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Sample records for region greater boston

  1. Greater Boston Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New Pages RecentPlantMagma EnergyGoogleProgramsScienceGreater Boston

  2. Concentration of ozone in surface air over greater Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widen, Donald Allen

    1966-01-01

    Surface ozone concentrations were measured in the Greater Boston area from November, 1964 to December, 1965. Ozone was monitored continuosly using a Mast microcoulombmetric sensor. A chromium trioxide filter was fitted to ...

  3. The impact of multifamily development on single family home prices in the Greater Boston Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuur, Arah (Arah Louise Adele)

    2005-01-01

    The impact of large, multifamily developments on nearby single-family home prices was tested in five towns in the Greater Boston Area. Case studies that had recent multifamily developments built near transit nodes or town ...

  4. New opportunities for Boston's Chinatown : turnpike air rights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Xiaofang, 1971-

    2001-01-01

    Boston's Chinatown is a regional business, cultural and service center to the Asian community in greater Boston area. However, it is confronting serious problems at this moment. These problems can be classified as three ...

  5. PLANNING FOR WATER CONSERVATION Greater Vancouver Regional District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with increasing populations and costs associated with urban growth--related to infrastructure, energy, operationPLANNING FOR WATER CONSERVATION Greater Vancouver Regional District by Andrew K. Doi B. A in urban areas around the globe, yet per capita water consumption continues to increase. Faced

  6. The study of the communication patterns of Boston-Cambridge regional biotech firms to universities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hashmi, Nada

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes data from a study which focused on understanding the informal scientific communication network among Biotechnology firms in the Boston-Cambridge Biotech area. A previous study (Allen, et. al., 2009) ...

  7. Climatological simulations of ozone and atmospheric aerosols in the Greater Cairo region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steiner, A. L.; Tawfik, A. B.; Shalaby, A.; Zakey, A. S.; Abdel Wahab, M. M.; Salah, Z.; Solmon, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2014-04-16

    An integrated chemistry-climate model (RegCM4-CHEM) simulates present-day climate, ozone and tropospheric aerosols over Egypt with a focus on Greater Cairo (GC) region. The densley populated GC region is known for its severe air quality issues driven by high levels of anthropogenic pollution in conjuction with natural sources such as dust and agricultural burning events. We find that current global emission inventories underestimate key pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and anthropogenic aerosol species. In the GC region, average-ground-based NO2 observations of 40-60 ppb are substantially higher than modeled estimates (5-10 ppb), likely due to model grid resolution, improper boundary layer representation, and poor emissions inventories. Observed ozone concentrations range from 35 ppb (winter) to 80 ppb (summer). The model reproduces the seasonal cycle fairly well, but modeled summer ozone is understimated by approximately 15 ppb and exhibits little interannual variability. For aerosols, springtime dust events dominate the seasonal aerosol cycle. The chemistry-climate model captures the springtime peak aerosol optical depth (AOD) of 0.7-1 but is slightly greater than satellite-derived AOD. Observed AOD decreases in the summer and increases again in the fall due to agricultural burning events in the Nile Delta, yet the model underestimates this fall observed AOD peak, as standard emissions inventories underestimate this burning and the resulting aerosol emissions. Our comparison of modeled gas and particulate phase atmospheric chemistry in the GC region indicates that improved emissions inventories of mobile sources and other anthropogenic activities are needed to improve air quality simulations in this region.

  8. Boston, Massachusetts Location: Boston, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    ,000 sq. feet Project scope: a single building Completed April 2007Completed April 2007 Rating: U.S. Green in the U.S. #12;This 140-unit condominium building in South Boston, was designed to incorporate green came through loans from private banks that recognized the potential sales premium of green condominiums

  9. From waterfront to watershed : mapping a big idea in the Greater Toronto Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciesielski, Linda C. (Linda Claire)

    2011-01-01

    Today, Toronto is revered among Great Lakes' and waterfront cities for its environmental planning: its massive re-investment in water and stormwater infrastructure; protected headwaters of the region's rivers; realized ...

  10. Boston, Massachusetts: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Boston, MA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given. The City of Boston and its Solar America Cities program, Solar Boston, are helping to debunk the myth that solar energy is only feasible in the southern latitudes. Boston has some of the highest energy prices in the country and will likely be one of the first locations where solar power achieves grid parity with conventional energy technologies. Solar Boston is facilitating the rapid development of solar energy projects and infrastructure in the short-term, and is preparing for the rapid market growth that is expected with the imminent arrival of grid parity over the long-term. Solar Boston developed the strategy for achieving Mayor Menino's goal of installing 25 MW of solar energy throughout Boston by 2015. Through Solar Boston, the city has developed a strategy for the installation of solar technology throughout Boston, including mapping feasible locations, preparing a permitting guide, and planning the citywide bulk purchase, financing, and installation of solar technology. The city has also worked with local organizations to maximize Boston's participation in state incentive programs and innovative financing initiatives. The resulting accomplishments include the following: (1) Created an online map of current local renewable energy projects with a tool to allow building owners to calculate their rooftop solar potential. The map is currently live at http://gis.cityofboston.gov/solarboston/. (2) Supported the city's Green Affordable Housing Program (GAHP), in partnership with the Department of Neighborhood Development (DND). Under GAHP, the city is installing more than 150 kW of PV on 200 units of affordable housing. DND requires that all new city-funded affordable housing be LEED silver certified and built solar-ready. (3) Defined solar's role in emergency preparedness with the Boston Mayor's Office of Emergency Preparedness. (4) Worked with local organizations to maximize Boston's participation in state incentive programs and innovative financing mechanisms. Solar Boston partners include DOE, MTC, local utilities and unions, an anonymous foundation, and a broad range of local, regional, and national clean-energy stakeholders. Solar Boston kicked off its partner program on January 10, 2008, sponsoring a workshop on 'Thinking BIG about Boston's Solar Energy Future,' to discuss how state, utility, and municipal programs can work together. Presentations were given by Solar Boston, Keyspan/National Grid, NSTAR, and MTC.

  11. Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development - An Application on Alternative Fuels in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shropshire, D.E.; Cobb, D.A.; Worhach, P.; Jacobson, J.J.; Berrett, S.

    2000-12-30

    The Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development project integrated the Bechtel/Nexant Industrial Materials Exchange Planner and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory System Dynamic models, demonstrating their capabilities on alternative fuel applications in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Park system. The combined model, called the Dynamic Industrial Material Exchange, was used on selected test cases in the Greater Yellow Teton Parks region to evaluate economic, environmental, and social implications of alternative fuel applications, and identifying primary and secondary industries. The test cases included looking at compressed natural gas applications in Teton National Park and Jackson, Wyoming, and studying ethanol use in Yellowstone National Park and gateway cities in Montana. With further development, the system could be used to assist decision-makers (local government, planners, vehicle purchasers, and fuel suppliers) in selecting alternative fuels, vehicles, and developing AF infrastructures. The system could become a regional AF market assessment tool that could help decision-makers understand the behavior of the AF market and conditions in which the market would grow. Based on this high level market assessment, investors and decision-makers would become more knowledgeable of the AF market opportunity before developing detailed plans and preparing financial analysis.

  12. Boston Harbor -Deep Draft Navigation Improvement Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    of Massachusetts Bay and is the New England region's largest port. The main deep water harbor is comprised for the Chelsea River which has an authorized depth of 38 feet MLLW. Deep water access to the harbor is providedBoston Harbor - Deep Draft Navigation Improvement Massachusetts 21 August 2008 and 18 September

  13. University Council on International Exchange and Research PROPOSAL FOR A FOREIGN POLICY FOR BOSTON COLLEGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    University Council on International Exchange and Research PROPOSAL FOR A FOREIGN POLICY FOR BOSTON, and greater opportunities for faculty to engage in global research and collaboration. Thus, to move Boston of the human family can and should affect the graduate and undergraduate curricular offerings

  14. HOUSING RESOURCES Description of Boston Neighborhoods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HOUSING RESOURCES Boston Description of Boston Neighborhoods http://www.bu.edu/offcampus/tips-resources/bostons-neighborhoods/ Summer Housing Boston http://www.urbaninterns.com/journal/jobseekers/summer-housing-for-boston-interns/ https://www.northeastern.edu/conferences/intern/index.html http://housing.mit.edu/summer_guest/non_mit_summer_internship_housing

  15. Downtown Boston : a public place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meiklejohn, Robert

    1984-01-01

    This thesis explores the physical and experiential qualities of public space in downtown Boston. Streets are the dominant element of urban public space; other elements include plazas , squares, promenades, alleys and parks. ...

  16. Boston Urban Farm : mending the Southwest Corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Timothy Eric

    1990-01-01

    This work studies Boston's segregated nature in terms of race and class especially as this coincides with the physical form of the city. Known for its strong neighborhoods, Boston cannot escape definite boundaries between ...

  17. Boston College | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  18. Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology Boston University School of Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology Boston University School of Medicine Ph.D. Program Boston University School of Medicine Doctor of Philosophy in Anatomy & Neurobiology #12; Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology Boston University School of Medicine Ph.D. Program Guidelines Revised

  19. Paleoecology of Calf Island in Boston's Outer Harbor WILLIAM A. PATTERSON III1,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    -marsh peat to understand the landscape processes (both natural and anthropogenic) that have influenced greater detail over a longer period of nearly 1200 years. 1 Department of Natural Resources Conservation- responding author - wap@forwild.umass.edu. Boston Harbor Islands National Park Area: Natural Resources

  20. Boston College Carroll School of Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    th Annual Finance Conference Registration List Nick Dell'Osso, Jr. Chesapeake Energy Corporation BobBoston College Carroll School of Management 10th Annual Finance Conference Registration List FirstDonato Rhode Island Distributing Jane Dornbusch Gemma Dorsey Boston College Joe Downing General Finance LLC Joe

  1. Boston College Office for Research Protections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    on projects approved by the Boston College IRB. The only modules in the CITI training program that meetBoston College Office for Research Protections Human Participant Research Training Policy Appropriate training is required for all research personnel who participate in the conduct of human

  2. Boston Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  3. boston

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2A en46A NAME AND(b)(4)

  4. Year End Information Session BOSTON COLLEGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    Information Session BOSTON COLLEGE 17 Processing in the correct fiscal year · Prepaid Expense ­ Expenses paid in FY15 relating to FY16 event or service ­ Amount over $1,000 ­ Paid from a prepaid expense account

  5. BOSTON UNIVERSITY PERSONAL INFORMATION PROTECTION PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xia, Yu "Brandon"

    BOSTON UNIVERSITY PERSONAL INFORMATION PROTECTION PROGRAM February 12, 2010 Program Statement Numbers, drivers' license numbers, financial account numbers and other sensitive information relating to collecting, handling, storing and using that Information properly and securely. This Personal Information

  6. Projective preservation : reframing Rudolph's Tower for Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Jessica K

    2012-01-01

    By 2012, the fate of Paul Rudolph's tower in downtown Boston has been in question for years while a vision of a denser city calls for its demolition. Projected development on the site currently argues that to move forward, ...

  7. Urban solarium : thermal performance in Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Juliet Chia-Wen

    2012-01-01

    This thesis addresses the issue of energy efficiency through the lens of thermal performance in the context of urban housing in the city of Boston. Located in the historic brick row house neighborhood of the South End, the ...

  8. Boston University College of Arts & Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Chemical Methodology and Library Development at Boston University (CMLD- BU) along) activation. HSF1 inhibitors have received significant attention for their potential role of a three-year research grant from the National Institutes of Health awarded to Porco

  9. Rafael Guastavino and the Boston Public Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mroszczyk, Lisa J. (Lisa Jean)

    2004-01-01

    This thesis looks at the role of Spanish architect Rafael Guastavino in the design and construction of the Boston Public Library through an examination of correspondence, construction documents and meeting minutes from the ...

  10. Water rites : a city stage for Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mansfield, Timothy Denton

    1990-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the design of a public theatre for the entire city of Boston, a "city stage." The intention is to explore through design the boundaries of an architectural setting for large scale performance art; ...

  11. Marr, David Lucia M Vaina, Boston University and Harvard Medical School, Boston,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaina, Lucia M.

    Level 1 Marr, David Lucia M Vaina, Boston University and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA INTRODUCTION 0456.001 David Courtnay Marr was born on 19 January 1945 in Essex, England. He with meticulous synthesis of the available neuroanatomical data, Marr pro- posed a definite answer

  12. Boston University -College of Engineering Course Number: EC/MS 573 Course Title: Solar Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , recombination and other losses, I-V characteristics, output power; 3) Single junction and triple-junction solar; 2) Solar cell properties and design; p-n junction photodiodes, depletion region, electrostatic field1 Boston University - College of Engineering Course Number: EC/MS 573 Course Title: Solar Energy

  13. Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology Boston University School of Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology Boston University School of Medicine Masters Program of Medicine Vesalius Program Master of Science in Anatomy & Neurobiology #12;Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology Boston University School of Medicine Masters Program Guidelines Revised Summer 2015 2

  14. Boston, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  15. BOSTON!UNIVERSITY! COLLEGE!OF!ENGINEERING!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xi

    !system! approaches! and! lean! manufacturing! concepts,! the! course! proceeds! with! the! exposition! of! ME/SE!765! BOSTON!UNIVERSITY! COLLEGE!OF!ENGINEERING! DEPARTMENT!OF!MANUFACTURING!ENGINEERING! ! ME/SE!765! methodology! for! the! analysis! and! design! of! manufacturing! systems! that! operate! in! a! time! based

  16. The Colonnade Boston Hotel 120 Huntington Ave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennett, Daniel

    Rates: 15% off best available rate Tufts Rate Code: P55 ­ [Some blackout dates apply] #12;Doubletree% off best available rate Tufts Rate Code: P55 ­ [Some blackout dates apply] (Direct bill available: Tufts University ­ (Some blackout dates apply) Midtown Hotel 220 Huntington Avenue Boston, MA 02115 (617

  17. Boston University Department of Biomedical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    Boston University Department of Biomedical Engineering ENG BE 747 Advanced Signals and Systems 2014 The required textbook for the course is Discrete-Time Signal Processing by Alan V. Oppenheim & Ronald Schafer. 7. Gaussian random processes: White Gaussian noise ­ Filtered Gaussian process, Detection of signal

  18. Boston University Department of Biomedical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    Boston University Department of Biomedical Engineering ENG BE 747 Advanced Signals and Systems 2013 The required textbook for the course is Discrete-Time Signal Processing by Alan V. Oppenheim & Ronald Schafer. 7. Gaussian random processes: White Gaussian noise ­ Filtered Gaussian process, Detection of signal

  19. Building infrastructural piers in East Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonnell, Sean

    1992-01-01

    The thesis is an inquiry into the urban waterfront and access to it. In particular, it is about the waterfront of Boston which ought to be more accessible, more public, and more present in the life of the city. The project ...

  20. Boston Architectural College Urban Sustainability Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byers, Arthur C.

    2013-07-31

    The Boston Architectural College's Urban Sustainability initiative is a demonstration project as defined by the National Energy Technology Laboratory. BAC's proposed project with the U.S. Department of Energy - NETL, is a large part of that overall initiative. The BAC's Urban Sustainability Initiative is a multi-part project with several important goals and objectives that will have a significant impact on the surrounding neighborhood including: energy conservation, reduction of storm water runoff, generation of power through alternative energy sources, elimination/reduction of BAC carbon footprint, and to create a vehicle for ongoing public outreach and education. Education and outreach opportunities will serve to add to the already comprehensive Sustainability Design courses offered at BAC relative to energy savings, performance and conservation in building design. At the finish of these essential capital projects there will be technical materials created for the education of the design, sustainability, engineering, community development and historic preservation communities, to inform a new generation of environmentally-minded designers and practitioners, the city of Boston and the general public. The purpose of the initiative, through our green renovations program, is to develop our green alley projects and energy saving renovations to the BAC physical plant, to serve as a working model for energy efficient design in enclosed 19th century and 20th century urban sites and as an educational laboratory for teaching ecological and sustainable technologies to students and the public while creating jobs. The scope of our project as it relates to the BAC and the U.S. Department of Energy- NETL combined efforts includes: Task I of the project is Phase II (Green Alley). Task I encompasses various renovation activities that will demonstrate the effectiveness of permeable paving and ground water recharge systems. It will aid in the reduction of storm water runoff into the Charles River Basin in one of its most significantly polluted sections and, will provide a green renovation mechanism for the redirected storm water of a public alley way. This activity is designed to improve the quality of water recharging the ground water and protecting the vulnerable wood pilings under many of the historic masonry buildings in Boston's Back Bay. Sustainable design research and system monitoring opportunities will also be incorporated, providing ongoing tools for public outreach and education through innovative signage and "virtual tour" technology. The monitoring will include a "building performance dash board" that reflects real time operating conditions and improvements in environmental and economic performance to be prominently displayed on the face of our 320 Newbury Street building (approximately 1.5 million people walk by annually). The project site and demonstration area is located at the rear of 951 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02115 and the parking area adjacent to Public Alley #444 in Boston's historic Back Bay. Task II of the project is Geothermal Solution. This task involves the installation of approximately seven Geothermal wells which will tap into the earth's constant underground temperatures to provide air-conditioning and heating for BAC facilities. The environmentally friendly geothermal system uses no fossil fuel, produces no emissions and runs silently, providing a sustainable model for commercial and residential buildings throughout Boston. Ultimately the combination of this project and other projects will assist in making the BAC "carbon-neutral", and could generate enough additional energy to provide free power to the Engine 33 and Ladder 15 Firehouse located at 941 Boylston Street. The project is located at the rear of 951 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02115 and the parking area adjacent to Public Alley #444 in Boston's historic Back Bay. Task III of the project is the Sustainability Design Curriculum at the BAC. The BAC is the nation’s largest independent, multi-disciplinary college of spatial design, and a leader in

  1. PROJECT PROFILE: Boston University | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1, CONDUCT P - . . - -INL EducationBoston University

  2. BOSTON HARBOR, MASSACHUSETTS DEEP DRAFT NAVIGATION IMPROVEMENT PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    entrance channels connecting Massachusetts Bay to the harbor, deep water anchorages in the harbor, a mainBOSTON HARBOR, MASSACHUSETTS DEEP DRAFT NAVIGATION IMPROVEMENT PROJECT Civil Works Review Board Re-Presentation - 26 April 2013 ABSTRACT: The Boston Harbor Deep Draft Navigation Improvement Project consists

  3. PANKAJ MEHTA 2010-Assistant Professor, Dept. of Physics, Boston University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, Pankaj

    PANKAJ MEHTA 2010- Assistant Professor, Dept. of Physics, Boston University 2011- Member, Graduate Commonwealth Ave Boston, MA 02215 Phone: +1 617 358 6303 email: pankajm@bu.edu http://physics.bu.edu/~pankajm Education 2006-2010 Postdoctoral Scholar, Molecular Biology and Physics, Princeton University (Mentor: Ned

  4. Boston Carbon Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  5. Boston Green Building | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  6. CleanTech Boston | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:ClayBurnVita JumpCleanCleanCleanStartBoston

  7. Boston, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  8. REGIONAL TRAVEL MAPS Philadelphia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    REGIONAL TRAVEL MAPS 2 hrs. 1 hr. 3 hrs. 4 hrs. 5 hrs. Philadelphia New York City Pittsburgh BostonReadingand Harrisburg 476 476 276 309 309 663 378 309 33 78 80 80 LEHIGH UNIVERSITY Bethlehem Quakertown to Philadelphia Coast including Philadelphia (50 miles south) and New York City (90 miles northeast). Bethlehem

  9. Lung Extraction, Lobe Segmentation and Hierarchical Region Assessment for Quantitative Analysis on High

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lung Extraction, Lobe Segmentation and Hierarchical Region Assessment for Quantitative Analysis Care Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA Abstract. Regional assessment of lung disease specific to different lung regions on high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) datasets. We present

  10. EA-1885: Boston Architectural College's Urban Sustainability Initiative Renovation of Green Alley #444, Boston, Massachusetts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide a grant to Boston Architectural College (BAC) to design, construct and implement the renovation of Public Alley #444 in Boston's Historic Back Bay District. The project would include the installation of 7 to 10 open loop geothermal wells to provide heating and cooling energy to BAC's facilities; the installation of a green screen trellis system, planting soils, concrete pavement, pavers, and landscaping; and mechanical upgrades (plumbing and electrical) to accommodate the geothermal solution into the benefiting facilities. Comment Period Ends: 01/13/2012 Comments should be marked "BAC Public Alley #444 Draft EA Comments" and sent to: Mr. Fred Pozzuto U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880, MS B07 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 Email: fred.pozzuto@netl.doe.gov Facsimile: 1-304-285-4403

  11. An urban infill : a residual site in Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savvides, Andreas L. (Andreas Loucas)

    1996-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the treatment of residual sites in the context of the urban environment and in particular with the wounds inflicted by the passage of the Massachusetts Turnpike through the city of Boston. The ...

  12. A study of housing modification in East Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yokouchi, Toshihito

    1980-01-01

    This thesis deals with inhabitants' modifications of the 19th century sidehall houses in East Boston, now a predominantly Italian neighborhood. On the basis of the data obtained by a survey and observations, the practical ...

  13. Boston's urban wilds : the persistence of an idea over time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bird, Caroline J. (Caroline Jennifer)

    2014-01-01

    Many city natural areas programs are constricted due to limited resources for the acquisition and management of land. Boston's urban wilds offer an alternative model for the protection of urban open space that focuses on ...

  14. Analysis of aircraft surface motion at Boston Logan International Airport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alhanatis, Robert Elias

    The purpose of this thesis is to examine the nature of aircraft surface motion on the airport surface during normal operations. Twelve hours of radar data, gathered by MIT Lincoln Laboratories from Logan airport in Boston, ...

  15. Improving public transportation to Boston Logan International Airport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Siyuan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    Boston Logan International Airport is the largest airport in New England and the 1 9 th busiest airport in the United States, serving 29.3 million passengers (arrivals and departures) in 2012. There are approximately 36,900 ...

  16. Developing resident leadership : theory and practice in Boston's neighborhoods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alleyne, Kim L

    2005-01-01

    For decades, Boston residents have worked together and organized to strengthen and protect their neighborhoods, often in response to encroaching government policy and local development. The South End's Villa Victoria housing ...

  17. Groundwater decline and the preservation of property in Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoham, Tamar

    2006-01-01

    There is a slow-motion disaster underway below the city of Boston. The levels of groundwater have been steadily decreasing over the past eighty years and the structural integrity of the city's older buildings is in jeopardy. ...

  18. Boston University Physics Colloquium Microscale propulsion in biological and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Raj

    Boston University Physics Colloquium Microscale propulsion in biological and engineered systems biological locomotion and engineered propulsion. In the first example, we examine swimming microorganisms the microstructure. In the second example, we examine engineered magnetic artificial microswimmers which can

  19. HAVING A CAR IN BOSTON There are many wonderful aspects of life here in Boston; unfortunately, owning and driving a car

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennett, Daniel

    HAVING A CAR IN BOSTON There are many wonderful aspects of life here in Boston; unfortunately, owning and driving a car is not one of them. Especially within Boston city limits, off-street parking do not have a specific need for a car in your first year (such as a commute requiring one), we

  20. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

  1. Clean Cities: Greater Washington Region Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Columbia University. He completed additional graduate studies in economics and real estate at the University of California, Berkeley. 2000 14th St., NW, DPW-Ste 330 P.O. Box...

  2. Ground penetrating radar characterization of wood piles and the water table in Back Bay, Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LeFrançois, Suzanne O'Neil, 1980-

    2003-01-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys are performed to determine the depth to the water table and the tops of wood piles beneath a residential structure at 122 Beacon Street in Back Bay, Boston. The area of Boston known ...

  3. From Gondwanaland, with love : the tale of how Boston got its rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cull, Selby (Selby C.)

    2006-01-01

    The rocks on which the city of Boston was built did not form as part of North America. They formed about 600 million years ago, at the South Pole, as the northern coast of a supercontinent called Gondwanaland. Boston's ...

  4. The moment of William Ralph Emerson's Art Club in Boston's art culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoeffler, Michelle Leah

    2000-01-01

    This thesis will analyze the architect William Ralph Emerson's (1833-1917) Boston Art Club building (1881-82) and its station within Boston and New York's art culture. Even though there has been considerable research on ...

  5. Boston Power GP Batteries JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC JumpBiossence JumpJersey Logo: Boston College Name: Boston

  6. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides loans for single family residencies and owner occupied duplexes in Hamilton, Butler, Warren, and Clermont counties in Ohio and Boone, Kenton, and...

  7. THE MAGAZINE OF THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Innovations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ecological technology seriously, she also races Formula Ford cars. Seriously. page 12 SUMMER RESEARCHTHE MAGAZINE OF THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Innovations ENGINEERING FACULTY ARE BRINGING THEIR RESEARCH TO PRACTICAL USE Class Dismissed · Racing Toward a Green Earth F A L L 2 0 0 6 #12

  8. Make Music with The Boston College Chamber Music Society!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    Make Music with The Boston College Chamber Music Society! The BC Chamber Music Society is the umbrella organization for most small ensembles based in the Music Department, and includes instrumentalists to provide music for various university functions. All members of the BC community are welcome to audition

  9. Impact of Storm Water Recharge Practices on Boston Groundwater Elevations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Richard M.

    Impact of Storm Water Recharge Practices on Boston Groundwater Elevations Brian F. Thomas, S periodically experienced a decline in groundwater elevations and the associated deterioration of untreated wood a groundwater conservation overlay district enforced by city zoning boards to require storm water recharge

  10. Boston University 2012 Graduate Student Library Survey Report Supplementary Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    Manuscripts Print journals Print books E-Books Databases E-Journals Importance of Types of Library Resources 5 the importance of various types of library resources. #12;9% 11% 11% 14% 14% 16% 29% 29% 13% 17% 19% 23% 23% 27Boston University 2012 Graduate Student Library Survey Report Supplementary Data Library Assessment

  11. BOSTON UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Eric L.

    BOSTON UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES Dissertation MONTE CARLO ESTIMATION FUNCTIONAL ARCHITECTURE by DOHMNULL GRANQUIST-FRASER B.S., University of the State of New York, Regents on this project. David Ziarnowski for his tutelage in the mysteries of Adobe Illustrator. Breault Research Inc

  12. Boston University College of Engineering Division of Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xi

    /EC 573 Solar Energy Systems ME 779 Solid State Ionics and Electrochemistry MS/ME 781 Electroceramics for Energy and Environment MS/ME 527 Trans. Phenomena in Matls Processing MS/ME 532 Atomic StructureBoston University College of Engineering Division of Materials Science & Engineering MS Program

  13. Biomedical Engineering Specimen Curriculum Boston University Dresden, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomedical Engineering Specimen Curriculum Boston University Dresden, Germany Spring Semester Circuits II, Lab 4 BME 271 Biomedical Instrumentation 4 BME 210 Physiological Transport 3 BME 252 Systems Physiology 3 Math 194 Linear Algebra 3 BME 260 Analysis of Biomedical Data 3 BME ELEC BME Elective 3 BME 103

  14. Text-Alternative Version: Boston Manufacturing R&D Workshop Video

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Following is a text version of Jim Brodrick's welcome presentation video from the April 2011 DOE SSL Manufacturing R&D Workshop in Boston, Massachusetts.

  15. Distribution of Permo-Carboniferous clastics of Greater Arabian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Laboun, A.A.

    1987-05-01

    Strikingly correlative sequences of sediments composed of sandstones, siltstones, shales, and thin argillaceous carbonate beds are present, practically everywhere, underlying the Late Permian carbonates in the Greater Arabian basin. The Greater Arabian basin as defined here occupies the broad Arabian Shelf that borders the Arabian shield. This basin is composed of several smaller basins. These clastics are exposed as thin bands and scattered small exposures in several localities around the margins of the basin. The Permo-Carboniferous clastics are represented by the Unayzah Formation of Arabia, the Doubayat Group of Syria, the Hazro Formation of southeast Turkey, the Ga'arah Formation of Iraq, the Faraghan Formation of southwest Iran, and the Haushi Group of Oman. A Late Carboniferous-Early Permian age is assigned to these clastics because they contain fossil plants and palynomorphs. These sediments represent time-transgressive fluctuating sea deposits following a phase of regional emergence, erosion, and structural disturbance which preceded the Permian transgression. The basal contact of these clastics is marked by a well-pronounced angular unconformity with various older units, ranging in age from early Carboniferous to late Precambrian. This regional unconformity is probably related to the Hercynian movements. The upper contact is conformable with the Permian carbonates. The porous sandstones of the Permo-Carboniferous sediments are important hydrocarbon exploration targets. These reservoir rocks sometimes overlie mature source rocks and are capped by shales, marls, and tight carbonates. Significant quantities of hydrocarbons are contained in these reservoirs in different parts of the Greater Arabian basin.

  16. The Graduate Student Anchored Project : a new approach to incentivizing multifamily development in the City of Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Stephen Thayer

    2014-01-01

    Despite a significant addition of new multifamily housing stock into Boston's residential rental market, Boston in 2014 faces a considerable shortage of middle income housing supply relative to demand. Both the supply ...

  17. Balancing the Scale of Rationality: The Public Memory of the Boston Tea Party and the Transformation of Dissent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neville, Meredith Diane

    2010-06-10

    This study examines the public memory of the Boston Tea Party as it has been appropriated for political purposes throughout history. First, I examine the Boston Tea Party to show that the rhetoric surrounding this protest created a tradition...

  18. Company Name: Boston Partners Financial Group, LLC Web Site: bostonpartnersfinancialgroup.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    .com Industry: Financial Planning Brief Company Overview: Boston Partners Financial Group is a great placeCompany Name: Boston Partners Financial Group, LLC Web Site: bostonpartnersfinancialgroup to ensure that they and those they care about are protected now, and in the future. Majors they typically

  19. North Boston, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNew Hampshire: EnergyReservoir |SolkraftWashington: EnergyBoston,

  20. Boston Area Solar Energy Association | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformationBio-GasIllinois:EnergyIdaho |InformationBorregoBoston Area

  1. The Potential of Distributed Cogeneration in Commercial Sites in the Greater Vancouver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Potential of Distributed Cogeneration in Commercial Sites in the Greater Vancouver Regional of Resource Management PROJECT TITLE: The Potential of Distributed Cogeneration in Commercial Sites opportunities for systems that cogenerate useful heat and electricity. This form of distributed generation

  2. Boston solar retrofits: studies of solar access and economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro, M.

    1980-11-01

    Studies of solar access and solar retrofit economics are described for residential applications in the City of Boston. The study of solar access was based upon a random sample of 94 buildings; the sample was stratified to ensure a broad geographic representation from the city's various sections. Using available data on the heights and orientations of the sampled structures and surrounding buildings, each building's hourly access to sunlight was computed separately for the roof and south facing walls. These data were then aggregated by broad structural classifications in order to provide general measures of solar access. The second study was a comparative analysis of the economics of several solar heating and hot water systems. An active hot water system, installed using pre-assembled, commercially purchased equipment, was selected as a reference technology. A variety of measures of economic performance were computed for this system, with and without existing tax credits and under various financing arrangements. Next, a number of alternative approaches for solar space and water heating were identified from interviews with individuals and groups involved in solar retrofit projects in the Boston area. The objective was to identify approaches that many of those interviewed believe to be low-cost means of applying solar energy in residential settings. The approaches selected include thermal window covers, wall collectors, bread box water heaters, and sun spaces. Preliminary estimates of the performance of several representative designs were developed and the economics of these designs evaluated.

  3. Cooperation Among Balancing Authorities Offers Greater Use of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cooperation Among Balancing Authorities Offers Greater Use of Renewable Energy with Lower Integration Costs Cooperation Among Balancing Authorities Offers Greater Use of Renewable...

  4. Research in particle physics. [Dept. of Physics, Boston Univ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitaker, Scott J.

    1992-09-01

    Research accomplishments and current activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics are presented. Principal areas of activity include the following: detectors for studies of electron[endash]positron annihilation in colliding beams; advanced accelerator component design, including the superconducting beam inflector, electrostatic quadrupoles, and the electrostatic muon kicker''; the detector for the MACRO (Monopole, Astrophysics, and Cosmic Ray Observatory) experiment; neutrino astrophysics and the search for proton decay; theoretical particle physics (electroweak and flavor symmetry breaking, hadron collider phenomenology, cosmology and astrophysics, new field-theoretic models, nonperturbative investigations of quantum field theories, electroweak interactions); measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon; calorimetry for the GEM experiment; and muon detectors for the GEM experiment at the Superconducting Super Collider.

  5. A system design for a courthouse building in Boston : implementing user needs and requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiroz, Edgar Alexander

    1992-01-01

    In this thesis, will design a courthouse building located in the Government Center, Boston. This investigation will eventually lead to the development of a preliminary building system. In order to arrive at this level of ...

  6. A comparison of the behavior of intact and Resedimented Boston Blue Clay (BBC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    House, Robert Donald

    2012-01-01

    Resedimented Boston Blue Clay (RBBC) has been used as an analog test material for research at MIT for decades, due to local variability and the high cost of sampling. However, a comprehensive study of the differences in ...

  7. Overdue, returned, and missing: the changing stories of Boston's Chinatown Branch Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, Aditi, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01

    In 1896, the Boston Public Library (BPL) opened a reading room on Tyler Street in between the South End and Chinatown. Since then, the library has disappeared and reappeared in various forms in Chinatown for different ...

  8. Inventing the Charles River Basin : urban images and civic discourse in Boston, 1844-1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haglund, Karl T

    1997-01-01

    The Charles River Basin, extending from the foot of Beacon Hill upstream past Harvard's Soldiers Field, has been called Boston's "Central Park." The river looks to all appearances tranquil and unchanging, one of the most ...

  9. Schedule and cost estimate for an innovative Boston Harbor concert hall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coste, Amelie, 1982-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis formulates a cost estimate and schedule for constructing the Boston Concert Hall, an innovative hypothetical building composed of two concert halls and a restaurant. Concert Halls are complex and expensive ...

  10. The Potential of Distributed Cogeneration in Commercial Sites in the Greater Vancouver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that provides district heating for several buildings for example) may be economically viable, even without District By Jeremy Higham B.Sc. (Agr), University of Guelph, 1992 RESEARCH PROJECT SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL in the Greater Vancouver Regional District PROJECT: 240 SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE

  11. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    market barriers to greater investment in energy efficiency and combined heat and power (CHP) technologies. CHP technology captures and reuses heat created during electricity...

  12. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Rebate Program (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides rebate incentives for homeowners in Hamilton, Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties. To qualify for rebates, homeowners must receive a [http://www...

  13. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Rebate Program (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides rebate incentives for homeowners in Hamilton, Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties. To qualify for rebates, homeowners must receive a [http://www...

  14. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    greater investment in energy efficiency and combined heat and power (CHP) technologies. CHP technology captures and reuses heat created during electricity production and other...

  15. Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide for State Government Officials Prepared by The National Council on Electricity Policy November 2009 NATIONAL COUNCIL...

  16. Clean Cities: Greater Lansing Area Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calnin has worked with the Clean Cities initiative since 2007, having supported the Detroit Area coalition as well as the Greater Lansing Area coalition. With a background that...

  17. Boston University -Department of Biomedical Engineering ENG BE/EC 765 -Biomedical Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    Boston University - Department of Biomedical Engineering ENG BE/EC 765 - Biomedical Optics Spring: After the class, or by appointment Recommended textbook: "Biomedical Optics: Principles and Imaging 22 Basics of light Tu. Jan 27 Basics of optics Th. Jan 29 Basics of biology Tu. Feb 3 Microscopy Th

  18. Boston Massachusetts: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Boston, MA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  19. The BosTon College ChroniclemarCh 27, 2008 -VOL. 16 NO. 14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    since the United States invaded Iraq, a milestone that formally passed earlier this month -- March 19 in these pages in relation to the Iraq War -- for their thoughts on the conflict, and how it has touched them. The war in Iraq has affected few in the Boston College com- munity as personally as Laura Sanchez Cross

  20. Greenovate Composting Fellowship Greenovate Boston is the City's initiative to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 25% by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    effort to divert food waste on a large scale. If successful, it can influence food waste diversion Composting Fellowship Greenovate Boston is the City's initiative to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 25, healthy, and innovative city. A Greenovate community composting program was piloted in 2014, and met

  1. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Loan Program (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides loans for single family residencies and owner occupied duplexes in Hamilton county in Ohio and Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties in Kentucky. To...

  2. Great ranging associated with greater reproductive investment in mammals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pontzer, Herman

    intake of Enet(J/day) acquires food energy at a constant rate B (J/m) and spends energy on travel at some rate C (J/m), it must travel sufficient distance, D (m/day), so that D (B­C) Enet. Perhaps surprisingly movement dis- tances to be energetically beneficial, since greater D will lead to greater Enet as long as B

  3. Community in the garden in the community : the development of an open space resource in Boston's South End

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meehan, Angela Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    Now a permanently protected type of open space, the community gardens in Boston's South End began in the early 1970's as an effort to utilize vacant land in what was a predominantly low-income neighborhood. Since then, the ...

  4. Impact of communications between firms on innovation and new product development : the case of the Cambridge/Boston biotech cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolosov, Dmitry, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    The paper reports the results of a study of innovations and new product development in biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies in Boston/Cambridge cluster. The purpose of the study was to test the hypothesis that more ...

  5. Greenovate Energy Efficiency Pilot Fellowship Greenovate Boston is the City's initiative to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 25% by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    ; it is economically unsustainable. The City has done extensive outreach driving residential energy efficiency for buildings with four or fewer units. The Greenovate Boston Energy Efficiency Pilot Fellow will provide

  6. Designing density : building form and site design for contextually appropriate multi-family housing in Boston's inner-ring suburbs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanson-Benanav, Jesse

    2009-01-01

    This research focuses on multi-family residential development in the inner-ring suburbs around Boston in order to understand how dense housing can be designed in ways that are contextually appropriate for these existing ...

  7. By Community or Design? Age-restricted Neighbourhoods, Physical Design and Baby Boomers' Local Travel Behaviour in Suburban Boston, US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zegras, P. Christopher

    This article analyses the travel behaviour, residential choices and related preferences of 55+ baby boomers in suburban Boston, USA, looking specifically at age-restricted neighbourhoods. For this highly auto-dependent ...

  8. Boston.com / News / Local / New fuel cell uses germs to generate electricity Page 1 THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Boston.com / News / Local / New fuel cell uses germs to generate electricity Page 1 THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING New fuel cell uses germs to generate electricity By Gareth Cook, Globe://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2003/09/08/new_fuel_cell_uses_germs_to_generate_electricity?mode=9:15:28 AM 9/8/2003 #12;Boston

  9. Paleoecology of the Greater Phyllopod Bed community, Burgess Shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Don

    Paleoecology of the Greater Phyllopod Bed community, Burgess Shale Jean-Bernard Caron , Donald A and composition, ecological attributes, and environmental influences for the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale ecosystems further suggest the Burgess Shale community was probably highly dependent on immigration from

  10. Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface in Forested Landscapes Andrew A- tems. In 1998, a severe ice storm damaged over ten million hectares of forest across northern New York investigated the spatial arrangement of forest damage at the terrestrial-aquatic interface, an ecological edge

  11. Fast Cryptography in Genus 2 (Two is Greater than One)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Fast Cryptography in Genus 2 (Two is Greater than One) Joppe W. Bos1, Craig Costello1 , Huseyin techniques to realize genus 2 based cryptography, which includes fast formulas on the Kummer surface of the speed records for fast curve-based cryptography are for elliptic curves (cf. the ECRYPT online

  12. DOE and Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships Host Two-Day Market Introduction Workshop in Boston

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Over 100 attendees gathered in Boston, MA to participate in the "Voices for SSL Efficiency" Solid-State Lighting Workshop on July 16-17, 2007. The workshop, hosted by DOE and Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships (NEEP), was the second DOE meeting to explore how Federal, State, and private-sector organizations can work together to guide market introduction of high-performance SSL products. The first workshop, hosted by DOE and Southern California Edison, was held in Pasadena in April 2007. In both workshops, a diverse gathering of participants – energy efficiency organizations, utilities, government, and industry – shared insights, ideas, and updates on the rapidly evolving SSL market.

  13. 8/25/08 8:13 AMLung provides breathing room underwater -The Boston Globe Page 1 of 1http://www.boston.com/news/science/articles/2008/08/25/lung_provides_breathing_room_underwater?mode=PF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, Morris R.

    ://www.boston.com/news/science/articles/2008/08/25/lung_provides_breathing_room_underwater?mode=PF THIS STORY HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING Lung provides breathing room underwater By Michelle Sipics, Globe Correspondent | August 25, 2008 bucket. "I accidentally caught a backswimmer while I was lunging for a water strider," recalled

  14. Invited talk A4.01, Symposium A: Compliant Energy Sources 2012 MRS Fall Meeting, Boston, MA, USA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    . This problem motivated many recent efforts into the development of soft electronics for truly wearable smartInvited talk A4.01, Symposium A: Compliant Energy Sources 2012 MRS Fall Meeting, Boston, MA, USA. Manuscript ID: 1445687 1 Flexible fiber batteries for applications in smart textiles Hang Qu*3 , Jean

  15. Proceedings of ANTEC `95, Boston, MA, May 7-11, 1995. MEASUREMENT OF THE FRICTION AND LUBRICITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nairn, John A.

    Proceedings of ANTEC `95, Boston, MA, May 7-11, 1995. 1 MEASUREMENT OF THE FRICTION AND LUBRICITY role in patient comfort, it is useful to study the friction and lubricity properties of contact lenses and of the effects of lubricants, such as tear fluid, on the sliding motion. This paper describes a custom

  16. Journal of Intelligent Information Systems, X, 275298 (X) c X Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston. Manufactured in The Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Journal of Intelligent Information Systems, X, 275­298 (X) c X Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston,babin}@ift.ulaval.ca,yvan.bedard@scg.ulaval.ca Interoperability Group, Information System Technology Section, Defence Research Establishment Valcartier, Val. Such an environment is developed for the purpose of making cooperative interac- tions between several systems

  17. Terry Boston

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Office of Hearings and Appeals U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585-0107 Via Electronic Mail Re: In the Matter of the Steffes...

  18. Terry Boston

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaics »TanklessResearch Proposal"NationalSatishEconomy |

  19. Terry Boston

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaics »TanklessResearch Proposal"NationalSatishEconomy | July

  20. The art of cross-writing in Grove Hall : two centuries of form and place-making in a Boston neighborhood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenzweig, Gilad J

    2013-01-01

    The Boston neighborhood of Grove Hall is presently engaged in a period of urban revival. New civic, commercial and residential projects are starting to fill in empty lots and rejuvenate historic yet dilapidated structures. ...

  1. PUNTO. DESIGN TRAINING CENTER FOR SMALL-SIZED BUSINESS OWNERS AND ENTREPRENEURS IN THE CENTRAL AMERICAN REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miselem, Maria Jose

    2012-05-31

    of cooperation to improve the economic viability of developing nations. Currently, there are a number of NGOs, Figure 1-3: Regional adoption of technologies of information. TICs en las PYMES de Centroamérica, impacto de la adopción de las tecnologías de la...-13. Print. Martin, Roger. The Opposable Mind: Winning Through Integrative Thinking. Boston: Harvard Business Press, 2009. Print. Monge, Ricardo, Cindy Alfaro and Jose Alfaro. TICs en las PYMES de Centroamérica, impacto de la adopción de las tecnologías de la...

  2. EnergyWorks Final Report: A Better Buildings Neighborhood Program in the Five-County Greater Philadelphia Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gajewski, Katherine

    2014-03-05

    This report covers the grant performance period of July 1, 2010-September 30, 2013 and discusses of the program design, outcomes and best practices as they relate to the following six areas: 1. Institutional Design and Business Model; 2. Program Design and Customer Experience; 3. Driving Demand; 4. Workforce Development; 5. Financing and Incentives; 6. Data and Evaluation.

  3. The hydrological model of the Mahanagdong sector, Greater Tongonan Geothermal Field, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herras, E.B.; Licup, A.C. Jr.; Vicedo, R.O.

    1996-12-31

    The Mahanagdong sector of the Greater Tongonan Geothermal Field is committed to supply 180 MWe of steam by mid-1997. An updated hydrological model was constructed based on available geoscientific and reservoir engineering data from a total of 34 wells drilled in the area. The Mahanagdong; resource is derived from a fracture-controlled and volcano hosted geothermal system characterized by neutral to slightly alkali-chloride fluids with reservoir temperatures exceeding 295{degrees}C. A major upflow region was identified in the vicinity of MG-3D, MG-14D and MG-5D. Isochemical contours indicate outflowing fluids with temperatures of 270-275{degrees}C to the south and west. Its southwesterly flow is restricted by the intersection of the impermeable Mahanagdong Claystone near MG-10D, which delimits the southern part of the resource. Low temperature (<200{degrees}C), shallow inflows are evident at the west near MG-4D and MG-17D wells which act as a cold recharge in this sector.

  4. Eocene climates, depositional environments, and geography, greater Green River basin, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roehler, H.W.

    1993-12-31

    The climates, depositional environments, and geography of Eocene rocks in the greater Green River basin are investigated to determine the origin, mode of deposition, and areal distribution of the Wasatch, Green River, Bridger, and Washakie Formations. The data indicate that Eocene climates ranged from cool temperature to tropical and were affected by both terrestrial and astronomical factors. The terrestrial factors were mainly latitude, altitude, regional geography, tectonism, and volcanism. The astronomical factors are interpreted from reptitious rock sequences in the Wilkins Peak Member of the Green River Formation that record seasonal changes, 21,000 year precession of the equinox cycles, 100,000 year eccentricity cycles, and an undetermined cycle of 727,000 years. Eight depositional environments are identified, discussed, and illustrated by diagrams, columnar sections, and photographs. They are: (1) fluvial, (2) paludal, (3) freshwater lacustrine, (4) saltwater lacustrine, (5) pond and playa lake, (6) evaporite (salt pan), (7) mudflat, and (8) volcanic and fluviovolcanic. The areal distribution of the eight depositional environments in the Wasatch, Green River, Bridger, and Washakie Formations is illustrated by photographs and 13 paleogeographic maps. 76 refs., 90 figs.

  5. Article published in BARCEL M. et SIGAUT F., (eds.), The Making of Feudal Agricultures ?, Boston-Leiden, Brill editor, coll. The transformation of the Roman World, vol. 14, 2004, p. 177-253.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Article published in BARCELÓ M. et SIGAUT F., (eds.), The Making of Feudal Agricultures ?, Boston SIGAUT F., (eds.), The Making of Feudal Agricultures ?, Boston-Leiden, Brill editor, coll results in the birth of two new feudal principalities: the county of Provence torn between its allegiance

  6. Greater India Basin hypothesis and a two-stage Cenozoic collision between India and Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torsvik, Trond Helge

    Greater India Basin hypothesis and a two-stage Cenozoic collision between India and Asia Douwe J. J and where India­Asia convergence was accommodated after collision at or be- fore 52 Ma remains a long and 25 Ma. Paleomagnetic data show that this extended continental and oceanic "Greater India" promontory

  7. Prioritizing winter habitat quality for greater sage-grouse in a landscape influenced by energy development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Jeffrey L.

    Prioritizing winter habitat quality for greater sage-grouse in a landscape influenced by energy, and F. C. Blomquist. 2014. Prioritizing winter habitat quality for Greater Sage-Grouse in a landscape influenced by energy development. Ecosphere 5(2):15. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ES13-00238. 1 Abstract

  8. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix H: Packaging factors for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, G.; Grant, P.

    1991-08-01

    This report develops and presents estimates for a set of three values that represent a reasonable range for the packaging factors for several waste streams that are potential greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste. The packaging factor is defined as the volume of a greater-than-Class C low-level waste disposal container divided by the original, as-generated or ``unpackaged,`` volume of the wastes loaded into the disposal container. Packaging factors take into account any processes that reduce or increase an original unpackaged volume of a greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste, the volume inside a waste container not occupied by the waste, and the volume of the waste container itself. The three values developed represent (a) the base case or most likely value for a packaging factor, (b) a high case packaging factor that corresponds to the largest anticipated volume of waste for disposal, and (c) a low case packaging factor for the smallest volume expected. Three categories of greater-than-Class C low-level waste are evaluated in this report: activated metals, sealed sources, and all other wastes. Estimates of reasonable packaging factors for the low, base, and high cases for the specific waste streams in each category are shown in Table H-1.

  9. Annual emissions and air-quality impacts of an urban area district-heating system: Boston case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernow, S.S.; McAnulty, D.R.; Buchsbaum, S.; Levine, E.

    1980-02-01

    A district-heating system, based on thermal energy from power plants retrofitted to operate in the cogeneration mode, is expected to improve local air quality. This possibility has been examined by comparing the emissions of five major atmospheric pollutants, i.e., particulates, sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and nitrogen oxides, from the existing heating and electric system in the City of Boston with those from a proposed district heating system. Detailed, spatial distribution of existing heating load and fuel mix is developed to specify emissions associated with existing heating systems. Actual electric-power-plant parameters and generation for the base year are specified. Additional plant fuel consumption and emissions resulting from cogeneration operation have been estimated. Six alternative fuel-emissions-control scenarios are considered. The average annual ground-level concentrations of sulfur oxides are calculated using a modified form of the EPA's Climatological Dispersion Model. This report describes the methodology, the results and their implications, and the areas for extended investigation. The initial results confirm expectations. Average sulfur oxides concentrations at various points within and near the city drop by up to 85% in the existing fuels scenarios and by 95% in scenarios in which different fuels and more-stringent emissions controls at the plants are used. These reductions are relative to concentrations caused by fuel combustion for heating and large commercial and industrial process uses within the city and Boston Edison Co. electric generation.

  10. To appear: Proceedings of the 1998 SPIE International Symposium on Intelligent Systems and Advanced Manufacturing: Mechatronics Conference, November 5, 1998, Boston.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manufacturing: Mechatronics Conference, November 5, 1998, Boston. Mechatronic objects for real-time control of real-time control software for a mechatronic system must be effectively integrated with the system-oriented approach to software design. These Universal Mechatronic Objects (UMOs) are applicable to a wide spectrum

  11. A. Kusiak, Non-Traditional Applications of Data Mining, in D. Braha (Ed.), Data Mining for Design and Manufacturing, Kluwer, Boston, MA, 2001, pp. 401-416.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    A. Kusiak, Non-Traditional Applications of Data Mining, in D. Braha (Ed.), Data Mining for Design and Manufacturing, Kluwer, Boston, MA, 2001, pp. 401-416. CHAPTER 17 Non-Traditional Applications of Data Mining problem in the latter two application areas. A data mining approach is used for matrix decomposition

  12. CIRCUITS SYSTEMS SIGNAL PROCESSING c Birkhauser Boston (2006) VOL. 25, NO. 3, 2006, PP. 431446 DOI: 10.1007/s00034-005-0528-6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapeau-Blondeau, François

    2006-01-01

    CIRCUITS SYSTEMS SIGNAL PROCESSING c Birkh¨auser Boston (2006) VOL. 25, NO. 3, 2006, PP. 431 often encountered as a basic component in many situ- ations of signal processing, information coding­446 DOI: 10.1007/s00034-005-0528-6 NONLINEAR DEVICES ACTING AS SNR AMPLIFIERS FOR A HARMONIC SIGNAL

  13. Course Description for Spring 2009 offering: GE 520/ME500: Analysis of Energy Conservation/Supply Alternatives: Boston University case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xi

    /Supply Alternatives: Boston University case study This course will continue the analysis of energy use at BU with a goal of identifying, evaluating, and implementing specific conservation and energy alternativesCourse Description for Spring 2009 offering: GE 520/ME500: Analysis of Energy Conservation

  14. Designs, Codes and Cryptography, 14(1), 5769 (April 1998) c April 1998 Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston. Manufactured in The Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Boston. Manufactured in The Netherlands. Montgomery Multiplication in GF(2k ) * ** C¸ETIN K. KOC(2k) can be implemented significantly faster in software than the standard multiplication, where r for computing the product, perform a thorough performance analysis, and compare the algorithm to the standard

  15. Nesting Range, Spatial Use, Habitat Selection and Sex Identification of the Greater Raodrunner (Geococcyx californianus) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montalvo, Andrea

    2012-11-27

    I conducted this study to better understand the greater roadrunner’s (Geococcyx californianus) spatial use, nest site selection, and sexual morphometrics. Data were first collected from a roadrunner population in Fisher County, Texas. I trapped...

  16. Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste (GTCC LLW) ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, N.M. On February 17, 2011, DOE issued the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive...

  17. Blasting Our World (Joy to The World) Pedrolina "Paige" Delaperrucca and The Greater Westerly Raging Grannies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nightingale, Peter

    Blasting Our World (Joy to The World) Pedrolina "Paige" Delaperrucca and The Greater Westerly of the our They Rem- We Blast- Nu- G 2 truth di- leave they king- do dom D world waste war bomb, world

  18. Are We Heading Towards a Reversal of the Trend for Ever-Greater...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Region(s): Europe, Latin America & Caribbean, Global This paper shows that a decline in car ownership in cities in developed nations can be attributed primarily to people living...

  19. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-4: Packaging factors for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, G.; Grant, P.; Winberg, M.; Williams, K.

    1994-09-01

    This report estimates packaging factors for several waste types that are potential greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste (LLW). The packaging factor is defined as the volume of a GTCC LLW disposal container divided by the as-generated or ``unpackaged`` volume of the waste loaded into the disposal container. Packaging factors reflect any processes that reduce or increase an original unpackaged volume of GTCC LLW, the volume inside a waste container not occupied by the waste, and the volume of the waste container itself. Three values are developed that represent (a) the base case or most likely value for a packaging factor, (b) a high case packaging factor that corresponds to the largest anticipated disposal volume of waste, and (c) a low case packaging factor for the smallest volume expected. GTCC LLW is placed in three categories for evaluation in this report: activated metals, sealed sources, and all other waste.

  20. Radiation risk to low fluences of particles may be greater than we thought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) have recommended that estimates of cancer risk for low doseRadiation risk to low fluences of particles may be greater than we thought Hongning Zhou*, Masao to reconsider the validity of the linear extrapolation in making risk estimates for low dose, high linear

  1. Recent experimental data may point to a greater role for osmotic pressures in the subsurface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recent experimental data may point to a greater role for osmotic pressures in the subsurface C. E large osmotic pressures when highly compacted. In the last few years, additional laboratory and in situ experiments have greatly increased the number of data on osmotic properties of argillaceous formations

  2. Effects of wind energy development on survival of female greater prairie-chickens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    Effects of wind energy development on survival of female greater prairie-chickens Virginia L of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA Summary 1. The potential effects of wind energy development on wildlife have received increased attention over the past decade. In Kansas, optimal sites for wind energy

  3. Space use by female Greater Prairie-Chickens in response to wind energy development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    Space use by female Greater Prairie-Chickens in response to wind energy development V. L. WINDER,1-Chickens in response to wind energy development. Ecosphere 5(1):3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ ES13-00206.1 Abstract. Wind energy development is targeted to meet 20% of U.S. energy demand by 2030. In Kansas, optimal sites

  4. Restoration of Cenozoic deformation in Asia and the size of Greater India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torsvik, Trond Helge

    Restoration of Cenozoic deformation in Asia and the size of Greater India Douwe J. J. van 2011. [1] A long standing problem in the geological evolution of the India Asia collision zone is how and where convergence between India and Asia was accommodated since collision. Proposed collision ages vary

  5. Bark beetles, fuels and future fire hazard in contrasting conifer forests of Greater Yellowstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    1 Bark beetles, fuels and future fire hazard in contrasting conifer forests of Greater Yellowstone. Insects and fire have tremendous ecological and economic effects in western forests, yet surprisingly fire hazard in two widespread but contrasting forest types, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and Douglas

  6. LYAPOUNOV NORMS FOR RANDOM WALKS IN LOW DISORDER AND DIMENSION GREATER THAN THREE.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Adam

    LYAPOUNOV NORMS FOR RANDOM WALKS IN LOW DISORDER AND DIMENSION GREATER THAN THREE. N. ZYGOURAS, it is shown by Zerner [11] that there exists a nondegenerate norm (·) on Rd such that for P - a.e. disorder decay of it. It turns out that this is governed by the annealed Lyapounov norm (x), x Zd and in analogy

  7. DESCRIPTION OF HOSPITALS IN THE GREATER HARTFORD AREA Connecticut Children's Medical Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 27 DESCRIPTION OF HOSPITALS IN THE GREATER HARTFORD AREA Connecticut Children's Medical Center Connecticut Children's Medical Center (CCMC) is a nationally recognized, 187-bed not-for- profit children's hospital serving as the primary teaching hospital for the University of Connecticut School of Medicine

  8. Citizen Science System Assemblages: Toward Greater Understanding of Technologies to Support Crowdsourced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Citizen Science System Assemblages: Toward Greater Understanding of Technologies to Support crowston@syr.edu ABSTRACT We explore the nature of technologies to support citizen science, a method different citizen science platforms may be comprised of widely varying functionalities, yet still support

  9. FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GS FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

  10. Regional Purchasing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * ImpactsandRegarding ConfinementRegional Partnerships

  11. Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: A Case Study for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M; Chen, Chien-Wei

    2008-01-01

    T. and A. Tarquin. Engineering economy. McGraw-Hill, Boston,Academy of Engineering. The Hydrogen Economy: Opportunities,

  12. Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: The Least-Cost Hydrogen for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Chen, Chien-Wei; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    T. and A. Tarquin. Engineering economy. McGraw-Hill, Boston,Academy of Engineering. The Hydrogen Economy: Opportunities,

  13. International Beacon Satellite Symposium 2007 11-15 June 2007, Boston, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Effects on GPS Receivers during Solar Minimum and Maximum Jiwon Seo, Todd Walter, Edward Marks, Tsung-Yu Chiou, and Per Enge Stanford University ABSTRACT The ionosphere has practical importance in GPS (Global of channels. Although scintillation is not frequent in the mid-latitude region, it is a potential hazard

  14. VENTURE CAPITAL, THE REGIONS AND PUBLIC POLICY: THE UNITED KINGDOM SINCE THE POST-2000 TECHNOLOGY CRASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    which gives greater emphasis to the demand-side. Key words: venture capital, regions, regional policy of the amount of money under management and the scale of investing. The subsequent ,,tech bust at the turn

  15. 4.9 NON-POINT SOURCE CONTAMINATION IN THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT OF GREATER VANCOUVER by Kenneth J. Hall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    109 4.9 NON-POINT SOURCE CONTAMINATION IN THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT OF GREATER VANCOUVER 4.9 by Kenneth, Vancouver, B.C. NON-POINT SOURCE CONTAMINATION IN THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT OF GREATER VANCOUVER: A CASE STUDY;110 4.9 NON-POINT SOURCE CONTAMINATION IN THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT OF GREATER VANCOUVER THE BRUNETTE RIVER

  16. Hydrology of the Greater Tongonan geothermal system, Philippines, as deduced from geochemical and isotopic data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvis-Isidro, R.R.; Solana, R.R.; D`amore, F.; Nuti, S.; Gonfiantini, R.

    1993-10-01

    Fluids in the Greater Tongonan geothermal system exhibit a large positive {sup 18}O shift from the Leyte meteoric water line. However, there is also a significant shift in {sup 2}H. The {delta}{sup 2}H-{delta}{sup 18}O plot shows that the geothermal fluids may be derived by the mixing of meteoric water with local magmatic water. The most enriched water in the Greater Tongonan system, in terms of {delta}{sup 18}O, {delta}{sup 2}H and Cl, is comprised of approximately 40% magmatic water. Baseline isotope results support a hydrogeochemical model in which there is increasing meteoric water dilution to the southeast, from Mahiao to Sambaloran and towards Malitbog. The Cl-{delta}{sup 18}O plot confirms that the geothermal fluid in Mahanagdong, further southeast, is distinct from that of the Mahiao-Sambaloran-Malitbog system.

  17. Drilling Off-Shore (Mademoiselle From Armentiers) Pedrolina "Paige" Delaparrucca and the Greater Westerly Grannies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nightingale, Peter

    Drilling Off-Shore (Mademoiselle From Armentiers) Pedrolina "Paige" Delaparrucca and the Greater- George ofU Old Drill- Litt- heat lost had need had get E his no more his more belch, ba- Bush, A, Rea Car- Ba- Litt- U Old Drill- B 7 5 bon rack le S Ron- ing more oil, D o we his no more his in ma who we

  18. Engineering, analytical, and program management assistance to the US Department of Energy Boston Support Office. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, W.; Azad, B.; Poston, P.

    1982-08-01

    The scope of the monitoring effort included a total of 132 grants awarded to schools, hospitals, and other eligible institutions throughout the six New England States. The monitoring was conducted during a six-month period at the rate of approximately 22 grantees per month. Table 1 presents a summary of grantees assigned for monitoring for the period December 1981 - May 1982. The nature of the monitoring involved a significant level of communication and coordination with State Program Coordinators at the Boston Support Office and Program Managers at the State Energy Offices. The monitoring required the cooperation and active participation of the grantees' energy conservation grant project managers and building operators. The effort also required a high level of internal coordination due to the geographic dispersion of the grantees being monitored and the need to maintain regular communication with federal- and state-level officials during the course of the project. To address the requirements of all parties involved in the monitoring, it was necessary to organize and conduct the work in a systematic fashion. As a result, the approach to the monitoring program consisted of five distinct steps which were replicated on a monthly basis for each group of grants assigned for monitoring. These steps included: scheduling of site visits; review of working files prior to each visit; site visitation and meeting with grantee officials; notification of BSO regarding critical problems; and preparation of site visit and monthly reports.

  19. Method to produce alumina aerogels having porosities greater than 80 percent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2003-09-16

    A two-step method for producing monolithic alumina aerogels having porosities of greater than 80 percent. Very strong, very low density alumina aerogel monoliths are prepared using the two-step sol-gel process. The method of preparing pure alumina aerogel modifies the prior known sol method by combining the use of substoichiometric water for hydrolysis, the use of acetic acid to control hydrolysis/condensation, and high temperature supercritical drying, all of which contribute to the formation of a polycrystalline aerogel microstructure. This structure provides exceptional mechanical properties of the alumina aerogel, as well as enhanced thermal resistance and high temperature stability.

  20. Activities of ?-ray emitting isotopes in rainwater from Greater Sudbury, Canada following the Fukushima incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. T. Cleveland; F. A. Duncan; I. T. Lawson; N. J. T. Smith; E. Vazquez-Jauregui

    2012-02-29

    We report the activity measured in rainwater samples collected in the Greater Sudbury area of eastern Canada on 3, 16, 20, and 26 April 2011. The samples were gamma-ray counted in a germanium detector and the isotopes 131I and 137Cs, produced by the fission of 235U, and 134Cs, produced by neutron capture on 133Cs, were observed at elevated levels compared to a reference sample of ice-water. These elevated activities are ascribed to the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex in Japan that followed the 11 March earthquake and tsunami. The activity levels observed at no time presented health concerns.

  1. Beyond the Inventory: An Interagency Collaboration to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Greater Yellowstone Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Fiebig, M.

    2010-10-01

    As one of the largest, intact ecosystems in the continental United States, land managers within the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) have recognized the importance of compiling and understanding agency greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The 10 Federal units within the GYA have taken an active role in compiling GHG inventories on a unit- and ecosystem-wide level, setting goals for GHG mitigation, and identifying mitigation strategies for achieving those goals. This paper details the processes, methodologies, challenges, solutions, and lessons learned by the 10 Federal units within the GYA throughout this ongoing effort.

  2. Enabling Greater Penetration of Solar Power via the Use of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2011-11-01

    At high penetration of solar generation there are a number of challenges to economically integrating this variable and uncertain resource. These include the limited coincidence between the solar resource and normal demand patterns and limited flexibility of conventional generators to accommodate variable generation resources. Of the large number of technologies that can be used to enable greater penetration of variable generators, concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) presents a number of advantages. The use of storage enables this technology to shift energy production to periods of high demand or reduced solar output. In addition, CSP can provide substantial grid flexibility by rapidly changing output in response to the highly variable net load created by high penetration of solar (and wind) generation. In this work we examine the degree to which CSP may be complementary to PV by performing a set of simulations in the U.S. Southwest to demonstrate the general potential of CSP with TES to enable greater use of solar generation, including additional PV.

  3. Massive global ozone loss predicted following regional nuclear conflict

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    that nuclear war could be winnable, and preceded the first significant reductions in nuclear weapons stockpiles, the proliferation of nuclear weapons has produced greater risks of a regional nuclear conflict. At the same timeMassive global ozone loss predicted following regional nuclear conflict Michael J. Mills* , Owen B

  4. Regional Summary Pacific Region Management Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacific Rim nations. As such, the management of the HMS fisheries s coordinated by the Pacific FisheryRegional Summary Pacific Region Management Context The Pacific Region includes California, Oregon, and Washington. Federal fisheries in this region are managed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC

  5. Description of Regional Superfund pilots. Excerpts from `Status of Regional Superfund pilots: End-of-year report`

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    Following are brief descriptions of the Regional Superfund pilots excerpted from OSWER Publication 9202.1-15A entitled, ``Status of Regional Superfund Pilots: End of Year Report`` (NTIS {number_sign}PB94-963216). The above-referenced report provides greater detail on each pilot`s goals, status and results to date.

  6. Hydrology of the Greater Tongonan Geothermal system, Philippines and its implications to field exploitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seastres, J.S. Jr.; Salonga, N.D.; Saw, V.S.

    1996-12-31

    The Greater Tongonan Geothermal Field will be operating a total of 694 MWe by July 1997. The field has produced steam for the 112.5 MWe Tongonan I power plant since June 1983. With massive fluid withdrawal starting July 1996, a pre-commissioning hydrology was constructed to assess its implications to field exploitation. Pressure drawdown centered at well 106 in Mahiao was induced by fluid withdrawal at Tongonan-I production field. This drawdown will be accelerated by major steam withdrawal (734 kg/s) upon commissioning of power plants at Mahiao, Sambaloran and Malitbog sectors. To resolve this concern, fluid injection will be conducted at the periphery of Mahiao to provide recharge of reheated reinjection fluids in the reservoir. At Mahanagdong, the acidic fluid breakthrough will unlikely occur since the acidic zone north of this sector is not hydrologically well-connected to the main neutral-pH reservoir as indicated by pressure profiles.

  7. Department of Energy treatment capabilities for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrell, D.K.; Fischer, D.K.

    1995-01-01

    This report provides brief profiles for 26 low-level and high-level waste treatment capabilities available at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), Savannah River Site (SRS), and West Valley Demonstration Plant (WVDP). Six of the treatments have potential use for greater-than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW). They include: (a) the glass ceramic process and (b) the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility incinerator at INEL; (c) the Super Compaction and Repackaging Facility and (d) microwave melting solidification at RFP; (e) the vitrification plant at SRS; and (f) the vitrification plant at WVDP. No individual treatment has the capability to treat all GTCC LLW streams. It is recommended that complete physical and chemical characterizations be performed for each GTCC waste stream, to permit using multiple treatments for GTCC LLW.

  8. Wintertime aerosol chemical composition, volatility, and spatial variability in the greater London area

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, L.; Williams, L. R.; Young, D. E.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Massoli, P.; Fortner, E.; Chhabra, P.; Herndon, S.; Brooks, W. A.; et al

    2015-08-28

    The composition of PM1 (particulate matter with diameter less than 1 ?m) in the greater London area was characterized during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project in winter 2012. Two High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (HR-ToF-AMS) were deployed at a rural site (Detling, Kent) and an urban site (North Kensington, London). The simultaneous and high-temporal resolution measurements at the two sites provide a unique opportunity to investigate the spatial distribution of PM1. We find that the organic aerosol (OA) concentration is comparable between the rural and urban sites, but the sources of OA are distinctly different. The concentration ofmore »solid fuel OA at the urban site is about twice as high as at the rural site, due to elevated domestic heating in the urban area. While the concentrations of oxygenated OA (OOA) are well-correlated between the two sites, the OOA concentration at the rural site is almost twice that of the urban site. At the rural site, more than 70 % of the carbon in OOA is estimated to be non-fossil, which suggests that OOA is likely related to aged biomass burning considering the small amount of biogenic SOA in winter. Thus, it is possible that the biomass burning OA contributes a larger fraction of ambient OA in wintertime than what previous field studies have suggested. A suite of instruments was deployed downstream of a thermal denuder (TD) to investigate the volatility of PM1 species at the rural Detling site. After heating at 250 °C in the TD, 40 % of the residual mass is OA, indicating the presence of non-volatile organics in the aerosol. Although the OA associated with refractory black carbon (rBC, measured by a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer) only accounts for « less

  9. Regional Transportation Coordination Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden Crescent Regional Planning Commission

    2006-01-01

    stream_source_info Golden Crescent Regional Transportation Coordination Study.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 357268 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Golden Crescent Regional Transportation Coordination... Study.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Golden Crescent Regional Transit i Regional Transportation Coordination Study: 7-County Golden Crescent Region Regional...

  10. Medical Records in the Greater Los Angeles State Veterans Home: A Unique Opportunity to Improve Quality of Care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allison Townsend; Galena Kolchugina

    2006-01-01

    of the Office of Asset Management of the Greater Los AngelesGLA Department of Asset Management will benefit most fromby the GLA Office of Asset Management. Recommendation #2: If

  11. The SQUARE-NURSE merger in Greater Manchester : the impact of social and spatial identity on phonological variation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barras, William

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the SQUARE/NURSE merger in three neighbouring locations in Greater Manchester. Several approaches are used to provide explanations for the geographical patterns of variation that are observed. These ...

  12. Serial longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging data indicate non-linear regional gray matter volume recovery in abstinent alcohol-dependent individuals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    parietal and occipital gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM), total cortical GM and total lobar WM, thalamus andVolume increases in regional GM were significantly greater

  13. Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Use and Population Demographics at the Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area, Carbon County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory D. Johnson; Chad W. LeBeau; Ryan Nielsen; Troy Rintz; Jamey Eddy; Matt Holloran

    2012-03-27

    This study was conducted to obtain baseline data on use of the proposed Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area (SRWRA) in Carbon County, Wyoming by greater sage-grouse. The first two study years were designed to determine pre-construction seasonally selected habitats and population-level vital rates (productivity and survival). The presence of an existing wind energy facility in the project area, the PacifiCorp Seven Mile Hill (SMH) project, allowed us to obtain some information on initial sage-grouse response to wind turbines the first two years following construction. To our knowledge these are the first quantitative data on sage-grouse response to an existing wind energy development. This report presents results of the first two study years (April 1, 2009 through March 30, 2011). This study was selected for continued funding by the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative Sage-Grouse Collaborative (NWCC-SGC) and has been ongoing since March 30, 2011. Future reports summarizing results of this research will be distributed through the NWCC-SGC. To investigate population trends through time, we determined the distribution and numbers of males using leks throughout the study area, which included a 4-mile radius buffer around the SRWRA. Over the 2-year study, 116 female greater sage-grouse were captured by spotlighting and use of hoop nets on roosts surrounding leks during the breeding period. Radio marked birds were located anywhere from twice a week to once a month, depending on season. All radio-locations were classified to season. We developed predictor variables used to predict success of fitness parameters and relative probability of habitat selection within the SRWRA and SMH study areas. Anthropogenic features included paved highways, overhead transmission lines, wind turbines and turbine access roads. Environmental variables included vegetation and topography features. Home ranges were estimated using a kernel density estimator. We developed resource selection functions (RSF) to estimate probability of selection within the SRWRA and SMH. Fourteen active greater sage-grouse leks were documented during lek surveys Mean lek size decreased from 37 in 2008 to 22 in 2010. Four leks located 0.61, 1.3, 1.4 and 2.5 km from the nearest wind turbine remained active throughout the study, but the total number of males counted on these four leks decreased from 162 the first year prior to construction (2008), to 97 in 2010. Similar lek declines were noted in regional leks not associated with wind energy development throughout Carbon County. We obtained 2,659 sage-grouse locations from radio-equipped females, which were used to map use of each project area by season. The sage-grouse populations within both study areas are relatively non-migratory, as radio-marked sage-grouse used similar areas during all annual life cycles. Potential impacts to sage-grouse from wind energy infrastructure are not well understood. The data rom this study provide insight into the early interactions of wind energy infrastructure and sage-grouse. Nest success and brood-rearing success were not statistically different between areas with and without wind energy development in the short-term. Nest success also was not influenced by anthropogenic features such as turbines in the short-term. Additionally, female survival was similar among both study areas, suggesting wind energy infrastructure was not impacting female survival in the short-term; however, further analysis is needed to identify habitats with different levels of risk to better understand the impact of wind enregy development on survival. Nest and brood-rearing habitat selection were not influenced by turbines in the short-term; however, summer habitat selection occurred within habitats closer to wind turbines. Major roads were avoided in both study areas and during most of the seasons. The impact of transmission lines varied among study areas, suggesting other landscape features may be influencing selection. The data provided in this report are preliminary and are not meant to provide a basis for fo

  14. NORTHWEST REGIONAL TECHNOLOGY CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NORTHWEST REGIONAL TECHNOLOGY CENTER for Homeland Security Northwest Regional Technology Center May 2015 | 1 AROUND THE REGION IN HOMELAND SECURITY The Northwest Regional Technology Center (NWRTC.S. Army Cyber Command; and Michael Echols, Director, Cyber Joint Program Management Office National

  15. Conservation Regional ConservationRegional Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Power and Conservation Council Regional ConservationRegional Conservation Update:Update?"" #12;slide 3 Northwest Power and Conservation Council PNW Energy Efficiency AchievementsPNW Energy Since 1978 Utility & BPASince 1978 Utility & BPA Programs, Energy Codes &Programs, Energy Codes

  16. Randolph : Boston's gateway suburb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madden, James, Jr. (James Michael)

    2010-01-01

    In the last two decades, certain American suburbs have begun to struggle with issues traditionally thought of as urban problems and dealt with in city settings, such as failing schools, fragmented community, affordable ...

  17. Boston University Dresden Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , The Analysis and Design of Linear Circuits, Prentice Hall Neudorfer and Hassul, Introduction to Circuit And Design Of Linear Circuits, 7th edition, Jon Wiley & Sons Inc., 2012 References: Recommended Analysis, Allyn and Bacon Hayt and Kemmerly, Engineering Circuit Analysis, McGraw Hill Simpson, Student

  18. BOSTON UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Eric L.

    interesting project to work on and for pulling me out of many dead­lock moments, but also for transmitting me Vision architectures which are space­variant, i.e. the local image resolution is a function of space transform, called the Exponential Chirp Transform (ECT), which provides frequency domain estimation of log

  19. Boston University Columbia University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bucci, David J.

    University CUNY Hunter College University of Massachusetts Amherst & Yestermorrow Design/Build School to consider the safety and security of the programs you are considering attending. Also Dartmouth's Dickey searching for program options by criteria: http://www.iiepassport.org/ http

  20. Method of making selective crystalline silicon regions containing entrapped hydrogen by laser treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pankove, Jacques I. (Princeton, NJ); Wu, Chung P. (Trenton, NJ)

    1982-01-01

    A novel hydrogen rich single crystalline silicon material having a band gap energy greater than 1.1 eV can be fabricated by forming an amorphous region of graded crystallinity in a body of single crystalline silicon and thereafter contacting the region with atomic hydrogen followed by pulsed laser annealing at a sufficient power and for a sufficient duration to recrystallize the region into single crystalline silicon without out-gasing the hydrogen. The new material can be used to fabricate semi-conductor devices such as single crystalline silicon solar cells with surface window regions having a greater band gap energy than that of single crystalline silicon without hydrogen.

  1. Regional Research Collaborations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regional Research Collaborations Merrill Series on The Research Mission of Public Universities at Birmingham Regional Neuroscience Research Collaboration: The Alabama Experience Panel 1: Research ........................................................................................................5 Vice Chancellor for Research, University of Kansas Medical Center Evolution of Reproductive

  2. INTRODUCTION The Uinta Mountain region contains a relatively

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pederson, Joel L.

    as the major drainage reversal that resulted in the Green River traversing and incising the Uinta uplift. This regional drainage change is important because it integrated the upper Green River into the greater Colorado River drainage, lowering baselevel and setting the stage for the late Cenozoic erosion that defines

  3. The Java programming language is acheiving greater accep-tance in high-end embedded systems such as cellphones and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharyya, Shuvra S.

    been explored recently. TurboJ [4] speeds up execution by compiling bytecode to native code aheadAbstract The Java programming language is acheiving greater accep- tance in high-end embedded and bytecode. Bytecode is object code that is processed by a program, referred to as the Java Virtual Machine

  4. Chemical reactions at the single molecule level Two molecules may have greater stability as a complex or as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert, Réka

    Chemical reactions at the single molecule level · Two molecules may have greater stability is the more favorable one · For two molecules to undergo a chemical reaction, they must encounter each other. · In a gaseous mixture of two molecular species the average probability that a reaction takes place is = (c dt

  5. Wind Turbine Towers for Greater Hub Heights Why higher wind turbine tower can contribute to increase energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    towers represent 26% of the total WTG (Wind Turbine Generator) cost #12;Why concrete towerWind Turbine Towers for Greater Hub Heights Why higher wind turbine tower can contribute to increase energy output? · Energy output is proportional to the cube of wind velocity, 100m towers (versus

  6. Observations and Tectonic Setting of Historic and Instrumentally Located Earthquakes in the Greater New York CityPhiladelphia Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Greater New York City­Philadelphia Area by Lynn R. Sykes, John G. Armbruster, Won-Young Kim, and Leonardo Seeber Abstract A catalog of 383 earthquakes in southeastern New York, southwestern Connecticut, northern New Jersey, and eastern Pennsylvania, including metropolitan New York City and Philadelphia

  7. Northwest Regional Technology Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    management and public safety professionals to define and prioritize technology needs. Coordinate and leadNorthwest Regional Technology Center for Homeland Security The Northwest Regional Technology Center and deployment of technologies that are effective homeland security solutions for the region, and accelerate

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Portland, OR (United States) Boston Regional Office, Boston, MA (United States) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States) Carlsbad Field Office (United...

  9. SciTech Connect:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (BAPL), West Mifflin, PA (United States) Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Portland, OR (United States) Boston Regional Office, Boston, MA...

  10. Multilateral, regional and bilateral energy trade governance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leal-Arcas, Rafael; Grasso, Costantino; Rios, Juan Alemany )

    2014-12-01

    The current international energy trade governance system is fragmented and multi-layered. Streamlining it for greater legal cohesiveness and international political and economic cooperation would promote global energy security. The current article explores three levels of energy trade governance: multilateral, regional and bilateral. Most energy-rich countries are part of the multilateral trading system, which is institutionalized by the World Trade Organization (WTO). The article analyzes the multilateral energy trade governance system by focusing on the WTO and energy transportation issues. Regionally, the article focuses on five major regional agreements and their energy-related aspects and examines the various causes that explain the proliferation of regional trade agreements, their compatibility with WTO law, and then provides several examples of regional energy trade governance throughout the world. When it comes to bilateral energy trade governance, this article only addresses the European Union’s (EU) bilateral energy trade relations. The article explores ways in which gaps could be filled and overlaps eliminated whilst remaining true to the high-level normative framework, concentrating on those measures that would enhance EU energy security.

  11. Regional Test Centers (RTCs)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has established five Regional Test Centers (RTCs) across the United States to independently validate the performance and reliability of photovoltaic (PV) systems in different...

  12. Regional Public Coordination Transportation Plan Texoma Region #22 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texoma Council of Governments

    2006-12-01

    .......................................................................................................... 6 Regional Geography and Demographics..................................................................................... 6 Regional Agencies Responsible for Transportation Planning.................................................. 6 Descriptions... of the Region?s Public Transportation Providers................................................. 7 Coordinated Transportation Plan..................................................................................................... 8 Coordination Actions...

  13. Regional Analysis Briefs

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2028-01-01

    Regional Analysis Briefs (RABs) provide an overview of specific regions that play an important role in world energy markets, either directly or indirectly. These briefs cover areas that are currently major producers (Caspian Sea), have geopolitical importance (South China Sea), or may have future potential as producers or transit areas (East Africa, Eastern Mediterranean).

  14. Activities of \\gamma-ray emitting isotopes in rainwater from Greater Sudbury, Canada following the Fukushima incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cleveland, B T; Lawson, I T; Smith, N J T; Vazquez-Jauregui, E

    2012-01-01

    We report the activity measured in rainwater samples collected in the Greater Sudbury area of eastern Canada on 3, 16, 20, and 26 April 2011. The samples were gamma-ray counted in a germanium detector and the isotopes 131I and 137Cs, produced by the fission of 235U, and 134Cs, produced by neutron capture on 133Cs, were observed at elevated levels compared to a reference sample of ice-water. These elevated activities are ascribed to the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex in Japan that followed the 11 March earthquake and tsunami. The activity levels observed at no time presented health concerns.

  15. A Methodology for the Assessment of Unconventional (Continuous) Resources with an Application to the Greater Natural Buttes Gas Field, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olea, Ricardo A.; Cook, Troy A.; Coleman, James L.

    2010-12-15

    The Greater Natural Buttes tight natural gas field is an unconventional (continuous) accumulation in the Uinta Basin, Utah, that began production in the early 1950s from the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group. Three years later, production was extended to the Eocene Wasatch Formation. With the exclusion of 1100 non-productive ('dry') wells, we estimate that the final recovery from the 2500 producing wells existing in 2007 will be about 1.7 trillion standard cubic feet (TSCF) (48.2 billion cubic meters (BCM)). The use of estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) per well is common in assessments of unconventional resources, and it is one of the main sources of information to forecast undiscovered resources. Each calculated recovery value has an associated drainage area that generally varies from well to well and that can be mathematically subdivided into elemental subareas of constant size and shape called cells. Recovery per 5-acre cells at Greater Natural Buttes shows spatial correlation; hence, statistical approaches that ignore this correlation when inferring EUR values for untested cells do not take full advantage of all the information contained in the data. More critically, resulting models do not match the style of spatial EUR fluctuations observed in nature. This study takes a new approach by applying spatial statistics to model geographical variation of cell EUR taking into account spatial correlation and the influence of fractures. We applied sequential indicator simulation to model non-productive cells, while spatial mapping of cell EUR was obtained by applying sequential Gaussian simulation to provide multiple versions of reality (realizations) having equal chances of being the correct model. For each realization, summation of EUR in cells not drained by the existing wells allowed preparation of a stochastic prediction of undiscovered resources, which range between 2.6 and 3.4 TSCF (73.6 and 96.3 BCM) with a mean of 2.9 TSCF (82.1 BCM) for Greater Natural Buttes. A second approach illustrates the application of multiple-point simulation to assess a hypothetical frontier area for which there is no production information but which is regarded as being similar to Greater Natural Buttes.

  16. Modeling regional power transfers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kavicky, J.A.; Veselka, T.D.

    1994-03-01

    The Spot Market Network (SMN) model was used to estimate spot market transactions and prices between various North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions for summer on-peak situations. A preliminary analysis of new or proposed additions to the transmission network was performed. The effects of alternative exempt wholesale generator (EWG) options on spot market transactions and the transmission system are also studied. This paper presents the SMN regional modelling approach and summarizes simulation results. Although the paper focuses on a regional network representation, a discussion of how the SMN model was used to represent a detailed utility-level network is also presented.

  17. Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also...

  18. 80 BOSTONIA Summer 2014 As a student in the School of Law in the 1980s, Michael A. Gollin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) and Matthew Horowitz (LAW'14). Among the agencies where PIP grantees have worked are Greater Boston Legal

  19. Potential co-disposal of greater-than-class C low-level radioactive waste with Department of Energy special case waste - greater-than-class C low-level waste management program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allred, W.E.

    1994-09-01

    This document evaluates the feasibility of co-disposing of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) special case waste (SCW). This document: (1) Discusses and evaluates key issues concerning co-disposal of GTCC LLW with SCW. This includes examining these issues in terms of regulatory concerns, technical feasibility, and economics; (2) Examines advantages and disadvantages of such co-disposal; and (3) Makes recommendations. Research and analysis of the issues presented in this report indicate that it would be technically and economically feasible to co-dispose of GTCC LLW with DOE SCW. However, a dilemma will likely arise in the current division of regulatory responsibilities between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and DOE (i.e., current requirement for disposal of GTCC LLW in a facility licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission). DOE SCW is currently not subject to this licensing requirement.

  20. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix A-2: Timing of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste from nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinke, W.F.

    1994-09-01

    Planning for the storage or disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of that waste. Timing, or the date the waste will require storage or disposal, is an integral aspect of that planning. The majority of GTCC LLW is generated by nuclear power plants, and the length of time a reactor remains operational directly affects the amount of GTCC waste expected from that reactor. This report uses data from existing literature to develop high, base, and low case estimates for the number of plants expected to experience (a) early shutdown, (b) 40-year operation, or (c) life extension to 60-year operation. The discussion includes possible effects of advanced light water reactor technology on future GTCC LLW generation. However, the main focus of this study is timing for shutdown of current technology reactors that are under construction or operating.

  1. Southeast Texas Region Regional Public Transportation Coordination Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southeast Texas Regional Planning Commission

    2006-01-01

    REGION REGIONAL PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN PREPARED FOR THE TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION NOVEMBER 2006 REGIONAL PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN NOVEMBER 2006 PAGE 1 Table of Contents... ....................................................................4 History of Regional Coordination of Public Transportation ..............................10 REGIONAL SERVICE COORDINATION PLANNING........................................................10 Lead Agency...

  2. ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANT (EECBG) - BETTER BUILDINGS NEIGHBORHOOD PROGRAM AT GREATER CINCINNATI ENERGY ALLIANCE Project Title: Home Performance with Energy Star® and Better Buildings Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holzhauser, Andy; Jones, Chris; Faust, Jeremy; Meyer, Chris; Van Divender, Lisa

    2013-12-30

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (Energy Alliance) is a nonprofit economic development agency dedicated to helping Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky communities reduce energy consumption. The Energy Alliance has launched programs to educate homeowners, commercial property owners, and nonprofit organizations about energy efficiency opportunities they can use to drive energy use reductions and financial savings, while extending significant focus to creating/retaining jobs through these programs. The mission of the Energy Alliance is based on the premise that investment in energy efficiency can lead to transformative economic development in a region. With support from seven municipalities, the Energy Alliance began operation in early 2010 and has been among the fastest growing nonprofit organizations in the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky area. The Energy Alliance offers two programs endorsed by the Department of Energy: the Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® Program for homeowners and the Better Buildings Performance Program for commercial entities. Both programs couple expert guidance, project management, and education in energy efficiency best practices with incentives and innovative energy efficiency financing to help building owners effectively invest in the energy efficiency, comfort, health, longevity, and environmental impact of their residential or commercial buildings. The Energy Alliance has raised over $23 million of public and private capital to build a robust market for energy efficiency investment. Of the $23 million, $17 million was a direct grant from the Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP). The organization’s investments in energy efficiency projects in the residential and commercial sector have led to well over $50 million in direct economic activity and created over 375,000 hours of labor created or retained. In addition, over 250 workers have been trained through the Building Performance Training Center, a program that was developed and funded by the Energy Alliance and housed at Cincinnati State Technical and Community College. Nearly 100 residential and commercial contractors currently participate in the Energy Alliance’s two major programs, which have together served over 2,800 residential and 100 commercial customers. Additionally, the Energy Alliance established loan programs for homeowners, nonprofits and commercial businesses. The GC-HELP program was established to provide up to ten year low interest, unsecured loans to homeowners to cover the energy efficiency products they purchased through the Energy Alliance approved contractor base. To date the Energy Alliance has financed over $1 million in energy efficiency loans for homeowners, without any loans written off. The nonprofit business community is offered five year, fixed-interest rate loans through the Building Communities Loan Fund of $250,000. Additionally, the Energy Alliance has developed GC-PACE, a commercial financing tool that enables buildings owners to finance their energy upgrades through voluntary property assessments deploying low-interest extended-term capital from the bond market. The Energy Alliance and its partners are actively evaluating additional market-based financing solutions.

  3. Evaluation of Department of Energy-Held Potential Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    A number of commercial facilities have generated potential greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW), and, through contractual arrangements with the US Department of Energy (DOE) or for health and safety reasons, DOE is storing the waste. This report presents the results of an assessment conducted by the GTCC LLW Management Program to consider specific circumstances under which DOE accepted the waste, and to determine whether disposal in a facility licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, or by DOE in a nonlicensed facility, is appropriate. Input from EG&G Idaho, Inc., and DOE Idaho Operations Office legal departments concerning the disposal requirements of this waste were the basis for the decision process used in this report.

  4. Catalog of documents produced by the Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winberg, M.R.

    1995-03-01

    This catalog provides a ready reference for documents prepared by the Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Waste (GTCC LLW) Management Program. The GTCC LLW Management Program is part of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP). The NLLWMP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and is responsible for assisting the DOE in meeting its obligations under Public Law 99-240, The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985. This law assigns DOE the responsibility of ensuring the safe disposal of GTCC LLW in a facility licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The NLLWMP is managed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL).

  5. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-2: Mixed GTCC LLW assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirner, N.P. [Ebasco Environmental, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Mixed greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (mixed GTCC LLW) is waste that combines two characteristics: it is radioactive, and it is hazardous. This report uses information compiled from Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Characterization: Estimated Volumes, Radionuclide Activities, and Other Characteristics (DOE/LLW 1 14, Revision 1), and applies it to the question of how much and what types of mixed GTCC LLW are generated and are likely to require disposal in facilities jointly regulated by the DOE and the NRC. The report describes how to classify a RCRA hazardous waste, and then applies that classification process to the 41 GTCC LLW waste types identified in the DOE/LLW-114 (Revision 1). Of the 41 GTCC LLW categories identified, only six were identified in this study as potentially requiring regulation as hazardous waste under RCRA. These wastes can be combined into the following three groups: fuel-in decontamination resins, organic liquids, and process waste consisting of lead scrap/shielding from a sealed source manufacturer. For the base case, no mixed GTCC LLW is expected from nuclear utilities or sealed source licensees, whereas only 177 ml of mixed GTCC LLW are expected to be produced by other generators through the year 2035. This relatively small volume represents approximately 40% of the base case estimate for GTCC wastes from other generators. For these other generators, volume estimates for mixed GTCC LLW ranged from less than 1 m{sup 3} to 187 m{sup 3}, depending on assumptions and treatments applied to the wastes.

  6. Northeast Regional Biomass Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lusk, P.D.

    1992-12-01

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program has been in operation for a period of nine years. During this time, state managed programs and technical programs have been conducted covering a wide range of activities primarily aim at the use and applications of wood as a fuel. These activities include: assessments of available biomass resources; surveys to determine what industries, businesses, institutions, and utility companies use wood and wood waste for fuel; and workshops, seminars, and demonstrations to provide technical assistance. In the Northeast, an estimated 6.2 million tons of wood are used in the commercial and industrial sector, where 12.5 million cords are used for residential heating annually. Of this useage, 1504.7 mw of power has been generated from biomass. The use of wood energy products has had substantial employment and income benefits in the region. Although wood and woodwaste have received primary emphasis in the regional program, the use of municipal solid waste has received increased emphasis as an energy source. The energy contribution of biomass will increase as potentia users become more familiar with existing feedstocks, technologies, and applications. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program is designed to support region-specific to overcome near-term barriers to biomass energy use.

  7. Northeast Regional Biomass Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connell, R.A.

    1991-11-01

    The management structure and program objectives for the Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) remain unchanged from previous years. Additional funding was provided by the Bonneville Power Administration Regional Biomass Program to continue the publication of articles in the Biologue. The Western Area Power Administration and the Council of Great Lakes Governors funded the project Characterization of Emissions from Burning Woodwaste''. A grant for the ninth year was received from DOE. The Northeast Regional Biomass Steering Committee selected the following four projects for funding for the next fiscal year. (1) Wood Waste Utilization Conference, (2) Performance Evaluation of Wood Systems in Commercial Facilities, (3) Wood Energy Market Utilization Training, (4) Update of the Facility Directory.

  8. NV PFA Regional Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    James Faulds

    2015-10-28

    This project focused on defining geothermal play fairways and development of a detailed geothermal potential map of a large transect across the Great Basin region (96,000 km2), with the primary objective of facilitating discovery of commercial-grade, blind geothermal fields (i.e. systems with no surface hot springs or fumaroles) and thereby accelerating geothermal development in this promising region. Data included in this submission consists of: structural settings (target areas, recency of faulting, slip and dilation potential, slip rates, quality), regional-scale strain rates, earthquake density and magnitude, gravity data, temperature at 3 km depth, permeability models, favorability models, degree of exploration and exploration opportunities, data from springs and wells, transmission lines and wilderness areas, and published maps and theses for the Nevada Play Fairway area.

  9. Regional Energy Baseline 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

    2011-01-01

    -09-02 REGIONAL ENERGY BASELINE (1960 ~ 2009) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 To tal En erg y U se pe r C ap ita (M MB tu) Year Total Energy Use per Capita (1960-2009) US... SEEC 12-States TX Hyojin Kim Juan-Carlos Baltazar, Ph.D. Jeff S. Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. September 2011 ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University System 1960-2009 Regional Energy...

  10. Uplifted supersymmetric Higgs region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogdan A. Dobrescu; Patrick J. Fox

    2010-05-26

    We show that the parameter space of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model includes a region where the down-type fermion masses are generated by the loop-induced couplings to the up-type Higgs doublet. In this region the down-type Higgs doublet does not acquire a vacuum expectation value at tree level, and has sizable couplings in the superpotential to the tau leptons and bottom quarks. Besides a light standard-like Higgs boson, the Higgs spectrum includes the nearly degenerate states of a heavy spin-0 doublet which can be produced through their couplings to the $b$ quark and decay predominantly into \\tau^+\\tau^- or \\tau\

  11. Regional companies eye growth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAbout UsRegional companies eye growth Regional

  12. Prince George Forest Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coxson, Darwyn

    Prince George Forest Region Forest Resources & Practices Team May 1999 Note #PG-20 · ExtensionAssociate,UniversityofNorthern BritishColumbia 2 MSc, RPBio, Silvifauna Research, Prince George, BC 3 PhD, R.M. Sagar and Associates, Prince George, BC #12;Ministry of Forests, 5th Floor, 1011 - 4th Avenue, Prince George, BC V2L 3H9

  13. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulse, R.A.

    1991-08-01

    Planning for storage or disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of that waste to estimate volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms. Data from existing literature, disposal records, and original research were used to estimate the characteristics and project volumes and radionuclide activities to the year 2035. GTCC LLW is categorized as: nuclear utilities waste, sealed sources waste, DOE-held potential GTCC LLW; and, other generator waste. It has been determined that the largest volume of those wastes, approximately 57%, is generated by nuclear power plants. The Other Generator waste category contributes approximately 10% of the total GTCC LLW volume projected to the year 2035. Waste held by the Department of Energy, which is potential GTCC LLW, accounts for nearly 33% of all waste projected to the year 2035; however, no disposal determination has been made for that waste. Sealed sources are less than 0.2% of the total projected volume of GTCC LLW.

  14. Preliminary identification of potentially disruptive scenarios at the Greater Confinement Disposal Facility, Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzowski, R.V.; Newman, G.

    1993-12-01

    The Greater Confinement Disposal location is being evaluated to determine whether defense-generated transuranic waste buried at this location complies with the Containment Requirements established by the US Environmental Protection Agency. One step in determining compliance is to identify those combinations of events and processes (scenarios) that define possible future states of the disposal system for which performance assessments must be performed. An established scenario-development procedure was used to identify a comprehensive set of mutually exclusive scenarios. To assure completeness, 761 features, events, processes, and other listings (FEPS) were compiled from 11 references. This number was reduced to 205 primarily through the elimination of duplications. The 205 FEPs were screened based on site-specific, goal-specific, and regulatory criteria. Four events survived screening and were used in preliminary scenario development: (1) exploratory drilling penetrates a GCD borehole, (2) drilling of a withdrawal/injection well penetrates a GCD borehole, (3) subsidence occurs at the RWMS, and (4) irrigation occurs at the RWMS. A logic diagram was used to develop 16 scenarios from the four events. No screening of these scenarios was attempted at this time. Additional screening of the currently retained events and processes will be based on additional data and information from site-characterization activities. When screening of the events and processes is completed, a final set of scenarios will be developed and screened based on consequence and probability of occurrence.

  15. Vitrification treatment options for disposal of greater-than-Class-C low-level waste in a deep geologic repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullmer, K.S.; Fish, L.W.; Fischer, D.K.

    1994-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), in keeping with their responsibility under Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, is investigating several disposal options for greater-than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW), including emplacement in a deep geologic repository. At the present time vitrification, namely borosilicate glass, is the standard waste form assumed for high-level waste accepted into the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System. This report supports DOE`s investigation of the deep geologic disposal option by comparing the vitrification treatments that are able to convert those GTCC LLWs that are inherently migratory into stable waste forms acceptable for disposal in a deep geologic repository. Eight vitrification treatments that utilize glass, glass ceramic, or basalt waste form matrices are identified. Six of these are discussed in detail, stating the advantages and limitations of each relative to their ability to immobilize GTCC LLW. The report concludes that the waste form most likely to provide the best composite of performance characteristics for GTCC process waste is Iron Enriched Basalt 4 (IEB4).

  16. Natural Recharge to the Unconfined Aquifer System on the Hanford Site from the Greater Cold Creek Watershed: Progress Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waichler, Scott R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2004-09-14

    Movement of contaminants in groundwater at the Hanford Site is heavily dependent on recharge to the unconfined aquifer. As the effects of past artificial discharges dissipate, the water table is expected to return to more natural conditions, and natural recharge will become the driving force when evaluating future groundwater flow conditions and related contaminant transport. Previous work on the relationship of natural recharge to groundwater movement at the Hanford Site has focused on direct recharge from infiltrating rainfall and snowmelt within the area represented by the Sitewide Groundwater Model (SGM) domain. However, part of the groundwater recharge at Hanford is provided by flow from Greater Cold Creek watershed (GCC), a large drainage area on the western boundary of the Hanford Site that includes Cold Creek Valley, Dry Creek Valley, and the Hanford side of Rattlesnake Mountain. This study was undertaken to estimate the recharge from GCC, which is believed to enter the unconfined aquifer as both infiltrating streamflow and shallow subsurface flow. To estimate recharge, the Distributed Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model (DHSVM) was used to simulate a detailed water balance of GCC from 1956 to 2001 at a spatial resolution of 200~m and a temporal resolution of one hour. For estimating natural recharge to Hanford from watersheds along its western and southwestern boundaries, the most important aspects that need to be considered are 1)~distribution and relative magnitude of precipitation and evapotranspiration over the watershed, 2)~streamflow generation at upper elevations and infiltration at lower elevations during rare runoff events, and 3)~permeability of the basalt bedrock surface underlying the soil mantle.

  17. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) planning for the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of the waste. This report estimates volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms of GTCC LLW to the year 2035. It groups the waste into four categories, representative of the type of generator or holder of the waste: Nuclear Utilities, Sealed Sources, DOE-Held, and Other Generator. GTCC LLW includes activated metals (activation hardware from reactor operation and decommissioning), process wastes (i.e., resins, filters, etc.), sealed sources, and other wastes routinely generated by users of radioactive material. Estimates reflect the possible effect that packaging and concentration averaging may have on the total volume of GTCC LLW. Possible GTCC mixed LLW is also addressed. Nuclear utilities will probably generate the largest future volume of GTCC LLW with 65--83% of the total volume. The other generators will generate 17--23% of the waste volume, while GTCC sealed sources are expected to contribute 1--12%. A legal review of DOE`s obligations indicates that the current DOE-Held wastes described in this report will not require management as GTCC LLW because of the contractual circumstances under which they were accepted for storage. This report concludes that the volume of GTCC LLW should not pose a significant management problem from a scientific or technical standpoint. The projected volume is small enough to indicate that a dedicated GTCC LLW disposal facility may not be justified. Instead, co-disposal with other waste types is being considered as an option.

  18. Regional Education Partners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen Generation |Publications TheGas SeparationsRelevantRegional

  19. Method of making selective crystalline silicon regions containing entrapped hydrogen by laser treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pankove, J.I.; Wu, C.P.

    1982-03-30

    A novel hydrogen rich single crystalline silicon material having a band gap energy greater than 1.1 eV can be fabricated by forming an amorphous region of graded crystallinity in a body of single crystalline silicon and thereafter contacting the region with atomic hydrogen followed by pulsed laser annealing at a sufficient power and for a sufficient duration to recrystallize the region into single crystalline silicon without out-gassing the hydrogen. The new material can be used to fabricate semi-conductor devices such as single crystalline silicon solar cells with surface window regions having a greater band gap energy than that of single crystalline silicon without hydrogen. 2 figs.

  20. Colorado Regional Faults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Regional Faults Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the regional faults of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4543192.100000 m Left: 144385.020000 m Right: 754585.020000 m Bottom: 4094592.100000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  1. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 7. The south central region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, R.L.; Graves, L.F.; Sprankle, A.C.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1981-03-01

    This atlas of the south central region combines seven collections of wind resource data: one for the region, and one for each of the six states (Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas). At the state level, features of the climate, topography, and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than that provided in the regional discussion, and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction, and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

  2. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 2. The North Central Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, D.L.; Hadley, D.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1981-02-01

    The North Central atlas assimilates six collections of wind resource data: one for the region and one for each of the five states that compose the North Central region (Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota). At the state level, features of the climate, topography and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than is provided in the regional discussion, and that data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and international wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed direction and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

  3. Boston College Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan January 2014 BOSTON COLLEGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    9 Meetings 10 Plans Development and Maintenance 10 Plan Review, Testing, and Exercises 11 Training Additional Command Staff 19 Operations Staff 19 Logistics Staff 19 Planning Staff 20 Finance & Administration

  4. Regional trends in the take-up of clean coal technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wootten, J.M. [Peabody Holding Co., Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Using surveys of the electricity industry taken in major OECD coal producing/coal consuming regions of North America, Europe, Southern Africa, and Asia/Pacific, this paper reports on the attitudes of power plant operators and developers toward clean coal technologies, the barriers to their use and the policies and measures that might be implemented, if a country or region desired to encourage greater use of clean coal technologies.

  5. Strengthening regional safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palhares, L.; Almeida, G.; Mafra, O. [Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    Nuclear cooperation between Argentina and Brazil has been growing since the early 1980`s and as it grew, so did cooperation with the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC) was formed in December 1991 to operate the Common System of Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (SCCC). In April 1994, ABACC and the DOE signed an Agreement of Cooperation in nuclear material safeguards. This cooperation has included training safeguards inspectors, exchanging nuclear material measurement and containment and surveillance technology, characterizing reference materials, and studying enrichment plant safeguards. The goal of the collaboration is to exchange technology, evaluate new technology in Latin American nuclear facilities, and strengthen regional safeguards. This paper describes the history of the cooperation, its recent activities, and future projects. The cooperation is strongly supported by all three governments: the Republics of Argentina and Brazil and the United States.

  6. Ability of a global three-dimensional model to locate regional events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Nikolai

    is that the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), irrespec- tive of its current status, has motivated greater; revised 31 March 2003; accepted 29 April 2003; published 30 July 2003. [1] We assess the ability events using regional travel time data alone (epicentral distances Assessments are based

  7. 6, 1332313366, 2006 Regional pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 13323­13366, 2006 Regional pollution potentials of major population centers M. G. Lawrence a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Regional pollution potentials. Lawrence (lawrence@mpch-mainz.mpg.de) 13323 #12;ACPD 6, 13323­13366, 2006 Regional pollution potentials

  8. Regional Summary Pacific Management Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Bocaccio, Pacific ocean perch, cowcod, and darkblotched and widow rockfish are currently in rebuildingRegional Summary Pacific Management Context The Pacific Region includes California, Oregon, and Washington. Federal fisheries in this region are managed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC

  9. Southern Region Watershed Management Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and technology transfer programs. #12;Southern Region Watershed Management Project September 15, 2000 and networking both internally and with other regional water resources management programs, promoted technology1 Southern Region Watershed Management Project September 15, 2000 to September 14, 2005 Terminal

  10. Boston University College of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .G., and Lafortune, S., Introduction to Discrete Event Systems, 2nd Edition, Springer, 2008. Law, A.M., and Kelton, W and random processes. 2. Learn fundamental modeling and analysis techniques for stochastic systems so you can use them in applications found in various Engineering disciplines, Operations Research, Management

  11. Policy and Syllabus BOSTON UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xi

    transport theorem. balance of linear momentum. balance of angular momentum. conservation of energy. 1 #12;AM 580 Theory of Elasticity Spring 2009 Policy and Syllabus · Constitutive equations. strain energy; Green's postulate. linear elastic solids. linear visco-elastic solids. crystal classes and anisotropy

  12. Landscape viewing in metropolitan Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teas, Wendy Ann

    1990-01-01

    This thesis recognizes the importance of landscape viewing, especially as a solitary act of contemplation. It suggests the creation of a place from which to gaze upon a vast landscape. It postulates that an observation ...

  13. boston | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifiesValidationENCOAL® MildEffectsbiswasrboersmaboston |

  14. A Regional Climate Change Assessment Program for North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mearns, L. O.; Gutowski, William; Jones, Richard; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; McGinnis, Seth; Nunes, A.; Qian, Yun

    2009-09-08

    There are two main uncertainties in determining future climate: the trajectories of future emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols, and the response of the global climate system to any given set of future emissions [Meehl et al., 2007]. These uncertainties normally are elucidated via application of global climate models, which provide information at relatively coarse spatial resolutions. Greater interest in, and concern about, the details of climate change at regional scales has provided the motivation for the application of regional climate models, which introduces additional uncertainty [Christensen et al., 2007a]. These uncertainties in fi ne- scale regional climate responses, in contrast to uncertainties of coarser spatial resolution global models in which regional models are nested, now have been documented in numerous contexts [Christensen et al., 2007a] and have been found to extend to uncertainties in climate impacts [Wood et al., 2004; Oleson et al., 2007]. While European research in future climate projections has moved forward systematically to examine combined uncertainties from global and regional models [Christensen et al., 2007b], North American climate programs have lagged behind. To fi ll this research gap, scientists developed the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (-NARCCAP). The fundamental scientifi c motivation of this international program is to explore separate and combined uncertainties in regional projections of future climate change resulting from the use of multiple atmosphere- ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) to drive multiple regional climate models (RCMs). An equally important, and related, motivation for this program is to provide the climate impacts and adaptation community with high- resolution regional climate change scenarios that can be used for studies of the societal impacts of climate change and possible adaptation strategies.

  15. Texas State Planning Region 3 Report of Regional Transportation Coordination 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nortex Regional Planning Commission

    2006-12-01

    stream_source_info Nortex Regional Transportation Coordination Plan.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 50110 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Nortex Regional Transportation Coordination Plan.pdf.txt Content... Transportation Coordination December 1, 2006 Submitted to The Texas Department of Transportation Mission To provide reliable, quality, coordinated, public transportation. Texas State Planning Region 3 Page 1 Table of Contents Table...

  16. EIS-0375: Disposal of Greater-than-Class-C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Department of Energy GTCC-like Waste

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the reasonably foreseeable environmental impacts associated with the proposed development, operation, and long-term management of a disposal facility or facilities for Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste and GTCC-like waste. The Environmental Protection Agency is a cooperating agency in the preparation of this EIS.

  17. New England Real Estate Journal February 21 -27, 2014 11BVisit the paper online nerej.com Connecticut MetroHartford Alliance/Greater Hartford County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    .com Connecticut MetroHartford Alliance/Greater Hartford County MetroHartford Alliance Sandra Johnson Metro Connecticut-Israel Technology Summit. Thiseventbroughttogether CEO's from Israel who interfaced with Connecticut leaders, venture capitalists, academia and business. These attendees not only flew in from Israel

  18. no pedestrian call during some cycles. It is not a problem if the required vehicle phase split is greater than the pedestrian Walk plus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Zong Z.

    no pedestrian call during some cycles. It is not a problem if the required vehicle phase split is greater than the pedestrian Walk plus FDW time. However, if the vehicle demand is low and the pedestrian. The objective of this paper is to incor- porate the stochastic nature of pedestrian call events into the HCM

  19. ERPs to the main-clause verb in both SR and OR sentences showed a greater left anterior negativity than the second verb in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Richard

    ERPs to the main-clause verb in both SR and OR sentences showed a greater left anterior negativity, we would like to point out that the ERP studies cited above also include notable demonstrations large ERP differences between SR and OR sentence types, whereas poorer comprehenders show almost none

  20. Discovery of Localized Regions of Excess 10-TeV Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Abdo; B. Allen; T. Aune; D. Berley; E. Blaufuss; S. Casanova; C. Chen; B. L. Dingus; R. W. Ellsworth; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; M. M. Gonzales; J. A. Goodman; C. M. Hoffman; P. H. Hüntemeyer; B. E. Kolterman; C. P. Lansdell; J. T. Linnemann; J. E. McEnery; A. I. Mincer; P. Nemethy; D. Noyes; J. Pretz; J. M. Ryan; P. M. Saz Parkinson; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; V. Vasileiou; G. P. Walker; D. A. Williams; G. B. Yodh

    2008-10-14

    An analysis of 7 years of Milagro data performed on a 10-degree angular scale has found two localized regions of excess of unknown origin with greater than 12 sigma significance. Both regions are inconsistent with gamma-ray emission with high confidence. One of the regions has a different energy spectrum than the isotropic cosmic-ray flux at a level of 4.6 sigma, and it is consistent with hard spectrum protons with an exponential cutoff, with the most significant excess at ~10 TeV. Potential causes of these excesses are explored, but no compelling explanations are found.

  1. Discovery of Localized Regions of Excess 10-TeV Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdo, A A; Aune, T; Berley, D; Blaufuss, E; Casanova, S; Chen, C; Dingus, B L; Ellsworth, R W; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gonzales, M M; Goodman, J A; Hoffman, C M; Hüntemeyer, P H; Kolterman, B E; Lansdell, C P; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Mincer, A I; Némethy, P; Noyes, D; Pretz, J; Ryan, J M; Parkinson, P M Saz; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Vasileiou, V; Walker, G P; Williams, D A; Yodh, G B

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of 7 years of Milagro data performed on a 10-degree angular scale has found two localized regions of excess of unknown origin with greater than 12 sigma significance. Both regions are inconsistent with gamma-ray emission at a level of 11 sigma. One of the regions has a different energy spectrum than the isotropic cosmic-ray flux at a level of 4.6 sigma, and it is consistent with hard spectrum protons with an exponential cutoff, with the most significant excess at ~10 TeV. Potential causes of these excesses are explored, but no compelling explanations are found.

  2. 2015 NHA Alaska Regional Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Register today and join industry professionals for interactive discussions covering a variety of regional topics and a tour of the Eklutna lake Project.

  3. Regional GHG Emissions Stat s Greenhouse Gas and the Regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,00070.0 Historical CO2 Emissions of the NW Power System CO2 Emissions Hydro Gen Fossil Fuel Gen (NG + Coal) Wind Gen6/5/2013 1 Regional GHG Emissions Stat s Greenhouse Gas and the Regional Power System Symposium power system All emissions are displayed in short tons (not metric tons) The Pacific Northwest (PNW

  4. REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY PLANNING AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mays, Larry W.

    CHAPTER 3 REGIONAL WATER SUPPLY PLANNING AND CAPACITY EXPANSION MODELS Messele Z. Ejeta California Department of Water Resources Sacramento, California Larry W. Mays Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona 3.1 INTRODUCTION Water supply planning on a regional scale

  5. PITTSBURGH REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL THREATS ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    AND COMMUNITIES PITTSBURGH, PA. | AUGUST 2013 #12;PRETA AIR: HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS 32 PITTSBURGH REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL THREATS ANALYSIS REPORT PRETA AIR: HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS (HAPs)/AIR TOXICS PREPARED BY AUTHORSPITTSBURGH REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL THREATS ANALYSIS (PRETA) REPORT PRETA AIR: HAZARDOUS AIR

  6. USDA Regional Conservation Partnership Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture is accepting applications for the Regional Conservation Partnership Program to identify and address natural resource objectives in balance with operational goals in order to benefit soil, water, wildlife, and related natural resources locally, regionally, and nationally.

  7. RAFT Regional Algal Feedstock Testbed

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Breakout Session 3B—Integration of Supply Chains III: Algal Biofuels Strategy RAFT Regional Algal Feedstock Testbed Kimberly Ogden, Professor, University of Arizona, Engineering Technical Lead, National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts

  8. Anomalous Emission from HII regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Dickinson

    2008-08-04

    Spinning dust appears to be the best explanation for the anomalous emission that has been observed at $\\sim 10-60$ GHz. One of the best examples of spinning dust comes from a HII region in the Perseus molecular cloud. Observations of other HII regions also show tentative evidence for excess emission at frequencies $\\sim 30$ GHz, although at lower emissivity levels. A new detection of excess emission at 31 GHz in the HII region RCW175 has been made. The most plausible explanation again comes from spinning dust. HII regions are a good place to look for spinning dust as long as accurate radio data spanning the $\\sim 5-100$ GHz range is available.

  9. U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2005-07-01

    The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a multi-sector, integrated model of the U.S. energy system put out by the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. NEMS is used to produce the annual 20-year forecast of U.S. energy use aggregated to the nine-region census division level. The research objective was to disaggregate this regional energy forecast to the county level for select forecast years, for use in a more detailed and accurate regional analysis of energy usage across the U.S. The process of disaggregation using a geographic information system (GIS) was researched and a model was created utilizing available population forecasts and climate zone data. The model's primary purpose was to generate an energy demand forecast with greater spatial resolution than what is currently produced by NEMS, and to produce a flexible model that can be used repeatedly as an add-on to NEMS in which detailed analysis can be executed exogenously with results fed back into the NEMS data flow. The methods developed were then applied to the study data to obtain residential and commercial electricity demand forecasts. The model was subjected to comparative and statistical testing to assess predictive accuracy. Forecasts using this model were robust and accurate in slow-growing, temperate regions such as the Midwest and Mountain regions. Interestingly, however, the model performed with less accuracy in the Pacific and Northwest regions of the country where population growth was more active. In the future more refined methods will be necessary to improve the accuracy of these forecasts. The disaggregation method was written into a flexible tool within the ArcGIS environment which enables the user to output the results in five year intervals over the period 2000-2025. In addition, the outputs of this tool were used to develop a time-series simulation showing the temporal changes in electricity forecasts in terms of absolute, per capita, and density of demand.

  10. Regional

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * ImpactsandRegarding Confinement Resonances Print3 AÇORIANO

  11. Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The Keystone Center

    2005-06-15

    The Keystone Center convened and facilitated a year-long Dialogue on "Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions" to develop recommendations that will help address the difficult and contentious issues related to expansions of regional electric transmission systems that are needed for reliable and economic transmission of power within and across regions. This effort brought together a cross-section of affected stakeholders and thought leaders to address the problem with the collective wisdom of their experience and interests. Transmission owners sat at the table with consumer advocates and environmental organizations. Representatives from regional transmission organizations exchanged ideas with state and federal regulators. Generation developers explored common interests with public power suppliers. Together, the Dialogue participants developed consensus solutions about how to begin unraveling some of the more intractable issues surrounding identification of need, allocation of costs, and reaching consensus on siting issues that can frustrate the development of regional transmission infrastructure. The recommendations fall into three broad categories: 1. Recommendations on appropriate institutional arrangements and processes for achieving regional consensus on the need for new or expanded transmission infrastructure 2. Recommendations on the process for siting of transmission lines 3. Recommendations on the tools needed to support regional planning, cost allocation, and siting efforts. List of Dialogue participants: List of Dialogue Participants: American Electric Power American Transmission Company American Wind Energy Association California ISO Calpine Corporation Cinergy Edison Electric Institute Environmental Defense Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Great River Energy International Transmission Company ISO-New England Iowa Public Utility Board Kanner & Associates Midwest ISO National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates National Grid Northeast Utilities PA Office of Consumer Advocates Pacific Gas & Electric Corporation Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission PJM Interconnection The Electricity Consumers Resource Council U.S. Department of Energy US Department of the Interior Van Ness Feldman Western Interstate Energy Board Wind on the Wires Wisconsin Public Service Commission Xcel Energy

  12. Preliminary evaluation of the use of the greater confinement disposal concept for the disposal of Fernald 11e(2) byproduct material at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, J.R.; Brown, T.J.; Stockman, H.W.; Gallegos, D.P.; Conrad, S.H.; Price, L.L.

    1997-09-01

    This report documents a preliminary evaluation of the ability of the greater confinement disposal boreholes at the Nevada Test Site to provide long-term isolation of radionuclides from the disposal of vitrified byproduct material. The byproduct material is essentially concentrated residue from processing uranium ore that contains a complex mixture of radionuclides, many of which are long-lived and present in concentrations greater than 100,000 picoCuries per gram. This material has been stored in three silos at the fernald Environmental Management Project since the early 1950s and will be vitrified into 6,000 yd{sup 3} (4,580 m{sup 3}) of glass gems prior to disposal. This report documents Sandia National Laboratories` preliminary evaluation for disposal of the byproduct material and includes: the selection of quantitative performance objectives; a conceptual model of the disposal system and the waste; results of the modeling; identified issues, and activities necessary to complete a full performance assessment.

  13. Coordinated Regional Public Transportation Plan: Heart of Texas Region 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heart of Texas Council of Governments

    2006-12-01

    % Freestone 16.4% 11.4% Hill 17.1 11.1 Limestone 16.4% 11.3% McLennan 13.0% 9.7% HOTCOG Region 14.5% 10.2% State of Texas 9.9% 8.7% Section 2.2.4 ? Automobile Availability Despite the generally lower incomes, automobile availability within the Heart...% Falls 1.65 12.2% Freestone 1.82 6.2% Hill 1.78 5.9% Limestone 1.76 7.8% McLennan 1.68 8.3% HOTCOG Region 1.71 7.9% State of Texas 1.70 7.4% Section 2.3 ? Current Services This section describes the public transportation services currently provided...

  14. Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    adjoining regions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources of the...

  15. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Southeast Regional Summit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Southeast Regional Summit Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Southeast Regional Summit July 9, 2015 8:30AM to 6:00PM EDT Renaissance...

  16. Thurston Regional Planning Council Helps Washingtonians Save...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thurston Regional Planning Council Helps Washingtonians Save on Travel Costs Thurston Regional Planning Council Helps Washingtonians Save on Travel Costs April 10, 2013 - 12:00am...

  17. Clean Cities Regional Support & Petroleum Displacement Awards...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regional Support & Petroleum Displacement Awards Clean Cities Regional Support & Petroleum Displacement Awards 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

  18. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 10. Alaska region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, J.L.; Wentink, T. Jr.; Becker, R. Jr.; Comiskey, A.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-12-01

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each subregion of Alaska. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a state scale is given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each subregion are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the Alaska wind energy resource. An outline to the descriptions of the wind resource given for each subregion is included. Assessments for individual subregions are presented as separate chapters. The subregion wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the Alaska wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the subregion chapters.

  19. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  20. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  1. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2006-08-30

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's (SECARB) Phase I program focused on promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and commercial deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. The SECARB program, and its subsequent phases, directly support the Global Climate Change Initiative's goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by the year 2012. Work during the project's two-year period was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix''. The SECARB team was successful in accomplishing its tasks to define the geographic boundaries of the region; characterize the region; identify and address issues for technology deployment; develop public involvement and education mechanisms; identify the most promising capture, sequestration, and transport options; and prepare action plans for implementation and technology validation activity. Milestones accomplished during Phase I of the project are listed below: (1) Completed preliminary identification of geographic boundaries for the study (FY04, Quarter 1); (2) Completed initial inventory of major sources and sinks for the region (FY04, Quarter 2); (3) Completed initial development of plans for GIS (FY04, Quarter 3); (4) Completed preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues (FY04, Quarter 4); (5) Assessed safety, regulatory and permitting issues (FY05, Quarter 1); (6) Finalized inventory of major sources/sinks and refined GIS algorithms (FY05, Quarter 2); (7) Refined public involvement and education mechanisms in support of technology development options (FY05, Quarter 3); and (8) Identified the most promising capture, sequestration and transport options and prepared action plans (FY05, Quarter 4).

  2. Regional Partnerships | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report Appendices |ProjectKnowRedox Shuttle Additive,Regional

  3. Project management plan for low-level mixed wastes and greater-than category 3 waste per Tri-Party Agreement M-91-10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOUNINI, L.

    1999-06-17

    The objective of this project management plan is to define the tasks and deliverables that will support the treatment, storage, and disposal of remote-handled and large container contact-handled low-level mixed waste, and the storage of Greater-Than-Category 3 waste. The plan is submitted to fulfill the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-91-10. The plan was developed in four steps: (1) the volumes of the applicable waste streams and the physical, dangerous, and radioactive characteristics were established using existing databases and forecasts; (2) required treatment was identified for each waste stream based on land disposal restriction treatment standards and waste characterization data; (3) alternatives for providing the required treatment were evaluated and the preferred options were selected; and (4) an acquisition plan was developed to establish the techuical, schedule, and cost baselines for providing the required treatment capabilities. The major waste streams are summarized in the table below, along with the required treatment for disposal.

  4. Project management plan for low-level mixed waste and greater-than-category 3 waste per tri-party agreement M-91-10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOUNINI, L.

    1999-05-20

    The objective of this project management plan is to define the tasks and deliverables that will support the treatment, storage, and disposal of remote-handled and large container contact-handled low-level mixed waste, and the storage of Greater-thaw category 3 waste. The plan is submitted to fulfill the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-91-10, The plan was developed in four steps: (1) the volumes of the applicable waste streams and the physical, dangerous, and radioactive characteristics were established using existing databases and forecasts; (2) required treatment was identified for each waste stream based on land disposal restriction treatment standards and waste characterization data; (3) alternatives for providing the required treatment were evaluated and the preferred options were selected; (4) an acquisition plan was developed to establish the technical, schedule, and cost baselines for providing the required treatment capabilities. The major waste streams are tabulated, along with the required treatment for disposal.

  5. Survey of DOE NDA practices for CH-Tru waste certification--illustrated with a greater than 10,000 drum NDA data base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, F.J.; Caldwell, J.T.; Smith, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    We have compiled a greater than 10,000 CH-TRU waste drum data base from seven DOE sites which have utilized such multiple NDA measurements within the past few years. Most of these nondestructive assay (NDA) technique assay result comparisons have been performed on well-characterized, segregated waste categories such as cemented sludges, combustibles, metals, graphite residues, glasses, etc., with well-known plutonium isotopic compositions. Waste segregation and categorization practices vary from one DOE site to another. Perhaps the most systematic approach has been in use for several years at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), operated by Rockwell International, and located near Golden, Colorado. Most of the drum assays in our data base result from assays of RFP wastes, with comparisons available between the original RFP assays and PAN assays performed independently at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Solid Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) facility. Most of the RFP assays were performed with hyperpure germanium (HPGe)-based SGS assay units. However, at least one very important waste category, processed first-stage sludges, is assayed at RFP using a sludge batch-sampling procedure, prior to filling of the waste drums. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Stakeholder Engagement on the Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste -12565

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, Christine; Joyce, James; Edelman, Arnold [Office of Environmental Management, Office of Disposal Operations-EM-43 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Disposal Operations is responsible for developing a permanent disposal capability for a small volume, but highly radioactive, class of commercial low-level radioactive waste, known as Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste. DOE has issued a draft environmental impact statement (EIS) and will be completing a final EIS under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) that evaluates a range of disposal alternatives. Like other classes of radioactive waste, proposing and evaluating disposal options for GTCC waste is highly controversial, presents local and national impacts, and generates passionate views from stakeholders. Recent national and international events, such as the cancellation of the Yucca Mountain project and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, have heighten stakeholder awareness of everything nuclear, including disposal of radioactive waste. With these challenges, the Office of Disposal Operations recognizes that informed decision-making that will result from stakeholder engagement and participation is critical to the success of the GTCC EIS project. This paper discusses the approach used by the Office of Disposal Operations to engage stakeholders on the GTCC EIS project, provides advice based on our experiences, and proffers some ideas for future engagements in today's open, always connected cyber environment. (authors)

  7. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste shipping package/container identification and requirements study. National Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyacke, M.

    1993-08-01

    This report identifies a variety of shipping packages (also referred to as casks) and waste containers currently available or being developed that could be used for greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level waste (LLW). Since GTCC LLW varies greatly in size, shape, and activity levels, the casks and waste containers that could be used range in size from small, to accommodate a single sealed radiation source, to very large-capacity casks/canisters used to transport or dry-store highly radioactive spent fuel. In some cases, the waste containers may serve directly as shipping packages, while in other cases, the containers would need to be placed in a transport cask. For the purpose of this report, it is assumed that the generator is responsible for transporting the waste to a Department of Energy (DOE) storage, treatment, or disposal facility. Unless DOE establishes specific acceptance criteria, the receiving facility would need the capability to accept any of the casks and waste containers identified in this report. In identifying potential casks and waste containers, no consideration was given to their adequacy relative to handling, storage, treatment, and disposal. Those considerations must be addressed separately as the capabilities of the receiving facility and the handling requirements and operations are better understood.

  8. Cooperative monitoring of regional security agreements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, A.L.; Vannoni, M.; Biringer, K.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nonproliferation and Arms Control Analysis Dept.

    1996-11-01

    This paper argues that cooperative monitoring plays a critical role in the implementation of regional security agreements and confidence building measures. A framework for developing cooperative monitoring options is proposed and several possibilities for relating bilateral and regional monitoring systems to international monitoring systems are discussed. Three bilateral or regional agreements are analyzed briefly to illustrate different possibilities. These examples illustrate that the relationship of regional or bilateral arms control or security agreements to international agreements depends on a number of factors: the overlap of provisions between regional and international agreements; the degree of interest in a regional agreement among the international community; efficiency in implementing the agreement; and numerous political considerations. Given the importance of regional security to the international community, regions should be encouraged to develop their own infrastructure for implementing regional arms control and other security agreements. A regional infrastructure need not preclude participation in an international regime. On the contrary, establishing regional institutions for arms control and nonproliferation could result in more proactive participation of regional parties in developing solutions for regional and international problems, thereby strengthening existing and future international regimes. Possible first steps for strengthening regional infrastructures are identified and potential technical requirements are discussed.

  9. Evaluation of Maxim Module-Integrated Electronics at the DOE Regional Test Centers (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deline, C.; Sekulic, B.; Barkaszi, S.; Yang, J.; Kahn, S.

    2014-06-01

    Module-embedded power electronics developed by Maxim Integrated are under evaluation through a partnership with the Department of Energy's Regional Test Center (RTC) program. Field deployments of both conventional modules and electronics-enhanced modules are designed to quantify the performance advantage of Maxim's products under different amounts of interrow shading, and their ability to be deployed at a greater ground-coverage ratio than conventional modules. Simulations in PVSYST have quantified the predicted performance difference between conventional modules and Maxim's modules from interrow shading. Initial performance results have identified diffuse irradiance losses at tighter row spacing for both the Maxim and conventional modules. Comparisons with published models show good agreement with models predicting the greatest diffuse irradiance losses. At tighter row spacing, all of the strings equipped with embedded power electronics outperformed their conventional peers. An even greater performance advantage is predicted to occur in the winter months when the amount of interrow shading mismatch is at a maximum.

  10. Enhancing regional security agreements through cooperative monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, A.L.

    1995-05-01

    This paper proposes that strengthening regional capabilities for formulating and implementing arms control and confidence-building measures is a tangible method of enhancing regional security. It discusses the importance of developing a regional infrastructure for arms control and confidence building and elucidates the role of technology in facilitating regional arms control and confidence-building agreements. In addition, it identifies numerous applications for regional cooperative monitoring in the areas of arms control, resource management, international commerce and disaster response. The Cooperative Monitoring Center at Sandia National Laboratories, whose aim is to help individual countries and regions acquire the tools they need to develop their own solutions to regional problems, is discussed briefly. The paper ends with recommendations for establishing regional cooperative monitoring centers.

  11. DC High School Science Bowl Regionals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This event is the Washington, D.C. High School Regional competition for the US National Science Bowl. The regional competition is run by the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, and the...

  12. Region Type Checking for Core-Java

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Wei Ngan

    Region-based memory management offers several important advantages over garbage-collected heap, including real-time performance, better data locality and efficient use of limited memory. The concept of regions was first ...

  13. Geothermal Literature Review At Cascades Region (Ingebritsen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Literature Review At Cascades Region (Ingebritsen & Mariner, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal...

  14. Creating Representations for Continuously Moving Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of such moving regions are oil spills, forest fires, hurricanes, schools of fish, spreads of diseases, or armies

  15. The Road Map For Regional Coordinated Public Transportation West Texas/El Paso Region 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West Texas/El Paso Regional Coordinated Transportation Planning Coalition

    2006-12-01

    -1 THE ROAD MAP FOR REGIONAL COORDINATED PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION West Texas/El Paso Region Regional Service Plan for Brewster, Culberson, El Paso, Hudspeth, Jeff Davis and Presidio Counties Submitted... by the West Texas/El Paso Regional Coordinated Transportation Planning Coalition Prepared by El Paso County Transit December 1, 2006 El Paso, Texas VAMONOS West Texas/El Paso Regional Service Plan 2 COORDINATED REGIONAL PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION PLAN...

  16. Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Everest, Graham R

    Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective A report prepared for East of England #12;Low Carbon Innovation Centre Report for EEDA Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective 20/04/2009 ii Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective A report prepared for East

  17. Cooperative monitoring of regional security agreements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, A.L.; Vannoni, M.; Biringer, K.L.

    1995-08-01

    This paper argues that cooperative monitoring plays a critical role in the implementation of regional security agreements and confidence building measures. A framework for developing cooperative monitoring options is proposed and several possibilities for relating bilateral and regional monitoring systems to international monitoring systems are discussed. Three bilateral or regional agreements are analyzed briefly to illustrate different possibilities: (1) the demilitarization of the Sinai region between Israel and Egypt in the 1970s; (2) the 1991 quadripartite agreement for monitoring nuclear facilities among Brazil, Argentina, The Argentine-Brazilian Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials and the International Atomic Energy Agency; and (3) a bilateral Open Skies agreement between Hungary and Romania in 1991. These examples illustrate that the relationship of regional or bilateral arms control or security agreements to international agreements depends on a number of factors: the overlap of provisions between regional and international agreements; the degree of interest in a regional agreement among the international community; efficiency in implementing the agreement; and numerous political considerations.Given the importance of regional security to the international community, regions should be encouraged to develop their own infrastructure for implementing regional arms control and other security agreements. A regional infrastructure need not preclude participation in an international regime. On the contrary, establishing regional institutions for arms control and nonproliferation could result in more proactive participation of regional parties in developing solutions for regional and international problems, thereby strengthening existing and future international regimes. Possible first steps for strengthening regional infrastructures are identified and potential technical requirements are discussed.

  18. Securing non-volatile memory regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faraboschi, Paolo; Ranganathan, Parthasarathy; Muralimanohar, Naveen

    2013-08-20

    Methods, apparatus and articles of manufacture to secure non-volatile memory regions are disclosed. An example method disclosed herein comprises associating a first key pair and a second key pair different than the first key pair with a process, using the first key pair to secure a first region of a non-volatile memory for the process, and using the second key pair to secure a second region of the non-volatile memory for the same process, the second region being different than the first region.

  19. Explanation of Significant Differences Between Models used to Assess Groundwater Impacts for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Greater-Than-Class C-Like Waste Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0375-D) and the

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-08-01

    Models have been used to assess the groundwater impacts to support the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste (DOE-EIS 2011) for a facility sited at the Idaho National Laboratory and the Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project (INL 2011). Groundwater impacts are primarily a function of (1) location determining the geologic and hydrologic setting, (2) disposal facility configuration, and (3) radionuclide source, including waste form and release from the waste form. In reviewing the assumptions made between the model parameters for the two different groundwater impacts assessments, significant differences were identified. This report presents the two sets of model assumptions and discusses their origins and implications for resulting dose predictions. Given more similar model parameters, predicted doses would be commensurate.

  20. Magnetorefractive effect in manganites with a colossal magnetoresistance in the visible spectral region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukhorukov, Yu. P., E-mail: suhorukov@imp.uran.ru; Telegin, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Granovsky, A. B., E-mail: granov@magn.ru; Gan'shina, E. A. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation); Zhukov, A.; Gonzalez, J. [Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV)/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea (EHU), Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica (Spain); Herranz, G. [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB)-CSIC (Spain); Caicedo, J. M. [Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV)/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea (EHU), Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica (Spain); Yurasov, A. N. [Moscow State Institute of Radio-Engineering, Electronics, and Automation (Technical University) (Russian Federation); Bessonov, V. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Kaul', A. R.; Gorbenko, O. Yu.; Korsakov, I. E. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation)

    2012-01-15

    The magnetotransmission, magnetoreflection, and magnetoresistance of the La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.9}Ag{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} epitaxial films have been investigated. It has been found that the films exhibit a significant magnetorefractive effect in the case of reflection and transmission of light in the fundamental absorption region both in the vicinity of the Curie temperature and at low temperatures. It has been shown that the magnetorefractive effect in the infrared spectral region of the manganites is determined by a high-frequency response to magnetoresistance, whereas the magnetorefractive effect in the visible spectral region of these materials is associated with a change in the electronic structure in response to a magnetic field, which, in turn, leads to a change in the electron density of states, the probability of interband optical transitions, and the shift of light absorption bands. The obtained values of the magnetotransmittance and magnetoreflectance in the visible spectral region are less than those observed in the infrared region of the spectrum, but they are several times greater than the linear magneto-optical effects. As a result, the magnetorefractive effect, which is a nongyrotropic phenomenon, makes it possible to avoid the use of light analyzers and polarizers in optical circuits.

  1. The Regional Incidence of a National Greenhouse Gas Emission Limit: Title VII of the American Clean Energy and Security Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wing, Ian Sue

    the macroeconomic costs of greenhouse gas emission reductions under Title VII of the American Clean Energy Clean Energy and Security Act Ian Sue Wing* Dept. of Geography & Environment, Boston University. Introduction Title VII of the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 (H.R. 2454) has the distinction

  2. Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report covers the states that largely fall into the Southeastern Reliability Corporation (SERC) region: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee.

  3. Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii). Task 3: water resources evaluation. Topical report Jump to: navigation, search...

  4. Enforcement Policy Statement: Compliance Period for Regional...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    conservation standards for residential furnaces, central air conditioners, and heat pumps, including regional standards for different product types in indicated States. 76 FR...

  5. Enforcement Policy Statement: Regional Standards Enforcement...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    set forth amended energy conservation standards for central air conditioners and heat pumps, including regional standards in certain States. 76 FR 37408. DOE has initiated a...

  6. Northwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

  7. Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

  8. Hedge cities : gambling on regional futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shorett, Mark, 1976-

    2004-01-01

    Environmental degradation, automobile dependence, anticipated rapid population growth and spatial inequity have combined to form the basis for recent North American regional plans advocating a physical alternative to ...

  9. INVESTIGATION OF BULK POWER MIDWEST REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    INVESTIGATION OF BULK POWER MARKETS MIDWEST REGION November 1, 2000 The analyses and conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11 1. Bulk Power Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-24 D. Retail Access

  10. Regional Analysis And Characterization Of Fractured Aquifers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regional Analysis And Characterization Of Fractured Aquifers In The Virginia Blue Ridge And Piedmont Provinces Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  11. 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Northwest Region Workshop, held in Seattle July 15, 2011.

  12. Regional weather modeling on parallel computers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baillie, C.; Michalakes, J.; Skalin, R.; Mathematics and Computer Science; NOAA Forecast Systems Lab.; Norwegian Meteorological Inst.

    1997-01-01

    This special issue on 'regional weather models' complements the October 1995 special issue on 'climate and weather modeling', which focused on global models. In this introduction we review the similarities and differences between regional and global atmospheric models. Next, the structure of regional models is described and we consider how the basic algorithms applied in these models influence the parallelization strategy. Finally, we give a brief overview of the eight articles in this issue and discuss some remaining challenges in the area of adapting regional weather models to parallel computers.

  13. Northeast Region Combined Heat and Power Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE's Regional CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

  14. Regional Resource Centers for Innovation Brochure (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wogsland, J.

    2000-09-14

    This brochure describes OIT's Regional Resource Centers for Innovation (RCIs), which provide the Innovation and Invention program grantees and other small business energy innovators commercialization assistance.

  15. Regional characteristics, tilt domains, and extensional history...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Report Number 303 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Regional characteristics, tilt domains, and extensional history of the...

  16. BOSTON COLLEGE CHILDREN'S CENTER PARENT HANDBOOK 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    .......................................................................................................... 5 Criminal Record and DSS check................................................................................................... 3 Children's Records and Assessment

  17. Whose city? : redevelopment and governance in Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molina Costa, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    This thesis explores the challenges and opportunities of the community-based redevelopment model in a neoliberal economic context. Drawing on a review of the history and theories of redevelopment and governance in the ...

  18. Boston College Office of Student Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    .sec.state.ma.us/pre/precom/comidx.htm). Prepaid mailer addressed to you to be used by the Secretary of Commonwealth's Office. Transcript: Please.sec.state.ma.us/pre/precom/comidx.htm). Prepaid mailer addressed to you to be used by the Secretary of Commonwealth's Office

  19. Boston College Facilities Management Summer Projects 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    Commons Boiler Upgrades: Replace the boiler that provides steam for the food service kitchen equipment

  20. Form follows flows -- the Boston urban ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kikutake, Natsuko

    2009-01-01

    The formal architectural language of existing public transit can be categorized into one of the following four architectural prototypes: form follows function, the duck, the decorated shed, and the inverted decorated shed. ...

  1. Annual Report Boston University College of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    determined and the predicted structures of the double-headed barley alpha-amylase inhibitor (shown as green

  2. www.aptima.com Boston DC Dayton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    . 11 #12;Experimental Design 32 head-up display (HUD) configurations created by presenting 1, 3, or 5 across 4 trials 2008, Aptima, Inc. 12 #12;Task Presented 16 static HUD images at specific points along

  3. Boston University Office of Sponsored Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Frank

    will not be established in the SAP financial system until this review and approval has occurred. There is a high volume that the responsible Department has the resources and facilities to carry out the project; and to assess the potential

  4. Urban waterfront : problems and potentials of Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hossain, Mohammad Iqbal

    1984-01-01

    The essence of this thesis is based on the fact that downtown waterfronts are special urban areas in a city. These areas offer unique opportunities for providing cultural and recreational public amenities to urban life. ...

  5. BOSTON COLLEGE Office for Research Protections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    Human Participants in Research Revision History: Date Sections 06/01/10 All 08/15/12 All 7/19/13 I.D.11 a Federalwide Assurance (FWA) 35 I. Research in Other Countries 36 J. Conflict of Interest 36 K. Internet Research 36 Internet Research and the Consent Process Internet Research and Privacy

  6. BOSTON COLLEGE Office for Research Protections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    Human Participants in Research Revision History: Date Sections 06/01/10 All 08/15/12 All 7/19/13 I.D.11 of Interest 36 K. Internet Research 36 Internet Research and the Consent Process Internet Research and Privacy

  7. AppsBoston2014_final.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D SFederal8823 Revision 0 Approved for4:28 pm, OctAPPS on

  8. A. M. Szelc, Neutrino 2014, Boston

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 News BelowAsked toUSC-Aiken,AU T H OPortraitM.

  9. FA Technology Ventures (Boston) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEnia SpA JumpGmbH EFC JumpPennsylvania)EyeforenergyS

  10. Boston Technology Venture Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformationBio-GasIllinois:EnergyIdahoTechnology Venture Center Jump to:

  11. Solar Policy Environment: Boston | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVES PursuantEnergySolar FlareSolar Phoenix 2Ready

  12. Boston Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves AdjustmentsDecade Year-0dAnnual Energy

  13. High-Resolution, Wide-Field Imaging of the Galactic Center Region at 330 MHz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael E. Nord; T. Joseph W. Lazio; Namir E. Kassim; S. D. Hyman; T. N. LaRosa; C. Brogan; N. Duric

    2004-07-08

    We present a wide field, sub-arcminute resolution VLA image of the Galactic Center region at 330 MHz. With a resolution of ~ 7" X 12" and an RMS noise of 1.6 mJy/beam, this image represents a significant increase in resolution and sensitivity over the previously published VLA image at this frequency. The improved sensitivity has more than tripled the census of small diameter sources in the region, has resulted in the detection of two new Non Thermal Filaments (NTFs), 18 NTF candidates, 30 pulsar candidates, reveals previously known extended sources in greater detail, and has resulted in the first detection of Sagittarius A* in this frequency range. A version of this paper containing full resolution images may be found at http://lwa.nrl.navy.mil/nord/AAAB.pdf.

  14. Active region emission measure distributions and implications for nanoflare heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cargill, P. J., E-mail: p.cargill@imperial.ac.uk [Space and Atmospheric Physics, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW, UKAND (United Kingdom); School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Scotland KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-20

    The temperature dependence of the emission measure (EM) in the core of active regions coronal loops is an important diagnostic of heating processes. Observations indicate that EM(T) ? T{sup a} below approximately 4 MK, with 2 < a < 5. Zero-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of nanoflare trains are used to demonstrate the dependence of a on the time between individual nanoflares (T{sub N} ) and the distribution of nanoflare energies. If T{sub N} is greater than a few thousand seconds, a < 3. For smaller values, trains of equally spaced nanoflares cannot account for the observed range of a if the distribution of nanoflare energies is either constant, randomly distributed, or a power law. Power law distributions where there is a delay between consecutive nanoflares proportional to the energy of the second nanoflare do lead to the observed range of a. However, T{sub N} must then be of the order of hundreds to no more than a few thousand seconds. If a nanoflare leads to the relaxation of a stressed coronal field to a near-potential state, the time taken to build up the required magnetic energy is thus too long to account for the EM measurements. Instead, it is suggested that a nanoflare involves the relaxation from one stressed coronal state to another, dissipating only a small fraction of the available magnetic energy. A consequence is that nanoflare energies may be smaller than previously envisioned.

  15. Regional Networks for Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regional Networks for Energy Efficiency Regional Networks for Energy Efficiency Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call: Regional Networks for...

  16. Roadmap: Associate of Arts Regional College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Associate of Arts [RE-AA-AA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 12-Mar-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major GPA Overall GPA 61 2.000 2.000 #12;Roadmap: Associate of Arts [RE-AA-AA] Regional College Catalog Year

  17. Roadmap: Associate of Arts Regional College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Associate of Arts [RE-AA-AA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 27-Feb-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major.000 #12;Roadmap: Associate of Arts [RE-AA-AA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 2 of 2 | Last

  18. Roadmap: Associate of Science Regional College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Associate of Science [RE-AS-AS] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 27-Feb-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study.000 #12;Roadmap: Associate of Science [RE-AS-AS] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 2 of 2

  19. Roadmap: Associate of Science Regional College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Associate of Science [RE-AS-AS] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 12-Mar-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study GPA Overall GPA 61 2.000 2.000 #12;Roadmap: Associate of Science [RE-AS-AS] Regional College Catalog

  20. Lateral boundary errors in regional numerical weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?umer, Slobodan

    Lateral boundary errors in regional numerical weather prediction models Author: Ana Car Advisor, they describe evolution of atmospher - weather forecast. Every NWP model solves the same system of equations (1: assoc. prof. dr. Nedjeljka Zagar January 5, 2015 Abstract Regional models are used in many national

  1. Regional Analysis of Impediments to Fair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    participated in the HUD Sustainable Communities Regional Planning Grant. This grant was awarded to Salt Lake to this effort was the local HUD office. Kelly Jorgenson, Pauline Zvonkovic, and Michele Hutchins were invaluable included representatives from: Salt Lake HUD office, Wasatch Front Regional Council (MPO), Mountainland

  2. Future Regional Climates Jason Evans,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Chapter 9 Future Regional Climates Jason Evans,a John McGregorb , and Kendal McGuffiec a Climate of Dynamical Downscaling 235 9.3.1.6. Future Development in Dynamical Downscaling 235 9.3.2. Statistical' Future Climate and Its Probability 242 9.5. Achieving Regional Climate Predictions 243 9.5.1. Water

  3. IN THIS ISSUE Regional Climate Change..............1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamann, Andreas

    IN THIS ISSUE · Regional Climate Change..............1 · From the Executive Director...........2 release of new climate change scenarios from the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM) heralds of the fundamental questions remaining with respect to understanding climate change and even climate variability. And

  4. The CO2 Content of Consumption Across US Regions: A Multi-Regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    than when attributed on a production basis. Second, when attributing emissions on a consumption basisThe CO2 Content of Consumption Across US Regions: A Multi-Regional Input-Output (MRIO) Approach: globalchange@mit.edu Website: http://globalchange.mit.edu/ #12;The CO2 Content of Consumption Across US Regions

  5. Northwest Regional Technology Center, January 2014 Page 1 of 2 Around The Region In Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Regional Technology Center, January 2014 Page 1 of 2 Around The Region In Homeland Security January 2014 The Northwest Regional Technology Center (NWRTC) is a virtual resource center resolutions to seek out growth opportunities both personally and professionally. Conveniently the Disaster

  6. Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth Report Title: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth Report Title: Coal Production@nmsu.edu #12;Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth i Disclaimer This report States Government or any agency thereof. #12;Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic

  7. Regional seismic discrimination research at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, W.R.; Mayeda, K.M.; Goldstein, P.; Patton, H.J.; Jarpe, S.; Glenn, L.

    1995-10-01

    The ability to verify a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) depends in part on the ability to seismically detect and discriminate between potential clandestine underground nuclear tests and other seismic sources, including earthquakes and mining activities. Regional techniques are necessary to push detection and discrimination levels down to small magnitudes, but existing methods of event discrimination are mainly empirical and show much variability from region to region. The goals of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) regional discriminant research are to evaluate the most promising discriminants, improve the understanding of their physical basis and use this information to develop new and more effective discriminants that can be transported to new regions of high monitoring interest. In this report the authors discuss preliminary efforts to geophysically characterize the Middle East and North Africa. They show that the remarkable stability of coda allows one to develop physically based, stable single station magnitude scales in new regions. They then discuss progress to date on evaluating and improving physical understanding and ability to model regional discriminants, focusing on the comprehensive NTS dataset. The authors apply this modeling ability to develop improved discriminants including slopes of P to S ratios. They find combining disparate discriminant techniques is particularly effective in identifying consistent outliers such as shallow earthquakes and mine seismicity. Finally they discuss development and use of new coda and waveform modeling tools to investigate special events.

  8. Control of Regional and Global Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-09

    Author suggests and researches a new revolutionary idea for regional and global weather control. He offers to cover cities, bad regions of country, full country or a continent by a thin closed film with control clarity located at a top limit of the Earth troposphere (4 - 6 km). The film is supported at altitude by small additional atmospheric pressure and connected to ground by thin cables. It is known, the troposphere defines the Earth weather. Authors show this closed dome allows to do a full control of the weather in a given region (the day is always fine, the rain is only in night, no strong wind). The average Earth (white cloudy) reflectance equal 0.3 - 0.5. That means the Earth losses about 0.3 - 0.5 of a solar energy. The dome controls the clarity of film and converts the cold regions to subtropics and creates the hot deserts, desolate wildernesses to the prosperous regions with temperate climate. That is a realistic and the cheapest method of the weather control in the Earth at the current time. Key words: Global weather control, gigantic film dome, converting a cold region to subtropics, converting desolate wilderness to a prosperous region.

  9. Regional Climate Modeling: Progress, Challenges, and Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuqing; Leung, Lai R.; McGregor, John L.; Lee, Dong-Kyou; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Ding, Yihui; Kimura, Fujio

    2004-12-01

    Regional climate modeling with regional climate models (RCMs) has matured over the past decade and allows for meaningful utilization in a broad spectrum of applications. In this paper, latest progresses in regional climate modeling studies are reviewed, including RCM development, applications of RCMs to dynamical downscaling for climate change assessment, seasonal climate predictions and climate process studies, and the study of regional climate predictability. Challenges and potential directions of future research in this important area are discussed, with the focus on those to which less attention has been given previously, such as the importance of ensemble simulations, further development and improvement of regional climate modeling approach, modeling extreme climate events and sub-daily variation of clouds and precipitation, model evaluation and diagnostics, applications of RCMs to climate process studies and seasonal predictions, and development of regional earth system models. It is believed that with both the demonstrated credibility of RCMs’ capability in reproducing not only monthly to seasonal mean climate and interannual variability but also the extreme climate events when driven by good quality reanalysis and the continuous improvements in the skill of global general circulation models (GCMs) in simulating large-scale atmospheric circulation, regional climate modeling will remain an important dynamical downscaling tool for providing the needed information for assessing climate change impacts and seasonal climate predictions, and a powerful tool for improving our understanding of regional climate processes. An internationally coordinated effort can be developed with different focuses by different groups to advance regional climate modeling studies. It is also recognized that since the final quality of the results from nested RCMs depends in part on the realism of the large-scale forcing provided by GCMs, the reduction of errors and improvement in physics parameterizations in both GCMs and RCMs remain a priority for climate modeling community.

  10. Equilibrium pressure measurements in the beta region of palladium protide and palladium deuteride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carstens, D.H.W.; David, W.R.

    1989-03-01

    We have measured the pressure-composition isotherms of the palladium-deuterium and palladium-protium systems in the beta region of both and the plateau region of the protide. For these two systems, data were measured at pressures up to about 3.5 MPa (500 psi) and at temperatures from 173 to 473 K. This study extends to a greater pressure and temperature regime the work on palladium hydrides reported previously by other authors. We also report results of an empirical analytical fit to the data for these two isotope systems. For completeness, we have applied our analysis to previously reported data for the tritide. The data were fit to an equation of the form P = exp/A + 2ln(R/(1 - R))-(B - CR)/T/ + exp(D + E/T), where R is the hydrogen-to-metal atomic ratio, P is the pressure, and T is the temperature. A, B, C, D, and E are empirically determined parameters and differ for absorbing and desorbing systems of each isotope. This equation gives a good fit to the data in the beta region of the absorption curves but a poorer fit in the alpha plus beta (plateau) region. 15 refs., 6 figs.

  11. New York/Region Opinions Editorial Observer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pianka, Eric R.

    New York/Region Opinions Editorial Observer Grasping the Depth of Time as a First Step of us. The idea of such quantities of time is extremely new. Humans began to understand the true scale

  12. Northeast Regional Land Cover Change Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . To learn more about the C-CAP data products used in this report and to access the data sets, please visit% of the total land area. The region has significant coastal-dependent industries, including tourism

  13. Detection of amplified or deleted chromosomal regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stokke, T.; Pinkel, D.; Gray, J.W.

    1995-12-05

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20. 3 figs.

  14. 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Northeast Region Workshop, held in Philadelphia, May 19–20, 2011.

  15. AWEA Wind Energy Regional Summit: Northeast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The AWEA Wind Energy Northeast Regional Summit will connect you with New England-area wind energy professionals and offers the opportunity to discuss significant issues related to land-based and...

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Executive summary Background This report was prepared for the Environmental Conservation Branch, Environment Canada, Vancouver, by CoastWriters Research and environmental planners, to stakeholders in planning processes, to businessmen and community activists

  17. 2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Southeast Region Workshop, held in Tampa, FL, February 17–18, 2011.

  18. 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Southwest Region Workshop, held in Los Angeles on September 30, 2010.

  19. 2011 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Southwest Region Workshop, held in San Jose, California, August 25­–26, 2011.

  20. Residential market transformation: National and regional indicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Wie McGrory, Laura L.; McNamara, Maureen; Suozzo, Margaret

    2000-06-01

    A variety of programs are underway to address market barriers to the adoption of energy-efficient residential technologies and practices. Most are administered by utilities, states, or regions that rely on the Energy Star as a consistent platform for program marketing and messaging. This paper reviews regional and national market transformation activities for three key residential end-uses -- air conditioning, clothes washing, and lighting -- characterizing current and ongoing programs; reporting on progress; identifying market indicators; and discussing implications.

  1. West Central Texas Regional Transportation Final Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West Central Texas Council of Governments

    2006-01-01

    incorporated work conducted in 2005 by the Central Texas Rural Transit District (CARR) and WCTCOG including a survey of transportation providers and stakeholders. Development of a regional inventory of transit providers, evaluation of the abilities... and capabilities of existing transit providers, and community outreach through a series of pubic meetings were conducted in April and May of 2006. West Central Texas is unique among the 24 Texas regions having four public transit providers, three rural...

  2. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Southeast Regional Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative (CEMI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) organizes regional summits around the country to expand its partnerships, share resources and successes, and refine its strategy to boost U.S. competitiveness in clean energy manufacturing. The CEMI Southeast Regional Summit, which will be held on July 9, 2015 at the Renaissance Atlanta Midtown Hotel in Atlanta, Georgia, is the third in this series.

  3. [CII] dynamics in the S140 region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dedes, C.; Röllig, M.; Okada, Y.; Ossenkopf, V.; Mookerjea, B.; Collaboration: WADI Team

    2015-01-22

    We report the observation of [C II] emission in a cut through the S140 region together with single pointing observations of several molecular tracers, including hydrides, in key regions of the photon-dominated region (PDR) and molecular cloud [1]. At a distance of 910 pc, a BOV star ionizes the edge of the molecular cloud L1204, creating S140. In addition, the dense molecular cloud hosts a cluster of embedded massive young stellar objects only 75' from the H II region [e.g. 2, 3]. We used HIFI on Herschel to observe [CII] in a strip following the direction of the impinging radiation across the ionisation front and through the cluster of embedded YSOs. With [C II], we can trace the ionising radiation and, together with the molecular tracers such as CO isotopologues and HCO{sup +}, study the dynamical processes in the region. Combining HIFIs high spectral resolution data with ground based molecular data allows us to study the dynamics and excitation conditions both in the ionization front and the dense molecular star forming region and model their physical conditions [4].

  4. SEARCHING FOR NEW HYPERCOMPACT H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, INAF, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Pandian, Jagadheep D. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Dr., Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Kurtz, Stan, E-mail: asanchez@arcetri.astro.it [Centro de RadioastronomIa y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2011-09-20

    Hypercompact (HC) H II regions are, by nature, very young H II regions, associated with the earliest stages of massive star formation. They may represent the transition phase as an early B-type star grows into an O-type star. Unfortunately, so few HC H II regions are presently known that their general attributes and defining characteristics are based on small number statistics. A larger sample is needed for detailed studies and good statistics. Class II methanol masers are one of the best indicators of the early stages of massive star formation. Using the Arecibo Methanol Maser Galactic Plane Survey-the most sensitive blind survey for 6.7 GHz methanol masers to date-we selected 24 HC H II region candidates. We made Expanded Very Large Array continuum observations at 3.6 and 1.3 cm to search for HC H II regions associated with these masers. We identified six potential HC H II regions in our sample based on the presence of optically thick free-free emission. Overall, we find that 30% of the methanol masers have an associated centimeter radio continuum source (separation less than 0.1 pc), which is in general agreement with previous studies.

  5. Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Rutledge

    2011-02-01

    The Southwest Regional Partnership (SWP) on Carbon Sequestration designed and deployed a medium-scale field pilot test of geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in the Aneth oil field. Greater Aneth oil field, Utah's largest oil producer, was discovered in 1956 and has produced over 455 million barrels of oil (72 million m3). Located in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah, Greater Aneth is a stratigraphic trap producing from the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation. Because it represents an archetype oil field of the western U.S., Greater Aneth was selected as one of three geologic pilots to demonstrate combined enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO2 sequestration under the auspices of the SWP on Carbon Sequestration, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. The pilot demonstration focuced on the western portion of the Aneth Unit as this area of the field was converted from waterflood production to CO2 EOR starting in late 2007. The Aneth Unit is in the northwestern part of the field and has produced 149 million barrels (24 million m3) of the estimated 450 million barrels (71.5 million m3) of the original oil in place - a 33% recovery rate. The large amount of remaining oil makes the Aneth Unit ideal to demonstrate both CO2 storage capacity and EOR by CO2 flooding. This report summarizes the geologic characterization research, the various field monitoring tests, and the development of a geologic model and numerical simulations conducted for the Aneth demonstration project. The Utah Geological Survey (UGS), with contributions from other Partners, evaluated how the surface and subsurface geology of the Aneth Unit demonstration site will affect sequestration operations and engineering strategies. The UGS-research for the project are summarized in Chapters 1 through 7, and includes (1) mapping the surface geology including stratigraphy, faulting, fractures, and deformation bands, (2) describing the local Jurassic and Cretaceous stratigraphy, (3) mapping the Desert Creek zone reservoir, Gothic seal, and overlying aquifers, (4) characterizing the depositional environments and diagenetic events that produced significant reservoir heterogeneity, (5) describing the geochemical, petrographic, and geomechanical properties of the seal to determine the CO2 or hydrocarbon column it could support, and (6) evaluating the production history to compare primary production from vertical and horizontal wells, and the effects of waterflood and wateralternating- gas flood programs. The field monitoring demonstrations were conducted by various Partners including New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, University of Utah, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan, Los Alamos National Laboratory and Cambridge Geosciences. The monitoring tests are summarized in Chapters 8 through 12, and includes (1) interwell tracer studies during water- and CO2-flood operations to characterize tracer behavoirs in anticipation of CO2-sequestration applications, (2) CO2 soil flux monitoring to measure background levels and variance and assess the sensitivity levels for CO2 surface monitoring, (3) testing the continuous monitoring of self potential as a means to detect pressure anomalies and electrochemical reaction due to CO2 injection, (4) conducting time-lapse vertical seismic profiling to image change near a CO2 injection well, and (5) monitoring microseismicity using a downhole string of seismic receivers to detect fracture slip and deformation associated with stress changes. Finally, the geologic modeling and numerical simulation study was conducted by researcher at the University of Utah. Chapter 13 summarizes their efforts which focused on developing a site-specific geologic model for Aneth to better understand and design CO2 storage specifically tailored to oil reservoirs.

  6. A nanoflare model for active region radiance: application of artificial neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bazarghan; H. Safari; D. E. Innes; E. Karami; S. K. Solanki

    2008-12-20

    Context. Nanoflares are small impulsive bursts of energy that blend with and possibly make up much of the solar background emission. Determining their frequency and energy input is central to understanding the heating of the solar corona. One method is to extrapolate the energy frequency distribution of larger individually observed flares to lower energies. Only if the power law exponent is greater than 2, is it considered possible that nanoflares contribute significantly to the energy input. Aims. Time sequences of ultraviolet line radiances observed in the corona of an active region are modelled with the aim of determining the power law exponent of the nanoflare energy distribution. Methods. A simple nanoflare model based on three key parameters (the flare rate, the flare duration time, and the power law exponent of the flare energy frequency distribution) is used to simulate emission line radiances from the ions Fe XIX, Ca XIII, and Si iii, observed by SUMER in the corona of an active region as it rotates around the east limb of the Sun. Light curve pattern recognition by an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) scheme is used to determine the values. Results. The power law exponents, alpha 2.8, 2.8, and 2.6 for Fe XIX, Ca XIII, and Si iii respectively. Conclusions. The light curve simulations imply a power law exponent greater than the critical value of 2 for all ion species. This implies that if the energy of flare-like events is extrapolated to low energies, nanoflares could provide a significant contribution to the heating of active region coronae.

  7. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01

    Report Southwest Power Pool,” Prepared by Boston PacificTables Figure 1. Southwest Power Pool Region Footprint and14 Table 1. Southwest Power Pool Membership

  8. Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courtney Lane

    2011-12-20

    As the Department of Energy stated in its 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, there will need to be enhanced outreach efforts on a national, state, regional, and local level to communicate wind development opportunities, benefits and challenges to a diverse set of stakeholders. To help address this need, PennFuture was awarded funding to create the Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute to provide general education and outreach on wind energy development across Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Over the course of the two-year grant period, PennFuture used its expertise on wind energy policy and development in Pennsylvania and expanded it to other states in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture accomplished this through reaching out and establishing connections with policy makers, local environmental groups, health and economic development organizations, and educational institutions and wind energy developers throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture conducted two regional wind educational forums that brought together wind industry representatives and public interest organizations from across the region to discuss and address wind development in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture developed the agenda and speakers in collaboration with experts on the ground in each state to help determine the critical issue to wind energy in each location. The sessions focused on topics ranging from the basics of wind development; model ordinance and tax issues; anti-wind arguments and counter points; wildlife issues and coalition building. In addition to in-person events, PennFuture held three webinars on (1) Generating Jobs with Wind Energy; (2) Reviving American Manufacturing with Wind Power; and (3) Wind and Transmission. PennFuture also created a web page for the institute (http://www.midatlanticwind.org) that contains an online database of fact sheets, research reports, sample advocacy letters, top anti-wind claims and information on how to address them, wind and wildlife materials and sample model ordinances. Video and presentations from each in-person meeting and webinar recordings are also available on the site. At the end of the two-year period, PennFuture has accomplished its goal of giving a unified voice and presence to wind energy advocates in the Mid-Atlantic region. We educated a broad range of stakeholders on the benefits of wind energy and gave them the tools to help make a difference in their states. We grew a database of over 500 contacts and hope to continue the discussion and work around the importance of wind energy in the region.

  9. Inversion of Gravity Data to Define the Pre-Cenozoic Surface and Regional Structures Possibly Influencing Groundwater Flow in the Rainier Mesa Region, Nye County, Nevada.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas G. Hildenbrand; Geoffrey A. Phelps; Edward A. Mankinen

    2006-09-21

    A three-dimensional inversion of gravity data from the Rainier Mesa area and surrounding regions reveals a topographically complex pre-Cenozoic basement surface. This model of the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rocks is intended for use in a 3D hydrogeologic model being constructed for the Rainier Mesa area. Prior to this study, our knowledge of the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rocks was based on a regional model, applicable to general studies of the greater Nevada Test Site area but inappropriate for higher resolution modeling of ground-water flow across the Rainier Mesa area. The new model incorporates several changes that lead to significant improvements over the previous regional view. First, the addition of constraining wells, encountering old volcanic rocks lying above but near pre-Cenozoic basement, prevents modeled basement from being too shallow. Second, an extensive literature and well data search has led to an increased understanding of the change of rock density with depth in the vicinity of Rainier Mesa. The third, and most important change, relates to the application of several depth-density relationships in the study area instead of a single generalized relationship, thereby improving the overall model fit. In general, the pre-Cenozoic basement surface deepens in the western part of the study area, delineating collapses within the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes, and shallows in the east in the Eleana Range and Yucca Flat regions, where basement crops out. In the Rainier Mesa study area, basement is generally shallow (< 1 km). The new model identifies previously unrecognized structures within the pre-Cenozoic basement that may influence ground-water flow, such as a shallow basement ridge related to an inferred fault extending northward from Rainier Mesa into Kawich Valley.

  10. The 17 GHz active region number

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selhorst, C. L.; Pacini, A. A.; Costa, J. E. R.; Giménez de Castro, C. G.; Valio, A.; Shibasaki, K.

    2014-08-01

    We report the statistics of the number of active regions (NAR) observed at 17 GHz with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph between 1992, near the maximum of cycle 22, and 2013, which also includes the maximum of cycle 24, and we compare with other activity indexes. We find that NAR minima are shorter than those of the sunspot number (SSN) and radio flux at 10.7 cm (F10.7). This shorter NAR minima could reflect the presence of active regions generated by faint magnetic fields or spotless regions, which were a considerable fraction of the counted active regions. The ratio between the solar radio indexes F10.7/NAR shows a similar reduction during the two minima analyzed, which contrasts with the increase of the ratio of both radio indexes in relation to the SSN during the minimum of cycle 23-24. These results indicate that the radio indexes are more sensitive to weaker magnetic fields than those necessary to form sunspots, of the order of 1500 G. The analysis of the monthly averages of the active region brightness temperatures shows that its long-term variation mimics the solar cycle; however, due to the gyro-resonance emission, a great number of intense spikes are observed in the maximum temperature study. The decrease in the number of these spikes is also evident during the current cycle 24, a consequence of the sunspot magnetic field weakening in the last few years.

  11. A Hierarchical Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ringler, Todd; Collins, William D.; Taylor, Mark; Ashfaq, Moetasim

    2013-08-20

    Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tools for predicting the evolution of the climate system. Through decades of development, GCMs have demonstrated useful skill in simulating climate at continental to global scales. However, large uncertainties remain in projecting climate change at regional scales, which limit our ability to inform decisions on climate change adaptation and mitigation. To bridge this gap, different modeling approaches including nested regional climate models (RCMs), global stretch-grid models, and global high-resolution atmospheric models have been used to provide regional climate simulations (Leung et al. 2003). In previous efforts to evaluate these approaches, isolating their relative merits was not possible because factors such as dynamical frameworks, physics parameterizations, and model resolutions were not systematically constrained. With advances in high performance computing, it is now feasible to run coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs at horizontal resolution comparable to what RCMs use today. Global models with local refinement using unstructured grids have become available for modeling regional climate (e.g., Rauscher et al. 2012; Ringler et al. 2013). While they offer opportunities to improve climate simulations, significant efforts are needed to test their veracity for regional-scale climate simulations.

  12. Conservation Assessment of Greater Sage-grouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wrote portions of one or more chapters. Jenny Barnett Handford Reach National Monument/Saddle Mountain NWR 3250 Port of Benton Blvd. Richland, WA 99352 Jenny Barnett, After studying sage grouse for her Master's degree, Jenny Barnett has worked as a wildlife b

  13. Greater Rochester Nursing Home Quality Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Agenda 08:15 Registration; Continental Breakfast; Lean Six Sigma Teams' Posters 09:00 Welcome the Impact of Transforming Elder Care 10:15 Lean Six Sigma Team Project Presentations Melissa Allmaier, RN, Six Sigma Master Black Belt John Biuso, BSIE, Six Sigma Black Belt, CPIM Project Team leaders

  14. Promoting greater Federal energy productivity [Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Mark; Dudich, Luther

    2003-03-05

    This document is a close-out report describing the work done under this DOE grant to improve Federal Energy Productivity. Over the four years covered in this document, the Alliance To Save Energy conducted liaison with the private sector through our Federal Energy Productivity Task Force. In this time, the Alliance held several successful workshops on the uses of metering in Federal facilities and other meetings. We also conducted significant research on energy efficiency, financing, facilitated studies of potential energy savings in energy intensive agencies, and undertook other tasks outlined in this report.

  15. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Loan Programs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Homewoners can review what energy efficiency upgrades are available and apply for either a 6.99% Whole Home loan  (which requires a Whole Home Energy Assessment) or a 9.99% Improvement Specific...

  16. Clean Cities: Greater Indiana Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 4, 1999 Alternative Fueling Stations: Biodiesel (B20 and above): 5 Natural Gas: 26 Ethanol (E85): 132 Electric: 185 Propane: 138 Petroleum and GHG Savings* Total Gallons...

  17. Sunspot transition region oscillations in NOAA 8156

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Brynildsen; T. Leifsen; O. Kjeldseth-Moe; P. Maltby; K. Wilhelm

    1998-12-01

    Based on observations obtained with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory - SOHO joint observing program for velocity fields in sunspot regions, we have detected 3 min transition region umbral oscillations in NOAA 8156. Simultaneous recordings of O V $\\lambda$629 and N V $\\lambda$1238, $\\lambda$1242 with the SUMER instrument give the spatial distribution of power in the 3 min oscillations, both in intensity and line-of-sight velocity. Comparing loci with the same phase we find that the entire umbral transition region oscillates. The observed maxima in peak line intensity are nearly in phase with the maxima in velocity directed towards the observer. We discuss the suggestion that the waves are upward propagating acoustic waves.

  18. SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP ON CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson; Rick Allis; Barry Biediger; Joel Brown; Jim Cappa; George Guthrie; Richard Hughes; Eugene Kim; Robert Lee; Dennis Leppin; Charles Mankin; Orman Paananen; Rajesh Pawar; Tarla Peterson; Steve Rauzi; Jerry Stuth; Genevieve Young

    2004-11-01

    The Southwest Partnership Region includes six whole states, including Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Utah, roughly one-third of Texas, and significant portions of adjacent states. The Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership project is to achieve an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. The Partnership made great progress in this first year. Action plans for possible Phase II carbon sequestration pilot tests in the region are almost finished, including both technical and non-technical aspects necessary for developing and carrying out these pilot tests. All partners in the Partnership are taking an active role in evaluating and ranking optimum sites and technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region. We are identifying potential gaps in all aspects of potential sequestration deployment issues.

  19. Light emitting device having peripheral emissive region

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-05-28

    Light emitting devices are provided that include one or more OLEDs disposed only on a peripheral region of the substrate. An OLED may be disposed only on a peripheral region of a substantially transparent substrate and configured to emit light into the substrate. Another surface of the substrate may be roughened or include other features to outcouple light from the substrate. The edges of the substrate may be beveled and/or reflective. The area of the OLED(s) may be relatively small compared to the substrate surface area through which light is emitted from the device. One or more OLEDs also or alternatively may be disposed on an edge of the substrate about perpendicular to the surface of the substrate through which light is emitted, such that they emit light into the substrate. A mode expanding region may be included between each such OLED and the substrate.

  20. Regional Lead Agents and County Coordinators 2011 RESPONSIBILITY NAME COUNTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    #12;Regional Lead Agents and County Coordinators 2011 RESPONSIBILITY NAME COUNTY REGION 1 Regional Lead Millie Davenport HGIC County Coordinator Matt Burns Pickens County Coordinator Marty Watt Anderson County Coordinator Morris Warner Oconee REGION 2 Regional Lead Danny Howard Greenville County Coordinator

  1. FY08 LDRD Final Report Regional Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bader, D C; Chin, H; Caldwell, P M

    2009-05-19

    An integrated, multi-model capability for regional climate change simulation is needed to perform original analyses to understand and prepare for the impacts of climate change on the time and space scales that are critical to California's future environmental quality and economic prosperity. Our intent was to develop a very high resolution regional simulation capability to address consequences of climate change in California to complement the global modeling capability that is supported by DOE at LLNL and other institutions to inform national and international energy policies. The California state government, through the California Energy Commission (CEC), institutionalized the State's climate change assessment process through its biennial climate change reports. The bases for these reports, however, are global climate change simulations for future scenarios designed to inform international policy negotiations, and are primarily focused on the global to continental scale impacts of increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. These simulations do not meet the needs of California public and private officials who will make major decisions in the next decade that require an understanding of climate change in California for the next thirty to fifty years and its effects on energy use, water utilization, air quality, agriculture and natural ecosystems. With the additional development of regional dynamical climate modeling capability, LLNL will be able to design and execute global simulations specifically for scenarios important to the state, then use those results to drive regional simulations of the impacts of the simulated climate change for regions as small as individual cities or watersheds. Through this project, we systematically studied the strengths and weaknesses of downscaling global model results with a regional mesoscale model to guide others, particularly university researchers, who are using the technique based on models with less complete parameterizations or coarser spatial resolution. Further, LLNL has now built a capability in state-of-the-science mesoscale climate modeling that complements that which it has in global climate simulation, providing potential sponsors with an end-to-end simulation and analysis program.

  2. Expansive components in H II regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Relano; J. E. Beckman

    2004-10-18

    We study the presence of low intensity high velocity components, which we have termed wing features in the integrated Halpha emission line profiles of the HII region populations of the spiral barred galaxies NGC 1530, NGC 3359 and NGC 6951. We find that more than a third of the HII region line profiles in each galaxy show these components. The highest fraction is obtained in the galaxy whose line profiles show the best S:N, which suggests that wing features of this type may well exist in most, if not all, HII region line profiles. Applying selection criteria to the wing features, we obtain a sample of HII regions with clearly defined high velocity components in their profiles. Deconvolution of a representative sample of the line profiles eliminates any doubt that the wing features could possibly be due to instrumental effects. We present an analysis of the high velocity low intensity features fitting them with Gaussian functions; the emission measures, central velocities and velocity dispersions for the red and blue features take similar values. We interpret the features as signatures of expanding shells inside the HII regions. Up to a shell radius of R(shell)~0.2R(reg), the stellar winds from the central ionizing stars appear to satisfy the energy and momentum requirements for the formation and driving the shell. Several examples of the most luminous HII regions show that the shells appear to have larger radii; in these cases additional mechanisms may well be needed to explain the kinetic energies and momenta of the shells.

  3. Middle Rio Grande Region Transportation Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Community Council of Southwest Texas, Inc.

    2006-12-01

    with the low education levels in the area. Only fifty-four percent (54%) of the adult population (25+) completed twelve or more years of formal education. Less than 8% of the region?s population has a college degree, and 3.6% have graduate or professional...,780 Communications and Utilities 510 Wholesale Trade 9,390 Retail Trade 7,990 Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate 1,270 Services 18,300 Government 6,450 9 Employment and Business 2000 Census % 2004 Estimate % Age 16+ population 108,693 115...

  4. Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson

    2006-03-31

    The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed its Phase I program in December 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership Phase I project was to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. Many other goals were accomplished on the way to this objective, including (1) analysis of CO{sub 2} storage options in the region, including characterization of storage capacities and transportation options, (2) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} sources, (3) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} separation and capture technologies employed in the region, (4) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region, (5) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, and (6) assessing and initiating public knowledge and acceptance of possible sequestration approaches. Results of the Southwest Partnership's Phase I evaluation suggested that the most convenient and practical ''first opportunities'' for sequestration would lie along existing CO{sub 2} pipelines in the region. Action plans for six Phase II validation tests in the region were developed, with a portfolio that includes four geologic pilot tests distributed among Utah, New Mexico, and Texas. The Partnership will also conduct a regional terrestrial sequestration pilot program focusing on improved terrestrial MMV methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region. The sixth and final validation test consists of a local-scale terrestrial pilot involving restoration of riparian lands for sequestration purposes. The validation test will use desalinated waters produced from one of the geologic pilot tests. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state government agencies and universities, five major electric utility companies, seven oil, gas and coal companies, three federal agencies, the Navajo Nation, several NGOs, and the Western Governors Association. This group is continuing its work in the Phase II Validation Program, slated to conclude in 2009.

  5. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Southeast Regional Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Registration is now open for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative’s (CEMI) Southeast Regional Summit! The all-day conference, hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), will take place on July 9 in Atlanta, Georgia, at the Renaissance Atlanta Midtown Hotel. The Southeast Regional Summit will bring together leaders from industry, academia, and government to focus on competitiveness and innovation in clean energy manufacturing throughout the southeastern United States. The Summit is the third in a series organized around the country, and will convene key stakeholders to:

  6. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Midwest Region

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969Central Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines -Midwest Region

  7. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Southwest Region

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969Central Region About U.S. Natural Gas PipelinesSouthwest Region

  8. Regional math teacher wins presidential award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * ImpactsandRegarding ConfinementRegional PartnershipsMethodRegional

  9. Climate Change Projections of the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mearns, L. O.; Sain, Steve; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Bukovsky, M. S.; McGinnis, Seth; Biner, S.; Caya, Daniel; Arritt, R.; Gutowski, William; Takle, Eugene S.; Snyder, Mark A.; Jones, Richard; Nunes, A M B.; Tucker, S.; Herzmann, D.; McDaniel, Larry; Sloan, Lisa

    2013-10-01

    We investigate major results of the NARCCAP multiple regional climate model (RCM) experiments driven by multiple global climate models (GCMs) regarding climate change for seasonal temperature and precipitation over North America. We focus on two major questions: How do the RCM simulated climate changes differ from those of the parent GCMs and thus affect our perception of climate change over North America, and how important are the relative contributions of RCMs and GCMs to the uncertainty (variance explained) for different seasons and variables? The RCMs tend to produce stronger climate changes for precipitation: larger increases in the northern part of the domain in winter and greater decreases across a swath of the central part in summer, compared to the four GCMs driving the regional models as well as to the full set of CMIP3 GCM results. We pose some possible process-level mechanisms for the difference in intensity of change, particularly for summer. Detailed process-level studies will be necessary to establish mechanisms and credibility of these results. The GCMs explain more variance for winter temperature and the RCMs for summer temperature. The same is true for precipitation patterns. Thus, we recommend that future RCM-GCM experiments over this region include a balanced number of GCMs and RCMs.

  10. Regional Interagency Steering GIS Sub-Committee for FEMA's Region II Caribbean Area Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Regional Interagency Steering GIS Sub-Committee for FEMA's Region II Caribbean Area Division Jimmy Committee (RISC) consists of an interagency group where GIS users from State, Federal and Educational and download GIS data shared by participants. This effort stems from past experiences where GIS data needed

  11. Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal-energy storage. Volume 2. Regions 7 through 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: Unglaciated Central Region; Glaciated Appalachians, Unglaciated Appalachians; Coastal Plain; Hawaii; and Alaska. (LCL)

  12. Northwest Regional Technology Center, May 2014 Page 1 of 2 Around The Region In Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO), recently visited PNNL. The goals of the trip wereNorthwest Regional Technology Center, May 2014 Page 1 of 2 Around The Region In Homeland Security, and recovery. The center enables homeland security solutions for emergency responder communities and federal

  13. Toledo Regional Economic PlanToledo Regional Economic Plan Transportation and LogisticsTransportation and Logistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    Toledo Regional Economic PlanToledo Regional Economic Plan Transportation and LogisticsTransportation and Logistics Industry SectorIndustry Sector Submitted by:Submitted by: Transportation and Logistics Working GroupTransportation and Logistics Working Group September 2009September 2009 #12;22 Transportation

  14. National Marine Fisheries ServiceNational Marine Fisheries Service Southeast RegionSoutheast Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Marine Fisheries ServiceNational Marine Fisheries Service Southeast RegionSoutheast Region-340-773-5774 Puerto Rico: 1-787-399-8432 Report Harassment of Marine Mammals to NMFS Enforcement at: 1-800-863-1964 How Can I Get More Involved in the Southeast Marine Mammal Stranding Network? Anyone can volunteer

  15. STUDENT MANUAL SCHOOL OF CITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    STUDENT MANUAL SCHOOL OF CITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY MASTER OF CITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING ........................................................................................... 1 III. CITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING FACULTY AND STAFF, 20132014

  16. NEW IMAGE RETRIEVAL PARADIGM : LOGICAL COMPOSITION OF REGION CATEGORIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fauqueur, Julien

    the "photometric region thesaurus" of the image database. Logical composition of region categories expresses be viewed as a "photometric region thesaurus". Images are simply indexed by the list of category labels and

  17. Region Streams: Functional Macroprogramming for Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of computational power, communication bandwidth, and energy de- mand new approaches to programming that shield the developer from low-level details of resource management, concurrency, and in-network pro- cessing. We argue. The essential data model in Regiment is based on region streams, which represent spatially distributed, time

  18. Root region airfoil for wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tangler, James L. (Boulder, CO); Somers, Dan M. (State College, PA)

    1995-01-01

    A thick airfoil for the root region of the blade of a wind turbine. The airfoil has a thickness in a range from 24%-26% and a Reynolds number in a range from 1,000,000 to 1,800,000. The airfoil has a maximum lift coefficient of 1.4-1.6 that has minimum sensitivity to roughness effects.

  19. CHAPTER FOUR Global and African Regional Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deMenocal, Peter B.

    45 CHAPTER FOUR Global and African Regional Climate during the Cenozoic SARAH J. FEAKINS AND PETER by significant climate change. Major global changes included massive tectonic reorganization, a reduction in atmospheric pCO2 (Pagani et al., 1999; Pearson and Palmer, 2000), and a dramatic cooling of global climate

  20. Magnetic Landscape of Sun's Polar Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Tsuneta; K. Ichimoto; Y. Katsukawa; B. W. Lites; K. Matsuzaki; S. Nagata; D. Orozco Suarez; T. Shimizu; M. Shimojo; R. A. Shine; Y. Suematsu; T. K. Suzuki; T. D. Tarbell; A. M. Title

    2008-08-08

    We present the magnetic landscape of the polar region of the Sun that is unprecedented in terms of high spatial resolution, large field of view, and polarimetric precision. These observations were carried out with the Solar Optical Telescope aboard \\emph{Hinode}. Using a Milne-Eddington inversion, we found many vertically-oriented magnetic flux tubes with field strength as strong as 1 kG that are scattered in latitude between 70-90 degree. They all have the same polarity, consistent with the global polarity of the polar region. The field vectors were observed to diverge from the center of the flux elements, consistent with a view of magnetic fields that expand and fan out with height. The polar region is also covered with ubiquitous horizontal fields. The polar regions are the source of the fast solar wind channelled along unipolar coronal magnetic fields whose photospheric source is evidently rooted in the strong field, vertical patches of flux. We conjecture that vertical flux tubes with large expansion around the photosphere-corona boundary serve as efficient chimneys for Alfven waves that accelerate the solar wind.

  1. Compilationof Regional to Global Inventoriesof Anthropogenic Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Compilationof Regional to Global Inventoriesof Anthropogenic Emissions CarmenM. Benkovitz, Hajime inventories of emissions of the trace species included in the study at the appropriate sectoral, spatial on emissions is also required at high resolution for the design of policies aimed at reducing emissions

  2. Regional Climate Downscaling Intercomparison over the Philippines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Jian-Hua "Joshua"

    Regional Climate Downscaling Intercomparison over the Philippines J.H. Qian, A.W. Robertson, M: PAGASA, the Philippines #12;#12;#12;#12;Analysis of r a i n f a l l fluctuations in the Philippines 237 Figure 1 Climatological map (after "Philippines Water Resources", 1976). Vigan, Legaspi, Zamboanga

  3. Regional Service Planning for the Coastal Bend 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coastal Bend Council of Governments

    2006-12-01

    -Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ?R?E?G?I?O?N?A?L? ?S?E?R?V?I?C?E? ?P?L?A?N?N?I?N?G ?F?O?R? ?T?H?E? ?C?O?A?S?T?A?L? ?B?E?N?D ?R?e?g?i?o?n?a?l? ?P?u?b?l?i?c? ?T?r?a?n?s?p?o?r?t?a?t?i?o?n ?C?o?o?r?d?i?n?a?t?i?o?n? ?S?t?u?d?y ?w...?w?w?.?r?e?g?i?o?n?a?l?s?e?r?v?i?c?e?p?l?a?n?n?i?n?g?.?o?r?g ?D?e?c?e?m?b?e?r? ?1?,? ?2?0?0?6 Regional Service Planning for the Coastal Bend Regional Public Transportation Coordination Study This study was funded by financial grant from the Texas...

  4. PA Regional Nanotechnology Conference Nanotechnology for Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    4/19/2011 Present PA Regional Nanotechnology Conference Nanotechnology for Industry May 31, 2011 9 _____________________________________________________________ _____________The field of nanotechnology continues to be one of the leading forces behind our nation's ability to develop, commercialize, and produce advancements that are enabled by nanotechnology. Therefore, Drexel

  5. Passive Scalar Evolution in Peripheral Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Passive Scalar Evolution in Peripheral Region V. V. Lebedev Landau Institute for Theoretical investigate the passive scalar (concentration of pollutants or temperature) evolution in the random (turbulent stages of the passive scalar homogenization (decay). There are some peculiarities of the decay related

  6. Geology of the Shenandoah National Park Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eaton, L. Scott

    1 Geology of the Shenandoah National Park Region 39th Annual Virginia Geological Field Conference October 2nd - 3rd, 2009 Scott Southworth U. S. Geological Survey L. Scott Eaton James Madison University Meghan H. Lamoreaux College of William & Mary William C. Burton U. S. Geological Survey Christopher M

  7. Patentanwlte in der Region Aachen Bauer, Dirk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule Aachen (RWTH)

    Patentanwälte in der Region Aachen Bauer, Dirk Patent- und Rechtsanwälte Bauer, Wagner, Priesmeyer, Klaus Dr. Patentanwälte Potthast & Spengler Auf der Rur, 52459 Inden Tel.: (02465) 86 29 144, mail@kleinespatent.de Busse, Frank Patent- und Rechtsanwälte Bauer, Wagner, Priesmeyer Grüner Weg 1, 52070 Aachen Tel.: (0241

  8. Regional Technical Forum AND 2015 PROGRESS UPDATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is a leader in developing energy efficiency as a resource. Remarkably, it's now our second largest resource, determined that energy efficiency would be the resource of first choice, we were embarking on a new course FORUM Energy efficiency is major resource in the region's energy portfolio. Since 1980, over

  9. INVESTIGATION OF BULK POWER NORTHEAST REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    INVESTIGATION OF BULK POWER MARKETS NORTHEAST REGION November 1, 2000 The analyses and conclusions Activities and Retail Competition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-49 5. Prices, Market Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-13 A. Overview of Product Markets, Market Design and Pricing Rules . . . . . . . 1-15 1. Energy

  10. Interaction Region Issues at the NLC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Maruyama, T.; /SLAC

    2007-09-26

    Two detector concepts are being investigated for the Next Linear Collider. This paper discusses the current design of the interaction region for one of them, based on a 6 Tesla solenoid and silicon based tracking. Topics include masking layout, backgrounds and the suppression of final quadrupole jitter. All calculations are based on the 1 TeV design parameters.

  11. Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaren, Joyce

    2011-04-01

    More than half of the electricity produced in the southeastern states is fuelled by coal. Although the region produces some coal, most of the states depend heavily on coal imports. Many of the region's aging coal power facilities are planned for retirement within the next 20 years. However, estimates indicate that a 20% increase in capacity is needed over that time to meet the rapidly growing demand. The most common incentives for energy efficiency in the Southeast are loans and rebates; however, total public spending on energy efficiency is limited. The most common state-level policies to support renewable energy development are personal and corporate tax incentives and loans. The region produced 1.8% of the electricity from renewable resources other than conventional hydroelectricity in 2009, half of the national average. There is significant potential for development of a biomass market in the region, as well as use of local wind, solar, methane-to-energy, small hydro, and combined heat and power resources. Options are offered for expanding and strengthening state-level policies such as decoupling, integrated resource planning, building codes, net metering, and interconnection standards to support further clean energy development. Benefits would include energy security, job creation, insurance against price fluctuations, increased value of marginal lands, and local and global environmental paybacks.

  12. Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaren, J.

    2011-04-01

    More than half of the electricity produced in the southeastern states is fuelled by coal. Although the region produces some coal, most of the states depend heavily on coal imports. Many of the region's aging coal power facilities are planned for retirement within the next 20 years. However, estimates indicate that a 20% increase in capacity is needed over that time to meet the rapidly growing demand. The most common incentives for energy efficiency in the Southeast are loans and rebates; however, total public spending on energy efficiency is limited. The most common state-level policies to support renewable energy development are personal and corporate tax incentives and loans. The region produced 1.8% of the electricity from renewable resources other than conventional hydroelectricity in 2009, half of the national average. There is significant potential for development of a biomass market in the region, as well as use of local wind, solar, methane-to-energy, small hydro, and combined heat and power resources. Options are offered for expanding and strengthening state-level policies such as decoupling, integrated resource planning, building codes, net metering, and interconnection standards to support further clean energy development. Benefits would include energy security, job creation, insurance against price fluctuations, increased value of marginal lands, and local and global environmental paybacks.

  13. Quasar H II Regions During Cosmic Reionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcelo A. Alvarez; Tom Abel

    2007-09-10

    Cosmic reionization progresses as HII regions form around sources of ionizing radiation. Their average size grows continuously until they percolate and complete reionization. We demonstrate how this typical growth can be calculated around the largest, biased sources of UV emission, such as quasars, by further developing an analytical model based on the excursion set formalism. This approach allows us to calculate the sizes and growth of the HII regions created by the progenitors of any dark matter halo of given mass and redshift with a minimum of free parameters. Statistical variations in the size of these pre-existing HII regions are an additional source of uncertainty in the determination of very high redshift quasar properties from their observed HII region sizes. We use this model to demonstrate that the transmission gaps seen in very high redshift quasars can be understood from the radiation of only their progenitors and associated clustered small galaxies. The fit sets a lower limit on the redshift of overlap at z = 5.8 +/- 0.1. This interpretation makes the transmission gaps independent of the age of the quasars observed. If this interpretation were correct it would raise the prospects of using radio interferometers currently under construction to detect the epoch of reionization.

  14. Geography & Regional Development Speaker Series Spring 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    Geography & Regional Development Speaker Series Spring 2008 January 18th - Leila Harris (University', and geographies of environmental politics January 25th - Jenny Lee (University of Arizona) Departmental climate and student experiences in graduate geography programs February 1st - Deborah Thien (California State - Long

  15. Regional Focus on GM Crop Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    Regional Focus on GM Crop Regulation THE RECENT MEDIA COVERAGE OF THE DEVEL- opments in Brazil for com- mercial genetically modified (GM) crops in both the scientific and regulatory arena. The release of GM crops in these coun- tries might result in the unintentional entry of GM seeds into neighboring

  16. acoustic cavitation of slightly subcritical bubbles of Mathematics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harkin, Anthony

    , the transition between regular and chaotic os- cillations,& as well as the onset of rapid radial growth, is stud with two or more frequencies, the transition to chaos& and the threshold for rapid growth occur at lower am oscillations of spherically symmetric bubbles in inviscid incompressible liquids are nonlinear.5 0 The phase

  17. Jimmy Chau , Thomas Little Multimedia Communications Laboratory, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, Thomas

    Communication Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) can be used to both provide general illumination and transmit high

  18. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2005-09-30

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is a diverse partnership covering eleven states involving the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) an interstate compact; regulatory agencies and/or geological surveys from member states; the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); academic institutions; a Native American enterprise; and multiple entities from the private sector. Figure 1 shows the team structure for the partnership. In addition to the Technical Team, the Technology Coalition, an alliance of auxiliary participants, in the project lends yet more strength and support to the project. The Technology Coalition, with its diverse representation of various sectors, is integral to the technical information transfer, outreach, and public perception activities of the partnership. The Technology Coalition members, shown in Figure 2, also provide a breadth of knowledge and capabilities in the multiplicity of technologies needed to assure a successful outcome to the project and serve as an extremely important asset to the partnership. The eleven states comprising the multi-state region are: Alabama; Arkansas; Florida; Georgia; Louisiana; Mississippi; North Carolina; South Carolina; Tennessee; Texas; and Virginia. The states making up the SECARB area are illustrated in Figure 3. The primary objectives of the SECARB project include: (1) Supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carbon Sequestration Program by promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. This requires the development of relevant data to reduce the uncertainties and risks that are barriers to sequestration, especially for geologic storage in the SECARB region. Information and knowledge are the keys to establishing a regional carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage industry with public acceptance. (2) Supporting the President's Global Climate Change Initiative with the goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by 2012. A corollary to the first objective, this objective requires the development of a broad awareness across government, industry, and the general public of sequestration issues and establishment of the technological and legal frameworks necessary to achieve the President's goal. The information developed by the SECARB team will play a vital role in achieving the President's goal for the southeastern region of the United States. (3) Evaluating options and potential opportunities for regional CO{sub 2} sequestration. This requires characterization of the region regarding the presence and location of sources of greenhouse gases (GHGs), primarily CO{sub 2}, the presence and location of potential carbon sinks and geological parameters, geographical features and environmental concerns, demographics, state and interstate regulations, and existing infrastructure.

  19. SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP (SECARB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2004-09-01

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is on schedule and within budget projections for the work completed during the first year of its two year program. Work during the semiannual period (third and fourth quarter) of the project (April 1--September 30, 2004) was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix.'' Under Task 1.0 Define Geographic Boundaries of the Region, Texas and Virginia were added during the second quarter of the project and no geographical changes occurred during the third or fourth quarter of the project. Under Task 2.0 Characterize the Region, general mapping and screening of sources and sinks has been completed, with integration and Geographical Information System (GIS) mapping ongoing. The first step focused on the macro level characterization of the region. Subsequent characterization will focus on smaller areas having high sequestration potential. Under Task 3.0 Identify and Address Issues for Technology Deployment, SECARB has completed a preliminary assessment of safety, regulatory, permitting, and accounting frameworks within the region to allow for wide-scale deployment of promising terrestrial and geologic sequestration approaches. Under Task 4.0 Develop Public Involvement and Education Mechanisms, SECARB has conducted a survey and focus group meeting to gain insight into approaches that will be taken to educate and involve the public. Task 5.0 and 6.0 will be implemented beginning October 1, 2004. Under Task 5.0 Identify the Most Promising Capture, Sequestration, and Transport Options, SECARB will evaluate findings from work performed during the first year and shift the focus of the project team from region-wide mapping and characterization to a more detailed screening approach designed to identify the most promising opportunities. Under Task 6.0 Prepare Action Plans for Implementation and Technology Validation Activity, the SECARB team will develop an integrated approach to implementing and setting up measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) programs for the most promising opportunities. During this semiannual period special attention was provided to Texas and Virginia, which were added to the SECARB region, to ensure a smooth integration of activities with the other 9 states. Milestones completed and submitted during the third and fourth quarter included: Q3-FY04--Complete initial development of plans for GIS; and Q4-FYO4--Complete preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues.

  20. SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHP (SECARB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2005-04-01

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) is on schedule and within budget projections for the work completed during the first 18-months of its two year program. Work during the semiannual period (fifth and sixth project quarters) of the project (October 1, 2004-March 31, 2005) was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix.'' Under Task 1.0 Define Geographic Boundaries of the Region, no changes occurred during the fifth or sixth quarters of the project. Under Task 2.0 Characterize the Region, refinements have been made to the general mapping and screening of sources and sinks. Integration and geographical information systems (GIS) mapping is ongoing. Characterization during this period was focused on smaller areas having high sequestration potential. Under Task 3.0 Identify and Address Issues for Technology Deployment, SECARB continues to expand upon its assessment of safety, regulatory, permitting, and accounting frameworks within the region to allow for wide-scale deployment of promising terrestrial and geologic sequestration approaches. Under Task 4.0 Develop Public Involvement and Education Mechanisms, SECARB has used results of a survey and focus group meeting to refine approaches that are being taken to educate and involve the public. Under Task 5.0 Identify the Most Promising Capture, Sequestration, and Transport Options, SECARB has evaluated findings from work performed during the first 18-months. The focus of the project team has shifted from region-wide mapping and characterization to a more detailed screening approach designed to identify the most promising opportunities. Under Task 6.0 Prepare Action Plans for Implementation and Technology Validation Activity, the SECARB team is developing an integrated approach to implementing the most promising opportunities and in setting up measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) programs for the most promising opportunities. Milestones completed during the fifth and sixth project quarters included: (1) Q1-FY05--Assess safety, regulatory and permitting issues; and (2) Q2-FY05--Finalize inventory of major sources/sinks and refine GIS algorithms.

  1. Evaluation of Maxim Module-Integrated Electronics at the DOE Regional Test Centers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deline, C.; Sekulic, B.; Stein, J.; Barkaszi, S.; Yang, J.; Kahn, S.

    2014-07-01

    Module-embedded power electronics developed by Maxim Integrated are under evaluation through a partnership with the Department of Energy's Regional Test Center (RTC) program. Field deployments of both conventional modules and electronics-enhanced modules are designed to quantify the performance advantage of Maxim's products under different amounts of inter-row shading, and their ability to be deployed at a greater ground-coverage-ratio than conventional modules. Simulations in PVSYST have quantified the predicted performance difference between conventional modules and Maxim's modules from inter-row shading. Initial performance results have identified diffuse irradiance losses at tighter row spacing for both the Maxim and conventional modules. Comparisons with published models show good agreement with models predicting the greatest diffuse irradiance losses. At tighter row spacing, all of the strings equipped with embedded power electronics outperformed their conventional peers. An even greater performance advantage is predicted to occur in the winter months when the amount of inter-row shading mismatch is at a maximum.

  2. Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown...

  3. Cooling Boiling in Head Region - PACCAR Integrated Underhood...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cooling Boiling in Head Region - PACCAR Integrated Underhood Thermal and External Aerodynamics- Cummins Cooling Boiling in Head Region - PACCAR Integrated Underhood Thermal and...

  4. May 29 Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar to Highlight Regional...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    May 29 Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar to Highlight Regional Transmission Planning Efforts May 29 Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar to Highlight Regional Transmission Planning...

  5. Jefferson Lab hosts 19 schools for Virginia Regional High School...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feb. 10, to compete in the Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl. Nineteen teams, representing high schools from across the region are participating in this year's...

  6. ECOWAS Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ECOWAS Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (ECREEE) (Redirected from West African Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (ECREEE)) Jump...

  7. Refraction Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Heimgartner...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique...

  8. Geodetic Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Blewitt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geodetic Survey At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration...

  9. Field Mapping At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Blewitt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping...

  10. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

  11. regional clean energy application centers | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (DOE's) Regional Clean Energy Application Centers (CEACs), formerly called the Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Regional Application Centers (RACs), promote and assist in transforming...

  12. Wind energy resources atlas. Volume 1. Northwest region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.

    1980-04-01

    Information is presented concering regional wind energy resource assessment; regional features; and state features for Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.

  13. Documnet for Hydrogen State and Regional Workshop, March 30,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documnet for Hydrogen State and Regional Workshop, March 30, 2008, Sacramento, CA Documnet for Hydrogen State and Regional Workshop, March 30, 2008, Sacramento, CA Consumer Trends...

  14. KAir Battery Wins Southwest Regional Clean Energy Business Plan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    KAir Battery Wins Southwest Regional Clean Energy Business Plan Competition KAir Battery Wins Southwest Regional Clean Energy Business Plan Competition April 18, 2014 - 12:05pm...

  15. Saint Kitts and Nevis-Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Saint Kitts and Nevis-Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change Resilience Framework Jump to: navigation, search Name Saint Kitts and Nevis-Regional Implementation...

  16. Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the United States Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the United States...

  17. National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition: Six Regional...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of KAir Battery Southeastern Region Winner 2 of 5 Southeastern Region Winner Energy Internet won the ACC Clean Energy Challenge for its software system that addresses cyber and...

  18. Regional Study to Guide Policy Interventions for Enhancing the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regional Study to Guide Policy Interventions for Enhancing the Development and Transfer of Publicly-Funded Environmentally Sound Technologies in Asia and the Pacific Region Jump...

  19. Climate Action Champions: Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection Authority, CA Climate Action Champions: Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection Authority, CA In 2005, nine cities and the County of...

  20. Alaska Facility- and Community-Scale Project Development Regional...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Facility- and Community-Scale Project Development Regional Energy Workshops Alaska Facility- and Community-Scale Project Development Regional Energy Workshops April 13, 2015 -...

  1. Thermal Gradient Holes At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date...

  2. Large Higgs energy region in Higgs associated top pair production...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Large Higgs energy region in Higgs associated top pair production at the Linear Collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Large Higgs energy region in Higgs associated...

  3. The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James J. Dooley; Robert Dahowski; Casie Davidson

    2005-12-01

    This final report summarizes the Phase I research conducted by the Midwest regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). The Phase I effort began in October 2003 and the project period ended on September 31, 2005. The MRCSP is a public/private partnership led by Battelle with the mission of identifying the technical, economic, and social issues associated with implementation of carbon sequestration technologies in its seven state geographic region (Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia) and identifying viable pathways for their deployment. It is one of seven partnerships that together span most of the U.S. and parts of Canada that comprise the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Regional Carbon Sequestration Program led by DOE's national Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The MRCSP Phase I research was carried out under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41981. The total value of Phase I was $3,513,513 of which the DOE share was $2,410,967 or 68.62%. The remainder of the cost share was provided in varying amounts by the rest of the 38 members of MRCSP's Phase I project. The next largest cost sharing participant to DOE in Phase I was the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority (OCDO). OCDO's contribution was $100,000 and was contributed under Grant Agreement No. CDO/D-02-17. In this report, the MRCSP's research shows that the seven state MRCSP region is a major contributor to the U. S. economy and also to total emissions of CO2, the most significant of the greenhouse gases thought to contribute to global climate change. But, the research has also shown that the region has substantial resources for sequestering carbon, both in deep geological reservoirs (geological sequestration) and through improved agricultural and land management practices (terrestrial sequestration). Geological reservoirs, especially deep saline reservoirs, offer the potential to permanently store CO2 for literally 100s of years even if all the CO2 emissions from the region's large point sources were stored there, an unlikely scenario under any set of national carbon emission mitigation strategies. The terrestrial sequestration opportunities in the region have the biophysical potential to sequester up to 20% of annual emissions from the region's large point sources of CO2. This report describes the assumptions made and methods employed to arrive at the results leading to these conclusions. It also describes the results of analyses of regulatory issues in the region affecting the potential for deployment of sequestration technologies. Finally, it describes the public outreach and education efforts carried out in Phase I including the creation of a web site dedicated to the MRCSP at www.mrcsp.org.

  4. Regional partnerships lead US carbon sequestration efforts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    During the sixth annual conference on carbon capture and sequestration, 7-10 May 2007, a snapshot was given of progress on characterization efforts and field validation tests being carried out through the Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership Initiative. The initiative is built on the recognition that geographical differences in fossil fuel/energy use and CO{sub 2} storage sinks across North America will dictate approaches to carbon sequestration. The first characterization phase (2003-2005) identified regional opportunities and developed frameworks to validate and deploy technologies. The validation phase (2005-2009) includes 10 enhanced oil recovery/enhanced gas recovery field tests in progress in Alberta and six US states and is applying lessons learned from these operations to sequestration in unmineable coal seams. Storage in saline formations are the focus of 10 field tests, and terrestrial sequestration will be studied in 11 other projects. 1 tab., 3 photos.

  5. WEST COAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Myer; Terry Surles; Kelly Birkinshaw

    2004-01-01

    The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership is one of seven partnerships which have been established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate carbon dioxide capture, transport and sequestration (CT&S) technologies best suited for different regions of the country. The West Coast Region comprises Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, and the North Slope of Alaska. Led by the California Energy Commission, the West Coast Partnership is a consortium of over thirty five organizations, including state natural resource and environmental protection agencies; national labs and universities; private companies working on CO{sub 2} capture, transportation, and storage technologies; utilities; oil and gas companies; nonprofit organizations; and policy/governance coordinating organizations. In an eighteen month Phase I project, the Partnership will evaluate both terrestrial and geologic sequestration options. Work will focus on five major objectives: (1) Collect data to characterize major CO{sub 2} point sources, the transportation options, and the terrestrial and geologic sinks in the region, and compile and organize this data via a geographic information system (GIS) database; (2) Address key issues affecting deployment of CT&S technologies, including storage site permitting and monitoring, injection regulations, and health and environmental risks (3) Conduct public outreach and maintain an open dialogue with stakeholders in CT&S technologies through public meetings, joint research, and education work (4) Integrate and analyze data and information from the above tasks in order to develop supply curves and cost effective, environmentally acceptable sequestration options, both near- and long-term (5) Identify appropriate terrestrial and geologic demonstration projects consistent with the options defined above, and create action plans for their safe and effective implementation A kickoff meeting for the West Coast Partnership was held on Sept 30-Oct.1. Contracts were then put into place with twelve organizations which will carry out the technical work required to meet Partnership objectives.

  6. Root region airfoil for wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    1995-05-23

    A thick airfoil is described for the root region of the blade of a wind turbine. The airfoil has a thickness in a range from 24%--26% and a Reynolds number in a range from 1,000,000 to 1,800,000. The airfoil has a maximum lift coefficient of 1.4--1.6 that has minimum sensitivity to roughness effects. 3 Figs.

  7. Assistance Focus: Asia/Pacific Region (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    The Clean Energy Solutions Center Ask an Expert service connects governments seeking policy information and advice with one of more than 30 global policy experts who can provide reliable and unbiased quick-response advice and information. The service is available at no cost to government agency representatives from any country and the technical institutes assisting them. This publication presents summaries of assistance provided to governments in the Asia/Pacific region, including the benefits of that assistance.

  8. Fayans functional for deformed nuclei. Uranium region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Tolokonnikov; I. N. Borzov; M. Kortelainen; Yu. S. Lutostansky; E. E. Saperstein

    2015-08-03

    Fayans energy density functional (EDF) FaNDF^0 has been applied to the nuclei around uranium region. Ground state characteristics of the Th, U and Pu isotopic chains, up to the two-neutron drip line, are found and compared with predictions from several Skyrme EDFs. The two-neutron drip line is found for FaNDF^0, SLy4 and SkM^* EDFs for a set of elements with even proton number, from Pb up to Fm.

  9. Fayans functional for deformed nuclei. Uranium region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolokonnikov, S V; Kortelainen, M; Lutostansky, Yu S; Saperstein, E E

    2015-01-01

    Fayans energy density functional (EDF) FaNDF^0 has been applied to the nuclei around uranium region. Ground state characteristics of the Th, U and Pu isotopic chains, up to the two-neutron drip line, are found and compared with predictions from several Skyrme EDFs. The two-neutron drip line is found for FaNDF^0, SLy4 and SkM^* EDFs for a set of elements with even proton number, from Pb up to Fm.

  10. Regional Standards Enforcement | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuildingBudgetFinancial Opportunities »RefrigeratorSitingRegional

  11. Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, W.; Sullivan, P.; Mai, T.; Mowers, M.; Uriarte, C.; Blair, N.; Heimiller, D.; Martinez, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) is a deterministic optimization model of the deployment of electric power generation technologies and transmission infrastructure throughout the contiguous United States into the future. The model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Strategic Energy Analysis Center, is designed to analyze the critical energy issues in the electric sector, especially with respect to potential energy policies, such as clean energy and renewable energy standards or carbon restrictions. ReEDS provides a detailed treatment of electricity-generating and electrical storage technologies and specifically addresses a variety of issues related to renewable energy technologies, including accessibility and cost of transmission, regional quality of renewable resources, seasonal and diurnal generation profiles, variability of wind and solar power, and the influence of variability on the reliability of the electrical grid. ReEDS addresses these issues through a highly discretized regional structure, explicit statistical treatment of the variability in wind and solar output over time, and consideration of ancillary services' requirements and costs.

  12. Regional Effort to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald Hill; Kenneth Nemeth; Gary Garrett; Kimberly Sams

    2009-01-31

    The Southern States Energy Board's (SSEB) 'Regional Effort to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies' program began on June 1, 2003, and was completed on January 31, 2009. The project proved beneficial in providing state decision-makers with information that assisted them in removing barriers or implementing incentives to deploy clean coal technologies. This was accomplished through two specific tasks: (1) domestic energy security and diversity; and (2) the energy-water interface. Milestones accomplished during the project period are: (1) Presentations to Annual Meetings of SSEB Members, Associate Member Meetings, and the Gasification Technologies Council. (2) Energy: Water reports - (A) Regional Efforts to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies: Impacts and Implications for Water Supply and Quality. June 2004. (B) Energy-Water Interface Challenges: Coal Bed Methane and Mine Pool Water Characterization in the Southern States Region. 2004. (C) Freshwater Availability and Constraints on Thermoelectric Power Generation in the Southeast U.S. June 2008. (3) Blackwater Interactive Tabletop Exercise - Decatur, Georgia April 2007. (4) Blackwater Report: Blackwater: Energy and Water Interdependency Issues: Best Practices and Lessons Learned. August 2007. (5) Blackwater Report: BLACKWATER: Energy Water Interdependency Issues REPORT SUMMARY. April 2008.

  13. Physically Based Global Downscaling: Regional Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Shippert, Timothy R.; Fox, Jared

    2006-02-01

    The climate simulated by a global atmosphere/land model with a physically-based subgrid orography scheme is evaluated in ten selected regions. Climate variables simulated for each of multiple elevation classes within each grid cell are mapped according the high-resolution distribution of surface elevation in each region. Comparison of the simulated annual mean climate with gridded observations leads to the following conclusions. At low to moderate elevations the downscaling scheme correctly simulates increasing precipitation, decreasing temperature, and increasing snow with increasing elevation within regions smaller than 100 km. At high elevations the downscaling scheme correctly simulates a decrease in precipitation with increasing elevation. Too little precipitation is simulated on the windward side of mountain ranges and too much precipitation is simulated on the lee side. The simulated sensitivity of surface air temperature to surface elevation is too strong, particularly in valleys influenced by drainage circulations. Observations show little evidence of a “snow shadow”, so the neglect of the subgrid rainshadow does not produce an unrealistic simulation of the snow distribution. Summertime snow area, which is a proxy for land ice, is much larger than observed. Summertime snow water equivalent is far less than the observed thickness of glaciers because a 1 m upper bound on snow water is applied to the simulations and because snow transport by slides is neglected. The 1 m upper bound on snow water equivalent also causes an underestimate of seasonal snow water during late winter, compared with gridded station measurements. Potential solutions to these problems are discussed.

  14. OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Testa, Paola; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark; De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Title, Alan; Hansteen, Viggo; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig

    2013-06-10

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial ({approx}0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to {approx}15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 A channel, and by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 10{sup 23} erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).

  15. Future regional climate change in the ten hydrologic regions of California: A climate modeling investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, Lisa C

    2005-01-01

    4) Central Coast; (5) Tulare Lake; (6) San Joaquin; (7) San4) Central Coast, (5) Tulare Lake, (6) San Joaquin River, (the smallest increase is in the Tulare Lake region. Median

  16. The logic of regionalism: a comparative study of regionalism in Europe and Asia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Mi-Kyung

    2005-02-17

    the balance between the state?s public power and the state?s market governability, consequently resulting in a political convergence toward a majoritarian political system based on individualism and delegative democracy. However, regionalism is realized...

  17. The Chimalapas Region, Oaxaca, Mexico: a high-priority region for bird conservation in Mesoamerica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Navarro-Sigü enza, Adolfo G.; Herná ndez-Bañ os, Blanca E.; Escalona-Segura, Griselda; Rebó n-Gallardo, Fanny; Rodrí guez-Ayala, Emir; Figueroa-Esquivel, Elsa M.; Cabrera-Garcí a, Leonardo

    2003-01-01

    The Chimalapas region, in eastern Oaxaca, Mexico, holds lowland rainforests, tropical dry forests, and cloud forests typical of the Neotropics, as well as montane pine and pine-oak forests more typical of the Nearctic. ...

  18. Studying Transition Region Phenomena with Solar-B/EIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. R. Young

    2007-08-13

    Transition region lines in active regions can become strongly enhanced in coronal footpoints and active region blinkers. The weak transition region lines found in the Solar-B/EIS wavebands will thus become useful for diagnostic studies of these events. EIS count rates predicted from SOHO/CDS spectra are presented, and a Mg VII density diagnostic is highlighted.

  19. Field Testing Protocol Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain Regional Supplement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Field Testing Protocol Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain Regional Supplement Organization of field the field testing of the draft Regional Supplement. Field testing will be done in cooperation with regional, the District coordinator will provide team members with an introduction to the Regional Supplement

  20. Mapping karst regions of Illinois: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weibel, C.P.; Panno, S.V. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Groundwater contamination may be significant in shallow aquifers in the parts of Illinois where karst occurs. Problems with ground-water contamination in shallow aquifers in karst areas may be significant in parts of Illinois. A study is underway to study factors that contribute to karst development and to map the karst areas of the state, including areas where obvious diagnostic karst geomorphic features are absent. The following generalizations can be made about the structural and stratigraphic factors that control the extent and maturity of karst areas and the development of karstic terrain in Illinois: (1) karstification is restricted to the flanks of the Illinois Basin because most of the basin interior contains carbonate-poor Pennsylvanian bedrock; (2) karstic terrain generally occurs in thick, flatlying, carbonate-rich lithologic units; (3) carbonate to non-carbonate facies changes in formations and the presence of disconformities affect the degree of karstification; (4) structures (folds, faults) may either increase or decrease the likelihood of karstification; and (5) karstification is potentially greater in areas where overlying regolith is absent or thin.

  1. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn A. Baskin

    2004-03-31

    Work during the first six months of the project mainly concentrated on contracts execution and collection of data to characterize the region and input of that data into the geographical information system (GIS) system. Data was collected for source characterization, transportation options and terrestrial options. In addition, discussions were held to determine the extent of the geologic information that would be needed for the project. In addition, activities associated with the regulatory, permitting and safety issues were completed. Outreach activities are in the formative stages.

  2. SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP ON CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson

    2005-08-01

    The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed several more tasks during the period of October 1, 2004--March 31, 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership project is to achieve an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. Action plans for possible Phase 2 carbon sequestration pilot tests in the region are completed, and a proposal was developed and submitted describing how the Partnership may develop and carry out appropriate pilot tests. The content of this report focuses on Phase 1 objectives completed during this reporting period.

  3. TCEQ Regional Offices | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)Model forTechnologies95Symerton,E C CenterRegional Offices

  4. Template:GeothermalRegion | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) | Open EnergyDBpediaValue JumpFacebookLikeGeothermalRegion Jump

  5. Form:GeothermalRegion | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport JumpFlowood,Pevafersa JVOhio:River,EventGeothermalRegion

  6. New Zealand Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI Ventures LtdNeville,Information 7th congressionalGeothermal Region Jump

  7. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Central Region

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969Central Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting

  8. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Northeast Region

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969Central Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines -Midwest

  9. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Southeast Region

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969Central Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines

  10. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Western Region

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969Central Region About U.S. Natural Gas PipelinesSouthwest

  11. Property:Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLCALLETE Inc dEA EISProject JumpRegion Jump to:

  12. Johnstown Regional Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervar Hydro JumpHuari Silicon Material CoJohnstown Regional Energy

  13. Regional Science Bowl | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * ImpactsandRegarding ConfinementRegional PartnershipsMethod

  14. Regional nonprofits receive sizeable monetary boost

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * ImpactsandRegarding ConfinementRegional

  15. Austria Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex AAustria Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search

  16. Lake Region Electric Cooperative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformation Actions(RedirectedLouisiana:Nacimiento,Lake Region

  17. WIPP Mine Rescue Team Wins Regional Competition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN A 035(92/02) nerg *4 o**Colorado CompetitionRegional

  18. INL Equipment to Aid Regional Response Team

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHussein KhalilResearch8 IEEEINL Equipment to Aid Regional

  19. F region above kauai: Measurement, model, modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.Y.; Sjolander, G.W.; Oran, E.S.; Young, T.R.; Bernhardt, P.A.; Da Rosa, A.V.

    1980-08-01

    A detailed description and analysis is presented of the Lagopedo II results. The rocket was launched on September 11, 1977. Prior to an explosive chemical release a rocket-borne ion mass spectrometer and dual-frequency beacon measured the ion composition and electron content of the undisturbed F region above Kauai, Hawaii. These results are compared to a detailed calculation of ionospheric ion denities. Considerable H/sub 2/O outgassing produced measurable 18/sup +/(H/sub 2/O/sup +/) and 19/sup +/(H/sub 3/O/sup +/) currents which together with O/sup +/ current were used to determine the H/sup 3/O/sup +//H/sub 2/O/sup +/ dissociative recombination rate ratio. The explosive event at 283 km swept clean a l-km-radius region. The boundary of the ionic void was characterized by a steep gradient in the ion density. Results for the first 60 s after the event are presented which show changes in ambient ion species 14/sup +/, 16/sup +/, 30/sup +/, new reactant species 15/sup +/, 17/sup +/, 18/sup +/, 19/sup +/, 27/sup +/, and 46/sup +/, and evidence of ionic depletion by sweeping.

  20. Detection and Attribution of Regional Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, G; Mirin, A

    2007-01-19

    We developed a high resolution global coupled modeling capability to perform breakthrough studies of the regional climate change. The atmospheric component in our simulation uses a 1{sup o} latitude x 1.25{sup o} longitude grid which is the finest resolution ever used for the NCAR coupled climate model CCSM3. Substantial testing and slight retuning was required to get an acceptable control simulation. The major accomplishment is the validation of this new high resolution configuration of CCSM3. There are major improvements in our simulation of the surface wind stress and sea ice thickness distribution in the Arctic. Surface wind stress and ocean circulation in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current are also improved. Our results demonstrate that the FV version of the CCSM coupled model is a state of the art climate model whose simulation capabilities are in the class of those used for IPCC assessments. We have also provided 1000 years of model data to Scripps Institution of Oceanography to estimate the natural variability of stream flow in California. In the future, our global model simulations will provide boundary data to high-resolution mesoscale model that will be used at LLNL. The mesoscale model would dynamically downscale the GCM climate to regional scale on climate time scales.

  1. Applying waste logistics modeling to regional planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holter, G.M.; Khawaja, A.; Shaver, S.R.; Peterson, K.L.

    1995-05-01

    Waste logistics modeling is a powerful analytical technique that can be used for effective planning of future solid waste storage, treatment, and disposal activities. Proper waste management is essential for preventing unacceptable environmental degradation from ongoing operations, and is also a critical part of any environmental remediation activity. Logistics modeling allows for analysis of alternate scenarios for future waste flowrates and routings, facility schedules, and processing or handling capacities. Such analyses provide an increased understanding of the critical needs for waste storage, treatment, transport, and disposal while there is still adequate lead time to plan accordingly. They also provide a basis for determining the sensitivity of these critical needs to the various system parameters. This paper discusses the application of waste logistics modeling concepts to regional planning. In addition to ongoing efforts to aid in planning for a large industrial complex, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is currently involved in implementing waste logistics modeling as part of the planning process for material recovery and recycling within a multi-city region in the western US.

  2. Stratified precambrian rocks (sedimentary?) beneath the midcontinent region of the US. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, E.C.

    1993-02-01

    A thick sequence of layered rocks occurs beneath the Phanerozoic platform strata which blanket the US midcontinent. Observed on COCORP deep reflection data in southern Illinois and Indiana and in SW Oklahoma and adjacent Texas, this sequence is locally 1--3 times as thick as the overlying Paleozoic cover, but the origin of this sequence and its ultimate lateral extent are unknown. However, the occurrences of Precambrian layered rocks on both the COCORP profiles and reprocessed industry seismic reflection data from the region lie within regions of generally low amplitude and low frequency aeromagnetic anomaly, suggesting an even greater distribution. Unmetamorphosed Precambrian sedimentary rocks have been recovered from drill holes in southwest Ohio and adjacent northern Kentucky and southwesternmost Indiana. These Precambrian sedimentary rocks lie above and may be part of an underlying package of strongly layered rocks imaged on a short and shallow seismic profile in southwest Ohio. These Precambrian sedimentary rocks were originally viewed as part of a late Precambrian (Keweenawan?) rift; however, in light of Grenville foreland structures seen on the COCORP profile to the north in west central Ohio, these Precambrian strata may (1) be part of a heretofore unrecognized Grenville foreland basin, or (2) indicate that unmetamorphosed Precambrian sedimentary material may be an important constituent of the layered rocks observed on COCORP beneath southern Illinois and Indiana.

  3. Stratified precambrian rocks (sedimentary ) beneath the midcontinent region of the US

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, E.C.

    1993-02-01

    A thick sequence of layered rocks occurs beneath the Phanerozoic platform strata which blanket the US midcontinent. Observed on COCORP deep reflection data in southern Illinois and Indiana and in SW Oklahoma and adjacent Texas, this sequence is locally 1--3 times as thick as the overlying Paleozoic cover, but the origin of this sequence and its ultimate lateral extent are unknown. However, the occurrences of Precambrian layered rocks on both the COCORP profiles and reprocessed industry seismic reflection data from the region lie within regions of generally low amplitude and low frequency aeromagnetic anomaly, suggesting an even greater distribution. Unmetamorphosed Precambrian sedimentary rocks have been recovered from drill holes in southwest Ohio and adjacent northern Kentucky and southwesternmost Indiana. These Precambrian sedimentary rocks lie above and may be part of an underlying package of strongly layered rocks imaged on a short and shallow seismic profile in southwest Ohio. These Precambrian sedimentary rocks were originally viewed as part of a late Precambrian (Keweenawan ) rift; however, in light of Grenville foreland structures seen on the COCORP profile to the north in west central Ohio, these Precambrian strata may (1) be part of a heretofore unrecognized Grenville foreland basin, or (2) indicate that unmetamorphosed Precambrian sedimentary material may be an important constituent of the layered rocks observed on COCORP beneath southern Illinois and Indiana.

  4. Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tomasi, Claudio; Kokhanovsky, Alexander A.; Lupi, Angelo; Ritter, Christoph; Smirnov, Alexander; O'Neill, Norman T.; Stone, Robert S.; Holben, Brent N.; Nyeki, Stephan; Wehrli, Christoph; et al

    2015-01-01

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness ?(?) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ångström's exponent ? were calculated. Analysing these data, the monthly mean values of ?(0.50 ?m) and ? and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter–spring and summer–autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of ? versus ?(0.50 ?m) showed: (i)more »a considerable increase in ?(0.50 ?m) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter–spring, without marked changes in ?; and (ii) a marked increase in ?(0.50 ?m) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas ? decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of ?(?) and ? at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterise vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ålesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of ?(?) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were defined to represent the average features of nuclei, accumulation and coarse mode particles for Arctic haze, summer background aerosol, Asian dust and boreal forest fire smoke, and for various background austral summer aerosol types at coastal and high-altitude Antarctic sites. The main columnar aerosol optical characteristics were determined for all 14 particle modes, based on in-situ measurements of the scattering and absorption coefficients. Diurnally averaged direct aerosol-induced radiative forcing and efficiency were calculated for a set of multimodal aerosol extinction models, using various Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function models over vegetation-covered, oceanic and snow-covered surfaces. These gave a reliable measure of the pronounced effects of aerosols on the radiation balance of the surface–atmosphere system over polar regions.« less

  5. Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomasi, Claudio; Kokhanovsky, Alexander A.; Lupi, Angelo; Ritter, Christoph; Smirnov, Alexander; O'Neill, Norman T.; Stone, Robert S.; Holben, Brent N.; Nyeki, Stephan; Mazzola, Mauro; Lanconelli, Christian; Vitale, Vito; Stebel, Kerstin; Aaltonen, Veijo; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Rodriguez, Edith; Herber, Andreas B.; Radionov, Vladimir F.; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomasz; Sakerin, Sergey M.; Kabanov, Dmitry M.; Xue, Yong; Mei, Linlu; Istomina, Larysa; Wagener, Richard; McArthur, Bruce; Sobolewski, Piotr S.; Kivi, Rigel; Courcoux, Yann; Larouche, Pierre; Broccardo, Stephen; Piketh, Stuart J.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness ?(?) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ångström's exponent ? were calculated. Analysing these data, the monthly mean values of ?(0.50 ?m) and ? and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter–spring and summer–autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of ? versus ?(0.50 ?m) showed: (i) a considerable increase in ?(0.50 ?m) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter–spring, without marked changes in ?; and (ii) a marked increase in ?(0.50 ?m) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas ? decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of ?(?) and ? at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterise vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ålesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of ?(?) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were defined to represent the average features of nuclei, accumulation and coarse mode particles for Arctic haze, summer background aerosol, Asian dust and boreal forest fire smoke, and for various background austral summer aerosol types at coastal and high-altitude Antarctic sites. The main columnar aerosol optical characteristics were determined for all 14 particle modes, based on in-situ measurements of the scattering and absorption coefficients. Diurnally averaged direct aerosol-induced radiative forcing and efficiency were calculated for a set of multimodal aerosol extinction models, using various Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function models over vegetation-covered, oceanic and snow-covered surfaces. These gave a reliable measure of the pronounced effects of aerosols on the radiation balance of the surface–atmosphere system over polar regions.

  6. Greater solubility usually = greater toxicity Chromium (Cr) Six oxidation states, +1, +2, +3, +4, +5, +6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    inhibitor · Migration into water supply Metals andMetals and radionuclidesradionuclides #12;Radionuclides (depleted uranium) · 4 oxidation states (+4, +6 most common) · U(VI) water-soluble, U(IV) in-soluble Metals andMetals and radionuclidesradionuclides #12;Bioremediation Bioremediation strategies for metals

  7. Southwest Alaska Regional Geothermal Energy Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holdmann, Gwen

    2015-04-30

    The village of Elim, Alaska is 96 miles west of Nome, on the Seward Peninsula. The Darby Mountains north of the village are rich with hydrothermal systems associated with the Darby granitic pluton(s). In addition to the hot springs that have been recorded and studied over the last 100 years, additional hot springs exist. They are known through a rich oral history of the region, though they are not labeled on geothermal maps. This research primarily focused on Kwiniuk Hot Springs, Clear Creek Hot Springs and Molly’s Hot Springs. The highest recorded surface temperatures of these resources exist at Clear Creek Hot Springs (67°C). Repeated water sampling of the resources shows that maximum temperatures at all of the systems are below boiling.

  8. The Physics of Traffic and Regional Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helbing, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    This contribution summarizes and explains various principles from physics which are used for the simulation of traffic flows in large street networks, the modeling of destination, transport mode, and route choice, or the simulation of urban growth and regional development. The methods stem from many-particle physics, from kinetic gas theory, or fluiddynamics. They involve energy and entropy considerations, transfer the law of gravity, apply cellular automata and require methods from evolutionary game theory. In this way, one can determine interaction forces among driver-vehicle units, reproduce breakdowns of traffic including features of synchronized congested flow, or understand changing usage patterns of alternative roads. One can also describe daily activity patterns based on decision models, simulate migration streams, and model urban growth as a particular kind of aggregation process.

  9. Wide Area Security Region Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Lu, Shuai; Guo, Xinxin; Gronquist, James; Du, Pengwei; Nguyen, Tony B.; Burns, J. W.

    2010-03-31

    This report develops innovative and efficient methodologies and practical procedures to determine the wide-area security region of a power system, which take into consideration all types of system constraints including thermal, voltage, voltage stability, transient and potentially oscillatory stability limits in the system. The approach expands the idea of transmission system nomograms to a multidimensional case, involving multiple system limits and parameters such as transmission path constraints, zonal generation or load, etc., considered concurrently. The security region boundary is represented using its piecewise approximation with the help of linear inequalities (so called hyperplanes) in a multi-dimensional space, consisting of system parameters that are critical for security analyses. The goal of this approximation is to find a minimum set of hyperplanes that describe the boundary with a given accuracy. Methodologies are also developed to use the security hyperplanes, pre-calculated offline, to determine system security margins in real-time system operations, to identify weak elements in the system, and to calculate key contributing factors and sensitivities to determine the best system controls in real time and to assist in developing remedial actions and transmission system enhancements offline . A prototype program that automates the simulation procedures used to build the set of security hyperplanes has also been developed. The program makes it convenient to update the set of security hyperplanes necessitated by changes in system configurations. A prototype operational tool that uses the security hyperplanes to assess security margins and to calculate optimal control directions in real time has been built to demonstrate the project success. Numerical simulations have been conducted using the full-size Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) system model, and they clearly demonstrated the feasibility and the effectiveness of the developed technology. Recommendations for the future work have also been formulated.

  10. Establishment of Small Wind Regional Test Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez, T.; Forsyth, T.; Huskey, A.; Mendoza, I.; Sinclair, K.; Smith, J.

    2011-01-01

    The rapid growth of the small wind turbine (SWT) market is attracting numerous entrants. Small wind turbine purchasers now have many options, but often lack information (such as third-party certification) to select a quality turbine. Most SWTs do not have third-party certification due to the expense and difficulty of the certification process. Until recently, the only SWT certification bodies were in Europe. In North America, testing has been limited to a small number of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) subsidized tests conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) under the ongoing Independent Testing Project. During the past few years, DOE, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and some states have worked with the North American SWT industry to create a SWT certification infrastructure. The goal is to increase the number of certified turbines and gain greater consumer confidence in SWT technology. The American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) released the AWEA Small Wind Turbine Performance and Safety Standard, AWEA Standard 9.1 - 2009, in December 2009. The Small Wind Certification Council (SWCC) and Intertek, North American SWT certification bodies, began accepting applications for certification to the AWEA standard in 2010. To reduce certification testing costs, DOE and NREL are providing financial and technical assistance for an initial round of tests at four SWT test sites, which were selected through a competitive solicitation. The four organizations selected are Windward Engineering (Utah), The Alternative Energy Institute at West Texas A and M (Texas), a consortium consisting of Kansas State University and Colby Community College (Kansas), and Intertek (New York). Each organization will test two small wind turbines as part of their respective subcontracts with DOE and NREL. The testing results will be made publically available. The goal is to establish a lower-cost U.S. small wind testing capability that will lead to increased SWT certification. Turbine installation is ongoing. Testing began in early 2011 and is scheduled to conclude in mid-late 2012.

  11. Automatically identifying critical input regions and code in applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbin, Michael James

    Applications that process complex inputs often react in different ways to changes in different regions of the input. Small changes to forgiving regions induce correspondingly small changes in the behavior and output. Small ...

  12. Dynamic interactions between electricity prices and the regional economy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bethapudi, Daniel Naveen

    2005-08-29

    In this thesis we study characterize the dynamic relationships among two electricity price variables (residential and commercial) and six regional economic variables in order to examine each individual variable??s role in regional economic activity...

  13. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Regional Laboratory System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Division of Environmental Science and Assessment Laboratory Branch John Bourbon, Director bourbonU.S. Environmental Protection Agency Regional Laboratory System EPA Regional Laboratories the Conversation on Environmentalism and Working for Environmental Justice

  14. Regional parking fee : a potential funding source for transit?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misiak, Jodie Mercer

    2005-01-01

    From a regional mobility perspective, Chicagoland is in serious trouble. The current Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) funding shortfall is just the most recent evidence of major flaws in the region's transit governance and ...

  15. Regional Short-Term Energy Model (RSTEM) Overview

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The Regional Short-Term Energy Model (RSTEM) utilizes estimated econometric relationships for demand, inventories and prices to forecast energy market outcomes across key sectors and selected regions throughout the United States.

  16. Studies of two-region subcritical uranium heavy water lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gosnell, James Waterbury

    1969-01-01

    Reactor physics parameters were measured in eleven two-region subcritical assemblies moderated by heavy water. The regions of the assemblies consisted of nine different lattices of various fuel rod size, U235 enrichment, ...

  17. Alleviating the disparities among the European Community regions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karveli, Kalliopi N.

    1994-01-01

    In this work the author identifies the existing disparities among the European Community regions and analyzes their development during the last decade (1980-90), with main emphasis on the disparities between the Community lagging regions...

  18. 2015 NHA Southeast Regional Meeting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Southeast Regional Meeting 2015 NHA Southeast Regional Meeting August 27, 2015 8:00AM EDT to August 28, 2015 5:00PM EDT Hilton Charlotte Center City 222 E 3rd Street Charlotte, NC...

  19. 2015 ACI Mid-Atlantic Regional Home Performance Conference |...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2015 ACI Mid-Atlantic Regional Home Performance Conference 2015 ACI Mid-Atlantic Regional Home Performance Conference October 20, 2015 9:00AM EDT to October 21, 2015 5:00PM EDT...

  20. National Strategy for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for the Arctic Region Stakeholder Outreach Meeting: Bethel February 25, 2015 1:30PM to 3:30PM AKST Bethel, Alaska AVCP Regional Housing Authority 411 Ptarmigan St. Bethel, AK 99559...

  1. The Lepidopteran Mitochondrial Control Region: Structure and Evolution 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Naomi E.

    -region function and evolution is hampered by a lack of comparative data, and control-region sequence data, University Mol. Bid. Ed. 1O(6): 1259- 1212. 1993. 0 1993 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved

  2. Construction and AvailabilityConstruction and Availability Uncertainty in the RegionalUncertainty in the Regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 Construction and AvailabilityConstruction and Availability Uncertainty in the Regional and Technology Availability Construction Costs Economic Retirement Variable Capacity for Existing Units #12;Page to construction power plants or to take other action May include policies for particular resources "Scenario

  3. Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration...

  4. Foster-Glocester Regional School District (Rhode Island) - Financing Profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-12-01

    This document is an EnergySmart Schools Financing Profile of Foster-Glocester Regional School District in Rhode Island

  5. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2013-06-06

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  6. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Cascades Region (Ingebritsen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Cascades Region (Ingebritsen & Mariner, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data...

  7. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01

    an effective tsunami warning system for this region.to put an effective tsunami warning system in place. The

  8. Energy Efficiency as a Resource Regional Reports Introduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-06-25

    This is an introduction to the Energy Efficiency as a Resource Regional Reports produced by the DOE Industrial Technologies Program.

  9. Regional Service Plan For Coordinated Transportation In the Permian Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Permian Basin Regional Planning Commission

    2010-10-27

    Regional Service Plan Permian Basin ? Region 9 Table of Contents I. Acknowledgements 4 II. Executive Summary 5 III. Background 6 A. Regional Description 6 i. Geography and Demographics 6 ii. Transportation... Planning Partners 12 iii. Current Transportation Services/Providers 13 B. History of Regional Coordination of Public Transportation 14 i. Past/Continuing Planning Activities 14 ii. Past/Current Implemented Projects/Services 15 IV...

  10. Establishment of Small Wind Turbine Regional Test Centers (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, K.

    2011-09-16

    This presentation offers an overview of the Regional Test Centers project for Small Wind Turbine testing and certification.

  11. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2012-10-10

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  12. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Yellowstone Region (Chatterjee...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Yellowstone Region (Chatterjee, Et Al., 1985) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  13. San Francisco Estuary Wetlands Regional Monitoring Program Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Francisco Estuary Wetlands Regional Monitoring Program Plan: Version 1 Framework and Protocols Wetlands Regional Monitoring Program Steering Committee Compiled and Edited by Joshua N. Collins, PhD San ................. 91 #12;#12;Wetlands Regional Monitoring Program Plan 2002 Executive Summary i San Francisco Estuary

  14. Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ten Brink, Uri S.

    Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico Report to the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program #12;#12;Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico Report should be cited as: Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico: U.S. Geological

  15. DESIGN PHILOSOPHY FOR STEEL STRUCTURES IN MODERATE SEISMIC REGIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hines, Eric

    DESIGN PHILOSOPHY FOR STEEL STRUCTURES IN MODERATE SEISMIC REGIONS E.M. Hines1 and L.A. Fahnestock2 ABSTRACT The authors propose a design philosophy for steel buildings in moderate seismic regions that draws of the International Building Code has introduced seismic design to regions of North America that heretofore have

  16. Gulf of Mexico Regional Land Cover Change Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulf of Mexico Regional Land Cover Change Report 1996­2010 #12;About This Report The Gulf of Mexico at www.coast.noaa.gov. #12;GULF OF MEXICO REGIONAL LAND COVER CHANGE REPORT, 1996­2010 THE GULF OF MEXICO REGION covers over 200,400 square miles and extends from Texas'border with Mexico in the west to the tip

  17. Diamond Lattice Model of Semicrystalline Polyethylene in the Amorphous Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond Lattice Model of Semicrystalline Polyethylene in the Amorphous Region Zhong­Hui Duan Abstract The statistics of polyethylene chains in the amorphous region between two crystallites have been as models of the chain molecules in the amorphous region of semicrystalline polyethylene, both

  18. Field Testing Protocol Western Mountains, Valleys and Coast Regional Supplement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Field Testing Protocol Western Mountains, Valleys and Coast Regional Supplement Organization and oversee the field testing of the draft Regional Supplement. Field testing will be done in cooperation, the District coordinator will provide team members with an introduction to the Regional Supplement

  19. STUDENT MANUAL SCHOOL OF CITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    STUDENT MANUAL SCHOOL OF CITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY MASTER OF CITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING DEGREE Academic Year 2014-2015 #12;Contents I. INTRODUCTION..............................................................................................1 III. CITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING FACULTY AND STAFF, 2013

  20. Measurement of Regional Lung Function in Rats Using Hyperpolarized 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measurement of Regional Lung Function in Rats Using Hyperpolarized 3 Helium Dynamic MRI Ben T. Chen,* Anja C.S. Brau, and G. Allan Johnson Dynamic regional lung function was investigated in rats using by a constant flow ventila- tor. Based on regional differences in the behavior of inspired air, the lung