Direct Loan (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio Development Services Agency's (ODSA) Regional 166 Direct Loan provides low-interest loans to businesses creating new jobs or preserving existing employment opportunities in the State of Ohio.

  2. Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The Keystone Center

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Keystone Center convened and facilitated a year-long Dialogue on "Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions" to develop recommendations that will help address the difficult and contentious issues related to expansions of regional electric transmission systems that are needed for reliable and economic transmission of power within and across regions. This effort brought together a cross-section of affected stakeholders and thought leaders to address the problem with the collective wisdom of their experience and interests. Transmission owners sat at the table with consumer advocates and environmental organizations. Representatives from regional transmission organizations exchanged ideas with state and federal regulators. Generation developers explored common interests with public power suppliers. Together, the Dialogue participants developed consensus solutions about how to begin unraveling some of the more intractable issues surrounding identification of need, allocation of costs, and reaching consensus on siting issues that can frustrate the development of regional transmission infrastructure. The recommendations fall into three broad categories: 1. Recommendations on appropriate institutional arrangements and processes for achieving regional consensus on the need for new or expanded transmission infrastructure 2. Recommendations on the process for siting of transmission lines 3. Recommendations on the tools needed to support regional planning, cost allocation, and siting efforts. List of Dialogue participants: List of Dialogue Participants: American Electric Power American Transmission Company American Wind Energy Association California ISO Calpine Corporation Cinergy Edison Electric Institute Environmental Defense Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Great River Energy International Transmission Company ISO-New England Iowa Public Utility Board Kanner & Associates Midwest ISO National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates National Grid Northeast Utilities PA Office of Consumer Advocates Pacific Gas & Electric Corporation Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission PJM Interconnection The Electricity Consumers Resource Council U.S. Department of Energy US Department of the Interior Van Ness Feldman Western Interstate Energy Board Wind on the Wires Wisconsin Public Service Commission Xcel Energy

  3. Regional

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection RadiationRecord-SettingHead5 IdleRegardingIndustrial Technologies|3

  4. Southeast Texas Region Regional Public Transportation Coordination Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southeast Texas Regional Planning Commission

    Providers Public transportation in the southeast Texas region includes primarily demand- response service, with two localities managing fixed-route systems. Table 2 identifies the transportation providers within the region. The major transportation... citywide bus services with eleven local routes. PAT operates from 6:15am to 6:15pm five days a week. Annual ridership for BMT totaled 671,420 fixed route and 22,155 demand response trips in 2005, while PAT ridership reached 116,632 fixed route and 20...

  5. Regions for Select Spot Prices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently Approved JustificationBio-Inspired PowerRegional companiesRegions

  6. EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison against 6th Power Plan (Update cyclically Data Clearinghouse BPA/RTF NEEA/Regional Programs Group Update Regional EE Technology Roadmap Lighting

  7. Panhandle Region Transportation Coordination Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panhandle Regional Transportation Advisory Group

    drivers; shared office staff with PCS Schedule for out of county trips Amarillo MWF Notes on Service Provided Medicaid to Amarillo M-F; school trips M-F; Hereford Satellite Center; some trips to Hereford Senior Center and nursing homes Table 2............................................................................................................................ 2-5 Health and Human Services Organizations ................................................................................. 2-9 History of Regional Coordination of Public Transportation .................................................... 2...

  8. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 10. Alaska region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, J.L.; Wentink, T. Jr.; Becker, R. Jr.; Comiskey, A.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each subregion of Alaska. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a state scale is given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each subregion are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the Alaska wind energy resource. An outline to the descriptions of the wind resource given for each subregion is included. Assessments for individual subregions are presented as separate chapters. The subregion wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the Alaska wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the subregion chapters.

  9. Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii)....

  10. Clean Cities Regional Support & Petroleum Displacement Awards...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regional Support & Petroleum Displacement Awards Clean Cities Regional Support & Petroleum Displacement Awards 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

  11. Texas State Planning Region 3 Report of Regional Transportation Coordination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nortex Regional Planning Commission

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the 24 regions studying public transportation in their area was charged with assessing Barriers, Constraints and Best Practices in public transportation. This Coordination Committee addressed this issue with enthusiasm, generating significant topics...DOT requirement that all vehicles be ADA compliant, Medicaid restrictions and Insurance as significant barriers to public transportation. Best practices included sharing of information regarding this project through publication in rural newspapers, inter...

  12. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  13. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid loaded nano-insulin has greater potentials of combating arsenic induced hyperglycemia in mice: Some novel findings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samadder, Asmita; Das, Jayeeta; Das, Sreemanti; De, Arnab; Saha, Santu Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Soumya Sundar; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman, E-mail: prof_arkb@yahoo.co.in

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Diabetes is a menacing problem, particularly to inhabitants of groundwater arsenic contaminated areas needing new medical approaches. This study examines if PLGA loaded nano-insulin (NIn), administered either intraperitoneally (i.p.) or through oral route, has a greater cost-effective anti-hyperglycemic potential than that of insulin in chronically arsenite-fed hyperglycemic mice. The particle size, morphology and zeta potential of nano-insulin were determined using dynamic light scattering method, scanning electronic and atomic force microscopies. The ability of the nano-insulin (NIn) to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB) was also checked. Circular dichroic spectroscopic (CD) data of insulin and nano-insulin in presence or absence of arsenic were compared. Several diabetic markers in different groups of experimental and control mice were assessed. The mitochondrial functioning through indices like cytochrome c, pyruvate-kinase, glucokinase, ATP/ADP ratio, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell membrane potential and calcium-ion level was also evaluated. Expressions of the relevant marker proteins and mRNAs like insulin, GLUT2, GLUT4, IRS1, IRS2, UCP2, PI3, PPAR?, CYP1A1, Bcl2, caspase3 and p38 for tracking-down the signaling cascade were also analyzed. Results revealed that i.p.-injected nano-encapsulated-insulin showed better results; NIn, due to its smaller size, faster mobility, site-specific release, could cross BBB and showed positive modulation in mitochondrial signaling cascades and other downstream signaling molecules in reducing arsenic-induced-hyperglycemia. CD data indicated that nano-insulin had less distorted secondary structure as compared with that of insulin in presence of arsenic. Thus, overall analyses revealed that PLGA nano-insulin showed better efficacy in combating arsenite-induced-hyperglycemia than that of insulin and therefore, has greater potentials for use in nano-encapsulated form. - Highlights: ? PLGA encapsulated nano-insulin attenuates arsenic-induced diabetes in mice. ? Encapsulated insulin acts effectively at nearly 10 fold lesser dose than insulin. ? Injection route is more effective than oral administration route. ? Nano-insulin can cross blood–brain barrier with added physiological implications. ? Nano-insulin acts mainly through regulation of mitochondrial signaling cascade.

  14. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's (SECARB) Phase I program focused on promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and commercial deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. The SECARB program, and its subsequent phases, directly support the Global Climate Change Initiative's goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by the year 2012. Work during the project's two-year period was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix''. The SECARB team was successful in accomplishing its tasks to define the geographic boundaries of the region; characterize the region; identify and address issues for technology deployment; develop public involvement and education mechanisms; identify the most promising capture, sequestration, and transport options; and prepare action plans for implementation and technology validation activity. Milestones accomplished during Phase I of the project are listed below: (1) Completed preliminary identification of geographic boundaries for the study (FY04, Quarter 1); (2) Completed initial inventory of major sources and sinks for the region (FY04, Quarter 2); (3) Completed initial development of plans for GIS (FY04, Quarter 3); (4) Completed preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues (FY04, Quarter 4); (5) Assessed safety, regulatory and permitting issues (FY05, Quarter 1); (6) Finalized inventory of major sources/sinks and refined GIS algorithms (FY05, Quarter 2); (7) Refined public involvement and education mechanisms in support of technology development options (FY05, Quarter 3); and (8) Identified the most promising capture, sequestration and transport options and prepared action plans (FY05, Quarter 4).

  15. Developing a Regional Recovery Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, Ann M.; Olson, Jarrod; Stein, Steven L.; Clark, Rebecca; Kelly, Heather; Sheline, Jim; Tietje, Grant; Williamson, Mark; Woodcock, Jody

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract A biological attack would present an unprecedented challenge for local, state, and federal agencies; the military; the private sector; and individuals on many fronts ranging from vaccination and treatment to prioritization of cleanup actions to waste disposal. To prepare the Seattle region to recover from a biological attack, the Seattle Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) partners collaborated with military and federal agencies to develop a Regional Recovery Framework for a Biological Attack in the Seattle Urban Area. The goal was to reduce the time and resources required to recover and restore wide urban areas, military installations, and other critical infrastructure following a biological incident by providing a coordinated systems approach. Based on discussions in small workshops, tabletop exercises, and interviews with emergency response agency staff, the partners identified concepts of operation for various areas to address critical issues the region will face as recovery progresses. Key to this recovery is the recovery of the economy. Although the Framework is specific to a catastrophic, wide-area biological attack using anthrax, it was designed to be flexible and scalable so it could also serve as the recovery framework for an all-hazards approach. The Framework also served to coalesce policy questions that must be addressed for long-term recovery. These questions cover such areas as safety and health, security, financial management, waste management, legal issues, and economic development.

  16. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste shipping package/container identification and requirements study. National Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyacke, M.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies a variety of shipping packages (also referred to as casks) and waste containers currently available or being developed that could be used for greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level waste (LLW). Since GTCC LLW varies greatly in size, shape, and activity levels, the casks and waste containers that could be used range in size from small, to accommodate a single sealed radiation source, to very large-capacity casks/canisters used to transport or dry-store highly radioactive spent fuel. In some cases, the waste containers may serve directly as shipping packages, while in other cases, the containers would need to be placed in a transport cask. For the purpose of this report, it is assumed that the generator is responsible for transporting the waste to a Department of Energy (DOE) storage, treatment, or disposal facility. Unless DOE establishes specific acceptance criteria, the receiving facility would need the capability to accept any of the casks and waste containers identified in this report. In identifying potential casks and waste containers, no consideration was given to their adequacy relative to handling, storage, treatment, and disposal. Those considerations must be addressed separately as the capabilities of the receiving facility and the handling requirements and operations are better understood.

  17. Project management plan for low-level mixed wastes and greater-than category 3 waste per Tri-Party Agreement M-91-10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOUNINI, L.

    1999-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project management plan is to define the tasks and deliverables that will support the treatment, storage, and disposal of remote-handled and large container contact-handled low-level mixed waste, and the storage of Greater-Than-Category 3 waste. The plan is submitted to fulfill the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-91-10. The plan was developed in four steps: (1) the volumes of the applicable waste streams and the physical, dangerous, and radioactive characteristics were established using existing databases and forecasts; (2) required treatment was identified for each waste stream based on land disposal restriction treatment standards and waste characterization data; (3) alternatives for providing the required treatment were evaluated and the preferred options were selected; and (4) an acquisition plan was developed to establish the techuical, schedule, and cost baselines for providing the required treatment capabilities. The major waste streams are summarized in the table below, along with the required treatment for disposal.

  18. Project management plan for low-level mixed waste and greater-than-category 3 waste per tri-party agreement M-91-10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOUNINI, L.

    1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project management plan is to define the tasks and deliverables that will support the treatment, storage, and disposal of remote-handled and large container contact-handled low-level mixed waste, and the storage of Greater-thaw category 3 waste. The plan is submitted to fulfill the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-91-10, The plan was developed in four steps: (1) the volumes of the applicable waste streams and the physical, dangerous, and radioactive characteristics were established using existing databases and forecasts; (2) required treatment was identified for each waste stream based on land disposal restriction treatment standards and waste characterization data; (3) alternatives for providing the required treatment were evaluated and the preferred options were selected; (4) an acquisition plan was developed to establish the technical, schedule, and cost baselines for providing the required treatment capabilities. The major waste streams are tabulated, along with the required treatment for disposal.

  19. Stakeholder Engagement on the Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste -12565

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, Christine; Joyce, James; Edelman, Arnold [Office of Environmental Management, Office of Disposal Operations-EM-43 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Disposal Operations is responsible for developing a permanent disposal capability for a small volume, but highly radioactive, class of commercial low-level radioactive waste, known as Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste. DOE has issued a draft environmental impact statement (EIS) and will be completing a final EIS under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) that evaluates a range of disposal alternatives. Like other classes of radioactive waste, proposing and evaluating disposal options for GTCC waste is highly controversial, presents local and national impacts, and generates passionate views from stakeholders. Recent national and international events, such as the cancellation of the Yucca Mountain project and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, have heighten stakeholder awareness of everything nuclear, including disposal of radioactive waste. With these challenges, the Office of Disposal Operations recognizes that informed decision-making that will result from stakeholder engagement and participation is critical to the success of the GTCC EIS project. This paper discusses the approach used by the Office of Disposal Operations to engage stakeholders on the GTCC EIS project, provides advice based on our experiences, and proffers some ideas for future engagements in today's open, always connected cyber environment. (authors)

  20. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste transportation regulations and requirements study. National Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyacke, M.; Schmitt, R.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to identify the regulations and requirements for transporting greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and to identify planning activities that need to be accomplished in preparation for transporting GTCC LLW. The regulations and requirements for transporting hazardous materials, of which GTCC LLW is included, are complex and include several Federal agencies, state and local governments, and Indian tribes. This report is divided into five sections and three appendices. Section 1 introduces the report. Section 2 identifies and discusses the transportation regulations and requirements. The regulations and requirements are divided into Federal, state, local government, and Indian tribes subsections. This report does not identify the regulations or requirements of specific state, local government, and Indian tribes, since the storage, treatment, and disposal facility locations and transportation routes have not been specifically identified. Section 3 identifies the planning needed to ensure that all transportation activities are in compliance with the regulations and requirements. It is divided into (a) transportation packaging; (b) transportation operations; (c) system safety and risk analysis, (d) route selection; (e) emergency preparedness and response; and (f) safeguards and security. This section does not provide actual planning since the details of the Department of Energy (DOE) GTCC LLW Program have not been finalized, e.g., waste characterization and quantity, storage, treatment and disposal facility locations, and acceptance criteria. Sections 4 and 5 provide conclusions and referenced documents, respectively.

  1. West Central Texas Regional Transportation Final Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West Central Texas Council of Governments

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WEST CENTRAL TEXAS REGIONAL REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION FINAL REPORT NOVEMBER 2006 West Central Texas Regional Transit Coordination Plan Final Report and Executive Summary November 2006 A&R Consulting The Goodman... Workshops 177 Appendix C - Public Meetings 183 West Central Texas Regional Transit Coordination Plan Final Report and Executive Summary November 2006 A&R Consulting The Goodman Corporation November 2006 3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...

  2. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Slip and dilation tendency on the Great Basin fault surfaces (from the USGS Quaternary Fault Database) were calculated using 3DStress (software produced by Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by the measured ambient stress field. - Values range from a maximum of 1 (a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions) to zero (a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate). - Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the Great Basin. As dip is unknown for many faults in the USGS Quaternary Fault Database, we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum slip and dilation tendency. - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  3. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 8. The southern Rocky Mountain region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, S.R.; Freeman, D.L.; Hadley, D.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southern Rocky Mountain atlas assimilates five collections of wind resource data: one for the region and one for each of the four states that compose the Southern Rocky Mountain region (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah). At the state level, features of the climate, topography and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than is provided in the regional discussion, and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction, and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

  4. Geothermal Regions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to libraryOpen EnergyInformation|Regions

  5. Cooperative monitoring of regional security agreements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, A.L.; Vannoni, M.; Biringer, K.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nonproliferation and Arms Control Analysis Dept.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper argues that cooperative monitoring plays a critical role in the implementation of regional security agreements and confidence building measures. A framework for developing cooperative monitoring options is proposed and several possibilities for relating bilateral and regional monitoring systems to international monitoring systems are discussed. Three bilateral or regional agreements are analyzed briefly to illustrate different possibilities. These examples illustrate that the relationship of regional or bilateral arms control or security agreements to international agreements depends on a number of factors: the overlap of provisions between regional and international agreements; the degree of interest in a regional agreement among the international community; efficiency in implementing the agreement; and numerous political considerations. Given the importance of regional security to the international community, regions should be encouraged to develop their own infrastructure for implementing regional arms control and other security agreements. A regional infrastructure need not preclude participation in an international regime. On the contrary, establishing regional institutions for arms control and nonproliferation could result in more proactive participation of regional parties in developing solutions for regional and international problems, thereby strengthening existing and future international regimes. Possible first steps for strengthening regional infrastructures are identified and potential technical requirements are discussed.

  6. Evaluation of Maxim Module-Integrated Electronics at the DOE Regional Test Centers (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deline, C.; Sekulic, B.; Barkaszi, S.; Yang, J.; Kahn, S.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Module-embedded power electronics developed by Maxim Integrated are under evaluation through a partnership with the Department of Energy's Regional Test Center (RTC) program. Field deployments of both conventional modules and electronics-enhanced modules are designed to quantify the performance advantage of Maxim's products under different amounts of interrow shading, and their ability to be deployed at a greater ground-coverage ratio than conventional modules. Simulations in PVSYST have quantified the predicted performance difference between conventional modules and Maxim's modules from interrow shading. Initial performance results have identified diffuse irradiance losses at tighter row spacing for both the Maxim and conventional modules. Comparisons with published models show good agreement with models predicting the greatest diffuse irradiance losses. At tighter row spacing, all of the strings equipped with embedded power electronics outperformed their conventional peers. An even greater performance advantage is predicted to occur in the winter months when the amount of interrow shading mismatch is at a maximum.

  7. Identifying Isotropic Events Using a Regional Moment Tensor Inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, S R; Dreger, D S; Walter, W R

    2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the deviatoric and isotropic source components for 17 explosions at the Nevada Test Site, as well as 12 earthquakes and 3 collapses in the surrounding region of the western US, using a regional time-domain full waveform inversion for the complete moment tensor. The events separate into specific populations according to their deviation from a pure double-couple and ratio of isotropic to deviatoric energy. The separation allows for anomalous event identification and discrimination between explosions, earthquakes, and collapses. Confidence regions of the model parameters are estimated from the data misfit by assuming normally distributed parameter values. We investigate the sensitivity of the resolved parameters of an explosion to imperfect Earth models, inaccurate event depths, and data with low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) assuming a reasonable azimuthal distribution of stations. In the band of interest (0.02-0.10 Hz) the source-type calculated from complete moment tensor inversion is insensitive to velocity models perturbations that cause less than a half-cycle shift (<5 sec) in arrival time error if shifting of the waveforms is allowed. The explosion source-type is insensitive to an incorrect depth assumption (for a true depth of 1 km), and the goodness-of-fit of the inversion result cannot be used to resolve the true depth of the explosion. Noise degrades the explosive character of the result, and a good fit and accurate result are obtained when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is greater than 5. We assess the depth and frequency dependence upon the resolved explosive moment. As the depth decreases from 1 km to 200 m, the isotropic moment is no longer accurately resolved and is in error between 50-200%. However, even at the most shallow depth the resultant moment tensor is dominated by the explosive component when the data have a good SNR.

  8. Enhancing regional security agreements through cooperative monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, A.L.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes that strengthening regional capabilities for formulating and implementing arms control and confidence-building measures is a tangible method of enhancing regional security. It discusses the importance of developing a regional infrastructure for arms control and confidence building and elucidates the role of technology in facilitating regional arms control and confidence-building agreements. In addition, it identifies numerous applications for regional cooperative monitoring in the areas of arms control, resource management, international commerce and disaster response. The Cooperative Monitoring Center at Sandia National Laboratories, whose aim is to help individual countries and regions acquire the tools they need to develop their own solutions to regional problems, is discussed briefly. The paper ends with recommendations for establishing regional cooperative monitoring centers.

  9. REALIZATION OF THE REGIONAL ADVANTAGEOUS AGRICULTURAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    REALIZATION OF THE REGIONAL ADVANTAGEOUS AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRIES ANALYSIS SYSTEM Kaimeng Sun Institute of Agricultural Information, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing,P. R. China 100081 Abstract: In this paper, a system for analyzing the strategic adjustment of regional agricultural

  10. DC High School Science Bowl Regionals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This event is the Washington, D.C. High School Regional competition for the US National Science Bowl. The regional competition is run by the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, and the...

  11. Regional Revolving Loan Trust Fund (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Regional Revolving Loan Trust Fund Program, coordinated by the Empire State Development program, is operated in six regions by nonprofit organizations and provides working capital loans (up to ...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Photovoltaic Regional Testing Center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grid Integration, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Partnership, Photovoltaic, Photovoltaic Regional Testing Center (PV RTC), Photovoltaic Systems Evaluation...

  13. Explanation of Significant Differences Between Models used to Assess Groundwater Impacts for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Greater-Than-Class C-Like Waste Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0375-D) and the

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models have been used to assess the groundwater impacts to support the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste (DOE-EIS 2011) for a facility sited at the Idaho National Laboratory and the Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project (INL 2011). Groundwater impacts are primarily a function of (1) location determining the geologic and hydrologic setting, (2) disposal facility configuration, and (3) radionuclide source, including waste form and release from the waste form. In reviewing the assumptions made between the model parameters for the two different groundwater impacts assessments, significant differences were identified. This report presents the two sets of model assumptions and discusses their origins and implications for resulting dose predictions. Given more similar model parameters, predicted doses would be commensurate.

  14. 6, 1092910958, 2006 Regional scale CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 10929­10958, 2006 Regional scale CO2 flux estimation using radon A. I. Hirsch Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions On using radon-222 and CO2 to calculate regional-scale CO2 fluxes A. I (Adam.Hirsch@noaa.gov) 10929 #12;ACPD 6, 10929­10958, 2006 Regional scale CO2 flux estimation using

  15. Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Everest, Graham R

    Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective A report prepared for East of England #12;Low Carbon Innovation Centre Report for EEDA Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective 20/04/2009 ii Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective A report prepared for East

  16. Segmentation into fuzzy regions using topographic distance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp-Foliguet, Sylvie

    recognition from fuzzy regions. Keywords: Segmentation, Fuzzy region, Watershed, Color image, TopographicSegmentation into fuzzy regions using topographic distance SYLVIE PHILIPP­FOLIGUET 1 MARCELO@dcc.ufmg.br, arnaldo@dcc.ufmg.br 3 Supported by CAPES. Abstract. This paper exposes an algorithm that leads to a fuzzy

  17. Cooperative monitoring of regional security agreements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, A.L.; Vannoni, M.; Biringer, K.L.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper argues that cooperative monitoring plays a critical role in the implementation of regional security agreements and confidence building measures. A framework for developing cooperative monitoring options is proposed and several possibilities for relating bilateral and regional monitoring systems to international monitoring systems are discussed. Three bilateral or regional agreements are analyzed briefly to illustrate different possibilities: (1) the demilitarization of the Sinai region between Israel and Egypt in the 1970s; (2) the 1991 quadripartite agreement for monitoring nuclear facilities among Brazil, Argentina, The Argentine-Brazilian Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials and the International Atomic Energy Agency; and (3) a bilateral Open Skies agreement between Hungary and Romania in 1991. These examples illustrate that the relationship of regional or bilateral arms control or security agreements to international agreements depends on a number of factors: the overlap of provisions between regional and international agreements; the degree of interest in a regional agreement among the international community; efficiency in implementing the agreement; and numerous political considerations.Given the importance of regional security to the international community, regions should be encouraged to develop their own infrastructure for implementing regional arms control and other security agreements. A regional infrastructure need not preclude participation in an international regime. On the contrary, establishing regional institutions for arms control and nonproliferation could result in more proactive participation of regional parties in developing solutions for regional and international problems, thereby strengthening existing and future international regimes. Possible first steps for strengthening regional infrastructures are identified and potential technical requirements are discussed.

  18. Securing non-volatile memory regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faraboschi, Paolo; Ranganathan, Parthasarathy; Muralimanohar, Naveen

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, apparatus and articles of manufacture to secure non-volatile memory regions are disclosed. An example method disclosed herein comprises associating a first key pair and a second key pair different than the first key pair with a process, using the first key pair to secure a first region of a non-volatile memory for the process, and using the second key pair to secure a second region of the non-volatile memory for the same process, the second region being different than the first region.

  19. Timing of the deposition of uppermost Cretaceous and Paleocene coal-bearing deposits in the Greater Glendive area, Montana and North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the aid of a grant from the National Geographic Society, a cooperative agreement with the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Late Cretaceous and Paleocene geologic and paleontologic field studies were undertaken in Makoshika, State Park and vicinity, Dawson County, Montana. This region was chosen as a study area because of its potential for yielding new fossil localities and extensive exposures both above and below the K/T boundary, as suggested by previous research by David W. Krause and Joseph H. Hartman. Related field studies were also undertaken in areas adjacent to the Cedar Creek Anticline in North Dakota. This work was part of ongoing research to document change in the composition of mammalian and molluscan faunas during the Late Cretaceous and Paleocene and to relate observed patterns to floral and invertebrate changes in composition. This study focuses on the record of mammals and mollusks in the Makoshika stratigraphic section and places old and new observations into a paleomagnetic and palynomorph framework. Of particular interest is the appearance and diversification of archaic ungulate mammals. Simultaneous dinosaur extinction with ungulate radiation has been invoked in gradual, as opposed to catastrophic, models of faunal change at the K/T boundary. However, supposed Cretaceous localities bearing archaic ungulates and other mammals of {open_quotes}Paleocene aspect{close_quotes} may be the product of faunal reworking. Elsewhere in the Williston Basin (e.g., Garfield and McCone Counties, Montana), the molluscan record of uppermost Cretaceous and Paleocene strata indicates the extinction of all of the highly sculptured unionid bivalves just prior to the onset of coal swamps and subsequent coal formation.

  20. James George Baldwin Curriculum Vitae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutyra, Lucy R.

    policy (with Edward Cunningham). Forecasting regional carbon dioxide emissions in China (with Edward.A., Boston University, Energy and Environmental Analysis 1997-2002 B.A., Boston University, Environmental: An Analysis of the Potential Utilization of Public Space in Boston Massachusetts. Energy and Environment

  1. Northwest Regional Technology Center, March 2013 Page 1 of 2 Around The Region In Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to homeland security in the region, and this issue highlights Puget Sound Regional Blue Force Tracking Puget Sound Regional Blue Force Tracking Initiative The Puget Sound Regional Blue Force Tracking (BFTS the Puget Sound Area Maritime Security Committee Area of Responsibility. As part of the Initiative

  2. Emitting gas regions in Mrk 493: An extensive Fe II line emission region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. C. Popovic; A. Smirnova; D. Ilic; A. Moiseev; J. Kovacevic; V. Afanasiev

    2007-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed 3D spectroscopic observations of Mrk 493 in order to investigate the Fe II emitting region and their possible connection with the Hydrogen emitting region. We found that there is a strong Fe II emission in an extensive region ~ 4" x 4" around Sy 1 nucleus. The Fe II line width indicates that these lines are originated in an intermediate line region.

  3. Enforcement Policy Statement: Regional Standards Enforcement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    42 U.S.C. 6291-6309, which set forth amended energy conservation standards for central air conditioners and heat pumps, including regional standards in certain States....

  4. BPA Regional Science Bowl Begins Jan. 31

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional-Science-Bowl-Begins-Jan-31 Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects &...

  5. Regional Analysis And Characterization Of Fractured Aquifers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regional Analysis And Characterization Of Fractured Aquifers In The Virginia Blue Ridge And Piedmont Provinces Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  6. Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Validation Phase ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Validation Phase Core Storage R&D Storage Infrastructure Strategic Program Support NATCARBAtlas Program Plan Project Portfolio...

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Vermont Photovoltaic Regional Test...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photovoltaic Regional Test Center (RTC). The RTC will enable research on integrating solar panels into the statewide smart grid and help reduce the cost of solar power. The...

  8. Regional Districts, Commissions, and Authorities (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes a number of regional districts, commissions, and authorities with the power to implement regulations and development plans for protected park and recreational areas.

  9. Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources of the Basin and Range Province and adjoining regions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  10. Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report covers the states that largely fall into the Southeastern Reliability Corporation (SERC) region: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee.

  11. Northwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

  12. 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Northwest Region Workshop, held in Seattle July 15, 2011.

  13. Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

  14. Regional Resource Centers for Innovation Brochure (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wogsland, J.

    2000-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure describes OIT's Regional Resource Centers for Innovation (RCIs), which provide the Innovation and Invention program grantees and other small business energy innovators commercialization assistance.

  15. Northeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

  16. The metallicity of circumnuclear star forming regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. I. Diaz; E. Terlevich; M. Castellanos; G. F. Hagele

    2006-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a spectrophotometric study of circumnuclear star forming regions (CNSFR) in the early type spiral galaxies: NGC 2903, NGC 3351 and NGC 3504, all of them of over solar metallicity according to standard empirical calibrations. A detailed determination of their abundances is made after careful subtraction of the very prominent underlying stellar absorption. It is found that most regions show the highest abundances in HII region-like objects. The relative N/O and S/O abundances are discussed. In is also shown that CNSFR, as a class, segregate from the disk HII region family, clustering around smaller ``softness parameter" -- \\eta' -- values, and therefore higher ionizing temperatures.

  17. The metallicity of circumnuclear star forming regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Díaz, A I; Castellanos, M; Hägele, G F

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a spectrophotometric study of circumnuclear star forming regions (CNSFR) in the early type spiral galaxies: NGC 2903, NGC 3351 and NGC 3504, all of them of over solar metallicity according to standard empirical calibrations. A detailed determination of their abundances is made after careful subtraction of the very prominent underlying stellar absorption. It is found that most regions show the highest abundances in HII region-like objects. The relative N/O and S/O abundances are discussed. In is also shown that CNSFR, as a class, segregate from the disk HII region family, clustering around smaller ``softness parameter" -- \\eta' -- values, and therefore higher ionizing temperatures.

  18. Western Regional Emergency Medicine Student Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Daniel A; Fernandez, Jorge

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Western Regional Emergency Medicine Student Symposium DanielFernandez, MD Keck School of Medicine of the University ofDepartment of Emergency Medicine, Los Angles, CA The Western

  19. anemia mga1 region: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Plants Websites Summary: 652013 1 Regional GHG Emissions O tlook Greenhouse Gas and the Regional Power System Symposium Regional GHG Emissions - Outlook June 4, 2013...

  20. Predicting Functional Regions of Objects Chaitanya Desai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramanan, Deva

    regions. We compare "blind" approaches that ig- nore image data, bottom-up approaches that reason about). We benchmark a wide variety of algo- rithms for producing such outputs, including blind baselines- fords little use to an observer. The central thesis of this work is that functional regions

  1. THE ECONOMIC SITUATION IN THE ECE REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE ECONOMIC SITUATION IN THE ECE REGION DIETER HESSE ECONOMIC ANALYSIS DIVISION UNECE #12;Major trends in the global economy so far in 2003 Global economic activity picked up ­ but uneven regional growth forces United States remains main engine of global economic growth Japan and Asian emerging

  2. Understanding Regional Economic Growth in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Understanding Regional Economic Growth in India Jeffrey D. Sachs, Nirupam Bajpai and Ananthi Ramiah Papers #12;Understanding Regional Economic Growth in India Jeffrey D. Sachs Center for International Development (CID) Harvard University Ananthi_Ramiah@harvard.edu This paper was prepared for the Asian Economic

  3. Roadmap: Associate of Arts Regional College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Associate of Arts [RE-AA-AA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 12-Mar-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major GPA Overall GPA 61 2.000 2.000 #12;Roadmap: Associate of Arts [RE-AA-AA] Regional College Catalog Year

  4. Roadmap: Associate of Arts Regional College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Associate of Arts [RE-AA-AA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 27-Feb-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major.000 #12;Roadmap: Associate of Arts [RE-AA-AA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 2 of 2 | Last

  5. Roadmap: Associate of Science Regional College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Associate of Science [RE-AS-AS] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 27-Feb-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study.000 #12;Roadmap: Associate of Science [RE-AS-AS] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 2 of 2

  6. Roadmap: Associate of Science Regional College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Associate of Science [RE-AS-AS] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 12-Mar-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study GPA Overall GPA 61 2.000 2.000 #12;Roadmap: Associate of Science [RE-AS-AS] Regional College Catalog

  7. Cardiff School of City and Regional Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Christopher

    Cardiff School of City and Regional Planning Undergraduate Degree Programmes www School of City and Regional Planning 11 BSc Geography (Human) 13 BSc Geography (Human) and Planning 15 to Find Us #12;Welcome 1www.cardiff.ac.uk/cplan Thank you for your interest in the Cardiff School of City

  8. MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................. 24 #12;v ASMFC Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission BOEM Bureau of Ocean Energy Management BMPMID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN SEPTEMBER 2012 Sea Grant Mid-Atlantic Ocean Research #12;MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN SEPTEMBER 2012 Sea Grant Mid-Atlantic Ocean Research

  9. Identifying isotropic events using a regional moment tensor inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, S R; Dreger, D S; Walter, W R

    2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The deviatoric and isotropic source components for 17 explosions at the Nevada Test Site, as well as 12 earthquakes and 3 collapses in the surrounding region of the western US, are calculated using a regional time-domain full waveform inversion for the complete moment tensor. The events separate into specific populations according to their deviation from a pure double-couple and ratio of isotropic to deviatoric energy. The separation allows for anomalous event identification and discrimination between explosions, earthquakes, and collapses. Confidence regions of the model parameters are estimated from the data misfit by assuming normally distributed parameter values. We investigate the sensitivity of the resolved parameters of an explosion to imperfect Earth models, inaccurate event depths, and data with a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) assuming a reasonable azimuthal distribution of stations. In the band of interest (0.02-0.10 Hz) the source-type calculated from complete moment tensor inversion is insensitive to velocity models perturbations that cause less than a half-cycle shift (<5 sec) in arrival time error if shifting of the waveforms is allowed. The explosion source-type is insensitive to an incorrect depth assumption (for a true depth of 1 km), but the goodness-of-fit of the inversion result cannot be used to resolve the true depth of the explosion. Noise degrades the explosive character of the result, and a good fit and accurate result are obtained when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is greater than 5. We assess the depth and frequency dependence upon the resolved explosive moment. As the depth decreases from 1 km to 200 m, the isotropic moment is no longer accurately resolved and is in error between 50-200%. However, even at the most shallow depth the resultant moment tensor is dominated by the explosive component when the data has a good SNR. The sensitivity investigation is extended via the introduction of the network sensitivity solution, which takes into account the unique station distribution, frequency band, and SNR of a given test scenario. An example of this analysis is presented for the North Korea test, which shows that in order to constrain the explosive component one needs a certain station configuration. In the future we will analyze the bias in the source-type parameters due to error in the Green's function by incorporating a suite of suitable velocity models in the inversion.

  10. Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth Report Title: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth Report Title: Coal Production@nmsu.edu #12;Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth i Disclaimer This report States Government or any agency thereof. #12;Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic

  11. The CO2 Content of Consumption Across US Regions: A Multi-Regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , when attributed on a consumption basis, California's per capita emissions are over 25 percent higherThe CO2 Content of Consumption Across US Regions: A Multi-Regional Input-Output (MRIO) Approach: globalchange@mit.edu Website: http://globalchange.mit.edu/ #12;The CO2 Content of Consumption Across US Regions

  12. Control of Regional and Global Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Author suggests and researches a new revolutionary idea for regional and global weather control. He offers to cover cities, bad regions of country, full country or a continent by a thin closed film with control clarity located at a top limit of the Earth troposphere (4 - 6 km). The film is supported at altitude by small additional atmospheric pressure and connected to ground by thin cables. It is known, the troposphere defines the Earth weather. Authors show this closed dome allows to do a full control of the weather in a given region (the day is always fine, the rain is only in night, no strong wind). The average Earth (white cloudy) reflectance equal 0.3 - 0.5. That means the Earth losses about 0.3 - 0.5 of a solar energy. The dome controls the clarity of film and converts the cold regions to subtropics and creates the hot deserts, desolate wildernesses to the prosperous regions with temperate climate. That is a realistic and the cheapest method of the weather control in the Earth at the current time. Key words: Global weather control, gigantic film dome, converting a cold region to subtropics, converting desolate wilderness to a prosperous region.

  13. Regional Climate Modeling: Progress, Challenges, and Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuqing; Leung, Lai R.; McGregor, John L.; Lee, Dong-Kyou; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Ding, Yihui; Kimura, Fujio

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional climate modeling with regional climate models (RCMs) has matured over the past decade and allows for meaningful utilization in a broad spectrum of applications. In this paper, latest progresses in regional climate modeling studies are reviewed, including RCM development, applications of RCMs to dynamical downscaling for climate change assessment, seasonal climate predictions and climate process studies, and the study of regional climate predictability. Challenges and potential directions of future research in this important area are discussed, with the focus on those to which less attention has been given previously, such as the importance of ensemble simulations, further development and improvement of regional climate modeling approach, modeling extreme climate events and sub-daily variation of clouds and precipitation, model evaluation and diagnostics, applications of RCMs to climate process studies and seasonal predictions, and development of regional earth system models. It is believed that with both the demonstrated credibility of RCMs’ capability in reproducing not only monthly to seasonal mean climate and interannual variability but also the extreme climate events when driven by good quality reanalysis and the continuous improvements in the skill of global general circulation models (GCMs) in simulating large-scale atmospheric circulation, regional climate modeling will remain an important dynamical downscaling tool for providing the needed information for assessing climate change impacts and seasonal climate predictions, and a powerful tool for improving our understanding of regional climate processes. An internationally coordinated effort can be developed with different focuses by different groups to advance regional climate modeling studies. It is also recognized that since the final quality of the results from nested RCMs depends in part on the realism of the large-scale forcing provided by GCMs, the reduction of errors and improvement in physics parameterizations in both GCMs and RCMs remain a priority for climate modeling community.

  14. Stellar Populations in Circumnuclear Star Forming Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. I. Diaz; M. Alvarez-Alvarez; M. Castellanos

    2002-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the stellar populations and gas physical conditions in Circumnuclear Star Forming Regions (CNSFR) based on broad and narrow band photometry and spectrophotometric data, which have been analyzed with the use of evolutionary population synthesis and photoionization models. It is found that most CNSFR show composite stellar populations of slightly different ages. They seem to have the highest abundances in HII region-like objects, showing also N/O overabundances and S/O underabundances by a factor of about three. Also, CNSFR as a class, segregate from the disk HII region family, clustering around smaller $\\eta$' values, and thereforefore higher ionizing temperatures.

  15. Stage III Melanoma in the Axilla: Patterns of Regional Recurrence After Surgery With and Without Adjuvant Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinkham, Mark B., E-mail: mark.pinkham@health.qld.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Foote, Matthew C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Queensland Melanoma Project, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Diamantina Institute, Brisbane (Australia); University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Burmeister, Elizabeth [Nursing Practice Development Unit, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia) [Nursing Practice Development Unit, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Research Centre for Clinical and Community Practice, Griffith University, Brisbane (Australia); Thomas, Janine [Queensland Melanoma Project, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia)] [Queensland Melanoma Project, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Meakin, Janelle [Clinical Trials Research Unit, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia)] [Clinical Trials Research Unit, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Smithers, B. Mark [Queensland Melanoma Project, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia) [Queensland Melanoma Project, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Burmeister, Bryan H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Queensland Melanoma Project, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To describe the anatomic distribution of regionally recurrent disease in patients with stage III melanoma in the axilla after curative-intent surgery with and without adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A single-institution, retrospective analysis of a prospective database of 277 patients undergoing curative-intent treatment for stage III melanoma in the axilla between 1992 and 2012 was completed. For patients who received radiation therapy and those who did not, patterns of regional recurrence were analyzed, and univariate analyses were performed to assess for potential factors associated with location of recurrence. Results: There were 121 patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy because their clinicopathologic features conferred a greater risk of regional recurrence. There were 156 patients who received no radiation therapy. The overall axillary control rate was 87%. There were 37 patients with regional recurrence; 17 patients had received adjuvant radiation therapy (14%), and 20 patients (13%) had not. The likelihood of in-field nodal recurrence was significantly less in the adjuvant radiation therapy group (P=.01) and significantly greater in sites adjacent to the axilla (P=.02). Patients with high-risk clinicopathologic features who did not receive adjuvant radiation therapy also tended to experience in-field failure rather than adjacent-field failure. Conclusions: Patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy were more likely to experience recurrence in the adjacent-field regions rather than in the in-field regions. This may not simply reflect higher-risk pathology. Using this data, it may be possible to improve outcomes by reducing the number of adjacent-field recurrences after adjuvant radiation therapy.

  16. Enforcement Policy Statement: Compliance Period for Regional...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Compliance Period for Regional Standards Applicable to Central Air Conditioners April 24, 2014 On June 27, 2011, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published in the Federal...

  17. Sierra Nevada Region - Western Area Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Sierra Nevada Region is one of five offices in the Western Area Power Administration. SN markets power in northern and central California, and portions of Nevada, to wholesale...

  18. Detection Of Amplified Or Deleted Chromosomal Regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stokke, Trond (San Fransisco, CA), Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA), Gray, Joe W. (San Fransisco, CA)

    1997-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20.

  19. Detection of amplified or deleted chromosomal regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stokke, Trond (San Francisco, CA); Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA); Gray, Joe W. (San Francisco, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20.

  20. Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NIRPC is a regional council of local governments serving the citizens of Lake, Porter, and LaPorte counties in Northwest Indiana. NIRPC provides a forum that enables the citizens of Northwest...

  1. INVESTIGATION OF BULK POWER MIDWEST REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    INVESTIGATION OF BULK POWER MARKETS MIDWEST REGION November 1, 2000 The analyses and conclusions Energy Regulatory Commission, any individual Commissioner, or the Commission itself #12;3-i Contents Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 A. Description of the Midwest

  2. Public School Transportation National and Regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Public School Transportation National and Regional Perspectives: An Update Presented to Education University #12;Table of Contents I. Current Transportation Funding Policies ..................................................................................................................................1 B. Transportation Funding Options Used by States

  3. Contact Upper Great Plains Regional Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Great Plains Regional Office Mailing Address: PO Box 35800 Billings, MT 59107-5800 406-255-2800 Toll Free: 1-800-358-3415 Fax: 406-255-2900 Organizational chart with phone numbers...

  4. 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Northeast Region Workshop, held in Philadelphia, May 19–20, 2011.

  5. 2011 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Southwest Region Workshop, held in San Jose, California, August 25­–26, 2011.

  6. 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Southwest Region Workshop, held in Los Angeles on September 30, 2010.

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Photovoltaic Regional Testing Center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Test Center (RTC). The RTC will enable research on integrating solar panels into the statewide smart grid and help reduce the cost of solar power. The Vermont RTC...

  8. What is the Broad Line Region?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Laor

    2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    What is the Broad Line Region (BLR) made of? What determines its location? Why is it sometimes missing? What controls its properties? Some recent results and new approaches which may shed light on these issues are briefly described.

  9. About Upper Great Plains Regional Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7,800 miles of Federal power lines, which are connected with other regional transmission systems and groups. To keep power moving through the system, we rely on our operations in...

  10. AWEA Wind Energy Regional Summit: Northeast

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The AWEA Wind Energy Northeast Regional Summit will connect you with New England-area wind energy professionals and offers the opportunity to discuss significant issues related to land-based and...

  11. Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Rutledge

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southwest Regional Partnership (SWP) on Carbon Sequestration designed and deployed a medium-scale field pilot test of geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in the Aneth oil field. Greater Aneth oil field, Utah's largest oil producer, was discovered in 1956 and has produced over 455 million barrels of oil (72 million m3). Located in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah, Greater Aneth is a stratigraphic trap producing from the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation. Because it represents an archetype oil field of the western U.S., Greater Aneth was selected as one of three geologic pilots to demonstrate combined enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO2 sequestration under the auspices of the SWP on Carbon Sequestration, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. The pilot demonstration focuced on the western portion of the Aneth Unit as this area of the field was converted from waterflood production to CO2 EOR starting in late 2007. The Aneth Unit is in the northwestern part of the field and has produced 149 million barrels (24 million m3) of the estimated 450 million barrels (71.5 million m3) of the original oil in place - a 33% recovery rate. The large amount of remaining oil makes the Aneth Unit ideal to demonstrate both CO2 storage capacity and EOR by CO2 flooding. This report summarizes the geologic characterization research, the various field monitoring tests, and the development of a geologic model and numerical simulations conducted for the Aneth demonstration project. The Utah Geological Survey (UGS), with contributions from other Partners, evaluated how the surface and subsurface geology of the Aneth Unit demonstration site will affect sequestration operations and engineering strategies. The UGS-research for the project are summarized in Chapters 1 through 7, and includes (1) mapping the surface geology including stratigraphy, faulting, fractures, and deformation bands, (2) describing the local Jurassic and Cretaceous stratigraphy, (3) mapping the Desert Creek zone reservoir, Gothic seal, and overlying aquifers, (4) characterizing the depositional environments and diagenetic events that produced significant reservoir heterogeneity, (5) describing the geochemical, petrographic, and geomechanical properties of the seal to determine the CO2 or hydrocarbon column it could support, and (6) evaluating the production history to compare primary production from vertical and horizontal wells, and the effects of waterflood and wateralternating- gas flood programs. The field monitoring demonstrations were conducted by various Partners including New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, University of Utah, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan, Los Alamos National Laboratory and Cambridge Geosciences. The monitoring tests are summarized in Chapters 8 through 12, and includes (1) interwell tracer studies during water- and CO2-flood operations to characterize tracer behavoirs in anticipation of CO2-sequestration applications, (2) CO2 soil flux monitoring to measure background levels and variance and assess the sensitivity levels for CO2 surface monitoring, (3) testing the continuous monitoring of self potential as a means to detect pressure anomalies and electrochemical reaction due to CO2 injection, (4) conducting time-lapse vertical seismic profiling to image change near a CO2 injection well, and (5) monitoring microseismicity using a downhole string of seismic receivers to detect fracture slip and deformation associated with stress changes. Finally, the geologic modeling and numerical simulation study was conducted by researcher at the University of Utah. Chapter 13 summarizes their efforts which focused on developing a site-specific geologic model for Aneth to better understand and design CO2 storage specifically tailored to oil reservoirs.

  12. Clusters of Extragalactic Ultra Compact HII Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelsey E. Johnson; Chip Kobulnicky; Phil Massey; Peter Conti

    2001-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the detection of optically thick free-free radio sources in the galaxies M33, NGC 253, and NGC 6946 using data in the literature. We interpret these sources as being young, embedded star birth regions, which are likely to be clusters of ultracompact HII regions. All 35 of the sources presented in this article have positive radio spectral indices alpha>0 suggesting an optically thick thermal bremsstrahlung emission arising in the HII region surrounding hot stars. Energy requirements indicate a range of a several to >500 O7V star equivalents powering each HII region. Assuming a Salpeter IMF, this corresponds to integrated stellar masses of 0.1--60,000 Msun. For roughly half of the sources in our sample, there is no obvious optical counterpart, giving further support for their deeply embedded nature. Their luminosities and radio spectral energy distributions are consistent with HII regions having electron densities from 1500 cm^-3 to 15000 cm^-3 and radii of 1 - 7 pc. We suggest that the less luminous of these sources are extragalactic ultracompact HII region complexes, those of intermediate luminosity are similar to W49 in the Galaxy, while the brightest will be counterparts to 30 Doradus. These objects constitute the lower mass range of extragalactic ``ultradense HII regions'' which we argue are the youngest stages of massive star cluster formation yet observed. This sample is beginning to fill in the continuum of objects between small associations of ultracompact HII regions and the massive extragalactic clusters that may evolve into globular clusters.

  13. Regional interpretation of Kansas aeromagnetic data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarger, H.L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aeromagnetic mapping techniques used in a regional aeromagnetic survey of the state are documented and a qualitative regional interpretation of the magnetic basement is presented. Geothermal gradients measured and data from oil well records indicate that geothermal resources in Kansas are of a low-grade nature. However, considerable variation in the gradient is noted statewide within the upper 500 meters of the sedimentary section; this suggests the feasibility of using groundwater for space heating by means of heat pumps.

  14. Regions of influence for two iterative methods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leifeste, Arlee Ross

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subject Mathematics REGIONS OF INFLUENCE FOR TWO ITERATIVE METHODS A Thesis By ARLEE ROSS LEIFESTE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) (N b )' January 1966 ACKNOWLEDGMENT The author wishes... purpose of the present discussion is to initiate a study of the "regions of influence" of the various solutions of the simul- taneous equations involved. Let the simultaneous functions be denoted and let ( y , y , , y 1 be a point of n...

  15. Residential market transformation: National and regional indicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Wie McGrory, Laura L.; McNamara, Maureen; Suozzo, Margaret

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of programs are underway to address market barriers to the adoption of energy-efficient residential technologies and practices. Most are administered by utilities, states, or regions that rely on the Energy Star as a consistent platform for program marketing and messaging. This paper reviews regional and national market transformation activities for three key residential end-uses -- air conditioning, clothes washing, and lighting -- characterizing current and ongoing programs; reporting on progress; identifying market indicators; and discussing implications.

  16. A nanoflare model for active region radiance: application of artificial neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bazarghan; H. Safari; D. E. Innes; E. Karami; S. K. Solanki

    2008-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Context. Nanoflares are small impulsive bursts of energy that blend with and possibly make up much of the solar background emission. Determining their frequency and energy input is central to understanding the heating of the solar corona. One method is to extrapolate the energy frequency distribution of larger individually observed flares to lower energies. Only if the power law exponent is greater than 2, is it considered possible that nanoflares contribute significantly to the energy input. Aims. Time sequences of ultraviolet line radiances observed in the corona of an active region are modelled with the aim of determining the power law exponent of the nanoflare energy distribution. Methods. A simple nanoflare model based on three key parameters (the flare rate, the flare duration time, and the power law exponent of the flare energy frequency distribution) is used to simulate emission line radiances from the ions Fe XIX, Ca XIII, and Si iii, observed by SUMER in the corona of an active region as it rotates around the east limb of the Sun. Light curve pattern recognition by an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) scheme is used to determine the values. Results. The power law exponents, alpha 2.8, 2.8, and 2.6 for Fe XIX, Ca XIII, and Si iii respectively. Conclusions. The light curve simulations imply a power law exponent greater than the critical value of 2 for all ion species. This implies that if the energy of flare-like events is extrapolated to low energies, nanoflares could provide a significant contribution to the heating of active region coronae.

  17. SEARCHING FOR NEW HYPERCOMPACT H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, INAF, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Pandian, Jagadheep D. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Dr., Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Kurtz, Stan, E-mail: asanchez@arcetri.astro.it [Centro de RadioastronomIa y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Hypercompact (HC) H II regions are, by nature, very young H II regions, associated with the earliest stages of massive star formation. They may represent the transition phase as an early B-type star grows into an O-type star. Unfortunately, so few HC H II regions are presently known that their general attributes and defining characteristics are based on small number statistics. A larger sample is needed for detailed studies and good statistics. Class II methanol masers are one of the best indicators of the early stages of massive star formation. Using the Arecibo Methanol Maser Galactic Plane Survey-the most sensitive blind survey for 6.7 GHz methanol masers to date-we selected 24 HC H II region candidates. We made Expanded Very Large Array continuum observations at 3.6 and 1.3 cm to search for HC H II regions associated with these masers. We identified six potential HC H II regions in our sample based on the presence of optically thick free-free emission. Overall, we find that 30% of the methanol masers have an associated centimeter radio continuum source (separation less than 0.1 pc), which is in general agreement with previous studies.

  18. 1 Kneeland Street Boston, MA 02111

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufts University

    for the patients we serve. I At its heart, the initiative celebrates the spirit of TUSDM--a community that ranges, and to serve our diverse patient populations. Situated at the heart of the Tufts Health Sciences Campus true crisis proportions through a comprehensive master planning effort. Working in conjunction

  19. Boston University Joint Physics and Chemistry Colloquium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    of Protein Dynamics The self-assembly of proteins ("protein folding") is one of the key steps in the function provided a new framework for simulating and conceptualizing protein folding, leading to a new analytic statistical mechanics theory for protein folding kinetics. The picture that is emerging suggests a change

  20. Government Documents Department Boston Public Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamos, Michael I.

    , design, and plant. Utility patents are granted for any "new and useful process, machine, article." Plant patents are granted "to anyone who invents or discovers and asexually reproduces any distinct and new variety of plants." Laws of nature, physical phenomena, and abstract ideas are not patentable. How

  1. Boston University Fall 2011 ECE Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    protocols relevant to security. 4. Be familiar with the implementation of various cyber attacks. 5. Be able of this course is to provide a wholistic, and yet technically deep, examination of security related to computers, based on the Backtrack Linux distribution. The course describes the underlying foundations of popular

  2. The BosTon College STOKES HALL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    's enduring commit- ment to the liberal arts," said Col- lege of Arts & Sciences Dean Da- vid Quigley. "The David Quigley September 30, 2010 Publi

  3. The Boston Globe May 19, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    Reserve, the Office of Management and Budget, and the Congressional Budget Office. The study was ordered asset income. Would the present value (the value today) of the future revenues cover the present value in the country working for four years and handing over every penny earned to pay this bill, and you'll grasp its

  4. Moving the Massachusetts Masses: Boston's Subway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Susan L.

    inexpensive, the cars were slow and overcrowded. Seven dif- ferent horsecar companies converged on downtown End Street Railway Company with Henry M. Whitney as its president. By 1893 both Whitney and city of timber brac- es. The braces kept the excavated walls from caving in. #12;power. Although the electric

  5. BOSTON UNIVERSITY Policy BU 000-001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Frank

    : Security Management Process Policy ID: BU 000-001 HIPAA Section: 164.308(a)(3) Version: 1.1 Effective Date of these processes and controls. See the Risk Management Policy [BU 000-001B]. 2.3. Sanctions Policy [164.308(a)(1 process for applying appropriate sanctions against workforce members who do not comply with the security

  6. Boston University Office of Sponsored Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Frank

    will not be established in the SAP financial system until this review and approval has occurred. There is a high volume that the responsible Department has the resources and facilities to carry out the project; and to assess the potential

  7. Field Trips (1) Boston: An Urban Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeStefano, Stephen

    Reservoir and Watershed Trip Leaders: Steve DeStefano and Justin Compton, USGS Cooperative Research Unit. The Quabbin also plays an important role as wildlife habitat: moose, deer, bears, bobcats, fishers, beavers

  8. Urban waterfront : problems and potentials of Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hossain, Mohammad Iqbal

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The essence of this thesis is based on the fact that downtown waterfronts are special urban areas in a city. These areas offer unique opportunities for providing cultural and recreational public amenities to urban life. ...

  9. Boston College Libraries January, 2008 Dear student,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    in this Institutional Repository (IR) will make them available to anyone with access to the World Wide Web shall include the right to publicly post my dissertation/thesis on the World Wide Web. I will retain, the electronic copy of your manuscript should be in Microsoft Word file format. Other acceptable file formats are

  10. Whose city? : redevelopment and governance in Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molina Costa, Patricia

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the challenges and opportunities of the community-based redevelopment model in a neoliberal economic context. Drawing on a review of the history and theories of redevelopment and governance in the ...

  11. Disturbing ecologies : interventions in Boston's seaport district

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaspar, Christine

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "For the past fifty years the question of nature has been conspicuously absent from urbanistic discourse... The development of the American city can be explained through the opposition between nature and culture, wilderness ...

  12. Boston University Photonics Center Shared Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finzi, Adrien

    (s) Project/Organization Role Helen Fawcett Manager, Operations and Technical Programs Robert Schaejbe .........................................................................................................5 3.3 Personal Property................................................................................................8 4.4 Personal Productivity and Protection................

  13. FA Technology Ventures (Boston) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGerman Aerospace CenterEverlightOpenEyeforenergy JumpF S

  14. Solar Policy Environment: Boston | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmart Metersof Energy LEDMarketReady

  15. AppsBoston2014_final.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta3ApplianceApplying the10:05 am, Jun7:45

  16. Boston Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment ActivitiesAge Refining Air1,D O E

  17. A. M. Szelc, Neutrino 2014, Boston

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced Charged-CurrentN NAstudy

  18. Boston Green Building | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthby

  19. CleanTech Boston | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformation SmyrnaNewClay ElectricCleangoogle hangout

  20. Greater Rochester Nursing Home Quality Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Agenda 08:15 Registration; Continental Breakfast; Lean Six Sigma Teams' Posters 09:00 Welcome the Impact of Transforming Elder Care 10:15 Lean Six Sigma Team Project Presentations Melissa Allmaier, RN, Six Sigma Master Black Belt John Biuso, BSIE, Six Sigma Black Belt, CPIM Project Team leaders

  1. Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the module includes training on the Idaho site commitment to safety and safety programs, quality assurance and environmental protection and the right to a safe and healthful...

  2. Ecology and Greater Prairie-Chicken

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    of Mortality and Competition _______________ 5 Wind Power Generation ___________________________ 5 Habitat

  3. Promoting greater Federal energy productivity [Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Mark; Dudich, Luther

    2003-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a close-out report describing the work done under this DOE grant to improve Federal Energy Productivity. Over the four years covered in this document, the Alliance To Save Energy conducted liaison with the private sector through our Federal Energy Productivity Task Force. In this time, the Alliance held several successful workshops on the uses of metering in Federal facilities and other meetings. We also conducted significant research on energy efficiency, financing, facilitated studies of potential energy savings in energy intensive agencies, and undertook other tasks outlined in this report.

  4. SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southwest Partnership Region includes five states (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Utah) and contiguous areas from three adjacent states (west Texas, south Wyoming, and west Kansas). This energy-rich region exhibits some of the largest growth rates in the nation, and it contains two major CO{sub 2} pipeline networks that presently tap natural subsurface CO{sub 2} reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery at a rate of 30 million tons per year. The ten largest coal-fired power plants in the region produce 50% (140 million tons CO{sub 2}/y) of the total CO{sub 2} from power-plant fossil fuel combustion, with power plant emissions close to half the total CO{sub 2} emissions. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state government agencies and universities, the five major electric utility industries, seven oil, gas and coal companies, three federal agencies, the Navajo Nation, several NGOs including the Western Governors Association, and data sharing agreements with four other surrounding states. The Partnership is developing action plans for possible Phase II carbon sequestration pilot tests in the region, as well as the non-technical aspects necessary for developing and carrying out these pilot tests. The establishment of a website network to facilitate data storage and information sharing, decision-making, and future management of carbon sequestration in the region is a priority. The Southwest Partnership's approach includes (1) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, (2) assessing and initiating public acceptance of possible sequestration approaches, and (3) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region. The Partnership will also identify potential gaps in monitoring and verification approaches needed to validate long-term storage efforts.

  5. Inversion of Gravity Data to Define the Pre-Cenozoic Surface and Regional Structures Possibly Influencing Groundwater Flow in the Rainier Mesa Region, Nye County, Nevada.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas G. Hildenbrand; Geoffrey A. Phelps; Edward A. Mankinen

    2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-dimensional inversion of gravity data from the Rainier Mesa area and surrounding regions reveals a topographically complex pre-Cenozoic basement surface. This model of the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rocks is intended for use in a 3D hydrogeologic model being constructed for the Rainier Mesa area. Prior to this study, our knowledge of the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rocks was based on a regional model, applicable to general studies of the greater Nevada Test Site area but inappropriate for higher resolution modeling of ground-water flow across the Rainier Mesa area. The new model incorporates several changes that lead to significant improvements over the previous regional view. First, the addition of constraining wells, encountering old volcanic rocks lying above but near pre-Cenozoic basement, prevents modeled basement from being too shallow. Second, an extensive literature and well data search has led to an increased understanding of the change of rock density with depth in the vicinity of Rainier Mesa. The third, and most important change, relates to the application of several depth-density relationships in the study area instead of a single generalized relationship, thereby improving the overall model fit. In general, the pre-Cenozoic basement surface deepens in the western part of the study area, delineating collapses within the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes, and shallows in the east in the Eleana Range and Yucca Flat regions, where basement crops out. In the Rainier Mesa study area, basement is generally shallow (< 1 km). The new model identifies previously unrecognized structures within the pre-Cenozoic basement that may influence ground-water flow, such as a shallow basement ridge related to an inferred fault extending northward from Rainier Mesa into Kawich Valley.

  6. Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courtney Lane

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    As the Department of Energy stated in its 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, there will need to be enhanced outreach efforts on a national, state, regional, and local level to communicate wind development opportunities, benefits and challenges to a diverse set of stakeholders. To help address this need, PennFuture was awarded funding to create the Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute to provide general education and outreach on wind energy development across Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Over the course of the two-year grant period, PennFuture used its expertise on wind energy policy and development in Pennsylvania and expanded it to other states in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture accomplished this through reaching out and establishing connections with policy makers, local environmental groups, health and economic development organizations, and educational institutions and wind energy developers throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture conducted two regional wind educational forums that brought together wind industry representatives and public interest organizations from across the region to discuss and address wind development in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture developed the agenda and speakers in collaboration with experts on the ground in each state to help determine the critical issue to wind energy in each location. The sessions focused on topics ranging from the basics of wind development; model ordinance and tax issues; anti-wind arguments and counter points; wildlife issues and coalition building. In addition to in-person events, PennFuture held three webinars on (1) Generating Jobs with Wind Energy; (2) Reviving American Manufacturing with Wind Power; and (3) Wind and Transmission. PennFuture also created a web page for the institute (http://www.midatlanticwind.org) that contains an online database of fact sheets, research reports, sample advocacy letters, top anti-wind claims and information on how to address them, wind and wildlife materials and sample model ordinances. Video and presentations from each in-person meeting and webinar recordings are also available on the site. At the end of the two-year period, PennFuture has accomplished its goal of giving a unified voice and presence to wind energy advocates in the Mid-Atlantic region. We educated a broad range of stakeholders on the benefits of wind energy and gave them the tools to help make a difference in their states. We grew a database of over 500 contacts and hope to continue the discussion and work around the importance of wind energy in the region.

  7. A Hierarchical Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ringler, Todd; Collins, William D.; Taylor, Mark; Ashfaq, Moetasim

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tools for predicting the evolution of the climate system. Through decades of development, GCMs have demonstrated useful skill in simulating climate at continental to global scales. However, large uncertainties remain in projecting climate change at regional scales, which limit our ability to inform decisions on climate change adaptation and mitigation. To bridge this gap, different modeling approaches including nested regional climate models (RCMs), global stretch-grid models, and global high-resolution atmospheric models have been used to provide regional climate simulations (Leung et al. 2003). In previous efforts to evaluate these approaches, isolating their relative merits was not possible because factors such as dynamical frameworks, physics parameterizations, and model resolutions were not systematically constrained. With advances in high performance computing, it is now feasible to run coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs at horizontal resolution comparable to what RCMs use today. Global models with local refinement using unstructured grids have become available for modeling regional climate (e.g., Rauscher et al. 2012; Ringler et al. 2013). While they offer opportunities to improve climate simulations, significant efforts are needed to test their veracity for regional-scale climate simulations.

  8. IS ACTIVE REGION CORE VARIABILITY AGE DEPENDENT?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of both steady and transient loops in active region cores has been reported from soft X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of the solar corona. The relationship between the different loop populations, however, remains an open question. We present an investigation of the short-term variability of loops in the core of two active regions in the context of their long-term evolution. We take advantage of the nearly full Sun observations of STEREO and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft to track these active regions as they rotate around the Sun multiple times. We then diagnose the variability of the active region cores at several instances of their lifetime using EIS/Hinode spectral capabilities. We inspect a broad range of temperatures, including for the first time spatially and temporally resolved images of Ca XIV and Ca XV lines. We find that the active region cores become fainter and steadier with time. The significant emission measure at high temperatures that is not correlated with a comparable increase at low temperatures suggests that high-frequency heating is viable. The presence, however, during the early stages, of an enhanced emission measure in the ''hot'' (3.0-4.5 MK) and ''cool'' (0.6-0.9 MK) components suggests that low-frequency heating also plays a significant role. Our results explain why there have been recent studies supporting both heating scenarios.

  9. Future regional climate change in the ten hydrologic regions of California: A climate modeling investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, Lisa C

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    snow accumulation (mm snow water equivalent) by region.Bell, J.L. , Jour. American Water Resources Assoc. , 591-CO, 1993. Department of Water Resources (DWR), California

  10. Ultraviolet and Optical Observations of OB Associations and Field Stars in the Southwest Region of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joel Wm. Parker; Dennis Zaritsky; Theodore P. Stecher; Jason Harris; Phil Massey

    2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Using photometry from the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) and photometry and spectroscopy from three ground-based optical datasets we have analyzed the stellar content of OB associations and field areas in and around the regions N 79, N 81, N 83, and N 94 in the LMC. We compare data for the OB association Lucke-Hodge 2 (LH 2) to determine how strongly the initial mass function (IMF) may depend on different photometric reductions and calibrations. We also correct for the background contribution of field stars, showing the importance of correcting for field star contamination in determinations of the IMF of star formation regions. It is possible that even in the case of an universal IMF, the variability of the density of background stars could be the dominant factor creating the differences between calculated IMFs for OB associations. We have also combined the UIT data with the Magellanic Cloud Photometric Survey to study the distribution of the candidate O-type stars in the field. We find a significant fraction, roughly half, of the candidate O-type stars are found in field regions, far from any obvious OB associations. These stars are greater than 2 arcmin (30 pc) from the boundaries of existing OB associations in the region, which is a distance greater than most O-type stars with typical dispersion velocities will travel in their lifetimes. The origin of these massive field stars (either as runaways, members of low-density star-forming regions, or examples of isolated massive star formation) will have to be determined by further observations and analysis.

  11. Regional Lead Agents and County Coordinators 2011 RESPONSIBILITY NAME COUNTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    #12;Regional Lead Agents and County Coordinators 2011 RESPONSIBILITY NAME COUNTY REGION 1 Regional Lead Millie Davenport HGIC County Coordinator Matt Burns Pickens County Coordinator Marty Watt Anderson County Coordinator Morris Warner Oconee REGION 2 Regional Lead Danny Howard Greenville County Coordinator

  12. Extended emission associated with young HII regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. P. Ellingsen; S. S. Shabala; S. E. Kurtz

    2004-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) to make observations of a sample of eight young ultra-compact HII regions, selected on the basis that they have associated class II methanol maser emission. We have made observations sensitive to both compact and extended structures and find both to be present in most sources. The scale of the extended emission in our sample is in general less than that observed towards samples based on IRAS properties, or large single-dish flux densities. Our observations are consistent with a scenario where extended and compact radio continuum emission coexists within HII regions for a significant period of time. We suggest that these observations are consistent with a model where HII evolution takes place within hierarchically structured molecular clouds. This model is the subject of a companion paper (Shabala et al. 2005) and addresses both the association between compact and extended emission and UCHII region lifetime problem.

  13. The Corona Australis Star Forming Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ralph Neuhäuser; Jan Forbrich

    2008-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    At a distance of about 130 pc, the Corona Australis molecular cloud complex is one of the nearest regions with ongoing and/or recent star formation. It is a region with highly variable extinction of up to AV~45 mag, containing, at its core, the Coronet protostar cluster. There are now 55 known optically detected members, starting at late B spectral types. At the opposite end of the mass spectrum, there are two confirmed brown dwarf members and seven more candidate brown dwarfs. The CrA region has been most widely surveyed at infrared wavelengths, in X-rays, and in the millimeter continuum, while follow-up observations from centimeter radio to X-rays have focused on the Coronet cluster.

  14. SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP ON CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson; Rick Allis; Barry Biediger; Joel Brown; Jim Cappa; George Guthrie; Richard Hughes; Eugene Kim; Robert Lee; Dennis Leppin; Charles Mankin; Orman Paananen; Rajesh Pawar; Tarla Peterson; Steve Rauzi; Jerry Stuth; Genevieve Young

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southwest Partnership Region includes six whole states, including Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Utah, roughly one-third of Texas, and significant portions of adjacent states. The Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership project is to achieve an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. The Partnership made great progress in this first year. Action plans for possible Phase II carbon sequestration pilot tests in the region are almost finished, including both technical and non-technical aspects necessary for developing and carrying out these pilot tests. All partners in the Partnership are taking an active role in evaluating and ranking optimum sites and technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region. We are identifying potential gaps in all aspects of potential sequestration deployment issues.

  15. Light emitting device having peripheral emissive region

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Light emitting devices are provided that include one or more OLEDs disposed only on a peripheral region of the substrate. An OLED may be disposed only on a peripheral region of a substantially transparent substrate and configured to emit light into the substrate. Another surface of the substrate may be roughened or include other features to outcouple light from the substrate. The edges of the substrate may be beveled and/or reflective. The area of the OLED(s) may be relatively small compared to the substrate surface area through which light is emitted from the device. One or more OLEDs also or alternatively may be disposed on an edge of the substrate about perpendicular to the surface of the substrate through which light is emitted, such that they emit light into the substrate. A mode expanding region may be included between each such OLED and the substrate.

  16. FY08 LDRD Final Report Regional Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bader, D C; Chin, H; Caldwell, P M

    2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated, multi-model capability for regional climate change simulation is needed to perform original analyses to understand and prepare for the impacts of climate change on the time and space scales that are critical to California's future environmental quality and economic prosperity. Our intent was to develop a very high resolution regional simulation capability to address consequences of climate change in California to complement the global modeling capability that is supported by DOE at LLNL and other institutions to inform national and international energy policies. The California state government, through the California Energy Commission (CEC), institutionalized the State's climate change assessment process through its biennial climate change reports. The bases for these reports, however, are global climate change simulations for future scenarios designed to inform international policy negotiations, and are primarily focused on the global to continental scale impacts of increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. These simulations do not meet the needs of California public and private officials who will make major decisions in the next decade that require an understanding of climate change in California for the next thirty to fifty years and its effects on energy use, water utilization, air quality, agriculture and natural ecosystems. With the additional development of regional dynamical climate modeling capability, LLNL will be able to design and execute global simulations specifically for scenarios important to the state, then use those results to drive regional simulations of the impacts of the simulated climate change for regions as small as individual cities or watersheds. Through this project, we systematically studied the strengths and weaknesses of downscaling global model results with a regional mesoscale model to guide others, particularly university researchers, who are using the technique based on models with less complete parameterizations or coarser spatial resolution. Further, LLNL has now built a capability in state-of-the-science mesoscale climate modeling that complements that which it has in global climate simulation, providing potential sponsors with an end-to-end simulation and analysis program.

  17. Climate Change Projections of the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mearns, L. O.; Sain, Steve; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Bukovsky, M. S.; McGinnis, Seth; Biner, S.; Caya, Daniel; Arritt, R.; Gutowski, William; Takle, Eugene S.; Snyder, Mark A.; Jones, Richard; Nunes, A M B.; Tucker, S.; Herzmann, D.; McDaniel, Larry; Sloan, Lisa

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate major results of the NARCCAP multiple regional climate model (RCM) experiments driven by multiple global climate models (GCMs) regarding climate change for seasonal temperature and precipitation over North America. We focus on two major questions: How do the RCM simulated climate changes differ from those of the parent GCMs and thus affect our perception of climate change over North America, and how important are the relative contributions of RCMs and GCMs to the uncertainty (variance explained) for different seasons and variables? The RCMs tend to produce stronger climate changes for precipitation: larger increases in the northern part of the domain in winter and greater decreases across a swath of the central part in summer, compared to the four GCMs driving the regional models as well as to the full set of CMIP3 GCM results. We pose some possible process-level mechanisms for the difference in intensity of change, particularly for summer. Detailed process-level studies will be necessary to establish mechanisms and credibility of these results. The GCMs explain more variance for winter temperature and the RCMs for summer temperature. The same is true for precipitation patterns. Thus, we recommend that future RCM-GCM experiments over this region include a balanced number of GCMs and RCMs.

  18. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  19. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  20. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  1. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  2. 2030 Northwest Arkansas Regional Transportation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Arkansas Regional Planning Commission

    2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    united front. B. Regional Transportation History An early road was established through Northwest Arkansas in the 1830s linking Fort Smith to points in southern Missouri and on to St. Louis. By the mid 1800s many roads crossed the growing region including... the historic Butterfield Overland Coach Road that linked St. Louis and San Francisco. The Civil War brought troop movements through the area with major battles being fought at Pea Ridge and Prairie Grove. The University of Arkansas was established in 1872...

  3. SPEER: Building a Regional Energy Efficiency Partnership 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewin, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPEER: Building a Regional Energy Efficiency Partnership Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference – San Antonio, TX Doug Lewin December 18, 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-52 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas... Dec. 16-18 SPEER • Member-based, non-profit organization • The Newest Regional Energy Efficiency Organization (REEO) • Founded in 2011 • 38 members from wide cross section of E.E. industries ESL-KT-13-12-52 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy...

  4. SPEER: Building a Regional Energy Efficiency Partnership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewin, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPEER: Building a Regional Energy Efficiency Partnership Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference – San Antonio, TX Doug Lewin December 18, 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-52 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas... Dec. 16-18 SPEER • Member-based, non-profit organization • The Newest Regional Energy Efficiency Organization (REEO) • Founded in 2011 • 38 members from wide cross section of E.E. industries ESL-KT-13-12-52 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy...

  5. Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed its Phase I program in December 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership Phase I project was to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. Many other goals were accomplished on the way to this objective, including (1) analysis of CO{sub 2} storage options in the region, including characterization of storage capacities and transportation options, (2) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} sources, (3) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} separation and capture technologies employed in the region, (4) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region, (5) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, and (6) assessing and initiating public knowledge and acceptance of possible sequestration approaches. Results of the Southwest Partnership's Phase I evaluation suggested that the most convenient and practical ''first opportunities'' for sequestration would lie along existing CO{sub 2} pipelines in the region. Action plans for six Phase II validation tests in the region were developed, with a portfolio that includes four geologic pilot tests distributed among Utah, New Mexico, and Texas. The Partnership will also conduct a regional terrestrial sequestration pilot program focusing on improved terrestrial MMV methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region. The sixth and final validation test consists of a local-scale terrestrial pilot involving restoration of riparian lands for sequestration purposes. The validation test will use desalinated waters produced from one of the geologic pilot tests. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state government agencies and universities, five major electric utility companies, seven oil, gas and coal companies, three federal agencies, the Navajo Nation, several NGOs, and the Western Governors Association. This group is continuing its work in the Phase II Validation Program, slated to conclude in 2009.

  6. Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal-energy storage. Volume 2. Regions 7 through 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: Unglaciated Central Region; Glaciated Appalachians, Unglaciated Appalachians; Coastal Plain; Hawaii; and Alaska. (LCL)

  7. Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal energy storage. Volume 1. Regions 1 through 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: the Western Mountains; Alluvial Basins; Columbia LAVA Plateau; Colorado Plateau; High Plains; and Glaciated Central Region. (LCL)

  8. Regional Interagency Steering GIS Sub-Committee for FEMA's Region II Caribbean Area Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Regional Interagency Steering GIS Sub-Committee for FEMA's Region II Caribbean Area Division Jimmy Rodríguez-Zamora Caribbean Area Division, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00918 Department of Homeland Security also. This effort is being carried out at the Caribbean Area Division as New York and New Jersey

  9. Minutes of Southern Region Animal Waste Team: Southern Regional Water Quality Project Animal Waste Management Topic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Southern Animal and Waste Management Quarterly 2. Format & length: Electronic, pdf and MSWord (by requestMinutes of Southern Region Animal Waste Team: Southern Regional Water Quality Project Animal Waste with the Symposium on the State of the Science: Animal Manure and Waste Management Attended by: M. Risse (UGA), T

  10. african region summary: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    model (MRCM) in simulating the West African monsoon. The MRCM is built on the Regional Climate Model, ... Im, Eun-Soon 12 Regional Summary Gulf of Mexico Region Management...

  11. Drive-access transit : a regional analytical framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorensen, James B

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A framework for analyzing drive-access transit at a regional level is developed in this research. This framework is intended primarily for in-house use by regional transit agencies, yet has implications for the regional ...

  12. Evaluation of Maxim Module-Integrated Electronics at the DOE Regional Test Centers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deline, C.; Sekulic, B.; Stein, J.; Barkaszi, S.; Yang, J.; Kahn, S.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Module-embedded power electronics developed by Maxim Integrated are under evaluation through a partnership with the Department of Energy's Regional Test Center (RTC) program. Field deployments of both conventional modules and electronics-enhanced modules are designed to quantify the performance advantage of Maxim's products under different amounts of inter-row shading, and their ability to be deployed at a greater ground-coverage-ratio than conventional modules. Simulations in PVSYST have quantified the predicted performance difference between conventional modules and Maxim's modules from inter-row shading. Initial performance results have identified diffuse irradiance losses at tighter row spacing for both the Maxim and conventional modules. Comparisons with published models show good agreement with models predicting the greatest diffuse irradiance losses. At tighter row spacing, all of the strings equipped with embedded power electronics outperformed their conventional peers. An even greater performance advantage is predicted to occur in the winter months when the amount of inter-row shading mismatch is at a maximum.

  13. Interaction Region Issues at the NLC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Maruyama, T.; /SLAC

    2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Two detector concepts are being investigated for the Next Linear Collider. This paper discusses the current design of the interaction region for one of them, based on a 6 Tesla solenoid and silicon based tracking. Topics include masking layout, backgrounds and the suppression of final quadrupole jitter. All calculations are based on the 1 TeV design parameters.

  14. Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaren, J.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than half of the electricity produced in the southeastern states is fuelled by coal. Although the region produces some coal, most of the states depend heavily on coal imports. Many of the region's aging coal power facilities are planned for retirement within the next 20 years. However, estimates indicate that a 20% increase in capacity is needed over that time to meet the rapidly growing demand. The most common incentives for energy efficiency in the Southeast are loans and rebates; however, total public spending on energy efficiency is limited. The most common state-level policies to support renewable energy development are personal and corporate tax incentives and loans. The region produced 1.8% of the electricity from renewable resources other than conventional hydroelectricity in 2009, half of the national average. There is significant potential for development of a biomass market in the region, as well as use of local wind, solar, methane-to-energy, small hydro, and combined heat and power resources. Options are offered for expanding and strengthening state-level policies such as decoupling, integrated resource planning, building codes, net metering, and interconnection standards to support further clean energy development. Benefits would include energy security, job creation, insurance against price fluctuations, increased value of marginal lands, and local and global environmental paybacks.

  15. Finding Regions of Interest on Toroidal Meshes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Kesheng; Sinha, Rishi R; Jones, Chad; Ethier, Stephane; Klasky, Scott; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Shoshani, Arie; Winslett, Marianne

    2011-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion promises to provide clean and safe energy, and a considerable amount of research effort is underway to turn this aspiration intoreality. This work focuses on a building block for analyzing data produced from the simulation of microturbulence in magnetic confinementfusion devices: the task of efficiently extracting regions of interest. Like many other simulations where a large amount of data are produced,the careful study of ``interesting'' parts of the data is critical to gain understanding. In this paper, we present an efficient approach forfinding these regions of interest. Our approach takes full advantage of the underlying mesh structure in magnetic coordinates to produce acompact representation of the mesh points inside the regions and an efficient connected component labeling algorithm for constructingregions from points. This approach scales linearly with the surface area of the regions of interest instead of the volume as shown with bothcomputational complexity analysis and experimental measurements. Furthermore, this new approach is 100s of times faster than a recentlypublished method based on Cartesian coordinates.

  16. Superfund Dredging Restoration Results in Widespread Regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinton, Jeffrey

    Superfund Dredging Restoration Results in Widespread Regional Reduction in Cadmium in Blue Crabs J connected to the Hudson River estuary. A major Superfund dredging cleanup in 1994-1995 removed most ofcadmiumsedimentconcentrationswithinthecovefollowing the cleanup. This unique study demonstrates the efficacy of a major dredging cleanup

  17. Root region airfoil for wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tangler, James L. (Boulder, CO); Somers, Dan M. (State College, PA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thick airfoil for the root region of the blade of a wind turbine. The airfoil has a thickness in a range from 24%-26% and a Reynolds number in a range from 1,000,000 to 1,800,000. The airfoil has a maximum lift coefficient of 1.4-1.6 that has minimum sensitivity to roughness effects.

  18. Compilationof Regional to Global Inventoriesof Anthropogenic Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    inventories of emissions of the trace species included in the study at the appropriate sectoral, spatial inventories calculated global emissions by large geographic areas (Vfkhelyi, 1985), with very little spatial to compile regional to global inventories of anthropogenic emissions. This discussion is by no means

  19. Regional Report New Jersey's New Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutgers Regional Report New Jersey's New Economy Growth Challenges James W. Hughes Dean Edward J July 2006 #12;advanced new-economy peers--New York, Connecticut, and Massachusetts--have been experi- encing employment declines in the post­2000 period in a number of important "new economy" sectors

  20. Southern Region Water Quality Coordination Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an existing collaborative process through which new and existing technologies and management systems Committee (SRWQPC) promotes the development and delivery of effective management systems that can be adaptedSouthern Region Water Quality Coordination Project September 14, 2004 to June 1, 2005 Progress